Science.gov

Sample records for gamma spectrometry spectra

  1. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-07

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  2. Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Bucher, Benno; Rybach, Ladislaus

    2008-08-01

    Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of 137Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

  3. Photon energy conversion efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Švec, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Photon energy conversion efficiency coefficient is presented as the ratio of total energy registered in the collected spectrum to the emitted photon energy. This parameter is calculated from the conventional gamma-ray histogram and in principle is not affected by coincidence phenomena. This feature makes it particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide samples at close geometries. It complements the number of efficiency parameters used in gamma-ray spectrometry and can partly change the view as to how the gamma-ray spectra are displayed and processed. PMID:26474210

  4. GRABGAM Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level HPGe Gamma Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1999-07-28

    The GRABGAM code has been used successfully for ultra-low level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis since its development in 1985 at Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Although numerous gamma analysis codes existed at that time, reviews of institutional and commercial codes indicated that none addressed all features that were desired by SRTC. Furthermore, it was recognized that development of an in-house code would better facilitate future evolution of the code to address SRTC needs based on experience with low-level spectra. GRABGAM derives its name from Gamma Ray Analysis BASIC Generated At MCA/PC.

  5. Scaling of gamma-spectra registered by semiconductor detectors

    E-print Network

    E. G. Obrazovskii

    2012-11-20

    Scaling properties of gamma-spectra recorded by semiconductor detectors are investigated. For practical purposes the method of simulation multicomponent spectra using single experimental spectrum are suggested.

  6. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-raymore »multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  7. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  8. Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

  9. Gamma spectrometry of the minor bodies of the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Surkov, Yu.A.; Moskaleva, L.P.; Manvelyan, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigate the possibility of determining the elemental composition of the surfaces of minor bodies of the solar system (asteroids, the Martian satellites Phobos and Deimos, etc.) using spacecraft-based ..gamma..-spectrometry. The dependence of ..gamma..-photon flux on altitude above the body was calculated for body radii from 13 to 500 km. Estimates were made of the sensitivity of the determination of basic rock-forming elements with respect to changes in geometry of a factor of two, using ..gamma..-spectrometry with a 100 mm by 100 mm crystal of NaI(Tl). Finally, the time required to determine the stipulated characteristic ..gamma..-radiation of surface rocks with the given precision was derived as a function of altitude.

  10. The 2002 IAEA test spectra for low-level ?-ray spectrometry software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Arcos, José Mª; Blaauw, Menno; Fazinic, Stjepko; Kolotov, Vladimir P.

    2005-01-01

    Test spectra for low-level ?-ray spectrometry were acquired and made available to the general public at www.iri.tudelft.nl/~rc/fmr/iaea2002. As opposed to the 1995 test spectra, where reference values were made available only for the peak energies and areas, the new set of test spectra was acquired with certified sources, so that the reference values are radionuclide activities. Two well-defined detection geometries were employed: a 500 ml Marinelli beaker on a 33% relative efficiency HPGe detector; and a 100 ml pillbox on a 96% HPGe detector. The complete set addresses various issues that are especially important in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry, i.e. determination of efficiency curves in the presence of coincidence summing, differences in source geometry and density between standard and sample, poor statistics, shielding of background by the sample, use of low X- or ?-ray energies and the assumption of secular equilibrium of the natural radionuclides. The set was used in an IAEA intercomparison of software packages in December, 2002, reported on in a separate paper.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Z.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Wang, Tzu-Fang; Ruhter, W.D.

    1993-07-16

    Monte Carlo calculations were investigated as a means of simulating the gamma-ray spectra of Pu. These simulated spectra will be used to develop and evaluate gamma-ray analysis techniques for various nondestructive measurements. Simulated spectra of calculational standards can be used for code intercomparisons, to understand systematic biases and to estimate minimum detection levels of existing and proposed nondestructive analysis instruments. The capability to simulate gamma-ray spectra from HPGe detectors could significantly reduce the costs of preparing large numbers of real reference materials. MCNP was used for the Monte Carlo transport of the photons. Results from the MCNP calculations were folded in with a detector response function for a realistic spectrum. Plutonium spectrum peaks were produced with Lorentzian shapes, for the x-rays, and Gaussian distributions. The MGA code determined the Pu isotopes and specific power of this calculated spectrum and compared it to a similar analysis on a measured spectrum.

  12. Augmentation of ENDF/B fission product gamma-ray spectra by calculated spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Katakura, J. ); England, T.R. )

    1991-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectral data of the ENDF/B-V fission product decay data file have been augmented by calculated spectra. The calculations were performed with a model using beta strength functions and cascade gamma-ray transitions. The calculated spectra were applied to individual fission product nuclides. Comparisons with several hundred measured aggregate gamma spectra after fission were performed to confirm the applicability of the calculated spectra. The augmentation was extended to a preliminary ENDF/B-VI file, and to beta spectra. Appendix C provides information on the total decay energies for individual products and some comparisons of measured and aggregate values based on the preliminary ENDF/B-VI files. 15 refs., 411 figs.

  13. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which were reported to collect noticeable Be-7 on their leading surfaces. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed.

  14. Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Willard G.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 31 samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of Al, V, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultralow level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include an end piece that collects noticeable Be-7 on its leading surface. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90 pct. efficient HPGe gamma ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive active shield.

  15. Features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Paczynski, Bohdan; Goodman, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Gravitational lensing of cosmological gamma-ray bursts by objects in the mass range about 10 exp 17 to 10 exp 20 g (femtolensing) may introduce complicated interference patterns that might be interpreted as absorption or emission lines in the bursts' spectra. This phenomenon, if detected, may be used as a unique probe of dark matter in the universe. The BATSE spectral data should allow one to detect such spectral features or to put significant upper limits on the cosmic density of a dark matter component that may be in the femtolensing range. Software to generate theoretical spectra has been developed, and it is accessible over the computer network with anonymous ftp.

  16. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin synchrotron radiation are likely required in a full explanation of the spectral peaks or breaks of the GRB prompt emission phase. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Guide to plutonium isotopic measurements using gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.; Rakel, D.A.

    1982-08-26

    Purpose of this guide is to assist those responsible for plutonium isotopic measurements in the application of gamma-ray spectrometry. Objectives are to promote an understanding of the measurement process, including its limitations and applicability, by reviewing the general features of a plutonium spectrum and identifying the quantities which must be extracted from the data; to introduce state-of-the-art analysis techniques by reviewing four isotopic analysis packages and identifying their differences; to establish the basis for measurement control and assurance by discussing means of authenticating the performance of a measurement system; and to prepare for some specific problems encountered in plutonium isotopic analyses by providing solutions from the practical experiences of several laboratories. 29 references, 12 figures, 17 tables.

  18. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.; Tanner, Allan B.

    1977-01-01

    Sedimentary-type uranium deposits accumulate at favorable sites along a migration path which may be kilometers in length. Their source is a large volume of rock from which the uranium has been leached. The geochemical mobilities and half lives of uranium and its daughter products vary widely so that they are transported from the source rocks, at different rates, along the migration path to their ultimate site. The radioactive disequilibrium resulting from this process has been well documented in the immediate vicinity of ore deposits, and disequilibrium is commonly recorded on gamma-ray logs up the hydraulic gradient from uranium ore. Little is known about the state of secular equilibrium in the leached host rocks, which often represent the only part of the migration path that is at or near the surface and is thus most accessible to the exploration geophysicist. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry provides a means of investigating the disequilibrium associated with uranium leaching and migration. Direct measurement of uranium can be made by this method, and the equivalent weight percents can be determined for six of the seven daughter-product decay groups that characterize the state of radioactive equilibrium. The technique has been used quantitatively in laboratory studies, where the results compare favorably with radiochemical analyses; field experiments suggest that semi-quantitative data may be obtained at the outcrop.

  19. Investigation of elemental analysis using neutron-capture gamma ray spectra

    E-print Network

    Hamawi, John Nicholas

    1969-01-01

    This thesis evaluated the potential of neutron-capture gamma rays in elemental analysis. A large portion of the work was devoted to the development of a method for the analysis of weak peaks in gamma ray spectra. This was ...

  20. Matrix of Response Functions for Deconvolution of Gamma-ray Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, A. E.; Ulin, S. E.

    An approach for creation the response functions'matrix for the xenon gamma-ray detector is discussed. A set of gamma-ray spectra was obtained by Geant4 simulation to generate the matrix. Iterative algorithms used allow to deconvolve and restore initial gamma-ray spectra. Processed spectrum contains peaks that help to identify and estimate a activity of a radioactive source. Results and analysis of experimental spectra deconvolution are shown.

  1. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  2. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

  3. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Hojbota, Calin; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime. PMID:26724015

  4. Compression and Encryption of Search Survey Gamma Spectra using Compressive Sensing

    E-print Network

    Alexander Heifetz; Sasan Bakhtiari; Apostolos C. Raptis

    2015-01-21

    We have investigated the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) computational method to simultaneous compression and encryption of gamma spectra measured with NaI(Tl) detector during wide area search survey applications. Our numerical experiments have demonstrated secure encryption and nearly lossless recovery of gamma spectra coded and decoded with CS routines.

  5. ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, P.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Normand, S.

    2011-07-01

    ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

  6. QUALITY CONTROL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS USING GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the quality control procedures, calibration, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data in measuring the activity of gamma ray-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. Included in the appendices are basic data for selected gamma ray-emitting ra...

  7. Nondestructive determination of plutonium by gamma spectrometry and neutron well coincidence counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Chhavi; Poi, Sanhita; Nathaniel, T. N.; Mhatre, Amol; Kalsi, P. C.; Singh, Sarbjit; Goswami, A.

    2009-03-01

    Different NDA methods based on gamma ray and neutron measurements developed for the determination of Pu in solid samples is reported. In the gamma spectrometric measurements for solid samples, a method which takes advantage of the multiple ?-rays emitted by Pu and relies on the empirical relation between apparent mass of the sample and ?-ray energy was used. The method is applicable for the determination of small quantities of plutonium samples of non standard geometry by gamma ray spectrometry. The gross and coincidence neutron count rates for two different sets of standard Pu oxide powder samples were found to fall on different calibration lines. Isotopic composition of the two sets were determined using gamma ray spectrometry to obtain effective 240Pu content in the samples. A common calibration curve could be obtained when coincidence count rates were plotted vs. effective 240Pu content.

  8. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  9. A Simple Analytic Treatment of the Intergalactic Absorption Effect in Blazar Gamma-ray Spectra

    E-print Network

    F. W. Stecker; S. T. Scully

    2006-11-13

    We derive a new and user friendly simple analytic approximation for determining the effect of intergalactic absorption in the energy range 0.2-2 TeV and the redshift range 0.05-0.4. In these ranges, the form of the absorption coeeficient is approximately logarithmic in energy. The effect of this energy dependence is to steepen intrinsic source spectra such that a source with an approximate power-law intrinsic spectrum in this energy range with spectral index $\\Gamma_{s}$ is steepened to a power-law with an observed spectral index $\\Gamma_{o} = $\\Gamma_{s} + $\\Delta \\Gamma (z)$ where $\\Delta \\Gamma (z)$ is a linear function of z in the redshift range 0.05-0.4. We apply this approximation to the spectra of seven TeV blazars.

