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Sample records for gamma spectrometry spectra

  1. Analysis of spectra from portable handheld gamma-ray spectrometry for terrain comparative assessment.

    PubMed

    Dias, Flávio; Lima, Marco; Sanjurjo-Sánchez, Jorge; Alves, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Geological characteristics can have impacts on societal development by, e.g., geotechnical issues and radiological hazard levels. Due to urban sprawl, there is an increasing need for detailed geological assessment. In this work are analysed data from portable handheld gamma-ray spectra (K, eU and eTh) obtained in granitic and Silurian metaclastic outcrops as well as in an profile, roughly N-S, on soil covered terrains transecting a mapped contact between these rock types (the profile's northern extremity is at locations mapped as granite). Estimations from gamma-ray spectra were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. K, eU and eTh values were higher on granite in relation to Silurian metaclastic rocks. The northern extremity of the profile showed clearly higher contents of eTh and this contrast was supported by univariate statistical tools (normality plot and Wilk-Shapiro test; boxplots). A ternary plot with the contribution of the elements to gamma-ray absorbed dose showed the separation of granite from Silurian metaclastic rocks with the former being nearer the eTh vertex. The points in the northern extremity of the profile are nearer the eTh vertex than the other points on the profile. These visual suggestions were supported by hierarchical cluster analysis, which was able to differentiate between granite and metaclastic outcrops and separate portions of the profile located on different terrains. Portable gamma-ray spectrometry showed, hence, the potential to distinguish granite and metaclastic terrains at a scale useful for engineering works. These results can also be useful for a first comparative zoning of radiological hazards (which are higher for granite). PMID:26867098

  2. GRABGAM Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level HPGe Gamma Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1999-07-28

    The GRABGAM code has been used successfully for ultra-low level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis since its development in 1985 at Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Although numerous gamma analysis codes existed at that time, reviews of institutional and commercial codes indicated that none addressed all features that were desired by SRTC. Furthermore, it was recognized that development of an in-house code would better facilitate future evolution of the code to address SRTC needs based on experience with low-level spectra. GRABGAM derives its name from Gamma Ray Analysis BASIC Generated At MCA/PC.

  3. Automatic analysis of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padayachee, J.; Meyer, K. A.; Prozesky, V. M.

    2001-07-01

    It has been shown that Bayesian statistics is a powerful tool in the analysis of ion beam analysis (IBA) data. Past work has shown its applicability to the deconvolution of the detector response function from micro-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectra, subtraction of the background from PIXE spectra, the extraction of depth profiles from PIXE spectra using two detectors and the extraction of depth profiles from RBS spectra. However, the method has some drawbacks, e.g. numerical integration, α-marginalisation, etc., all of which result in very long computation times. In this paper, preliminary results are presented from the application of the Bayesian theory to the automatic extraction of depth profiles from RBS spectra with the aim of creating an online RBS analysis program, which has the advantage of minimal user input while still being as computationally intensive as conventional RBS analysis packages to extract a depth profile.

  4. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  5. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-01

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of 137Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  6. EML Gamma Spectrometry Data Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Karin M.

    1998-02-28

    This report represents the results of the analyses for the second EML Gamma Spectrometry Data Evaluation Program (August 1997). A calibration spectrum, a background spectrum and three sample spectra were included for each software format as part of the evaluation. The calibration spectrum contained nuclides covering the range from 59.5 keV to 1836 keV. The participants were told fallout and fission product nuclides as well as naturally occurring nuclides could be present. The samples were designed to test the detection and quantification of very low levels of nuclides and the ability of the software and user to properly resolve multiplets. The participants were asked to report values and uncertainties as Becquerel per sample with no decay correction. Twenty-nine sets of results were reported from a total of 70 laboratories who received the spectra. The percentage of the results within 1 F of the expected value was 76, 67, and 55 for samples 1, 2, and 3, respectively. From all three samples, 12% of the results were more than 3 F from the expected value. Sixty-two nuclides out of a total of 580 expected results were not reported for the three samples. Sixty percent of these false negatives were due to nuclides which were present at the minimum detectable activity level. There were 53 false positives reported with 60% of the responses due to problems with background subtraction. The results indicate that the Program is beneficial to the participating laboratories in that it provides them with analysis problems that are difficult to create with spiked samples due to the unavailability of many nuclides and the short half-lives of others. EML will continue its annual distribution, the third is to be held in March 1999.

  7. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  8. Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-15

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  9. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-raymore » multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  10. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  11. Parametric Studies for 233U Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffing, C.C.; Krichinsky, A.

    2004-01-01

    Quantification of special nuclear material is a necessary aspect to assuring material accountability and is often accomplished using non-destructive gamma spectrometry. For 233U, gamma rays are affected by matrix and packaging attenuation and by a strong Compton continuum from decay products of 232U (inherently found in 233U) that obscure 233U gamma photopeaks. This project, based on current work at the national repository for separated 233U located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), explores the effects of various parameters on the quantification of 233U– including material form and geometry. Using an attenuation correction methodology for calculating the mass of 233U from NDA analysis, a bias of almost 75% less than the actual 233U mass was identified. The source of the bias needs to be understood at a more fundamental level for further use of this quantification method. Therefore, controlled experiments using well characterized packages of 233U were conducted at the repository and are presented in this paper.

  12. Use of new spectral analysis methods in gamma spectra deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinault, Jean Louis

    1991-07-01

    A general deconvolution method applicable to X and gamma ray spectrometry is proposed. Using new spectral analysis methods, it is applied to an actual case: the accurate on-line analysis of three elements (Ca, Si, Fe) in a cement plant using neutron capture gamma rays. Neutrons are provided by a low activity (5 μg) 252Cf source; the detector is a BGO 3 in. × 8 in. scintillator. The principle of the method rests on the Fourier transform of the spectrum. The search for peaks and determination of peak areas are worked out in the Fourier representation, which enables separation of background and peaks and very efficiently discriminates peaks, or elements represented by several peaks. First the spectrum is transformed so that in the new representation the full width at half maximum (FWHM) is independent of energy. Thus, the spectrum is arranged symmetrically and transformed into the Fourier representation. The latter is multiplied by a function in order to transform original Gaussian into Lorentzian peaks. An autoregressive filter is calculated, leading to a characteristic polynomial whose complex roots represent both the location and the width of each peak, provided that the absolute value is lower than unit. The amplitude of each component (the area of each peak or the sum of areas of peaks characterizing an element) is fitted by the weighted least squares method, taking into account that errors in spectra are independent and follow a Poisson law. Very accurate results are obtained, which would be hard to achieve by other methods. The DECO FORTRAN code has been developed for compatible PC microcomputers. Some features of the code are given.

  13. Augmentation of ENDF/B fission product gamma-ray spectra by calculated spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Katakura, J. ); England, T.R. )

    1991-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectral data of the ENDF/B-V fission product decay data file have been augmented by calculated spectra. The calculations were performed with a model using beta strength functions and cascade gamma-ray transitions. The calculated spectra were applied to individual fission product nuclides. Comparisons with several hundred measured aggregate gamma spectra after fission were performed to confirm the applicability of the calculated spectra. The augmentation was extended to a preliminary ENDF/B-VI file, and to beta spectra. Appendix C provides information on the total decay energies for individual products and some comparisons of measured and aggregate values based on the preliminary ENDF/B-VI files. 15 refs., 411 figs.

  14. The width of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Borgonovo, Luis

    2015-03-01

    The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper, we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the EFE spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability <10-6). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes - synchrotron and blackbody radiation - the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78 per cent of long GRBs and 85 per cent of short GRBs are incompatible with the minimum width of standard slow cooling synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, with fast cooling spectra predicting even wider spectra. Photospheric emission can explain the spectra if mechanisms are invoked to give a spectrum much broader than a blackbody.

  15. Neutron spectra unfolding in Bonner spheres spectrometry using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kardan, M R; Setayeshi, S; Koohi-Fayegh, R; Ghiassi-Nejad, M

    2003-01-01

    The neural network method has been used for the unfolding of neutron spectra in neutron spectrometry by Bonner spheres. A back propagation algorithm was used for training of neural networks. 4 mm x 4 mm bare LiI (Eu) and in a polyethylene sphere set: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 18 inch diameter have been used for unfolding of neutron spectra. Neural networks were trained by 199 sets of neutron spectra, which were subdivided into 6, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 20 energy bins and for each of them an appropriate neural network was designed and trained. The validation was performed by the 21 sets of neutron spectra. A neural network with 10 energy bins which had a mean value of error of 6% for dose equivalent estimation of spectra in the validation set showed the best results. The obtained results show that neural networks can be applied as an effective method for unfolding neutron spectra especially when the main target is neutron dosimetry. PMID:12862240

  16. Analysis of G protein gamma subunit heterogeneity using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M D; Schey, K L; Dingus, J; Mehta, N D; Tatum, B S; Halushka, M; Finch, J W; Hildebrandt, J D

    1994-04-29

    The diversity of the gamma subunits in bovine brain G protein preparations was investigated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. Analysis of these G protein mixtures revealed at least four gamma subunit masses by the following four criteria. 1) The measured masses were in the same mass range as the predicted molecular weights of gamma isoforms. 2) The masses were reproducible between the same or different preparations of G proteins. 3) The masses were independent of the matrix used for MALDI analysis. 4) The masses comigrated with the gamma subunit, as part of the heterotrimer, the beta gamma dimer, or the separated gamma subunit. These measured masses were compared with those calculated from cDNA sequences of known bovine brain gamma isoforms with the addition of plausible post-translational modifications. The mass of each spectral peak was consistent with the calculated mass for only one of four known bovine brain gamma subunit isoforms, but the data suggest modifications of the gamma subunits in addition to those already known or suspected at their carboxyl termini. Besides these four major masses, several additional, less resolved spectral peaks were observed whose measured masses did not correlate with any known gamma subunit or plausible modification. MALDI mass spectrometry promises to be a powerful technique for the analysis of the diversity of the gamma subunit in G proteins and for the characterization of their post-translational modifications. PMID:8175659

  17. Formation of cyclotron lines in gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. G.; Meszaros, P.

    1989-01-01

    A transmission model of gamma-ray burst sources is studied using the relativistic QED magnetic-resonant opacities including multiple photon scattering, incorporated into a discrete-ordinate radiative-transport scheme. The physics of the cyclotron line-producing region is discussed in general, and the expected line profiles, relative harmonic strengths, and polarizations are indicated under various conditions. The calculated spectra for these models show good agreement with the spectra reported from Ginga for GB 880205 and GB 870303.

  18. A sensitive continuum analysis method for gamma ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakur, Alakh N.; Arnold, James R.

    1993-01-01

    In this work we examine ways to improve the sensitivity of the analysis procedure for gamma ray spectra with respect to small differences in the continuum (Compton) spectra. The method developed is applied to analyze gamma ray spectra obtained from planetary mapping by the Mars Observer spacecraft launched in September 1992. Calculated Mars simulation spectra and actual thick target bombardment spectra have been taken as test cases. The principle of the method rests on the extraction of continuum information from Fourier transforms of the spectra. We study how a better estimate of the spectrum from larger regions of the Mars surface will improve the analysis for smaller regions with poorer statistics. Estimation of signal within the continuum is done in the frequency domain which enables efficient and sensitive discrimination of subtle differences between two spectra. The process is compared to other methods for the extraction of information from the continuum. Finally we explore briefly the possible uses of this technique in other applications of continuum spectra.

  19. Gamma-Ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, John; Jandel, Marian; Bredeweg, Todd; Couture, Aaron; Haight, Robert; O'Donnell, John; Vieira, David; Wu, Ching-Yen; Chyzh, Andrii; Gostic, Julie; Henderson, Roger; Kwan, Elaine

    2011-10-01

    A new measurement of the gamma-ray energy spectrum and multiplicity following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu has been made using DANCE, a highly-segmented, nearly 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The 239Pu target consisted of an approximately 2 mg/cm2 deposit mounted in a small parallel-plate avalanche chamber inserted into the DANCE in order to tag fission events. The gamma-ray spectra were measured for several strong neutron resonances below 100 eV. The measured spectra were corrected for detector response by using simple parameterizations of the actual fission gamma-ray emission coupled with a GEANT model of the DANCE array. This research was supported by funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

  20. Inversion of neutron/gamma spectra from scintillator measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Ehresmann, B.; Martin, C.; Böhm, E.; Kharytonov, A.; Kortmann, O.; Zeitlin, C.; Hassler, D. M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2011-11-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on-board NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover will measure charged particles as well as neutron and gamma radiation on the Martian surface. Neutral particles are an important contribution to this radiation environment. RAD measures them with a CsI (Tl) and a plastic scintillator, which are both surrounded by an anticoincidence. The incident neutron/gamma spectrum is obtained from the measurements using inversion methods which often fit a functional behavior, e.g., a power law, to the measured data applying the instrument response function and, e.g., a least-squares method. In situations where count rates are small, i.e., where the stochastic nature of the measurement is evident, maximum likelihood estimates with underlying Poissonian statistics improve the resulting spectra. We demonstrate the measurement and inversion of gamma/neutron spectra for a detector concept featuring one high-density scintillator and one high-proton-content scintillator. The applied inversion methods derive the original spectra without any strong assumptions of the functional behavior. Instrument response functions are obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations in matrix form with which the instrument response is treated as a set of linear equations. Using the response matrices we compare a constrained least-squares minimization, a chi-squared minimization and a maximum likelihood method with underlying Poissonian statistics. We make no assumptions about the incident particle spectrum and the methods intrinsically satisfy the constraint of non-negative counts. We analyzed neutron beam measurements made at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and inverted the measurement data for both neutron and gamma spectra. Monte-Carlo-generated measurements of the expected Martian neutron/gamma spectra were inverted as well, here the maximum likelihood method with underlying Poissonian statistics produces significantly better results.

  1. The 2002 IAEA test spectra for low-level γ-ray spectrometry software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Arcos, José Mª; Blaauw, Menno; Fazinic, Stjepko; Kolotov, Vladimir P.

    2005-01-01

    Test spectra for low-level γ-ray spectrometry were acquired and made available to the general public at www.iri.tudelft.nl/~rc/fmr/iaea2002. As opposed to the 1995 test spectra, where reference values were made available only for the peak energies and areas, the new set of test spectra was acquired with certified sources, so that the reference values are radionuclide activities. Two well-defined detection geometries were employed: a 500 ml Marinelli beaker on a 33% relative efficiency HPGe detector; and a 100 ml pillbox on a 96% HPGe detector. The complete set addresses various issues that are especially important in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry, i.e. determination of efficiency curves in the presence of coincidence summing, differences in source geometry and density between standard and sample, poor statistics, shielding of background by the sample, use of low X- or γ-ray energies and the assumption of secular equilibrium of the natural radionuclides. The set was used in an IAEA intercomparison of software packages in December, 2002, reported on in a separate paper.

  2. Features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Paczynski, Bohdan; Goodman, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Gravitational lensing of cosmological gamma-ray bursts by objects in the mass range about 10 exp 17 to 10 exp 20 g (femtolensing) may introduce complicated interference patterns that might be interpreted as absorption or emission lines in the bursts' spectra. This phenomenon, if detected, may be used as a unique probe of dark matter in the universe. The BATSE spectral data should allow one to detect such spectral features or to put significant upper limits on the cosmic density of a dark matter component that may be in the femtolensing range. Software to generate theoretical spectra has been developed, and it is accessible over the computer network with anonymous ftp.

  3. Diversity and Patterns: Gamma-ray spectra of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Stefan

    2012-07-01

    Gamma ray emission from AGN is generally thought to be related to relativistic beaming in jets and is associated with high Doppler boosting. Doppler boosting inferred from gamma-ray observations are often significantly higher than those determined by other techniques at lower energy bands. Furthermore, GeV and TeV facilities have discovered AGN of different flavors beyond the traditional Blazar objects. The sources discovered have been classified at lower energy bands as belonging to different classes, many of which are not though to display significant Doppler boosting at all. This study compares GeV-TeV spectra and broad-band SEDs of AGN belonging to different classes. It aims at identifying patterns related to different source classes in order to understand whether the phenomenon of significant gamma-ray emission is related to similar processes in AGN of otherwise different overall characteristics or whether there are indeed fundamentally different mechanisms of gamma-ray emission operating in different AGN types. The effects of limited dynamic range of gamma-ray observations, diversity in gamma-ray properties among otherwise similar AGN, and ambiguities in derivation of Doppler factors will be discussed.

  4. New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

  5. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin synchrotron radiation are likely required in a full explanation of the spectral peaks or breaks of the GRB prompt emission phase. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-12-31

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

  8. Proficiency test of gamma spectrometry laboratories in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Pantelić, G; Vuletić, V; Mitrović, R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the statistical evaluation of results from the analysis of 8 radionuclides in water samples within the frame of the First Proficiency Test of gamma spectrometry Laboratories in Serbia organized in 2008. The water samples used in this proficiency test were prepared using certified radioactive solution containing gamma emitting radionuclides. This solution was diluted and used as a master solution for preparation of test samples. The overall performance evaluation showed that 64.7% of all reported results met the individual proficiency test criteria, where 26.5% of all reported results did not pass the overall PT acceptance criterion. PMID:19945291

  9. Experimental simulation of A-bomb gamma ray spectra: revisited.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E; Payne, Lester C; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Beddoe, Alun H; Charles, Monty W

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported recently that the A-bomb gamma ray spectra received by the colon of the average Japanese survivor of Hiroshima and Nagasaki may be experimentally simulated using a hospital-based Philips SL15 linear accelerator. The simulated A-bomb gamma radiation may be used in radiobiology experiments to determine, amongst other things, the biological effectiveness of the A-bomb gamma radiation. However, in that study, the electron beams from the linear accelerator were poorly defined and photon contamination was ignored. In the study reported here, a Varian Clinac 2100C linear accelerator has been used for the same purpose but with photon contamination included in better defined output electron beams. It is found that the A-bomb gamma radiation can still be matched to an acceptable degree (<10%). The cause of the slightly poorer fit was due mainly to the different ranges of energies available from the linear accelerators used. The absorbed dose received by model breasts was also estimated in this study for the same situations as in the previous study. The ratio of the breast to colon doses was found to be only (3.9 +/- 4.0)% low compared with the expected values of 1.17 and 1.16 for Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively. These results provide further confirmation of the acceptability of the simple cylindrically symmetrical body models employed in these studies to represent the average Japanese survivor. PMID:15254320

  10. Spectra and positions of galactic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, F. K.; Matteson, J. L.; Jung, G. V.; Rothschild, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The UCSD/MIT Hard X-Ray and Low Energy Gamma-Ray Experiment aboard HEAO-1 scanned the galactic center region during three epochs in 1977 and 1978 from 13 to 180 keV. The results are presented from the scanning epoch of 1978 September. Twenty-two known 2 to 10 keV source positions were necessary for an acceptable fit to the data. The spectra of the 16 strongest, least confused sources are all consistent with power laws with photon spectral indices ranging from 2.1 to 7.2. Acceptable fits to thermal bremsstrahlung models are also possible for most sources. No one source in this survey can be extrapolated to higher energy to match the intensity of the gamma-ray continuum as measured by HEAO-1 large field of view detectors, which implies that the continuum is a composite of contributions from a number of sources.

  11. Analysis of gamma-ray burst spectra with cyclotron lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargatis, Vincent; Liang, Edison P.

    1992-01-01

    Motivated by the recent developments in the cyclotron resonance upscattering of soft photons or CUSP model of Gamma Ray Burst (GBR) continuum spectra, we revisit a select database of GRBs with credible cyclotron absorption features. We measure the break energy of the continuum, the slope below the break and deduce the soft photon energy or the electron beam Lorentz factor cutoff. We study the correlation (or lack of) between various parameters in the context of the CUSP model. One surprise result is that there appears to be marginal correlation between the break energy and the spectral index below the break.

  12. On gamma-ray bursts spectra: A possible theoretical understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardonnet, Pascal; Filina, Anastasia; Popov, Mikhail; Chechetkin, Valery; Baranov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    The study of spectra of gamma-ray burst is certainly a very promising part of the GRB studies. More and more data are available for GRBs and with time-sequence analysis it is possible also to propose a link with the other set of data represented by the light curves. Consequently, the explanation of the spectra requires both the local physical condition of the engine as well as the dynamic of the explosion process. In this view, we have analysed the GRB spectra with a specific model: black-body + thermal Bremsstrahlung. Our results show that this model is consistent with the observed GRB spectra. We can derive the temperature of the hot plasma needed to reproduce this spectrum consistent with the core of a very hot star ˜109 K. We have also found a correlation between the variation in time of this temperature and the variation of the spikes in luminosity of the light curves. This time profile each spike could be the correct fingerprint of the GRB physical process.Each spike, as a fingerprint, could keep the memory of the GRB physical process. If this model find a confirmation for other GRBs, this idea will ask us to open a new paradigm in GRB physics.

  13. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  14. The low energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Lamb, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of observed gamma-ray burst spectra for the physical conditions and geometries of the sources are examined. It is noted that an explanation of the continua in terms of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung requires a relatively large area but a fairly shallow depth. On the other hand, a spectrum similar to that observed could be produced by rapid flickering of sources with less extreme geometries if each flicker emits a Comptonized thermal spectrum. Either field inhomogeneities or plasma motions are required to interpret the low energy features as cyclotron extinction. An alternative explanation is photoelectric absorption by heavy atoms; this requires a field strength high enough to make one-photon electron positron annihilation possible. Observational tests of these possibilities are proposed

  15. Dating the age of a nuclear event by gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nir-El, Y

    2004-01-01

    The age of a nuclear event can be determined by measuring the activity of two fission products. The event studied was a short irradiation, of a small sample of uranium, in a nuclear reactor. Two types of a clock were investigated: non-isobaric and isobaric parent-daughter fission products. Measurements of the source by gamma spectrometry yielded very good agreement between true and measured ages. The accuracy of each clock and the upper and lower age limits of applicability were studied. PMID:14987642

  16. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which were reported to collect noticeable Be-7 on their leading surfaces. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed.

  17. Analysis of size-fractionated soil samples by gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Savva, M I; Karangelos, D J; Anagnostakis, M J; Simopoulos, S E

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of particle size on radionuclides in soil, particularly in relation to depth. A set of soil samples at the 0-10cm and 10-20cm depth layers were collected, separated into size fractions using a sieving machine and analyzed by gamma spectrometry to determine (238)U, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (137)Cs. Significant variations between different size fractions and depth layers were observed. A 0-20cm depth profile was also investigated. PMID:26671791

  18. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of Al, V, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultralow level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include an end piece that collects noticeable Be-7 on its leading surface. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90 pct. efficient HPGe gamma ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive active shield.

  19. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

  20. Gamma spectrometry of 234Th (238U) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    El-Daoushy, Farid; Hernndez, Francisco

    2002-07-01

    Environmental samples from a wide-range of aquatic and soil deposits, mainly of Scandinavian origin, were analysed for 234Th (238U) using low-level gamma-spectrometry. The diversity of the samples, in terms of composition and ages, allowed a detailed evaluation of the analytical problems associated with gamma-ray spectrometry with focus on the reliability of the 234Th peaks for absolute determination of the 234Th activities. The X-ray contributions in the 93 keV peak were compared with the corresponding self-absorption corrected activities of the 63 keV peak. These X-ray contributions were, also, correlated with the 238U, 232Th, 235U, 40K and 137Cs activities of the samples. Despite the difficulties imposed by the self-absorption corrections, the 63 keV peak is still the best option. Large variability in the 93 keV peak interferences, due to X-rays from Th, exists in sediment and soil samples. Only in the case of young ombrotrophic peat samples was it possible to conclude that the 93 keV peak is free from X-ray contributions and can be as good as the 63 keV Monte-Carlo self-absorption corrected peak. X-ray contributions in the samples correlated with the 238U and 232Th activities, only, in closed environmental systems where a secular equilibrium with the daughters of the U/Th series can occur. PMID:12173662

  1. The use of commercial glass as a potential gamma accidental dosimeter through the absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Yousef, S.; Bakr, S.

    2012-05-01

    Various types of commercial glass (ordinary windows, cathode ray tubes, glass kitchenware) have been studied as potential accidental radiation dosimeters. The proposed method utilizes the changes in the glasses' absorption spectra as a result of irradiation. A 60Co gamma irradiation cell has been used to irradiate samples with doses ranging from 5 to 200 Gy. The transmittance was measured using a photospectrometer (UV-visible spectrometry). The results demonstrate that the transmittance spectra of most of the glass samples change in linear proportion to the exposure dose. Moreover, the study considers the fading effect on the absorption spectra of the irradiated samples for fading times up to 100 days at room temperature. The results of this work demonstrate that several widely used types of glass can be used as high-dose accidental dosimeters for doses ranging between 8 and 200 Gy. A reasonable calibration line can be established for any irradiated glass sample by heating, re-irradiating with standard doses and measuring the related absorption coefficient. Further investigations are needed to decrease the minimum detectable dose of the proposed method and to study the effect of glass composition on radiation response.

  2. Gamma-ray spectra from neutron capture on /sup 87/Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.E.; Becker, J.A.; Stelts, M.L.

    1981-07-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum following neutron capture on /sup 87/Sr was measured at 3 neutron energies: E/sub n/ = thermal, 2 keV, and 24 keV. Gamma rays were detected in a three-crystal Ge(Li)-NaI-NaI pair spectrometer. Gamma-ray intensities deduced from these spectra by spectral unfolding are presented.

  3. Efficiency Calibration for Environmental Gamma Spectrometry Using GATE.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2016-06-01

    This work investigated the utility of performing efficiency calibration for environmental gamma spectrometry using the Monte Carlo based, free of charge GATE toolbox. The validity of this approach was tested by comparing output efficiency values of an in-house developed GATE-based program with experimental measurements covering various geometries and primary photon energies. The results of this comparison revealed relative deviations within ±20%, thus validating the employed computational approach. Moreover, the GATE-based method was able to predict quantities that are generally difficult to measure experimentally, such as the number of interactions preceding full energy absorption. These computationally obtained predictions were found to be in agreement with theory. PMID:27115226

  4. Measured neutron and gamma spectra from californium-252 in a tissue-equivalent medium.

    PubMed

    Elson, H R; Stupar, T A; Shapiro, A; Kereiakes, J G

    1979-01-01

    A method of experimentally obtaining both neutron and gamma-ray spectra in a scattering medium is described. The method utilizes a liquid-organic scintillator (NE-213) coupled with a pulse-shape discrimination circuit. This allows the separation of the neutron-induced pulse-height data from the gamma-ray pulse-height data. Using mathematical unfolding techniques, the two sets of pulse-height data were transformed to obtain the neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra. A small spherical detector was designed and constructed to reduce the errors incurred by attempting spectral measurements in a scattering medium. Demonstration of the utility of the system to obtain the neutron and gamma-ray spectra in a scattering medium was performed by characterizing the neutron and gamma-ray spectra at various sites about a 3.7-microgram (1.5 cm active length) californium-252 source in a tissue-equivalent medium. PMID:492077

  5. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.; Tanner, Allan B.

    1977-01-01

    Sedimentary-type uranium deposits accumulate at favorable sites along a migration path which may be kilometers in length. Their source is a large volume of rock from which the uranium has been leached. The geochemical mobilities and half lives of uranium and its daughter products vary widely so that they are transported from the source rocks, at different rates, along the migration path to their ultimate site. The radioactive disequilibrium resulting from this process has been well documented in the immediate vicinity of ore deposits, and disequilibrium is commonly recorded on gamma-ray logs up the hydraulic gradient from uranium ore. Little is known about the state of secular equilibrium in the leached host rocks, which often represent the only part of the migration path that is at or near the surface and is thus most accessible to the exploration geophysicist. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry provides a means of investigating the disequilibrium associated with uranium leaching and migration. Direct measurement of uranium can be made by this method, and the equivalent weight percents can be determined for six of the seven daughter-product decay groups that characterize the state of radioactive equilibrium. The technique has been used quantitatively in laboratory studies, where the results compare favorably with radiochemical analyses; field experiments suggest that semi-quantitative data may be obtained at the outcrop.

  6. Contribution of a germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. Spectral analysis and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, S.; Guillot, L.; Bourgeois, C.

    2002-04-01

    The sensitivity of the germanium semi-conductor detector is 30 times lower than that of the sodium iodide (NaI) detectors frequently used in airborne spectrometry. Its energy resolution however, is 20 times better, giving more accurate identification of radionuclides, especially when complex spectra are involved. The use of the germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry provides a large amount of qualitative and quantitative information. In post-accident situations a germanium detector will be sufficient, and should therefore be used in preference to a NaI detector. An algorithm for detecting the total absorption peaks by studying the variations in the spectral profile of germanium gamma-ray spectra has been developed at the CEA. The use of digital filters that take into account the characteristics of the absorption peaks reduces the statistical fluctuations, making possible detection based on the analysis of the first and second derivatives. The absorption peak is then estimated by subtracting the background noise modelled in the detection window. This method of analysis offers the advantage of not requiring prior knowledge of the number or nature of the radionuclides to be detected. A study has been carried out to assess the specific performances of this detection software in different situations: average background noise in France and detection of artificial sources with varying activity levels. This analysis showed that the performance of our detection algorithm is very close to the theoretical detection limits, for both natural and artificial radionuclides. This algorithm is therefore well suited to the germanium type of spectral profile and to low count rates.

  7. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Timing analysis can be a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and, more in general, to investigate the dominant variability timescales in astrophysical sources. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties involved, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature thus far. Aims: We aim at characterising the individual PDS of GRBs to describe their variability in terms of a stochastic process, to explore their variety, and to carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between PDS properties and other GRB observables. Methods: We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study the individual PDS of 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope in the 15-150 keV band from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Results: Two classes of GRBs emerge: with or without a unique dominant timescale. A comparison with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals similar distributions of PDS slopes. Unexpectedly, GRBs with subsecond-dominant timescales and duration longer than a few tens of seconds in the source frame appear to be either very rare or altogether absent. Three GRBs are found with possible evidence for a periodic signal at 3.0-3.2σ (Gaussian) significance, corresponding to a multi-trial chance probability of ~1%. Thus, we found no compelling evidence for periodic signal in GRBs. Conclusions: The analogy between the PDS of GRBs and of AGNs could tentatively indicate similar stochastic processes that rule BH accretion across different BH mass scales and objects. In addition, we find evidence that short dominant timescales and duration are not completely independent of each other, in contrast with commonly accepted paradigms. Full Tables 1-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/589/A98

  8. Spectra, fluxes, and observability of gamma rays from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Tylka, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Details of the physics of gamma-ray production by the annihilation of dark matter particles in the Galaxy are presented. Improved gamma-ray spectra and fluxes are calculated and compared with present observational data on cosmic gamma-ray fluxes at high Galactic latitudes. A comparison with the gamma-ray flux from cosmic-ray interactions is made. It is found that gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation are most potentially observable from patches of the sky at high Galactic latitudes in directions having an unusually low total column density of gas and from a dark matter core at the Galactic center.

  9. Cadium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    William Quam

    2001-09-01

    This report describes CZT crystals and their use in large arrays for generation of gamma ray spectra. Laboratory spectra will be shown together with spectra accumulated by various battery powered portable instruments (see Appendix A). One of these portable instruments was specifically constructed to minimize power consumption and yet provide reasonable isotope identification capability. Detailed data will be presented covering gamma energy resolution, gamma peak shapes, system background, and detector efficiency. Nearly all data were taken with very small crystals of CZT; cubes 5 mm on a side. A few spectra will be presented from cylindrical crystals of about the same size (see Appendix A). The small crystal size leads to low counting rates and extended counting times for reliable isotope identification. We have addressed this problem by using arrays of CZT crystals, initially two crystals and, at present, arrays of eight crystals. Data will be shown relating spectral parameters for these two arrays. System MDA is one way of combining resolution, efficiency, and background that will enable direct comparison of various detector types for individual isotope identification. We have calculated the MDA for an early dual crystal array and the current eight crystal array. Data derived from each array will be presented. In addition, it is possible to extrapolate the MDA methodology to much larger arrays. A 32-crystal array is under construction and extrapolations to 256 and 1024 crystals are considered possible. Estimated MDA values for these larger arrays are also presented. Several 8-crystal arrays have been constructed and versions have been incorporated into portable instruments. Descriptions of these small instruments are given covering physical size, weight, and general configuration. These instruments have been tested for shock and temperature effects and data will be presented on the results of these tests. The MDA concept will also allow extrapolation to large source to detector distances. The usual laboratory measurements are done with small sources at 20 to 50 cm ranges. Practical ranges for aerial work will be 50 to 100 meters or greater. These distances will require correction for air attenuation for most of the low energy isotopes. The approximations used in the present note for aerial measurements involve small diameter sources (diameter approximately equal to the altitude), a 1 kt pass, and a planar array with no aircraft attenuation material in the field of view. The array will have a collimator to limit the side-looking sensitivity to enable a more accurate extrapolation from the laboratory data. Large arrays will have significant physical size and weight compared to the small hand-held instruments thus far constructed. We estimate these parameters and extrapolate the power consumption to provide a realistic estimate of a suitable airborne system. In all cases these larger systems are lighter and physically more compact than the usual NaI or high purity Germanium (HPGe) systems used in aerial work. Thus deployment should be simple. The power consumption is much less as well.

  10. BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra. Part 3; Low-Energy Behavior of Time-Averaged Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Matteson, J. L.; Band, D. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Meegan, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze time-averaged spectra from 86 bright gamma-ray bursts from the first 5 years of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to determine whether the lowest energy data are consistent with a standard spectra form fit to the data at all energies. The BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors have the capability to observe photons as low as 5 keV. Using the gamma-ray burst locations obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors, the Spectroscopy Detectors' low-energy response can be modeled accurately. This, together with a postlaunch calibration of the lowest energy Spectroscopy Detector discriminator channel, which can lie in the range 5-20 keV, allows spectral deconvolution over a broad energy range, approx. 5 keV to 2 MeV. The additional coverage allows us to search for evidence of excess emission, or for a deficit, below 20 keV. While no burst has a significant (greater than or equal to 3 sigma) deficit relative to a standard spectra model, we find that 12 bursts have excess low-energy emission, ranging between 1.2 and 5.8 times the model flux, that exceeds 5 sigma in significance. This is evidence for an additional low-energy spectral component in at least some bursts, or for deviations from the power-law spectral form typically used to model gamma-ray bursts at energies below 100 keV.

  11. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    SciTech Connect

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore.

  12. Portable microcomputer unit for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

    1981-10-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed for the IAEA to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, and a 20-character thermal printer for hardcopy output. Only the positions of the 148-keV Pu-241 and 208-keV U-237 peaks are required for spectral analysis. The unit was tested against gamma-ray spectra taken of NBS plutonium standards and IAEA spectra. Results obtained are presented.

  13. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons - Comparison with gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    The model of gamma-ray-burst spectra proposed by Zdziarski and Lamb (1986, 1987) is reviewed and compared with observed spectra. In the model, the spectrum arises from multiple Compton scatterings in a nonthermal source with a deficit of soft photons. The steady-state electron distribution in such a source is a nonthermal power law that joins at low energies onto a thermal distribution that may be either optically thick or thin. Both cases lead naturally to a two-component spectrum with a photon-energy index in the X-ray spectrum which is much less than one and a photon-energy index in the gamma-ray spectrum which is larger than the X-ray photon-energy index. Fits to the observed gamma-ray-burst spectra (where data exist for both X-ray and gamma-ray energies) show good agreement with the model.

  15. Computer simulation of gamma-ray spectra from semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Jim C.; Olschner, Fred; Shah, Kanai S.

    1992-12-01

    Traditionally, researchers developing improved gamma ray detectors have used analytical techniques or, rarely, computer simulations to predict the performance of new detectors. However, with the advent of inexpensive personal computers, it is now possible for virtually all detector researchers to perform some form of numerical computation to predict detector performance. Although general purpose code systems for semiconductor detector performance do not yet exist, it is possible to perform many useful calculations using commercially available, general purpose numerical software packages (such as `spreadsheet' programs intended for business use). With a knowledge of the rudimentary mechanics of detector simulation most researchers, including those with no programming skills, can effectively use numerical simulation methods to predict gamma ray detector performance. In this paper we discuss the details of the numerical simulation of gamma ray detectors with the hope of communicating the simplicity and effectiveness of these methods. In particular, we discuss the steps involved in simulating the pulse height spectrum produced by a semiconductor detector.

  16. Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Becerra-Ferreiro, Ana María; Carrillo-Nuñez, Aureliano

    2002-08-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe were measured and their dosimetric features were calculated. Neutron spectra were measured using a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator. The 239PuBe neutron spectrum was measured in an open environment, while the 241AmBe neutron spectrum was measured in a closed environment. Gamma-ray spectra were measured using a NaI(Tl) scintillator using the same experimental conditions for both sources. The effect of measuring conditions for the 241AmBe neutron spectrum indicates the presence of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The low-resolution neutron spectra obtained with the multisphere spectrometer allows one to calculate the dosimetric features of neutron sources. At 100 cm both sources produce approximately the same count rate as that of the 4.4 MeV gamma-ray per unit of alpha emitter activity. PMID:12150274

  17. Waste Characterization Using Gamma Ray Spectrometry with Automated Efficiency Optimization - 13404

    SciTech Connect

    Bosko, A.; Venkataraman, R.; Bronson, F.L.; Ilie, G.; Russ, W.R.

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray spectrometry using High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors is commonly employed in assaying radioactive waste streams from a variety of sources: nuclear power plants, Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, medical facilities, decontamination and decommissioning activities etc. The radioactive material is typically packaged in boxes or drums (for e.g. B-25 boxes or 208 liter drums) and assayed to identify and quantify radionuclides. Depending on the origin of the waste stream, the radionuclides could be special nuclear materials (SNM), fission products, or activation products. Efficiency calibration of the measurement geometry is a critical step in the achieving accurate quantification of radionuclide content. Due to the large size of the waste items, it is impractical and expensive to manufacture gamma ray standard sources for performing a measurement based calibration. For well over a decade, mathematical efficiency methods such as those in Canberra's In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) have been successfully employed in the efficiency calibration of gamma based waste assay systems. In the traditional ISOCS based calibrations, the user provides input data such as the dimensions of the waste item, the average density and fill height of the matrix, and matrix composition. As in measurement based calibrations, the user typically defines a homogeneous matrix with a uniform distribution of radioactivity. Actual waste containers can be quite nonuniform, however. Such simplifying assumptions in the efficiency calibration could lead to a large Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU), thus limiting the amount of waste that can be disposed of as intermediate or low activity level waste. To improve the accuracy of radionuclide quantification, and reduce the TMU, Canberra has developed the capability to optimize the efficiency calibration using the ISOCS method. The optimization is based on benchmarking the efficiency shape and magnitude to the data available in the analyzed gamma ray spectra. Data from measurements of a given item in multiple counting geometries are among the powerful benchmarks that could be used in the optimization. Also, while assaying a waste stream with fission products and activation products emitting gamma lines of multiple energies, optimizing the efficiency on the basis of line activity consistency is very effective. In the present paper, the ISOCS- based optimization methodology is applied to measurement scenarios involving multiple counting geometries, and multi-gamma-line radionuclides. Results will be presented along with accuracy and precision estimates for each measurement. (authors)

  18. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Hojbota, Calin; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime. PMID:26724015

  19. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Hojbota, Calin; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  20. Low level measurement of (60)Co by gamma ray spectrometry using γ-γ coincidence.

    PubMed

    Paradis, H; de Vismes Ott, A; Luo, M; Cagnat, X; Piquemal, F; Gurriaran, R

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the latest development of the laboratory to measure the natural and artificial massic activities in environmental samples. The measurement method of coincident emitters by gamma-gamma coincidence using an anti-Compton device and its digital electronics is described. Results obtained with environmental samples are shown. Despite its low efficiency, this method decreases detection limits of (60)Co for certain samples compared to conventional gamma-ray spectrometry due to its very low background. PMID:26682892

  1. Gamma-ray spectrometry data collection and reduction by simple computing systems.

    PubMed

    Op de Beeck, J

    1975-12-01

    The review summarizes the present state of the involvement of relatively small computing devices in the collection and processing of gamma-ray spectrum data. An economic and utilitarian point of view has been chosen with regard to data collection in order to arrive at practically valuable conclusions in terms of feasibility of possible configurations with respect to their eventual application. A unified point of view has been adopted with regard to data processing by developing an information theoretical approach on a more or less intuitive level in an attempt to remove the largest part of the virtual disparity between the several processing methods described in the literature. A synoptical introduction to the most important mathematical methods has been incorporated, together with a detailed theoretical description of the concept gamma-ray spectrum. In accordance with modern requirements, the discussions are mainly oriented towards high-resolution semiconductor detector-type spectra. The critical evaluation of the processing methods reviewed is done with respect to a set of predefined criteria. Smoothing, peak detection, peak intensity determination, overlapping peak resolving and detection and upper limits are discussed in great detail. A preferred spectrum analysis method combining powerful data reduction properties with extreme simplicity and speed of operation is suggested. The general discussion is heavily oriented towards activation analysis application, but other disciplines making use of gamma-ray spectrometry will find the material presented equally useful. Final conclusions are given pointing to future developments and shifting their centre of gravity towards improving the quality of the measurements rather than expanding the use of tedious and sophisticated mathematical techniques requiring the limits of available computational power. PMID:769794

  2. Analysis of multiplicity gated high energy gamma spectra for extracting giant dipole resonance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, D. R.

    2006-05-01

    The procedures adopted in analyzing the experimental multiplicity gated high energy gamma spectra for extracting the angular momentum dependent giant dipole resonance parameters have been discussed. A Monte Carlo based statistical model analysis is necessary for an accurate extraction of the parameters. A method is devised to use the code CASCADE for making an equivalent Monte Carlo calculation of the multiplicity gated high energy gamma spectra. A practical approach for a fast search of the resonance parameters using this equivalent Monte Carlo analysis is suggested and the accuracy of such procedure is demonstrated.

  3. Continuum spectra for gamma-ray bursts: Suppressing the soft photons

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Cheng; Epstein, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are observed to have very steep spectra below photon energy /approximately/100 keV; some have photon number spectra as steep as F /proportional to/ E/sup 0/. This property has been difficult to explain in terms of most radiation processes. The BATSE experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory should be able to test how common this spectral property is and whether there are bursts with even steeper low-energy spectra. To explain this spectral steepness, we study a model in which the /gamma/ radiation is produced by inverse-Compton and cyclotron scattering of blackbody radiation from the surface of a neutron star by relativistic electrons. If the neutron star has negligible magnetic field, Compton scattering dominates in producing the observed gamma-ray burst spectra. If the field exceeds 10/sup 10/ G, cyclotron scattering is more important. In the low-magnetic-field case, steep spectra may be produced via the suppression of the low energy part of the ''cooling spectrum'' (the spectrum integrated over the radiation lifetime of an electron), as a result of the smaller and more collimated photon flux an electron sees as it moves away from the neutron star. In the high-magnetic-field case, low-energy suppression occurs because electrons with higher energies scatter the blackbody photons more efficiently due to the cyclotron resonance, preferentially producing high energy photons. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polf, J C; Peterson, S; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Beddar, S; Trache, L

    2009-11-21

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy. PMID:19864704

  5. NOTE: Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polf, J. C.; Peterson, S.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Beddar, S.; Trache, L.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy.

  6. QUALITY CONTROL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS USING GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the quality control procedures, calibration, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data in measuring the activity of gamma ray-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. Included in the appendices are basic data for selected gamma ray-emitting ra...

  7. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  8. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-background gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden.

    PubMed

    Gastrich, Holger; Gößling, Claus; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kröninger, Kevin; Neddermann, Till; Nitsch, Christian; Quante, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The Dortmund Low Background Facility is an instrument for low-level gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden of ten meters of water equivalent, an inner shielding, featuring a neutron absorber, and an active muon veto. An integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV of (2.528±0.004)counts/(kgmin) enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry with sensitivities in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time. PMID:27082973

  9. ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, P.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Normand, S.

    2011-07-01

    ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

  10. A simple method for the absolute determination of uranium enrichment by high-resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Korob, R O; Blasiyh Nuño, G A

    2006-05-01

    A simple method for the determination of uranium enrichment using high-resolution gamma spectrometry is presented in this paper. The method relies solely on the gamma-ray emission probabilities of 235U and 234mPa, and an iterative procedure for the least squares fit of a polynomial to a set of experimentally determined data. To ensure the reliability of the 234mPa gamma-ray emission probabilities employed, a new determination of these probabilities was carried out using a combination of gamma spectrometry and Cerenkov counting of a purified 234Th solution. Using these new data, a maximum difference of approximately 5% has been found between the experimental and declared uranium enrichment in a set of solid and liquid samples containing uranium compounds. PMID:16311038

  11. Calculation of the decision thresholds in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2014-12-01

    A method was developed for calculating the decision thresholds for gamma-ray spectrometric measurements. At the energies where gamma-ray emitters that are present in the nuclide library, but were not identified in the spectrum, radiate, peaks are supposed to appear. The peak areas are calculated by fitting, using the method of least squares, the spectral region of the supposed peaks with a continuous background and the spectrometer response function at the gamma-ray energies where the supposed peaks are positioned. The null measurement uncertainty of a gamma-ray emitter is obtained as the uncertainty of the weighted average of the activities calculated from the areas of the supposed peaks in a spectrum where the specified activity of the gamma-ray emitter is zero. For the calculation of the decision threshold the null measurement uncertainty is used. These decision thresholds overestimate the critical limits calculated with the Currie formula by about 10% in the case of single gamma-ray emitters. For multi-gamma-ray emitters the decision thresholds yield smaller values than the Currie formula. The presence of a peaked background or peaks that are near the supposed peaks increases the decision threshold considerably. PMID:25233528

  12. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  13. Study of total gamma spectra correlation for extending identification range over photopeak analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, A. W.

    1984-03-01

    This report shows that gamma spectra identification by total flux correlation can be used to extend identification range over photo peak methods. Identification was based on two decision rules both employing cross-correlation coefficients. The largest coefficient (first decision rule) matched the unknown spectra with the correct source thirty-seven out of thirty-eight trials. The proposed likelihood function (second decision rule) had a success rate of thirty-five out of thirty-eight trials. These results were based on spectra generated by the transport code, Morse.

  14. The gamma-ray spectra of 5-carbon alkane isomers in the positron annihilation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Yinghao; Liu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    The gamma-ray spectra of pentane (C5H12) and its two isomers, i.e., 2-Methylbutane (CH3C(CH3)HC2H5) and 2,2-Dimethylpropane (C(CH3)4) have been studied theoretically in the present work. The recent experimental gamma-ray spectra of these three molecules show that they have the same Doppler shifts, although their molecular structures are dramatically different. In order to reveal why the gamma-ray spectra of these molecules are less sensitive to the molecular structures, the one-dimensional gamma-ray spectra and spherically averaged momentum (SAM) distributions, the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR), and the three-dimensional momentum distributions of the positron-electron pair are studied. The one-centered momentum distributions of the electrons are found to play more important role than the multi-centered coordinate distributions. The present theoretical predictions have confirmed the experimental findings for the first time. The dominance of the inner valence electrons in the positron-electron annihilation process has also been suggested in the present work.

  15. An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

    1989-09-07

    A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The program titled IAEAPU consists of three separate applications: (1) a data-transfer application for transferring spectral data from a CICERO multichannel analyzer to a binary data file, (2) a data-analysis application to analyze plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percents of total plutonium, (3) and a data-quality assurance application to check spectral data for proper data-acquisition setup and performance. Volume 2 describes the operations of these applications and the installation and maintenance of the software.

  16. Effects of axion-photon mixing on gamma-ray spectra from magnetized astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Sigl, Guenter

    2007-12-15

    Astrophysical {gamma}-ray sources come in a variety of sizes and magnetizations. We deduce general conditions under which {gamma}-ray spectra from such sources would be significantly affected by axion-photon mixing. We show that, depending on strength and coherence of the magnetic field, axion couplings down to {approx}(10{sup 13}GeV){sup -1} can give rise to significant axion-photon conversions in the environment of accreting massive black holes. Resonances can occur between the axion mass term and the plasma frequency term as well as between the plasma frequency term and the vacuum Cotton-Mouton shift. Both resonances and nonresonant transitions could induce detectable features or even strong suppressions in finite energy intervals of {gamma}-ray spectra from active galactic nuclei. Such effects can occur at keV to TeV energies for couplings that are currently allowed by all experimental constraints.

  17. An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

    1989-09-07

    A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The program titled IAEAPU consists of three separate applications: a data-transfer application for transferring spectral data from a CICERO multichannel analyzer to a binary data file, a data-analysis application to analyze plutonium gamma-ray spectra, for plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percents of total plutonium, and a data-quality assurance application to check spectral data for proper data-acquisition setup and performance. Volume 3 contains the software listings for these applications.

  18. Distribution of iron and titanium on the lunar surface from lunar prospector gamma ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma ray pulse height spectra acquired by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) contain information on the abundance of major elements in the lunar surface, including O, Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, and Th. With the exception of Th and K, prompt gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with surface materials are used to determine elemental abundance. Most of these gamma rays are produced by inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and by neutrons and by neutron capture. The production of neutron-induced gamma rays reaches a maximum deep below the surface (e.g. approximately 140g/cm2 for inelastic scattering and approximately 50 g/cm2 for capture). Consequently, gamma rays sense the bulk composition of lunar materials, in contrast to optical methods (e.g. Clementine Spectral Reflectance (CSR)), which only sample the top few microns. Because most of the gamma rays are produced deep beneath the surface, few escape unscattered and the continuum of scattered gamma rays dominates the spectrum. In addition, due to the resolution of the spectrometer, there are few well-isolated peaks and peak fitting algorithms must be used to deconvolve the spectrum on order to determine the contribution of individual elements.