  10. Characterization of coal and charcoal by alpha-particle and gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Lourtau, A. M.; Rubio Montero, M. P.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Although coal and charcoal have similar physical and chemical characteristics, there are several crystallographic procedures used to distinguish and characterize them. But if the matrix is crushed, there is no standard procedure to distinguish coal from charcoal. In this work, a procedure to characterize coal and charcoal samples based on the radioactive content is proposed. The first assay is by gamma-ray spectrometry, which allows a part of the radioactive content to be determined rapidly and non-destructively. Then, alpha-particle spectrometry is applied to assay the content of those radionuclides which are difficult to determine precisely by gamma-ray spectrometry. This second technique requires prior chemical purification of the carbon sample in order to separate the corresponding radionuclides of interest.

  11. Time-Integrated Gamma-Ray Burst Synchrotron Spectra from Blast Wave/Cloud Interactions

    E-print Network

    James Chiang

    1998-10-15

    We show that the spectral shape of the low energy tails found for the time-integrated spectra of gamma-ray bursts, even in the absence of strong synchrotron cooling, can be significantly softer than the $\

  12. Efficiency corrections in low-energy gamma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakar, K.; Realo, K.; Kiisk, M.; Realo, E.

    2007-09-01

    In HPGe gamma spectrometric analysis of 210Pb in aerosol filter samples, the activity concentrations were corrected for self-attenuation and sample heights. Corrections were evaluated using the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4 and the Gespecor software. Calculations were made for 46.5 keV gamma line of 210Pb in Petryanoff (FPP) and fiberglass aerosol filters of varying heights. The IAEA RGU-1 reference material of different heights in a similar beaker served as a standard source. As a result, the approximations were found to calculate corrected efficiencies for samples with different heights. The method was applied for the study of 210Pb content in air in Estonia.

  13. [Investigation of JinKui ShenQi pills by ultraviolet spectra and tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-lan; Sun, Zhi; Cheng, Bin; Ji, Yu-bin; Bai, Jing

    2008-08-01

    On the base of establishing the fingerprint of JinKui ShenQi pills, the ultraviolet spectra-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, method was used to identify the fingerprint. Seperation was performed on the Symmetry Shield RP18 (5 microm, 4. 6 mm X 15 mm) analytical column with mobile phase consisting of 1% acetic acid and acetonitrile with gradient elute at the flow rate of 1.0 mL x min(-1), and the ultraviolet detection wavelength was set at 248 nm. Using the above-mentioned chromatographic condition, the fingerprint of different samples was established and the same fingerprint was defined. The fingerprints of different samples were compared with similarity evaluation software published by Pharmacopeia committee codex (2004A). The mass spectrograph with API-ESI ionization source was used, setting the flow rate at 0.5 mL x min(-1) after splitting stream. The pressure of atomization room was 50 Psi, the flow rate of dry gas was 9.0 L x min(-1), the capillary voltage was 4 kV, and the transmission voltage was 70 V. The negative scanner mode was chosen, scan scope was 100-2000, using ion trap to analyze quasimolecular ion peak and the selected fragment ion, and TIC chromatography and second order mass chromatogram were recorded. The major constituents among in JinKui ShenQi pills from different origins were separated well by HPLC. Although there was difference among different origins, they showed nineteen identical characteristic absorption bands. Three fingerprints chemical compositions such as loganin, cinnamal and paeonol were identified based on the retention time and ultraviolet spectra of standard preparation. According to their ultraviolet spectra, molecular weight and fragmentation information, ten peaks in the fingerprint were identified by ultraviolet spectroscopy-mass, spectrometry/massg spectrometry. They are 1,2,3-tri-O-galloyl-glucose, loganin, paeoniflorin, 1,2,3,6-tetro-O-galloyl-glucose, soya-cerebroside, cornuside, and PGG, benzoyl-oxypaeoniflorin. The result showed that the presented fingerprint of JinKui ShenQi pills contained plenty of information quite valuable for the quality evaluation as well as chemical characterization of JinKui ShenQi pills. PMID:18975832

  14. The dependence of observed gamma-ray pulsar spectra on viewing geometry

    E-print Network

    Agnieszka Wozna; Jaroslaw Dyks; Tomasz Bulik; Bronislaw Rudak

    2002-05-15

    We calculate the gamma-ray lightcurves and spectra of rotation powered pulsars for a wide range of observer's viewing angles, and inclination angles of the magnetic axis to the rotation axis. We show how the shapes of the observed phase-averaged spectra as well as energy-integrated pulse profiles depend on the orientation for classical and millisecond pulsars.

  15. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    SciTech Connect

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore.

  16. BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra. Part 3; Low-Energy Behavior of Time-Averaged Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Matteson, J. L.; Band, D. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Meegan, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze time-averaged spectra from 86 bright gamma-ray bursts from the first 5 years of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to determine whether the lowest energy data are consistent with a standard spectra form fit to the data at all energies. The BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors have the capability to observe photons as low as 5 keV. Using the gamma-ray burst locations obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors, the Spectroscopy Detectors' low-energy response can be modeled accurately. This, together with a postlaunch calibration of the lowest energy Spectroscopy Detector discriminator channel, which can lie in the range 5-20 keV, allows spectral deconvolution over a broad energy range, approx. 5 keV to 2 MeV. The additional coverage allows us to search for evidence of excess emission, or for a deficit, below 20 keV. While no burst has a significant (greater than or equal to 3 sigma) deficit relative to a standard spectra model, we find that 12 bursts have excess low-energy emission, ranging between 1.2 and 5.8 times the model flux, that exceeds 5 sigma in significance. This is evidence for an additional low-energy spectral component in at least some bursts, or for deviations from the power-law spectral form typically used to model gamma-ray bursts at energies below 100 keV.

  17. Portable microcomputer unit for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

    1981-10-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed for the IAEA to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, and a 20-character thermal printer for hardcopy output. Only the positions of the 148-keV Pu-241 and 208-keV U-237 peaks are required for spectral analysis. The unit was tested against gamma-ray spectra taken of NBS plutonium standards and IAEA spectra. Results obtained are presented.

  18. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Noise power spectra of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a cooled spray chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, D.; Pilger, C.; Hergenröder, R.; Leis, F.; Tschöpel, P.; Broekaert, J. A. C.

    1994-07-01

    The influence of the spray chamber temperature and the related aerosol water loading on ArO + as typical spectral interference in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is studied. Therefore, the noise power spectra for the ArO + have been measured by use of fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. A Meinhard nebulizer and a GMK nebulizer were used in connection with a cooled spray chamber at a temperature of 5-25°C. It could be found that the relative standard deviation of the analyte signal in ICP-MS was improved by cooling the spray chamber. The noise power spectra showed that especially the white noise goes down when the spray chamber is cooled. The overall white noise with the GMK nebulizer is shown to be higher in the case of an Al 2O 3 slurry than in the case of an AlCl 3 solution, containing both 400 ?g/ml Al. The pumping pulse rates are clearly visible in the noise amplitude spectra, but their amplitudes decrease at the presence of an impactor bead m the GMK nebulizer. Shifts of the noise band around 355 Hz were shown to occur as a result of the power level and the outer gas flow as well.

  20. Investigation of Failed TRISO Fuel Assay Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Jason Michael

    TRISO microsphere fuel is the fundamental fuel unit for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). A single TRISO particle consists of an inner kernel of Uranium Oxycarbide surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. The silicon carbide serves as the primary barrier to the release of fission products into the core. If the silicon carbide layer fails, fission gas, especially Kr and Xe, will begin to escape the failed particle. In order to understand the behavior of TRISO fuel under in-core conditions, a series of experiments is being conducted by Idaho National Lab at the Advanced Test Reactor. AGR-1 is the first of these experiments. It will measure fission product release due to failed TRISO particles. Simulations of this experiment have been conducted at North Carolina State University to develop a method for the analysis of the results of the experiment. The ATR core was simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP to calculate the expected neutron energy spectrum for the AGR-1 experimental test train. This spectrum was used to create one-group cross sections for implementation in ORIGEN calculations of the amount of activity produced in the experiment. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the phenomenon of gas release. While each model is based on similar physics, different models contain unique features that distinguish them from one another. These Release to Birth (R/B) models are developed and applied to the activity found in the ORIGEN calculations to create expected release activities. The release activity is used to create gamma-ray spectra that are representative of the different R/B models. Expected R/B due to a model can be calculated for comparison to the experiment with knowledge of the number of failed particles in the spectra. The comparison of measured to predicted R/B ratios gives insight into the physics of release and also helps validate specific models. Direct comparison is possible, but many of the uncertainties associated with direct comparison are nullified through the use of relative indicators. Each R/B model has a unique set of indicators that reflect the physical processes simulated in the model. Trends in the model indicators can be matched up with trends in indicators derived from the release spectra to validate either an entire model or validate the need to consider certain parameters in the creation of a complete and successful release to birth model. Gamma spectrometry is a useful tool for the understanding of fission gas release from failed TRISO particles. A better understanding of the processes that influence fission gas release will influence the fuel manufacturing and quality assurance protocols during the continued development of the VHTR. Future work in this area includes experiment in which the conditions can be better controlled to document the effects of temperature and fission rate in the fuel.

  1. NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

    2002-05-10

    The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

  2. Analysis of polypropyleneglycols using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Effects of cationizing agents on the mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Shoji; Ohmoto, Masayoshi; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2003-01-01

    In electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) of polypropyleneglycol (PPG), effects of cationizing agents were examined. When NaI was used as a cationizing agent, the distribution of multiply-charged ions in the spectra was greatly affected by the ratio of cationizing agent and PPG. However, the distribution was not affected by the use of CH(3)COONH(4). With an increase of cone voltage, fragmentation occurred by in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) when CH(3)COONH(4) was used. On the contrary, no decomposition of the PPG backbone was observed with NaI. Instead, the intensity of the lower-charged ions, whose mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios are larger, increased because of the elimination of Na(+) with increase of cone voltage. Under optimum conditions for ESI-MS analysis, PPGs that have different molecular weights, different initiators or end groups were easily and accurately characterized. A tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) study of NH(4)(+) adduct ions of PPG indicated that a vinyl-terminated linear structure is formed at the end group during the fragmentation. PMID:12748393

  3. Similarity analysis of spectra obtained via reflectance spectrometry in legal medicine.

    PubMed

    Belenki, Liudmila; Sterzik, Vera; Bohnert, Michael

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, a series of reflectance spectra of postmortem lividity, pallor, and putrefaction-affected skin for 195 investigated cases in the course of cooling down the corpse has been collected. The reflectance spectrometric measurements were stored together with their respective metadata in a MySQL database. The latter has been managed via a scientific information repository. We propose similarity measures and a criterion of similarity that capture similar spectra recorded at corpse skin. We systematically clustered reflectance spectra from the database as well as their metadata, such as case number, age, sex, skin temperature, duration of cooling, and postmortem time, with respect to the given criterion of similarity. Altogether, more than 500 reflectance spectra have been pairwisely compared. The measures that have been used to compare a pair of reflectance curve samples include the Euclidean distance between curves and the Euclidean distance between derivatives of the functions represented by the reflectance curves at the same wavelengths in the spectral range of visible light between 380 and 750 nm. For each case, using the recorded reflectance curves and the similarity criterion, the postmortem time interval during which a characteristic change in the shape of reflectance spectrum takes place is estimated. The latter is carried out via a software package composed of Java, Python, and MatLab scripts that query the MySQL database. We show that in legal medicine, matching and clustering of reflectance curves obtained by means of reflectance spectrometry with respect to a given criterion of similarity can be used to estimate the postmortem interval. PMID:23897013

  4. Evaluation of TASTEX task H: measurement of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnink, R.; Prindle, A.L.; Asakura, Y.; Masui, J.; Ishiguro, N.; Kawasaki, A.; Kataoka, S.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes a computer-based gamma spectrometer system that was developed for measuring isotopic and total plutonium concentrations in nitric acid solutions. The system was installed at the Tokai reprocessing plant where it is undergoing testing and evaluation as part of the Tokai Advanced Safeguards Exercise (TASTEX). Objectives of TASTEX Task H, High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometer for Plutonium Isotopic Analysis, the methods and equipment used, the installation and calibration of the system, and the measurements obtained from several reprocessing campaigns are discussed and described. In general, we find that measurements for gamma spectroscopy agree well with those of mass spectrometry and of other chemical analysis. The system measures both freshly processed plutonium from the product accountability tank and aged plutonium solutions from storage tanks. 14 figures, 15 tables.