  19. Distribution of iron&titanium on the lunar surface from lunar prospector gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Elphic, R. C.; Gasnault, O. M.; Maurice, S.; Moore, K. R.; Binder, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma ray pulse height spectra acquired by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) contain information on the abundance of major elements in the lunar surface, including O, Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, and Th. With the exception of Th and K, prompt gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with surface materials are used to determine elemental abundance. Most of these gamma rays are produced by inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and by neutron capture. The production of neutron-induced gamma rays reaches a maximum deep below the surface (e.g. {approx}140 g/cm{sup 2} for inelastic scattering and {approx}50 g/cm{sup 2} for capture). Consequently, gamma rays sense the bulk composition of lunar materials, in contrast to optical methods [e.g. Clementine Spectral Reflectance (CSR)], which only sample the top few microns. Because most of the gamma rays are produced deep beneath the surface, few escape unscattered and the continuum of scattered gamma rays dominates the spectrum. In addition, due to the resolution of the spectrometer, there are few well-isolated peaks and peak fitting algorithms must be used to deconvolve the spectrum in order to determine the contribution of individual elements.

  20. Pulse profiles and spectra of gamma ray pulsars in the polar cap model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Daugherty, Joseph K.

    We investigate predictions for pulse profiles and spectra of gamma-ray pulsars in the polar cap curvature radiation-initiated cascade model. In this model, the gamma-ray beam is a hollow cone centered on the magnetic pole, producing either double-peaked or single-peaked pulse profiles depending on observer orientation. We have computed simulated distributions of pulse peak phase separation seen by observers at random orientation as a function of gamma-ray beam width and obliquity distribution. The observed distribution of pulse peak phase separation, which favors double-peaked pulses with phase separation near 0.4, can be matched assuming that most gamma-ray pulsars have obliquity < 45 deg and beam opening angles of around 30 deg. The gamma-ray spectra result from primary particle curvature radiation, softened by synchrotron radiation from one or more generations of electron-positron pairs. We have determined the generation number and predicted spectral index of gamma-ray pulsar cascades as a function of period and surface magnetic field. It is found that the spectral hardness should decrease with cascade generation number and increase with characteristic age, a trend observed for EGRET-detected pulsars.

  1. On-line interrogation of pebble bed reactor fuel using passive gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwei

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multipass fuel cycle in which graphite fuel pebbles (of varying enrichment) are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burnup limit (80,000--100,000 MWD/MTU). Unlike the situation with conventional light water reactors (LWRs), depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management will be highly inaccurate. As a result, an on-line measurement approach becomes the only accurate method to assess whether a particular pebble has reached its end-of-life burnup limit. In this work, an investigation was performed to assess the feasibility of passive gamma-ray spectrometry assay as an approach for on-line interrogation of PBR fuel for the simultaneous determination of burnup and enrichment on a pebble-by-pebble basis. Due to the unavailability of irradiated or fresh pebbles, Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the gamma-ray spectra of the PBR fuel at various levels of burnup. A pebble depletion calculation was performed using the ORIGEN code, which yielded the gamma-ray source term that was introduced into the input of an MCNP simulation. The MCNP simulation assumed the use of a high-purity coaxial germanium detector. Due to the lack of one-group high temperature reactor cross sections for ORIGEN, a heterogeneous MCNP model was developed to describe a typical PBR core. Subsequently, the code MONTEBURNS was used to couple the MCNP model and ORIGEN. This approach allowed the development of the burnup-dependent, one-group spectral-averaged PBR cross sections to be used in the ORIGEN pebble depletion calculation. Based on the above studies, a relative approach for performing the measurements was established. The approach is based on using the relative activities of Np-239/I-132 in combination with the relative activities of Cs-134/Co-60 (Co-60 is introduced as a dopant) to yield the burnup and enrichment for each pebble. Furthermore, a direct consequence of the relative approach is the ability to apply a self-calibration scheme using the multiple gamma lines of Ba-La-140 to establish the relative efficiency curve of the HPGe detector. An assessment of the expected uncertainty components in this approach showed that a maximum uncertainty of less than 5% should be feasible. To confirm the above findings, gamma-ray scans were performed on irradiated PULSTAR reactor fuel assemblies at North Carolina Sate University. The measurements used a 40% efficient n-type coaxial HPGe detector connected to an ORTEC DSPEC plus digital Gamma-Ray Spectrometer, and a data acquisition computer. The obtained results showed consistency with the predictions of the simulations including the observation of the I-132, Cs-134, Np-239 uncontaminated gamma lines. In addition, the Ba-La-140 lines were clearly observed confirming the ability to perform relative calibration of the spectrometer.

  2. High resolution GRB spectra from the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. M.; Seifert, H.; Teegarden, B. J.; Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Ramaty, R.; Hurley, K.; Pehl, R.; Madden, N.; Owens, A.

    1996-08-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) is a germanium spectrometer designed to produce high-resolution (2-3 keV) spectra of bright gamma-ray bursts. In its first year of operation it has triggered on 62 GRBs, of which ~33 were bright enough for spectroscopy. Almost all of these bursts were also seen by the Konus detectors on the same spacecraft, and about half were also observed by BATSE. This allows the instruments and their results to be compared and will allow line candidates seen by any of the instruments to be confirmed or refuted by the others. This paper presents some typical spectra from GRBs observed by TGRS, and includes for comparison the corresponding BATSE and Konus spectra.

  3. ON WEAK REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2012-05-20

    Line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays provide a natural explanation of the hard gamma-ray spectra of distant blazars, which are believed to be capable of producing both gamma rays and cosmic rays. For sources with redshifts z {approx}> 0.1, secondary gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray interactions with background photons close to an observer can dominate over primary gamma rays originating at the source. The transition from one component to another is accompanied by a change in the spectral index depending on the source redshift. We present theoretical predictions and show that they agree with the data from Fermi Large Area Telescope. This agreement, combined with the spectral data from Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, provides evidence of cosmic-ray acceleration by active galactic nuclei and opens new opportunities for studying photon backgrounds and intergalactic magnetic fields.

  4. Pulser injection with subsequent removal for gamma-ray spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Hartwell, Jack K.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.; Killian, E. Wayne

    1990-01-01

    An improved system for gamma-ray spectroscopy characterized by an interface module that controls the injection of electronic pulses as well as separation logic that enables storage of pulser events in a region of the spectrum of a multichannel analyzer distinct from the region reserved for storage of gamma-ray events. The module accomplishes this by tagging pulser events (high or low) injected into the amplification circuitry, adding an offset to the events so identified at the time the events are at the output of the analog to digital converter, and storing such events in the upper portion of the spectrum stored in the multichannel analyzer. The module can be adapted for use with existing gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment to provide for automatic analyses of radioisotopes.

  5. Fission studies by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materna, T.; Letourneau, A.; Amouroux, Ch.; Marchix, A.; Litaize, O.; Sérot, O.; Regnier, D.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Soldner, T.; Simpson, G.; Leoni, S.; de France, G.; Urban, W.

    2015-05-01

    The feasibility of retrieving accurate fission observables with a Ge-detector array around a fissile target placed in a cold neutron beam was tested. In three measurement campaigns performed at ILL with the EXILL setup, 235U and 241Pu targets were placed in the high flux cold neutron beam available at the PF1B neutron guide. Gamma-rays following fission were detected by an array of 16 Ge detectors. In the following study, part of data was analyzed as a proof of principle. A set of yields belonging to the Kr-Ba pair were extracted using a gamma-gamma coincidence technique. Preliminary results were compared to the predictions of two phenomenological models: GEF and FIFRELIN.

  6. Prompt Fission Gamma-ray Spectra and Multiplicities for Various Fissioning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Regnier, David; Serot, Olivier

    The prompt fission gamma spectra (PFGS) and multiplicities (PFGM) are investigated from a Monte Carlo simulation of the fission fragment deexcitation. The fission fragment characteristics are sampled from mass, charge, kinetic energy, spin and parity distributions from experimental data or theoretical models. Initial excitation energy is shared between the two complementary fragments using a mass dependent temperature ratio law and a level density parameter law based on Ignatyuk's prescription. Details can be found elsewhere in the literature. The deexcitation process can be performed with different calculation schemes. The first one is based on a Weisskopf model for neutron evaporation and nuclear transition sampling (from level density and strength function models) for gamma evaporation. In this case, the competition between neutrons and gammas is taken into account by using a spin dependent excitation energy limit under which gamma emission takes place. The second one is based on an Hauser-Feshbach model for neutron/gamma evaporation based on neutron transmission coefficients (from optical model calculations) and the same model as above for gammas. The n/γ competition is then automatically taken into account at the very beginning of the primary fission fragments evaporation process. Fission observables, especially related to prompt fission gammas are presented and discussed for spontaneous fission (252Cf, 240Pu), thermal fission (235U+nth) and fast fission (238U+n1.8MeV). Comparisons with experimental data are shown when available.

  7. Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

  8. Characterization of coal and charcoal by alpha-particle and gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Lourtau, A. M.; Rubio Montero, M. P.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Although coal and charcoal have similar physical and chemical characteristics, there are several crystallographic procedures used to distinguish and characterize them. But if the matrix is crushed, there is no standard procedure to distinguish coal from charcoal. In this work, a procedure to characterize coal and charcoal samples based on the radioactive content is proposed. The first assay is by gamma-ray spectrometry, which allows a part of the radioactive content to be determined rapidly and non-destructively. Then, alpha-particle spectrometry is applied to assay the content of those radionuclides which are difficult to determine precisely by gamma-ray spectrometry. This second technique requires prior chemical purification of the carbon sample in order to separate the corresponding radionuclides of interest.

  9. Inclusive gamma-ray spectra from psi/3095/ and psi-prime/3684/ decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddick, C. J.; Burnett, T. H.; Masek, G. E.; Miller, E. S.; Smith, J. G.; Stronski, J. P.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vernon, W.; Badtke, D. H.; Barnett, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inclusive gamma-ray experiments were carried out in a e(+)e(-) colliding-beam apparatus with NaI(Tl) arrays as detectors. The inclusive gamma-ray spectra, after cosmic-ray background subtraction, are shown as histograms for the decays of the psi(3095) and psi-prime(3684). The psi spectrum has no significant narrow structure, while the psi-prime spectrum shows at least four peaks. Three major radiative decays of the psi-prime(3684) are found, and their respective branching fractions are computed.

  10. Thermal-neutron-capture prompt-gamma emission spectra of representative coals. [1. 5 to 11 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C L; Olson, I K

    1981-12-01

    Prompt gamma ray emission spectra have been calculated from 1.5 to 11 MeV for a wide range of coal compositions exposed to a thermal neutron flux. These include contributions to the spectra from all of the major and minor elements present in the coals. Characteristics of the spectra are discussed and correlated with the coal compositions.

  11. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B to K pi pi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B {yields} K{pi}{pi}{gamma} in the range m{sub K{pi}{pi}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. They reconstruct four final states: K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, where K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 232 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, they measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}) = (2.95 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.20(syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.07 {+-} 0.22(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) = (1.85 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.12(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.56 {+-} 0.42(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}.

  12. Application of PERALS™ alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry for analysis and investigation of environmental spills at ISL uranium mining projects.

    PubMed

    Borysenko, A; Ostrowski, A; Bellifemine, D; Palmer, G; Haigh, P; Johnston, A

    2014-03-01

    Radiation protection and environmental monitoring in mining requires effective and reliable radionuclide analysis at all stages of the mine project-prior to mining, during operation and through to remediation and decommissioning. The approach presented in this paper was specially developed for the monitoring of radioactive waste resulting from spills during mining and mineral processing operations and uses a combination of high resolution gamma spectrometry, and PERALS™ alpha spectrometry to identify and reliably quantify the activity of the major members of the U-238 decay chain at activities down to 10 mBq g(-1) by direct radionuclide counting and by assessment of the activity of their decay products. This approach has reduced sample preparation and analysis time while providing effective analysis and quantification of naturally occurring radionuclides in environmental samples. It has been successfully applied to several in situ leach (ISL) mining-related projects involving investigations of process material spill impacts and also to routine environmental monitoring. PMID:24270399

  13. Monitoring of Martian atmosphere with gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnault, O.; D'Uston, C.; Forni, O.; Maurice, S.

    Mars Odyssey has been monitoring the leakage gamma-rays from Mars since 2002 [1]. The spectrum of these gamma-rays is made of a dominating continuum plus lines (only 4% of the count rates) [2]. The latter have been used to build compositional maps of the surface [3]; the former can be analyzed to monitor atmospheric variations with time and place [4, 5]. Sometimes both aspects can be combined when during polar winters it is possible to track the argon in the atmosphere through its discrete gamma-ray line [6]. The Martian atmosphere is quite transparent (free mean path of about 100km) at these energies (100 keV - 10 MeV), and consequently the continuum varies by only a few percents over the Martian year. However the statistics are good enough to see these variations. Previous studies revealed short and long term time variations, as well as regional differences. In particular we noticed earlier that the atmospheric cycle looks slightly different from one year to the other. Deep basins (Argyre and Hellas) seem also to act as reservoirs at some seasons. We will present an update of the study of the gamma-ray continuum, including the latest data available, in terms of transparency of the Martian atmosphere. [1] Boynton et al. (2004) Space Sci. Rev., 110 (1), 37-83; [2] Evans et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., accepted; [3] Boynton et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., in preparation; [4] Gasnault et al. (2003) LPSC 34, abstract #1649 CD-ROM; [5] Gasnault et al. (2005) 1st Mars Express Sci. Conf., Noordwijk, Netherlands; [6] Sprague et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res., accepted.

  14. On line gamma-ray spectrometry at open sea.

    PubMed

    Tsabaris, C; Ballas, D

    2005-01-01

    Set up and application of a stationary monitoring network for measuring specific gamma- activities in the Aegean Sea are described. Three NaI scintillator based spectrometers have been used to detect the gamma rays. The gross counting rate of each system was found to be nearly constant, when there was no rainfall. The volumetric activity of the natural gamma-ray emitter 40K in open sea varied from 12,200 to 13,000 Bq/m3. The counting rate for 1461 keV 40K radiation was measured by intercalibration with an appropriate salinity sensor mounted close to the NaI-detector system. A simple relation between the counting rate and the salt concentration has been observed. The amount of the artificial radioactivity from 137Cs was increased up to seven times higher after strong rainfall, compared to the radiation level as given in literature (3.5-5.5 Bq/m3), while the 214Bi counting rate was increased up to ten times compared to the data without rainfall. PMID:15498689

  15. The spectra program library: A PC based system for gamma-ray spectra analysis and INAA data reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Grossman, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    A PC based system has been developed for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra and for the complete reduction of data from INAA experiments, including software to average the results from mulitple lines and multiple countings and to produce a final report of analysis. Graphics algorithms may be called for the analysis of complex spectral features, to compare the data from alternate photopeaks and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. A database of results for control samples can be used to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systemic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. The entire software library can be accessed through a user-friendly menu interface with internal help.

  16. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  17. Noise power spectra of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a cooled spray chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, D.; Pilger, C.; Hergenröder, R.; Leis, F.; Tschöpel, P.; Broekaert, J. A. C.

    1994-07-01

    The influence of the spray chamber temperature and the related aerosol water loading on ArO + as typical spectral interference in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is studied. Therefore, the noise power spectra for the ArO + have been measured by use of fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. A Meinhard nebulizer and a GMK nebulizer were used in connection with a cooled spray chamber at a temperature of 5-25°C. It could be found that the relative standard deviation of the analyte signal in ICP-MS was improved by cooling the spray chamber. The noise power spectra showed that especially the white noise goes down when the spray chamber is cooled. The overall white noise with the GMK nebulizer is shown to be higher in the case of an Al 2O 3 slurry than in the case of an AlCl 3 solution, containing both 400 μg/ml Al. The pumping pulse rates are clearly visible in the noise amplitude spectra, but their amplitudes decrease at the presence of an impactor bead m the GMK nebulizer. Shifts of the noise band around 355 Hz were shown to occur as a result of the power level and the outer gas flow as well.

  18. PHASE-AVERAGED SPECTRA AND LUMINOSITIES OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS FROM YOUNG ISOLATED PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Jiang, Z. J.; Zhang, L.

    2013-03-10

    We study the phase-averaged spectra and luminosities of {gamma}-ray emissions from young, isolated pulsars within a revised outer gap model. In the revised version of the outer gap, there are two possible cases for the outer gaps: the fractional size of the outer gap is estimated through the photon-photon pair process in the first case (Case I), and is limited by the critical field lines in the second case (Case II). The fractional size is described by Case I if the fractional size at the null charge surface in Case I is smaller than that in Case II, and vice versa. Such an outer gap can extend from the inner boundary, whose radial distance to the neutron star is less than that of the null charge surface to the light cylinder for a {gamma}-ray pulsar with a given magnetic inclination. When the shape of the outer gap is determined, assuming that high-energy emission at an averaged radius of the field line in the center of the outer gap, with a Gaussian distribution of the parallel electric field along the gap height, represents typical emission, the phase-averaged {gamma}-ray spectrum for a given pulsar can be estimated in the revised model with three model parameters. We apply the model to explain the phase-averaged spectra of the Vela (Case I) and Geminga (Case II) pulsars. We also use the model to fit the phase-averaged spectra of 54 young, isolated {gamma}-ray pulsars, and then calculate the {gamma}-ray luminosities and compare them with the observed data from Fermi-LAT.

  19. Self-Correction of Lanthanum-Cerium Halide Gamma Spectra (pre-print)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yuan, Paul Guss, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-04-01

    Lanthanum-cerium halide detectors generally exhibit superior energy resolutions for gamma radiation detection compared with conventional sodium iodide detectors. However, they are also subject to self-activities due to lanthanum-138 decay and contamination due to beta decay in the low-energy region and alpha decay in the high-energy region. The detectors self-activity and crystal contamination jointly contribute a significant amount of uncertainties to the gamma spectral measurement and affect the precision of the nuclide identification process. This paper demonstrates a self-correction procedure for self-activity and contamination reduction from spectra collected by lanthanum-cerium halide detectors. It can be implemented as an automatic self-correction module for the future gamma radiation detector made of lanthanum-cerium halide crystals.

  20. Application of in-situ gamma spectrometry in the remediation of radioactively contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, C.; Yesso, J.D.; Danahy, R.J.; Cox, T.

    1999-06-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a US Department of Energy site that is undergoing total remediation and closure. Most of the remediation effort entails massive excavation of soil for disposal, both offsite and onsite, at an engineered disposal facility. In-situ gamma spectrometry is routinely used to support soil excavation operations to accurately and quickly identify soil areas as being above or below regulatory remediation criteria. Two different in-situ gamma spectrometry systems are used. The first is a sodium iodide (NaI) detector mounted either on a tractor or a jogging stroller, depending on the terrain to be measured. The NaI system allows the collection of a gamma energy spectrum which can be analyzed to identify and quantify radioactive isotopes which are present within the detector`s viewing area. Each energy spectrum is tagged by location coordinates provided by an on-board global positioning system (GPS) to precisely locate elevated contamination areas. The second is a tripod-mounted, high purity germanium detector (HPGe) gamma spectrometry system that is functionally similar to the NaI system. The principal advantage of the HPGe is its superior resolution, which allows much more accurate identification and quantification of radionuclide contaminants in soils. In order to effectively utilize the data quality objective process with these systems, three quality assurance (QA) elements had to be performed.

  1. Quantification of uranium-238 in environmental samples using gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hult, M.; Andreotti, E.; González de Orduña, R.; Pommé, S.; Yeltepe, E.

    2012-04-01

    A large number of environmental samples are routinely measured world-wide using gamma-ray spectrometry some of its assets being easy sample preparation and comprehensive data for many radionu-clides in one analysis. Although other techniques can be considered more suitable for analysing 238U in environmental samples, it is also routinely done by gamma-ray spectrometry. One mainly uses γ-ray emissions following the decay of the first daughter, 234Th, for determining the 238U activity. However, the low-energy gamma-rays at 63 keV and 92.5 keV are very difficult to quantify in a robust way due to high attenuation and interferences. This paper quantifies parameters affecting the possibility of making robust quantification of 238U via 234Th using gamma-ray spectrometry. It addresses the use of correct decay data, suitable detectors, optimised sample size, enhanced spectral amplification, correction for peak interferences and control of background.

  2. Use of MCNP + GADRAS in Generating More Realistic Gamma-Ray Spectra for Plutonium and HEU Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean

    2012-08-07

    The ability to accurately simulate high-resolution gamma spectra from materials that emit both neutrons and gammas is very important to the analysis of special nuclear materials (SNM), e.g., uranium and plutonium. One approach under consideration has been to combine MCNP and GADRAS. This approach is expected to generate more accurate gamma ray spectra for complex three-dimensional geometries than can be obtained from one-dimensional deterministic transport simulations (e.g., ONEDANT). This presentation describes application of combining MCNP and GADRAS in simulating plutonium and uranium spectra.

  3. Which Epeak? The Characteristic Energy of Gamma-ray Burst Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Robert; Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, Narayana; Stanbro, Matthew; Hakkila, Jon; Blalock, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic energy of individual gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra can in most cases be determined from the peak energy of the energy density spectra (ν {{ F }}ν ), called “{E}{{peak}}.” Distributions of {E}{{peak}} have been compiled for time-resolved spectra from bright GRBs, as well as time-averaged spectra and peak flux spectra for nearly every burst observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst And Transient Source Experiment and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Even when determined by an instrument with a broad energy band, such as GBM (8 keV to 40 MeV), the distributions themselves peak at around 240 keV in the observer’s frame, with a spread of roughly a decade in energy. {E}{{peak}} can have considerable evolution (sometimes greater than one decade) within any given burst, as amply demonstrated by single pulses in GRB 110721A and GRB 130427A. Meanwhile, several luminosity or energy relations have been proposed to correlate with either the time-integrated or peak flux {E}{{peak}}. Thus, when discussing correlations with {E}{{peak}}, the question arises, “Which {E}{{peak}}?” A single burst may be characterized by any of a number of values for {E}{{peak}} that are associated with it. Using a single-pulse simulation model with spectral evolution as a proxy for the type of spectral evolution observed in many bursts, we investigate how the time-averaged {E}{{peak}} emerges from the spectral evolution within a single pulse, how this average naturally correlates with the peak flux derived {E}{{peak}} in a burst, and how the distribution in {E}{{peak}} values from many bursts derives its surprisingly narrow width.

  4. Natural Radiation from Soil using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Moreira, R. H.; de Paula, A. L. C.; Medina, N. H.

    2009-06-01

    We have studied the distribution of natural radioactivity in the soil of Interlagos, in São Paulo city and Billings Reservoir, in São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo, Brazil. The main contribution of the effective radiation dose is due to the elements of the 238Th decay series, with smaller contributions from 40K and the elements of the series of 238U. The results indicate the dose in all of the studied areas is around the average international dose due to external exposure to gamma rays (0.48 mSv/yr) proceeding from natural terrestrial elements.

  5. Similarity analysis of spectra obtained via reflectance spectrometry in legal medicine.

    PubMed

    Belenki, Liudmila; Sterzik, Vera; Bohnert, Michael

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, a series of reflectance spectra of postmortem lividity, pallor, and putrefaction-affected skin for 195 investigated cases in the course of cooling down the corpse has been collected. The reflectance spectrometric measurements were stored together with their respective metadata in a MySQL database. The latter has been managed via a scientific information repository. We propose similarity measures and a criterion of similarity that capture similar spectra recorded at corpse skin. We systematically clustered reflectance spectra from the database as well as their metadata, such as case number, age, sex, skin temperature, duration of cooling, and postmortem time, with respect to the given criterion of similarity. Altogether, more than 500 reflectance spectra have been pairwisely compared. The measures that have been used to compare a pair of reflectance curve samples include the Euclidean distance between curves and the Euclidean distance between derivatives of the functions represented by the reflectance curves at the same wavelengths in the spectral range of visible light between 380 and 750 nm. For each case, using the recorded reflectance curves and the similarity criterion, the postmortem time interval during which a characteristic change in the shape of reflectance spectrum takes place is estimated. The latter is carried out via a software package composed of Java, Python, and MatLab scripts that query the MySQL database. We show that in legal medicine, matching and clustering of reflectance curves obtained by means of reflectance spectrometry with respect to a given criterion of similarity can be used to estimate the postmortem interval. PMID:23897013

  6. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were unaffected by the presence of injected 137Cs contamination.

  7. Measurements of keV-neutron Capture Cross Sections and Capture Gamma-ray Spectra of Pd Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, K.; Matsuhashi, T.; Hales, B.; Katabuchi, T.; Igashira, M.

    2014-05-01

    The capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra of 104,105,106,108,110Pd were measured in the neutron energy region from 15 to 100 keV. A neutron time-of-flight method was utilized by means of an anti-Compton NaI(Tl) spectrometer and a 1.5 nsec pulsed neutron source via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. The capture yields were obtained by applying a pulse-height weighting technique to the net gamma-ray pulse-height spectra. The capture cross sections of 104,105,106,108,110Pd were determined with uncertainties of less than 6%, using the standard capture cross sections of 197Au. The capture gamma-ray spectra of 104,105,106,108,110Pd were also derived by unfolding the respective observed capture gamma-ray pulse-height spectra.

  8. Correction for radon distribution in solid/liquid and air phases in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carconi, P; Cardellini, F; Cozzella, M L; De Felice, P; Fazio, A

    2012-09-01

    The effect of radon diffusion and distribution between a (226)Ra matrix and the top air gap inside sample containers for gamma-ray spectrometry was studied. Containers filled at almost 100% or just 70% of total capacity yielded correction factors of about 7% and 20% respectively. Applying these correction factors allowed activity values calculated from (226)Ra or radon decay products to agree within 2%. PMID:22476014

  9. The potential of gamma-ray spectrometry as supplementary information for mapping central European soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, U.; Bock, M.; Baritz, R.; Willer, J.; Pickert, E.; Kardel, K.; Herrmann, L.

    2012-04-01

    Permanently updated soil maps are needed inter alia for the prediction of landslide hazards, flooding and drought effects, land degradation monitoring, and precision farming. Since comprehensive and intensive field mapping is not affordable, alternative mapping approaches are required. A promising tool, with quite unrecognised potential for modern soil science is gamma-ray spectrometry. As the radioelements potassium, thorium and uranium respond differently to soil forming processes, it should be possible to infer from their concentration on weathering status, and after calibration on soil properties and types. This paper aims to investigate the potential of airborne gamma spectrometry for mapping of central European soils and soil properties. The study was conducted for a test site in Southern Saxony, Germany, 140*85 km wide, representing diverse soil landscapes. Seven different petrographic training and validation areas were chosen each. To assess the potential of gamma-ray spectrometry as additional data layer, predictions were carried out (i) with and (ii) without radiometric data. The outputs were compared with independent soil information of the validation areas. Both prediction runs used the following predictors: elevation, slope, curvature, planform curvature, profile curvature, terrain ruggedness index, relative altitude, vertical distance above drainage network, wetness index, and convergence index. As additional predictor parent material derived from a reclassification of the official geological map (1:1M scale) was used. As radiometric properties potassium, thorium and uranium were used. The radiometric raster datasets were generated by universal kriging using relative altitude as covariate. Training and validation datasets were selected from a comprehensive dataset representing more than 14.000 point data. Point data include soil types and substrates, and for more than 800 sites soil profiles with analysed texture, pH, exchangeable cations, nutrients, and efficient cation exchange capacity. The study shows that gamma spectrometry is suitable to enhance the prediction of soil types and properties such as texture significantly.

  10. Determination of impurities in (124)I samples by high resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, M C M; da Silva, R L; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; de Araújo, M T F; Laranjeira, A S; de Veras, E; Braghirolli, A M S; Dos Santos, G R; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (124)I is a radionuclide used in the diagnosis of tumors. The National Health Agency requires identification and activity measurement of impurities. Using gamma spectrometry with an efficiency calibrated high-purity germanium detector, impurities (125)I and (126)I in an (1)(24)I production sample were identified. Activity ratios of (125)I and (126)I to (124)I were approximately 0.5% and 98%, respectively. PMID:26653211

  11. NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

    2002-05-10

    The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

  12. Combinatorial approach for large-scale identification of linked peptides from tandem mass spectrometry spectra.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Anania, Veronica G; Knott, Jeff; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R; Bourne, Philip E; Bandeira, Nuno

    2014-04-01

    The combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry has recently been shown to constitute a powerful tool for studying protein-protein interactions and elucidating the structure of large protein complexes. However, computational methods for interpreting the complex MS/MS spectra from linked peptides are still in their infancy, making the high-throughput application of this approach largely impractical. Because of the lack of large annotated datasets, most current approaches do not capture the specific fragmentation patterns of linked peptides and therefore are not optimal for the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here we propose a generic approach to address this problem and demonstrate it using disulfide-bridged peptide libraries to (i) efficiently generate large mass spectral reference data for linked peptides at a low cost and (ii) automatically train an algorithm that can efficiently and accurately identify linked peptides from MS/MS spectra. We show that using this approach we were able to identify thousands of MS/MS spectra from disulfide-bridged peptides through comparison with proteome-scale sequence databases and significantly improve the sensitivity of cross-linked peptide identification. This allowed us to identify 60% more direct pairwise interactions between the protein subunits in the 20S proteasome complex than existing tools on cross-linking studies of the proteasome complexes. The basic framework of this approach and the MS/MS reference dataset generated should be valuable resources for the future development of new tools for the identification of linked peptides. PMID:24493012

  13. Analyses of uranium and actinium gamma spectra: an application to measurements of environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    A system for the reduction of the complex gamma spectra of nuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series, tailored to calculation of line intensities, analyses of errors, and identification of nuclides is described. This system provides an efficient technique for characterizing contamination in the environs of uranium mines and mills. Identification of the nuclides and calculation of their concentrations require accurate knowledge of gamma energies and absolute quantum intensities. For some spectral lines, there are no reported measurements of absolute quantum intensities and in some cases where reports are available the measured intensities are not in agreement. In order to improve this data base, the spectra of gamma rays (of nuclides in the uranium and actinium series) with energies between 40 and 1400 keV were measured using high-resolution germanium detectors. A brief description of the spectroscopy system, computational algorithms for deconvolution, and methods of calibration for energy and efficiency, are described. The measured energies and absolute quantum intensities are compared with those reported in the literature.

  14. Experimental and MCNP simulated gamma-ray spectra for the UNCOSS neutron-based explosive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleon, C.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Valkovic, V.

    2011-02-01

    In the frame of the FP7 UNCOSS project (Underwater Coastal Sea Surveyor), whose aim is to develop a neutron-based explosive detection system to identify unexploded ordnance (UXO) lying on the sea bottom, the choice of the gamma-ray detector is essential to reach the optimal performances. This paper presents comparative tests between the two candidates: NaI(Tl) and LaBr 3(Ce) detectors, in favour to the 3 in.×3 in. LaBr 3(Ce); thus, confirming the choice previously performed by numerical simulation because of its higher fast timing properties, spectral resolution, and efficiency per volume unit. The gamma-ray spectra produced by 14 MeV tagged neutron beams on the elements of interest (C, O, N, Al, Fe, Si, and Ca) have also been recorded with this detector in order to unfold the spectrum of the interrogated object into elementary contributions. A qualitative comparison with the gamma-ray spectra simulated with the MCNPX computer code and the ENDFB/VII.0 nuclear library has also been performed to validate the numerical model. An additional quantitative validation has been performed with an explosive-like material (ammonium acetate).

  15. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Barnes, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra resulting from the interactions of approx. 14 MeV neutrons in laminated slabs of stainless steel type-304 and borated polyethylene have been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculated spectra are compared with measured data as a function of slab thickness and material composition and as a function of detector location behind the slabs. Comparisons of the differential energy spectra are made for neutrons with energies above 850 keV and for gamma rays with energies above 750 keV. The measured neutron spectra and those calculated using Monte Carlo methods agree witin 5% to 50% depending on the slab thickness and composition and neutron energy. The agreement between the measured and calculated gamma-ray energy spectra are also within this range. The MCNP data are also in favorable agreement with attenuated data calculated previously by discrete ordinates transport methods and the Monte Carlo code SAM-CE.

  16. Superluminal cascade spectra of TeV {gamma}-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaschitz, Roman . E-mail: tom@geminga.org

    2007-03-15

    Astrophysical radiation sources are scrutinized in search of superluminal {gamma}-rays. The tachyonic spectral densities generated by ultra-relativistic electrons in uniform motion are fitted to the high-energy spectra of Galactic supernova remnants, such as RX J0852.0-4622 and the pulsar wind nebulae in G0.9+0.1 and MSH 15-52. The superluminal spectral maps of the unidentified TeV {gamma}-ray sources HESS J1303-631, TeV J2032+4130 and HESS J1825-137 are inferred from EGRET, HEGRA and HESS data. Tachyonic cascade spectra are quite capable of generating the spectral curvature seen in double-logarithmic plots, as well as the extended spectral plateaus defined by EGRET flux points in the GeV band. The curvature of the TeV spectra is intrinsic, caused by the Boltzmann factor in the source densities. The spectral averaging with thermal and exponentially cut power-law electron densities can be done in closed form, and systematic high- and low-temperature expansions of the superluminal spectral densities are derived. Estimates on the electron/proton populations generating the tachyon flux are obtained from the spectral fits, such as power-law indices, temperature and source counts. The cutoff temperatures of the source densities suggest ultra-high-energy protons in MSH 15-52, HESS J1825-137 and TeV J2032+4130.

  17. Spectra of cosmic gamma-ray bursts in the hard X-ray range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Share, G. H.; Kane, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    Hard X-ray measurements of six gamma-ray bursts observed by detectors on the OGO-5 and OSO-6 satellites during the period Oct. 1969 to Apr. 1971 are presented. Spectra for five of the six bursts were determined using measurements from both satellites in order to reduce ambiguities due to uncertain source locations. A significant fraction, 20 to 60%, of the energy of the bursts fall in the hard X-ray range (20 to 130 keV). The time-integrated spectra were fitted by power-law, exponential, and thermal bremsstrahlung functions. They are consistent with power-laws which steepen at energies approx. above 150 keV, as reported earlier for two other bursts. Evidence for spectral variability from event to event in the hard X-ray region is presented. The hard X-ray spectra of the gamma-ray bursts differ from those of the recently discovered 1 to 15 keV bursts.

  18. Hard X-ray spectra of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.; Share, G. H.

    1977-01-01

    Hard X-ray measurements of six gamma-ray bursts observed during the period from October 1969 to April 1971 are presented. The measurements were made with detectors on the OGO-5 and OSO-6 satellites. Spectra for five of the six bursts have been determined using measurements from both satellites in order to reduce ambiguities due to uncertain source locations. A significant fraction, about 20-60%, of the energy of the bursts falls in the hard X-ray range (20-130 keV). The time-integrated spectra have been fitted by power-law, exponential, and thermal-bremsstrahlung functions. They are consistent with power laws which steepen at energies of at least 150 keV, as reported earlier for two other bursts. Evidence for spectral variability from event to event in the hard X-ray region is presented. For a power-law representation, the power-law index has values ranging from approximately unity to 2.5. The hard X-ray spectra of the gamma-ray bursts differ significantly from those of the recently discovered 1-15-keV X-ray bursts.

  19. Testing of regolith of celestial bolides with active neutron gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, Andrey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Golovin, Dmitry; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Current space instruments for studying planet's surface include gamma ray spectrometers that detect natural radioactive isotopes as well as gamma-rays induced in subsurface by galactic cosmic rays. When measuring from celestial body's surface, statistics and amount of detected elements can be dramatically increased with active methods, where soil exposed to artificial flux of particles. One good example is the Russian Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument onboard Martian Science Laboratory mission (Curiosity rover) developed in 2005-2011. It is the first active neutron spectrometer flown to another planet as part of a landed mission to investigate subsurface water distribution and which has now successfully operated for more than two years on the Martian surface. Presentation describes a number of space instruments for different landers and rovers being developed in Russian Space Research Institute for studying Moon and Mars, as well as method of active neutron and gamma spectrometry overview.

  20. An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

    1989-09-07

    A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The user interacts with the system by means of menus and screens that allow the user to select various applications and to enter information pertinent to a measurement. This information, along with the plutonium weight-percent-abundance results from the data analysis, is stored in dBASE III files. The spectral-data-analysis program, IAEAPU, determines the relative plutonium isotopic abundances from gamma-ray peaks in the 110- to 390-keV region of the spectral data. The program is compact so that it may be used on a portable, battery-operated, laptop, personal computer (PC) that uses a 3-1/2-in. floppy diskette. This is intended to be the final report on this work. We describe in detail the data-analysis methodology, the software, and the operation of the plutonium gamma-ray analysis system. 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. The Imprint of the Extragalactic Background Light in the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Schady, P.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Guirec, S.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Perkins, J. S.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL isimportant to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z approx. 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band.

  2. Expected gamma ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th, and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines are calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions are those of Reedy and Arnold (1972) and Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The areal resolution of the experiment is calculated to be around 70-140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method is described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  3. Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  4. The imprint of the extragalactic background light in the gamma-ray spectra of blazars.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Schady, P; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Domínguez, A; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Tramacere, A; Nuss, E; Greiner, J; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reyes, L C; Ritz, S; Rau, A; Romoli, C; Roth, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Sanchez, D A; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stawarz, Łukasz; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M

    2012-11-30

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL is important to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z ∼ 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band. PMID:23118013

  5. Gamma-ray Burst Spectra and Spectral Correlations from Sub-photospheric Comptonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhotray, Atul; Lazzati, Davide

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important unresolved issues in gamma-ray burst (GRB) physics is the origin of the prompt gamma-ray spectrum. Its general non-thermal character and the softness in the X-ray band remain unexplained. We tackle these issues by performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation-matter interactions in a scattering dominated photon-lepton plasma. The plasma—initially in equilibrium—is driven to non-equilibrium conditions by a sudden energy injection in the lepton population, mimicking the effect of a shock wave or the dissipation of magnetic energy. Equilibrium restoration occurs due to an energy exchange between the photons and leptons. While the initial and final equilibrium spectra are thermal, the transitional photon spectra are characterized by non-thermal features such as power-law tails, high energy bumps, and multiple components. Such non-thermal features are observed at infinity if the dissipation occurs at small to moderate optical depths, and the spectrum is released before thermalization is complete. We model the synthetic spectra with a Band function and show that the resulting spectral parameters are similar to observations for a frequency range of 2-3 orders of magnitude around the peak. In addition, our model predicts correlations between the low-frequency photon index and the peak frequency as well as between the low- and high-frequency indices. We explore baryon and pair-dominated fireballs and reach the conclusion that baryonic fireballs are a better model for explaining the observed features of GRB spectra.

  6. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul; Lit, Peter

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were calculated. From the scanning data, locations with observed Cs-137 ratios exceeding six standard deviations above the mean ratio were mapped in high resolution [2]. Field teams returned to those locations to collect static count measurements using the same detection systems. Soil surface samples were collected at 30 locations and analyzed for Cs-137. An exponential correlation was identified between Cs-137 concentrations in surface soil and field-scanned Cs-137 ratios. The data indicate field minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of Cs-137 at 0.02 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g) or lower depending on contaminant distribution in soil. (authors)

  7. Radiation anomaly detection algorithms for field-acquired gamma energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ron; Guss, Paul; Mitchell, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    The Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing a tactical, networked radiation detection system that will be agile, reconfigurable, and capable of rapid threat assessment with high degree of fidelity and certainty. Our design is driven by the needs of users such as law enforcement personnel who must make decisions by evaluating threat signatures in urban settings. The most efficient tool available to identify the nature of the threat object is real-time gamma spectroscopic analysis, as it is fast and has a very low probability of producing false positive alarm conditions. Urban radiological searches are inherently challenged by the rapid and large spatial variation of background gamma radiation, the presence of benign radioactive materials in terms of the normally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), and shielded and/or masked threat sources. Multiple spectral anomaly detection algorithms have been developed by national laboratories and commercial vendors. For example, the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) a one-dimensional deterministic radiation transport software capable of calculating gamma ray spectra using physics-based detector response functions was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The nuisance-rejection spectral comparison ratio anomaly detection algorithm (or NSCRAD), developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses spectral comparison ratios to detect deviation from benign medical and NORM radiation source and can work in spite of strong presence of NORM and or medical sources. RSL has developed its own wavelet-based gamma energy spectral anomaly detection algorithm called WAVRAD. Test results and relative merits of these different algorithms will be discussed and demonstrated.

  8. Automation system for measurement of gamma-ray spectra of induced activity for multi-element high volume neutron activation analysis at the reactor IBR-2 of Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics at the joint institute for nuclear research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, S. S.; Dmitriev, A. Yu.; Chepurchenko, I. A.; Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2014-11-01

    The automation system for measurement of induced activity of gamma-ray spectra for multi-element high volume neutron activation analysis (NAA) was designed, developed and implemented at the reactor IBR-2 at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics. The system consists of three devices of automatic sample changers for three Canberra HPGe detector-based gamma spectrometry systems. Each sample changer consists of two-axis of linear positioning module M202A by DriveSet company and disk with 45 slots for containers with samples. Control of automatic sample changer is performed by the Xemo S360U controller by Systec company. Positioning accuracy can reach 0.1 mm. Special software performs automatic changing of samples and measurement of gamma spectra at constant interaction with the NAA database.

  9. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry in the environment using dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Hee-Yeoul; Lee, Wanno; Kang, Mun Ja; Park, Sang Tae

    2016-02-01

    In order to expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was first conducted at a height of 1 m above the ground to calculate the ambient dose rate and individual dose rate at that height, as well as the radioactivity in the soil layer for the detected gamma nuclides from the dose rate spectroscopy. The reliable results could be obtained by introducing the angular correction factor to correct the G-factor with respect to incident photons distributed in a certain range of angles. The intercomparison results of radioactivity using ISOCS software, an analysis of a sample taken from the soil around a detector, and dose rate spectroscopy had a difference of <20% for 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 212Bi, 208Tl, and 40K, except for 212Pb with low-energy photons, that is, <300 keV. In addition, the drawback of using dose rate spectroscopy, that is, all gamma rays from a nuclide should be identified to accurately assess the individual dose rate, was overcome by adopting the concept of contribution ratio of the key gamma ray to the individual dose rate of a nuclide, so that it could be accurately calculated by identifying only a key gamma ray from a nuclide.

  10. Assay for uranium and determination of disequilibrium by means of in situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Allan B.; Moxham, Robert M.; Senftle, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two sealed sondes, using germanium gamma-ray detectors cooled by melting propane, have been field tested to depths of 79 m in water-filled boreholes at the Pawnee Uranium Mine in Bee Co., Texas. When, used as total-count devices, the sondes are comparable in logging speed and counting rate with conventional scintillation detectors for locating zones of high radioactivity. When used with a multichannel analyzer, the sondes are detectors with such high resolution that individual lines from the complex spectra of the uranium and thorium series can be distinguished. Gamma rays from each group of the uranium series can be measured in ore zones permitting determination of the state of equilibrium at each measurement point. Series of 10-minute spectra taken at 0.3- to 0.5-m intervals in several holes showed zones where maxima from the uranium group and from the 222Rn group were displaced relative to each other. Apparent excesses of 230Th at some locations suggest that uranium-group concentrations at those locations were severalfold greater some tens of kiloyears, ago. At the current state of development a 10-minute count yields a sensitivity of about 80 ppm U308. Data reduction could in practice be accomplished in about 5 minutes. The result is practically unaffected by disequilibrium or radon contamination. In comparison with core assay, high-resolution spectrometry samples a larger volume; avoids problems due to incomplete core recovery, loss of friable material to drilling fluids, and errors in depth and marking; and permits use of less expensive drilling methods. Because gamma rays from the radionuclides are accumulated simultaneously, it also avoids the problems inherent in trying to correlate logs made in separate runs with different equipment. Continuous-motion delayed-gamma activation by a 163-?g 252Cf neutron source attached to the sonde yielded poor sensitivity. A better neutron-activation method, in which the sonde is moved in steps so as to place the detector at the previous activation point, could not be evaluated because of equipment failure.

  11. The Study of Equilibrium factor between Radon-222 and its Daughters in Bangkok Atmosphere by Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rujiwarodom, Rachanee

    2010-05-01

    To study the Equilibrium between radon-222 and its daughters in Bangkok atmosphere by Gamma-ray spectrometry, air sample were collected on 48 activated charcoal canister and 360 glass fiber filters by using a high volume jet-air sampler during December 2007 to November 2008.The Spectra of gamma-ray were measured by using a HPGe (Hyper Pure Germanium Detector). In the condition of secular equilibrium obtaining between Radon-222 and its decay products, radon-222 on activated charcoal canister and its daughters on glass fiber filters collected in the same time interval were calculated. The equilibrium factor (F) in the open air had a value of 0.38 at the minimum ,and 0.75 at the maximum. The average value of equilibrium factor (F) was 0.56±0.12. Based on the results, F had variations with a maximum value in the night to the early morning and decreased in the afternoon. In addition, F was higher in the winter than in the summer. This finding corresponds with the properties of the Earth atmosphere. The equilibrium factor (F) also depended on the concentration of dust in the atmosphere. People living in Bangkok were exposed to average value of 30 Bq/m3 of Radon-222 in the atmosphere. The equilibrium factor (0.56±0.12) and the average value of Radon-222 showed that people were exposed to alpha energy from radon-222 and its daughters decay at 0.005 WL(Working Level) which is lower than the safety standard at 0.02 WL. Keywords: Radon, Radon daughters , equilibrium factor, Gamma -ray spectrum analysis ,Bangkok ,Thailand

  12. Measurements of gamma radiation levels and spectra in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, B. T.; Brozek, K. P.; Angell, C. T.; Norman, E. B.

    2011-10-01

    Much of the radiation received by an average person is emitted by naturally-occurring radioactive isotopes from the thorium, actinium, and uranium decay series, or potassium. In this study, we have measured gamma radiation levels at various locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and the UC Berkeley campus from spectra taken using an ORTEC NOMAD portable data acquisition system and a large-volume coaxial HPGe detector. We have identified a large number of gamma rays originating from natural sources. The most noticeable isotopes are 214Bi, 40K, and 208Tl. We have observed variations in counting rates by factors of two to five between different locations due to differences in local conditions - such as building, concrete, grass, and soil compositions. In addition, in a number of outdoor locations, we have observed 604-, 662-, and 795-keV gamma rays from 134,137Cs, which we attribute to fallout from the recent Fukushima reactor accident. The implications of these results will be discussed. This work was supported in part by a grant from the U. S. Dept. of Homeland Security.

  13. A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shoji, M; Hamajima, Y; Takatsuka, K; Honoki, H; Nakajima, T; Kondo, T; Nakanishi, T

    2001-08-01

    A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium reagent was developed by measuring and analyzing the gamma-ray spectra of some reagents with no standard source. The counting rates (R) of photoelectric peaks of gamma-rays from nuclides with the same radioactivity divided by their emission probability (B) are expressed as a function of gamma-ray energy. The radioactivities of 234Th and 234mPa and 21.72 times that of 235U are equal to the radioactivity of 235U in natural uranium. Therefore, the plot of 21.72-fold R/B for 235U should be on a curve fitted to the points for 234Th and 234mPa in natural uranium. Depleted uranium with a 235U isotopic composition of less than 0.68% could be discriminated from natural uranium in the case of a reagent containing 4.0 g of uranium. PMID:11393763

  14. EPR spectra induced by gamma-irradiation of some dry medical herbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation-induced EPR spectra in some medical herbs are reported. The samples studied are: (i) leaves of nettle, common balm, peppermint and thyme; (ii) stalks of common balm, thyme, milfoil, yarrow and marigold; (iii) blossoms of yarrow and marigold; (iv) blossoms and leaves of hawthorn and tutsan; and (v) roots of common valerian, nettle, elecampane (black and white), restharrows and carlina. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak anisotropic singlet EPR line with effective g-value of 2.0050±0.0002. The radiation-induced spectra fall into three groups. EPR spectra of irradiated blossoms of yarrow and marigold, stalks of common balm, thyme, tutsan and yarrow as well as roots of common valerian, nettle and elecampane (black and white) show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum typical for irradiated plants. It is characterized by one intense central line with g=2.0050±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. EPR spectra of gamma-irradiated restharrows and carlina are complex. They may be represented by one triplet corresponding to the "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, one relatively intense singlet, situated in the center of the spectrum, and five weak additional satellite lines left and right to the center. The last spectrum was assigned as "carbohydrate-like" type. Only one intense EPR singlet with g=2.0048±0.0005 was recorded after irradiation of leaves of nettle and common balm. The lifetime of the radiation-induced EPR spectra was followed for a period of 3 months.