  5. Testing of regolith of celestial bolides with active neutron gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, Andrey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Golovin, Dmitry; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Current space instruments for studying planet's surface include gamma ray spectrometers that detect natural radioactive isotopes as well as gamma-rays induced in subsurface by galactic cosmic rays. When measuring from celestial body's surface, statistics and amount of detected elements can be dramatically increased with active methods, where soil exposed to artificial flux of particles. One good example is the Russian Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument onboard Martian Science Laboratory mission (Curiosity rover) developed in 2005-2011. It is the first active neutron spectrometer flown to another planet as part of a landed mission to investigate subsurface water distribution and which has now successfully operated for more than two years on the Martian surface. Presentation describes a number of space instruments for different landers and rovers being developed in Russian Space Research Institute for studying Moon and Mars, as well as method of active neutron and gamma spectrometry overview.

  6. Gamma ray spectra from targets irradiated by picosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, Uri; Chen, Hui; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.

    2011-09-01

    Photon spectra in the energy range 60 keV to 1 MeV were recorded from targets irradiated by the LLNL Titan and LLE EP picosecond lasers. The radiation consisted of K-shell radiation, bremsstrahlung radiation from MeV electrons, and preliminary evidence for 511 keV positron annihilation radiation. The spectra were recorded by two instruments, an energy-dispersive CCD detector with a CsI phosphor coating that operated in the single-hit per pixel mode and was absolutely calibrated using a Cs-137 662 keV source, and a wavelength-dispersive Cauchois type spectrometer employing a curved Ge(220) transmission crystal that operated in the first and second diffraction orders with high spectral resolution. The calibrated photon energy distributions from Au, Eu, and Al targets are compared to the energetic electron distributions emerging from the targets.

  7. Broad-Band Model Spectra of Gamma-Ray Emission from Millisecond Pulsars

    E-print Network

    Tomasz Bulik; Bronislaw Rudak

    1998-10-01

    We present spectra of pulsed gamma-ray emission expected from millisecond pulsars within the framework of polar-cap models. The spectra are a superposition of three components due to curvature (CR), synchrotron (SR), and Compton upscattering (ICS) processes. The CR component dominates below $100 $GeV and the ICS component exhibits a peak at $\\sim 1 $TeV. The CR component should be observable from J0437-4715 with the next generation gamma-ray telescopes, like e.g. GLAST.

  8. The gamma-ray spectra of halocarbons in positron-electron annihilation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. G.; Zhu, Y. H.; Liu, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The gamma-ray spectra of the positron annihilation process in methane CH4 and its fully substituent halocarbons CF4, CCl4, and CBr4 have been studied. The theoretical predictions of the inner valence electrons agree well with the experimental measurements for all these molecules. That the outermost s electrons in carbon or halogen atoms dominate the gamma-ray spectra has been confirmed for the first time. The positrophilic site has also been found in these molecules and understanding of annihilation processes in molecules has been enhanced.

  9. Energy calibration of gamma spectra in plastic scintillators using Compton kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siciliano, E. R.; Ely, J. H.; Kouzes, R. T.; Schweppe, J. E.; Strachan, D. M.; Yokuda, S. T.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a simple and practicable method for assigning energy values to gamma-ray pulse-height distributions measured with polyvinyl toluene (PVT) based detectors. It is based upon the characteristic shape of simulated spectra in the region of maximum energy deposition resulting from a single Compton scattering. The validity of this method is demonstrated by applying it to a set of measured NaI(Tl) spectra, and comparing those results to the standard photopeak method of calibrating the same spectra. The method is then applied to a set of measured PVT spectra. It can now be applied to calibration of fielded PVT detectors using two selected gamma-ray sources, which was the initial motivation for this study.

  10. Consistency of time dilation in temporal profiles and spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriss, J. P.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Bonnell, J. T.; Scargle, J. D.; Davis, S. P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances-a possibility suggested by their isotropic distribution and spatial inhomogeneity-then the temporal profiles and spectra of more distant sources will be time dilated compared to those of relatively nearby sources. Analyses of bright and dim Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) gamma-ray bursts yield a relative time-dilation factor of 2.3 on timescales of pulses and event durations. We redshift the spectra of time intervals near the intensity peaks of the bright sample on a trial grid and compare with spectra of the dim sample. A redshift factor of order two-with wide latitude permitted-brings the spectra of the two brightness groups into alignment. Thus there is coarse agreement with the time-dilation factor found in the temporal domain.

  11. Combinatorial Approach for Large-scale Identification of Linked Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectra*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Anania, Veronica G.; Knott, Jeff; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R.; Bourne, Philip E.; Bandeira, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry has recently been shown to constitute a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions and elucidating the structure of large protein complexes. However, computational methods for interpreting the complex MS/MS spectra from linked peptides are still in their infancy, making the high-throughput application of this approach largely impractical. Because of the lack of large annotated datasets, most current approaches do not capture the specific fragmentation patterns of linked peptides and therefore are not optimal for the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here we propose a generic approach to address this problem and demonstrate it using disulfide-bridged peptide libraries to (i) efficiently generate large mass spectral reference data for linked peptides at a low cost and (ii) automatically train an algorithm that can efficiently and accurately identify linked peptides from MS/MS spectra. We show that using this approach we were able to identify thousands of MS/MS spectra from disulfide-bridged peptides through comparison with proteome-scale sequence databases and significantly improve the sensitivity of cross-linked peptide identification. This allowed us to identify 60% more direct pairwise interactions between the protein subunits in the 20S proteasome complex than existing tools on cross-linking studies of the proteasome complexes. The basic framework of this approach and the MS/MS reference dataset generated should be valuable resources for the future development of new tools for the identification of linked peptides. PMID:24493012

  12. Intergalactic magnetic field spectra from diffuse gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenlei; Chowdhury, Borun D.; Ferrer, Francesc; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2015-07-01

    Non-vanishing parity-odd correlators of gamma-ray arrival directions observed by Fermi-LAT indicate the existence of a helical intergalactic magnetic field with strength B ˜ 10-14 G on ˜10 Mpc scales. We successfully test this hypothesis using more stringent cuts of the data, Monte Carlo simulations with Fermi-LAT time exposure information, separate analyses for the Northern and Southern galactic hemispheres, and confirm predictions made in Tashiro & Vachaspati. With some further technical assumptions, we show how to reconstruct the magnetic helicity spectrum from the parity-odd correlators.

  13. Intergalactic magnetic field spectra from diffuse gamma rays

    E-print Network

    Wenlei Chen; Borun D. Chowdhury; Francesc Ferrer; Hiroyuki Tashiro; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2014-12-10

    Non-vanishing parity-odd correlators of gamma ray arrival directions observed by Fermi-LAT indicate the existence of a helical intergalactic magnetic field (Tashiro et al.2013). We successfully test this hypothesis using more stringent cuts of the data, Monte Carlo simulations with Fermi-LAT time exposure information, separate analyses for the northern and southern galactic hemispheres, and confirm predictions made in Tashiro & Vachaspati (2014). With some further technical assumptions, we show how to reconstruct the magnetic helicity spectrum from the parity-odd correlators.

  14. An iron absorption model of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.; Kargatis, Vincent E.

    1994-01-01

    Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibit deficits of X-rays below approximately 200 keV. Here we consider a spectral model in which the burst source is shielded by an optically thick layer of circumburster material (CBM) rich in iron-group elements whose photoelectric absorption opacity exceeds the Thomson opacity below approximately 120 keV. For power-law distributions of absorption depths along the lines of sight the absorbed spectrum can indeed mimic the typial GRB spectrum. This model predicts that (a) the spectrum should evolve monotonically from hard to soft during each energy release, which is observed in most bursts, especially in fast rise exponential decay bursts; (b) Fe spectral features near 7 keV may be present in some bursts; and (c) the ratio of burst distances to the CBM and to Earth should be approximately 10(exp -11) if the spectral evolution is purely due to Fe stripping by the photons.

  15. Energy Calibration of Gamma Spectra in Plastic Scintillators using Compton Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.; Strachan, Denis M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a simple and practicable method for assigning energy values to gamma-ray pulse-height distributions measured with polyvinyl toluene based detectors. It is based upon the characteristic shape of the spectrum in the region of maximum energy deposition resulting from a single Compton scattering. The validity of this method is first demonstrated by applying it to a set of NaI(Tl) spectra, and comparing those results to the standard photo-peak method of calibrating the same spectra. The method is then applied to a set of polyvinyl toluene derived spectra.

  16. Study of total gamma spectra correlation for extending identification range over photopeak analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, A. W.

    1984-03-01

    This report shows that gamma spectra identification by total flux correlation can be used to extend identification range over photo peak methods. Identification was based on two decision rules both employing cross-correlation coefficients. The largest coefficient (first decision rule) matched the unknown spectra with the correct source thirty-seven out of thirty-eight trials. The proposed likelihood function (second decision rule) had a success rate of thirty-five out of thirty-eight trials. These results were based on spectra generated by the transport code, Morse.

  17. An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

    2014-10-01

    AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

  18. Fluence Evaluations For Applications of In Situ Gamma-Ray Spectrometry in Non-Flat Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Kevin M.

    1999-02-28

    Evaluations of gamma-ray fluence are made for source geometries that depart from the flat ground geometry that is used in standard applications of in situ spectrometry. Geometries considered include uniform source distributions for soil mounds on top of flat terrain, cylindrical wells, and rectangular trenches. The results indicate that scaling the standard fluence values for flat terrain by the ratio of solid angle subtended by the soil to 2? leads to fluence estimates that are accurate to within a few percent. Practical applications of in situ spectrometry in non-flat terrain also appears to be simplified by the fact that the angular correction factor for a typical coaxial detector in these geometries may typically be about the same as that computed for flat ground.

  19. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry in the environment using dose rate spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Hee-Yeoul; Lee, Wanno; Kang, Mun Ja; Park, Sang Tae

    2016-02-01

    In order to expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, in situ gamma-ray spectrometry was first conducted at a height of 1 m above the ground to calculate the ambient dose rate and individual dose rate at that height, as well as the radioactivity in the soil layer for the detected gamma nuclides from the dose rate spectroscopy. The reliable results could be obtained by introducing the angular correction factor to correct the G-factor with respect to incident photons distributed in a certain range of angles. The intercomparison results of radioactivity using ISOCS software, an analysis of a sample taken from the soil around a detector, and dose rate spectroscopy had a difference of <20% for 214Pb, 214Bi, 228Ac, 212Bi, 208Tl, and 40K, except for 212Pb with low-energy photons, that is, <300 keV. In addition, the drawback of using dose rate spectroscopy, that is, all gamma rays from a nuclide should be identified to accurately assess the individual dose rate, was overcome by adopting the concept of contribution ratio of the key gamma ray to the individual dose rate of a nuclide, so that it could be accurately calculated by identifying only a key gamma ray from a nuclide.

  20. Decomposition of the laboratory gamma irradiation component of angular ESR spectra of fossil tooth enamel fragments

    E-print Network

    Bodin, Thomas

    Decomposition of the laboratory gamma irradiation component of angular ESR spectra of fossil tooth Enamel fragment COÃ? 2 radicals a b s t r a c t Spectrum decomposition of the angular measurements follows our earlier studies on the spectrum decomposition of fossil tooth enamel fragments (Joannes

  1. Assay for uranium and determination of disequilibrium by means of in situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Allan B.; Moxham, Robert M.; Senftle, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two sealed sondes, using germanium gamma-ray detectors cooled by melting propane, have been field tested to depths of 79 m in water-filled boreholes at the Pawnee Uranium Mine in Bee Co., Texas. When, used as total-count devices, the sondes are comparable in logging speed and counting rate with conventional scintillation detectors for locating zones of high radioactivity. When used with a multichannel analyzer, the sondes are detectors with such high resolution that individual lines from the complex spectra of the uranium and thorium series can be distinguished. Gamma rays from each group of the uranium series can be measured in ore zones permitting determination of the state of equilibrium at each measurement point. Series of 10-minute spectra taken at 0.3- to 0.5-m intervals in several holes showed zones where maxima from the uranium group and from the 222Rn group were displaced relative to each other. Apparent excesses of 230Th at some locations suggest that uranium-group concentrations at those locations were severalfold greater some tens of kiloyears, ago. At the current state of development a 10-minute count yields a sensitivity of about 80 ppm U308. Data reduction could in practice be accomplished in about 5 minutes. The result is practically unaffected by disequilibrium or radon contamination. In comparison with core assay, high-resolution spectrometry samples a larger volume; avoids problems due to incomplete core recovery, loss of friable material to drilling fluids, and errors in depth and marking; and permits use of less expensive drilling methods. Because gamma rays from the radionuclides are accumulated simultaneously, it also avoids the problems inherent in trying to correlate logs made in separate runs with different equipment. Continuous-motion delayed-gamma activation by a 163-?g 252Cf neutron source attached to the sonde yielded poor sensitivity. A better neutron-activation method, in which the sonde is moved in steps so as to place the detector at the previous activation point, could not be evaluated because of equipment failure.

  2. Effects of axion-photon mixing on gamma-ray spectra from magnetized astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Sigl, Guenter

    2007-12-15

    Astrophysical {gamma}-ray sources come in a variety of sizes and magnetizations. We deduce general conditions under which {gamma}-ray spectra from such sources would be significantly affected by axion-photon mixing. We show that, depending on strength and coherence of the magnetic field, axion couplings down to {approx}(10{sup 13}GeV){sup -1} can give rise to significant axion-photon conversions in the environment of accreting massive black holes. Resonances can occur between the axion mass term and the plasma frequency term as well as between the plasma frequency term and the vacuum Cotton-Mouton shift. Both resonances and nonresonant transitions could induce detectable features or even strong suppressions in finite energy intervals of {gamma}-ray spectra from active galactic nuclei. Such effects can occur at keV to TeV energies for couplings that are currently allowed by all experimental constraints.

  3. An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

    1989-09-07

    A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The program titled IAEAPU consists of three separate applications: (1) a data-transfer application for transferring spectral data from a CICERO multichannel analyzer to a binary data file, (2) a data-analysis application to analyze plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percents of total plutonium, (3) and a data-quality assurance application to check spectral data for proper data-acquisition setup and performance. Volume 2 describes the operations of these applications and the installation and maintenance of the software.

  4. An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

    1989-09-07

    A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The program titled IAEAPU consists of three separate applications: a data-transfer application for transferring spectral data from a CICERO multichannel analyzer to a binary data file, a data-analysis application to analyze plutonium gamma-ray spectra, for plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percents of total plutonium, and a data-quality assurance application to check spectral data for proper data-acquisition setup and performance. Volume 3 contains the software listings for these applications.

  5. Measurement of uranium series radionuclides in rock and groundwater at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia, by gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Keiichi

    1995-12-31

    Gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction was developed to measure low energy gamma rays emitted by uranium and actinium series radionuclides in rock samples and groundwater residues collected at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia. Thin samples were prepared to minimize the self-absorption by uranium in the samples. The present method gave standard deviations of 0.9 to 18% for the measurements of concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides. The concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th and {sup 235}U measured by gamma spectrometry were compared with those by alpha spectrometry that requires a complicated chemical separation procedure. The results obtained by both methods were in fairly good agreement, and it was found that the gamma spectrometry is applicable to rock and groundwater samples having uranium content sup to 8.1% (10{sup 3} B1/g) and 3 Bq/l of {sup 238}U, respectively. The detection limits were calculated to be of the order of 10{sup {minus}2} Bq/g for rock samples and 10{sup {minus}1} Bq/l for groundwater samples. The concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides can be determined precisely in these samples using gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction.

  6. Nuclear chemistry of returned lunar samples: Nuclide analysis by gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelley, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Primordial and cosmogenic radionuclide concentrations are determined nondestructively by gamma-ray spectrometry in soil and rock samples from the returned Apollo 17 sample collection from Taurus-Littrow and Descartes. Geochemical evidence in support of field geology speculation concerning layering of the subfloor basalt flows is demonstrated along with a possible correlation of magmatic fractionation of K/U as a function of depth. The pattern of radionuclide concentrations observed in these samples is distinct due to proton bombardment by the intense solar flares of August 4-9, 1972. Such radionuclide determinations are used in determining lunar sample orientation and characterizing solar flare activity.

  7. Thorium determination in intercomparison samples and in some Romanian building materials by gamma ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pantelica, A; Georgescu, I I; Murariu-Magureanu, M D; Margaritescu, I; Cincu, E

    2001-01-01

    Thorium content in zircon sand, thorium ore and a thorium liquid sample (EU Laboratories Network Intercomparison), as well as in some Romanian building materials: sand, wood, tufa, asbestos-cement. cement mill dust, coal fly ash, bricks, and tile (28 samples) was deterimined by gamma ray spectrometry. For the building materials, 226Ra, 40K and 137Cs specific activities were also measured. The results were compared with the Romanian legal norms concerning the highest admissible levels for 232Th, 226Ra. and 40K radioactivity. and to Th, U, and K concentration values previously determined in our laboratory on similar types of samples. PMID:11843363

  8. Determination of 226Ra Activity Using Gamma Spectrometry with 226Ra-222Rn Disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Wang, Shilian; Zhao, Yungang; Liu, Shujiang; Fan, Yuanqing; Shi, Jianfang; Jia, Huaimao; Yu, Weixiang

    2015-08-01

    Radium-226 (Ra) activity is normally determined indirectly by gamma spectrometry, in particular by measuring the characteristic ?-ray emitted from its progeny (Pb and Bi) when Ra-Rn secular equilibrium is reached. This article describes a measurement method involving the measurement of Pb ingrowth. The activity of Ra determined by this method agrees with that measured after Ra-Rn equilibrium. The method of Pb ingrowth allows rapid and sufficiently accurate determination of Ra activity without the need to wait for Ra-Rn equilibrium. PMID:26107431

  9. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul; Lit, Peter

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were calculated. From the scanning data, locations with observed Cs-137 ratios exceeding six standard deviations above the mean ratio were mapped in high resolution [2]. Field teams returned to those locations to collect static count measurements using the same detection systems. Soil surface samples were collected at 30 locations and analyzed for Cs-137. An exponential correlation was identified between Cs-137 concentrations in surface soil and field-scanned Cs-137 ratios. The data indicate field minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of Cs-137 at 0.02 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g) or lower depending on contaminant distribution in soil. (authors)

  10. Distribution of iron&titanium on the lunar surface from lunar prospector gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Elphic, R. C.; Gasnault, O. M.; Maurice, S.; Moore, K. R.; Binder, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma ray pulse height spectra acquired by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) contain information on the abundance of major elements in the lunar surface, including O, Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, and Th. With the exception of Th and K, prompt gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with surface materials are used to determine elemental abundance. Most of these gamma rays are produced by inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and by neutron capture. The production of neutron-induced gamma rays reaches a maximum deep below the surface (e.g. {approx}140 g/cm{sup 2} for inelastic scattering and {approx}50 g/cm{sup 2} for capture). Consequently, gamma rays sense the bulk composition of lunar materials, in contrast to optical methods [e.g. Clementine Spectral Reflectance (CSR)], which only sample the top few microns. Because most of the gamma rays are produced deep beneath the surface, few escape unscattered and the continuum of scattered gamma rays dominates the spectrum. In addition, due to the resolution of the spectrometer, there are few well-isolated peaks and peak fitting algorithms must be used to deconvolve the spectrum in order to determine the contribution of individual elements.

  11. Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shoji, M; Hamajima, Y; Takatsuka, K; Honoki, H; Nakajima, T; Kondo, T; Nakanishi, T

    2001-08-01

    A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium reagent was developed by measuring and analyzing the gamma-ray spectra of some reagents with no standard source. The counting rates (R) of photoelectric peaks of gamma-rays from nuclides with the same radioactivity divided by their emission probability (B) are expressed as a function of gamma-ray energy. The radioactivities of 234Th and 234mPa and 21.72 times that of 235U are equal to the radioactivity of 235U in natural uranium. Therefore, the plot of 21.72-fold R/B for 235U should be on a curve fitted to the points for 234Th and 234mPa in natural uranium. Depleted uranium with a 235U isotopic composition of less than 0.68% could be discriminated from natural uranium in the case of a reagent containing 4.0 g of uranium. PMID:11393763

  13. ON WEAK REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2012-05-20

    Line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays provide a natural explanation of the hard gamma-ray spectra of distant blazars, which are believed to be capable of producing both gamma rays and cosmic rays. For sources with redshifts z {approx}> 0.1, secondary gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray interactions with background photons close to an observer can dominate over primary gamma rays originating at the source. The transition from one component to another is accompanied by a change in the spectral index depending on the source redshift. We present theoretical predictions and show that they agree with the data from Fermi Large Area Telescope. This agreement, combined with the spectral data from Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, provides evidence of cosmic-ray acceleration by active galactic nuclei and opens new opportunities for studying photon backgrounds and intergalactic magnetic fields.