  15. Radioactivity Levels and Gamma-Ray Dose Rate in Soil Samples from Kohistan (Pakistan) Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. Khan; Ismail, M.; K., Khan; Akhter, P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) and an anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs is carried out in some soil samples collected from Kohistan district of N.W.F.P. (Pakistan), using gamma-ray spectrometry. The gamma spectrometry is operated using a high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector coupled with a computer based high resolution multi channel analyzer. The specific activity in soil ranges from 24.72 to 78.48Bq·kg-1 for 226Ra, 21.73 to 75.28Bq·kg-1 for 232Th, 7.06 to 14.9Bq·kg-1 for 137Cs and 298.46 to 570.77Bq·kg-1 for 40K with the mean values of 42.11, 43.27, 9.5 and 418.27Bq·kg-1, respectively. The radium equivalent activity in all the soil samples is lower than the safe limit set in the OECD report (370Bq·kg-1). Man-made radionuclide 137Cs is also present in detectable amount in all soil samples. Presence of 137Cs indicates that the samples in this remote area also receive some fallout from nuclear accident in Chernobyl power plant in 1986. The internal and external hazard indices have the mean values of 0.48 and 0.37 respectively. Absorbed dose rates and effective dose equivalents are also determined for the samples. The concentration of radionuclides found in the soil samples during the present study is nominal and does not pose any potential health hazard to the general public.

  16. Photon and neutrino spectra of time-dependent photospheric models of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, K.; Mészáros, P. E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu

    2013-09-01

    Thermal photons from the photosphere may be the primary source of the observed prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to produce the observed non-thermal spectra, some kind of dissipation mechanism near the photosphere is required. In this paper we numerically simulate the evolution of the photon spectrum in a relativistically expanding shell with a time-dependent numerical code. We consider two basic models. One is a leptonic model, where a dissipation mechanism heats the thermal electrons maintaining their high temperature. The other model involves a cascade process induced by pp(pn)-collisions which produce high-energy electrons, modify the thermal spectrum, and emit neutrinos. The qualitative properties of the photon spectra are mainly determined by the optical depth at which the dissipation mechanism sets in. Too large optical depths lead to a broad and curved spectrum contradicting the observations, while for optical depths smaller than unity the spectral hardness becomes softer than observed. A significant shift of the spectral peak energy to higher energies due to a large energy injection can lead to an overly broad spectral shape. We show ideal parameter ranges for which these models are able to reproduce the observed spectra. For the pn-collision model, the neutrino fluence in the 10–100 GeV range is well above the atmospheric neutrino fluence, but its detection is challenging for presently available detectors.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation by GEANT 4 and GESPECOR of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Chirosca, Alecsandru; Suvaila, Rares; Sima, Octavian

    2013-11-01

    The application of GEANT 4 and GESPECOR Monte Carlo simulation codes for efficiency calibration of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was studied. The long computing time required by GEANT 4 prevents its use in routine simulations. Due to the application of variance reduction techniques, GESPECOR is much faster. In this code specific procedures for incorporating the depth profile of the activity were implemented. In addition procedures for evaluating the effect of non-homogeneity of the source were developed. The code was validated by comparison with test simulations carried out with GEANT 4 and by comparison with published results. PMID:23566809

  18. Nuclear chemistry of returned lunar samples: Nuclide analysis by gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelley, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Primordial and cosmogenic radionuclide concentrations are determined nondestructively by gamma-ray spectrometry in soil and rock samples from the returned Apollo 17 sample collection from Taurus-Littrow and Descartes. Geochemical evidence in support of field geology speculation concerning layering of the subfloor basalt flows is demonstrated along with a possible correlation of magmatic fractionation of K/U as a function of depth. The pattern of radionuclide concentrations observed in these samples is distinct due to proton bombardment by the intense solar flares of August 4-9, 1972. Such radionuclide determinations are used in determining lunar sample orientation and characterizing solar flare activity.

  19. Thorium determination in intercomparison samples and in some Romanian building materials by gamma ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pantelica, A; Georgescu, I I; Murariu-Magureanu, M D; Margaritescu, I; Cincu, E

    2001-01-01

    Thorium content in zircon sand, thorium ore and a thorium liquid sample (EU Laboratories Network Intercomparison), as well as in some Romanian building materials: sand, wood, tufa, asbestos-cement. cement mill dust, coal fly ash, bricks, and tile (28 samples) was deterimined by gamma ray spectrometry. For the building materials, 226Ra, 40K and 137Cs specific activities were also measured. The results were compared with the Romanian legal norms concerning the highest admissible levels for 232Th, 226Ra. and 40K radioactivity. and to Th, U, and K concentration values previously determined in our laboratory on similar types of samples. PMID:11843363

  20. Low Background Gamma-Ray Spectrometry in the 'Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane'

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Ph.; Hubert, F.

    2007-03-28

    Most of the underground experiments in physics and many studies in geology, biology or environmental sciences face a common requirement with the necessity of using experimental devices with ultra-low background radioactivity. Many developments involving many different techniques have been used in order to be able to measure extremely low levels of radioactivity in materials. This report will focus on low background gamma-ray spectrometry and will describe the work which has been carried out over the last fifteen years in the 'Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane' (LSM)

  1. Contribution of atmospherical radon to in-situ scintillation gamma spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Klusoň, J; Thinová, L

    2011-08-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry can be used for monitoring and determining natural and man-made radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The low detection limit of potential contaminants depends on the natural background variations, including variations in the atmospheric concentrations of radon and its decay products. The scintillation spectrometer response for atmospheric radon was simulated by the Monte Carlo method, and the results were compared with the experimental measurements over large water surfaces. The contributions of atmospheric radon to the natural background were assessed. PMID:21129988

  2. Comparison of LabSOCS and GESPECOR codes used in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Done, L; Tugulan, L C; Gurau, D; Dragolici, F; Alexandru, C

    2016-03-01

    Two dedicated software packages -LabSOCS and GESPECOR- for efficiency evaluation in gamma-ray spectrometry, were compared for equivalence. The detection efficiency and the coincidence-summing corrections coefficients were calculated for a specific HPGe detector, for different sample parameters and energies typically encountered in environmental radioactivity measurements. The discrepancy between the results obtained with the two codes were acceptable for most of the applications. Furthermore, the deviations between the values of the standard sources/ reference materials activities from the certificate and the values obtained after Monte Carlo simulation were less than 8% for LabSOCS and 9% for GESPECOR. PMID:26625727

  3. Radioactivity measurements in the aquatic environment using in-situ and laboratory gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, G; Tsabaris, C; Androulakaki, E G; Patiris, D L; Kokkoris, M; Kalfas, C A; Vlastou, R

    2013-12-01

    The in-situ underwater gamma-ray spectrometry method is validated by inter-comparison with laboratory method. Deployments of the spectrometer KATERINA on a submarine spring and laboratory measurements of water samples with HPGe detector were performed. Efficiency calibrations, Monte Carlo simulations and the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) estimations were realized. MDAs varied from 0.19 to 10.4 (lab) and 0.05 to 0.35 (in-situ) Bq/L, while activity concentrations differed from 7% (for radon progenies) up to 10% (for (40)K), between the two methods. PMID:24103707

  4. Precipitation correction of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data using monitoring profiles: methodology and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl, Andreas; Motschka, Klaus; Slapansky, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Variations of soil moisture content caused by precipitation often complicate the interpretation of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data. This is particularly the case in repeated surveys designed to monitor the change of near surface abundances of radioactive elements or in large and time-consuming surveys. To counter this precipitation effect we propose a correction method based on repeated survey flights over a monitoring profile. Assuming that the weather and the soil conditions at the monitoring profile are representative for the survey area, the weather dependent effect of soil moisture can be observed and sufficiently corrected.

  5. GEANT4 calibration of gamma spectrometry efficiency for measurements of airborne radioactivity on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2014-11-01

    A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring airborne radioactivity collected on filter paper, was based on Monte Carlo simulations using the toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of an HPGe detector were calculated for a multi-gamma disk source. These efficiency values were compared to their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Such comparison revealed biases of 24, 10, 1, 3, 7, and 3% for the radionuclides (photon energies in keV) of Ce (166), Sn (392), Cs (662), Co (1,173), Co (1,333), and Y (1,836), respectively. The output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method. PMID:25271933

  6. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry: A tutorial for environmental radiation scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.M.; Shebell, P.

    1993-10-01

    This tutorial is intended for those in the environmental field who perform assessments in areas where there is radioactive contamination in the surface soil. Techniques will be introduced for performing on-site quantitative measurements of gamma radiation in the environment using high resolution germanium detectors. A basic understanding of ionizing radiation principles is assumed; however, a detailed knowledge of gamma spectrometry systems is not required. Emphasized is the practical end of operations in the field and the conversion of measured full absorption peak count rates in a collected spectrum to meaningful radiological quantities, such as the concentration of a radionuclide in the soil, activity per unit area, and dose rate in the air. The theory of operation and calibration procedures will be covered in detail to provide the necessary knowledge to adapt the technique to site-specific problems. Example calculations for detector calibration are also provided.

  7. Evaluation of radiological data of some saturated fatty acids using gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.; Palani Selvam, T.

    2016-02-01

    Radiological parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients (μm), total attenuation cross section (σtot), molar extinction coefficient (ε), mass energy absorption coefficient (μen/ρ) and effective electronic cross section (σt, el) of saturated fatty acids, namely butyric acid (C4H8O2), caproic acid (C6H12O2), enanthic acid (C7H14O2), caprylic acid (C8H16O2), pelargonic acid (C9H18O2) and valeric acid (C5H10O2) were measured using NaI(Tl)-based gamma spectrometry. Radioactive sources used in the study are 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 54Mn, 60Co and 22Na. Gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set up was used in the study. The measured data were compared against Win-XCOM-based data. The agreement is within 1%.

  8. Measurement of uranium series radionuclides in rock and groundwater at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia, by gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Keiichi

    1995-12-31

    Gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction was developed to measure low energy gamma rays emitted by uranium and actinium series radionuclides in rock samples and groundwater residues collected at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia. Thin samples were prepared to minimize the self-absorption by uranium in the samples. The present method gave standard deviations of 0.9 to 18% for the measurements of concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides. The concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th and {sup 235}U measured by gamma spectrometry were compared with those by alpha spectrometry that requires a complicated chemical separation procedure. The results obtained by both methods were in fairly good agreement, and it was found that the gamma spectrometry is applicable to rock and groundwater samples having uranium content sup to 8.1% (10{sup 3} B1/g) and 3 Bq/l of {sup 238}U, respectively. The detection limits were calculated to be of the order of 10{sup {minus}2} Bq/g for rock samples and 10{sup {minus}1} Bq/l for groundwater samples. The concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides can be determined precisely in these samples using gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction.

  9. Spectra of X-ray and Gamma-ray Bursts Produced by Stepping Lightning Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity. TGFs were serendipitously discovered by BATSE detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory originally launched to perform observations of celestial gamma-ray sources [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994]. These events have also been detected by the RHESSI satellite [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the AGILE satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010], and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010]. Moreover, measurements have correlated TGFs with initial development stages of normal polarity intra-cloud lightning that transports negative charge upward (+IC) [e.g, Lu et al., JGR, 116, A03316, 2011]. Photon spectra corresponding to well-established model of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. However, it has been suggested that high-potential +IC lightning leaders could produce a sufficient number of energetic electrons to explain TGFs [Celestin and Pasko, JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] and Xu et al. [GRL, 39, L08801, 2012] have shown that this mechanism could explain the TGF spectrum for lightning potentials higher than 100 MV. In addition to TGFs, X-ray bursts are produced by negative lightning leaders in association with stepping processes and are observed from the ground [Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L01803, 2005]. However, the energy spectrum of X-ray bursts from lightning is still poorly known, mainly due to the low fluence detected from the ground. In this work, we use Monte Carlo models to study the acceleration of runaway electrons in the electric field produced around lightning leader tip and the associated bremsstrahlung photon spectra observed by low-orbit satellites in the case of high potential +IC discharges and from the ground in the case of negative cloud-to-ground discharges. We particularly investigate the variability of the photon spectrum with the lightning electric potential.

  10. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methodsmore » for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20% FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.« less

  11. An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

    2014-10-01

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  12. An analysis of nuclear fuel burnup in the AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment using gamma spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and computational simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Winston, Philip L.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2014-09-03

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1% FIMA for the direct method and 20.0% FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3% FIMA to 10.7% FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. Furthermore, the results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20% FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  13. Systematic Measurement of keV-Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Capture Gamma-Ray Spectra of Zr Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgama, Kazuya; Igashira, Masayuki; Ohsaki, Toshiro

    2005-05-24

    The capture cross sections of 92Zr were measured in the incident neutron energy region from 15 to 90 keV and at 550 keV. A neutron time-of-flight method was adopted with a ns-pulsed neutron source by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and with a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) spectrometer. A pulse-height weighting technique was applied to observed capture gamma-ray pulse-height spectra to derive capture yields. Using the standard capture cross sections of 197Au in ENDF/B-VI, the capture cross sections of 92Zr were obtained with the errors from 7% to 11%. The present results were compared with previous measurements and the evaluations of JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI. The capture gamma-ray spectra of 92Zr were derived by unfolding observed capture gamma-ray pulse-height spectra.

  14. Gamma-ray spectra and doses from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Most radiation safety guidelines in the nuclear industry are based on the data concerning the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Crucial to determining these guidelines is the radiation from the explosions. We have measured gamma-ray pulse-height distributions from an accurate replica of the Little Boy device used at Hiroshima, operated at low power levels near critical. The device was placed outdoors on a stand 4 m from the ground to minimize environmental effects. The power levels were based on a monitor detector calibrated very carefully in independent experiments. High-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with a germanium detector to identify the lines and to obtain line intensities. The 7631 to 7645 keV doublet from neutron capture in the heavy steel case was dominant. Low-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with bismuth-germanate detectors. We calculated flux spectra from these distributions using accurately measured detector response functions and efficiency curves. We then calculated dose-rate spectra from the flux spectra using a flux-to-dose-rate conversion procedure. The integral of each dose-rate spectrum gave an integral dose rate. The integral doses at 2 m ranged from 0.46 to 1.03 mrem per 10/sup 13/ fissions. The output of the Little Boy replica can be calculated with Monte Carlo codes. Comparison of our experimental spectra, line intensities, and integral doses can be used to verify these calculations at low power levels and give increased confidence to the calculated values from the explosion at Hiroshima. These calculations then can be used to establish better radiation safety guidelines. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  16. GRABGAM: A Gamma Analysis Code for Ultra-Low-Level HPGe SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1999-07-28

    The GRABGAM code has been developed for analysis of ultra-low-level HPGe gamma spectra. The code employs three different size filters for the peak search, where the largest filter provides best sensitivity for identifying low-level peaks and the smallest filter has the best resolution for distinguishing peaks within a multiplet. GRABGAM basically generates an integral probability F-function for each singlet or multiplet peak analysis, bypassing the usual peak fitting analysis for a differential f-function probability model. Because F is defined by the peak data, statistical limitations for peak fitting are avoided; however, the F-function does provide generic values for peak centroid, full width at half maximum, and tail that are consistent with a Gaussian formalism. GRABGAM has successfully analyzed over 10,000 customer samples, and it interfaces with a variety of supplementary codes for deriving detector efficiencies, backgrounds, and quality checks.

  17. Spectra of GRB970228 from the transient gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. M.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Hurley, K.; Kurczynski, P.; Madden, N.; Pehl, R.; Ramaty, R.; Seifert, H.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1998-05-01

    Visible afterglow counterparts have now been detected for two GRBs (970228 and 970508) but are absent, with Lopt/L? ratios at least two orders of magnitude lower, for other GRBs, e.g., 970828. The causes of this variation are unknown. Any correspondence which could be discovered between the ?-ray properties of a GRB and its Lopt/L? would be useful, both in determining the GRB mechanisms, and in allocating resources for counterpart searches and studies. This paper presents the ?-ray spectra of GRB970228 as measured by the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer and comments on characteristics of this GRB compared to others that do and do not have observable counterparts.

  18. Systematic Measurement of keV-neutron Capture Cross Sections and Capture Gamma-ray Spectra of Sn Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, J.; Igashira, M.; Ohsaki, T.; Kim, G. N.; Chung, W. C.; Ro, T. I.

    2006-03-13

    The capture cross sections and capture {gamma}-ray spectra of 117,119Sn were measured in an incident neutron energy region from 10 to 100 keV and at 570 keV, using a 1.5-ns pulsed neutron source by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) {gamma}-ray spectrometer. A pulse-height weighting technique was applied to observed capture {gamma}-ray pulse-height spectra to derive capture yields. The capture cross sections of 117,119Sn were obtained with the error of about 5% by using the standard capture cross sections of 197Au. The present cross sections were compared with previous experimental data and the evaluated values in JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI. The capture {gamma}-ray spectra of 117,119Sn were derived by unfolding the observed capture {gamma}-ray pulse-height spectra.

  19. Modeling of Gamma-ray Spectra to Direct Efficient Chemical Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Matthew; Friese, Judah I.; Warren, Glen A.; Bachelor, Paula P.; Farmer, Orville T.; Choiniere, Andrea D.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Aalseth, Craig E.

    2008-06-15

    In an age of heightened national security regarding nuclear terrorist threats, reliable and rapid analytical methods for the quantification of radionuclides in fission product samples are needed to provide forensic information and sample characterization. Measurement of characteristic gamma-ray emissions by high-purity germanium spectrometers offers one means of analysis. Due to the high-activity and complex nature of samples, chemical separations are necessary to reduce background continuum levels and instances of spectral interference. A project has been initiated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to model singles and coincident gamma-ray spectra that would result from various chemical separation strategies. The goal is to use these complementary counting techniques to tailor a series of efficient chemical separations that allow the rapid quantification of signature isotopes in samples. Modeling enables probable instances of spectral interference to be identified and aids in defining the temporal window of detection for radionuclides of interest following a given chemical separation. These data will help future analysts prioritize analytes of interest and separation strategies in the processing of real samples. A description of results to date is described here, demonstrating the utility of this approach for improved processing and analysis of fission product samples.

  20. The Multi-Isotope Process Monitor: Multivariate Analysis of Gamma Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Rutherford, Crystal E.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-10-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MC&A) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource-intensive destructive assay (DA). The time delay between sampling and subsequent DA provides a potential opportunity to divert the material out of the appropriate chemical stream. Leveraging new on-line nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for MC&A verification at such facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies, including the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor. The MIP Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and pattern recognition software to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. Recent efforts have been made to explore the basic limits of using multivariate analysis techniques on gamma-ray spectra. This paper will provide an overview of the methods and report our on-going efforts to develop and demonstrate the technology.

  1. Development of a Method of Thermal-Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement by Unfolding Prompt Gamma-Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sakane, Hitoshi; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Shcherbakov, Oleg; Harada, Hideo; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Yamana, Hajimu

    2005-05-24

    A method of thermal neutron-capture cross-section measurement by using a pair spectrometer and unfolding prompt gamma-ray spectra is described. To evaluate the validity of the method, it was applied for the measurement of the thermal neutron cross section of 14N. A pair spectrometer system was used to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from 15N produced by thermal neutron capture. Response functions of the system were calculated by using EGS-4 code. To verify the reproducibility of the response functions, the measured spectrum of prompt gamma rays of 15N was reproduced by using EGS-4 code, which was used for calculating response functions.

  2. Differentiation of three pairs of Boc-beta,gamma- and gamma,beta-hybrid peptides by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Jayaprakash, P; Kunwar, A C

    2008-09-01

    A new series of Boc-N-beta(3), gamma(4)-/gamma(4), beta(3)-isomeric hybrid peptides (containing repeats of beta(3)-Caa and gamma(4)-Caa's, Caa = C-linked carbo beta(3)-/gamma(4)-amino acids derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion-trap and high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight/tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS). MS(n) of protonated isomeric peptides and [M+H-Boc+H](+) produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The positional isomers are differentiated from one another by the presence of y(n)(+), b(n)(+), and other fragment ions of different m/z values. It is observed that the peptides with beta-Caa at the N-terminus produce extensive fragmentation, whereas gamma-Caa gave rise to much less fragmentation. Peptides with gamma-Caa at the N-terminus lose NH(3), whereas this process is absent for the carbopeptides with beta-Caa at the N-terminus. Two pairs of dipeptide diastereomers are clearly differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of their protonated molecules. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-(R)-beta-Caa-(R)-gamma-Caa-OCH(3) (6) and Boc-NH-(R)-gamma-Caa-(R)-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (12), whereas it is insignificant or totally absent for its protonated diastereomeric pair Boc-NH-(S)-beta-Caa-(S)-gamma-Caa-OCH(3) (1) and Boc-NH-(S)-gamma-Caa-(S)-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (7). Further, ESI negative ion tandem mass spectrometry has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. PMID:18320536

  3. The 124Sb activity standardization by gamma spectrometry for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, M. C. M.; Iwahara, A.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; da Silva, R. L.

    2010-07-01

    This work describes a metrological activity determination of 124Sb, which can be used as radiotracer, applying gamma spectrometry methods with hyper pure germanium detector and efficiency curves. This isotope with good activity and high radionuclidic purity is employed in the form of meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) or sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) to treat leishmaniasis. 124Sb is also applied in animal organ distribution studies to solve some questions in pharmacology. 124Sb decays by β-emission and it produces several photons (X and gamma rays) with energy varying from 27 to 2700 keV. Efficiency curves to measure point 124Sb solid sources were obtained from a 166mHo standard that is a multi-gamma reference source. These curves depend on radiation energy, sample geometry, photon attenuation, dead time and sample-detector position. Results for activity determination of 124Sb samples using efficiency curves and a high purity coaxial germanium detector were consistent in different counting geometries. Also uncertainties of about 2% ( k=2) were obtained.

  4. Cosmic veto gamma-spectrometry for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, J. L.; Davies, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is supported by a global network of monitoring stations that perform high-resolution gamma-spectrometry on air filter samples for the identification of 85 radionuclides. At the UK CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory (GBL15), a novel cosmic veto gamma-spectrometer has been developed to improve the sensitivity of station measurements, providing a mean background reduction of 80.8% with mean MDA improvements of 45.6%. The CTBT laboratory requirement for a 140Ba MDA is achievable after 1.5 days counting compared to 5-7 days using conventional systems. The system consists of plastic scintillation plates that detect coincident cosmic-ray interactions within an HPGe gamma-spectrometer using the Canberra LynxTM multi-channel analyser. The detector is remotely configurable using a TCP/IP interface and requires no dedicated coincidence electronics. It would be especially useful in preventing false-positives at remote station locations (e.g. Halley, Antarctica) where sample transfer to certified laboratories is logistically difficult. The improved sensitivity has been demonstrated for a CTBT air filter sample collected after the Fukushima incident.

  5. NMIS with Imaging and Gamma Ray Spectrometry for Pu, HEU, HE and Other Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, John T; Mullens, James Allen

    2012-03-01

    The Nuclear Material Identification System (NMIS) has been under development at ORNL and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 National Security Complex since 1984. In the mid-1990s, what is now the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Verification (ONV) realized that it was a useful technology for future arms control treaty applications and supported further development of the system. In 2004, fast-neutron imaging was incorporated into the system. In 2007, the ONV decided to develop a fieldable version of the system, designated as FNMIS, for potential use in future treaties. The FNMIS is being developed to be compatible with the eventual incorporation of gamma-ray spectrometry and an information barrier. This report addresses how and what attributes could be determined by the FNMIS system with gamma-ray spectrometry. The NMIS is a time-dependent coincidence system that incorporates tomographic imaging (including mapping of the fission sites) and gamma-ray spectrometry. It utilizes a small, lightweight (30 lb), portable deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron (14.1 MeV) generator (4 x 10{sup 7} neutrons/second) for active interrogation and can also perform passive interrogation. A high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector with multichannel analysis can be utilized in conjunction with the source for active interrogation or passively. The system uses proton recoil scintillators: 32 small 2.5 x 2.5 x 10.2-cm-thick plastic scintillators for imaging and at least two 2 x 2 arrays of 27 x 27 x 10-cm-thick plastic scintillators that detect induced fission radiation. The DT generator contains an alpha detector that time and directionally tags a fan beam of some of the neutrons emitted and subdivides it into pixels. A fast (1 GHz) time correlation processor measures the time-dependent coincidence among all detectors in the system. A computer-controlled scanner moves the small detectors and the source appropriately for scanning a target object for imaging. The system is based on detection of transmitted 14.1 MeV neutrons, fission neutrons, and gamma rays from spontaneous, inherent source fission of the target, fission neutrons and gamma rays induced by the external DT source, gamma rays from natural emissions of uranium and plutonium, and induced gamma-ray emission by the interaction of the 14.1 MeV neutrons from the DT source. The NMIS can and has been used with a time-tagged californium spontaneous fission source. It has also been used with pulsed interrogation sources such as LINACs, DT, and deuterium-deuterium (DD) sources. This system is uniquely suited for detection of shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU), plutonium, and other special nuclear materials and detection of high explosives (HE) and chemical agents. The NMIS will be adapted to utilize a trusted processor that incorporates information barrier and authentication techniques using open software and then be useful in some international applications for materials whose characteristics may be classified. The proposed information barrier version of the NMIS system would consist of detectors and cables, the red (classified side) computer system, which processes the data, and the black (unclassified side) computer, which handles the computer interface. The system could use the 'IB wrapper' concept proposed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the software integrity (digital signatures) system proposed by Sandia. Since it is based entirely on commercially available components, the entire system, including NMIS data acquisition boards, can be built with commercial off-the-shelf components. This system is being developed into a fieldable system (FNMIS) for potential arms control treaties by the ONV. The system will be modularly constructed with the RF shielded modules connected to the processor by appropriate control and signal cable in metal conduit. The FNMIS is presently being designed for eventual incorporation of gamma-ray spectrometry and an information barrier to protect classified information. The system hardware and software can be configured to obtain the following: plutonium presence, plutonium mass, Pu-240/239 ratio, plutonium geometry, plutonium metal vs non-metallic (absence of metal), time (age) since processing for plutonium (or last purification), uranium presence, uranium mass, uranium enrichment, uranium geometry, uranium metal vs non-metallic compound (absence of metal), beryllium presence and mass, tritium and deuterium gas bottle presence, HE, and chemical weapons. A matrix of the quantities determined, the method of determination, whether active (external neutron source) or passive, and the measurement equipment involved is given in the Tables 1-4. Some of these attributes can be obtained by multiple data analysis methods. The gamma-ray spectrometry methods for HEU, plutonium, and HE have been developed by other laboratories, are well known, and will be incorporated.

  6. A review of the nationwide proficiency test on natural radioactivity measurements by gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Şahin, N K; Yeltepe, E; Yücel, Ü

    2016-03-01

    This study is the review of the first proficiency test on radioactivity measurement organized in Turkey by Sarayköy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM) of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK) in 2013. The objective of the test was to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations in natural soil samples using gamma-ray spectrometry. The bulk material consisting of uranium- and thorium-rich soil and sand was milled, mixed thoroughly and sieved. Homogeneity of the final mix was tested with 6 randomly taken samples. 16 proficiency test samples were distributed to 16 participating laboratories. 12 laboratories reported results. The results were evaluated on the accuracy and precision criteria adopted by the IAEA Proficiency Testing Group. The percentage of acceptable scores was 49%. Some recommendations have been provided to the laboratories to improve the quality of their results. It is planned to extend these proficiency tests periodically for various radionuclides in various matrices. PMID:26750585

  7. Fast-ion energy resolution by one-step reaction gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Kiptily, V. G.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Contributors, JET

    2016-04-01

    The spectral broadening of γ-rays from fusion plasmas can be measured in high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (GRS). We derive weight functions that determine the observable velocity space and quantify the velocity-space sensitivity of one-step reaction high-resolution GRS measurements in magnetized fusion plasmas. The weight functions suggest that GRS resolves the energies of fast ions directly without the need for tomographic inversion for selected one-step reactions at moderate plasma temperatures. The D(p,γ)3He reaction allows the best direct fast-ion energy resolution. We illustrate our general formalism using reactions with and without intrinsic broadening of the γ-rays for the GRS diagnostic at JET.

  8. Impact of secondary acceleration on the neutrino spectra in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, W.; Becker Tjus, J.; Klein, S. R.

    2014-09-01

    Context. The observation of charged cosmic rays with energies up to 1020 eV shows that particle acceleration must occur in astrophysical sources. Acceleration of secondary particles like muons and pions, produced in cosmic ray interactions, are usually neglected, however, when calculating the flux of neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions. Aims: Here, we discuss the acceleration of secondary muons, pions, and kaons in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the internal shock scenario, and their impact on the neutrino fluxes. Methods: We introduce a two-zone model consisting of an acceleration zone (the shocks) and a radiation zone (the plasma downstream the shocks). The acceleration in the shocks, which is an unavoidable consequence of efficient proton acceleration, requires efficient transport from the radiation back to the acceleration zone. On the other hand, stochastic acceleration in the radiation zone can enhance the secondary spectra of muons and kaons significantly if there is a sufficiently large turbulent region. Results: Overall, it is plausible that neutrino spectra can be enhanced by up to a factor of two at the peak by stochastic acceleration, that an additional spectral peak appears from shock acceleration of the secondary muons and pions, and that the neutrino production from kaon decays is enhanced. Conclusions: Depending on the GRB parameters, the general conclusions concerning the limits to the internal shock scenario obtained by recent IceCube and ANTARES analyses may be affected by up to a factor of two by secondary acceleration. Most of the changes occur at energies above 107 GeV, so the effects for next-generation radio-detection experiments will be more pronounced. In the future, however, if GRBs are detected as high-energy neutrino sources, the detection of one or several pronounced peaks around 106 GeV or higher energies could help to derive the basic properties of the magnetic field strength in the GRB.

  9. Inter-pulse high-resolution gamma-ray spectra using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, L.G.; Trombka, J.I.; Jensen, D.H.; Stephenson, W.A.; Hoover, R.A.; Mikesell, J.L.; Tanner, A.B.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron generator pulsed at 100 s-1 was suspended in an artificial borehole containing a 7.7 metric ton mixture of sand, aragonite, magnetite, sulfur, and salt. Two Ge(HP) gamma-ray detectors were used: one in a borehole sonde, and one at the outside wall of the sample tank opposite the neutron generator target. Gamma-ray spectra were collected by the outside detector during each of 10 discrete time windows during the 10 ms period following the onset of gamma-ray build-up after each neutron burst. The sample was measured first when dry and then when saturated with water. In the dry sample, gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering, neutron capture, and decay were counted during the first (150 ??s) time window. Subsequently only capture and decay gamma rays were observed. In the wet sample, only neutron capture and decay gamma rays were observed. Neutron capture gamma rays dominated the spectrum during the period from 150 to 400 ??s after the neutron burst in both samples, but decreased with time much more rapidly in the wet sample. A signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) analysis indicates that optimum conditions for neutron capture analysis occurred in the 350-800 ??s window. A poor S/N in the first 100-150 ??s is due to a large background continuum during the first time interval. Time gating can be used to enhance gamma-ray spectra, depending on the nuclides in the target material and the reactions needed to produce them, and should improve the sensitivity of in situ well logging. ?? 1984.

  10. A mobile high resolution gamma ray spectrometry system for radiological surveys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, A.R.

    1998-09-01

    Magnox Electric has developed a mobile large area radiological survey system designed to produce a rapid and cost effective characterization of outdoor land areas. The system combines the technique of high resolution gamma ray spectrometry, which is capable of rapidly identifying and quantifying specific radionuclides at levels well below those normally associated with natural background radiation, with modern automated surveying techniques that facilitate navigation and provide assurance as to the location of contamination. A dedicated software system supports survey operations, providing real time displays detailing spectrometry and navigational data capture, and enabling seamless remote switching between positioning methods. In open areas with an unrestricted line of sight to satellites Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) technology provides positional data, in areas where a significant portion of the sky is obscured a laser ranging device known as an Automatic Total Station (ATS) is employed and in the most restricted and confined areas manual surveying resorted to. In this report the system is described, its advantages and limitations compared with conventional survey methodologies are discussed, and its perceived role within the wider framework of the site investigation process is detailed, particularly with respect to current and proposed legislation in the US describing conditions for the release of nuclear licensed sites from regulatory controls. Experience at recent termination surveys on large nuclear licensed facilities is considered in detail, along with the principal features of the Magnox system that will enable it to overcome the difficulties and problems encountered.

  11. Peak fitting and identification software library for high resolution gamma-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Josef; Roach, Greg; Tickner, James

    2010-07-01

    A new gamma-ray spectral analysis software package is under development in our laboratory. It can be operated as a stand-alone program or called as a software library from Java, C, C++ and MATLAB TM environments. It provides an advanced graphical user interface for data acquisition, spectral analysis and radioisotope identification. The code uses a peak-fitting function that includes peak asymmetry, Compton continuum and flexible background terms. Peak fitting function parameters can be calibrated as functions of energy. Each parameter can be constrained to improve fitting of overlapping peaks. All of these features can be adjusted by the user. To assist with peak identification, the code can automatically measure half-lives of single or multiple overlapping peaks from a time series of spectra. It implements library-based peak identification, with options for restricting the search based on radioisotope half-lives and reaction types. The software also improves the reliability of isotope identification by utilizing Monte-Carlo simulation results.

  12. F-GAMMA: On the phenomenological classification of continuum radio spectra variability patterns of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Nestoras, I.; Fromm, C. M.; Perucho-Pla, M.; Schmidt, R.; Zensus, J. A.; Marchili, N.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Riquelme, D.; Pavlidou, V.

    2012-07-01

    The F-GAMMA program is a coordinated effort to investigate the physics of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) via multi-frequency monitoring of Fermi blazars. In the current study we show and discuss the evolution of broad-band radio spectra, which are measured at ten frequencies between 2.64 and 142 GHz using the Effelsberg 100-m and the IRAM 30-m telescopes. It is shown that any of the 78 sources studied can be classified in terms of their variability characteristics in merely 5 types of variability. It is argued that these can be attributed to only two classes of variability mechanisms. The first four types are dominated by spectral evolution and can be described by a simple two-component system composed of: (a) a steep quiescent spectral component from a large scale jet and (b) a time evolving flare component following the "Shock-in-Jet" evolutionary path. The fifth type is characterised by an achromatic change of the broad band spectrum, which could be attributed to a different mechanism, likely involving differential Doppler boosting caused by geometrical effects. Here we present the classification, the assumed physical scenario and the results of calculations that have been performed for the spectral evolution of flares.

  13. Constraining Lorentz invariance violation from the continuous spectra of short gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Chang; Xin, Li; Hai-Nan, Lin; Yu, Sang; Ping, Wang; Sai, Wang

    2016-04-01

    In some quantum gravity theories, a foamy structure of space-time may lead to Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). As the most energetic explosions in the Universe, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) provide an effect way to probe quantum gravity effects. In this paper, we use the continuous spectra of 20 short GRBs detected by the Swift satellite to give a conservative lower limit of quantum gravity energy scale M QG. Due to the LIV effect, photons with different energy have different velocities. This will lead to the delayed arrival of high energy photons relative to low energy ones. Based on the fact that the LIV-induced time delay cannot be longer than the duration of a GRB, we present the most conservative estimate of the quantum gravity energy scales from 20 short GRBs. The strictest constraint, M QG > 5.05 × 1014 GeV in the linearly corrected case, is from GRB 140622A. Our constraint on M QG, although not as tight as previous results, is the safest and most reliable so far. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375203, 11305181, 11322545, 11335012) and Knowledge Innovation Program of The Chinese Academy of Sciences

  14. BATSE observations of gamma-ray burst spectra. 2: Peak energy evolution in bright, long bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, L. A.; Band, D. L.; Matteson, J. L.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Preece, R. D.; Paciesas, W. S.; Teegarden, B. J.; Palmer, D. M.; Schaefer, B. E.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate spectral evolution in 37 bright, long gamma-ray bursts observed with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) spectroscopy detectors. High-resolution spectra are chracterized by the energy of the peak of nu F(sub nu), and the evolution of this quantity is examined relative to the emission intensity. In most cases it is found that this peak energy either rises with or slightly precedes major intensity increases and softens for the remainder of the pulse. Interpulse emission is generally harder early in the burst. For bursts with multiple intensity pulses, later spikes tend to be softer than earlier ones, indicating that the energy of the peak of nu F(sub nu) is bounded by an envelope which decays with time. Evidence is found that bursts in which the bulk of the flux comes well after the event which triggers the instrument tend to show less peak energy variability and are not as hard as several bursts in which the emission occurs promptly after the trigger. Several recently proposed burst models are examined in light of these results and no qualitative conflicts with the observations presented here are found.

  15. Fieldable computer system for determining gamma-ray pulse-height distributions, flux spectra, and dose rates from Little Boy

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Our system consists of a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system with a built-in CAMAC crate and eight bismuth-germanate detectors 7.62 cm in diameter and 7.62 cm long. Gamma-ray pulse-height distributions are acquired simultaneously for up to eight positions. The system was very carefully calibrated and characterized from 0.1 to 8.3 MeV using gamma-ray spectra from a variety of radioactive sources. By fitting the pulse-height distributions from the sources with a function containing 17 parameters, we determined theoretical repsonse functions. We use these response functions to unfold the distributions to obtain flux spectra. A flux-to-dose-rate conversion curve based on the work of Dimbylow and Francis is then used to obtain dose rates. Direct use of measured spectra and flux-to-dose-rate curves to obtain dose rates avoids the errors that can arise from spectrum dependence in simple gamma-ray dosimeter instruments. We present some gamma-ray doses for the Little Boy assembly operated at low power. These results can be used to determine the exposures of the Hiroshima survivors and thus aid in the establishment of radation exposure limits for the nuclear industry.

  16. Extraction of thermal exitance spectra (TIR) from Geoscan MK II scanner imagery - Spectra derived from airborne (mobile) and ground (stationary) imagery compared with spectra from direct exitance spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, R. J. P.; Honey, F. R.

    In this work, thermal infrared (TIR) three-band composites were prepared from the raw airborne imagery from the Geoscan Mark II airborne scanner (which has six bands), which exhibited colored areas in the Ludwig Skarn region (Yerington district, Australia), interpreted to show quartz-rich zones and garnet-pyroxene zones. It was found that the same scanner, used in the laboratory to view mineral samples heated to about 45-50 C can produce multiband thermal imagery from which TIR spectra can be extracted, provided that the instrument offsets are corrected by the use of water blackbodies.

  17. Application of gamma-ray spectrometry in a NORM industry for its radiometrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantero, J.; Gázquez, M. J.; Hurtado, S.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2015-11-01

    Industrial activities involving Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are found among the most important industrial sectors worldwide as oil/gas facilities, metal production, phosphate Industry, zircon treatment, etc. being really significant the radioactive characterization of the materials involved in their production processes in order to assess the potential radiological risk for workers or natural environment. High resolution gamma spectrometry is a versatile non-destructive radiometric technique that makes simultaneous determination of several radionuclides possible with little sample preparation. However NORM samples cover a wide variety of densities and composition, as opposed to the standards used in gamma efficiency calibration, which are either water-based solutions or standard/reference sources of similar composition. For that reason self-absorption correction effects (especially in the low energy range) must be considered individually in every sample. In this work an experimental and a semi-empirical methodology of self-absorption correction were applied to NORM samples, and the obtained results compared critically, in order to establish the best practice in relation to the circumstances of an individual laboratory. This methodology was applied in samples coming from a TiO2 factory (NORM industry) located in the south-west of Spain where activity concentration of several radionuclides from the Uranium and Thorium series through the production process was measured. These results will be shown in this work.

  18. Determination of (241)Pu by the method of disturbed radioactive equilibrium using 2πα-counting and precision gamma-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, I; Kuzmina, T

    2016-04-01

    A simple technique is proposed for the determination of the content of (241)Pu, which is based on disturbance of radioactive equilibrium in the genetically related (237)U←(241)Pu→(241)Am decay chain of radionuclides, with the subsequent use of 2πα-counting and precision gamma-spectroscopy for monitoring the process of restoration of that equilibrium. It has been shown that the data on dynamics of accumulation of the daughter (241)Am, which were obtained from the results of measurements of α- and γ-spectra of the samples, correspond to the estimates calculated for the chain of two genetically related radionuclides, the differences in the estimates of (241)Pu radioactivity not exceeding 2%. Combining the different methods of registration (2πα-counting, semiconductor alpha- and gamma-spectrometry) enables the proposed method to be efficiently applied both for calibration of (241)Pu-sources (from several hundreds of kBq and higher) and for radioisotopic analysis of plutonium mixtures. In doing so, there is a deep purification of (241)Pu from its daughter decay products required due to unavailability of commercial detectors that could make it possible, based only on analysis of alpha-spectra, to conduct quantitative analysis of the content of (238)Pu and (241)Am. PMID:26868275

  19. Hydride formation and thermal desorption spectra of hydrogen of cathodically charged single-phase gamma titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Takasaki, Akito; Furuya, Yoshio

    1999-02-05

    The authors have previously reported thermal desorption spectra of hydrogen obtained from cathodically charged two-phase (Ti{sub 3}Al ({alpha}{sub 2}) + TiAl ({gamma})) titanium aluminides by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), in which hydrogen ion current (H{sub 2}{sup +}) corresponding to hydrogen evolution rate during heating was measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer in an ultra-high vacuum condition. Several accelerated hydrogen evolutions (TDS peak temperatures) have been observed in a series of TDS measurement, and then the authors have suggested that these peaks were dependent on the microstructures ({alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} phases) as well as dissociation of the hydride phase which formed during cathodic charging. A comparison with the TDS spectra from other series of titanium aluminides, such as a single-phase {gamma} alloy, might give clearer views of the microstructural dependence on hydrogen evolution kinetics. In this paper, hydride formation, hydrogen uptake and hydrogen evolution kinetic of a cathodically charged single-phase {gamma} titanium aluminide are investigated, and these results are compared with the previous ones obtained in two-phase ({alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma}) titanium aluminides.

  20. An axially symmetric gamma-ray backscatter system for DuMond spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Innes K.

    1990-12-01

    An axially symmetric spectrometer is described which evolved from a program of measuring Compton profiles with unusually high geometric efficiency. When fitted with a large-volume Ge detector for combined X-ray and γ-ray spectrometry, such as the 51 mm diameter LO-AX detector from EG&G, it allows Compton profiles to be measured at counting rates in excess of 20000 cps. The axially symmetric configuration is also suited to high-efficiency analyses of thick targets by both XRF and Rayleigh/Compton R/C ratios. The same spectra permit a competitive binary-system analysis based on the shape of the Compton profile. Both this new analysis, which we call DuMond spectrometry, and R/C analysis are applied to studies of osteoporosis in the calcaneus with promising results. The combination of high intrinsic and geometric detection efficiency makes it practical to use very weak sources ( ˜ 100 MBq) and unusually low, localized doses ( ˜ 1 μGy) per reading.

  1. Numerical simulations of planetary gamma-ray spectra induced by galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

    1994-07-01

    The fluxes of cosmic-ray-produced gamma rays escaping from Mars were calculated using the LAHET Code System and basic nuclear data for {gamma}-ray production. Both surface water content and atmospheric thickness strongly affect the fluxes of {gamma}-ray lines escaping from Mars.

  2. CHIH-DFT determination of the molecular structure and infrared and ultraviolet spectra of gamma-solanine.

    PubMed

    Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Glycoalkaloids are toxic secondary plant metabolites found in potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants and they are considered potential precursors of steroids for applications in bionanotechnology. In this work, we make use of a new model chemistry within density functional theory, which is called CHIH-DFT, to calculate the molecular structure of gamma-solanine, as well to predict its infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV-vis) spectra, and some other electronic parameters. PMID:16859976

  3. Discriminating Nuclear Threats from Benign Sources in Gamma-ray Spectra using a Spectral Comparison Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kevin K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Mann, Matthew L.; Pfund, David M.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2008-06-15

    This manuscript presents a method for categorizing gamma-ray spectra as benign or threatening. It is widely believed that the goal of segregating gamma-ray spectra into benign and threatening populations can achieved with fewer counts than are required for confident characterization of a spectrum’s isotopic composition, while still providing improvement over count-based algorithms. This has potentially important implications on the detection of radiological and nuclear threats, where decisions must be made from analysis of count-starved spectra that dominate the landscape of monitoring special nuclear material transport and lost-or-stolen source search. We report here the method of Spectral Comparison Ratios (SCRs) which is useful in the targeted detection of specific gamma-ray signatures or signature classes. SCRs discriminate between benign and target sources by comparing counts in broad, pre-defined energy bins that are pre-determined using statistical discrimination criteria. The integral component of the SCR algorithm is the location and interdependence of the energy bins, and we discuss the statistical methods used for choosing their locations along with the decision criteria that maximally separate targets from benign sources.

  4. Application of low-background gamma-ray spectrometry to monitor radioactivity in the environment and food.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Beach, S E; Haines, D K; Bradt, C J; Bari, A; Syed, U-F; Torres, M; Marrantino, J; Kitto, M E; Menia, T; Fielman, E

    2014-08-01

    The results are described of an upgrade of the low-background gamma-ray spectrometry laboratory at New York State Department of Health by acquiring sensitivity to low-energy gamma rays. Tuning of the spectrometer and its low-energy response characteristics are described. The spectrometer has been applied to monitor the environment by measuring aerosols and water in New York State contaminated by the 2011 Fukushima accident plume. In addition, the spectrometer has been used to monitor radioactivity in food by performing a study of cesium in Florida milk. PMID:24836905

  5. Neutron-capture gamma-ray data for obtaining elemental abundances from planetary spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Robert; Frankle, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Determination of elemental abundances is a top scientific priority of most planetary missions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an excellent method to determine elemental abundances using gamma rays made by nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray particles and by the decay of radioactive nuclides [Re73,Re78]. Many important planetary gamma rays are made by neutron-capture reactions. However, much of the data for the energies and intensities of neutron-capture gamma rays in the existing literature [e.g. Lo81] are poor [RF99,RF00]. With gamma-ray spectrometers having recently returned data from Lunar Prospector and NEAR and soon to be launch to Mars, there is a need for good data for neutron-capture gamma rays.

  6. gamma-Irradiation effects on the thermal decomposition behaviour and IR absorption spectra of piperacillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R. M.; Gaffar, M. A.; Abu El-Fadl, A.; Hamad, Ar. G. K.

    2003-11-01

    The thermal decomposition behaviour of unirradiated and pre-gamma-irradiated piperacillin (pipril) as a semi-synthetic penicillin antibiotic has been studied in the temperature range of (273-1072 K). The decomposition was found to proceed through three major steps both for unirradiated and gamma-irradiated samples. Neither appearance nor disappearance of new bands in the IR spectrum of piperacillin was recorded as a result of gamma-irradiation but only a decrease in the intensity of most bands was observed. A degradation mechanism was suggested to explain the bond rupture and the decrease in the intensities of IR bands of gamma-irradiated piperacillin.

  7. Assessment of measurement result uncertainty in determination of (210)Pb with the focus on matrix composition effect in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iurian, A R; Pitois, A; Kis-Benedek, G; Migliori, A; Padilla-Alvarez, R; Ceccatelli, A

    2016-03-01

    Reference materials were used to assess measurement result uncertainty in determination of (210)Pb by gamma-ray spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting, or indirectly by alpha-particle spectrometry, using its daughter (210)Po in radioactive equilibrium. Combined standard uncertainties of (210)Pb massic activities obtained by liquid scintillation counting are in the range 2-12%, depending on matrices and massic activity values. They are in the range 1-3% for the measurement of its daughter (210)Po using alpha-particle spectrometry. Three approaches (direct computation of counting efficiency and efficiency transfer approaches based on the computation and, respectively, experimental determination of the efficiency transfer factors) were applied for the evaluation of (210)Pb using gamma-ray spectrometry. Combined standard uncertainties of gamma-ray spectrometry results were found in the range 2-17%. The effect of matrix composition on self-attenuation was investigated and a detailed assessment of uncertainty components was performed. PMID:26653212

  8. Assessment of radiological hazards of Lawrencepur sand, Pakistan using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Aziz Ahmed; Ali, Muhammad; Waheed, Abdul; Manzoor, Shahid; Siddique, Rehan Ul Haq; Ahmed Khan, Hameed

    2013-11-01

    The Lawrencepur sand had remained refrigerated during a long period of glaciations in the study area. Owing to its derivation from the granitic rocks of the Himalayas and its preservation under glacial environment, the sand grains are still fresh and may contain high level of primordial radioactivity. For that reason, radiological hazards of Lawrencepur sand were assessed using a high-purity germanium gamma spectrometry technique. The average activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to be 15.973.05, 27.984.89 and 498.2015.91 Bq kg(-1), respectively. These values are higher than those of the sands of many countries of the world but lower than those of some of the Pakistani, Indian and Egyptian sands. The outdoor and indoor hazard indices and annual effective doses of the Lawrencepur sand are higher than those of some of the sand deposits of European, African and American countries but lower than those of nearby Pakistani and Indian sands. However, the hazard indices and annual effective doses of the Lawrencepur sand are within the safe limits. Overall, the Lawrencepur sand does not pose any radiological health hazard as a building material. PMID:23630384

  9. Using gamma ray spectrometry for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment in Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, S.; Ohtsuka, J.; Murakami, Y.; Ishiya, T.; Hamamoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    To seek the geological tracers of environmental radionuclide for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment, the gamma ray spectrometry was conducted for the soil and sediment samples collected from subcatchments, rivers, estuaries and coast in Mukawa and Sarugawa river watersheds and Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan. Gamma ray spectrometry was conducted to determine the activities of environmental radionuclides associated with each soil and sediment samples using HP Ge well-type detector. Gamma ray spectrometry could determine 15 environmental radionuclides, including U-series, Th-series, cesium-137 and potassium-40. Lead-210 excess was also determined by subtracting the activities of Pb-214 from that of Pb-210. The Kruskal-Wallis H test was conducted to assess the ability of each tracer property to discriminate between surface soil samples from the categories divided by subcatchment, geological era and period, suggesting that more than 11 tracer properties were available. Subsequently, the stepwise discriminant function analysis was conducted to identify which combination of tracer properties provides the best composite fingerprint for differentiating source materials on the basis of subcatchment and geology source groups. This analysis suggested that the composite fingerprints of Pb-212, Ac-228 and K-40 can classify the geology into 6 groups based on rock type. Using these tracer properties, the contribution of rock to estuarine and coastal sediment can be evaluated with the multivariate sediment mixing model.