  14. Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

  15. Anomaly Detection in Gamma-Ray Vehicle Spectra with Principal Components Analysis and Mahalanobis Distances

    SciTech Connect

    Tardiff, Mark F.; Runkle, Robert C.; Anderson, K. K.; Smith, L. E.

    2006-01-23

    The goal of primary radiation monitoring in support of routine screening and emergency response is to detect characteristics in vehicle radiation signatures that indicate the presence of potential threats. Two conceptual approaches to analyzing gamma-ray spectra for threat detection are isotope identification and anomaly detection. While isotope identification is the time-honored method, an emerging technique is anomaly detection that uses benign vehicle gamma ray signatures to define an expectation of the radiation signature for vehicles that do not pose a threat. Newly acquired spectra are then compared to this expectation using statistical criteria that reflect acceptable false alarm rates and probabilities of detection. The gamma-ray spectra analyzed here were collected at a U.S. land Port of Entry (POE) using a NaI-based radiation portal monitor (RPM). The raw data were analyzed to develop a benign vehicle expectation by decimating the original pulse-height channels to 35 energy bins, extracting composite variables via principal components analysis (PCA), and estimating statistically weighted distances from the mean vehicle spectrum with the mahalanobis distance (MD) metric. This paper reviews the methods used to establish the anomaly identification criteria and presents a systematic analysis of the response of the combined PCA and MD algorithm to modeled mono-energetic gamma-ray sources.

  16. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-Background Gamma Ray Spectrometry with an Artificial Overburden

    E-print Network

    Holger Gastrich; Claus Gößling; Reiner Klingenberg; Kevin Kröninger; Till Neddermann; Christian Nitsch; Thomas Quante; Kai Zuber

    2015-12-06

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors used for low-background gamma ray spectrometry are usually operated under either a fairly low overburden of the order of one meter of water equivalent (mw.e.) or a high overburden of the order of 100mw.e. or more, e.g. in specialized underground laboratories. The Dortmund Low Background Facility (DLB) combines the advantages of both approaches. The artificial overburden of 10mw.e. already shields the hadronic component of cosmic rays. The inner shielding, featuring a state-of-the-art neutron shielding and an active muon veto, enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry at an easy-accessible location at the campus of the Technische Universit\\"at Dortmund. The integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV is 2.528+-0.004counts/kg/minute. This enables activity measurements of primordial radionuclides in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time.

  17. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-Background Gamma Ray Spectrometry with an Artificial Overburden

    E-print Network

    Gastrich, Holger; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kröninger, Kevin; Neddermann, Till; Nitsch, Christian; Quante, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2015-01-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors used for low-background gamma ray spectrometry are usually operated under either a fairly low overburden of the order of one meter of water equivalent (mw.e.) or a high overburden of the order of 100mw.e. or more, e.g. in specialized underground laboratories. The Dortmund Low Background Facility (DLB) combines the advantages of both approaches. The artificial overburden of 10mw.e. already shields the hadronic component of cosmic rays. The inner shielding, featuring a state-of-the-art neutron shielding and an active muon veto, enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry at an easy-accessible location at the campus of the Technische Universit\\"at Dortmund. The integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV is 2.528+-0.004counts/kg/minute. This enables activity measurements of primordial radionuclides in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time.

  18. Thermal-neutron-capture prompt-gamma emission spectra of representative coals. [1. 5 to 11 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C L; Olson, I K

    1981-12-01

    Prompt gamma ray emission spectra have been calculated from 1.5 to 11 MeV for a wide range of coal compositions exposed to a thermal neutron flux. These include contributions to the spectra from all of the major and minor elements present in the coals. Characteristics of the spectra are discussed and correlated with the coal compositions.

  19. Characteristics of raindrop spectra as normalized gamma distribution from a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanvir; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; Thurai, Merhala; Han, Dawei

    2012-05-01

    The raindrop spectra observed in a precipitation system is a complex phenomenon that can help to explain the underlying physical processes of rainfall. This paper explores the characteristics of raindrop spectra in terms of drop size distributions (DSD) using seven years of Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer data within the mid-latitude UK region climatology. A total of 162,415 one-minute "filtered" raindrop spectra obtained from the disdrometer are fitted into a normalized gamma DSD model describing DSDs by the concentration parameter (Nw), the drop diameter (Dm and D0), and the shape parameter (?). The results show that the rain rates retrieved from the normalized gamma DSD model are in good agreement with the disdrometer measured rain rates, implying the appropriateness of the raindrop spectra as normalized gamma distributions. The DSD characteristics are studied in different seasonal ("cold" and "warm"), atmospheric ("dry" and "wet") as well as rain type ("stratiform" and "convective") contexts in a long-term perspective. It has been revealed that the normalized gamma DSD parameters are very sensitive to the rain intensities. The mass weighted mean drop diameter Dm clearly increases exponentially with respect to the rain intensities. Variation of the DSDs in different contexts is also exposed reflecting seasonal, atmospheric and rain type consequence on raindrop spectra. Particularly, the scatterplot between the concentration parameter log10Nw and the median drop diameter D0 exhibits clear separation index between stratiform and convective DSDs. There is a large difference in averaged mass weighted mean drop diameters among stratiform and convective segments (stratiform < Dm> = 0.988 mm versus convective < Dm> = 1.99 mm). The DSD inconsistency in different contexts have been further examined in terms of the Z-R relationships (Z = aRb) variability. Additionally, 10 selected events taken place during the study period are also investigated, in which each of the events has shown unique DSD characteristics.

  20. Inclusive gamma-ray spectra from psi/3095/ and psi-prime/3684/ decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddick, C. J.; Burnett, T. H.; Masek, G. E.; Miller, E. S.; Smith, J. G.; Stronski, J. P.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vernon, W.; Badtke, D. H.; Barnett, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inclusive gamma-ray experiments were carried out in a e(+)e(-) colliding-beam apparatus with NaI(Tl) arrays as detectors. The inclusive gamma-ray spectra, after cosmic-ray background subtraction, are shown as histograms for the decays of the psi(3095) and psi-prime(3684). The psi spectrum has no significant narrow structure, while the psi-prime spectrum shows at least four peaks. Three major radiative decays of the psi-prime(3684) are found, and their respective branching fractions are computed.

  1. Gamma-ray and neutron leakage spectra calculated for unshieled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, J.

    1990-05-01

    The spectra of neutrons and gamma rays escaping from unshielded reactors have been calculated for a number of simplified cases. Such spectra are important in connection with reactors operating in space orbit around the earth, which would normally have little or no heavy shielding. Reactors in space, such as the Soviet RORSAT spacecraft. Knowledge of the characteristics of their leakage spectra may be useful in understanding or minimizing such interference. The Monte Carlo Neutron-Photon (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos has been used in these calculations. In the cases considered here the critical assembly is assumed to have spherically symmetrical geometry, with a central core of fissionable material surrounded by one or more shells of other material. The outer shells considered include beryllium, beryllium oxide, sodium, potassium, lithium, lithium hydride, and iron. The results obtained, presented as graphs, show that a number of materials that may be used in space reactors should lead to distinctive gamma-ray and neutron leakage spectra. Measurements of such spectra might well be useful in characterizing an unknown reactor type. 16 refs., 33 figs.

  2. Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B to K pi pi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B {yields} K{pi}{pi}{gamma} in the range m{sub K{pi}{pi}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. They reconstruct four final states: K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}, and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, where K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Using 232 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, they measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{gamma}) = (2.95 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.20(syst)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.07 {+-} 0.22(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}) = (1.85 {+-} 0.21(stat.) {+-} 0.12(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) = (4.56 {+-} 0.42(stat.) {+-} 0.31(syst.)) x 10{sup -5}.

  3. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  4. Assessment of calibration parameters for an aerial gamma spectrometry system using Monte-Carlo technique.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, P; Raman, Anand; Sharma, D N

    2002-04-01

    During a radiation emergency subsequent to a nuclear accident or weapon fallout, quick assessment of the ground contamination and the resulting exposure is of prime importance in planning and execution of effective counter measures. For an online assessment of ground contamination, it is essential to calibrate the detector system for several parameters viz. the source energy, source deployment matrix, the flight altitude and position above the contaminated surface. This article discusses the methodology to predict all the necessary parameters like photon fluence at various altitudes, the photo-peak counts in different energy windows, Air to Ground Correlation Factors IAGCF) and the dose rate at any height due to air scattered gamma ray photons. The methodology includes generation of theoretically simulated gamma spectra at a required detector position for a given source distribution on the ground using Monte-Carlo method provided by general purpose coupled neutron/photon transport code (MCNP CCC-200). Thus generated gamma spectra are analyzed to arrive at the required parameters mentioned above. PMID:15900666

  5. Measurements of the Martian Gamma/Neutron Spectra with MSL/RAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Ehresmann, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Reitz, G.; Brinza, D.; Weigle, E.; Boettcher, S.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Boehm, E.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Kortmann, O.

    2013-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory's rover curiosity measures the energetic charged and neutral particle spectra and the radiation dose rate on the Martian surface. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly. Their measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first measurements of the Martian gamma/neutron spectra and compare them to theoretical predictions. We find that the shape of the gamma spectrum is very similar to the predicted one, but with a ~50% higher intensity. The measured neutron spectrum agrees well with prediction up to ~100 MeV, but shows a considerably increased intensity for higher energies. The measured neutron spectrum translates into a radiation dose rate of 25 ?Gy/day and a dose equivalent rate of 106 ?Sv/day. This corresponds to 10% of the total surface dose rate, and 15% of the biological relevant surface dose equivalent rate on Mars. Measuring the Martian neutron spectra is an essential step for determining the mutagenic influences to past or present life at or beneath the Martian surface as well as the radiation hazard for future human exploration, including the shielding design of a potential habitat. The contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent increases considerably with shielding thickness, so our measurements provide an important figure to mitigate cancer risk.

  6. The 124Sb activity standardization by gamma spectrometry for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, M. C. M.; Iwahara, A.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; da Silva, R. L.

    2010-07-01

    This work describes a metrological activity determination of 124Sb, which can be used as radiotracer, applying gamma spectrometry methods with hyper pure germanium detector and efficiency curves. This isotope with good activity and high radionuclidic purity is employed in the form of meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) or sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) to treat leishmaniasis. 124Sb is also applied in animal organ distribution studies to solve some questions in pharmacology. 124Sb decays by ?-emission and it produces several photons (X and gamma rays) with energy varying from 27 to 2700 keV. Efficiency curves to measure point 124Sb solid sources were obtained from a 166mHo standard that is a multi-gamma reference source. These curves depend on radiation energy, sample geometry, photon attenuation, dead time and sample-detector position. Results for activity determination of 124Sb samples using efficiency curves and a high purity coaxial germanium detector were consistent in different counting geometries. Also uncertainties of about 2% ( k=2) were obtained.

  7. Cosmic veto gamma-spectrometry for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, J. L.; Davies, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is supported by a global network of monitoring stations that perform high-resolution gamma-spectrometry on air filter samples for the identification of 85 radionuclides. At the UK CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory (GBL15), a novel cosmic veto gamma-spectrometer has been developed to improve the sensitivity of station measurements, providing a mean background reduction of 80.8% with mean MDA improvements of 45.6%. The CTBT laboratory requirement for a 140Ba MDA is achievable after 1.5 days counting compared to 5-7 days using conventional systems. The system consists of plastic scintillation plates that detect coincident cosmic-ray interactions within an HPGe gamma-spectrometer using the Canberra LynxTM multi-channel analyser. The detector is remotely configurable using a TCP/IP interface and requires no dedicated coincidence electronics. It would be especially useful in preventing false-positives at remote station locations (e.g. Halley, Antarctica) where sample transfer to certified laboratories is logistically difficult. The improved sensitivity has been demonstrated for a CTBT air filter sample collected after the Fukushima incident.

  8. The spectra program library: A PC based system for gamma-ray spectra analysis and INAA data reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Grossman, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    A PC based system has been developed for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra and for the complete reduction of data from INAA experiments, including software to average the results from mulitple lines and multiple countings and to produce a final report of analysis. Graphics algorithms may be called for the analysis of complex spectral features, to compare the data from alternate photopeaks and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. A database of results for control samples can be used to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systemic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. The entire software library can be accessed through a user-friendly menu interface with internal help.

  9. Calculation of the total gamma-spectra of the fast neutrons capture in the isotopes 117,119Sn for the different parameters of cascade gamma-decay

    E-print Network

    A. M. Sukhovoj; V. A. Khitrov

    2008-09-15

    The gamma-spectra were calculated for the set of different level densities and radiative strength functions. The sufficiently precise reproduction of the experiment is impossible without taking into account the influence of the process of the nucleons Cooper pairs breaking on any nuclei cascade gamma-decay parameters.

  10. Summary of gamma spectrometry on local air samples from 1985--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1997-04-02

    This report summarizes the 1985--1995 results of low-level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis of high-volume air samples collected at the Aiken Airport, which is about 25 miles north of SRS. The author began analyzing these samples with new calibrations using the newly developed GRABGAM code in 1985. The air sample collections were terminated in 1995, as the facilities at the Aiken Airport were no longer available. Air sample measurements prior to 1985 were conducted with a different analysis system (and by others prior to 1984), and the data were not readily available. The report serves to closeout this phase of local NTS air sample studies, while documenting the capabilities and accomplishments. Hopefully, the information will guide other applications for this technology, both locally and elsewhere.

  11. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were unaffected by the presence of injected 137Cs contamination.

  12. Investigation of the soil-plant transfer of primordial radionuclides in tomatoes by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Köhler, M; Gleisberg, B; Niese, S

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents actual data from investigations of the soil-plant transfer of the primordial radionuclides 40K, 238U, 226Ra, 210Pb and 227Ac for tomatoes growing at soils from former uranium mining areas. The analysis were carried out using low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in a 47 m deep underground laboratory. For tomato fruits transfer factors of (0.0007 +/- 0.0006) for 235U, (0.0021 +/- 0.0017) for 226Ra, (0.0015 +/- 0.0009) for 210Pb and (0.0018 +/- 0.0012) for 227Ac were obtained. The investigation of the soil-plant transfer by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry is often limited by the Compton-continuum from the always present high-energy gamma-ray emitter 40K. PMID:10879862

  13. On the Shape of Pulse Spectra in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-print Network

    Felix Ryde; Roland Svensson

    1998-08-20

    The discovery (Liang & Kargatis 1996), that the peak energy of time-resolved spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses decays exponentially with fluence, is analytically shown to imply that the time-integrated photon number spectrum of a pulse should have a unique shape, given by an underlying E^-1 behavior. We also show that the asymptotic low energy normalization of the time-integrated spectrum is equal to the exponential decay constant. We study analytically how this general behavior is modified in more realistic situations and show that diversity is then introduced in the properties of time-integrated GRB pulse spectra. We argue that further diversity will occur in time-integrated multi-pulse (complex) GRB spectra. The total energy received per cm^2 is approximately the decay constant times the maximum peak energy of the pulse. Our analytical results connect the properties of the time-integrated pulse spectrum with those of the time-resolved spectra, and can thus be used when studying observed GRB pulse spectra. We illustrate with the bright burst GRB 910807 and comment on GRB 910525 and GRB 921207.

  14. Application of gamma-ray spectrometry in a NORM industry for its radiometrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantero, J.; Gázquez, M. J.; Hurtado, S.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2015-11-01

    Industrial activities involving Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are found among the most important industrial sectors worldwide as oil/gas facilities, metal production, phosphate Industry, zircon treatment, etc. being really significant the radioactive characterization of the materials involved in their production processes in order to assess the potential radiological risk for workers or natural environment. High resolution gamma spectrometry is a versatile non-destructive radiometric technique that makes simultaneous determination of several radionuclides possible with little sample preparation. However NORM samples cover a wide variety of densities and composition, as opposed to the standards used in gamma efficiency calibration, which are either water-based solutions or standard/reference sources of similar composition. For that reason self-absorption correction effects (especially in the low energy range) must be considered individually in every sample. In this work an experimental and a semi-empirical methodology of self-absorption correction were applied to NORM samples, and the obtained results compared critically, in order to establish the best practice in relation to the circumstances of an individual laboratory. This methodology was applied in samples coming from a TiO2 factory (NORM industry) located in the south-west of Spain where activity concentration of several radionuclides from the Uranium and Thorium series through the production process was measured. These results will be shown in this work.

  15. Examination of level density prescriptions in the interpretation of high energy gamma-ray spectra

    E-print Network

    Srijit Bhattacharya; Deepak Pandit; Balaram Dey; Debasish Mondal; S. Mukhopadhyay; Surajit Pal; A. De; S. R. Banerjee

    2014-11-05

    High energy $\\gamma$-ray spectra measured by our group involving the compound nuclei (CN) $^{63}$Cu at excitation energy ($E^*$) $\\sim$ 36 MeV with average angular momentum ($J$) = 12 - 17 $\\hbar$, $^{97}$Tc at $E^* \\sim$ 29 - 50 MeV with $J$ = 12 - 14 $\\hbar$, $^{113}$Sb at $E^*$ = 109 MeV and 121 MeV with $J$ = 49 - 59 $\\hbar$ and $^{201}$Tl at $E^*$ = 39.5, 47.5 MeV with $J$ = 18 - 24 $\\hbar$ have been analyzed utilizing the level density prescriptions of (i)Ignatyuk, Smirenkin and Tishin (IST), (ii)Budtz-Jorgensen and Knitter (BJK), and (iii) Kataria, Ramamurthy and Kapoor (KRK). These three prescriptions have been tested for correct statistical model description of high energy $\\gamma$-rays in the light of extracting the giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters at low excitation energy and spin where shell effects might play an important role as well as at high excitation energy where shell effects have melted. Interestingly, only the IST level density prescription could explain the high energy $\\gamma$-ray spectra with reasonable GDR parameters for all the four nuclei.

  16. Experimental and MCNP simulated gamma-ray spectra for the UNCOSS neutron-based explosive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleon, C.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Valkovic, V.

    2011-02-01

    In the frame of the FP7 UNCOSS project (Underwater Coastal Sea Surveyor), whose aim is to develop a neutron-based explosive detection system to identify unexploded ordnance (UXO) lying on the sea bottom, the choice of the gamma-ray detector is essential to reach the optimal performances. This paper presents comparative tests between the two candidates: NaI(Tl) and LaBr 3(Ce) detectors, in favour to the 3 in.×3 in. LaBr 3(Ce); thus, confirming the choice previously performed by numerical simulation because of its higher fast timing properties, spectral resolution, and efficiency per volume unit. The gamma-ray spectra produced by 14 MeV tagged neutron beams on the elements of interest (C, O, N, Al, Fe, Si, and Ca) have also been recorded with this detector in order to unfold the spectrum of the interrogated object into elementary contributions. A qualitative comparison with the gamma-ray spectra simulated with the MCNPX computer code and the ENDFB/VII.0 nuclear library has also been performed to validate the numerical model. An additional quantitative validation has been performed with an explosive-like material (ammonium acetate).

  17. Analyses of uranium and actinium gamma spectra: an application to measurements of environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    A system for the reduction of the complex gamma spectra of nuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series, tailored to calculation of line intensities, analyses of errors, and identification of nuclides is described. This system provides an efficient technique for characterizing contamination in the environs of uranium mines and mills. Identification of the nuclides and calculation of their concentrations require accurate knowledge of gamma energies and absolute quantum intensities. For some spectral lines, there are no reported measurements of absolute quantum intensities and in some cases where reports are available the measured intensities are not in agreement. In order to improve this data base, the spectra of gamma rays (of nuclides in the uranium and actinium series) with energies between 40 and 1400 keV were measured using high-resolution germanium detectors. A brief description of the spectroscopy system, computational algorithms for deconvolution, and methods of calibration for energy and efficiency, are described. The measured energies and absolute quantum intensities are compared with those reported in the literature.

  18. Efficiency transfer using the GEANT4 code of CERN for HPGe gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chagren, S; Tekaya, M Ben; Reguigui, N; Gharbi, F

    2016-01-01

    In this work we apply the GEANT4 code of CERN to calculate the peak efficiency in High Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry using three different procedures. The first is a direct calculation. The second corresponds to the usual case of efficiency transfer between two different configurations at constant emission energy assuming a reference point detection configuration and the third, a new procedure, consists on the transfer of the peak efficiency between two detection configurations emitting the gamma ray in different energies assuming a "virtual" reference point detection configuration. No pre-optimization of the detector geometrical characteristics was performed before the transfer to test the ability of the efficiency transfer to reduce the effect of the ignorance on their real magnitude on the quality of the transferred efficiency. The obtained and measured efficiencies were found in good agreement for the two investigated methods of efficiency transfer. The obtained agreement proves that Monte Carlo method and especially the GEANT4 code constitute an efficient tool to obtain accurate detection efficiency values. The second investigated efficiency transfer procedure is useful to calibrate the HPGe gamma detector for any emission energy value for a voluminous source using one point source detection efficiency emitting in a different energy as a reference efficiency. The calculations preformed in this work were applied to the measurement exercise of the EUROMET428 project. A measurement exercise where an evaluation of the full energy peak efficiencies in the energy range 60-2000keV for a typical coaxial p-type HpGe detector and several types of source configuration: point sources located at various distances from the detector and a cylindrical box containing three matrices was performed. PMID:26623928

  19. The Imprint of the Extragalactic Background Light in the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Schady, P.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Tramacere, A.; Nuss, E.; Greiner, J.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Rau, A.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Sanchez, D. A.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, ?ukasz; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.

    2012-11-01

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL is important to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z ˜ 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band.