  10. X-ray fluorescence and gamma-ray spectrometry combined with multivariate analysis for topographic studies in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    de Castilhos, Natara D B; Melquiades, Fábio L; Thomaz, Edivaldo L; Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2014-10-15

    Physical and chemical properties of soils play a major role in the evaluation of different geochemical signature, soil quality, discrimination of land use type, soil provenance and soil degradation. The objectives of the present study are the soil elemental characterization and soil differentiation in topographic sequence and depth, using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) as well as gamma-ray spectrometry data combined with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The study area is an agricultural region of Boa Vista catchment which is located at Guamiranga municipality, Brazil. PCA analysis was performed with four different data sets: spectral data from EDXRF, spectral data from gamma-ray spectrometry, concentration values from EDXRF measurements and concentration values from gamma-ray spectrometry. All PCAs showed similar results, confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis, allowing the data grouping into top, bottom and riparian zone samples, i.e. the samples were separated due to its landscape position. The two hillslopes present the same behavior independent of the land use history. There are distinctive and characteristic patterns in the analyzed soil. The methodologies presented are promising and could be used to infer significant information about the region to be studied. PMID:25464179

  11. A NEW METHDOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FISSILE MASS IN INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTING ITEMS WITH THE USE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    KANE,W.R.; VANIER,P.E.; ZUHOSKI,P.B.; LEMLEY,J.R.

    2000-07-16

    In the safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes measurements are required which give the quantity of fissile material in an accounting item, e.g., a standard container of plutonium or uranium oxide. Because of the complexity of modeling the absorption of gamma rays in high-Z materials, gamma-ray spectrometry is not customarily used for this purpose. Gamma-ray measurements can be used to determine the fissile mass when two conditions are met: (1) The material is in a standard container, and (2) The material is finely divided, or a solid item with a reproducible shape. The methodology consists of: (A) Measurement of the emitted gamma rays, and (B) Measurement of the transmission through the item of the high-energy gamma rays of Co-60 and Th-228. We have demonstrated that items containing nuclear materials possess a characteristic ''fingerprint'' of gamma rays which depends not only on the nuclear properties, but also on the mass, density, shape, etc.. The material's spectrum confirms its integrity, homogeneity, and volume as well. While there is attenuation of radiation from the interior, the residual radiation confirms the homogeneity of the material throughout the volume. Transmission measurements, where the attenuation depends almost entirely on Compton scattering, determine the material mass. With well-characterized standards, this methodology can provide an accurate measure of the contained fissile material.

  12. Monte carlo simulation of in situ gamma-spectra recorded by NaI (Tl) detector in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Yingying; Wu, Ning; Wu, Bingwei; Liu, Yan; Cao, Xuan; Wang, Qian

    2015-06-01

    To develop a NaI (Tl) detector for in situ radioactivity monitoring in the marine environment and enhance the confidence of the probability of the gamma-spectrum analysis, Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-Particle ( MNCP ) code were performed to provide the response spectra of some interested radionuclides and the background spectra originating from the natural radionuclides in seawater recorded by a NaI (Tl) detector. A newly developed 75 mm × 75 mm NaI (Tl) detector was calibrated using four reference radioactive sources 137Cs, 60Co, 40K and 54Mn in the laboratory before the field measurements in seawater. A simulation model was established for the detector immersed in seawater. The simulated spectra were all broadened with Gaussian pulses to reflect the statistical fluctuations and electrical noise in the real measurement. The simulated spectra show that the single-energy photons into the detector are mostly scattering low-energy photons and the high background in the low energy region mainly originates from the Compton effect of the high energy ?-rays of natural radionuclides in seawater. The simulated background spectrum was compared with the experimental one recorded in field measurement and they seem to be in good agreement. The simulation method and spectra can be used for the accurate analysis of the filed measurement results of low concentration radioactivity in seawater.

  13. Calculation of the decision thresholds for radionuclides identified in gamma-ray spectra by post-processing peak analysis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korun, Matjaž; Vodenik, Branko; Zorko, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    A method for calculating the decision thresholds for gamma-ray emitters, identified in gamma-ray spectrometric analyses, is described. The method is suitable for application in computerized spectra-analyzing procedures. In the calculation, the number of counts and the uncertainty in the number of counts for the peaks associated with the emitter are used. The method makes possible to calculate decision thresholds from peaks on a curved background and overlapping peaks. The uncertainty in the number of counts used in the calculation was computed using Canberra's Standard Peak Search Program (Canberra, 1986, Peak Search Algorithm Manual 07-0064). For isolated peaks, the decision threshold exceeds the value calculated from the channel contents in an energy region that is 2.5 FWHM wide, covering the background in the immediate vicinity of the peak. The decision thresholds vary by approximately 20% over a dynamic range of peak areas of about 1000. In the case of overlapping peaks, the decision threshold increases considerably. For multi-gamma-ray emitters, a common decision threshold is calculated from the decision thresholds obtained from individual gamma-ray emissions, being smaller than the smallest of the individual decision thresholds.

  14. Detailed parametrization of neutrino and gamma-ray energy spectra from high energy proton-proton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supanitsky, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma rays and neutrinos are produced as a result of proton-proton interactions that occur in different astrophysical contexts. The detection of these two types of messengers is of great importance for the study of different physical phenomena, related to nonthermal processes, taking place in different astrophysical scenarios. Therefore, the knowledge of the energy spectrum of these two types of particles, as a function of the incident proton energy, is essential for the interpretation of the observational data. In this paper, parametrizations of the energy spectra of gamma rays and neutrinos, originated in proton-proton collisions, are presented. The energy range of the incident protons considered extends from 102 to 108 GeV . The parametrizations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of proton-proton interactions performed with the hadronic interaction models QGSJET-II-04 and EPOS-LHC, which have recently been updated with the data taken by the Large Hadron Collider.

  15. Accurate gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of the half-life of 92Sr.

    PubMed

    Leconte, P; Hudelot, J P; Antony, M

    2008-10-01

    Studies of the nuclear fuel cycle require an accurate knowledge of the energy release from the decay of radioactive nuclides produced in a reactor, including precise half-life data for the short-lived radionuclides. Moreover, short-lived fission products are crucial for fission rate distribution measurements performed in low-power facilities, such as EOLE and MINERVE of CEA Cadarache [Fougeras, P., 2005. EOLE, MINERVE and MASURCA facilities and their associated neutron experimental programs. In: 13th International Conference on Nuclear Engineering, Beijing, China, 16-20 May 2005], and their nuclear decay data need to be known to high precision. For these reasons, the half-life of (92)Sr has been measured to solve a recently observed inconsistency identified with the quoted value in the main nuclear applications libraries (including JEFF3.1): T(1/2)=2.71+/-0.01 h [Parsa, B., Ashari, A., Goolvard, L., Nobar, Y.M., 1971. Decay scheme of 2.71 h (92)Sr. Nucl. Phys. A 175, 629-640]. An overestimation of 4.5% has been identified in this work, based on two independent methods. Specific gamma-ray spectrometry measurements on activated fissile foils have been carried out, using two HPGe detectors. Influencing factors such as net area measurements of photopeaks, pulse pile-up accuracy and dead time corrections in the presence of decaying activity are discussed. A new value has been obtained by combining eight series of measurements: T(1/2)=2.594+/-0.006 h. The uncertainty has been reduced by a factor of two with respect to previous evaluations. This measured value also shows good agreement with the most recent studies of T(1/2)=2.627+/-0.009 h [Nir-El, Y., 2003. Private Communications. Soreq Research Centre, Yavne, Israel]. PMID:18456504

  16. Neanderthal skeleton from Tabun: U-series data by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, H P; Simpson, J J; Stringer, C B

    1998-12-01

    The Neanderthal hominid Tabun C1, found in Israel by Garrod & Bate, was attributed to either layer B or C of their stratigraphic sequence. We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the 230Th/234U and 231Pa/235U ratios of two bones from this skeleton, the mandible and a femur. The ages calculated from these ratios depend on the uranium uptake history of the bones. Assuming a model of early U (EU) uptake the age of the Tabun C1 mandible is 34+/-5 ka. The EU age of the femur is 19+/-2 ka. The femur may have experienced continuous (linear) U uptake which would give an age of 33+/-4 ka, in agreement with the mandible's EU age, but implies marked inhomogeneity in U uptake history at the site. These new age estimates for the skeleton suggest that it was younger than deposits of layer C. This apparent age is less than those of other Neanderthals found in Israel, and distinctly younger than the ages of the Skhul and Qafzeh burials. This suggests that Neanderthals did not necessarily coexist with the earliest modern humans in the region. All of the more complete Neanderthal fossils from Israel are now dated to the cool period of the last glacial cycle, suggesting that Neanderthals may have arrived in this region as a result of the southward expansion of their habitable range. The young age determined for the Tabun skeleton would suggest that Neanderthals survived as late in the Levant as they did in Europe. PMID:9929173

  17. Hints of the Existence of Axion-Like-Particles From the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Cosmological Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; Paneque, D.; Bloom, E.; Prada, F.; Dominguez, A.; /IAA, Granada /Seville U.

    2009-06-23

    Axion Like Particles (ALPs) are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields. This effect may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as AGNs. Here we carry out a detailed study that for the first time simultaneously considers in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. An efficient photon/axion mixing in the source always means an attenuation in the photon flux, whereas the mixing in the intergalactic medium may result in a decrement and/or enhancement of the photon flux, depending on the distance of the source and the energy considered. Interestingly, we find that decreasing the value of the intergalactic magnetic field strength, which decreases the probability for photon/axion mixing, could result in an increase of the expected photon flux at Earth if the source is far enough. We also find a 30% attenuation in the intensity spectrum of distant sources, which occurs at an energy that only depends on the properties of the ALPs and the intensity of the intergalactic magnetic field, and thus independent of the AGN source being observed. Moreover, we show that this mechanism can easily explain recent puzzles in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources, like the possible detection of TeV photons from 3C 66A (a source located at z=0.444) by MAGIC and VERITAS, which should not happen according to conventional models of photon propagation over cosmological distances. Another puzzle is the recent published lower limit to the EBL intensity at 3.6 {micro}m (which is almost twice larger as the previous one), which implies very hard spectra for some detected TeV gamma-ray sources located at z=0.1-0.2. The consequences that come from this work are testable with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments, namely Fermi (formerly known as GLAST) and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like CANGAROO, HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS.

  18. Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Capture on 234,236,238U Measured with DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Mosby, S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C.-Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the 238U(n, ?) cross section using a thin 48 mg/cm2 target was made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE over the energy range from 10 eV to 500 keV. The results confirm earlier measurements. Measurements of the gamma-ray emission spectra were also made for 238U(n, ?) as well as 234,236U(n, ?). These measurements help to constrain the radiative strength function used in the cross-section calculations.

  19. Mapping the spatial distribution and activity of (226)Ra at legacy sites through Machine Learning interpretation of gamma-ray spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul; Davies, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Radium ((226)Ra) contamination derived from military, industrial, and pharmaceutical products can be found at a number of historical sites across the world posing a risk to human health. The analysis of spectral data derived using gamma-ray spectrometry can offer a powerful tool to rapidly estimate and map the activity, depth, and lateral distribution of (226)Ra contamination covering an extensive area. Subsequently, reliable risk assessments can be developed for individual sites in a fraction of the timeframe compared to traditional labour-intensive sampling techniques: for example soil coring. However, local heterogeneity of the natural background, statistical counting uncertainty, and non-linear source response are confounding problems associated with gamma-ray spectral analysis. This is particularly challenging, when attempting to deal with enhanced concentrations of a naturally occurring radionuclide such as (226)Ra. As a result, conventional surveys tend to attribute the highest activities to the largest total signal received by a detector (Gross counts): an assumption that tends to neglect higher activities at depth. To overcome these limitations, a methodology was developed making use of Monte Carlo simulations, Principal Component Analysis and Machine Learning based algorithms to derive depth and activity estimates for (226)Ra contamination. The approach was applied on spectra taken using two gamma-ray detectors (Lanthanum Bromide and Sodium Iodide), with the aim of identifying an optimised combination of detector and spectral processing routine. It was confirmed that, through a combination of Neural Networks and Lanthanum Bromide, the most accurate depth and activity estimates could be found. The advantage of the method was demonstrated by mapping depth and activity estimates at a case study site in Scotland. There the method identified significantly higher activity (<3Bqg(-1)) occurring at depth (>0.4m), that conventional gross counting algorithms failed to identify. It was concluded that the method could easily be employed to identify areas of high activity potentially occurring at depth, prior to intrusive investigation using conventional sampling techniques. PMID:26795756

  20. New capture Gamma-Ray library and Atlas of spectra for all elements

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.; Revay, Zs.; Molnar, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    A new library comprising 30 thousand neutron capture gamma rays has been created by combining new measurements on natural elements from Budapest and literature data for all stable isotope targets. All energies and intensities are consistent in that they are based on the chlorine and nitrogen standards, respectively. Accurate neutron binding energies and thermal capture cross-sections could also be inferred for all cases where the level scheme is sufficiently complete. The new data can be used for nuclear structure investigations, reaction model calculations, and a number of applications, such as Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA).

  1. Effect of different thickness of material filter on Tc-99m spectra and performance parameters of gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazifah, A.; Norhanna, S.; Shah, S. I.; Zakaria, A.

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of material filter technique on Tc-99m spectra and performance parameters of Philip ADAC forte dual head gamma camera. Thickness of material filter was selected on the basis of percentage attenuation of various gamma ray energies by different thicknesses of zinc material. A cylindrical source tank of NEMA single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) Triple Line Source Phantom filled with water and Tc-99m radionuclide injected was used for spectra, uniformity and sensitivity measurements. Vinyl plastic tube was used as a line source for spatial resolution. Images for uniformity were reconstructed by filtered back projection method. Butterworth filter of order 5 and cut off frequency 0.35 cycles/cm was selected. Chang's attenuation correction method was applied by selecting 0.13/cm linear attenuation coefficient. Count rate was decreased with material filter from the compton region of Tc-99m energy spectrum, also from the photopeak region. Spatial resolution was improved. However, uniformity of tomographic image was equivocal, and system volume sensitivity was reduced by material filter. Material filter improved system's spatial resolution. Therefore, the technique may be used for phantom studies to improve the image quality.

  2. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  3. Gamma spectrometry efficiency calibration using Monte Carlo methods to measure radioactivity of 137Cs in food samples.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, T

    2014-12-01

    A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring the radioactivity of (137)Cs in food samples, was based on Monte Carlo simulations available in the free-of-charge toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of a high-purity germanium detector were calculated for three reference materials representing three different food items. These efficiency values were compared with their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Interestingly, the output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method. PMID:24214912

  4. A revision factor to the Cutshall self-attenuation correction in (210)Pb gamma-spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Jod?owski, Pawe?

    2016-03-01

    The Cutshall transmission method of determination of self-attenuation correction in (210)Pb measurements by gamma-spectrometry gives the results burdened with errors of up to 10%. The author proposes introducing into the Cutshall correction Cs,Cuts an additional revision factor CCs,Cuts to eliminate errors. The proposed formula of the revision factor describes the CCs,Cuts value depending on the experimentally obtained Cs,Cuts correction. Formula holds true in wide ranges of the measurement geometries and linear attenuation coefficients of both the standard and the sample. PMID:26702546

  5. Use of a Shielded High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry System to Segregate LLW from Contact Handleable ILW Containing Plutonium - 13046

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Rosemary; Wilkins, Colin; Chard, Patrick; Jaederstroem, Henrik; LeBlanc, Paul; Mowry, Rick; MacDonald, Sanders; Gunn, William

    2013-07-01

    Dounreay Site Restoration Limited (DSRL) have a number of drums of solid waste that may contain Plutonium Contaminated Material. These are currently categorised as Contact Handleable Intermediate Level Waste (CHILW). A significant fraction of these drums potentially contain waste that is in the Low Level Waste (LLW) category. A Canberra Q2 shielded high resolution gamma spectrometry system is being used to quantify the total activity of drums that are potentially in the LLW category in order to segregate those that do contain LLW from CHILW drums and thus to minimise the total volume of waste in the higher category. Am-241 is being used as an indicator of the presence of plutonium in the waste from its strong 59.54 keV gamma-ray; a knowledge of the different waste streams from which the material originates allows a pessimistic waste 'fingerprint' to be used in order to determine an upper limit to the activities of the weak and non-gamma-emitting plutonium and associated radionuclides. This paper describes the main features of the high resolution gamma spectrometry system being used by DSRL to perform the segregation of CHILW and LLW and how it was configured and calibrated using the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). It also describes how potential LLW drums are selected for assay and how the system uses the existing waste stream fingerprint information to determine a reliable upper limit for the total activity present in each measured drum. Results from the initial on-site commissioning trials and the first measurements of waste drums using the new monitor are presented. (authors)

  6. A rapid dissolution procedure to aid initial nuclear forensics investigations of chemically refractory compounds and particles prior to gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, David G; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E; Britton, Richard

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and effective preparative procedure has been evaluated for the accurate determination of low-energy (40-200 keV) gamma-emitting radionuclides ((210)Pb, (234)Th, (226)Ra, (235)U) in uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The measurement of low-energy gamma photons is complicated in heterogeneous samples containing high-density mineral phases and in such situations activity concentrations will be underestimated. This is because attenuation corrections, calculated based on sample mean density, do not properly correct where dense grains are dispersed within a less dense matrix (analogous to a nugget effect). The current method overcomes these problems using a lithium tetraborate fusion that readily dissolves all components including high-density, self-attenuating minerals/compounds. This is the ideal method for dissolving complex, non-volatile components in soils, rocks, mineral concentrates, and other materials where density reduction is required. Lithium borate fusion avoids the need for theoretical efficiency corrections or measurement of matrix matched calibration standards. The resulting homogeneous quenched glass produced can be quickly dissolved in nitric acid producing low-density solutions that can be counted by gamma spectrometry. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated using uranium-bearing Certified Reference Materials and provides accurate activity concentration determinations compared to the underestimated activity concentrations derived from direct measurements of a bulk sample. The procedure offers an effective solution for initial nuclear forensic studies where complex refractory minerals or matrices exist. It is also significantly faster, safer and simpler than alternative approaches. PMID:26572834

  7. Cosmic Infrared Background From Population III Stars and Its Effect on Spectra of High-z Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the contribution of Population III stars to the near-IR (NIR) cosmic infrared background (CIB) and its effect on spectra of high-z, high-energy gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other sources. It is shown that if Population III is composed of massive stars, the claimed NIR CIB excess will be reproduced if only approx. 4% plus or minus 2% of all baryons went through these stars. Regardless of the precise amount of the NIR CIB due to them, they likely left enough photons to provide a large optical depth for high-energy photons from distant GRBs. Observations of such GRBs are expected following the planned launch of NASA's GLAST mission. Detecting such damping in the spectra of high-z GRBs will then provide important information on the emissions from the Population III epoch, and the location of this cutoff may serve as an indicator of the GRBs' redshifts. We also point out the difficulty of unambiguously detecting the CIB part originating from Population III in spectra of low-z blazars.

  8. Dating of sediments from four Swiss prealpine lakes with (210)Pb determined by gamma-spectrometry: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    Putyrskaya, V; Klemt, E; Röllin, S; Astner, M; Sahli, H

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the most important problems in dating lake sediments with unsupported (210)Pb are summarized and the progress in gamma-spectrometry of the unsupported (210)Pb is discussed. The main topics of these studies concern sediment samples preparation for gamma-spectrometry, measurement techniques and data analysis, as well as understanding of accumulation and sedimentation processes in lakes. The vertical distributions of artificial ((137)Cs, (241)Am, (239)Pu) and natural radionuclides ((40)K, (210,214)Pb, (214)Bi) as well as stable trace elements (Fe, Mn, Pb) in sediment cores from four Swiss lakes were used as examples for the interpretation, inter-comparison and validation of depth-age relations established by three (210)Pb-based models (CF-CSR, CRS and SIT). The identification of turbidite layers and the influence of the turbidity flows on the accuracy of sediment dating is demonstrated. Time-dependent mass sedimentation rates in lakes Brienz, Thun, Biel and Lucerne are discussed and compared with published data. PMID:25875007

  9. Self-absorption correction factor applied to 129I measurement by direct gamma-X spectrometry for Fucus serratus samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, O.; Bouisset, P.; Germain, P.; Barker, E.; Kerlau, G.; Cagnat, X.

    2003-06-01

    Self-absorption corrections have been determined for the energies characterising 129I below 40 keV in the frame of studying Fucus serratus samples by direct gamma-X spectrometry. This work was performed on a large spatio-temporal scale in order to integrate the fluctuations of the matrix. More than 200 samples monthly collected from January 1983 to December 1996 along the French Atlantic and English Channel coasts, have been measured as part of the Permanent Observatory of the radioactivity programme of the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN). A relationship has been established between experimental mass attenuation coefficients at low energy and the 40K concentrations of the samples, where the latter showed the same temporal variation as the 127I concentration (iodine stable isotope). Based on the mean correction factors determined in the present work, a simplified method is proposed to quantify the content of 129I. The direct gamma-X spectrometry results obtained in this way are in good agreement with those reported by Patti et al. (Radioprotection 23 (1988) 381) using neutron activation analysis for the samples collected between October 1983 and December 1984 at Herquemoulin, located near the La Hague reprocessing plant.

  10. Single Nanoparticle Mass Spectrometry as a High Temperature Kinetics Tool: Sublimation, Oxidation, and Emission Spectra of Hot Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Howder, Collin R; Long, Bryan A; Gerlich, Dieter; Alley, Rex N; Anderson, Scott L

    2015-12-17

    In single nanoparticle mass spectrometry, individual charged nanoparticles (NPs) are trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected optically, allowing their mass, charge, and optical properties to be monitored continuously. Previous experiments of this type probed NPs that were either fluorescent or large enough to detect by light scattering. Alternatively, small NPs can be heated to temperatures where thermally excited emission is strong enough to allow detection, and this approach should provide a new tool for measurements of sublimation and surface reaction kinetics of materials at high temperatures. As an initial test, we report a study of carbon NPs in the 20-50 nm range, heated by 10.6 μm, 532 nm, or 445 nm lasers. The kinetics for sublimation and oxidation of individual carbon NPs were studied, and a model is presented for the factors that control the NP temperature, including laser heating, and cooling by sublimation, buffer gas collisions, and radiation. The estimated NP temperatures were in the 1700-2000 K range, and the NP absorption cross sections ranged from ∼0.8 to 0.2% of the geometric cross sections for 532 nm and 10.6 μm excitation, respectively. Emission spectra of single NPs and small NP ensembles show a feature in the IR that appears to be the high energy tail of the thermal (blackbody-like) emission expected from hot particles but also a discrete feature peaking around 750 nm. Both the IR tail and 750 nm peak are observed for all particles and for both IR and visible laser excitation. No significant difference was observed between graphite and amorphous carbon NPs. PMID:26513667

  11. ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2013-02-20

    The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

  12. Determination of Vanadium by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in Conjunction with Compton Suppression Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    W. H. Zhang; A. Chatt

    2000-11-12

    The toxicity of vanadium has been known for a long time. It is only recently that vanadium has been recognized as an essential trace element. The determination of vanadium with high precision and accuracy in tissues, foods, and other biological materials is needed for the purpose of studying its effect on human nutrition and health. Several techniques such as spectrophotometry, atomic absorption, X-ray fluorescence, and neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be used for its determination. Vanadium can be determined by NAA through its short-lived nuclide {sup 52}V produced via the {sup 51}V(n, {gamma}){sup 52}V reaction; it has a 1434.2-keV gamma ray and a half-life of 3.74 min. It has been reported that {sup 52}V has sufficient sensitivity for its measurement down to nanogram levels. However, it is seldom assayed in practice by instrumental NAA (INAA) in conjunction with conventional gamma-ray spectrometry, in particular for low vanadium content in high-salt biological materials, due to the Compton background interference from nuclides such as {sup 28}Al, {sup 38}Cl, {sup 56}Mn, and {sup 24}Na. Alternatively, radiochemical NAA or preconcentration NAA methods are used to separate vanadium from the major and interfering elements. A Compton suppression counting technique can be beneficially used under such situations. One of the objectives of this work was to fully explore the advantages of Compton suppression counting for the determination of vanadium in biological samples.

  13. Gannet: A Batch-Processing Tool for the Quantitative Analysis of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid–Edited MR Spectroscopy Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Edden, Richard A.E.; Puts, Nicolaas A.J.; Harris, Ashley D.; Barker, Peter B.; Evans, C. John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe the Gannet toolkit for the quantitative batch analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) -edited MRS data. Materials and Methods Using MEGA-PRESS editing and standard acquisition parameters, four MEGA-PRESS spectra were acquired in three brain regions in 10 healthy volunteers. These 120 datasets were processed without user intervention with Gannet, a Matlab-based tool that takes raw time-domain data input, processes it to generate the frequency-domain edited spectrum, and applies a simple modeling procedure to estimate GABA concentration relative to the creatine or, if provided, the unsuppressed water signal. A comparison of four modeling approaches is also presented. Results All data were successfully processed by Gannet. Coefficients of variation across subjects ranged from 11% for the occipital region to 17% for the dorsolateral prefrontal region. There was no clear difference in fitting performance between the simple Gaussian model used by Gannet and the other more complex models presented. Conclusion Gannet, the GABA Analysis Toolkit, can be used to process and quantify GABA-edited MRS spectra without user intervention. PMID:25548816

  14. On the non-existence of a sharp cooling break in gamma-ray burst afterglow spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-01-01

    Although the widely used analytical afterglow model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) predicts a sharp cooling break ν {sub c} in its afterglow spectrum, the GRB observations so far rarely show clear evidence for a cooling break in their spectra or a corresponding temporal break in their light curves. Employing a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. We precisely follow the cooling history of non-thermal electrons accelerated into each Lagrangian shell. We show that a detailed calculation of afterglow spectra does not in fact give rise to a sharp cooling break at ν {sub c}. Instead, it displays a very mild and smooth transition, which occurs gradually over a few orders of magnitude in energy or frequency. The main source of this slow transition is that different mini shells have different evolutionary histories of the comoving magnetic field strength B, so that deriving the current value of ν {sub c} of each mini shell requires an integration of its cooling rate over the time elapsed since its creation. We present the time evolution of optical and X-ray spectral indices to demonstrate the slow transition of spectral regimes and discuss the implications of our result in interpreting GRB afterglow data.

  15. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  16. A prototype of radioactive waste drum monitor by non-destructive assays using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Trang, Hoang Thi Kieu; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Tran, Le Bao; Tam, Hoang Duc; Tao, Chau Van

    2016-03-01

    In this work, segmented gamma scanning and the gamma emission tomography were used to locate unknown sources in a radioactive waste drum. The simulated detector response function and full energy peak efficiency are compared to corresponding experimental data and show about 5.3% difference for an energy ranging from 81keV to 1332.5keV for point sources. Computation of the corresponding activity is in good agreement with the true values. PMID:26717796

  17. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity ratios showed distinct differences between the closed CANDU primary coolant system and radiopharmaceutical production releases. According to the concept proposed by Kalinowski and Pistner (2006), the relationship between different isotopic activity ratios based on three or four radioxenon isotopes was plotted in a log-log diagram for source characterisation (civil vs. nuclear test). The multiple isotopic activity ratios were distributed in three distinct areas: HC atmospheric monitoring ratios extended to far left; the CANDU primary coolant system ratios lay in the middle; and 99Mo stack monitoring ratios for ANSTO and CRL were located on the right. The closed CANDU primary coolant has the lowest logarithmic mean ratio that represents the nuclear power reactor operation. The HC atmospheric monitoring exhibited a broad range of ratios spreading over several orders of magnitude. In contrast, the ANSTO and CRL stack emissions showed the smallest range of ratios but the results indicate at least two processes involved in the 99Mo productions. Overall, most measurements were found to be shifted towards the reactor domain. The hypothesis is that this is due to an accumulation of the isotope 131mXe in the stack or atmospheric background as it has the longest half-life and extra 131mXe emissions from the decay of 131I. The contribution of older 131mXe to a fresh release shifts the ratio of 133mXe/131mXe to the left. It was also very interesting to note that there were some situations where isotopic ratios from 99Mo production emissions fell within the nuclear test domain. This is due to operational variability, such as shorter target irradiation times. Martin B. Kalinowski and Christoph Pistner, (2006), Isotopic signature of atmospheric xenon released from light water reactors, Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 88, 215-235.

  18. Drift problems in the automatic analysis of gamma-ray spectra using associative memory algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Olmos, P.; Diaz, J.C.; Perez, J.M.; Aguayo, P. ); Gomez, P.; Rodellar, V. )

    1994-06-01

    Perturbations affecting nuclear radiation spectrometers during their operation frequently spoil the accuracy of automatic analysis methods. One of the problems usually found in practice refers to fluctuations in the spectrum gain and zero, produced by drifts in the detector and nuclear electronics. The pattern acquired in these conditions may be significantly different from that expected with stable instrumentation, thus complicating the identification and quantification of the radionuclides present in it. In this work, the performance of Associative Memory algorithms when dealing with spectra affected by drifts is explored considering a linear energy-calibration function. The formulation of the extended algorithm, constructed to quantify the possible presence of drifts in the spectrometer, is deduced and the results obtained from its application to several practical cases are commented.

  19. Spatially-Dependent Measurements of Surface and Near-Surface Radioactive Material Using In situ Gamma Ray Spectrometry (ISGRS) For Final Status Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Chapman, A. J. Boerner, E. W. Abelquist

    2006-11-15

    In-situ, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (ISGRS) measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) field laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of these tests was to provide analytical data for assessing how “fit for use” this technology is for detecting discrete particles in soil.

  20. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-12-31

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  1. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  2. Calculation of the decision threshold in gamma-ray spectrometry using sum peaks.

    PubMed

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2016-03-01

    In the presence of radon daughters, gamma rays from (88)Y with energies at 898.0keV or 1836.1keV appear on a high, continuous background or overlap with other peaks. Therefore a calculation of the decision threshold from the sum peak at 2734.1keV represents a useful alternative, because here the continuous background is low. The decision threshold calculated from this peak can attain a value being comparable to the decision threshold calculated from the gamma-ray peak at 898.0keV. PMID:26625726

  3. Mathematical model of gamma-ray spectrometry borehole logging for quantitative analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1981-01-01

    A technique for analyzing gamma-ray spectral-logging data has been developed, in which a digital computer is used to calculate the effects of gamma-ray attentuation in a borehole environment. The computer model allows for the calculation of the effects of lithology, porosity, density, and the thickness of a horizontal layer of uniformly distributed radioactive material surrounding a centralized probe in a cylindrical borehole. The computer program also contains parameters for the calculation of the effects of well casing, drilling fluid, probe housing, and losses through the sodium-iodide crystal. Errors associated with the commonly used mathematical assumption of a point detector are eliminated in this model. (USGS)

  4. An intercomparison of gamma-spectrometry on two samples of biological origin by eight laboratories in four countries.

    PubMed

    Twining, J R

    1996-08-01

    This report gives details of the first inter-laboratory comparison of gamma-spectrometry to be run within SPERA, the South Pacific Environmental Radioactivity Association since its inauguration in 1991. Laboratories in Australia, Chile, French Polynesia and New Zealand participated in the exercise. Two 'unknown' samples of biological origin were analysed. The first was a sample of milk powder derived from IAEA reference material. This sample provided an assessment of overall accuracy of 134Cs, 137Cs and 40K determinations. The second sample consisted of dried fish flesh including natural 40K and spiked with a mixed nuclide solution containing 210Pb, 109Cd, 54Mn, 60Co and trace 133Ba. Together the samples gave information on analytical precision over a range of energies and activities. When the results were compared with the recommended values and confidence intervals of the IAEA reference material, the overall accuracy of the gamma-spectrometry analytical procedures was found to be good. The average mean values for combined laboratory data fell within the recommended value ranges for each isotope. Ninety percent of the individual laboratory isotope mean values were within two standard errors of the 95% confidence interval of the standard, 75% were within 1 s.e., and 33% of the analyses fell within the confidence interval. Technical precision was also adequate with the overall errors being of the same magnitude as that of the reference material values for each isotope with relative standard deviations of 5-10%. There was a tendency for standard deviations of the combined results to be larger than those reported or derived from individual laboratory results by a factor between 1.2-5.6. This result suggested an under-estimate of systematic errors within individual laboratories. The largest sources of error were derived from reporting and calculation of results which gave a 16% gross error rate. PMID:8828161

  5. The influence of exogenous conditions on mobile measured gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierke, C.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2012-12-01

    In the past, gamma ray measurements have been used for geological surveys and exploration using airborne and borehole logging systems. For these applications, the relationships between the measured physical parameter - the concentration of natural gamma emitters 40K, 238U and 232Th - and geological origin or sedimentary developments are well described. Based on these applications and knowledge in combination with adjusted sensor systems, gamma ray measurements are used to derive soil parameters to create detailed soil maps e.g., in digital soil mapping (DSM) and monitoring of soils. Therefore, not only qualitative but also quantitative comparability is necessary. Grain size distribution, type of clay minerals and organic matter content are soil parameters which directly influence the gamma ray emitter concentration. Additionally, the measured concentration is influenced by endogenous processes like soil moisture variation due to raining events, foggy weather conditions, or erosion and deposition of material. A time series of gamma ray measurements was used to observe changes in gamma ray concentration on a floodplain area in Central Germany. The study area is characterised by high variations in grain size distribution and occurrence of flooding events. For the survey, we used a 4l NaI(Tl) detector with GPS connection mounted on a sledge, which is towed across the field sites by a four-wheel-vehicle. The comparison of data from different time steps shows similar structures with minor variation between the data ranges and shape of structures. However, the data measured during different soil moisture contents differ in absolute value. An average increase of soil moisture of 36% leads to a decrease of Th (by 20%), K (by 29%), and U (by 41%). These differences can be explained by higher attenuation of radiation during higher soil moisture content. The different changes in nuclide concentration will also lead to varying ratios. We will present our experiences concerning the measurement under variable field conditions and their impacts on gamma ray data quality. These activities are done within the iSOIL project. iSOIL- Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities of the FP7 Thematic Priority Environment; iSOIL is one member of the SOIL TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER of Research Projects funded by the EC.

  6. Gamma-irradiated dry fruits. An example of a wide variety of long-time dependent EPR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Pachova, Zdravka

    2006-03-01

    EPR spectra of dry, sugar containing fruits—raisins, sultanas, figs, dates, peaches, blue plums and chokeberry recorded before and after irradiation with gamma-rays, are reported. It is shown that weak singlet EPR line with 2.0031 ± 0.0005 can be recorded before irradiation of seeds, stones or skin of chokeberry, figs and raisins as well as flesh of blue plum, raisins and peaches. EPR signals of various shape are distinguished after irradiation in different parts of the fruits, as well as in randomly cut pieces of them: Seeds of raisins, chokeberry and figs give a singlet line. Stones from blue plums and peaches exhibit typical "cellulose-like" EPR signal consisting of an intense singlet line with g = 2.0033 ± 0.0005 and 2 week satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. Stones of dates are the only sample in which "sugar-like" spectrum is recorded. Skin of raisins and figs exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum whereas that of dates and chokeberry—a singlet line. Under the same experimental conditions skin of sultanas, peaches and blue plums are EPR silent. Flesh of raisins, sultanas, figs, dates and peaches exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum, flesh of blue plums gives a singlet EPR line and that of chokeberry is EPR silent. As a result, randomly cut pieces of dry fruits suitable for EPR studies, containing various constituents, exhibit different in shape and intensity EPR spectra. Kinetic studies followed for 1 year on the time stability of all reported EPR signals indicate that intensity ratio between the simultaneously appearing EPR signals in particular fruit varies from 1:20 immediately after irradiation to 1:0.5 at the end of the period. These observations open a new possibility for identification of irradiated fruits - using the magnitude of the intensity ratio to find the approximate date of radiation processing in the first ca. 30-100 days.

  7. A review of nationwide radioactivity comparisons on gamma-ray spectrometry organized by the NIRP, China.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Fei; Xu, Cuihua; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qiang; Li, Wenhong; Zhang, Jianfeng; Su, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Six comparison exercises on radioactivity measurement by γ-spectrometry have been organized by NIRP in China since 2007. The type of measured nuclides changed from natural to man-made over this period. A total of 188 samples were prepared and distributed to 39 different participating laboratories and 528 radionuclide assays have been performed. A perceptible laboratory performance improvement was observed with the average percentage of acceptable scores being 87% in 2008, increasing to 92% in 2012. PMID:24369889

  8. Determination of the stellar (n,{gamma}) cross section of {sup 40}Ca with accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Wallner, A.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Mengoni, A.; Gallino, R.; Paul, M.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2009-06-15

    The stellar (n,{gamma}) cross section of {sup 40}Ca at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing {gamma}-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic {sup 40}Ca is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, {sup 40}Ca can also play a secondary role as ''neutron poison'' for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based on time-of-flight measurements. Our method uses an independent approach, and yields for the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV a value of <{sigma}>{sub 3}0 keV=5.73{+-}0.34 mb.

  9. Hydration of hyaluronan polysaccharide observed by IR spectrometry. II. Definition and quantitative analysis of elementary hydration spectra and water uptake.

    PubMed

    Haxaire, K; Maréchal, Y; Milas, M; Rinaudo, M

    2003-01-01

    We recorded a series of spectra of sodium hyaluronan (HA) films that were in equilibrium with their surrounding humid atmosphere. The hygrometry of this atmosphere extended from 0 to 0.97% relative humidity. We performed a quantitative analysis of the corresponding series of hydration spectra that are the difference spectra of the film at a defined hygrometry minus the spectrum of the dried film (hygrometry = 0). The principle of this analysis is to use this series of hydration spectra to define a limited number (four) of "elementary hydration spectra" over which we can decompose all hydration spectra with good accuracy. This decomposition, combined with the measurements of the numbers of H(2)O molecules at the origin in these elementary hydration spectra of the three characteristic vibrational bands of H(2)O, allowed us to calculate the hydration number under different relative humidity conditions. This number compares well with that determined by thermogravimetry. Furthermore, the decomposition defines for each hygrometry value which chemical mechanisms represented by elementary hydration spectra are active. This analysis is pursued by determining for the elementary hydration spectra the number of hydrogen bonds established by each of the four alcohol groups found in each disaccharide repeat unit before performing the same analysis for amide and carboxylate groups. These results are later utilized to discuss the structure of HA at various stages of hydration. PMID:12722111

  10. Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using γ-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, B.; Dhavamani, V.; Ramkumar, S.; Philominathan, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 238U and 40K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using γ-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of 232Th, 238U and 40K is 42.9±9.4 Bq.kg−1, 14.7±1.7 Bq.kg−1 and 149.5±3.1 Bq.kg−1 respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of 232Th, 238U and 40K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h−1 and 59.1 nGy.h−1 with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 ±9 nGy.h−1. This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h−1. Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 μSv.y−1 with an arithmetic mean of 53.1±11 μSv.y−1. The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels. PMID:20177570

  11. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume I. Data analysis methodology and hardware description

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and had dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  12. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings. [IAEAPU

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  13. Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. Semiannual technical report, 1 March-31 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rester, A.C. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

  14. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Haight, Robert Cameron; Jandel, Marian; Mosby, Shea Morgan; O'Donnell, John M.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Krticka, Milan

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  15. Characterisation of imperial college reactor centre legacy waste using gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuhaimi, Alif Imran Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Waste characterisation is a principal component in waste management strategy. The characterisation includes identification of chemical, physical and radiochemical parameters of radioactive waste. Failure to determine specific waste properties may result in sentencing waste packages which are not compliant with the regulation of long term storage or disposal. This project involved measurement of intensity and energy of gamma photons which may be emitted by radioactive waste generated during decommissioning of Imperial College Reactor Centre (ICRC). The measurement will use High Purity Germanium (HPGe) as Gamma-ray detector and ISOTOPIC-32 V4.1 as analyser. In order to ensure the measurements provide reliable results, two quality control (QC) measurements using difference matrices have been conducted. The results from QC measurements were used to determine the accuracy of the ISOTOPIC software.

  16. Gamma ray spectrometry logs as a hydrocarbon indicator for clastic reservoir rocks in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Alfy, I M; Nabih, M A; Eysa, E A

    2013-03-01

    Petroleum oil is an important source for the energy in the world. The Gulf of Suez, Nile Delta and South Valley are important regions for studying hydrocarbon potential in Egypt. A thorium normalization technique was applied on the sandstone reservoirs in the three regions to determine the hydrocarbon potentialities zones using the three spectrometric radioactive gamma ray-logs (eU, eTh and K% logs). The conventional well logs (gamma-ray, deep resistivity, shallow resistivity, neutron, density and sonic logs) are analyzed to determine the net pay zones in these wells. Indices derived from thorium normalized spectral logs indicate the hydrocarbon zones in petroleum reservoirs. The results of this technique in the three regions (Gulf of Suez, Nile Delta and South Valley) are in agreement with the results of the conventional well log analyses by ratios of 82%, 78% and 71% respectively. PMID:23306160

  17. Elemental analysis of a comet nucleus by passive gamma ray spectrometry from a penetrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, L. G.; Trombka, J. I.; Boynton, W. V.

    1986-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) spacecraft, to be launched in 1991, was designed to study the physical and chemical properties of cometary and asteroid bodies. It is proposed that these properties can be determined by utilizing a penetrator experiment delivery system aboard the CRAF, which would deliver a passive gamma ray spectrometer to the comet and determine the composition of subsurface materials. Results of calculations for a model comet (50 percent CI carbonaceous chrondrite, 50 percent ices) provide data on the expected gamma ray fluxes, the minimum detectable limits, and the detection uncertainties for 35 isotopes. These results confirm that this technique can determine the composition of both the rocky and ice components, and the rock-to-ice ratio in the nucleus. In addition, useful information regarding the formation of the solar system is provided.

  18. Optical and infrared absorption spectra of 3d transition metal ions-doped sodium borophosphate glasses and effect of gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; ElBatal, F H; Azooz, M A; Ouis, M A; ElBatal, H A

    2012-12-01

    Undoped and transition metals (3d TM) doped sodium borophosphate glasses were prepared. UV-visible absorption spectra were measured in the region 200-900nm before and after gamma irradiation. Experimental optical data indicate that the undoped sodium borophosphate glass reveals before irradiation strong and broad UV absorption and no visible bands could be identified. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for preparation of this base borophosphate glass. The TMs-doped glasses show absorption bands within the UV and/or visible regions which are characteristic to each respective TM ion in addition to the UV absorption observed from the host base glass. Infrared absorption spectra of the undoped and TMs-doped glasses reveal complex FTIR consisting of extended characteristic vibrational bands which are specific for phosphate groups as a main constituent but with the sharing of some vibrations due to the borate groups. This criterion was investigated and approved using DAT (deconvolution analysis technique). The effects of different TMs ions on the FTIR spectra are very limited due to the low doping level (0.2%) introduced in the glass composition. Gamma irradiation causes minor effect on the FTIR spectra specifically the decrease of intensities of some bands. Such behavior is related to the change of bond angles and/or bond lengths of some structural building units upon gamma irradiation. PMID:22995547

  19. Optical and infrared absorption spectra of 3d transition metal ions-doped sodium borophosphate glasses and effect of gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; ElBatal, F. H.; Azooz, M. A.; Ouis, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Undoped and transition metals (3d TM) doped sodium borophosphate glasses were prepared. UV-visible absorption spectra were measured in the region 200-900 nm before and after gamma irradiation. Experimental optical data indicate that the undoped sodium borophosphate glass reveals before irradiation strong and broad UV absorption and no visible bands could be identified. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for preparation of this base borophosphate glass. The TMs-doped glasses show absorption bands within the UV and/or visible regions which are characteristic to each respective TM ion in addition to the UV absorption observed from the host base glass. Infrared absorption spectra of the undoped and TMs-doped glasses reveal complex FTIR consisting of extended characteristic vibrational bands which are specific for phosphate groups as a main constituent but with the sharing of some vibrations due to the borate groups. This criterion was investigated and approved using DAT (deconvolution analysis technique). The effects of different TMs ions on the FTIR spectra are very limited due to the low doping level (0.2%) introduced in the glass composition. Gamma irradiation causes minor effect on the FTIR spectra specifically the decrease of intensities of some bands. Such behavior is related to the change of bond angles and/or bond lengths of some structural building units upon gamma irradiation.

  20. ENERGY-DEPENDENT LIGHT CURVES AND PHASE-RESOLVED SPECTRA OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2010-12-20

    Energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectra of high-energy {gamma}-ray emission from the Crab pulsar have been detected recently by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Within the framework of a two-pole, three-dimensional outer gap model, we calculate the energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectra in the inertial observer's frame. Our results show that (1) the observed {gamma}-ray properties from both Fermi LAT and MAGIC can be reproduced well in this model; (2) the first peak of the light curves in the energy region less than {approx}10 GeV comes from the sum of emissions from both the north and south poles, and the second peak comes only from the emission from the south pole; however, the relative contribution of the two poles to the first peak changes with increasing {gamma}-ray energy, and the light curve in the energy region greater than {approx}20 GeV comes completely from the emission of the south pole; and (3) {gamma}-rays in the energy region greater than 100 MeV are produced through inverse Compton scattering from secondary pairs and the survival curvature photons, where the latter dominate over {gamma}-ray emission in the energy region greater than several GeV.

  1. Application of spectrum shifting methodology to restore NaI(Tl)-recorded gamma spectra, shifted due to temperature variations in the environment.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pratip; Roy, Arup Singha; Verma, Amit K; Pant, Amar D; Prakasha, M S; Anilkumar, S; Kumar, A Vinod

    2016-01-01

    A method has been standardized for restoring a shifted differential pulse height spectrum from a scintillator based gamma ray spectrometer recorded at measurement temperature, to the position of a desired spectrum, recorded at a reference temperature. The method is based on the assumption that the spectrum obtained at measurement temperature represents the same statistical distribution as that at reference temperature but with different energy scales. A computer program has been developed for calculation of the transformation between the energy scales and for the restoration of the shifted spectrum. The method developed has been successfully applied for the restoration of gamma spectra measured at different temperatures. PMID:26492324

  2. Uncertainty assessment in the free release measurement by gamma spectrometry of rotating waste drums.

    PubMed

    Stanga, D; Sima, O; Gurau, D

    2016-03-01

    The assessment of uncertainty in free release measurements by integral gamma scanning method is described and applied to the measurement of homogeneous and heterogeneous waste drums. It is based on the propagation of distributions using the Monte Carlo method. In addition, two techniques for the uncertainty reduction are also described. The first technique makes use of containers constructed from two concentric cylinders and the second technique is based on the measurement of a group of waste drums. It is proved that the uncertainty of clearance measurements can be reduced using both techniques. PMID:26653210

  3. Modern aerial gamma-ray spectrometry and regional potassium map of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The aerial gamma-ray data were obtained as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy during the period 1975-1983. References for the Open-File Reports that describe the surveys and data collection can be found in Bendix Field Engineering Corp. (1983). The aerial surveys were flown by contractors using fixed-wing and helicopter systems with 33-50 L (liters) of thallium-activated sodium iodide (NaI (TI)) crystals. The nominal survey altitude used is 122 m. The survey lines were generally east-west with line spacings of 1.6-10 km. Tie lines were flown perpendicular to the flight lines at intervals of 16- 30 km. The data were corrected for background from aircraft contamination and cosmic rays, altitude variations, airborne 214Bi, and Compton scattering. The gamma-ray systems were calibrated using the calibrations pads at Grand Junction, Colorado (Ward, 1978 ) and the dynamic test strip at Lake Mead, Arizona (Geodata International, Inc., 1977).  

  4. ROLE OF LINE-OF-SIGHT COSMIC-RAY INTERACTIONS IN FORMING THE SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS IN TeV GAMMA RAYS AND HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander; Kalashev, Oleg; Beacom, John F.

    2011-04-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. The observed high-energy gamma-ray signals from distant blazars may be dominated by secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. This explains the surprisingly low attenuation observed for distant blazars, because the production of secondary gamma rays occurs, on average, much closer to Earth than the distance to the source. Thus, the observed spectrum in the TeV range does not depend on the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum, while it depends on the output of the source in cosmic rays. We apply this hypothesis to a number of sources and, in every case, we obtain an excellent fit, strengthening the interpretation of the observed spectra as being due to secondary gamma rays. We explore the ramifications of this interpretation for limits on the extragalactic background light and for the production of cosmic rays in AGNs. We also make predictions for the neutrino signals, which can help probe the acceleration of cosmic rays in AGNs.

  5. Ultraviolet and infrared absorption spectra of Cr2O3 doped-sodium metaphosphate, lead metaphosphate and zinc metaphosphate glasses and effects of gamma irradiation: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, M A; ElBatal, F H; Abdelghany, A M

    2013-10-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on spectral properties of Cr2O3-doped phosphate glasses of three varieties, namely sodium metaphosphate, lead metaphosphate and zinc metaphosphate have been investigated. Optical spectra of the undoped samples reveal strong UV absorption bands which are attributed to the presence of trace iron impurities in both the sodium and zinc phosphate glasses while the lead phosphate glass exhibits broad UV near visible bands due to combined absorption of both trace iron impurities and divalent lead ions. The effect of chromium oxide content has been investigated. The three different Cr2O3-doped phosphate glasses reveal spectral visible bands varying in their position and intensity and splitting due to the different field strengths of the Na(+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+) cations, together with the way they are housed in the network and their effects on the polarisability of neighboring oxygens ligands. The effects of gamma irradiation on the optical spectral properties of the various glasses have been compared. The different effects for lead and zinc phosphate are related to the ability of Pb(2+), and Zn(2+) to form additional structural units causing stability of the network towards gamma irradiation. Also, the introduction of the transition metal chromium ions reveals some shielding behavior towards irradiation. Infrared absorption spectra of the three different base phosphate glasses show characteristic vibrations due to various phosphate groups depending on the type of glass and Cr2O3 is observed to slightly affect the IR spectra. Gamma irradiation causes minor variations in some of the intensities of the IR spectra but the main characteristic bands due to phosphate groups remain in their number and position. PMID:23816486

  6. The splitting of the infrared vibrational spectra of RbAg4I5 in the low-temperature gamma-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, G. V.; Mirzoiants, G. I.; Volkov, A. A.; Goffman, V. G.

    1984-10-01

    Dynamic conductivity spectra at 2-33/cm, obtained with monochromatic backward-wave-tube radiation and a submillimeter spectrometer (resolution 0.001/cm) at 4.2-123 K, are presented for the gamma phase of monocrystalline RbAg4I5. Progressive spectral splitting is seen as temperature decreases, with almost 30 well-defined lines of widths as small as 0.01/cm at 4.2 K. Possible mechanisms for this phenomenon are considered.

  7. Derivation of a Relation for the Steepening of TeV Selected Blazar Gamma-Ray Spectra with Energy and Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F.

    2010-01-01

    We derive a relation for the steepening of blazar gamma-ray spectra between the multi-GeV Fermi energy range and the TeV energy range observed by atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes. The change in spectral index is produced by two effects: (1) an intrinsic steepening, independent of redshift, owing to the properties of emission and absorption in the source, and (2) a redshift-dependent steepening produced by intergalactic pair production interactions of blazar gamma-rays with low energy photons of the "intergalactic background light" (IBL). Given this relation, with good enough data on the mean gamma-ray SED of TeV Selected BL Lacs, the redshift evolution of the IBL can, in principle, be determined independently of stellar evolution models. We apply our relation to the results of new Fermi observations of TeV selected blazars.

  8. Detection of frozen salt in pipes using gamma-ray spectrometry of potassium self-activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grena, Roberto; Scafe, Raffaele; Pisacane, Fabrizio; Pilato, Renzo; Crescenzi, Tommaso; Mazzei, Domenico

    2010-01-15

    Solar plants that use molten salts as heat transfer fluid need careful control to avoid the freezing of the salt in the pipes; if such a problem occurs, a diagnostic instrument to localize where is the frozen salt plug and to determine its length is useful. If the salt contains potassium (as is the case of the most common mixture used in solar plants, NaNO{sub 3}/KNO{sub 3} 60/40% by weight), the gamma decay of the natural unstable isotope {sup 40}K can be exploited to detect the frozen salt in a non-invasive way. Simulations and experimental results regarding the detectability of such plugs with different masses/lengths are presented. (author)

  9. Determination of Copper by Neutron Activation Analysis in Conjunction with Compton Suppression Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    W. H. Zhang; A. Chatt

    2000-06-04

    Copper is considered to be an essential element. Its accurate determination in tissues, foods, and other biological materials is needed to study the effect of copper on human nutrition and health. Using and Advance Prediction Computer Program, it has been shown that short-lived {sup 66}Cu (half-life = 5.09 min) can be used to determine copper in biological materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). However, it is seldom done in practice-in particular, for low copper content in high-salt biological materials-because of the Compton background interference from nuclides such as {sup 28}Al, {sup 38}Cl, and {sup 24}Na. To eliminate the Compton interference, a preconcentration NAA method has recently been developed in our laboratory using reversed-phase extraction chromatography of copper followed by short irradiation and conventional gamma-spectrometric counting of {sup 66}Cu; the detection limit is {approx}5 ppb.

  10. Measurement of Absolute Fission Yields in the Fast Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinides: {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm by Track-Etch-cum-Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Naik, H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Singh, R.J.; Ramaswami, A.; Nair, A.G.C.

    2000-07-15

    The absolute fission yields of 46 fission products in {sup 238}U (99.9997 at.%), 46 fission products in {sup 237}Np, 27 fission products in {sup 238}Pu (99.21 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 240}Pu (99.48 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 243}Am (99.998 at.%), and 32 fission products in {sup 244}Cm (99.43 at.%) induced by fast neutrons were determined using a fission track-etch-cum-gamma spectrometric technique. In the case of highly alpha-active and sparingly available actinides - e.g., {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm - a novel recoil catcher technique to collect the fission products on a Lexan polycarbonate foil followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was developed during the course of this work. This completely removed interferences from (a) gamma rays of daughter products in secular equilibrium with the target nuclide (e.g., {sup 243}Am-{sup 239}Np), (b) activation products of the catcher foil [e.g., {sup 24}Na from Al(n,{alpha})], and (c) activation products of the target [e.g., {sup 238}Np from {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) and {sup 239}Np from {sup 238}U(n,{gamma})] reactions, making the gamma spectrometric analysis very simple and accurate. The high-yield asymmetric fission products were analyzed by direct gamma spectrometry, whereas the low-yield symmetric products (e.g., Ag, Cd, and Sb) as well as some of the asymmetric fission products (e.g., Br) and rare earths (in the case of {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np) were radiochemically separated and then analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. The neutron spectra in the irradiation positions of the reactors were measured and delineated in the thermal to 10-MeV region using threshold activation detectors. The present data were compared with the ENDF/VI and UKFY2 evaluated data files. From the measured cumulative yields, the mass-chain yields have been deduced using charge distribution systematics. The mass yields, along with similar data for other fast neutron-induced fissioning systems, show several important features:1. Fine structure in the interval of five mass units in even-Z fissioning systems due to odd-even effects. The fine structure decreases from lighter to heavier even-Z actinides, in accordance with their odd-even effect.2. Higher yields in the mass regions 133 to 135, 138 to 140, and 143 to 145 and their complementary mass regions, depending on the mass of the fissioning systems due to the presence of 82n-66n, 86n-62n, and 88n-56n shells.3. For odd-Z fissioning systems having no odd-even effect, the fine structure is very feeble and is due only to shell effects.4. Unusually high yields observed in the mass region 133 to 139 in the fissioning system {sup 239}U* as compared to other U isotopes are explained on the basis of a higher neutron-to-proton ratio (N/Z) of {sup 238}U compared to lower-mass uranium isotopes. The {nu}-bar, full-width at tenth-maximum, and A{sub L}-bar increase with increasing mass of the fissioning systems, whereas A{sub H}-bar of {approx}139 {+-} 1 remains constant throughout due to the strong preference for the formation of the deformed 88n shell, which is also favorable from the N/Z point of view.

  11. Survey of the {sup 137}Cs contamination in Belgium by in-situ gamma spectrometry, a decade after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, J.; Pomme, S.; Hardenman, F.; Culot, J.P.

    1997-10-01

    The residual radiocesium concentration, nearly 10 y after the Chernobyl accident, is measured at different sites on the Belgian territory by means of in-situ gamma-spectrometry. A possible link between the rainfall at the beginning of May 1986 and the actual cesium concentration is investigated. The radiological impact of this contamination, even in the most affected regions in the Ardennes, is very small (<6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics: Workshop Results and Next Steps

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Brent R; Solodov, Alexander A; Shipwash, Jacqueline L; Zhernosek, Alena V; McKinney, Teressa L; Pickett, Chris A; Peerani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In November 2008, the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA) co-hosted the International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This workshop was conducted in response to needs expressed by the international safeguards community to understand better the capabilities and limitations of the codes; to ensure these codes are sustained; and to ensure updates or revisions are performed in a controlled manner. The workshop was attended by approximately 100 participants. The participants included code developers, code suppliers, safeguards specialists, domestic and international inspectors, process operators, regulators, and programme sponsors from various government agencies. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for code developers, commercial distributors and end users to interact in a hands-on laboratory environment to develop solutions for programmatic and technical issues associated with the various codes. The workshop also provided an international forum for discussing development of an internationally accepted standard test method. This paper discusses the organization of the workshop, its goals and objectives and feedback received from the participants. The paper also describes the significance of the working group's contribution to improving codes that are commonly used during inspections to verify that nuclear facilities are compliant with treaty obligations that ensure nuclear fuel cycle facilities are used for peaceful purposes.

  13. Data acquisition ATCA system for neutron and gamma-rays spectrometries

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, R.; Fernandes, A. G.; Sousa, J.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2006-10-15

    Digital pulse processing (DPP) systems are known to have better performance than analog ones for neutron and/or gamma-ray pulses. DPP can synthesize almost any pulse response shape without the associated signal degradation which happens in a complex analog path. Measuring techniques involving detectors/spectrometers for fusion diagnostics rely on real-time algorithms, implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA), for pulse height analysis, pulse shape discrimination, and pileup rejection of digitized pulses in real time for reduced data throughput, monitoring, and control. This article describes a data acquisition system for real-time pulse analysis based on ATCA and contains a 6 GFLPOS ix86-based control unit and a number of transient recorder (TR) modules interconnected through PCI Express links. Each TR module features (i) eight channels of 12 bit resolution with accuracy equal or higher than 10 bits, (ii) 200 Msamples/s of sampling rate achieving 400 Msamples/s in an interleaved architecture, (iii) 2 or 4 Gbytes of local memory, and (iv) two field FPGAs able to perform real-time processing algorithms.

  14. Data acquisition ATCA system for neutron and gamma-rays spectrometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R.; Fernandes, A. G.; Sousa, J.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2006-10-01

    Digital pulse processing (DPP) systems are known to have better performance than analog ones for neutron and/or gamma-ray pulses. DPP can synthesize almost any pulse response shape without the associated signal degradation which happens in a complex analog path. Measuring techniques involving detectors/spectrometers for fusion diagnostics rely on real-time algorithms, implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA), for pulse height analysis, pulse shape discrimination, and pileup rejection of digitized pulses in real time for reduced data throughput, monitoring, and control. This article describes a data acquisition system for real-time pulse analysis based on ATCA and contains a 6 GFLPOS i ×86-based control unit and a number of transient recorder (TR) modules interconnected through PCI Express links. Each TR module features (i) eight channels of 12bit resolution with accuracy equal or higher than 10bits, (ii) 200Msamples/s of sampling rate achieving 400Msamples/s in an interleaved architecture, (iii) 2 or 4Gbytes of local memory, and (iv) two field FPGAs able to perform real-time processing algorithms.

  15. Gamma-rays interactions on optical, FTIR absorption and ESR spectra of 3d transition metals-doped sodium silicophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; ElBatal, H. A.

    2014-06-01

    Glasses of the basic composition mol% 50%P2O5·30%SiO2·20%Na2O together with samples containing one of 3d transition metal oxides (TiO2 → CuO) were prepared. Combined optical and FTIR absorption spectra of the prepared glasses were measured before and after gamma irradiation with a dose of 8 Mrad (8 × 104 Gy). Undoped sodium phosphosilicate glass reveals strong UV absorption with a peak at 225 nm but with no visible bands. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities contaminated with the chemicals used for preparation of this glass. 3d-transition metal ions-doped glasses exhibit characteristic absorption bands extended in the UV/Vis regions which are characteristics for the specific TM ions. Gamma irradiation causes broadness of the UV absorption bands in the spectrum of the undoped glass and the resolution of three peaks at about 250, 310 and 340 nm beside the appearance of an induced broad visible band centered at about 450 nm. Glasses doped with 3d TM ions reveal variations in their response towards gamma irradiation. FTIR absorption spectra show extended broad vibrational bands which are related to the presence of both vibrational modes due to silicate and phosphate groups but the later groups are predominant due to the high percent of P2O5 (50%). The presence of TM ions within the dopant level (0.2%) causes no obvious changes in the number and position of the IR structural vibrational bands. ESR spectra of 3d TM-ions-doped glasses reveal quite distinct spin resonance after gamma irradiation indicating that unpaired electrons increase through the capturing or releasing of energetic electrons during the irradiation process.

  16. Regional Crustal Components of Martian Heat Flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (GRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, B. C.; McLennan, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Martian thermal state and evolution depend principally on the heat-producing element distributions in the planet’s crust and mantle, specifically the incompatible radiogenic isotopes of K, Th, and U. Normally these elements are preferentially sequestered into a planet’s crust during differentiation, and this is especially true for Mars, which possesses a thick and mostly ancient crust that is proportionally large with respect to the planet’s total volume. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) instrument on board the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft can detect all three of these elements and has been used to map the K and Th abundances across nearly the entire Martian surface. It has been estimated that as much as 50% or more of the Martian planetary budget of heat producing elements has seen sequestered into the crust during planetary differentiation due to their incompatibility in igneous processes; a process that mostly took place very early in Martian geological history. As such, the crustal component of heat flow represents as much as half of the total planetary output of radiogenic heat. While GRS measurements can not constrain heat flow from mantle sources, previous work calculated the average crustal component of heat flow of 6.43 mW/m2 based on radiogenic elemental abundances. Orbital GRS data are of lower spatial resolution (5°x5° per pixel) than most other orbital remote sensing instruments and, accordingly, are best suited for global or large, regional-scale studies, rather than detailed, local analyses of geographically small features and landforms. Here we present detailed calculations for specific, areally-large, regions and geologic provinces on Mars, reporting the present-day crustal component of heat flow, the crustal heat flow at time of regional formation, and constraints of geothermal gradients from these measurements.

  17. Evaluation of the Doppler-Broadening of Gamma-Ray Spectra from Neutron Inelastic Scattering on Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, Phillip C.; Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Howard, Joseph; Musser, Jason

    2009-03-10

    Neutron-induced gamma-ray reactions are extensively used in the nondestructive analysis of materials and other areas where the information about the chemical composition of a substance is crucial. The common technique to find the intensity of the gamma ray is to fit gamma-ray line shape with an analytical function, for example, a Gaussian. However, the Gaussian fitting may fail if the gamma-ray peak is Doppler-broadened since this leads to the miscalculation of the area of the peak and, therefore, to misidentification of the material. Due to momentum considerations, Doppler-broadening occurs primarily with gamma rays from neutron-induced inelastic scattering reactions with light nuclei. The recoiling nucleus of interest must have excited states whose lifetimes are much smaller than the time of flight in the material. We have examined various light nuclei bombarded by 14 MeV neutrons to predict when the peak shape of a neutron-induced gamma ray emitted from these nuclei will be Doppler-broadened. We have found that nearly all the gamma rays from neutron-induced gamma-ray reactions on light elements (A<20) are Doppler-broadened with only a few exceptions. This means that utilization of resolution curves derived from isotopic sources or thermal neutron capture reactions have little value in the analysis.

  18. Gamma-carboxylation and fragmentation of osteocalcin in human serum defined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Douglas S; Gundberg, Caren M; Booth, Sarah L; Borges, Chad R

    2015-06-01

    Serum osteocalcin (Oc) concentration is a highly specific measure of bone turnover, but its circulating proteoform(s) have not been well defined. Based on immunological methods, the major forms are thought to be the intact polypeptide and a large N-terminal-mid molecule fragment for which there is no consensus on the precise sequence. Vitamin K-dependent gamma (γ)-carboxylated variants of Oc are also found in circulation but there have been no methods that can define how many of the three potential γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues are γ-carboxylated or provide their relative abundances. Recent reports that uncarboxylated and partially γ-carboxylated Oc forms have hormonal function underscore the need for precise evaluation of Oc at all three potential γ-carboxylation sites. Herein, mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA) was used to provide qualitative and semiquantitative (relative percent abundance) information on Oc molecular variants as they exist in individual plasma and serum samples. Following verification that observable Oc proteoforms were accurately assigned and not simply ex vivo artifacts, MALDI-MSIA and ESI-MSIA were used to assess the relative abundance of Oc truncation and γ-carboxylation, respectively, in plasma from 130 patients enrolled in vitamin K supplementation trials. Human Oc was found to circulate in over a dozen truncated forms with each of these displaying anywhere from 0-3 Gla residues. The relative abundance of truncated forms was consistent and unaffected by vitamin K supplementation. In contrast, when compared with placebo, vitamin K supplementation dramatically increased the fractional abundance of Oc with three Gla residues, corresponding to a decrease in the fractional abundance of Oc with zero Gla residues. These findings unequivocally document that increased vitamin K intake reduces the uncarboxylated form of Oc. Several reports of a positive effect of vitamin K intake on insulin sensitivity in humans have shown that un- or undercarboxylation of Oc, unlike in mice, is not associated with insulin resistance. Analyses similar to those described here will be useful to understand the functional significance of Oc γ-carboxylation in human health and disease. PMID:25855755

  19. 'Discrepant hardenings' in cosmic ray spectra: A first estimate of the effects on secondary antiproton and diffuse gamma-ray yields

    SciTech Connect

    Donato, Fiorenza; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2011-01-15

    Recent data from CREAM seem to confirm early suggestions that primary cosmic ray spectra at few TeV/nucleon are harder than in the 10-100 GeV range. Also, helium and heavier nuclei spectra appear systematically harder than the proton fluxes at corresponding energies. We note here that if the measurements reflect intrinsic features in the interstellar fluxes (as opposed to local effects) appreciable modifications are expected in the sub-TeV range for the secondary yields, such as antiprotons and diffuse gamma rays. Presently, the ignorance on the origin of the features represents a systematic error in the extraction of astrophysical parameters as well as for background estimates for indirect dark matter searches. We find that the spectral modifications are appreciable above 100 GeV, and can be responsible for {approx}30% effects for antiprotons at energies close to 1 TeV or for gammas at energies close to 300 GeV, compared to currently considered predictions based on simple extrapolation of input fluxes from low-energy data. Alternatively, if the feature originates from local sources, uncorrelated spectral changes might show up in antiproton and high-energy gamma rays, with the latter ones likely dependent from the line of sight.

  20. High Pressure Mass Spectrometry: The Generation of Mass Spectra at Operating Pressures Exceeding 1 Torr in a Microscale Cylindrical Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Kenion H; Wolfe, Derek W; Cavanaugh, Craig A; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    We present the first demonstration of high pressure mass spectrometry (HPMS), which we define as mass spectrometry performed at pressures greater than 100 mTorr. Mass analysis is shown at operational pressures exceeding 1 Torr of helium buffer gas. A differentially pumped MS system was constructed for HPMS development consisting of two chambers. The first chamber (mass analysis chamber) was operated at pressures up to 1.2 Torr and contained the ionization source and a microscale cylindrical ion trap (CIT) mass analyzer. The CIT had critical dimensions of r0 = 500 μm and z0 = 650 μm. The second chamber was held at a lower pressure (≤10 mTorr) and contained an electron multiplier for detection. Mass spectra for xenon, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), and octane were acquired with helium buffer gas pressures ranging from 0.04 to 1.2 Torr in the mass analysis chamber. Full-width at half-maximum of mass spectral peaks was found to increase 143% for xenon, 40% for CEES, and 77% for octane over this pressure range, with maximum peak widths of 1.19, 1.26, and 0.82 Da, respectively. Data were fitted with an algebraic model that factors in ion-neutral collision peak broadening effects at high pressures. Experimental and theoretical peak broadening slopes showed good agreement at buffer gas pressures greater than 0.2 Torr. Experiments presented here demonstrate mass spectrometry at pressures orders of magnitude higher than conventionally practiced with any type of mass analyzer. The use of HPMS provides a way to eliminate turbo pumping requirements, leading to significant reduction in MS system size, weight, and power and facilitating a path toward compact/hand-held mass spectrometers with numerous potential applications. PMID:27109864

  1. Application of continuum analysis to borehole gamma-ray spectra obtained from the German continental deep drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Alakh N.; Arnold, James R.; Schweitzer, Jeffrey S.

    1995-02-01

    Neutron-induced γ-ray spectra from borehole rock at several depths have been analyzed for use as test samples for evaluating continuum spectra for deriving chemical compositions from γ-ray spectra of thick target sources. A fast Fourier transform technique has been used to obtain the information from selected energy bands in the continuum spectra. Monte Carlo calculations to model the borehole data have been performed using the major γ-ray energy sources to generate the γ-ray spectra. Borehole spectra are compared to simulated spectra to confirm the signal distribution between the γ-ray photopeak and the Compton continuum. For a chosen γ-ray energy, we calculate the continuum above and below that energy in order to find what fraction of the lower energy continuum is due to that γ-ray. The accuracy of the relative elemental concentrations determined by this method is confirmed by a comparison with laboratory energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analyses of cuttings and core samples from the borehole. A number of tests have shown that using the continuum can greatly increase the sensitivity and precision of the measurement of elemental concentrations determined from γ-ray spectra of thick target sources, and especially for spectra having γ-ray peaks of poor statistical significance. The results obtained for calcium concentrations in the current work are a particularly good illustration of the improvement that can be achieved. For spectra with very good γ-ray peak statistics, or spectra having little continuum contribution, this method may not provide a significant enhancement over traditional spectral analysis technique.

  2. Improvements on Low Level Activity Gamma Measurements and X-ray Spectrometry at the CEA-MADERE Measurement Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyeva, Victoria; Domergue, Christophe; Destouches, Christophe; Girard, Jean Michel; Philibert, Hervé; Bonora, Jonathan; Thiollay, Nicolas; Lyoussi, Abdallah

    2016-02-01

    The CEA MADERE platform (Measurement Applied to DosimEtry in REactors) is a part of the Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory (LDCI). This facility is dedicated to the specific activity measurements of solid and radioactive samples using Gamma and X-ray spectrometry. MADERE is a high-performance facility devoted to neutron dosimetry for experimental programs performed in CEA and for the irradiation surveillance programmes of PWR vessels. The MADERE platform is engaged in a continuous improvement process. Recently, two High Efficiency diodes have been integrated to the MADERE platform in order to manage the accurate low level activity measurements (few Bq per sample). This new equipment provides a good level of efficiency over the energy range from 60 keV to 2 MeV. The background continuum is reduced due to the use of a Ultra Low Background (ULB) lead shielding. Relative and absolute X-ray measurement techniques have been improved in order to facilitate absolute rhodium activity measurement (Rh103m) on solid samples. Additional efforts have been made to increase the accuracy of the relative niobium (Nb93m) activity measurement technique. The way of setting up an absolute measurement method for niobium is under investigation. After a presentation of the MADERE's measurement devices, this paper focuses on the technological options taken into account for the design of high efficiency measurement devices. Then, studies performed on X-ray measurement techniques are presented. Some details about the calculation of uncertainties and correction factors are also mentioned. Finally, future research and development axes are exposed.

  3. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  4. Characterization by combined optical and FT infrared spectra of 3d-transition metal ions doped-bismuth silicate glasses and effects of gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    ElBatal, F H; Abdelghany, A M; ElBatal, H A

    2014-03-25

    Optical and infrared absorption spectral measurements were carried out for binary bismuth silicate glass and other derived prepared samples with the same composition and containing additional 0.2% of one of 3d transition metal oxides. The same combined spectroscopic properties were also measured after subjecting the prepared glasses to a gamma dose of 8 Mrad. The experimental optical spectra reveal strong UV-near visible absorption bands from the base and extended to all TMs-doped samples and these specific extended and strong UV-near visible absorption bands are related to the contributions of absorption from both trace iron (Fe(3+)) ions present as contaminated impurities within the raw materials and from absorption of main constituent trivalent bismuth (Bi(3+)) ions. The strong UV-near visible absorption bands are observed to suppress any further UV bands from TM ions. The studied glasses show obvious resistant to gamma irradiation and only small changes are observed upon gamma irradiation. This observed shielding behavior is related to the presence of high Bi(3+) ions with heavy mass causing the observed stability of the optical absorption. Infrared absorption spectra of the studied glasses reveal characteristic vibrational bands due to both modes from silicate network and the sharing of Bi-O linkages and the presence of TMs in the doping level (0.2%) causes no distinct changes within the number or position of the vibrational modes. The presence of high Bi2O3 content (70 mol%) appears to cause stability of the structural building units towards gamma irradiation as revealed by FTIR measurements. PMID:24326262

  5. Applying 'Sequential Windowed Acquisition of All Theoretical Fragment Ion Mass Spectra' (SWATH) for systematic toxicological analysis with liquid chromatography-high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arnhard, Kathrin; Gottschall, Anna; Pitterl, Florian; Oberacher, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has become an indispensable analytical technique in clinical and forensic toxicology for detection and identification of potentially toxic or harmful compounds. Particularly, non-target LC-MS/MS assays enable extensive and universal screening requested in systematic toxicological analysis. An integral part of the identification process is the generation of information-rich product ion spectra which can be searched against libraries of reference mass spectra. Usually, 'data-dependent acquisition' (DDA) strategies are applied for automated data acquisition. In this study, the 'data-independent acquisition' (DIA) method 'Sequential Windowed Acquisition of All Theoretical Fragment Ion Mass Spectra' (SWATH) was combined with LC-MS/MS on a quadrupole-quadrupole-time-of-flight (QqTOF) instrument for acquiring informative high-resolution tandem mass spectra. SWATH performs data-independent fragmentation of all precursor ions entering the mass spectrometer in 21m/z isolation windows. The whole m/z range of interest is covered by continuous stepping of the isolation window. This allows numerous repeat analyses of each window during the elution of a single chromatographic peak and results in a complete fragment ion map of the sample. Compounds and samples typically encountered in forensic casework were used to assess performance characteristics of LC-MS/MS with SWATH. Our experiments clearly revealed that SWATH is a sensitive and specific identification technique. SWATH is capable of identifying more compounds at lower concentration levels than DDA does. The dynamic range of SWATH was estimated to be three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the >600,000 SWATH spectra matched led to only 408 incorrect calls (false positive rate = 0.06 %). Deconvolution of generated ion maps was found to be essential for unravelling the full identification power of LC-MS/MS with SWATH. With the available software, however, only semi-automated deconvolution was enabled, which rendered data interpretation a laborious and time-consuming process. PMID:25366975

  6. Speciation of Nitrogen-Bearing Species Using Negative and Positive Secondary Ion Spectra with Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexue; Sinha, Baerbel; Hoppe, Peter

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) can be used to differentiate different nitrogen-containing species commonly observed in atmospheric aerosol particles with micrometer or submicrometer spatial resolution, on the basis of the relative intensity of secondary ion signals, both in negative and positive secondary ion mode, without the need to chemically or physically separate the samples. Compounds tested include nitrate, nitrite, ammonium salts, urea, amino acids, sugars, organic acids, amides, triazine, imidazole, protein, and biological tissue. We show that NO2(-) secondary ions are unique to the decomposition of nitrate and nitrite salts, whereas NH4(+) secondary ions are unique to samples containing ammonium ions, with low signal intensities observed from amino groups but none from biological tissue. CN(-) signals are obtained from all nitrogen-bearing compounds, but relative signal intensities are the highest for organic nitrogen-containing compounds. We demonstrate that quantitative determination of the elemental fractions of carbon, oxygen, and nitrate in nanometer-sized aerosol samples using normalized secondary ion intensities is possible. We further demonstrate that stable isotope ratios measured on in-house standards of unknown isotopic composition using the (12)C(15)N(-)/(12)C(14)N(-) ratio (all nitrogen-containing species), the (15)N(16)O2(-)/(14)N(16)O2(-) ratio (nitrate and nitrite species), and the (15)NH4(+)/(14)NH4(+) ratio (ammonium salts, amino acids, and urea) are stable and sufficiently precise for nitrogen isotope analysis. PMID:26854563

  7. Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Resonances in 234,236,238U Measured Using the Dance Detector at Lansce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2013-03-01

    An accurate knowledge of the radiative strength function and level density is needed to calculate of neutron-capture cross sections. An additional constraint on these quantities is provided by measurements of ?-ray emission spectra following capture. We present ?-emission spectra from several neutron resonances in 234,236,238U, measured using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. The measurements are compared to preliminary calculations of the cascade. It is observed that the generalized Lorentzian form of the E1 strength function cannot reproduce the shape of the emission spectra, but a better description is made by adding low-lying M1 Lorentzian strength.

  8. DS02 fluence spectra for neutrons and gamma rays at Hiroshima and Nagasaki with fluence-to-kerma coefficients and transmission factors for sample measurements.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D; Cullings, Harry M

    2007-11-01

    Fluence spectra at several ground distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are provided along with associated fluence-to-kerma coefficients from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). Also included are transmission factors for calculating expected responses of in situ sample measurements of neutron activation products such as (32)P,(36)Cl,(39)Ar,(41)Ca, (60)Co,(63)Ni,(152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The free-in-air (FIA) fluences calculated in 2002 are available for 240 angles, 69 energy groups, 101 ground distances, 5 heights, 4 radiation source components, 2 cities. The DS02 code uses these fluences partitioned to a prompt and delayed portion, collapsed to 58 energy groups and restricted to 97 ground distances. This is because the fluence spectra were required to be in the same format that was used in the older Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) computer code, of which the DS02 computer code is a modification. The 2002 calculation fluences and the collapsed DS02 code fluences are presented and briefly discussed. A report on DS02, which is available on the website at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, provides tables and figures of the A-bomb neutron and gamma-ray output used as the sources in the 2002 radiation transport calculations. While figures illustrating the fluence spectra at several ground ranges are presented in the DS02 Report, it does not include any tables of the calculated fluence spectra in the DS02 report. This paper provides, at several standard distances from the hypocenter, the numerical information which is required to translate the FIA neutron fluences given in DS02 to a neutron activation measurement or neutron and gamma-ray soft-tissue dose. PMID:17643260

  9. A mass spectrometric analysis of {gamma}-GPS films

    SciTech Connect

    Dillingham, R.G.; Boerio, F.J.; Bertelsen, C.; Savina, M.R.; Lykke, K.R.; Calaway, W.F.

    1996-06-01

    {gamma}-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane ({gamma}-GPS) is used for pre-treatment of grit-blasted aluminum before adhesive bonding. This paper discusses analysis of non-reflective grit-blasted surfaces using mass spectrometry of species that were either sputtered off using an ion beam or thermally desorbed as neutrals using a pulsed laser and then post-ionized using a secondary laser. Results show that fragmentation is excessive and structural information is difficult to obtain from the spectra.

  10. Systematic Measurements of keV-NEUTRON Capture Cross Sections and Capture Gamma-Ray Spectra of pd Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, K.; Igashira, M.; Matsuhashi, T.; Katabuchi, T.; Anh, T. T.

    2013-03-01

    The capture cross sections and capture γ-ray spectra of 104,105Pd were measured in the neutron energy region of 15-100 keV as a part of systematic series of measurements. A neutron time-of-flight method was adopted, using a ns pulsed neutron source via the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction. The capture γ-rays from the samples were measured with an anti-Compton NaI(Tl) spectrometer. The capture yields were obtained by applying a pulse-height weighting technique to the net capture γ-ray pulse-height spectra. The capture cross sections of 104,105Pd were derived with errors less than 5%, using the standard capture cross sections of 197Au. The capture γ-ray spectra of 104,105Pd were also derived by un-folding the respective observed capture γ-ray pulse-height spectra.

  11. Gamma-ray spectrometry method used for radioactive waste drums characterization for final disposal at National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste--Baita, Romania.

    PubMed

    Done, L; Tugulan, L C; Dragolici, F; Alexandru, C

    2014-05-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Department from IFIN-HH, Bucharest, performs the conditioning of the institutional radioactive waste in concrete matrix, in 200 l drums with concrete shield, for final disposal at DNDR - Baita, Bihor county, in an old exhausted uranium mine. This paper presents a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the characterization of the radioactive waste drums' radionuclides content, for final disposal. In order to study the accuracy of the method, a similar concrete matrix with Portland cement in a 200 l drum was used. PMID:24331854

  12. Monte Carlo validation of the self-attenuation correction determination with the Cutshall transmission method in ²¹⁰Pb measurements by gamma-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jodłowski, Paweł; Wachniew, Przemysław; Dinh, Chau Nguyen

    2014-05-01

    The accuracy of estimation of the self-attenuation correction Cs with the Cutshall transmission method in (210)Pb measurements by gamma-spectrometry was assessed using the Monte Carlo method. The Cutshall method overestimates the correction for samples with linear attenuation coefficient at 46.5 keV higher than that of the standard and underestimates it in the opposite case. The highest bias was found for thick samples. C(s,Cuts)/C(s) ratio grows linearly with sample linear attenuation coefficient. PMID:24387906

  13. Building-up a code for the purpose of TRUE coincidence summing correction in gamma-ray spectrometry with EGS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Necati; Altin, Duygu; Cevik, Ugur

    2015-10-01

    In the presented study, a code was created for the purpose of true coincidence summing (TCS) correction factors for 134Cs. The created code was implemented in EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation package. TCS factors were determined for nine different energies for different detector-source geometries. The calculated results were successfully validated by an empirical method using a point 134Cs radioactive source and a p-type HPGe detector having 55% relative efficiency. Although the code created gives TCS factors only for 134Cs, the technique presented can be used to obtain the factors for any radionuclide used in gamma-ray spectrometry.

  14. Measurement of {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al{sup g} resonance strengths via accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arazi, A.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Poutivtsev, M.; Rugel, G.; Richter, E.; Wallner, A.

    2006-08-15

    The strengths of resonances located at center-of-mass energies of E{sub c.m.}=189, 304, 374, and 418 keV for the {sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}) reaction have been measured for the first time with an off-line method: Mg targets were firstly activated with protons at the resonance energies and the produced {sup 26}Al{sup g} nuclei were counted by means of highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Thus, the production of {sup 26}Al in its ground state is determined independently from the {gamma}-decay branching ratio. While the 304, 374, and 418 keV resonances show fair agreement with previous measurements, the 189 keV resonance yield a significantly less strength. In addition, an experimental upper limit for the E{sub c.m.}=92 keV resonance was determined.

  15. Monte Carlo based method for conversion of in-situ gamma ray spectra obtained with a portable Ge detector to an incident photon flux energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    1998-02-01

    A Monte Carlo based method for the conversion of an in-situ gamma-ray spectrum obtained with a portable Ge detector to photon flux energy distribution is proposed. The spectrum is first stripped of the partial absorption and cosmic-ray events leaving only the events corresponding to the full absorption of a gamma ray. Applying to the resulting spectrum the full absorption efficiency curve of the detector determined by calibrated point sources and Monte Carlo simulations, the photon flux energy distribution is deduced. The events corresponding to partial absorption in the detector are determined by Monte Carlo simulations for different incident photon energies and angles using the CERN's GEANT library. Using the detector's characteristics given by the manufacturer as input it is impossible to reproduce experimental spectra obtained with point sources. A transition zone of increasing charge collection efficiency has to be introduced in the simulation geometry, after the inactive Ge layer, in order to obtain good agreement between the simulated and experimental spectra. The functional form of the charge collection efficiency is deduced from a diffusion model. PMID:9450590

  16. Complete sequencing of anti-vancomycin fab fragment by liquid chromatography-electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry with a combination of database searching and manual interpretation of the MS/MS spectra.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Maciej; Gebler, John C; Wu, Jiang; Yu, Zhiguang

    2002-02-01

    Sequencing of anti-vancomycin monoclonal antibody (mAb) Fab region (48,000 Da) was carried out using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS). Comprehensive strategies were employed to ensure complete sequence coverage. The sequence information was obtained from the spectra of collision-induced dissociation (CID) (MS/MS) of the protonated proteolytic peptides resulting from multiple enzymatic digestions of reduced/S-carboxymethylated (RCM) light chain and Fd fragment. Database searching of the spectra against the published immunoglobulin G (IgG) sequences allowed the identification of all the peptides in constant domains as well as partial sequences in variable domains. The rest of the sequences were deduced by manual interpretation of the peptide tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra. The analysis showed that the N-terminus of the heavy chain was modified by the conversion of a glutamine residue to pyroglutamic acid. PMID:11792392

  17. Measurements of keV-NEUTRON Capture Cross Section and Gamma-Ray Spectra of 142Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katabuchi, T.; Igashira, M.; Tajika, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kamada, S.; Terada, K.

    2013-03-01

    The neutron capture cross section and capture γ-ray spectra of 142Nd in the neutron energy ranges from 15 to 95 keV, and around 550 keV have been measured by the time-of-flight method. Capture γ-rays were detected with an anti-Compton NaI(Tl) spectrometer, and the pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the neutron capture cross section. The capture γ-ray spectra were obtained by unfolding the detector pulse-height spectra with the detector response matrix. The results were compared with previous measurements and cross section data in the evaluated nuclear data libraries, JENDL-4.0 and ENDF/B-VII.0.

  18. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat spectrum radio quasar in fast-cooling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-04-01

    In external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of the very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution N^' }_e(γ^')∝ γ^' -p} with the spectral index p ˜ 1.3 is formed below the minimum energy of injection electron when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e., inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum, and can reasonably explain the very hard Fermi-LAT spectrum of the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December.

  19. Observation of the double optical-gamma resonance in Mssbauer spectra of 151 Eu in EuP 5 O 14 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, V.; Chuev, M.; Polikarpov, M.; Nikoulin, S.; Panchenko, V.

    2014-04-01

    A theoretical analysis has been made and calculation procedures have been developed for describing the hyperfine structure of 151Eu Mssbauer spectra and the effect of double optical-gamma resonance (DOGR) in the presence of hyperfine quadrupole interaction with an arbitrary symmetry of the electric field gradient tensor. An experimental setup was designed for DOGR-effect observation, incorporating the pumping argon laser and the tunable dye laser combined with the Mssbauer spectrometer on a common platform. The Mssbauer absorption spectra of 151Eu3 + nuclei in single crystals of europium pentaphosphate, EuP5O14, have been measured at T = 5 K and 80 K under the absence and presence of optical pumping tuned to the 7FD0 electronic transition at the 578 nm wavelength. A simultaneous analysis of these spectra in terms of the spin Hamiltonian of hyperfine quadrupole interaction has allowed us to evaluate the DOGR-effect magnitude with the population of the excited (5D0) electronic state under optical pumping of about 10 %.

  20. Portable gamma spectrometry system for simultaneous monitoring of radiotracers in vivo using CdTe and CdZnTe radiation detector probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, M.; Van Ryn, J.; Merk, H.; Markert, M.; Eisert, W. G.

    1994-12-01

    A portable gamma spectrometry system has been designed to simultaneously monitor various radiotracers in vivo. This system includes a portable IBM® compatible personal computer and miniaturized gamma radiation detector probes based on the semiconductor materials CdTe and CdZnTe. The computer has been expanded with pulse processing and analyzing electronics for three independent inputs and a software package. A portable NIM Bin cabinet, equipped with charge loss correction electronics, is an optional addition. This can be used to improve the peak to valley ratio, the spectral resolution and the peak efficiency of the CdTe detectors. Two different probe housings have been developed, a rectangular and a cylindrical shaped housing. The rectangular probe is designed for clinical use. This device contains one CdTe or CdZnTe crystal with a sensitive area of 10 × 2 mm (2 mm thick) or 10 × 3 mm (3 mm thick) and a preamplifier circuit. The probes can be attached to each other, in order to form a linear array. The cylindrical detector probe is developed for implantation in animals and contains two parallel switched CdTe crystals with a sensitive area of 5 × 5 mm (2 mm thick) and a preamplifier circuit. Both probe housings were made from a tungsten alloy (2 mm thick), which provides good shielding for low-energy gamma radiation isotopes frequently used in clinical settings ( 111In, 123I, 99mTc, 125I). The detection sensitivity of the probes was very similar to the sensitivity of a standard gamma camera when comparing measurements in different in vitro models and in patients. In addition, the detector probes more accurately measured small, local radiation sources as compared to the gamma camera. This gamma spectrometry system has also been used to simultaneously measure the accumulation of 99mTc-labelled platelets and 123I-labelled fibrin after arterial injury in rabbits. This has allowed the in vivo monitoring of different doses of antithrombotic therapies in animals by observing the dynamic growth and interactions between different blood components during thrombotic processes.

  1. On background radiation gradients--the use of airborne surveys when searching for orphan sources using mobile gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kock, Peder; Rääf, Christopher; Samuelsson, Christer

    2014-02-01

    Systematic background radiation variations can lead to both false positives and failures to detect an orphan source when searching using car-borne mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. The stochastic variation at each point is well described by Poisson statistics, but when moving in a background radiation gradient the mean count rate will continually change, leading to inaccurate background estimations. Airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) surveys conducted on the national level, usually in connection to mineral exploration, exist in many countries. These data hold information about the background radiation gradients which could be used at the ground level. This article describes a method that aims to incorporate the systematic as well as stochastic variations of the background radiation. We introduce a weighted moving average where the weights are calculated from existing AGS data, supplied by the Geological Survey of Sweden. To test the method we chose an area with strong background gradients, especially in the thorium component. Within the area we identified two roads which pass through the high-variability locations. The proposed method is compared with an unweighted moving average. The results show that the weighting reduces the excess false positives in the positive background gradients without introducing an excess of failures to detect a source during passage in negative gradients. PMID:24321866

  2. Spiked environmental matrix for use as a reference material for gamma-ray spectrometry: Production and homogeneity test.

    PubMed

    Sobiech-Matura, K; Máté, B; Altzitzoglou, T

    2016-03-01

    The application of a spiking method for reference material production and its utilisation for a food matrix is presented. The raw rice powder was tested by means of γ-ray spectrometry and spiked with a (137)Cs solution. The spiked material was mixed and tested for homogeneity. The future use of the rice powder reference material after the entire characterisation cycle will be for γ-ray spectrometry method validation. PMID:26610369

  3. Development of a neural network approach to characterise (226)Ra contamination at legacy sites using gamma-ray spectra taken from boreholes.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul

    2015-02-01

    There are a large number of sites across the UK and the rest of the world that are known to be contaminated with (226)Ra owing to historical industrial and military activities. At some sites, where there is a realistic risk of contact with the general public there is a demand for proficient risk assessments to be undertaken. One of the governing factors that influence such assessments is the geometric nature of contamination particularly if hazardous high activity point sources are present. Often this type of radioactive particle is encountered at depths beyond the capabilities of surface gamma-ray techniques and so intrusive borehole methods provide a more suitable approach. However, reliable spectral processing methods to investigate the properties of the waste for this type of measurement have yet to be developed since a number of issues must first be confronted including: representative calibration spectra, variations in background activity and counting uncertainty. Here a novel method is proposed to tackle this issue based upon the interrogation of characteristic Monte Carlo calibration spectra using a combination of Principal Component Analysis and Artificial Neural Networks. The technique demonstrated that it could reliably distinguish spectra that contained contributions from point sources from those of background or dissociated contamination (homogenously distributed). The potential of the method was demonstrated by interpretation of borehole spectra collected at the Dalgety Bay headland, Fife, Scotland. Predictions concurred with intrusive surveys despite the realisation of relatively large uncertainties on activity and depth estimates. To reduce this uncertainty, a larger background sample and better spatial coverage of cores were required, alongside a higher volume better resolution detector. PMID:25461525

  4. Energetic neutron and gamma-ray spectra under the earth radiation belts according to "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686" orbital complex and "CORONAS-I" satellite data.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Dmitriev, A V; Myagkova, I N; Ryumin, S P; Smirnova, O N; Sobolevsky, I M

    1998-01-01

    The spectra of neutrons >10 MeV and gamma-rays 1.5-100 MeV under the Earth Radiation Belts, restored from the data, obtained onboard orbital complex "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686", are presented. The spectra shapes are similar to those for albedo neutrons and gamma-rays, but absolute values of their fluxes (0.2 cm-2 s-1 for neutrons, 0.8 cm-2 s-1 for gamma-rays at the equator and 1.2 cm-2 s-1, 1.9 cm-2 s-1, accordingly, at L=1.9) are several times as large. It is possibly explained by the fact that most of the detected particles were produced by the cosmic ray interactions with the orbital complex matter. Neutron and gamma-ray fluxes obtained from "CORONAS-1" data are near those for albedo particles. PMID:11542904

  5. Comparison of optimised germanium gamma spectrometry and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of 134Cs, 137Cs and 154Eu single ratios in highly burnt UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, S.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Murphy, M. F.; Jatuff, F.; Chawla, R.

    2008-05-01

    Non-destructive and destructive methods have been compared to validate their corresponding assessed accuracies in the measurement of 134Cs/137Cs and 154Eu/137Cs isotopic concentration ratios in four spent UO2 fuel samples with very high (52 and 71 GWd/t) and ultra-high (91 and 126 GWd/t) burnup values, and about 10 (in the first three samples) and 4 years (in the latter sample) cooling time. The non-destructive technique tested was high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) and a special tomographic station for the handling of highly radioactive 400 mm spent fuel segments that included a tungsten collimator, lead filter (to enhance the signal to Compton background ratio and reduce the dead time) and paraffin wax (to reduce neutron damage). The non-destructive determination of these isotopic concentration ratios has been particularly challenging for these segments because of the need to properly derive non-Gaussian gamma-peak areas and subtract the background from perturbing capture gammas produced by the intrinsic high-intensity neutron emissions from the spent fuel. Additionally, the activity distribution within each pin was determined tomographically to correct appropriately for self-attenuation and geometrical effects. The ratios obtained non-destructively showed a 1σ statistical error in the range 1.9-2.9%. The destructive technique used was a high-performance liquid chromatographic separation system, combined online to a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HPLC-MC-ICP-MS), for the analysis of dissolved fuel solutions. During the mass spectrometric analyses, special care was taken in the optimisation of the chromatographic separation for Eu and the interfering element Gd, as also in the mathematical correction of the 154Gd background from the 154Eu signal. The ratios obtained destructively are considerably more precise (1σ statistical error in the range 0.4-0.8% for most of the samples, but up to 2.8% for one sample). The HPGe gamma spectrometry can achieve a high degree of accuracy (agreement with HPLC-MC-ICP-MS within a few percent), only by virtue of the optimised setup, and the refined measurement strategy and data treatment employed.

  6. Comparison Between the NIST and the KEBS for the Determination of Air Kerma Calibration Coefficients for Narrow X-Ray Spectra and 137Cs Gamma-Ray Beams

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Michelle; Minniti, Ronaldo; Masinza, Stanslaus Alwyn

    2010-01-01

    Air kerma calibration coefficients for a reference class ionization chamber from narrow x-ray spectra and cesium 137 gamma-ray beams were compared between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS). A NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber was calibrated by each laboratory in terms of the quantity air kerma in four x-ray reference radiation beams of energies between 80 kV and 150 kV and in a cesium 137 gamma-ray beam. The reference radiation qualities used for this comparison are described in detail in the ISO 4037 publication.[1] The comparison began in September 2008 and was completed in March 2009. The results reveal the degree to which the participating calibration facility can demonstrate proficiency in transferring air kerma calibrations under the conditions of the said facility at the time of the measurements. The comparison of the calibration coefficients is based on the average ratios of calibration coefficients.

  7. The use of the bulk properties of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra for the study of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Adam

    The study of bulk spectral properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is important to understanding the physics behind these powerful explosions and may even be an aide in studying cosmology. The prompt emission spectral properties have long been studied by a growing community of researchers, and many theories have been developed since the discovery of GRBs. Even though the exact physics of these phenomena is not completely understood, GRBs have been proposed to give insight on other astrophysical phenomena from dark matter to the expansion of the universe. Obviously, using GRBs to study cosmology requires a large sample size to adequately constrain results and provide confident conjectures. For this reason, BATSE and GBM results are paramount to the study of the prompt emission of GRBs. Using results from both instruments, I study the bulk spectral properties of GRBs and describe analysis techniques that can be used to study cosmology.

  8. Method for the Compound Annotation of Conjugates in Nontargeted Metabolomics Using Accurate Mass Spectrometry, Multistage Product Ion Spectra and Compound Database Searching

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Tairo; Bamba, Takeshi; Tai, Akihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Owing to biotransformation, xenobiotics are often found in conjugated form in biological samples such as urine and plasma. Liquid chromatography coupled with accurate mass spectrometry with multistage collision-induced dissociation provides spectral information concerning these metabolites in complex materials. Unfortunately, compound databases typically do not contain a sufficient number of records for such conjugates. We report here on the development of a novel protocol, referred to as ChemProphet, to annotate compounds, including conjugates, using compound databases such as PubChem and ChemSpider. The annotation of conjugates involves three steps: 1. Recognition of the type and number of conjugates in the sample; 2. Compound search and annotation of the deconjugated form; and 3. In silico evaluation of the candidate conjugate. ChemProphet assigns a spectrum to each candidate by automatically exploring the substructures corresponding to the observed product ion spectrum. When finished, it annotates the candidates assigning a rank for each candidate based on the calculated score that ranks its relative likelihood. We assessed our protocol by annotating a benchmark dataset by including the product ion spectra for 102 compounds, annotating the commercially available standard for quercetin 3-glucuronide, and by conducting a model experiment using urine from mice that had been administered a green tea extract. The results show that by using the ChemProphet approach, it is possible to annotate not only the deconjugated molecules but also the conjugated molecules using an automatic interpretation method based on deconjugation that involves multistage collision-induced dissociation and in silico calculated conjugation. PMID:26819907

  9. The average X-ray/gamma-ray spectra of Seyfert galaxies from Ginga and OSSE and the origin of the cosmic X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Johnson, W. Neil; Done, Chris; Smith, David; Mcnaron-Brown, Kellie

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained the first average 2-500 keV spectra of Seyfert galaxies, using the data from Ginga and Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory's (CGRO) Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE). Our sample contains three classes of objects with markedly different spectra: radio-quiet Seyfert 1's and 2's, and radio-loud Seyfert 1's. The average radio-quiet Seyfert 1 spectrum is well-fitted by a power law continuum with the energy spectral index alpha approximately equals 0.9, a Compton reflection component corresponding to a approximately 2 pi covering solid angle, and ionized absorption. There is a high-energy cutoff in the incident power law continuum: the e-folding energy is E(sub c) approximately equals 0.6(sup +0.8 sub -0.3) MeV. The simplest model that describes this spectrum is Comptonization in a relativistic optically-thin thermal corona above the surface of an accretion disk. Radio-quiet Seyfert 2's show strong netural absorption, and there is an indication that their X-ray power laws are intrinsically harder. Finally, the radio-loud Seyfert spectrum has alpha approximately equals 0.7, moderate neutral absorption E(sub C) = 0.4(sup +0.7 sub -0.2) MeV, and no or little Compton reflection. This is incompatible with the radio-quiet Seyfert 1 spectrum, and probably indicating that the X-rays are beamed away from the accretion disk in these objects. The average spectra of Seyferts integrated over redshift with a power-law evolution can explain the hard X-ray spectrum of the cosmic background.