  20. Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  1. The imprint of the extragalactic background light in the gamma-ray spectra of blazars.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Schady, P; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Domínguez, A; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Tramacere, A; Nuss, E; Greiner, J; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reyes, L C; Ritz, S; Rau, A; Romoli, C; Roth, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Sanchez, D A; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stawarz, ?ukasz; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M

    2012-11-30

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL is important to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z ? 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band. PMID:23118013

  2. The Imprint of the Extragalactic Background Light in the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Schady, P.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Guirec, S.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Perkins, J. S.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL isimportant to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z approx. 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band.

  3. Hints of the existence of axionlike particles from the gamma-ray spectra of cosmological sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, M. A.; Prada, F.; Paneque, D.; Bloom, E.; Dominguez, A.

    2009-06-15

    Axionlike particles (ALPs) are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields. This effect may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Here we carry out a detailed study that for the first time simultaneously considers in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. An efficient photon/axion mixing in the source always means an attenuation in the photon flux, whereas the mixing in the intergalactic medium may result in a decrement and/or enhancement of the photon flux, depending on the distance of the source and the energy considered. Interestingly, we find that decreasing the value of the intergalactic magnetic field strength, which decreases the probability for photon/axion mixing, could result in an increase of the expected photon flux at Earth if the source is far enough. We also find a 30% attenuation in the intensity spectrum of distant sources, which occurs at an energy that only depends on the properties of the ALPs and the intensity of the intergalactic magnetic field, and thus independent of the AGN source being observed. Moreover, we show that this mechanism can easily explain recent puzzles in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources, like the possible detection of TeV photons from 3C 66A (a source located at z=0.444) by MAGIC and VERITAS, which should not happen according to conventional models of photon propagation over cosmological distances. Another puzzle is the recent published lower limit to the extragalactic background light intensity at 3.6 {mu}m (which is almost twice larger as the previous one), which implies very hard spectra for some detected TeV gamma-ray sources located at z=0.1-0.2. The consequences that come from this work are testable with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments, namely Fermi (formerly known as GLAST) and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like CANGAROO, HESS, MAGIC, and VERITAS.

  4. Application of low-background gamma-ray spectrometry to monitor radioactivity in the environment and food.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Beach, S E; Haines, D K; Bradt, C J; Bari, A; Syed, U-F; Torres, M; Marrantino, J; Kitto, M E; Menia, T; Fielman, E

    2014-08-01

    The results are described of an upgrade of the low-background gamma-ray spectrometry laboratory at New York State Department of Health by acquiring sensitivity to low-energy gamma rays. Tuning of the spectrometer and its low-energy response characteristics are described. The spectrometer has been applied to monitor the environment by measuring aerosols and water in New York State contaminated by the 2011 Fukushima accident plume. In addition, the spectrometer has been used to monitor radioactivity in food by performing a study of cesium in Florida milk. PMID:24836905

  5. Facile access to 154Eu, a new reference source for calibration in gamma ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vimalnath, K V; Das, M K; Ananthakrishnan, M; Ramamoorthy, N

    2005-01-01

    Europium-154 can be obtained as a by-product from the large-scale production of Samarium-153 and possesses attractive features (t1/2 8.592 yr; Egamma 0.12-1.6 MeV) for use as a reference source similar to 152Eu (t1/2 13.516 yr; Egamma 0.12-1.4 MeV), which is the gold standard for calibration in gamma ray spectrometry. Thermal neutron irradiation of 5mg of 98% enriched 153Sm2O3 target in the reactor led to approximately 200 GBq 153Sm and 1.26 MBq 154Eu. A typical batch control sample of 153SmCl3 solution and final radiopharmaceutical product formulation of 153Sm-phosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP) pooled together contained about 20% of total yield, requiring post decay disposal of 153Sm as radioactive waste. Such spent solutions pooled on quarterly basis led to availing 756 kBq of 154Eu. The radioactivity content and radionuclide purity (approximately 82%) of the recovered 154Eu sample were envisaged as adequate to prepare reference sources for calibration of gamma ray spectrometers. At present, one batch of 153Sm is handled per month at our institution, with the possibility for weekly processing in future. Access to approximately 3.5 MBq of 154Eu on quarterly basis is envisaged, apart from obviating the need for instituting steps to tackle disposal of the long-lived 154Eu in the spent solution. Up to 60-120 units of 20-100 kBq of 154Eu reference sources per year could thus be available by the proposed strategy. PMID:15498680

  6. EPR spectra induced by gamma-irradiation of some dry medical herbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation-induced EPR spectra in some medical herbs are reported. The samples studied are: (i) leaves of nettle, common balm, peppermint and thyme; (ii) stalks of common balm, thyme, milfoil, yarrow and marigold; (iii) blossoms of yarrow and marigold; (iv) blossoms and leaves of hawthorn and tutsan; and (v) roots of common valerian, nettle, elecampane (black and white), restharrows and carlina. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak anisotropic singlet EPR line with effective g-value of 2.0050±0.0002. The radiation-induced spectra fall into three groups. EPR spectra of irradiated blossoms of yarrow and marigold, stalks of common balm, thyme, tutsan and yarrow as well as roots of common valerian, nettle and elecampane (black and white) show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum typical for irradiated plants. It is characterized by one intense central line with g=2.0050±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. EPR spectra of gamma-irradiated restharrows and carlina are complex. They may be represented by one triplet corresponding to the "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, one relatively intense singlet, situated in the center of the spectrum, and five weak additional satellite lines left and right to the center. The last spectrum was assigned as "carbohydrate-like" type. Only one intense EPR singlet with g=2.0048±0.0005 was recorded after irradiation of leaves of nettle and common balm. The lifetime of the radiation-induced EPR spectra was followed for a period of 3 months.

  7. Measurements of gamma radiation levels and spectra in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, B. T.; Brozek, K. P.; Angell, C. T.; Norman, E. B.

    2011-10-01

    Much of the radiation received by an average person is emitted by naturally-occurring radioactive isotopes from the thorium, actinium, and uranium decay series, or potassium. In this study, we have measured gamma radiation levels at various locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and the UC Berkeley campus from spectra taken using an ORTEC NOMAD portable data acquisition system and a large-volume coaxial HPGe detector. We have identified a large number of gamma rays originating from natural sources. The most noticeable isotopes are 214Bi, 40K, and 208Tl. We have observed variations in counting rates by factors of two to five between different locations due to differences in local conditions - such as building, concrete, grass, and soil compositions. In addition, in a number of outdoor locations, we have observed 604-, 662-, and 795-keV gamma rays from 134,137Cs, which we attribute to fallout from the recent Fukushima reactor accident. The implications of these results will be discussed. This work was supported in part by a grant from the U. S. Dept. of Homeland Security.

  8. The spectra and light curves of two gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, F. K.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Observations made by the Hard X-ray and Low Energy Gamma-Ray Experiment on board HEAO-1 of the spectra and light curves of two gamma-ray bursts for which localized arrival directions will become available are presented. The burst of October 20, 1977 is found to exhibit a fluence of 0.000031 + or - 0.000005 erg/sq cm over the energy range 0.135-2.05 MeV and a duration of 38.7 sec, while that of November 10, 1977 is found to have a fluence of 0.000021 + or - 0.000008 erg/sq cm between 0.125 and 3 MeV over 2.8 sec. The light curves of both bursts exhibit time fluctuations down to the limiting time resolution of the detectors. The spectrum of the October burst can be fit by a power law of index -1.93 + or -0.16, which is harder than any other gamma-burst spectrum yet reported. The spectrum of the second burst is softer (index -2.4 + or - 0.7), and is consistent with the upper index in the double power law fit to the burst of April 27, 1972.

  9. Using gamma ray spectrometry for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment in Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, S.; Ohtsuka, J.; Murakami, Y.; Ishiya, T.; Hamamoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    To seek the geological tracers of environmental radionuclide for fingerprinting sources of estuarine and coastal sediment, the gamma ray spectrometry was conducted for the soil and sediment samples collected from subcatchments, rivers, estuaries and coast in Mukawa and Sarugawa river watersheds and Mukawa coast, Hokkaido, northern Japan. Gamma ray spectrometry was conducted to determine the activities of environmental radionuclides associated with each soil and sediment samples using HP Ge well-type detector. Gamma ray spectrometry could determine 15 environmental radionuclides, including U-series, Th-series, cesium-137 and potassium-40. Lead-210 excess was also determined by subtracting the activities of Pb-214 from that of Pb-210. The Kruskal-Wallis H test was conducted to assess the ability of each tracer property to discriminate between surface soil samples from the categories divided by subcatchment, geological era and period, suggesting that more than 11 tracer properties were available. Subsequently, the stepwise discriminant function analysis was conducted to identify which combination of tracer properties provides the best composite fingerprint for differentiating source materials on the basis of subcatchment and geology source groups. This analysis suggested that the composite fingerprints of Pb-212, Ac-228 and K-40 can classify the geology into 6 groups based on rock type. Using these tracer properties, the contribution of rock to estuarine and coastal sediment can be evaluated with the multivariate sediment mixing model.

  10. Photon and neutrino spectra of time-dependent photospheric models of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, K.; Mészáros, P. E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu

    2013-09-01

    Thermal photons from the photosphere may be the primary source of the observed prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to produce the observed non-thermal spectra, some kind of dissipation mechanism near the photosphere is required. In this paper we numerically simulate the evolution of the photon spectrum in a relativistically expanding shell with a time-dependent numerical code. We consider two basic models. One is a leptonic model, where a dissipation mechanism heats the thermal electrons maintaining their high temperature. The other model involves a cascade process induced by pp(pn)-collisions which produce high-energy electrons, modify the thermal spectrum, and emit neutrinos. The qualitative properties of the photon spectra are mainly determined by the optical depth at which the dissipation mechanism sets in. Too large optical depths lead to a broad and curved spectrum contradicting the observations, while for optical depths smaller than unity the spectral hardness becomes softer than observed. A significant shift of the spectral peak energy to higher energies due to a large energy injection can lead to an overly broad spectral shape. We show ideal parameter ranges for which these models are able to reproduce the observed spectra. For the pn-collision model, the neutrino fluence in the 10–100 GeV range is well above the atmospheric neutrino fluence, but its detection is challenging for presently available detectors.

  11. The time evolution of GRB spectra by a precessing lighthouse Gamma Jet

    E-print Network

    D. Fargion; A. Salis

    1996-05-28

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) by a relativistic electron beam jet at GeV energies (emitted by a compact object as a NS, BH,...), a NSJ, onto thermal BBR photons (from a nearby stellar companion) may originate a collinear gamma jet (GJ). Due to the binary system interaction the GJ precession would blaze suddenly toward the observer leading to a GRB event. The internal GJ cone structure is ruled by relativistic kinematics into a concentric onion-like sequence of photon rings, the softer in the external boundaries, the harder in the inner cone. The pointing and the crossing of such different GJ photon rings to the detector lead to a GRB hardness spectra evolution nearly corresponding to most observed ones. Moreover expected time integral spectra are also comparable with known GRB spectra. The total energy input of tens of thousands of such NSJ in an extended galactic halo, mainly cosmic rays electrons, should be reflected into the recent observational evidence (COMPTEL) of a diffused relic extended halo. Evidences of such precessing jets are offered by the discover of galactic superluminal sources, recent HH jets, SN1987A outer rings, Hourglass Nebula, planetary Egg Nebula, GROJ1744-28 binary X-rays pulsar.