  10. Evaluation of comparison and proficiency test results of gamma ray spectrometry at Jožef Stefan Institute from 1986 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Glavič-Cindro, Denis; Korun, Matjaž; Nečemer, Marijan; Vodenik, Branko; Zorko, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    One of the best ways to demonstrate the performance and capabilities of testing laboratories is to participate successfully in different international comparison schemes and proficiency tests. The overview of all results of such schemes in the field of high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry where the Laboratory for Radioactivity Measurements (LMR) of the Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia, participated in years 1986-2014 is presented. Different schemes are compared, strong points and drawbacks of different providers and schemes regarding evaluation procedures, determination of reference values, reporting time, sets of radionuclides included in the samples and range of activities of different radionuclides are discussed. One of the main conclusions is that the comparison and proficiency test samples normally contain substantially larger activities than are usually detected in environmental samples. Therefore the capability of determination of activities close to detection limits is usually covered only by few schemes. PMID:26706285

  11. Determination of thorium-232 in Canadian soils by gamma-ray spectrometry via lead-212 and actinium-228, interference from uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Zikovsky, L.; Blagoeva, R.

    1994-12-31

    Thorium-232 background levels in non-cultivated Canadian soils (southern and northern Quebec and the Northwest Territories) are presented. Gamma-ray spectrometry was used to determine the activity of {sup 232}Th by measuring the activities of {sup 228}Ac and {sup 212}Pb at 37 sites. The specific activity levels ranged from 2.7 to 95.5 Bq/kg with an overall mean of 24.0 {+-} 15.4 Bq/kg. This activity generated an annual absorbed dose equivalent in air of 0.1 mSv. The activities of {sup 228}Ac and {sup 212}Pb in the soil increased with increasing depth. IT was found that uranium, via its decay product radium, can interfere with the determination of thorium in the soil.

  12. Size Effect on Nuclear Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra Acquired by Different Sized CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan, Ding; Beller, Denis; Cutler, Matthew; Contreras, Chris; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wilde, Scott UNLV

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-ray energy spectra were acquired for different sizes of cerium tribromide (CeBr3), cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), and thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) detectors. A comparison was conducted of the energy resolution and detection efficiency of these scintillator detectors for different sizes of detectors. The results of this study are consistent with the observation that for each size detector, LaBr3:Ce offers better resolution than either a CeBr3 or NaI:Tl detector of the same size. In addition, CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks in the spectra of several radioisotopes that NaI:Tl could not. As the detector size increased, all three detector materials exhibited higher efficiency, albeit with slightly reduced resolution. Significantly, the very low intrinsic activity of CeBr3 is also demonstrated in this study, which, when combined with energy resolution characteristics for a range of detector sizes, could lead to an improved ability to detect special nuclear materials compared to the other detectors.

  13. Geochemistry of Asteroid 4 Vesta: HED Meteorites as Constraints for Interpreting Gamma- Ray and Neutron Spectra from the Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, H. Y.; Usui, T.

    2007-05-01

    Rotational spectra of Vesta have revealed compositionally distinct units that are smaller than the footprint of the GRaND instrument on the Dawn orbiting spacecraft. Geochemical analyses by GRaND will thus represent lithologic mixtures. HED meteorites, thought to have been derived from Vesta, can be used to quantify the admixed components. Using selected meteorites representing basaltic eucrite, cumulate eucrite, and diogenite as endmembers, we have modeled the chemical compositions of other HED meteorites. Element ratios are more accurately determined by this method than are absolute element abundances. A mixing model utilizing molar (Mg+Fe)/Si versus Al/Si ratios accurately calculates all major and minor element abundances. Surface analyses of Vesta can thus be deconvolved into the relative proportions of these HED lithologies. In addition, the model calculates the abundances of elements not analyzed by GRaND, such as Na, Mn, and Cr. The full set of elements enables the calculation of normative mineralogy, which can be compared with minerals identified by Dawn's VIR spectrometer. Another model, substituting Ca/Si for Al/Si, allows the direct estimation of olivine proportions in olivine-bearing diogenites, and presumably within a large 460 km-diameter crater that exposures the mantle or lower crust on Vesta.

  14. Analysis of observational spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The first step in the analysis of gamma ray energy loss spectra is their conversion to differential energy and differential angular photon spectra. This conversion can be carried out if the detector response and the background are both known. Once these parameters are known, there are many techniques that can be used to convert pulse height spectra to photon spectra. These techniques are discussed and background problems are considered. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of energy loss spectra in the lower gamma ray energy domain. Problems of transportations from pulse height to photon space are most complex in this domain and the methods shown illustrate many of the problems which arise in the general analysis of energy loss spectra.

  15. Determination of the natural radioactivity levels in north west of Dukhan, Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K S; Alkhomashi, N; Al-Dahan, N; Al-Dosari, M; Bradley, D A; Bukhari, S; Matthews, M; Regan, P H; Santawamaitre, T; Malain, D; Habib, A

    2012-07-01

    This study is aimed at the determination of the activity concentrations of naturally occuring and technologically enhanced levels of radiation in 34 representative soil samples that have been collected from an inshore oil field area which was found to have, in a previous study, the highest observed value of 226Ra concentration among 129 soil samples. The activity concentrations of 238U and 226Ra have been inferred from gamma-ray transitions associated with their decay progenies and measured using a hyper-pure germanium detector. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented, together with the values of the activity concentrations associated with the naturally occuring radionuclide chains for all the samples collected from NW Dukhan. Discrete-line, gamma-ray energy transitions from spectral lines ranging in energy from ∼100 keV up to 2.6 MeV have been associated with characteristic decays of the various decay products within the 235.8U and 232Th radioactive decay chains. These data have been analyzed, under the assumption of secular equilibrium for the U and Th decay chains. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented. The weighted mean value of the activity concentrations of 226Ra in one of the samples was found to be around a factor of 2 higher than the values obtained in the previous study and approximately a factor of 10 higher than the accepted worldwide average value of 35 Bq/kg. The weighted mean values of the activity concentrations of 232Th and 40K were also deduced and found to be within the worldwide average values of 30 and 400 Bq/kg, respectively. Our previous study reported a value of 201.9±1.5Stat.±13Syst.Bq/kg for 226Ra in one sample and further investigation in the current work determined a measured value for 226Ra of 342.00±1.9Stat.±25Syst.Bq/kg in a sample taken from the same locality. This is significantly higher than all the other investigated soil samples in the current and previous works. Notably, the Th levels in the same sample are within the worldwide average expectations, implying that the increased 226Ra concentration arises from TENORM processes. PMID:22244196

  16. Assessing sample attenuation parameters for use in low-energy efficiency transfer in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, M; Verheyen, L; Vidmar, T; Liu, B

    2016-03-01

    We present a numerical fitting method for transmission data that outputs an equivalent sample composition. This output is used as input to a generalised efficiency transfer model based on the EFFTRAN software integrated in a LIMS. The procedural concept allows choosing between efficiency transfer with a predefined sample composition or with an experimentally determined composition based on a transmission measurement. The method can be used for simultaneous quantification of low-energy gamma emitters like (210)Pb, (241)Am, (234)Th in typical environmental samples. PMID:26688363

  17. Rapid determination of radon daughters and of artificial radionuclides in air by online gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hötzl, H; Winkler, R

    1993-01-01

    For the determination of airborne radionuclide concentrations in real time, a fixed filter device was constructed which fits directly onto a germanium detector with standard nuclear electronics and a multichannel analyzer buffer connected via a data line to a personal computer for remote control and on-line spectrum evaluation. The on-line gamma-ray spectrometer was applied to the study of radon decay product concentrations in ground-level air and to the rapid detection of any contamination of the environmental air by artificial radionuclides. At Munich-Neuherberg, depending on the meterological conditions, the measured air concentrations of 214Pb, the first gamma-ray-emitting member of the 222Rn decay series, varied from about 1 to 50 Bq m-3. For the artificial radionuclides 60Co, 131I and 137Cs the detection limits were determined as a function of the varying natural radon daughter concentrations at sampling and counting times of 1 h or 1 day. For these radionuclides minimum detectable air activity concentrations of 0.3 or 0.001 Bq m-3, respectively, were obtained at low radon daughter levels. At high radon daughter levels the respective detection limits were found to be higher by a factor of only about 2. PMID:8393198

  18. The natural radioactivity measurements in coastal sediment samples along the East Coast of Tamilnadu using gamma spectrometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramohan, J.; Tholkappian, M.; Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R.

    2015-08-01

    The natural radioactivity concentration in beach sediment samples collected from Pattipulam to Devanampattinam of East Coast of Tamilnadu have been determined by NaI (TI) gamma ray spectrometer. The specific activity concentrations range from ≤ 2.21 (BDL) to 37.02 Bq kg-1 with a mean of 3.79 Bqkg-1 for 238U, ≤ 2.11 (BDL) to 643.77 Bqkg-1 with a mean of 49.60 Bqkg-1 for 232Th and 300.34 Bqkg-1 to 449.08 Bqkg-1 with a mean of 360.23 Bqkg-1 for 40K. The potential radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides content such as Radium Equivalent activity (Raeq), Representative level index (RLI), External hazard index (Hex), absorbed gamma does rate (DR), and Annual effective dose rate (AEDR) are estimated to assess the radiation hazard associated with the sediments. The obtained data are compared with the recommended safety limits and international approved values. All the values are well below the recommended safety limits indicating that radiation levels do not poses any significant health hazard to the public in the area as a result of the natural radioactivity of beach sediments. This study may help the baseline data for more extensive works in the same subjects of future studies.

  19. Investigation of the environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in the processing of sulfide ores for gold using gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gbadago, J K; Faanhof, A; Darko, E O; Schandorf, C

    2011-09-01

    The possible environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on workers and a critical community, as a result of milling and processing sulfide ores for gold by a mining company at Bogoso in the western region of Ghana, have been investigated using gamma spectroscopy. Indicative doses for the workers during sulfide ore processing were calculated from the activity concentrations measured at both physical and chemical processing stages. The dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and radioactivity level index for tailings, for the de-silted sediments of run-off from the vicinity of the tailings dam through the critical community, and for the soils of the critical community's basic schools were calculated and found to be lower than their respective permissible limits. The environmental impact of the radionuclides is therefore expected to be low in this mining environment. PMID:21865616

  20. An analytical calculation of the peak efficiency for cylindrical sources perpendicular to the detector axis in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Julio C

    2008-08-01

    An analytical expression for the so-called full-energy peak efficiency epsilon(E) for cylindrical source with perpendicular axis to an HPGe detector is derived, using point-source measurements. The formula covers different measuring distances, matrix compositions, densities and gamma-ray energies; the only assumption is that the radioactivity is homogeneously distributed within the source. The term for the photon self-attenuation is included in the calculation. Measurements were made using three different sized cylindrical sources of 241Am, 57Co, 137Cs, 54Mn, and 60Co with corresponding peaks of 59.5, 122, 662, 835, 1173, and 1332 keV, respectively, and one measurement of radioactive waste drum for 662, 1173, and 1332 keV. PMID:18249126

  1. Iron and titanium distribution on the moon from orbital gamma ray spectrometry with implications for crustal evolutionary models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A set of Fe and Ti maps and regional values are obtained from the Apollo 15 and 16 orbital gamma ray data by energy band analysis. High-Ti basalts predominate the early and late stages of mare volcanism with high-Fe basaltic volcanism in the interim. The first evidence of a high-Ti-KREEP basalt association is found in the Aristarchus region. A N-S asymmetry for Fe and Ti in the east limb and farside highlands complicates the E-W asymmetry for Th but substantiates crustal inhomogeneity. The observed crustal inhomogeneity adds an additional objection to the primitive source model for crustal evolution. The high-Ti-KREEP basalt association and the general trend of decreasing mare basalt Ti with time lend support to the cumulate source model; however, this model cannot account for young, high-Ti maria. The dynamic assimilation model better accounts for chemical variations observed on the moon.

  2. Broad screening and identification of β-agonists in feed and animal body fluid and tissues using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry combined with spectra library search.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Cao, Jingjing; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xian; He, Pingli

    2016-02-01

    Broad screening and identification of β-agonists in feed, serum, urine, muscle and liver samples was achieved in a quick and highly sensitive manner using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap HRMS) combined with a spectra library search. Solid-phase extraction technology was employed for sample purification and enrichment. After extraction and purification, the samples were analyzed using a Q-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer under full-scan and data-dependent MS/MS mode. The acquired mass spectra were compared with an in-house library (compound library and MS/MS mass spectral library) built with TraceFinder Software which contained the M/Z of the precursor ion, chemical formula, retention time, character fragment ions and the entire MS/MS spectra of 32 β-agonist standards. Screening was achieved by comparing 5 key mass spectral results and positive matches were marked. Using the developed method, the identification results from 10 spiked samples and 238 actual samples indicated that only 2% of acquired mass spectra produced false identities. The method validation results showed that the limit of detection ranged from 0.021-3.854 μg kg(-1)and 0.015-1.198 ng mL(-1) for solid and liquid samples, respectively. PMID:26304337

  3. Effects of Fe as a physical filter on spectra of Technitium- 99m, uniformity, system volume sensitivity and spatial resolution of Philip ADAC Forte dual-head gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohaimi, N.; Abdullah, N.; Shah, S. I.; Zakaria, A.

    2014-11-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging inherits some limitations, i.e., due to scattered gamma photons which degrade spatial resolution causes poor image quality. This study attempts to reduce a fraction of scattered gamma photons before reaching gamma camera detector by using Fe sheet (0.35 mm and 0.40 mm) as a physical filter. Also investigate the effects on spectra of Tc-99m, spatial resolution, system volume sensitivity and uniformity. The thickness of Fe physical filter is selected on the basis of percentage attenuation calculations of different gamma ray energies by various thicknesses of material. Data were acquired using Philip ADAC forte dual-head gamma camera without and with physical filter with LEHR collimator installed. For spectra, uniformity and system volume sensitivity, a cylindrical source tank filled with water added with Tc-99m was scanned. Uniformity and system volume sensitivity images were reconstructed with FBP method by applying Butterworth filter of order 5, cut-off frequency 0.35 cycles/cm and Chang's attenuation correction method using 0.13 cm-1 linear attenuation coefficient. Spatial resolution study was done by scanning a line source (0.8 mm inner diameter) of Tc-99m at various source-to-collimator distances in air and in scattering medium without and with physical filter. A substantial reduction in count rate from Compton and photopeak regions of Tc-99m spectra with physical filter is recorded. Improvement in spatial resolution with physical filter up to 4 cm source-to-collimator distance is obtained. System volume sensitivity was reduced and no improvement in uniformity. These thicknesses of physical filter may be tested further by scanning different planar/SPECT phantoms in Tc-99m imaging.

  4. LAFARA: a new underground laboratory in the French Pyrénées for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Beek, P; Souhaut, M; Lansard, B; Bourquin, M; Reyss, J-L; von Ballmoos, P; Jean, P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new underground laboratory, namely LAFARA (for "LAboratoire de mesure des FAibles RAdioactivités"), that was recently created in the French Pyrénées. This laboratory is primarily designed to analyze environmental samples that display low radioactivity levels using gamma-ray spectrometry. Two high-purity germanium detectors were placed under 85 m of rock (ca. 215 m water equivalent) in the tunnel of Ferrières (Ariège, France). The background is thus reduced by a factor of ∼20 in comparison to above-ground laboratories. Both detectors are fully equipped so that the samples can be analyzed in an automatic mode without requiring permanent presence of a technician in the laboratory. Auto-samplers (twenty positions) and systems to fill liquid nitrogen automatically provide one month of autonomy to the spectrometers. The LAFARA facility allows us to develop new applications in the field of environmental sciences based on the use of natural radionuclides present at low levels in the environment. As an illustration, we present two of these applications: i) dating of marine sediments using the decay of (226)Ra in sedimentary barite (BaSO(4)), ii) determination of (227)Ac ((231)Pa) activities in marine sediment cores. PMID:23164692

  5. LAFARA: a new underground laboratory in the French Pyrénées for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    van Beek P; Souhaut M; Lansard B; Bourquin M; Reyss JL; von Ballmoos P; Jean P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new underground laboratory, namely LAFARA (for "LAboratoire de mesure des FAibles RAdioactivités"), that was recently created in the French Pyrénées. This laboratory is primarily designed to analyze environmental samples that display low radioactivity levels using gamma-ray spectrometry. Two high-purity germanium detectors were placed under 85 m of rock (ca. 215 m water equivalent) in the tunnel of Ferrières (Ariège, France). The background is thus reduced by a factor of ∼20 in comparison to above-ground laboratories. Both detectors are fully equipped so that the samples can be analyzed in an automatic mode without requiring permanent presence of a technician in the laboratory. Auto-samplers (twenty positions) and systems to fill liquid nitrogen automatically provide one month of autonomy to the spectrometers. The LAFARA facility allows us to develop new applications in the field of environmental sciences based on the use of natural radionuclides present at low levels in the environment. As an illustration, we present two of these applications: i) dating of marine sediments using the decay of (226)Ra in sedimentary barite (BaSO(4)), ii) determination of (227)Ac ((231)Pa) activities in marine sediment cores.

  6. Assessment of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in rocks and soils in the environs of Swieradow Zdroj in Sudetes, Poland, by in situ gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malczewski, D; Teper, L; Dorda, J

    2004-01-01

    The natural radioactivity of 40K, 208Ti, 212Pb, 214Pb, 228Ac, and the fallout of 137Cs in typical rocks and soils of Swieradów Zdrój area (Sudetes Mountains, Poland) were measured in situ using a portable gamma-ray spectrometry workstation. The measurement points were chosen for different regional lithology: within hornfelses of the Szklarska Poreba schist-belt, quartz rocks, gneisses of the Swieradów Zdrój unit, leucogranites, leptinites, mica schists of the Stara Kamienica belt, and finally the zones of the southern and northern contacts of the Stara Kamienica schist-belt with leucogranites and gneisses of the Lesna unit, respectively. 40K activity varied in the range from about 320 Bq kg(-1) (quartz) to 1200 Bq kg(-1) (gneisses). The activity concentrations associated with 228Ac (232Th series) varied in the range from 25 Bq kg(-1) (quartz) to 62 Bq kg(-1) (leucogranites), whereas activity concentration of 226Ra varied in the range from about 31 Bq kg(-1) (hornfelses) to 122 Bq kg(-1) (leucogranites). Relatively low deposits of 137Cs were noted in the investigated area, where the activity concentrations ranged from 4001 (hornfelses) Bq m(-2) to less than 154 Bq m(-2) (leucogranites). PMID:15050357

  7. Evaluation of natural radioactivity content in high-volume surface water samples along the northern coast of Oman Sea using portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Omidi, Zohre; Khorambagheri, Mahdi; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh; Ebrahimi, Mahmood; Akbarzadeh, Gholamali

    2015-06-01

    Portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry was carried out to determine the natural radioactivity levels in high volume surface water samples of the northern coast of Oman Sea, covering the coastal strip from Hormoz strait to Goatr seaport, for the first time. The water samples from 36 coastal and near shore locations were collected for analysis. Analyses on the samples collected were carried out to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K contents. The concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in surface water samples ranged between 2.19 and 2.82 Bq/L, 1.66-2.17 Bq/L and 132.6-148.87 Bq/L, respectively. The activity profile of radionuclides shows low activity across the study area. The study also examined some radiation hazard indices. The external hazard index was found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. The results of measurements will serve as background reference level for Oman Sea coastlines. PMID:25847859

  8. Radionuclides in the ground-level atmosphere in Vilnius, Lithuania, in March 2011, detected by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gudelis, A; Druteikienė, R; Lujanienė, G; Maceika, E; Plukis, A; Remeikis, V

    2012-07-01

    This study presents the ground-level air monitoring results obtained in Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania, on 14 March-14 April 2011 after the recent earthquake and subsequent Tsunami having a crucial impact on Japanese nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on 11 March 2011. To collect representative diurnal aerosol samples a powerful sampling system ensuring the air filtration rate of 5500 m(3) h(-1) was used. The following artificial gamma-ray emitting radionuclides have been determined: (129m)Te, (132)Te (in equilibrium with its daughter (132)I), (131)I, (134)Cs, (136)Cs and (137)Cs. Activity concentration of the globally distributed fission product (137)Cs has increased from a background value of 1.6 μBq m(-3) to the value of 0.9 mBq m(-3) at the beginning of April. The activity ratio (134)Cs/(137)Cs was found to be close to 1, with a slightly higher activity of (134)Cs. The maximum aerosol-associated (131)I activity concentration of 3.45 mBq m(-3) was by four orders of magnitude lower than that measured at the same location in April-May 1986 as a consequence of the Chernobyl NPP accident. The estimated gaseous fraction of iodine-131 constituted about 70% of the total (131)I activity. PMID:22541992

  9. A method for determining the analytical form of a radionuclide depth distribution using multiple gamma spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Steven Clifford; Whetstone, Zachary David; Kearfott, Kimberlee Jane

    2011-06-01

    When characterizing environmental radioactivity, whether in the soil or within concrete building structures undergoing remediation or decommissioning, it is highly desirable to know the radionuclide depth distribution. This is typically modeled using continuous analytical expressions, whose forms are believed to best represent the true source distributions. In situ gamma ray spectroscopic measurements are combined with these models to fully describe the source. Currently, the choice of analytical expressions is based upon prior experimental core sampling results at similar locations, any known site history, or radionuclide transport models. This paper presents a method, employing multiple in situ measurements at a single site, for determining the analytical form that best represents the true depth distribution present. The measurements can be made using a variety of geometries, each of which has a different sensitivity variation with source spatial distribution. Using non-linear least squares numerical optimization methods, the results can be fit to a collection of analytical models and the parameters of each model determined. The analytical expression that results in the fit with the lowest residual is selected as the most accurate representation. A cursory examination is made of the effects of measurement errors on the method. PMID:21482447

  10. Systematic influences of gamma-ray spectrometry data near the decision threshold for radioactivity measurements in the environment.

    PubMed

    Zorko, Benjamin; Korun, Matjaž; Mora Canadas, Juan Carlos; Nicoulaud-Gouin, Valerie; Chyly, Pavol; Blixt Buhr, Anna Maria; Lager, Charlotte; Aquilonius, Karin; Krajewski, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Several methods for reporting outcomes of gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of environmental samples for dose calculations are presented and discussed. The measurement outcomes can be reported as primary measurement results, primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit, best estimates obtained by the Bayesian posterior (ISO 11929), best estimates obtained by the probability density distribution resembling shifting, and the procedure recommended by the European Commission (EC). The annual dose is calculated from the arithmetic average using any of these five procedures. It was shown that the primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit could lead to an underestimation of the annual dose. On the other hand the best estimates lead to an overestimation of the annual dose. The annual doses calculated from the measurement outcomes obtained according to the EC's recommended procedure, which does not cope with the uncertainties, fluctuate between an under- and overestimation, depending on the frequency of the measurement results that are larger than the limit of detection. In the extreme case, when no measurement results above the detection limit occur, the average over primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit underestimates the average over primary measurement results for about 80%. The average over best estimates calculated according the procedure resembling shifting overestimates the average over primary measurement results for 35%, the average obtained by the Bayesian posterior for 85% and the treatment according to the EC recommendation for 89%. PMID:27085965

  11. The use of MCNP and gamma spectrometry in supporting the evaluation of NORM in Libyan oil pipeline scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Ahmed S.; Bradley, D. A.; Regan, P. H.; Shutt, A. L.

    2010-07-01

    The accumulation of scales in production pipes is a common problem in the oil industry, reducing fluid flow and also leading to costly remedies and disposal issues. Typical materials found in such scale are sulphates and carbonates of calcium and barium, or iron sulphide. Radium arising from the uranium/thorium present in oil-bearing rock formations may replace the barium or calcium in these salts to form radium salts. This creates what is known as technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM or simply NORM). NORM is a serious environmental and health and safety issue arising from commercial oil and gas extraction operations. Whilst a good deal has been published on the characterisation and measurement of radioactive scales from offshore oil production, little information has been published regarding NORM associated with land-based facilities such as that of the Libyan oil industry. The ongoing investigation described in this paper concerns an assessment of NORM from a number of land based Libyan oil fields. A total of 27 pipe scale samples were collected from eight oil fields, from different locations in Libya. The dose rates, measured using a handheld survey meter positioned on sample surfaces, ranged from 0.1-27.3 μSv h -1. In the initial evaluations of the sample activity, use is being made of a portable HPGe based spectrometry system. To comply with the prevailing safety regulations of the University of Surrey, the samples are being counted in their original form, creating a need for correction of non-homogeneous sample geometries. To derive a detection efficiency based on the actual sample geometries, a technique has been developed using a Monte Carlo particle transport code (MCNPX). A preliminary activity determination has been performed using an HPGe portable detector system.

  12. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Ion Recovery and Clean-Up of MS and MS/MS Spectra Obtained from Low Abundance Viral Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Crispin, Max; Bonomelli, Camille; Scrivens, Jim H.

    2015-07-01

    Many samples of complex mixtures of N-glycans released from small amounts of material, such as glycoproteins from viruses, present problems for mass spectrometric analysis because of the presence of contaminating material that is difficult to remove by conventional methods without involving sample loss. This study describes the use of ion mobility for extraction of glycan profiles from such samples and for obtaining clean CID spectra when targeted m/z values capture additional ions from those of the target compound. N-glycans were released enzymatically from within SDS-PAGE gels, from the representative recombinant glycoprotein, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus, and examined by direct infusion electrospray in negative mode followed by ion mobility with a Waters Synapt G2 mass spectrometer (Waters MS-Technologies, Manchester, UK). Clean profiles of singly, doubly, and triply charged N-glycans were obtained from samples in cases where the raw electrospray spectra displayed only a few glycan ions as the result of low sample concentration or the presence of contamination. Ion mobility also enabled uncontaminated CID spectra to be obtained from glycans when their molecular ions displayed coincidence with ions from fragments or multiply charged ions with similar m/z values. This technique proved to be invaluable for removing extraneous ions from many CID spectra. The presence of such ions often produces spectra that are difficult to interpret. Most CID spectra, even those from abundant glycan constituents, benefited from such clean-up, showing that the extra dimension provided by ion mobility was invaluable for studies of this type.

  13. Natural gamma-ray spectrometry, lithofacies, and depositional environments of selected upper Cretaceous marine mudrocks, western United States, including tropic shale and tununk member of Mancos shale

    SciTech Connect

    Zelt, F.B.

    1985-01-01

    In-situ measurements of gamma-ray spectra provide estimates of the potassium, thorium, the pre-weathering uranium contents of outcropping marine mudrocks. Th/U is a sensitive indicator of the oxidation potential of paleoenvironments of deposition of Phanerozoic epi- and pericontinental marine deposits. High (>10 x 10/sup -4/) ratios of uranium or organic carbon occur in phosphatic and cherty mudrocks; low (<1.5 x 10/sup -4/) ratios occur in nonmarine mudrocks and in epicontinental marine strata that were deposited during unusual paleo-oceanographic conditions, which sometimes accompanied global extinction events. Spectrometric data compliment sedimentologic data in defining five lithologic/geochemical facies in marine mudrocks of the Cenomanian-Turonian Greenhorn marine cycle. The rock units that were studied in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah are the Graneros Shale, Greenhorn Limestone, Garlile Shale, Mancos Shale, and Tropic Shale. Results of analyses of the different rock units are used to explain various geological structures of the area under investigation. Outcrops and geophysical well logs combine to indicate the distribution of lithologic/geochemical focus of marine mudrocks.

  14. Evaluating airborne and ground based gamma spectrometry methods for detecting particulate radioactivity in the environment: a case study of Irish Sea beaches.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J; Sanderson, D C W

    2012-10-15

    In several places, programmes are in place to locate and recover radioactive particles that have the potential to cause detrimental health effects in any member of the public who may encounter them. A model has been developed to evaluate the use of mobile gamma spectrometry systems within such programmes, with particular emphasis on large volume (16l) NaI(Tl) detectors mounted in low flying helicopters. This model uses a validated Monte Carlo code with assessment of local geochemistry and natural and anthropogenic background radiation concentrations and distributions. The results of the model, applied to the example of particles recovered from beaches in the vicinity of Sellafield, clearly show the ability of rapid airborne surveys conducted at 75 m ground clearance and 120 kph speeds to demonstrate the absence of sources greater than 5 MBq (137)Cs within large areas (10-20 km(2)h(-1)), and identify areas requiring further ground based investigation. Lowering ground clearance for airborne surveys to 15m whilst maintaining speeds covering 1-2 km(2) h(-1) can detect buried (137)Cs sources of 0.5MBq or greater activity. A survey design to detect 100 kBq (137)Cs sources at 10 cm depth has also been defined, requiring surveys at <15m ground clearance and <2 ms(-1) ground speed. The response of airborne systems to the Sellafield particles recovered to date has also been simulated, and the proportion of the existing radiocaesium background in the vicinity of the nuclear site has been established. Finally the rates of area coverage and sensitivities of both airborne and ground based approaches are compared, demonstrating the ability of airborne systems to increase the rate of particle recovery in a cost effective manner. The potential for equipment and methodological developments to improve performance are discussed. PMID:22947616

  15. A Users' Guide for the Computer Program ISDMAP: Analysis and Mapping of In-Situ Gamma-Ray Spectrometry and Soil Sample Data

    SciTech Connect

    Reginatto, Marcel; Bailey, Paul; Shebell, Peter

    2000-11-30

    The computer program ISDMAP was written to analyze data from a set of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements on a grid. It can also do a combined analysis of this type of data and data from soil samples. One well-known difficulty with attempting this type of analysis is that such sets of data can never provide enough information to determine a unique solution. This can be understood intuitively since a finite number of measurements cannot be sufficient to determine a continuous distribution (this observation is not restricted to data collected with the in situ technique, but holds for any set of discrete measurements, such as a series of soil samples). One can, however, restrict to particular types of solutions by requiring that they satisfy other conditions in addition to the measurements, and this is the approach taken by ISDMAP. In ISDMAP, the data are analyzed in a different manner depending on whether the data is from a characterization survey or from a post-remediation survey. The ''characterization'' option creates a map of contamination in surface soil that is smooth and fits the data. The ''post-remediation'' option creates a map with a summary of potential hot spots over a constant background level, providing a map of hot spots that might be ''hidden'' in the data. This report describes the operation of ISDMAP in sufficient detail to allow a user to prepare the necessary input files and run the program. The program requires a PC with DOS or a DOS emulator (most Windows machines have this).

  16. Exposure Dose Reconstruction from EPR Spectra of Tooth Enamel Exposed to the Combined Effect of X-rays and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, J. I.

    2014-09-01

    We have used EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel to show that the combined effect of x-rays with effective energy 34 keV and gamma radiation with average energy 1250 keV leads to a significant increase in the reconstructed absorbed dose compared with the applied dose from a gamma source or from an x-ray source or from both sources of electromagnetic radiation. In simulation experiments, we develop an approach to estimating the contribution of diagnostic x-rays to the exposure dose formed in the tooth enamel by the combined effect of x-rays and gamma radiation.

  17. Free electron laser-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry facility for obtaining infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra of gaseous ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Jose J.; Eyler, John R.; Oomens, Jos; Moore, David T.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; von Helden, Gert; Meijer, Gerard; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.; Blakney, Gregory T.

    2005-02-01

    A Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer has been installed at a free electron laser (FEL) facility to obtain infrared absorption spectra of gas phase ions by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The FEL provides continuously tunable infrared radiation over a broad range of the infrared spectrum, and the FT-ICR mass spectrometer, utilizing a 4.7Tesla superconducting magnet, permits facile formation, isolation, trapping, and high-mass resolution detection of a wide range of ion classes. A description of the instrumentation and experimental parameters for these experiments is presented along with preliminary IRMPD spectra of the singly-charged chromium-bound dimer of diethyl ether (Cr(C4H10O)2+) and the fluorene molecular ion (C13H10+). Also presented is a brief comparison of the fluorene cation spectrum obtained by the FT-ICR-FEL with an earlier spectrum recorded using a quadrupole ion trap (QIT).

  18. Purification of pharmaceutical preparations using thin-layer chromatography to obtain mass spectra with Direct Analysis in Real Time and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jessica L; Steiner, Robert R

    2011-06-01

    Forensic analysis of pharmaceutical preparations requires a comparative analysis with a standard of the suspected drug in order to identify the active ingredient. Purchasing analytical standards can be expensive or unattainable from the drug manufacturers. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART™) is a novel, ambient ionization technique, typically coupled with a JEOL AccuTOF™ (accurate mass) mass spectrometer. While a fast and easy technique to perform, a drawback of using DART™ is the lack of component separation of mixtures prior to ionization. Various in-house pharmaceutical preparations were purified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectra were subsequently obtained using the AccuTOF™- DART™ technique. Utilizing TLC prior to sample introduction provides a simple, low-cost solution to acquiring mass spectra of the purified preparation. Each spectrum was compared against an in-house molecular formula list to confirm the accurate mass elemental compositions. Spectra of purified ingredients of known pharmaceuticals were added to an in-house library for use as comparators for casework samples. Resolving isomers from one another can be accomplished using collision-induced dissociation after ionization. Challenges arose when the pharmaceutical preparation required an optimized TLC solvent to achieve proper separation and purity of the standard. Purified spectra were obtained for 91 preparations and included in an in-house drug standard library. Primary standards would only need to be purchased when pharmaceutical preparations not previously encountered are submitted for comparative analysis. TLC prior to DART™ analysis demonstrates a time efficient and cost saving technique for the forensic drug analysis community. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21548141

  19. Software tool for xenon gamma-ray spectrometer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, I. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Shustov, A. E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Pyae Nyein, Sone; Petrenko, D.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2016-02-01

    Software tool "Acquisition and processing of gamma-ray spectra" for xenon gamma-ray spectrometers control was developed. It supports the multi-windows interface. Software tool has the possibilities for acquisition of gamma-ray spectra from xenon gamma-ray detector via USB or RS-485 interfaces, directly or via TCP-IP protocol, energy calibration of gamma-ray spectra, saving gamma-ray spectra on a disk.

  20. Neutron spectrometry for UF6 enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principalmore » component analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.« less

  1. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  2. Toward prompt gamma spectrometry for monitoring boron distributions during extra corporal treatment of liver metastases by boron neutron capture therapy: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Khelifi, R; Nievaart, V A; Bode, P; Moss, R L; Krijger, G C

    2009-07-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of extra corporal liver phantom. The present paper describes the basis for a subsequent clinical application of the prompt gamma spectroscopy set-up aimed at in vivo monitoring of boron distribution. MCNP code was used first to validate the homogeneity in thermal neutron field in the liver phantom and simulate the gamma ray detection system (collimator and detector) in the treatment room. The gamma ray of 478 keV emitted by boron in small specific region can be detected and a mathematical formalism was used for the tomography image reconstruction. PMID:19394243

  3. Spectra and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma rays from 0.3 to 10 MeV at lambda = 40 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, J. C.; Gruber, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the spectral and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma sq cm rays in the energy range 0.3-10 MeV over Palestine, Texas, at residual depths of 2.5 and 70 g/sq cm are reported. In confirmation of the general features of a model prediction, the measurements show at 2.5 g/sq cm upward moving fluxes greater than the downward moving fluxes, the effect increasing with energy, and approximate isotropy at 70 g/sq cm. Numerous characteristic gamma-ray lines were observed, most prominently at 0.511, 1.6, 2.3, 4.4, and 6.1 MeV. Their intensities were also compared with model predictions. Observations were made with an actively shielded scintillator counter with two detectors, one of aperture 50 deg FWHM and the other of 120 deg FWHM. Above 1 MeV, contributions to the counting rate from photons penetrating the shield annulus and from neutron interactions were large; they were studied by means of a Monte Carlo code and are extensively discussed.

  4. The role of mass spectrometry in medicinal plant research.

    PubMed

    Héthelyi, E; Tétényi, P; Dabi, E; Dános, B

    1987-11-01

    In phytochemical and chemotaxonomic research work mass spectrometry plays an outstandingly important role. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) we established the chemotaxa of Tanacetum vulgare L. Chemotypes with essential oils containing 60-90% of artemisia ketone, carveol, dihydrocarvone, myrtenol, umbellulone, terpinen-4-ol, davanone, and Tagetes species containing various essential oils can be clearly distinguished by their spectra; we examined many variations of Tagetes erecta, T. lucida, T. minuta, T. patula and T. tenuifolia. We have identified alpha-beta-pinene-, 1,8-cineol-, linalool-, camphor-, nerol-, geraniol- and gamma-gurjonene as components of Achillea distans L. Injecting the essential oil direct from the oil-secreting organs of T. minuta plants we identified using GC/MS 6-10 and 16% eugenol from the involucral bract and hypsophyll, respectively, as well as beta-ocimene, dihydrotagetone, tagetone, Z- and E-ocimenones. In the course of studies on essential fatty acids Borago officinalis and Lappula squarrosa were selected from 70 species of the family Boraginaceae to obtain seed oil as a source of gamma-linolenic acid, and for the PG synthesis we isolated several grams of gamma-linolenic acid, as well as C18:4, i.e. octadecatetraenic acid, from L. squarrosa on the basis of the mass spectra. From the seed oil of Aquilegia vulgaris C18:3 (5) from the oil of Limnanthes dougloasii C20:1 (5) and from the seed oils of Delphinium consolida and of Tropaeolum species (T. majus, T. minus, T. peregrinum) C20:1 (11) fatty acids were identified on the basis of spectra. PMID:2962668

  5. Distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples of Kalpakkam (India) using hyper pure germanium (HPGe) gamma ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kannan, V; Rajan, M P; Iyenga, M A R; Ramesh, R

    2002-07-01

    Pre-operational survey at Kalpakkam coast, indicated elevated gamma background radiation levels in the range of 100-4000 nGy h(-1) over the large tracts of the coastal sands due to the presence of pockets of monazite mineral in beach sands. In view of the prevalence of monazite, a systematic gamma spectrometric study of distribution of natural radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples collected from the terrestrial and coastal environment of Kalpakkam was performed and concentrations of primordial radionuclides such as 238U, 232Th and 40K and anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs were determined. The concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K in soil samples were 5-71, 15-776 and 200-854 Bq kg(-1) dry, respectively. In beach sand samples, 238U, 232Th and 40K contents varied in the range of 36-258, 352-3872 and 324-405 Bq kg(-1) dry, respectively. The total absorbed gamma dose rate in air due to the presence of 238U, 232Th and 40K in Kalpakkam soil samples varied between 24 and 556 nGy h(-1) with a mean of 103 nGy h(-1). The contribution to the total absorbed gamma dose rate in air in the decreasing order was due to the presence of 232Th (76.4%), followed by 40K (16.9%) and 238U (6.7%) in Kalpakkam soils. However, in beach areas of Kalpakkam, the presence of 232Th in beach sand contributed maximum (94.0%) to the total absorbed gamma dose rate in air followed by 238U (4.7%) and minimum contribution was by 40K (1.3%). 137Cs in Kalpakkam soils ranged from < or = 1.0 to 2.8 Bq kg(-1) dry, which was 1-3 order of magnitude less than the concentration of primordial radionuclides in soil. PMID:12137019

  6. Gamma scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental examinations have been performed on a gamma scattering source/detector configuration that is believed to have the potential for providing density information at a finite number of positions along the primary beam and the average attenuation along the exit rays from those positions. Scattering spectra were acquired for several void-fluid density distribution simulations. The multiple-scattered photon contribution to the total acquired spectrum from a water-filled pipe simulation was extracted and found to be between 18 to 33% of the total counts in the single-scattered photon energy region, with a region average of 24%.

  7. Mass spectra of copolymers.

    PubMed

    Montaudo, Maurizio S

    2002-01-01

    Recent and older literature (covering the last 12-13 years) in the field of mass spectra of random and block copolymers is reviewed. A detailed description is given of the information on copolymer properties that can be recovered from the analysis of the low-mass region of the spectrum (the region below 500 Da) and the high-mass region. The features of mass spectra of copolymers obtained by different synthetic routes are discussed, such as free radical, condensation, ring-chain equilibration, microbial synthesis, ring-opening, simple anionic, cationic, Ziegler-Natta, and/or metallocene catalysis, along with some random and block copolymers that occur in Nature. The emphasis is on copolymer composition and average molar mass determination, and on the benefits of coupling mass spectrometry (MS) with separation techniques such as size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:12373747

  8. Calculation of responses and analysis of experimental data for a silicon gamma spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klusoň, Jaroslav; Jánský, Bohumil

    2010-07-01

    A silicon detector developed for gamma ray spectrometry (intended for measurement in the mixed neutron gamma fields, e.g. in reactor physics) was tested for the photon energy interval up to 10 MeV. The responses of this spectrometric system were simulated using a Monte Carlo method (MCNPX code), and the response matrix was calculated. Unfolding techniques for reconstructing incident photon spectra were tested, and a method based on the Scofield-Gold iterative solution of the corresponding matrix equation was applied. The applicability of such an approach to spectrometry data processing and spectral analysis is demonstrated, an example of the results is presented, and possible future improvements and optimizations are discussed.

  9. A New Method for the Reconstruction of Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Spectra and Application to Galactic Cosmic-Ray Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgílio

    2014-06-01

    In this thesis, high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E > 0.1 TeV) γ-ray data were investigated to probe Galactic stellar clusters (SCs) and star-forming regions (SFRs) as sites of hadronic Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) acceleration. In principle, massive SCs and SFRs could accelerate GCRs at the shock front of the collective SC wind fed by the individual high-mass stars. The subsequently produced VHE γ rays would be measured with imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). A couple of the Galactic VHE γ-ray sources, including those potentially produced by SCs, fill a large fraction of the field-of-view (FoV) and require additional observations of source-free regions to determine the dominant background for a spectral reconstruction. A new method of reconstructing spectra for such extended sources without the need of further observations is developed: the Template Background Spectrum (TBS). This methods is based on a method to generate skymaps, which determines background in parameter space. The idea is the creation of a look-up of the background normalisation in energy, zenith angle, and angular separation and to account for possible systematics. The results obtained with TBS and state-of-the-art background-estimation methods on H.E.S.S. data are in good agreement. With TBS even those sources could be reconstructed that normally would need further observations. Therefore, TBS is the third method to reconstruct VHE γ-ray spectra, but the first one to not need additional observations in the analysis of extended sources. The discovery of the largest VHE γ-ray source HESS J1646-458 (2.2° in size) towards the SC Westerlund 1 (Wd 1) can be plausibly explained by the SC-wind scenario. But owing to its size, other alternative counterparts to the TeV emission (pulsar, binary system, magnetar) were found in the FoV. Therefore, an association of HESS J1646-458 with the SC is favoured, but cannot be confirmed. The SC Pismis 22 is located in the centre of the previously reported, but unidentified extended TeV γ-ray source HESS J1614-518. Unpublished H.E.S.S. data and archival multi-wavelength (MWL) data (radio, X-ray, and HE data) as well various astrophysical objects in the FoV were investigated in search of a counterpart. The energy-dependent TeV morphology (with at least two source regions) can hardly be reconciled with the MWL data. A SC-wind scenario appears unlikely and the FoV lacks plausible counterparts, but a relic pulsar wind nebula could explain the lack of prominent X-ray emission. The VHE γ-ray source remains unidentified. The analysis of unpublished H.E.S.S. data on the SFR the Gould Belt (GB) did not provide any firm evidence of VHE γ-ray emission, and upper limits on the flux and the cosmic-ray enhancement were derived. The analyses appeared to be affected by the many bright stars and a hypothetically faint large-scale extended emission, possibly posing a limitation in observations and data analysis of current IACTs. Towards Orion A, a possible discovery of extended VHE γ rays with a flux of 10.8% of the Crab Nebula is found with TBS, but cannot be confirmed and could be an artifact of the analysis of this region. Observations with the H.E.S.S. telescope system motivate that SCs and SFRs can accelerate GCRs. However, further H.E.S.S. observations are needed for further morphological and spectral studies. Also, more X-ray observations (in the case of HESS J1614-518) and further studies on the background-estimation methods and their systematics (in the case of the GB) are required.

  10. Neutron spectrometry for UF6 enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.

  11. Quantification of the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde products of 2-deoxyribose oxidation in DNA and cells by isotope-dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry: differential effects of gamma-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wan; Chen, Bingzi; Wang, Lianrong; Taghizadeh, Koli; Demott, Michael S; Dedon, Peter C

    2010-05-01

    The oxidation of 2-deoxyribose in DNA has emerged as a critical determinant of the cellular toxicity of oxidative damage to DNA, with oxidation of each carbon producing a unique spectrum of electrophilic products. We have developed and validated an isotope-dilution gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the rigorous quantification of two major 2-deoxyribose oxidation products: the 2-deoxyribonolactone abasic site of 1'-oxidation and the nucleoside 5'-aldehyde of 5'-oxidation chemistry. The method entails elimination of these products as 5-methylene-2(5H)-furanone (5MF) and furfural, respectively, followed by derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH), addition of isotopically labeled PFPH derivatives as internal standards, extraction of the derivatives, and quantification by GC-MS analysis. The precision and accuracy of the method were validated with oligodeoxynucleotides containing the 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde lesions. Further, the well-defined 2-deoxyribose oxidation chemistry of the enediyne antibiotics, neocarzinostatin and calicheamicin gamma(1)(I), was exploited in control studies, with neocarzinostatin producing 10 2-deoxyribonolactone and 300 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM in accord with its established minor 1'- and major 5'-oxidation chemistry. Calicheamicin unexpectedly caused 1'-oxidation at a low level of 10 2-deoxyribonolactone per 10(6) nt per microM in addition to the expected predominance of 5'-oxidation at 560 nucleoside 5'-aldehyde per 10(6) nt per microM. The two hydroxyl radical-mediated DNA oxidants, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA, produced nucleoside 5'-aldehyde at a frequency of 57 per 10(6) nt per Gy (G-value 74 nmol/J) and 3.5 per 10(6) nt per microM, respectively, which amounted to 40% and 35%, respectively, of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation as measured by a plasmid nicking assay. However, gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA produced different proportions of 2-deoxyribonolactone at 7% and 24% of total 2-deoxyribose oxidation, respectively, with frequencies of 10 lesions per 10(6) nt per Gy (G-value, 13 nmol/J) and 2.4 lesions per 10(6) nt per microM. Studies in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells, in which the analytical data were corrected for losses sustained during DNA isolation, revealed background levels of 2-deoxyribonolactone and nucleoside 5'-aldehyde of 9.7 and 73 lesions per 10(6) nt, respectively. Gamma-irradiation of the cells caused increases of 0.045 and 0.22 lesions per 10(6) nt per Gy, respectively, which represents a approximately 250-fold quenching effect of the cellular environment similar to that observed in previous studies. The proportions of the various 2-deoxyribose oxidation products generated by gamma-radiation are similar for purified DNA and cells. These results are consistent with solvent exposure as a major determinant of hydroxyl radical reactivity with 2-deoxyribose in DNA, but the large differences between gamma-radiation and Fe(2+)-EDTA suggest that factors other than hydroxyl radical reactivity govern DNA oxidation chemistry. PMID:20377226

  12. Potential of natural gamma-ray spectrometry for mapping and environmental monitoring of black-sand beach deposits on the northern coast of Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Aboelkhair, Hatem; Zaaeimah, Mostafa

    2013-04-01

    The concentrations and distributions of naturally occurring radioactive materials were studied with the aim of detecting and mapping radioactive anomalies as well as monitoring the environment for black-sand beach deposits in Northern Sinai, Egypt. For this purpose, ground gamma-ray spectrometric surveys were conducted using a portable GS-512 spectrometer, with an NaI (Tl) detector, on an area 77.5 km(2) in surface area located between the cities of Rafah and Elareish on the Mediterranean Sea coast. The results revealed that the black-sand beach deposits could be differentiated according to their total-count (TC) radioactivity into five normally distributed interpreted radiometric lithologic (IRL) units denoted by U1, U2, U3, U4 and U5. The computed characteristic TC radiometric statistics of these five IRL units range from 4.67  to 9.96 Ur for their individual arithmetic means. The computed arithmetic means for the three radioelements K, eU and eTh reach 0.46 %, 2.25 and 6.17 ppm, respectively for the whole study area. Monitoring the environmental effects of radioelement concentrations on the study area showed that the mean natural equivalent radiation dose rate from the terrestrial gamma-radiation of the whole area attains 0.33 mSv y(-1). This average value remains on the safe side and within the maximum permissible safe radiation dose (<1.0 mSv y(-1)) without harm to the individual, except at three scattered points reaching more than these values. Some of the local inhabitants in the region sometimes use black sands as a building material. Consequently, they are not recommended for use as building materials, because the inhabitants will, then, receive a relatively high radioactive dose generated mainly by monazite and zircon minerals, two of the main constituents of black sands. PMID:22869819

  13. Spatial mapping of soil and radioactivity redistribution at the hillslope scale using in-situ gamma spectrometry, terrestrial laser scanning and RFID tags after the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, Jeremy; Onda, Yuichi; Noguchi, Takehiro; Parsons, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    In March 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, triggered by the Tohoku earthquake and the consequent tsunami, released a large amount of radionuclides in the environment. To provide a rapid assessment of the soil contamination and its potential redistribution, intensive scientific monitoring has been conducted since July 2011 in our study site, located in the Yamakiya district of Kawamata town, in Fukushima prefecture, Japan, about 37 km from the power plant. In this paper, we summarize and analyze a dataset combining multiple innovative methods deployed inside a 5m x 22m bounded hillslope plot. In addition to runoff volumes and sediments radiocesium concentrations, each major rainfall event was followed by in situ gamma spectrometry measurements. In 2012, to trace the complex behavior of sediments inside the plot, about 300 RFID (Radio-Frequency IDentification) tags representing coarse sediments were scattered and their spatial position was periodically checked using a total station. Finally, several high resolutions Digital Elevation Models were acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner to assess the surface structure and changes. The observed processes at the event scale include interrill and rill erosion, as well as local deposition and remobilization phenomenon. Not only do they directly provide information on the erosion spatio-temporal variability and the associated radionuclides transfers, but combined together they can constitute a solid basis to improve and challenge process-based distributed erosion models.

  14. Small Scale Assessment of Spatial and Vertical Redistribution of Fukushima Fallouts Radiocaesium in Contaminated Soil Using in-situ HPGe Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, J.; Onda, Y.; Yoda, H.; Kato, H.

    2011-12-01

    After Tohoku earthquake on March 11th 2011, the subsequent tsunami and the resulting Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, gamma emitting particles, first release into the atmosphere, were quickly deposited on the soil surface, with potentially harmful level in the surroundings of the nuclear power plant. Thus, the evaluation of soil deposition pattern, depth migration and afterward radionuclides redistribution and export by erosion and hydrological processes is fundamental for contamination assessments and to plan future actions. Our study site is located 37km from Fukushima power plant, inside the evacuated zone. In this study, we used a bounded erosion plot of 22.1m x 5m to assess global export of sediments and 137Cs. This plot, previously cropped with tobacco, is morphologically divided into inter-rill areas separated by rills that formed into former wheel tracks. The bottom of the plot is subject to deposition of sediments. In order to determine and quantify the internal processes responsible of the export of sediment, the depth distribution of 137Cs is estimated using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Such a portable device, associated to the high radiation levels, allow an acquisition of spatially distributed data within the plot in a reasonable time (1 min/sample). At the same time, depth distribution of 137Cs are measured using the scrapper plate technique, adapted to obtain a fine resolution in the first, highly contaminated, centimeters of soil. Finally, 137Cs depth profiles, associated with in situ and laboratory gamma spectrums acquired with the portable detector, allow for the detector calibration. Although the initial deposit can reasonably be supposed homogeneous at the plot scale, the dataset obtained 3 months later shows high spatial and temporal variability due to erosion processes. Measurements with the portable HPGe detector proved to be useful at this small scale, avoiding the needs of a large number of soil samples, and our results are promising to understand erosion at larger scale where horizontal patterns of deposition and redistribution are usually supposed homogeneous over quite larger areas.

  15. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  16. Characterization of gamma-irradiated polyethylene terephthalate by liquid-chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC MS) with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, Rainer; Begley, Timothy H.

    2006-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (low-MW) constituents of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), irradiated with 60Co gamma rays at 25 and 50 kGy, were analyzed by HPLC-MS with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI). Consistent with earlier results, the concentrations of the major compounds that are present in the non-irradiated PET do not change perceptibly. However, we find a small but significant increase in terephthalic acid ethylester, from less than 1 mg/kg in the non-irradiated control to ca. 2 mg/kg after 50 kGy, which has not been described before. The finding is important because it gives an impression of the sensitivity of the analytical method. Additionally, it shows that even very radiation-resistant polymers can form measurable amounts of low-MW radiolysis products. The potential and limitations of LC-MS for the analysis of radiolysis products and unidentified migrants are briefly discussed in the context of the question: How can we validate our analytical methods for unknown analytes?

  17. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  18. Topics in gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of gamma rays from solar flares, gamma ray bursts, the Galactic center, galactic nucleosynthesis, SS433, and Cygnus X-3, and their effects on astrophysical problems are discussed. It is observed that gamma ray spectra from solar flares are applicable to the study of particle acceleration and confinement and the determination of chemical abundances in the solar atmosphere. The gamma ray lines from the compact galactic object SS433 are utilized to examine the acceleration of jets, and analysis of the gamma ray lines of Cygnus X-3 reveal that particles can be accelerated in compact sources to ultrahigh energies.

  19. Gamma spectroscopy of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2013-05-01

    We describe experiments for the undergraduate laboratory that use a high-resolution gamma detector to measure radiation in environmental samples. The experiments are designed to instruct the students in the quantitative analysis of gamma spectra and secular equilibrium. Experiments include the radioactive dating of Brazil nuts, determining radioisotope concentrations in natural samples, and measurement of the 235U abundance in uranium rich rocks.

  20. Modifications induced by gamma irradiation to Makrofol polymer nuclear track detector

    PubMed Central

    Tayel, A.; Zaki, M.F.; El Basaty, A.B.; Hegazy, Tarek M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was extended from obtaining information about the interaction of gamma rays with Makrofol DE 7-2 track detector to introduce the basis that can be used in concerning simple sensor for gamma irradiation and bio-engineering applications. Makrofol polymer samples were irradiated with 1.25 MeV 60Co gamma radiations at doses ranging from 20 to 1000 kG y. The modifications of irradiated samples so induced were analyzed using UV–vis spectrometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the measurements of Vickers’ hardness. Moreover, the change in wettability of irradiated Makrofol was investigated by the contact angle determination of the distilled water. UV–vis spectroscopy shows a noticeable decrease in the energy band gap due to gamma irradiation. This decrease could be attributed to the appearance of a shift to UV spectra toward higher wavelength region after irradiation. Photoluminescence spectra reveal a remarkable change in the integrated photoluminescence intensity with increasing gamma doses, which may be resulted from some matrix disorder through the creation of some defected states in the irradiated polymer. The hardness was found to increase from 4.78 MPa for the unirradiated sample to 23.67 MPa for the highest gamma dose. The contact angle investigations show that the wettability of the modified samples increases with increasing the gamma doses. The result obtained from present investigation furnishes evidence that the gamma irradiations are a successful technique to modify the Makrofol DE 7-2 polymer properties to use it in suitable applications. PMID:25750755

  1. Investigation of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (137)Cs, and heavy metal concentrations in Anzali international wetland using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Fallahi Kapourchali, Maryam; Bagheri, Hashem; Khoram Bagheri, Mahdi; Abedini, Ali; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in sediment and soil samples of the Anzali international wetland were carried out by two HPGe-gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The concentrations of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs in sediment samples ranged between 1.05 ± 0.51-5.81 ± 0.61, 18.06 ± 0.63-33.36 ± .0.34, 17.57 ± 0.38-45.84 ± 6.23, 371.88 ± 6.36-652.28 ± 11.60, and 0.43 ± 0.06-63.35 ± 0.94 Bq/kg, while in the soil samples they vary between 2.36-5.97, 22.71-38.37, 29.27-42.89, 472.66-533, and 1.05-9.60 Bq/kg for (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs, respectively. Present results are compared with the available literature data and also with the world average values. The radium equivalent activity was well below the defined limit of 370 Bq/kg. The external hazard indices were found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. Heavy metal concentrations were found to decrease in order as Fe > Mn > Sr > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd. These measurements will serve as background reference levels for the Anzali wetland. PMID:26490904

  2. Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

  3. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L. (Editor); Ramaty, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

  4. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a final report for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program from 06/01/91-07/31/97. The topics include: 1) Solar Flare Neutron Spectra and Accelerated Ions; 2) Gamma Ray Lines From The Orion Complex; 3) Implications of Nuclear Line Emission From The Orion Complex; 4) Possible Sites of Nuclear Line Emission From Massive OB Associations; 5) Gamma-Ray Burst Repitition and BATSE Position Uncertainties; 6) Effects of Compton Scattering on BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra; and 7) Selection Biases on the Spectral and Temporal Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts.

  5. Raman Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Derek J.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews mainly quantitative analytical applications in the field of Raman spectrometry. Includes references to other reviews, new and analytically untested techniques, and novel sampling and instrument designs. Cites 184 references. (CS)

  6. Detection of pulsed bremsstrahlung-induced prompt neutron capture gamma rays with a HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, James L.

    1997-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing a novel photoneutron-based nondestructive evaluation technique which uses a pulsed, high-energy electron accelerator and gamma-ray spectrometry. Highly penetrating pulses of bremsstrahlung photons are produced by each pulse of electrons. Interrogating neutrons are generated by the bremsstrahlung photons interacting within a photoneutron source material. The interactions of the neutrons within a target result in the emission of elemental characteristic gamma-rays. Spectrometry is performed by analyzing the photoneutron-induced, prompt gama-rays acquired between accelerator pulses with a unique, high- purity germanium gamma-ray detection system using a modified transistor reset preamplifier. The detection system, the experimental configuration, and the accelerator operation used to characterize the detection systems performance are described. Using a 6.5-MeV electron accelerator and a beryllium metal photoneutron source, gamma-ray spectra were successfully acquired for Al, Cu, polyethylene, NaCl, and depleted uranium targets as soon as 30 microsecond(s) after each bremsstrahlung flash.

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Metzger, A. E.; Trombka, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments in gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the geochemical composition of the lunar surface are reported. The theory is discussed of discrete energy lines of natural radioactivity, and the lines resulting from the bombardment of the lunar surface by high energy cosmic rays. The gamma-ray spectrometer used in lunar orbit and during transearth coast is described, and a preliminary analysis of the results is presented.

  8. Neutron spectrometry in mixed fields: proportional counter spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tagziria, H; Hansen, W

    2003-01-01

    Proton recoil proportional counters have been successfully used in many laboratories worldwide for more than 30 years in order to measure high-resolution neutron energy spectra. The method is well elaborated and understood, nevertheless high expertise is required for its proper application. Table 4.1 summarises typical basic data for proton recoil proportional counters and the requirements for their application. It is noteworthy that any limiting parameter can vary to a certain degree depending on the quality of the detectors used (design, gas purity, response functions, etc) and their response matrices, the data analysis and the unfolding procedures applied with a correct evaluation of the uncertainties involved. It is also important to lend a critical eye to details during measurements (e.g. environmental and electronics problems) as well as in subsequent analysis and unfolding (e.g. oscillations due to unfolding artefacts or inadequacies in detector response matrices). It is recommended that any spectrometry system (procedures for measurement and data evaluation) should be tested and validated in well-known neutron fields e.g. 252Cf standard fission or 241Am-Be. One should, however, expect that, due to different room scatter conditions, deviations from the ISO spectra may occur, especially for low neutron energies. In order to demonstrate the capability of the recoil proton counter technique, two examples of typical neutron spectra are shown in Figures 4.20 and 4.21, both measured in mixed neutron-gamma fields at nuclear research reactors. PMID:14756169

  9. Infrared spectra of olivine polymorphs - Alpha, beta phase and spinel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.

    1980-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of several olivines (alpha phase) and their corresponding beta phase (modified spinel) and spinel (gamma) high-pressure polymorphs are determined. Spectra were measured for ground and pressed samples of alpha and gamma A2SiO4, where A = Fe, Ni, Co; alpha and gamma Mg2GeO4; alpha Mg2SiO4; and beta Co2SiO4. The spectra are interpreted in terms of internal, tetrahedral and octagonal, and lattice vibration modes, and the spinel results are used to predict the spectrum of gamma Mg2SiO4. Analysis of spectra obtained from samples of gamma Mg2GeO4 heated to 730 and 1000 C provides evidence that partial inversion could occur in silicate spinels at elevated temperatures and pressures.

  10. Gamma Ray Pulsars: Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The six or more pulsars seen by CGRO/EGRET show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. Unless a new pulsed component appears at higher energies, progress in gamma-ray pulsar studies will be greatest in the 1-20 GeV range. Ground-based telescopes whose energy ranges extend downward toward 10 GeV should make important measurements of the spectral cutoffs. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2005, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

  11. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  12. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided. PMID:18200615

  13. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A.M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A.I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approx. 0.01 deg (E(sub gamma) > 100 GeV), the energy resolution approx. 1% (E(sub gamma) > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approx 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  14. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  15. Protocol for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of glutathione conjugates using postcolumn solvent modification.

    PubMed

    Bean, M F; Pallante-Morell, S L; Dulik, D M; Fenselau, C

    1990-01-15

    A novel protocol for thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of mixtures of glutathione conjugates is reported. Solvent conditions for optimal high-performance liquid chromatography are not always the same as for optimal thermospray ionization mass spectrometry. Labile glutathione conjugates that give poor spectra in aqueous ammonium acetate yield more intense molecular ion signals with increased percentages of acetonitrile. Direct injection thermospray ionization using 30-60% acetonitrile in aqueous ammonium acetate produced protonated molecular ions for glutathione conjugates of menadione, styrene oxide, pentachlorophenyl methyl sulfone, chlorodinitrobenzene, and chlorambucil. Since, the high percentages of organic modifier needed for good molecular ion intensity preclude chromatographic separation of these polar compounds, successful graphic separation of these polar compounds, successful LC/MS was facilitated by postcolumn addition of organic modifiers to the mobile phase. This new methodology allowed excellent chromatographic separations and thermospray ionization mass spectra to be obtained for a mixture of haloalkane glutathione conjugates. Moreover, cleavage of the gamma-glutamyl-cysteine amide bond of glutathione results in class-characteristic fragment ions. Changes in the fragmentation pathways in spectra acquired with and without organic modifiers shed light on the importance of the desolvation process in obtaining good molecular ion sensitivity in thermospray. PMID:2310009

  16. Automated interpretation of high-energy collision-induced dissociation spectra of singly protonated peptides by 'SeqMS', a software aid for de novo sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-de-Cossio, J; Gonzalez, J; Betancourt, L; Besada, V; Padron, G; Shimonishi, Y; Takao, T

    1998-01-01

    SeqMS, a software program designed for the automated interpretation of high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra of singly protonated peptides ionized by fast atom bombardment, has been developed. The software is capable of probing the sequence of an unknown peptide, and even of certain modified peptides. The program, compiled for WINDOWS95 or NT, also permits the retrieval of raw data and the reconstruction of the spectra on a user-friendly graphical interface with the aid of several tools for processing the spectra, which include setting multiple threshold levels and automatic peak detection. SeqMS is capable of generating candidate sequences, based on the detected peaks, and of displaying the resulting assignments for each candidate in a spectrum or in tabular form. The software has the following capabilities: 1) the ions derived from backbone and side-chain fragmentations, internal and immonium ions, and side-chain loss ions can be used for calculation; 2) 18O-labeling of a peptide at the C terminus, a methodology which was developed to differentiate N-terminal from C-terminal ions, is applicable as an optional setting; 3) modified amino acids and N- or C-terminal blocking groups are taken into account for calculation according to the user's setting in a library; 4) amino acid composition and partial or complete amino acid sequence of a peptide can be used as input for calculation; 5) the assignments of signal output in a spectrum can be graphically edited, and then re-calculated based on the edited peaks. The efficacy of the program is demonstrated by testing 74 high-energy CID spectra, obtained using a four-sector instrument, of synthetic, proteolytic, and biologically active peptides, some of which contain modified groups. PMID:9842738

  17. Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

  18. Radioactinide Additions to the Electronic Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Gehrke; J.R. Davidson; P.J. Taylor; R.G. Helmer; J.W. Mandler

    2001-05-01

    With the completion of a CD ROM version of the original R. L. HEATH''s Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogue, it became obvious that a number of radionuclides are missing which are important to various fields of nuclear science and technology. With a large amount of transuranic waste awaiting permanent disposal across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and the need for its assay in order to dispose of it, it was decided that the addition of the radioactinides encountered in transuranic waste should be the first priority. In response to this need, the spectra of 233U, 235U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am and 243Am have been acquired with modern Ge detectors, and prepared for graphics presentation along with the parent and progeny decay chains and decay schemes. The associated tables of -ray energies and emission probabilities have been downloaded from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data file (ENSDF) database. This information is being incorporated into the Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center Web Site at http://id.inel.gov/gamma

  19. Online Spectral Fit Tool for Analyzing Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, A.; Kohout, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Online Spectral Fit Tool is developed for analyzing Vis-NIR spectral behavior of asteroids and meteorites. Implementation is done using JavaScript/HTML. Fitted spectra consist of spline continuum and gamma distributions for absorption bands.

  20. Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far-IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High-Energy Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0Gamma-rays in intergalactic space owing to interactions with low-energy photons and the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation. We calculate the optical depth of the universe, Tau , for Gamma-rays having energies from 4 GeV to 100 TeV emitted by sources at redshifts from 0 to 5. We also give an analytic fit with numerical coefficients for approximating (E(Gamma), z). As an example of the application of our results, we calculate the absorbed spectrum of the blazar PKS 2155-304 at z=0.117 and compare it with the spectrum observed by the HESS air Cerenkov Gamma-ray telescope array.

  1. Erratum: Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2007-01-01

    Table 1 in our paper had erroneous numbers for the coefficients fitting the parametric form for the optical depth of the universe to gamma-rays; tau. The correct values for these parameters as described in the original text are given in the table for various redshifts for the baseline model (upper row) and fast evolution (lower row) for each individual redshift.

  2. Broadband Analysis of Bioagents by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine; Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan

    Mass spectrometry was first reported to provide analysis of intact metabolite biomarkers from whole cells in 1975.1 Since then advances in ionization techniques have extended our capabilities to polar lipids and, eventually, to proteins.2, 3 Mass spectrometry provides a broadband detection system, which, however, has great specificity. Bioinformatics plays an important role in providing flexible and rapid characterization of species, based on protein and peptide mass spectra collected in the field.

  3. Infrared spectra of U.S. automobile original finishes (1998-2000). IX. identification of bismuth oxychloride and silver/white mica pearlescent pigments using extended range FT-IR spectroscopy, XRF spectrometry, and SEM/EDS analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Edward M

    2014-09-01

    Bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl) was the first viable synthetic pearl pigment developed 50 years ago. It was only used for a limited time period in automotive paint (model years 1998-2000), serving to produce luster for a single Chrysler black metallic color. Identification of this pigment in an unknown automotive paint can thus facilitate determination of the vehicle of origin. Bismuth oxychloride imparts effects similar to those produced by silver/white mica pearlescent pigments, and such a pigment was used together with bismuth oxychloride in at least one original equipment manufacturer (OEM) basecoat. Silver/white micas are now used primarily in white pearl tricoat systems. This article describes the identification of bismuth oxychloride and silver/white mica pearlescent pigments in automotive finishes using FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry, and SEM/EDS analysis. Data for some cadmium pigments, which were used in automotive paint several decades ago, are also presented as they produce infrared absorptions similar to that of bismuth oxychloride. PMID:24646090

  4. Infrared spectra of U.S. automobile original finishes (post - 1989). VIII: In situ identification of bismuth vanadate using extended range FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Edward M

    2014-03-01

    Chrome Yellow (PbCrO4 ·xPbSO4 ) was a common pigment in U.S. automobile OEM finishes for more than three decades, but in the early 1990s its use was discontinued. One of its main replacements was Bismuth Vanadate (BiVO4 ·nBi2 MoO6 , n = 0-2), which was commercially introduced in 1985, as this inorganic pigment also produces a very bright hue and has excellent outdoor durability. This paper describes the in situ identification of Bismuth Vanadate in automotive finishes using FT-IR and dispersive Raman spectroscopy and XRF spectrometry. Some differentiation of commercial formulations of this pigment is possible based on far-infrared absorptions, Raman data, and elemental analysis. The spectral differences arise from the presence or absence of molybdenum, the use of two crystal polymorphs of BiVO4 , and differences in pigment stabilizers. Bismuth Vanadate is usually not used alone, and it is typically found with Isoindoline Yellow, hydrous ferric oxide, rutile, Isoindolinone Yellow 3R, or various combinations of these. PMID:24261821

  5. Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? The Gamma Knife® and its associated ... in size. top of page How does the equipment work? The Gamma Knife® utilizes a technique called ...

  6. Xgremlin: Interferograms and spectra from Fourier transform spectrometers analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, G.; Griesmann, U.; Brault, J. W.; Abrams, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Xgremlin is a hardware and operating system independent version of the data analysis program Gremlin used for Fourier transform spectrometry. Xgremlin runs on PCs and workstations that use the X11 window system, including cygwin in Windows. It is used to Fourier transform interferograms, plot spectra, perform phase corrections, perform intensity and wavenumber calibration, and find and fit spectral lines. It can also be used to construct synthetic spectra, subtract continua, compare several different spectra, and eliminate ringing around lines.

  7. Toward utilization of MCNP5 particle track output file for simulation problems in photon spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovic, Jelena; Marinkovic, Predrag; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Kaljevic, Jelica; Arandjic, Danijela; Lazarevic, Djordje

    2015-10-01

    Pulse height distribution (PHD) registered by a spectrometer is influenced by various physical phenomena such as photon interactions as well as disturbance produced by the electronic circuits inside the spectrometer. Therefore, spectrometry measurements of gamma and X-ray radiation inaccurately represent primary spectra. In order to overcome spectrum disruption, spectrum unfolding has to be applied. One of the common tools used in the unfolding process is Monte Carlo simulation of spectrometer response to monochromatic photons. The purpose of this work is to develop a new method for simulating CdTe semiconductor spectrometer response to monochromatic photons that can be further used for the spectrum unfolding procedure. The method is based upon post-processing of the particle track (PTRAC) output file generated by the MCNP5 program. In addition to the spectrometry output, this method provides information for each specific photon interaction inside the spectrometer active volume, which is required when taking into account spectrometer charge collection. The PTRAC generated detector response and the measured spectrum were in good agreement. The results obtained showed that this method can be used to generate precise response functions of gamma and X-ray spectrometers.

  8. Analysis of High-Fold Gamma Data

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, C.J.; Cromaz, M.; Radford, D.C.

    1998-08-10

    Historically, {gamma}-{gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence spectra were utilized to build nuclear level schemes. With the development of large detector arrays, it has became possible to analyze higher fold coincidence data sets. This paper briefly reports on software to analyze 4-fold coincidence data sets that allows creation of 4-fold histograms (hypercubes) of at least 1024 channels per side (corresponding to a 43 gigachannel data space) that will fit onto a few gigabytes of disk space, and extraction of triple-gated spectra in a few seconds. Future detector arrays may have even higher efficiencies, and detect an many as 15 or 20 {gamma} rays simultaneously; such data will require very different algorithms for storage and analysis. Difficulties inherent in the analysis of such data are discussed, and two possible new solutions are presented, namely adaptive list-mode systems and list-list-mode storage.

  9. Gamma-ray Spectral Analysis Algorithm Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-09-25

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithm library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from GE semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  10. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  11. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  12. Study on Raman spectra of synthetic celluloses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Changjun; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of aliphatic polyamide fiber and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The results show that Raman peaks beyond 1200 cm-1 appear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sodium hydroxide, while the Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sulfuric acid. Raman peaks beyond 1750 cm-1 decrease for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sodium hydroxide, while Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear, except weak peaks around 3000 cm-1 , for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sulfuric acid. The variations of the Raman spectra are primarily related to the changes of chemical bonds and molecular structures.

  13. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.

  14. Existing Data Format for Two-Parameter Beta-Gamma Histograms for Radioxenon

    SciTech Connect

    TW Bowyer; TR Heimbigner; JI McIntyre; AD McKinnon; PL Reeder; E Wittinger

    1999-03-23

    There is a need to establish a commonly acceptable format for storing beta-gated coincidence data for stations in the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The current aerosol RMS type data format is not applicable for radioxenon in that the current format contains implicit assumptions specific to conventional gamma-ray spectrometry. Some assumptions in the current RMS format are not acceptable for the beta-gated spectra expected from the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL Automated Radioxenon Sampler-Analyzer (ARSA) and other similar systems under use or development from various countries. The RMS data format is not generally applicable for radioxenon measurements in the CTBT for one or more of the following main reasons: 1) The RMS format does not currently support 2-dimensional data. That is, the RMS data format is setup for a simple l-dimensional gamma-ray energy histogram. Current data available from the ARSA system and planned for other radioxenon monitors includes spectral information from gamma-rays and betas/conversion electrons. It is worth noting that the beta/conversion electron energy information will be used to separate the contributions from the different radioxenons. 2) The RMS data format assumes that the conversion between counts and activity can be calculated based (in part) on a simple calibration curve (detector efficiency curve) that depends only on energy of the gamma-ray. In the case of beta-gated gamma-ray spectra and for 2-dimensional spectra, there are generally two detector calibration curves that must be convoluted, the lower energy cutoff for the betas must be considered, and the energy acceptance window must be taken into account to convert counts into activity. . 3) The RMS format has header information that contains aerosol-specific information that allows the activity (Bq) calculated to be converted into a concentration (Bq/SCM). This calculation is performed by dividing the activity calculated (Bq) into number of standard cubic meters of air (SCM) passed through the filters. Most xenon-samplers do not have a 100% collection and transfer efficiency, and these efficiencies should not be assumed constant, so that the total volume flow through the sampler may not be used to convert activity into concentration. There is a pretty straightforward analogy that requires, instead, the total volume of xenon gas measured by the xenon station for the conversion. The following paper describes one possible file format for storing the multi-parameter beta-gamma coincidence spectra generated by the DOE PNNL ARSA sampler. This format proposal was generated as a draft guide to begin discussions.

  15. NEAR Gamma Ray Spectrometer Characterization and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Joel Lee; Vajda, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the work completed in the third year of the contract. The principle activities during this period were (1) the characterization of the NEAR 2 Gamma Ray Spectrometer using a neutron generator to generate complex gamma ray spectra and a large Ge Detecter to identify all the major peaks in the spectra; (2) the evaluation and repair of the Engineering Model Unit of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer for the NEAR mission; (3) the investigation of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray detection; and (4) technology transfer from NASA to forensic science.

  16. Quantum synchrotron spectra from semirelativistic electrons in teragauss magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron spectra are calculated from quantum electrodynamic transition rates for thermal and power-law electron distributions. It is shown that quantum effects appear in thermal spectra when the photon energy is greater than the electron temperature, and in power-law spectra when the electron energy in units of the electron rest mass times the magnetic field strength in units of the critical field strength is of order unity. These spectra are compared with spectra calculated from the ultrarelativistic approximation for synchrotron emission. It is found that the approximation for the power-law spectra is good, and the approximation for thermal spectra produces the shape of the spectrum accurately but fails to give the correct normalization. Single photon pair creation masks the quantum effects for power-law distributions, so only modifications to thermal spectra are important for gamma-ray bursts.

  17. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. ); Kozanecki, W. )

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  18. Laser-desorption mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and the mechanism of desorption ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zakett, D.; Schoen, A.E.; Cooks, R.G.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1981-03-11

    This paper reports sucrose mass spectra obtained by combining laser desorption with mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Remarkable similarities in fragmentation behavior with secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) provide evidence for mechanistic similarities between SIMS and laser desorption (LD). Attachment of alkali metals to organic molecules (cationization) is a common feature of desorption ionization. This process also occurs during laser desorption of involatile compounds which further indicates the existence of underlying similarities between LD and SIMS. Steady ion currents (several thousand ions per laser pulse) of cationized sucrose are obtained for relatively long periods (minutes).

  19. Status of the GAMMA-400 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Farber, M. O.; Fradkin, M. I.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leoniv, A. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mazets, E. P.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.

    2013-01-01

    The preliminary design of the new space gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 for the energy range 100 MeV-3 TeV is presented. The angular resolution of the instrument, 1-2 deg at E(gamma) approximately 100 MeV and approximately 0.01 at E(gamma) greater than 100 GeV, its energy resolution is approximately 1% at E(gamma) greater than 100 GeV, and the proton rejection factor is approximately 10(exp 6) are optimized to address a broad range of science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of cosmic-ray electrons, positrons, and nuclei.

  20. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from a single wheat cultivar facilitates interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data and discrimination of gamma gliadin proteins that may play different functional roles in flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complement of gamma gliadin genes expressed in the wheat cultivar Butte 86 was evaluated by analyzing publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST) data. Eleven contigs were assembled from 153 Butte 86 ESTs. Nine of the contigs encoded full-length proteins and four of the proteins contained an...

  1. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  2. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  3. Photon spectra from quark generation by WIMPs

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Dobado, A.; Lineros, R.

    2011-05-23

    If the present dark matter (DM) in the Universe annihilates into Standard Model (SM) particles, it must contribute to the gamma ray fluxes that are detected on the Earth. The magnitude of such contribution depends on the particular DM candidate, but certain features of these spectra may be analyzed in a model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the fitting formula valid for the simulated photon spectra from WIMP annihilation into light quark-anti quark (qq-bar) channels in a wide range of WIMP masses. We illustrate our results for the cc-bar channel.

  4. Simultaneous beta/gamma digital spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.

    A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) built in our laboratory. The DPP board was designed to digitally capture the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfer valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimum crosstalk. The spectrometer proved to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

  5. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  6. Line positions and intensities for the gamma 1 + gamma 2 and gamma 2 + gamma 3 bands of (16)O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Flaud, J.-M.; Canypeyret, C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.

    1988-01-01

    Using 0.005 cm-resolution Fourier transform spectra of (16)O3, generated by electric discharge from a greater than 99.98 percent pure sample of (16)O3, an extensive analysis of the gamma 1 + gamma 2 and the gamma 2 + gamma 3 bands in the 5.7 micron region was performed. The rotational energy levels of the upper (110) and (011) vibrational states of (16)O3 were reproduced within their experimental uncertainties using a Hamiltonian which takes explicitly into account the Coriolis-type interaction occurring between the rotational energy levels of both states. Improved vibrational energies and rotational and coupling constants were also derived for the (110) and (011) states. Precise transition moment constants for these two bands were deduced from analysis of 220 measured line intensities. Finally, a complete list of line positions, intensities, and lower state energies for both bands has been generated.

  7. Ion mobility spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometric characterization of dimenhydrinate.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, A H; Nanji, A A

    1988-10-01

    Positive and negative ion mobility spectra of dimenhydrinate are presented, and the calculated reduced mobility (K0) values for the most significant peaks are reported. Mass identification of the ionic species associated with the peaks in the ion mobility spectra was achieved by interfacing the ion mobility spectrometer to a mass spectrometer. The application of ion mobility spectrometry to the detection of dimenhydrinate and other drug residues on the hands of patients admitted to hospital with drug overdose is also discussed. PMID:3242691

  8. Single-protein nanomechanical mass spectrometry in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanay, M. S.; Kelber, S.; Naik, A. K.; Chi, D.; Hentz, S.; Bullard, E. C.; Colinet, E.; Duraffourg, L.; Roukes, M. L.

    2012-09-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) resonators can detect mass with exceptional sensitivity. Previously, mass spectra from several hundred adsorption events were assembled in NEMS-based mass spectrometry using statistical analysis. Here, we report the first realization of single-molecule NEMS-based mass spectrometry in real time. As each molecule in the sample adsorbs on the resonator, its mass and position of adsorption are determined by continuously tracking two driven vibrational modes of the device. We demonstrate the potential of multimode NEMS-based mass spectrometry by analysing IgM antibody complexes in real time. NEMS-based mass spectrometry is a unique and promising new form of mass spectrometry: it can resolve neutral species, provide a resolving power that increases markedly for very large masses, and allow the acquisition of spectra, molecule-by-molecule, in real time.

  9. Gamma ray astronomy and black hole astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.

    1990-01-01

    The study of soft gamma emissions from black-hole candidates is identified as an important element in understanding black-hole phenomena ranging from stellar-mass black holes to AGNs. The spectra of Cyg X-1 and observations of the Galactic Center are emphasized, since thermal origins and MeV gamma-ray bumps are evident and suggest a thermal-pair cloud picture. MeV gamma-ray observations are suggested for studying black hole astrophysics such as the theorized escaping pair wind, the anticorrelation between the MeV gamma bump and the soft continuum, and the relationship between source compactness and temperature.

  10. Alpha particle induced gamma yields in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Miller, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine has a relatively large (α,n) production cross-section in the MeV range, the energy range of interest for special nuclear materials. In the uranium fuel cycle enriched UF6 in particular is a reasonably prolific source of (α,n) neutrons because along with 235U, 234U becomes enriched and it has a relatively short half-life. This enables the mass content of storage cylinders containing UF6 to be verified by neutron counting methods. In association with such measurements high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (HRGS) measurements using a high-purity Ge detector are often undertaken to determine the 235U enrichment based off the intensity of the direct 186 keV line. The specific (α,n) neutron production, neutrons per second per gram of U, is sensitive to the relative isotopic composition, particularly the 234U concentration, and the traditional gross neutron counting approach is needed to quantitatively interpret the data. In addition to F(α,n) neutrons, α-induced reaction γ-rays are generated, notably at 110, 197, 582, 891, 1236 and 1275 keV. If one could observe 19F(α,xγ) gamma-lines in the HRGS spectra the thought was that perhaps the α-activity could be estimated directly, and in turn the 234U abundance obtained. For example, by utilizing the ratio of the detected 197-186 keV full energy peaks. However, until now there has been no readily available estimate of the expected strength of the reaction gamma-rays nor any serious consideration as to whether they might be diagnostic or not. In this work we compute the thick target yields of the chief reaction gamma-rays in UF6 using published thin target data. Comparisons are made to the neutron production rates to obtain γ/n estimates, and also to the 235U decay line at 186 keV which we take as a fiducial line. It is shown that the reaction gamma-rays are produced but are far too weak for practical safeguards purposes. Now that the underlying numerical data is readily available however, it can be used to support neutron and gamma production calculations in other fluorine compounds, for example impure plutonium reference materials where fluorine may be present only at the parts per million by weight level yet still present a serious nuisance addition to the neutron production rate.

  11. Protein sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, D F; Yates, J R; Shabanowitz, J; Winston, S; Hauer, C R

    1986-01-01

    Methodology for determining amino acid sequences of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry is described. The approach involves enzymatic and/or chemical degradation of the protein to a collection of peptides which are then fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Each fraction, containing as many as 10-15 peptides, is then analyzed directly, without further purification, by a combination of liquid secondary-ion/collision-activated dissociation mass spectrometry on a multianalyzer instrument. Interpretation of collision-activated dissociation mass spectra is described, and results are presented from a study of soluble peptides produced by treatment of apolipoprotein B with cyanogen bromide and trypsin. PMID:3462691

  12. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    van Breeman, R.B.; Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Effect of isotopic disorder on Raman scattering spectra of crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Plekhanov, V.G.

    1995-03-01

    The first results of a quantitative study into the effect of isotopic disorder on optical phonon states, revealed as a broadening and shift of LO({Gamma}) phonon lines in second-order Raman scattering spectra of LiH{sub x}D{sub 1-x} crystals, are presented. The presence in the spectra of a local vibration at small values of x and the two-mode character of the LO{Gamma} phonons for x {le} 0.45, together with the substantial broadening of the LO({Gamma}) phonon scattering lines, suggest the presence of a considerable isotopic disorder effect, which implies unambiguously strong LO({Gamma}) phonon scattering. Additional supporting evidence comes from the disagreement of the above experimental finding with the coherent-potential-model predictions for the case of weak phonon scattering. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  15. Galaxies and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The nature of the high-energy spectra of several types of active galaxies and their contribution to the measured diffuse gamma-ray emission between 1 and 150 MeV are considered, using X-ray spectra of active galaxies and SAS 2 data regarding the intensity upper limits to the gamma-ray emission above 35 MeV. It is found that a substantial increase in slope of the photon energy spectrum must occur in the low energy gamma-ray region for Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and emission line galaxies; the power-law spectra observed in the X-ray range must steepen substantially between 50 keV and 50 MeV. In addition, a cosmological integration shows that Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and quasars may account for most of the 1-150 MeV diffuse background, even without significant evolution.

  16. Portable gamma-ray holdup and attributes measurements of high- and variable-burnup plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, T.R.; Russo, P.A.; Miller, M.C.; Menlove, H.O. ); Takahashi, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Aoki, I. )

    1991-01-01

    High burnup-plutonium holdup has been assayed quantitatively by low resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The assay was calibrated with four plutonium standards representing a range of fuel burnup and {sup 241}Am content. Selection of a calibration standard based on its qualitative spectral similarity to gamma-ray spectra of the process material is partially responsible for the success of these holdup measurements. The spectral analysis method is based on the determination of net counts in a single spectral region of interest (ROI). However, the low-resolution gamma-ray assay signal for the high-burnup plutonium includes unknown amounts of contamination from {sup 241}Am. For most needs, the range of calibration standards required for this selection procedure is not available. A new low-resolution gamma-ray spectral analysis procedure for assay of {sup 239}Pu has been developed. The procedure uses the calculated isotope activity ratios and the measured net counts in three spectral ROIs to evaluate and remove the {sup 241}Am contamination from the {sup 239}Pu assay signal on a spectrum-by-spectrum basis. The calibration for the new procedure requires only a single plutonium standard. The procedure also provides a measure of the burnup and age attributes of holdup deposits. The new procedure has been demonstrated using portable gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment for a wide range of plutonium standards and has also been applied to the assay of {sup 239}Pu holdup in a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Elevated temperature reference spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Phillips, B.; Tussey, L.

    1997-12-31

    A compilation of infrared spectra at elevated temperatures is required for the accurate quantification of gas concentrations for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extractive sampling of stack gases and FTIR in-situ process monitoring. Analysis of high temperature gases utilizing ambient temperature reference spectra can result in significant quantification errors. The US Air Force`s Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is currently assisting the EPA in measuring reference spectra and making existing and new data available to the public through two ongoing efforts. One of these efforts is the measurement of elevated temperature infrared reference spectra of the low vapor pressure hazardous air pollutants (HAP) compounds, as well as spectral interfering compounds. The equipment and procedures used for the elevated temperature reference spectra measurements is described as well as some of the challenges encountered in these measurements. Examples of the reference spectra are also presented. To make the reference spectra developed by AEDC and other EPA programs easily accessible, AEDC has also been tasked to maintain a site on the World Wide Web containing reference spectra, reports, and software tools of interest to the optical sensing community. This web site has seen increased use during the three years that it has been in existence with users from academia, commercial, and government, both domestic and foreign. The site has undergone several improvements since inception and actively solicits inputs for further improvements from its users. A description of this web site and recent improvements and additions is given in this paper.

  18. Stable homotopical algebra and [Gamma]-spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwede, Stefan

    1999-03-01

    In this paper we advertise the category of [Gamma]-spaces as a convenient framework for doing ‘algebra’ over ‘rings’ in stable homotopy theory. [Gamma]-spaces were introduced by Segal [Se] who showed that they give rise to a homotopy category equivalent to the usual homotopy category of connective (i.e. ([minus sign]1)-connected) spectra. Bousfield and Friedlander [BF] later provided model category structures for [Gamma]-spaces. The study of ‘rings, modules and algebras’ based on [Gamma]-spaces became possible when Lydakis [Ly] introduced a symmetric monoidal smash product with good homotopical properties. Here we develop model category structures for modules and algebras, set up (derived) smash products and associated spectral sequences and compare simplicial modules and algebras to their Eilenberg-MacLane spectra counterparts.

  19. The 2002 IAEA intercomparison of software for low-level γ-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Dirk; Blaauw, Menno; Fazinic, Stjepko; Kolotov, Vladimir P.

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA 2002 set of test spectra for low-level γ-ray spectrometry, reported on in a separate paper, was used in an intercomparison of widely available software packages, i.e. Anges 1.0, GammaVision 5.3, Gamma-W 1.68 for Windows, Ganaas 3.11, Genie2000 2.1, Hyperlab 2002.3.2.18, Interwinner 5.0 and UniSampo 1.97. With each program, efficiency curves were obtained for the two counting geometries (a 500 ml Marinelli beaker on a 33% relative efficiency HPGe detector, and a 100 ml pillbox on a 96.3% HPGe detector) and subsequently used to obtain radionuclide activities for the unknown samples. Both the calibration sources and the unknown samples contained radionuclides giving rise to cascade summing effects. Cascade summing correction factors as obtained with some of these programs, as well as with GESPECOR, were compared directly. After the intercomparison meeting, the activities obtained were compared with the certified activities that had been kept secret until then. In this paper, the results will be presented and suggestions made for further improvement of the software.

  20. Gamma watermarking

    DOEpatents

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  1. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  2. Spectra over complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, H.A.; Larko, D.; Lipschutz, R.; Stone, G.

    1981-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over land downwind of a water surface, over hilltops and escarpments, and over rolling farmland. The following hypotheses can be used to explain the differences between these spectra. (1) For wavelengths short compared to the fetch over the new terrain, spectral densities are in equilibrium with the new terrain. (2) For wavelengths long compared to this fetch, spectral densities remain unchanged if the ground is horizontal. If the flow is over a steep hill, the low-frequency structure is modified by distortion of the mean flow, with the longitudinal component losing energy relative to the lateral and vertical components. Because vertical-velocity spectra contain relatively less low-frequency energy than horizontal-velocity spectra, energetic vertical-velocity fluctuations tend to be in equilibrium with local terrain.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  4. Detecting axionlike particles with gamma ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2007-12-01

    We propose that axionlike particles (ALPs) with a two-photon vertex, consistent with all astrophysical and laboratory bounds, may lead to a detectable signature in the spectra of high-energy gamma-ray sources. This occurs as a result of gamma rays being converted into ALPs in the magnetic fields of efficient astrophysical accelerators according to the "Hillas criterion", such as jets of active galactic nuclei or hot spots of radio galaxies. The discovery of such an effect is possible by GLAST in the 1-100 GeV range and by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes in the TeV range. PMID:18233353

  5. Gamma-Ray Astronomy with Cherenkov Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Stamerra, A.

    2005-10-12

    The {gamma}-astronomy with Cherenkov telescope has recently made great progress coming to the 2nd generation of instruments. The higher sensitivity and lower energy threshold have brought to discover new sources. The determination of their spectra, necessary for developing models for acceleration, emission and absorption of the {gamma}-rays, will shed new light on the century-old problem of the origin of galactic cosmic rays.A short summary of the current physics objectives in the {gamma}-astronomy and a description of the Cherenkov telescopes technique is given. Some representative observations from the two operative telescopes, HESS and MAGIC are described.

  6. The gamma 1 and gamma 3 bands of (16)O3: Line positions and intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Devi, V. Malathy; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.

    1988-01-01

    Using 0.005/cm-resolution Fourier transform spectra of samples of ozone, the gamma 1 and gamma 3 bands of (16)O3 have been reanalyzed to obtain accurate line positions and an extended set of upper state rotational levels (J up to 69, K sub a up to 20). Combined with the available microwave data, these upper state rotational levels were satisfactorily fitted using a Hamiltonian which takes explicitly into account the strong Coriolis interaction affecting the rotational levels of these two interacting states. In addition, 350 relative line intensities were measured from which the rotational expansions of the transition moment operators for the gamma 1 and gamma 3 states have been deduced. Finally, a complete listing of line positions, intensities, and lower state energies of the gamma 1 and gamma 3 bands of (16)O3 has been generated.

  7. Atmospheric gamma-ray and neutron flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L. P. Kudryavtsev, A. Yu. Kudryavtseva, M. L. Kutsyk, I. M.

    2008-01-15

    Gamma-ray pulses are calculated from 2D numerical simulations of an upward atmospheric discharge in a self-consistent electric field using the multigroup approach to the kinetics of relativistic runaway electrons (REs). Computed {gamma}-ray numbers and spectra are consistent with those of terrestrial {gamma}-ray flashes (TGFs) observed aboard spacecrafts. The RE flux is concentrated mainly within the domain of the Blue Jet fluorescence. This confirms that exactly the domain adjacent to a thundercloud is the source of the observed {gamma}-ray flashes. The yield of photonuclear neutrons is calculated. One {gamma}-ray pulse generates {approx}10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} neutrons. The possibility of the direct deposition of REs to the detector readings and the origin of the lightning-advanced TGFs are discussed.

  8. Characteristics of gamma-ray line flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Dennis, B.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of solar gamma rays by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) demonstrate that energetic protons and ions are rapidly accelerated during the impulsive phase. To understand the acceleration mechanisms for these particles, the characteristics of the gamma ray line flares observed by SMM were studied. Some very intense hard X-ray flares without detectable gamma ray lines were also investigated. Gamma ray line flares are distinguished from other flares by: (1) intense hard X-ray and microwave emissions; (2) delay of high energy hard X-rays; (3) emission of type 2 and/or type 4 radio bursts; and (4) flat hard X-ray spectra (average power law index: 3.1). The majority of the gamma ray line flares shared all these characteristics, and the remainder shared at least three of them. Positive correlations were found between durations of spike bursts and spatial sizes of flare loops as well as between delay times and durations of spike bursts.

  9. Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using γ-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Mandakini; Krishnan, Narayani; Sengupta, D.

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K were determined by a gamma ray spectrometer using the HPGe detector with 50% relative efficiency, and the radiation dose to the local population was estimated. The average estimated activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in the surface soil were 53.8, 44.2 and 464.2 Bq kg−1 respectively. The average absorbed dose rate in the study area was estimated to be 72.5 nGy h-1, where as the annual effective dose to the population was 0.09 mSv y-1. A correlation analysis was made between measured dose rate and individual radionuclides, in order to delineate the contribution of the respective nuclides towards dose rate. The radio-elemental concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium estimated for the soils, in the study area, indicated the enrichment of uranium series nuclide. The results of the present study were subsequently compared with international and national recommended values. PMID:21170189

  10. The use of low-level liquid scintillation spectrometry for rapid measurement and decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenhofer, F.

    1998-12-31

    Liquid scintillation spectrometry (LSC) has proved over the last fifteen years to be an excellent tool for low-level counting of beta- and alpha-particle emitters. Using low-level instruments the determination of, for instance {sup 90}Sr, could be considerably simplified in the laboratory, saving time and also money for chemicals and manpower. Furthermore, low-level instruments have been successfully used for measurements when fast analysis was required. The four instruments (Quantulus, Wallac Oy), that the author uses, have not only very low background, which cuts measurement time considerably; but from the pulse- height spectra much information about the nature of the radionuclides present and the absence of specific radionuclides can be extracted. From the absence of high-energy beta-particle activity in the pulse-height spectra of precipitation in the first days after the Chernobyl accident the author could draw the conclusion, that practically no {sup 90}Y was present and therefore only small amounts of {sup 90}Sr, if any, could be expected in precipitation and later in food. This enabled them to make the decision not to waste time with a large number of {sup 90}Sr analyses. Large numbers of drinking water samples could be screened for contamination much more sensitively and faster than by gamma-ray spectrometry. More examples will be presented of cases where rapid information was needed; how contamination and nuclear installations can be easily checked and how LSC helped to cut down the time required, the manpower and the costs for radon measurements and environmental surveillance.

  11. Gamma Ray Astrophysics: New insight into the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Trombka, J. I.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma ray observations of the solar system, the galaxy and extragalactic radiation are reported. Topics include: planets, comets, and asteroids; solar observations; interstellar medium and galactic structure; compact objects; cosmology; and diffuse radiation. The instrumentation used in gamma ray astronomy in covered along with techniques for the analysis of observational spectra.

  12. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  13. High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-07-01

    Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations and experiments, using fission-spectrum neutron sources to assess neutron transmission through composite low-Z attenuators.

  14. Detection Technologies. Ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng; Takats, Zoltan; Wiseman, Justin M

    2006-03-17

    A recent innovation in mass spectrometry is the ability to record mass spectra on ordinary samples, in their native environment, without sample preparation or preseparation by creating ions outside the instrument. In desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), the principal method described here, electrically charged droplets are directed at the ambient object of interest; they release ions from the surface, which are then vacuumed through the air into a conventional mass spectrometer. Extremely rapid analysis is coupled with high sensitivity and high chemical specificity. These characteristics are advantageously applied to high-throughput metabolomics, explosives detection, natural products discovery, and biological tissue imaging, among other applications. Future possible uses of DESI for in vivo clinical analysis and its adaptation to portable mass spectrometers are described. PMID:16543450

  15. "Decoupled" Proton NMR Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, M.; Freeman, R.

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra are recorded in a new form where all resonances are singlets at the chemical-shift frequencies, with no spin-spin splittings. These "decoupled" proton spectra are derived from two-dimensional J spectra after real Fourier transformation (without frequency discrimination in F1) so that each spin multiplet lies along both the 45° and the 135° diagonal, forming a pattern similar to St. Andrew's cross, with C 4 symmetry. The chemical shifts are located by searching for these centers of symmetry with a postacquisition data-processing algorithm. This is designed to facilitate the separation of overlapping and interpenetrating spin multiplets. The method is illustrated with applications to the 400 MHz high-resolution proton spectra of dehydrotestosterone and 4-androsten-3,17-dione. It is also possible to separate the spectra of components in a mixture and this is illustrated by breaking down the spectrum of an aqueous solution of D-glucose into subspectra from the α and β anomers, in order to follow the time evolution of the mutarotation.

  16. Measurement of the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter array

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.; Becvar, F.; Kroll, J.; Krticka, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2011-07-15

    The {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction was measured with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter (consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The multiplicity distributions of the {gamma} decay were used to determine the resonance spins up to E{sub n}=300 eV. The {gamma}-ray energy spectra for different multiplicities were measured for the s-wave resonances. The shapes of these spectra were compared with simulations based on the use of the DICEBOX statistical model code. Simulations showed that the scissors mode is required not only for the ground-state transitions but also for transitions between excited states.

  17. Induced Radioactivity in Recovered Skylab Materials. [gamma ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Four radioactive isotopes found in aluminum and stainless steel samples from Skylab debris were recovered in Australia. The low-level activity was induced by high-energy protons and neutrons in the space environment. Measurements of the specific activities are given.

  18. System and method for resolving gamma-ray spectra

    DOEpatents

    Gentile, Charles A.; Perry, Jason; Langish, Stephen W.; Silber, Kenneth; Davis, William M.; Mastrovito, Dana

    2010-05-04

    A system for identifying radionuclide emissions is described. The system includes at least one processor for processing output signals from a radionuclide detecting device, at least one training algorithm run by the at least one processor for analyzing data derived from at least one set of known sample data from the output signals, at least one classification algorithm derived from the training algorithm for classifying unknown sample data, wherein the at least one training algorithm analyzes the at least one sample data set to derive at least one rule used by said classification algorithm for identifying at least one radionuclide emission detected by the detecting device.

  19. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  20. Interpreting Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.

    1996-06-01

    Interpreting Astronomical Spectra D. Emerson Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edingurgh "Interpreting Astronomical Spectra" describes how physical conditions such as temperature, density and composition can be obtained from the spectra of a broad range of astronomical environments ranging from the cold interstellar medium to very hot coronal gas and from stellar atmospheres to quasars. In this book the author has succeeded in providing a coherent and integrated approach to the interpretation of astronomical spectroscopy, placing the emphasis on the physical understanding of spectrum formation rather than on instrumental considerations. MKS units and consistent symbols are employed throughout so that the fundamental ideas common to diverse environments are made clear and the importance of different temperature ranges and densities can be seen. Aimed at senior undergraduates and graduates studying physics, astronomy and astrophysics, this book will also appeal to the professional astronomer.

  1. Interpreting Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.

    1999-03-01

    Interpreting Astronomical Spectra D. Emerson Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edingurgh "Interpreting Astronomical Spectra" describes how physical conditions such as temperature, density and composition can be obtained from the spectra of a broad range of astronomical environments ranging from the cold interstellar medium to very hot coronal gas and from stellar atmospheres to quasars. In this book the author has succeeded in providing a coherent and integrated approach to the interpretation of astronomical spectroscopy, placing the emphasis on the physical understanding of spectrum formation rather than on instrumental considerations. MKS units and consistent symbols are employed throughout so that the fundamental ideas common to diverse environments are made clear and the importance of different temperature ranges and densities can be seen. Aimed at senior undergraduates and graduates studying physics, astronomy and astrophysics, this book will also appeal to the professional astronomer.

  2. Microdosimetric spectra measurements of JANUS neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, I.R.; Williamson, F.S.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiation from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory is being used with increasing frequency for major biological experiments. The fast neutron spectrum has a Kerma-weighted mean energy of 0.8 MeV and low gamma-ray contamination. In 1984 the JANUS fission converter plate of highly enriched uranium was replaced by one made of low-enriched uranium. We recorded microdosimetric spectra at several different positions in the high-flux irradiation room of JANUS before the change of the converter plate. Each set of measurements consisted of spectra taken at three different site diameters (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m) and in both ''attenuator up'' and ''attenuator down'' configurations. At two conventional dosimetry reference positions, two sets of measurements were recorded. At three biological reference positions, measurements simulating several biological irradiation conditions, were taken. The dose rate at each position was estimated and compared with dose rates obtained previously by conventional dosimetry. Comparison of the different measurements showed no major change in spectra as a function of position or irradiation condition. First results from similar sets of measurements recorded after the installment of the new converter plate indicate no major change in the spectra. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Physics issues of gamma ray burst emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison

    1987-01-01

    The critical physics issues in the interpretation of gamma-ray-burst spectra are reviewed. An attempt is made to define the emission-region parameter space satisfying the maximum number of observational and theoretical constraints. Also discussed are the physical mechanisms responsible for the bursts that are most consistent with the above parameter space.

  4. Study of laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry using a glow discharge source

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, X. |; Hutchinson, J.M.R.; Fassett, J.D.; Lucatorto, T.B.; Schima, F.J.; Bowman, W.A.; Hess, K.R.

    1994-09-01

    The mass spectra of a metal alloy sample consisting of Al, Cu and Fe were studied using both glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). Particular emphasis was placed on the reduction of isobaric interferences and discrimination between those ions formed by the discharge and those formed by the laser radiation.

  5. Experimental Study of Level Density and {gamma}-strength Functions from Compound Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Siem, S.

    2008-04-17

    The current status of experimental study of level density and {gamma}-strength functions is reviewed. Three experimental techniques are used. These are measurements of particle evaporation spectra from compound nuclear reactions, the measurements of particle-{gamma} coincidences from inelastic scattering and pick-up reactions and the method of two-step {gamma}-cascades following neutron/proton radiative capture. Recent experimental data on level densities from neutron evaporation spectra are shown. The first results on the cascade {gamma}-spectrum from the {sup 59}Co(p,2{gamma}){sup 60}Ni reaction are presented.

  6. EPR study of free radicals in non- and gamma-irradiated nutritive supplements containing anthocyanins concentrate from lyophilized red wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenova, Ralitsa B.; Firzov, Cyril; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2010-09-01

    Nutritive supplements Enoviton, Enoviton C and Enoviton CE containing standardized anthocyanins from lyophilized red wine, vitamins (some of them) and excipients were investigated by EPR spectrometry before and after gamma-irradiation. Non-irradiated samples exhibit one singlet line with g=2.0039±0.0002, most probably due to free radicals from anthocyanins. After irradiation with 10 kGy gamma-rays, tablets of Еnoviton, Еnoviton С and Еnoviton СЕ, all exhibit complex EPR signals centered at a g-value of g=2.0034. The EPR spectrum of irradiated Enoviton is different from that of Еnoviton С or Еnoviton СЕ due to the overlap of the spectra of microcrystalline cellulose and the background singlet spectrum present in all tablets with the EPR resonance due to irradiated ascorbic acid (in Еnoviton С and Еnoviton СЕ). Gamma-induced free radicals exhibit long time stability—for a six months period the intensity of central peak decrease with 30-40%.

  7. Methods to Collect, Compile, and Analyze Observed Short-lived Fission Product Gamma Data

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Ellis, Tere A.

    2011-09-29

    A unique set of fission product gamma spectra was collected at short times (4 minutes to 1 week) on various fissionable materials. Gamma spectra were collected from the neutron-induced fission of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium isotopes at thermal, epithermal, fission spectrum, and 14-MeV neutron energies. This report describes the experimental methods used to produce and collect the gamma data, defines the experimental parameters for each method, and demonstrates the consistency of the measurements.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasson, John R.; Salinas, Jorge E.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews current research in NMR spectrometry, in the areas of apparatus and techniques, spectral analysis, computer applications, analytical applications, and selected organic and inorganic systems. Various aspects of NMR spectrometry are presented in tabular form, with 133 references. Listed also are 124 references from the discussions in the…

  9. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  10. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical

  11. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  12. Gamma radiation detectors for safeguards applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carchon, R.; Moeslinger, M.; Bourva, L.; Bass, C.; Zendel, M.

    2007-08-01

    The IAEA uses extensively a variety of gamma radiation detectors to verify nuclear material. These detectors are part of standardized spectrometry systems: germanium detectors for High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS); Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for Room Temperature Gamma Spectrometry (RTGS); and NaI(Tl) detectors for Low Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (LRGS). HRGS with high-purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen is widely used in nuclear safeguards to verify the isotopic composition of plutonium or uranium in non-irradiated material. Alternative cooling systems have been evaluated and electrically cooled HpGe detectors show a potential added value, especially for unattended measurements. The spectrometric performance of CZT detectors, their robustness and simplicity are key to the successful verification of irradiated materials. Further development, such as limiting the charge trapping effects in CZT to provide improved sensitivity and energy resolution are discussed. NaI(Tl) detectors have many applications—specifically in hand-held radioisotope identification devices (RID) which are used to detect the presence of radioactive material where a lower resolution is sufficient, as they benefit from a generally higher sensitivity. The Agency is also continuously involved in the review and evaluation of new and emerging technologies in the field of radiation detection such as: Peltier-cooled CdTe detectors; semiconductor detectors operating at room temperature such as HgI 2 and GaAs; and, scintillator detectors using glass fibres or LaBr 3. A final conclusion, proposing recommendations for future action, is made.

  13. A gamma-gamma coincidence/anticoincidence spectrometer for low-level cosmogenic (22)Na/(7)Be activity ratio measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Ungar, Kurt; Stukel, Matthew; Mekarski, Pawel

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a digital gamma-gamma coincidence/anticoincidence spectrometer was developed and examined for low-level cosmogenic (22)Na and (7)Be in air-filter sample monitoring. The spectrometer consists of two bismuth germanate scintillators (BGO) and an XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The spectrometer design allows a more selective measurement of (22)Na with a significant background reduction by gamma-gamma coincidence events processing. Hence, the system provides a more sensitive way to quantify trace amounts of (22)Na than normal high resolution gamma spectrometry providing a critical limit of 3mBq within a 20h count. The use of a list-mode data acquisition technique enabled simultaneous determination of (22)Na and (7)Be activity concentrations using a single measurement by coincidence and anticoincidence mode respectively. PMID:24412563

  14. Electrons and protons separation in the GAMMA-400 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, Alexey

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific tasks: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in total flux is ~10^-3 for high energies. In present paper the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The separate investment in proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope. Using combined information from all detector systems allow us to provide rejection from protons with factor of ~4×10^5 for vertical incident particles and ~3×10^5 for particles with initial inclination of 30 deg.

  15. Spectral feature of 31 December 1981 gamma-ray burst not confirmed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Share, G. H.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Matz, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of a gamma ray burst at 01:37 UT on December 31, 1981 using the SMM gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) are compared with those made by the Konus instruments on Veneras 11-14. Burst time profiles, photon spectra, and detector energy loss spectra for three time intervals are compared for the GRS and the Konus instruments. It is concluded that the SMM spectra exhibit no evidence for the presence of emission features reported by the Konus group.

  16. Mass Spectrometry Based Identifications of LMW Glutenin Subunits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is routinely used to identify wheat endosperm proteins. In this method, peptide fragmentation patterns generated by MS/MS are identified using a ‘search engine’ to compare the spectra to those generated in silico from protein sequence databases. Trypsin is a commonly...

  17. Discrimination of multilocus sequence typing-based Campylobacter jejuni subgroups by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Campylobacter jejuni, the most common bacterial pathogen causing gastroenteritis, shows a wide genetic diversity. Previously, we demonstrated by the combination of multi locus sequence typing (MLST)-based UPGMA-clustering and analysis of 16 genetic markers that twelve different C. jejuni subgroups can be distinguished. Among these are two prominent subgroups. The first subgroup contains the majority of hyperinvasive strains and is characterized by a dimeric form of the chemotaxis-receptor Tlp7m+c. The second has an extended amino acid metabolism and is characterized by the presence of a periplasmic asparaginase (ansB) and gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (ggt). Results Phyloproteomic principal component analysis (PCA) hierarchical clustering of MALDI-TOF based intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) spectra was able to group particular C. jejuni subgroups of phylogenetic related isolates in distinct clusters. Especially the aforementioned Tlp7m+c+ and ansB+/ ggt+ subgroups could be discriminated by PCA. Overlay of ICMS spectra of all isolates led to the identification of characteristic biomarker ions for these specific C. jejuni subgroups. Thus, mass peak shifts can be used to identify the C. jejuni subgroup with an extended amino acid metabolism. Conclusions Although the PCA hierarchical clustering of ICMS-spectra groups the tested isolates into a different order as compared to MLST-based UPGMA-clustering, the isolates of the indicator-groups form predominantly coherent clusters. These clusters reflect phenotypic aspects better than phylogenetic clustering, indicating that the genes corresponding to the biomarker ions are phylogenetically coupled to the tested marker genes. Thus, PCA clustering could be an additional tool for analyzing the relatedness of bacterial isolates. PMID:24195572

  18. Numerical analysis of alpha spectra using two different codes.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, S; Jiménez-Ramos, M C; Villa, M; Vioque, I; Manjón, G; García-Tenorio, R

    2008-01-01

    This work presents an intercomparison between commercial software for alpha-particle spectrometry, Genie 2000, and the new free available software, Winalpha, developed by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In order to compare both codes, different environmental spectra containing plutonium, uranium, thorium and polonium have been analyzed, together with IAEA test alpha spectra. A statistical study was performed in order to evaluate the precision and accuracy in the analyses, and to enhance the confidence in using the software on alpha spectrometric studies. PMID:18342525

  19. Gamma spectroscopic analysis and associated radiation hazards of building materials used in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2010-02-01

    Radiation exposure of the population can be increased appreciably by the use of building materials containing above-normal levels of naturally occurring radionuclides of terrestrial origin. Using gamma-ray spectrometry, the natural radioactivity levels of 55 samples of natural and manufactured Egyptian building materials have been investigated. The samples were collected from local market and construction sites. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined. The activities were in the ranges 11.7-35.6, 12.4-55.2 and 60-350 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The activities are compared with available reported data from other countries and with the world average value for soils. The radium equivalent activity Ra(eq), the external hazard index H(ex) and the absorbed dose rate in air D in each sample was evaluated to assess the radiation hazard for people living in dwellings made of the materials studied. All building materials have shown Ra(eq) (range from 37.76 to 116.87 Bq kg(-1)) lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1) adopted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The absorbed dose rate in indoor air is lower than the international recommended value of 55 nGy h(-1) for all test samples. All the materials examined are acceptable for use as building materials as defined by the OECD criterion. PMID:19841012

  20. A system for simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsoni, A. T.; Hamby, D. M.

    2007-08-01

    A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for real-time and simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) designed and built in our laboratory. The DPP board digitally captures the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfers valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A resolving algorithm also was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events, and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimal crosstalk. The spectrometer has proven to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

  1. Which unidentified EGRET sources are gamma-ray pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cheng, K. S.

    1998-07-01

    We consider high energy gamma -ray radiation from the radio pulsars associated with some unidentified EGRET gamma -ray sources. Calculated efficiencies for the conversion of spin-down power to gamma -rays and the energy spectra of the high energy gamma -rays from these possible gamma -ray pulsars in outer gap models are compared with observed results. Of these possible gamma -ray pulsars, our results indicate that (i) PSR B1900+05 is not a possible gamma -ray pulsar; (ii) although the newly discovered young radio pulsar PSR J1105-6107 is a possible gamma -ray pulsar, it may not account for the observed high energy gamma -ray emission from 2EG J1103-6106; (iii) the high energy gamma -rays from 2EG J1801-2312 and 2EG J1857+0118 may not be produced completely by radio pulsars PSR B1758-23 and PSR B1853+01 respectively; (iv) the counterparts (radio pulsars PSR B1046-58 and PSR B1823-13) of 2EG J1049-5247 and 2EG J1825-1307 are possible gamma -ray pulsars; and (v) 2EG J0008-7307 associated with a young supernova remnant CTA 1 may contain a gamma -ray pulsar with period 0.16>= P>= 0.12 s.

  2. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  3. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D. J.

    2008-02-27

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  4. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  5. Dual multifractal spectra.

    PubMed

    Roux, Stéphane; Jensen, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    The multifractal formalism characterizes the scaling properties of a physical density rho as a function of the distance L. To each singularity alpha of the field is attributed a fractal dimension for its support f(alpha). An alternative representation has been proposed by considering the distribution of distances associated to a fixed mass. Computing these spectra for a multifractal Cantor set, it is shown that these two approaches are dual to each other, and that both spectra as well as the moment scaling exponents are simply related. We apply the same inversion formalism to exponents obtained for turbulent statistics in the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model and observe that the same duality relation holds here. PMID:14995714

  6. Stars and their Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    1997-03-01

    This unique and informative text describes how stars are classified according to their spectral qualities and temperature. James Kaler explains the alphabet of stellar astronomy, running from cool M stars to hot O stars, and tells the story of their evolution. Before embarking on a voyage of cosmic discovery, the author discusses the fundamental properties of stars, their atomic structure and the formation of spectra. Then, Kaler considers each star type individually and explores its spectra in detail. A review of unusual, hard-to-classify stars, and a discussion of data related to the birth, life and death of stars round out the text. This book is an important resource for all amateur astronomers and students of astronomy. Professionals will find it a refreshing read as well.

  7. Photon-photon absorption and the uniqueness of the spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the feedback of e(+)-e(-) pair reinjection in a plasma due to photon-photon absorption of its own radiation was examined. Under the assumption of continuous electron injection with a power law spectrum E to the minus gamma power and Compton losses only, it is shown that for gamma 2 the steady state electron distribution function has a unique form independent of the primary injection spectrum. This electron distribution function can, by synchrotron emission, reproduce the general characteristics of the observed radio to optical active galactic nuclei spectra. Inverse Compton scattering of the synchrotron photons by the same electron distribution can account for their X-ray spectra, and also implies gamma ray emission from these objects. This result is invoked to account for the similarity of these spectra, and it is consistent with observations of the diffuse gamma ray background.

  8. Cross sections and differential spectra for reactions of 2-20 MeV neutrons on /sup nat/Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Komoto, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes product yields, secondary n,p and ..cap alpha.. spectra, and ..gamma..-ray spectra calculated for incident neutrons of 2 to 20 MeV on /sup nat/Cr targets. Results are all from the code ALICE, using the version ALISO which does weighting of results for targets which are a mix of isotopes. Where natural isotopic targets are involved, yields and n,p,..cap alpha.. spectra will be reported weighted over isotopic yields. Gamma-ray spectra, however, will be reported for the most abundant isotope. We present product yields versus incident neutron energy, n,p,..cap alpha.. spectra versus incident neutron energy, and calculated ..gamma..-ray spectra.

  9. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  10. Search for gamma ray lines from supernovae and supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.; Adams, R.; Tsai, C.

    1974-01-01

    A gamma ray monitor with a NaI crystal shielded with a cup-shaped CsI cover was contained in the rotating wheel compartment of the OSO-7 spacecraft for measuring the gamma ray spectra from 0.3 to 10 MeV in search for gamma ray lines from a possible remnant in the Gum Nebula and the apparent Type I supernovae in NGC5253. A brief analysis of data yielded no positive indications for X-rays, gamma ray lines, or continuum from these sources.

  11. Targeted Quantitation of Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  12. Mass spectrometry of modified RNAs: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Collin; Limbach, Patrick A

    2016-01-01

    A common feature of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) is that they can undergo a variety of chemical modifications. As nearly all of these chemical modifications result in an increase in the mass of the canonical nucleoside, mass spectrometry has long been a powerful approach for identifying and characterizing modified RNAs. Over the past several years, significant advances have been made in method development and software for interpreting tandem mass spectra resulting in approaches that can yield qualitative and quantitative information on RNA modifications, often at the level of sequence specificity. We discuss these advances along with instrumentation developments that have increased our ability to extract such information from relatively complex biological samples. With the increasing interest in how these modifications impact the epitranscriptome, mass spectrometry will continue to play an important role in bioanalytical investigations revolving around RNA. PMID:26501195

  13. X-Ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews instrumental developments and technique improvements in X-ray spectrometry, grouped into major topic areas of excitation, dispersion and detection, instrumentation and techniques, and quantitative analyses. Cites 162 references. (CS)

  14. Chemometrics in mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varmuza, Kurt

    1992-09-01

    New developments and applications of chemometric methods in mass spectrometry published since 1988 are summarized with emphasis on computer-assisted methods for the interpretation of mass spectral data and on analytical applications.

  15. Indoor and outdoor in situ high-resolution gamma radiation measurements in urban areas of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Svoukis, E; Tsertos, H

    2007-01-01

    In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of (232)Th and (238)U series, and (40)K are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +/- 0.5. PMID:17065195

  16. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  17. Gravitational effects on planetary neutron flux spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W.C.; Drake, D.M.; O'Dell, R.D.; Brinkley F.W. Jr.; Anderson, R.C.

    1989-01-10

    The one-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral-particle transport (ONEDANT) code is augmented to explore the effects of gravity on neutron flux spectra near planetary surfaces. The lifetime of the neutron is also explicitly accounted for. The results show a qualitatively new feature in planetary neutron leakage spectra in the form of a component of returning neutrons having kinetic energies less than the gravitational binding energy (0.132 eV for Mars). The net effect is an enhancement in flux at the lowest energies that is largest at and above the outermost layer of planetary matter. This effect diminishes with increasing depth. Fluxes for kinetic energies larger than the gravitational binding potential are minimally changed by gravity. All energy spectra can be well characterized by a model consisting of the super position of relatively simple thermal and epithermal functions that are completely specified by four parameters; the thermal and epithermal amplitudes, ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.., respectively; the thermal temperature, T/sub ..cap alpha../; and the epithermal power law exponent, p. Instrumental parameters for the initial version of the neutron mode of the Mars observer gamma ray spectrometer are used to demonstrate the ability to use measured count rates to determine thermal and epithermal amplitudes. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  18. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Some basic observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Although some properties were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the Compton Observatory in the past three years. The new observation with the greatest impact has been the observed isotropic distribution of bursts along with a deficiency of weak bursts which would be expected from a homogeneous burst distribution. This is not compatible with any known Galactic population of objects. Gamma-ray bursts show an enormous variety of burst morphologies and a wide spread in burst durations. The spectra of gamma-ray bursts are characterized by rapid variations and peak power which is almost entirely in the gamma-ray energy range. Delayed gamma-ray burst photons extending to GeV energies have been detected for the first time. A time dilation effect has also been reported to be observed in gamma-ray, bursts. The observation of a gamma-ray burst counterpart in another wavelength region has yet to be made.

  19. Artificial neural networks technology for neutron spectrometry and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Hernández-Dávila, V M; Manzanares-Acuña, E; Gallego, E; Lorente, A; Iñiguez, M P

    2007-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network Technology has been applied to unfold neutron spectra and to calculate 13 dosimetric quantities using seven count rates from a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer with a (6)LiI(Eu). Two different networks, one for spectrometry and another for dosimetry, were designed. To train and test both networks, 177 neutron spectra from the IAEA compilation were utilised. Spectra were re-binned into 31 energy groups, and the dosimetric quantities were calculated using the MCNP code and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients from ICRP 74. Neutron spectra and UTA4 response matrix were used to calculate the expected count rates in the Bonner spectrometer. Spectra and H(10) of (239)PuBe and (241)AmBe were experimentally obtained and compared with those determined with the artificial neural networks. PMID:17522034

  20. Cross sections and differential spectra for reactions of 2-20 MeV neutrons of /sup 27/Al

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.; Komoto, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes product yields, secondary n,p and ..cap alpha.. spectra, and ..gamma..-ray spectra calculated for incident neutrons of 2-20 MeV on /sup 27/Al targets. Results are all from the code ALICE, using the version ALISO which does weighting of results for targets which are a mix of isotopes. Where natural isotopic targets are involved, yields and n,p,..cap alpha.. spectra will be reported weighted over isotopic yields. Gamma-ray spectra, however, will be reported for the most abundant isotope.

  1. Application of nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques for the safeguarding of irradiated fuel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Lee, D.M.; Beach, S.E.; Bement, T.R.; Dermendjiev, E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Kaieda, K.; Medina, E.G.

    1980-05-01

    Nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques were used to characterize the irradiation exposures of irradiated fuel assemblies. Techniques for the rapid measurement of the axial-activity profiles of fuel assemblies have been developed using ion chambers and Be(..gamma..,n) detectors. Detailed measurements using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and passive neutron techniques were correlated with operator-declared values of cooling times and burnup.

  2. Uncoiling collagen: a multidimensional mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Simon, H J; van Agthoven, M A; Lam, P Y; Floris, F; Chiron, L; Delsuc, M-A; Rolando, C; Barrow, M P; O'Connor, P B

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry can be used to determine structural information about ions by activating precursors and analysing the resulting series of fragments. Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS) is a technique that correlates the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of fragment and precursor ions in a single spectrum. 2D FT-ICR MS records the fragmentation of all ions in a sample without the need for isolation. To analyse specific precursors, horizontal cross-sections of the spectrum (fragment ion scans) are taken, providing an alternative to conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. In this work, 2D FT-ICR MS has been used to study the tryptic digest of type I collagen, a large protein. Fragment ion scans have been extracted from the 2D FT-ICR MS spectrum for precursor m/z ratios: 951.81, 850.41, 634.34, and 659.34, and 2D FT-ICR MS spectra are compared with a set of 1D MS/MS spectra using different fragmentation methods. The results show that two-dimensional mass spectrometry excells at MS/MS of complex mixtures, simplifying spectra by eliminating contaminant peaks, and aiding the identification of species in the sample. Currently, with desktop computers, 2D FT-ICR MS is limited by data processing power, a limitation which should be alleviated using cluster parallel computing. In order to explore 2D FT-ICR MS for collagen, with reasonable computing time, the resolution in the fragment ion dimension is limited to 256k data points (compared to 4M data points in 1D MS/MS spectra), but the vertical precursor ion dimension has 4096 lines, so the total data set is 1G data points (4 Gbytes). The fragment ion coverage obtained with a blind, unoptimized 2D FT-ICR MS experiment was lower than conventional MS/MS, but MS/MS information is obtained for all ions in the sample regardless of selection and isolation. Finally, although all 2D FT-ICR MS peak assignments were made with the aid of 1D FT-ICR MS data, these results demonstrate the promise of 2D FT-ICR MS as a technique for studying complex protein digest mixtures. PMID:26568361

  3. Phosphorescence spectra of bacteriochlorophylls

    SciTech Connect

    Takiff, L.; Boxer, S.G.

    1988-06-22

    The authors wish to report phosphorescence spectra of the lowest triplet state of a number of bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) which provide the first accurate values for the triplet state energies of these chromophores. There have been many previous attempts to estimate the triplet state energies of bacteriochlorins motivated by the possible importance of triplet states in photosynthesis, the utility of these chromophores as sensitizers and quenchers of singlet oxygen, model studies of electron transfer, and intrinsic theoretical interest in the excited state energies of extended conjugated macrocycles.

  4. Staggered ladder spectra.

    PubMed

    Arvedson, E; Wilkinson, M; Mehlig, B; Nakamura, K

    2006-01-27

    We exactly solve a Fokker-Planck equation by determining its eigenvalues and eigenfunctions: we construct nonlinear second-order differential operators which act as raising and lowering operators, generating ladder spectra for the odd- and even-parity states. The ladders are staggered: the odd-even separation differs from even-odd. The Fokker-Planck equation corresponds, in the limit of weak damping, to a generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process where the random force depends upon position as well as time. The process describes damped stochastic acceleration, and exhibits anomalous diffusion at short times and a stationary non-Maxwellian momentum distribution. PMID:16486675

  5. IUE archived spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Edward C.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Heap, Sara R.; West, Donald K.; Schmitz, Marion

    1988-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite has been in continuous operation since January 26, 1978. To date, approximately 65,000 spectra have been stored in an archive at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. A number of procedures have been generated to facilitate access to the data in the IUE spectral archive. This document describes the procedures which include on-line quick look of the displays, search of an observation data base for selected observations, and several methods for ordering data from the archive.

  6. IUE archived spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E.C.; Bohlin, R.C.; Heap, S.R.; West, D.K.; Schmitz, M.

    1988-06-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite has been in continuous operation since January 26, 1978. To date, approximately 65,000 spectra have been stored in an archive at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. A number of procedures have been generated to facilitate access to the data in the IUE spectral archive. This document describes the procedures which include on-line quick look of the displays, search of an observation data base for selected observations, and several methods for ordering data from the archive.

  7. Identification of Highly Pathogenic Microorganisms by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry: Results of an Interlaboratory Ring Trial.

    PubMed

    Lasch, Peter; Wahab, Tara; Weil, Sandra; Pályi, Bernadett; Tomaso, Herbert; Zange, Sabine; Kiland Granerud, Beathe; Drevinek, Michal; Kokotovic, Branko; Wittwer, Matthias; Pflüger, Valentin; Di Caro, Antonino; Stämmler, Maren; Grunow, Roland; Jacob, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    In the case of a release of highly pathogenic bacteria (HPB), there is an urgent need for rapid, accurate, and reliable diagnostics. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a rapid, accurate, and relatively inexpensive technique that is becoming increasingly important in microbiological diagnostics to complement classical microbiology, PCR, and genotyping of HPB. In the present study, the results of a joint exercise with 11 partner institutions from nine European countries are presented. In this exercise, 10 distinct microbial samples, among them five HPB, Bacillus anthracis, Brucella canis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Yersinia pestis, were characterized under blinded conditions. Microbial strains were inactivated by high-dose gamma irradiation before shipment. Preparatory investigations ensured that this type of inactivation induced only subtle spectral changes with negligible influence on the quality of the diagnosis. Furthermore, pilot tests on nonpathogenic strains were systematically conducted to ensure the suitability of sample preparation and to optimize and standardize the workflow for microbial identification. The analysis of the microbial mass spectra was carried out by the individual laboratories on the basis of spectral libraries available on site. All mass spectra were also tested against an in-house HPB library at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI). The averaged identification accuracy was 77% in the first case and improved to >93% when the spectral diagnoses were obtained on the basis of the RKI library. The compilation of complete and comprehensive databases with spectra from a broad strain collection is therefore considered of paramount importance for accurate microbial identification. PMID:26063856

  8. Identification of Highly Pathogenic Microorganisms by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry: Results of an Interlaboratory Ring Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lasch, Peter; Wahab, Tara; Weil, Sandra; Pályi, Bernadett; Tomaso, Herbert; Zange, Sabine; Kiland Granerud, Beathe; Drevinek, Michal; Kokotovic, Branko; Wittwer, Matthias; Pflüger, Valentin; Di Caro, Antonino; Stämmler, Maren; Grunow, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In the case of a release of highly pathogenic bacteria (HPB), there is an urgent need for rapid, accurate, and reliable diagnostics. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a rapid, accurate, and relatively inexpensive technique that is becoming increasingly important in microbiological diagnostics to complement classical microbiology, PCR, and genotyping of HPB. In the present study, the results of a joint exercise with 11 partner institutions from nine European countries are presented. In this exercise, 10 distinct microbial samples, among them five HPB, Bacillus anthracis, Brucella canis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Yersinia pestis, were characterized under blinded conditions. Microbial strains were inactivated by high-dose gamma irradiation before shipment. Preparatory investigations ensured that this type of inactivation induced only subtle spectral changes with negligible influence on the quality of the diagnosis. Furthermore, pilot tests on nonpathogenic strains were systematically conducted to ensure the suitability of sample preparation and to optimize and standardize the workflow for microbial identification. The analysis of the microbial mass spectra was carried out by the individual laboratories on the basis of spectral libraries available on site. All mass spectra were also tested against an in-house HPB library at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI). The averaged identification accuracy was 77% in the first case and improved to >93% when the spectral diagnoses were obtained on the basis of the RKI library. The compilation of complete and comprehensive databases with spectra from a broad strain collection is therefore considered of paramount importance for accurate microbial identification. PMID:26063856

  9. Spectral archives: extending spectral libraries to analyze both identified and unidentified spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Ari M; Monroe, Matthew E; Shah, Anuj R; Carver, Jeremy J; Bandeira, Nuno; Moore, Ronald J; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2011-07-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments yield multiple, nearly identical spectra of the same peptide in various laboratories, but proteomics researchers typically do not leverage the unidentified spectra produced in other labs to decode spectra they generate. We propose a spectral archives approach that clusters MS/MS datasets, representing similar spectra by a single consensus spectrum. Spectral archives extend spectral libraries by analyzing both identified and unidentified spectra in the same way and maintaining information about peptide spectra that are common across species and conditions. Thus archives offer both traditional library spectrum similarity-based search capabilities along with new ways to analyze the data. By developing a clustering tool, MS-Cluster, we generated a spectral archive from ~1.18 billion spectra that greatly exceeds the size of existing spectral repositories. We advocate that publicly available data should be organized into spectral archives rather than be analyzed as disparate datasets, as is mostly the case today.

  10. Recent progress in low-level gamma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mahe, C.; Girones, Ph.; Lamadie, F.; Le Goaller, C.

    2007-07-01

    The CEA's Aladin gamma imaging system has been operated successfully for several years in nuclear plants and during decommissioning projects with additional tools such as gamma spectrometry detectors and dose rate probes. The radiological information supplied by these devices is becoming increasingly useful for establishing robust and optimized decommissioning scenarios. Recent technical improvements allow this gamma imaging system to be operated in low-level applications and with shorter acquisition times suitable for decommissioning projects. The compact portable system can be used in places inaccessible to operators. It is quick and easy to implement, notably for onsite component characterization. Feasibility trials and in situ measurements were recently carried out under low-level conditions, mainly on waste packages and glove boxes for decommissioning projects. This paper describes recent low-level in situ applications. These characterization campaigns mainly concerned gamma emitters with {gamma} energy < 700 keV. In many cases, the localization of hot spots by gamma camera was confirmed by additional measurements such as dose rate mapping and gamma spectrometry measurements. These complementary techniques associated with advanced calculation codes (MCNP, Mercure 6.2, Visiplan and Siren) offer a mobile and compact tool for specific assessment of waste packages and glove boxes. (authors)

  11. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  12. Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

  13. Decay eta'. --> omega gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Alde, D.; Binon, F.; Bricman, C.; Gouanere, M.; Donskov, S.V.; Duteil, P.; Inyakin, A.V.; Kakauridze, D.B.; Kachanov, V.A.; Kulik, A.V.; and others

    1987-05-01

    The neutral decay of the eta' (958) meson eta'..--> omega gamma --> pi../sup 0/..gamma gamma -->..4..gamma.. has been identified. The experiment was carried out in the IHEP 70-GeV accelerator by means of the multiphoton hodoscopic spectrometer GAMS-2000. The measured branching ratio of decay eta'..--> omega gamma.. (BR = 0.0330 +- 0.0036) is in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  14. Gamma ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  15. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  16. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  17. Cosmic Ray Spectra in Nambu-Goldstone Dark Matter Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, Masahiro; Murayama, Hitoshi; Shirai, Satoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; ,

    2010-06-11

    We discuss the cosmic ray spectra in annihilating/decaying Nambu-Goldstone dark matter models. The recent observed positron/electron excesses at PAMELA and Fermi experiments are well fitted by the dark matter with a mass of 3TeV for the annihilating model, while with a mass of 6TeV for the decaying model. We also show that the Nambu-Goldstone dark matter models predict a distinctive gamma-ray spectrum in a certain parameter space.

  18. Negative ion mass spectra of some polychlorinated 2-phenoxyphenols.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, K L; Norström, A; Nilsson, C A; Bursey, M M; Hass, J R

    1980-01-01

    Polychlorinated 2-phenoxyphenols were studied by negative ion mass spectrometry. Common to almost all of the methane enhanced negative ion mass spectra were (M-1)-, (M-36-)-., (M-37)-, (M-72)-., and chorinated quinoxide ions. The (M-36)-. ion does not apparently form in a mechanism analogous to the thermal or photochemical ring closure of these compounds to form the chlorinated dioxins. The chlorinated quinoxide ion reflects the number of chlorines on the ring with hydroxy substituent. Collision-induced dissociation mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy spectra (CID-MIKES) from different isomers were qualitatively different in both the normal and charge reversed mode of operation. Comparison of these spectra with those from other classes of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons such as the dioxins or the furans may reveal a common negative ion gas phase chemistry. PMID:7428741

  19. Gamma-spectrometry with Compton suppressed detectors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Schueck, C.; Hannachi, F.; Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N.; Paul, E.; Love, D.J.G.; Nolan, P.J.; Nelson, A.H.; Walker, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent results of experiments performed with two different Compton-suppressed detectors arrays in Daresbury and Berkeley (/sup 163,164/Yb and /sup 154/Er, respectively), are presented together with a brief description of the national French array presently under construction in Strasbourg. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  20. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples: Results of 1992 analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1993-09-01

    In January 1990, NASA retrieved the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which had orbited the Earth since April 1984. The satellite had become slightly radioactive due to cosmic exposure, and the SRTC Underground Counting Facility was used to analyze LDEF samples of Al and Ta for activations of {sup 22}Na, {sup 172}Lu, and {sup 173}Lu. Background steel trunnion samples, not irradiated in space, were analyzed for {sup 60}Co. This report summarizes results for 15 samples analyzed in 1992.

  1. Measurements of Natural Radionuclides in Vegetables by Gamma Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, M. A.; Zainal, N. Jenal; Hossain, I.; Javed, M. A.; Mubarak, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    This article reports the activity of natural radionuclides uranium, thorium, and potassium, in different vegetables in Malaysia, measured with a p-type high-purity germanium detector (HPGe). Potassium radionuclides were the most prevalent element in the tested samples, whose activity ranges from 138.89 to 2660.31 Bq/kg. Meanwhile, the activity of uranium was found to be within the minimum detection limit (MDL) to 46.94 Bq/kg, and thorium from < MDL to 192.98 Bq/kg. The annual dose was in the range 0.001 to 0.06 mSv, within the worldwide range of 0.29 mSv/year for ingestion of vegetables.

  2. Method of incident low-energy gamma-ray direction reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Zverev, V. G.; Galper, A. M.; Arkhangelskaya, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Dalkarov, O. D.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray space-based telescope has as its main goals to measure cosmic γ-ray fluxes and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component produced, theoretically, in dark-matter-particles decay or annihilation processes, to search for discrete γ-ray sources and study them in detail, to examine the energy spectra of diffuse γ-rays — both galactic and extragalactic — and to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and γ-rays from the active Sun. Scientific goals of GAMMA-400 telescope require fine angular resolution. The telescope is of a pair-production type. In the converter-tracker, the incident gamma-ray photon converts into electron-positron pair in the tungsten layer and then the tracks are detected by silicon- strip position-sensitive detectors. Multiple scattering processes become a significant obstacle in the incident-gamma direction reconstruction for energies below several gigaelectronvolts. The method of utilising this process to improve the resolution is proposed in the presented work.

  3. Physical Performance of GAMMA-400 Telescope. Angular Resolution, Proton and Electron Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. A.; Galper, A. O. Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Gusakov, Y. V.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kheymits, M. D.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Naumov, P. Y.; Runtso, M. F.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zverev, V. G.

    The specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope will realize the measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following broad range of scientific topics. Search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution ∼1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods, developed to reconstruct the direction of incident gamma photon, are presented in this paper, as well as, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is discussed.

  4. Multi-Epoch Multiwavelength Spectra and Models for Blazar 3C 279

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Boettcher, M.; Aldering, G.; Aller, H.; Aller, M.; Backman, D. E.; Balonek, T. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Bock, H.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Of the blazars detected by EGRET in GeV gamma-rays, 3C 279 is not only the best-observed by EGRET, but also one of the best-monitored at lower frequencies. We have assembled eleven spectra, from GHz radio through GeV gamma-rays, from the time intervals of EGRET observations. Although some of the data have appeared in previous publications, most are new, including data taken during the high states in early 1999 and early 2000. All of the spectra show substantial gamma-ray contribution to the total luminosity of the object; in a high state, the gamma-ray luminosity dominates over that at all other frequencies by a factor of more than 10. There is no clear pattern of time correlation; different bands do not always rise and fall together, even in the optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. The spectra are modeled using a leptonic jet, with combined synchrotron self-Compton + external Compton gamma-ray production. Spectral variability of 3C 279 is consistent with variations of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet, accompanied by changes in the spectral shape of the electron distribution. Our modeling results are consistent with the UV spectrum of 3C 279 being dominated by accretion disk radiation during times of low gamma-ray intensity.

  5. Californium-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Khan, A H; Shaikh, B; Allen, E H; Sokoloski, E A

    1988-10-01

    This paper presents mass spectral data of eleven aminoglycoside antibiotics by using californium-252 plasma desorption (252Cf PD) mass spectrometry. This mass spectral data could be used to develop a confirmatory method for monitoring aminoglycoside antibiotic residues isolated from food products of animal origin. Mass spectra were determined by applying time-of-flight 252Cf PD mass spectrometry to eleven aminoglycoside antibiotics, namely: neomycin, kanamycin, paromomycin, tobramycin, apramycin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, amikacin, netilmicin, sisomicin and gentamicins. All eleven antibiotics yielded positive ion spectra. These hydrophilic antibiotics were derivitized to extractable chromopheric compounds. All but two antibiotics (streptomycin and dihydrostreptomycin) yielded nitrophenyl derivatives and spectra were obtained in both negative and positive ion modes. Derivatized aminoglycosides produced cation and anion spectra with quasimolecular ions corresponding to [M + H]+., M+, [M - H]-., [M + Na]+, [M + K]+ and M-. or [M - H]- and M-. or [M - H]-. Underivatized antibiotics were best examined in the positive ion mode. 252Cf PD mass spectrometry consistently produced very strong molecular or quasimolecular ions for all aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:3191259

  6. Environmental Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Albert T.

    2013-06-01

    Environmental mass spectrometry is an important branch of science because it provides many of the data that underlie policy decisions that can directly influence the health of people and ecosystems. Environmental mass spectrometry is currently undergoing rapid development. Among the most relevant directions are a significant broadening of the lists of formally targeted compounds; a parallel interest in nontarget chemicals; an increase in the reliability of analyses involving accurate mass measurements, tandem mass spectrometry, and isotopically labeled standards; and a shift toward faster high-throughput analysis, with minimal sample preparation, involving various approaches, including ambient ionization techniques and miniature instruments. A real revolution in analytical chemistry could be triggered with the appearance of robust, simple, and sensitive portable mass spectrometers that can utilize ambient ionization techniques. If the cost of such instruments is reduced to a reasonable level, mass spectrometers could become valuable household devices.

  7. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  8. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurczynski, P.; Palmer, D.; Seifert, H.; Teegarden, B. J.; Gehrels, N.; Cline, T. L.; Ramaty, R.; Hurley, K.; Madden, N. W.; Pehl, R. H.

    2000-11-01

    A search for spectral lines in gamma-ray bursts detected with the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer has been unable to confirm their existence. The spectrometer, aboard the Wind spacecraft, has detected gamma-ray bursts and other transients since 1995. We have performed a systematic search for narrow spectral lines in gamma-ray bursts detected with this instrument that augments and extends the results of a similar search of bursts detected with BATSE. This search procedure tests for statistically significant lines at all possible times and durations during a burst using the method of maximum likelihood and C-statistic. Simulations demonstrated the effectiveness of this procedure, particularly on Poisson distributed data, for distinguishing real features from statistical fluctuations. The most promising line candidates were consistent with chance fluctuations, given the large number of spectra searched.

  9. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  10. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  11. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  12. X-Ray Spectra of Young Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae: Dependence on Spin-Down Energy Loss Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.

    2003-01-01

    An observational model is presented for the spectra of young rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae based on a study of nine bright Crab-like pulsar systems observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. A significant correlation is discovered between the X-ray spectra of these pulsars and that of their associated pulsar wind nebulae, both of which are observed to be a function of the spin-down energy loss rate, E. The 2-10 keV spectra of these objects are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices, Gamma, in the range of 0.6 < Gamma (sub PSR) < 2.1 and 1.3 < Gamma(sub PWN) < 2.3, for the pulsars and their nebulae, respectively. A linear regression fit relating these two sets of indexes yields Gamma(sub PWN) = 0.91 +/- 0.18 + (0.66 +/- 0.11) Gamma (sub PSR), with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.97. The spectra of these pulsars are found to steepen as Gamma = Gamma(sub max) + alpha E (exp -1/2), with Gamma(sub max) providing an observational limit on the spectral slopes of young rotation-powered pulsars. These results reveal basic properties of young pulsar systems, allow new observational constraints on models of pulsar wind emission, and provide a means of predicting the energetics of pulsars lacking detected pulsations.

  13. Gamma ray bursts: a 1983 overview

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L.

    1983-10-01

    Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect. Energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all. Burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective. Finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

  14. Gamma Ray Bursts: a 1983 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect; energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all; burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective; finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

  15. Unthermalized positrons in gamma ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkaczyk, W.; Karakula, S.

    1992-01-01

    The spectra of the broadening 0.511 MeV annihilation line produced by high temperatures was calculated in the case of unthermalized plasma; i.e., T sub e(+) is not = T sub e(-). The flattening in the spectrum of the annihilation lines for large differences of electron and positron temperatures is a strong indication that the observed features of the hard tailed spectrum of the gamma bursts can be well described by annihilation of unthermalized positrons. It is proposed that the charge separation occurring in Eddington limited accretion onto a neutron star or the one photon pair production in strong magnetic fields as a mechanism for the production of unthermalized positrons in the sources of gamma bursts. From the best fit of experimental spectra by the model, the parameters of sources for which the regions with different plasma temperatures can exist is evaluated.

  16. Stability of an injectable disulfiram formulation sterilized by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M; Agarwal, R P; Brodeur, R J; Garagusi, V F; Mossman, K L

    1985-02-01

    Stability of an injectable disulfiram suspension sterilized by gamma(gamma) irradiation was tested. Single doses of disulfiram powder in plastic syringes were subjected to 50,000 rads of gamma radiation. Culture media were inoculated with the irradiated drug to test for growth of bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. The irradiated drug and nonirradiated controls were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for disulfiram and its major degradation product, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC). Ultraviolet absorption spectra of irradiated and nonirradiated disulfiram were obtained. No organisms grew in any of the culture media. HPLC analysis indicated that disulfiram content of the irradiated specimens was not reduced, and DDC was not detected. There were no important differences between the ultraviolet spectra of the irradiated and nonirradiated samples. Disulfiram can be sterilized by gamma irradiation without chemical degradation. PMID:2983546

  17. Mapping surface mineralogy using imaging spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Fred A.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging spectrometry, simultaneous measurement of spectra and images in up to hundreds of spectral channels or bands, is a proven technology for identifying and mapping minerals based on their reflectance or emissivity signatures. Also known as hyperspectral imaging or "HSI", extraction of key spectral signatures from these data allows direct identification of iron minerals such as hematite, goethite, and jarosite in the visible/near infrared (VNIR); clays, carbonates, micas, sulfates, and other minerals in the short wave infrared (SWIR); and silicates and carbonates in the long wave infrared (LWIR). The unique capability of imaging spectrometry to produce detailed maps of the spatial distribution of specific minerals, mineral assemblages, and mineral variability on the surface of Earth makes it an ideal tool for enhanced geomorphic mapping. Case histories illustrate the use of HSI for characterizing and mapping active and relict geothermal/hydrothermal systems and determining relations between mineralogy and derived landforms. Imaging spectrometry, used in conjunction with complimentary datasets such as InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar), Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), or stereo (photogrammetric-derived) digital elevation models (DEMs), provides a unique means of visualizing the spatial distribution and association of mineralogy with topography, thus contributing to the understanding of the relations between geology and landscape and to improved interpretation of surface geologic processes.

  18. Understanding soft gamma-ray repeaters in the context of the extragalactic radio pulsar origin of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Fatuzzo, Marco

    1993-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) may be neutron stars undergoing structural adjustments that produce transient gamma-ray events. A unified scenario is proposed in which young radio pulsars are responsible for SGRs and classical GRB sources. The radiative emission associated with a pulsar 'glitch' is seen as a GRB or an SGR event depending on the direction of our line of sight. Burst spectra, energetics, and statistics of GRBs and SGRs are discussed. It is shown that classical GRB spectra arise from Compton upscattering by charges accelerated along the viewing direction and SGR burst spectra are due to the thermalization of Alfven wave energy away from this direction. If crustal adjustments occur within the first 50,000 years of a pulsar's lifetime, the model predicts two SGR sources within the galaxy, in agreement with current observations.

  19. Silver nanostructures in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Sekuła, Justyna; Nizioł, Joanna; Rode, Wojciech; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-09-21

    Silver nanoparticles have been successfully applied as a matrix replacement for the laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). Nanoparticles, producing spectra with highly reduced chemical background in the low m/z region, are perfectly suited for low-molecular weight compound analysis and imaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can efficiently absorb ultraviolet laser radiation, transfer energy to the analyte and promote analyte desorption, but also constitute a source of silver ions suitable for analyte cationisation. This review provides an overview of the literature on silver nanomaterials as non-conventional desorption and ionization promoters in LDI-MS and mass spectrometry imaging. PMID:26247064

  20. Search for spectral lines in cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Daniel C.; Share, Gerald H.

    1992-01-01

    Time-integrated spectra from 177 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM) have been systematically searched for evidence of emission lines in the range 300 keV and higher. The distribution of fitted line strengths is consistent with what is expected from a random sample of data, suggesting that there are no statistically significant narrow or moderately broadened line features in any of the bursts.