  12. Gamma-ray spectra and doses from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Most radiation safety guidelines in the nuclear industry are based on the data concerning the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Crucial to determining these guidelines is the radiation from the explosions. We have measured gamma-ray pulse-height distributions from an accurate replica of the Little Boy device used at Hiroshima, operated at low power levels near critical. The device was placed outdoors on a stand 4 m from the ground to minimize environmental effects. The power levels were based on a monitor detector calibrated very carefully in independent experiments. High-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with a germanium detector to identify the lines and to obtain line intensities. The 7631 to 7645 keV doublet from neutron capture in the heavy steel case was dominant. Low-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with bismuth-germanate detectors. We calculated flux spectra from these distributions using accurately measured detector response functions and efficiency curves. We then calculated dose-rate spectra from the flux spectra using a flux-to-dose-rate conversion procedure. The integral of each dose-rate spectrum gave an integral dose rate. The integral doses at 2 m ranged from 0.46 to 1.03 mrem per 10/sup 13/ fissions. The output of the Little Boy replica can be calculated with Monte Carlo codes. Comparison of our experimental spectra, line intensities, and integral doses can be used to verify these calculations at low power levels and give increased confidence to the calculated values from the explosion at Hiroshima. These calculations then can be used to establish better radiation safety guidelines. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Spectra of X-ray and Gamma-ray Bursts Produced by Stepping Lightning Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity. TGFs were serendipitously discovered by BATSE detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory originally launched to perform observations of celestial gamma-ray sources [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994]. These events have also been detected by the RHESSI satellite [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the AGILE satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010], and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010]. Moreover, measurements have correlated TGFs with initial development stages of normal polarity intra-cloud lightning that transports negative charge upward (+IC) [e.g, Lu et al., JGR, 116, A03316, 2011]. Photon spectra corresponding to well-established model of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. However, it has been suggested that high-potential +IC lightning leaders could produce a sufficient number of energetic electrons to explain TGFs [Celestin and Pasko, JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] and Xu et al. [GRL, 39, L08801, 2012] have shown that this mechanism could explain the TGF spectrum for lightning potentials higher than 100 MV. In addition to TGFs, X-ray bursts are produced by negative lightning leaders in association with stepping processes and are observed from the ground [Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L01803, 2005]. However, the energy spectrum of X-ray bursts from lightning is still poorly known, mainly due to the low fluence detected from the ground. In this work, we use Monte Carlo models to study the acceleration of runaway electrons in the electric field produced around lightning leader tip and the associated bremsstrahlung photon spectra observed by low-orbit satellites in the case of high potential +IC discharges and from the ground in the case of negative cloud-to-ground discharges. We particularly investigate the variability of the photon spectrum with the lightning electric potential.

  14. Analysis of gamma-irradiated melon, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della W M; Wong, Yiu Chung; Yao, Wai Yin

    2006-09-20

    Seeds of melon (Citrullus lanatus var. sp.), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), and sunflower (Heliantus annus) were gamma-irradiated at 1, 3, 5, and 10 kGy and analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) according to EN1787:2000 and EN1785:2003, respectively. Distinguishable triplet signals due to the presence of induced cellulose radicals were found at 2.0010-2.0047 g in the EPR spectra. The gamma-irradiated radiolytic markers of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (2-TCB) were identified in all irradiated seed samples. Both the free radicals and the alkylcyclobutanones were found to increase with irradiation dose. In general, linear relationships between the amount of radicals and irradiation dosage could be established. Studies at an ambient temperature (20-25 degrees C) in a humidity-controlled environment showed a complete disappearance of the cellulosic peaks for irradiated samples upon 60 days of storage. Such instability behavior was considered to render the usefulness of using EPR alone in the determination of irradiated seed samples. On the other hand, 2-DCB and 2-TCB were also found to decompose rapidly (>85% loss after 120 days of storage), but the radiolytic markers remained quantifiable after 120 days of postirradiation storage. These results suggest that GC-MS is a versatile and complimentary technique for the confirmation of irradiation treatment to seeds. PMID:16968077

  15. Performance of cerium-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG:Ce) scintillator in gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanowska, Joanna; Swiderski, Lukasz; Szczesniak, Tomasz; Sibczynski, Pawel; Moszynski, Marek; Grodzicka, Martyna; Kamada, Kei; Tsutsumi, Kousuke; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Performance of cerium-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG:Ce) scintillator in gamma-ray spectrometry has been investigated. The measurements of two samples of GAGG:Ce cover the tests of emission spectra (maximum of emission at about 530 nm), light output, non-proportionality, energy resolution, time resolution and decay time of light pulses. We compare the results with commonly known scintillators, such as NaI(Tl), LSO, LuAG etc. The results show that GAGG:Ce has a high light yield of about 33000 ph/MeV as measured with Hamamatsu S3590-18 Si PiN photodiode [1]. The total energy resolution for 662 keV gamma-rays from 137Cs source is equal to about 6%, whereas intrinsic resolution is equal to 5.2%. Additionally, we made basic measurements of photoelectron yield, non-proportionality and total energy resolution of small sample (5×5×5 mm3) of GAGG:Ce crystal coupled to Hamamatsu MPPC array (6×6 mm2). The results show that the performance of GAGG:Ce measured with the MPPC array are similar to those measured with the PMT.

  16. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter ? in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high ? flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  17. GRABGAM: A Gamma Analysis Code for Ultra-Low-Level HPGe SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1999-07-28

    The GRABGAM code has been developed for analysis of ultra-low-level HPGe gamma spectra. The code employs three different size filters for the peak search, where the largest filter provides best sensitivity for identifying low-level peaks and the smallest filter has the best resolution for distinguishing peaks within a multiplet. GRABGAM basically generates an integral probability F-function for each singlet or multiplet peak analysis, bypassing the usual peak fitting analysis for a differential f-function probability model. Because F is defined by the peak data, statistical limitations for peak fitting are avoided; however, the F-function does provide generic values for peak centroid, full width at half maximum, and tail that are consistent with a Gaussian formalism. GRABGAM has successfully analyzed over 10,000 customer samples, and it interfaces with a variety of supplementary codes for deriving detector efficiencies, backgrounds, and quality checks.

  18. A NEW METHDOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FISSILE MASS IN INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTING ITEMS WITH THE USE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    KANE,W.R.; VANIER,P.E.; ZUHOSKI,P.B.; LEMLEY,J.R.

    2000-07-16

    In the safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes measurements are required which give the quantity of fissile material in an accounting item, e.g., a standard container of plutonium or uranium oxide. Because of the complexity of modeling the absorption of gamma rays in high-Z materials, gamma-ray spectrometry is not customarily used for this purpose. Gamma-ray measurements can be used to determine the fissile mass when two conditions are met: (1) The material is in a standard container, and (2) The material is finely divided, or a solid item with a reproducible shape. The methodology consists of: (A) Measurement of the emitted gamma rays, and (B) Measurement of the transmission through the item of the high-energy gamma rays of Co-60 and Th-228. We have demonstrated that items containing nuclear materials possess a characteristic ''fingerprint'' of gamma rays which depends not only on the nuclear properties, but also on the mass, density, shape, etc.. The material's spectrum confirms its integrity, homogeneity, and volume as well. While there is attenuation of radiation from the interior, the residual radiation confirms the homogeneity of the material throughout the volume. Transmission measurements, where the attenuation depends almost entirely on Compton scattering, determine the material mass. With well-characterized standards, this methodology can provide an accurate measure of the contained fissile material.

  19. Neanderthal skeleton from Tabun: U-series data by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, H P; Simpson, J J; Stringer, C B

    1998-12-01

    The Neanderthal hominid Tabun C1, found in Israel by Garrod & Bate, was attributed to either layer B or C of their stratigraphic sequence. We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the 230Th/234U and 231Pa/235U ratios of two bones from this skeleton, the mandible and a femur. The ages calculated from these ratios depend on the uranium uptake history of the bones. Assuming a model of early U (EU) uptake the age of the Tabun C1 mandible is 34+/-5 ka. The EU age of the femur is 19+/-2 ka. The femur may have experienced continuous (linear) U uptake which would give an age of 33+/-4 ka, in agreement with the mandible's EU age, but implies marked inhomogeneity in U uptake history at the site. These new age estimates for the skeleton suggest that it was younger than deposits of layer C. This apparent age is less than those of other Neanderthals found in Israel, and distinctly younger than the ages of the Skhul and Qafzeh burials. This suggests that Neanderthals did not necessarily coexist with the earliest modern humans in the region. All of the more complete Neanderthal fossils from Israel are now dated to the cool period of the last glacial cycle, suggesting that Neanderthals may have arrived in this region as a result of the southward expansion of their habitable range. The young age determined for the Tabun skeleton would suggest that Neanderthals survived as late in the Levant as they did in Europe. PMID:9929173

  20. Correction factors to account for minor sample height variations in gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jod?owski, P.

    2007-09-01

    It often happens in gamma-ray spectrometry measurements that there is less sample material than required for the given measuring geometry. One approach to this problem is to stick to the original geometry, though a correction factor is to be introduced to account for the difference in the height of the sample material. This correction factor Ch is expressed as the ratio of spectrometer efficiency for the nominal sample height ?( h0) to that obtained for the actual height ?( h). The author determined the correction factor Ch for several radiation energies E, 81.0, 356.0, 661.7 and 1173.2 keV. Two measurement geometries were considered: a Marinelli beaker 710 cm 3 in volume, and a cylindrical sample 31.5 mm in height. The correction factors were obtained experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulation method for h falling within the range h0±8 mm. Ch values obtained by these two methods are consistent. For E?356 keV, Ch value almost does not depend on energy. Ch value varies linearly with d h. For Marinelli beaker for E?356 keV, the correction is 0.9% (1.0% for E=81 keV) for each millimeter of sample height change; for a cylindrical geometry the correction is 1.5% (1.7%). Monte Carlo method was further used to compute Ch values for several other cylindrical geometries. The lower the nominal height of the cylindrical samples, the more sensitive the method to sample height variations. The knowledge of the value Ch enables us to estimate the uncertainty of the measurements, associated with the sample height uncertainty.

  1. ON THE X-RAY SPECTRA OF ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA REPEATERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspi, V. M.; Boydstun, K.

    2010-02-20

    We revisit the apparent correlation between soft X-ray band photon index and spin-down rate {nu}-dot previously reported for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) by Marsden and White. Our analysis, improved thanks to new source discoveries, better spectral parameter measurements in previously known sources, and the requirement of source quiescence for parameter inclusion, shows evidence for the previously noted trend, although with greater scatter. This trend supports the twisted magnetosphere model of magnetars although the scatter suggests that factors other than {nu}-dot are also important. We also note possible correlations involving the spectra of AXPs and SGRs in the hard X-ray band. Specifically, the hard-band photon index shows a possible correlation with inferred {nu}-dot and B, as does the degree of spectral turnover. If the former trend is correct, then the hard-band photon index for AXP 1E 1048.1 - 5937 should be {approx}0-1. This may be testable with long integrations by the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, or by the upcoming focusing hard X-ray mission NuSTAR.

  2. Determination of the natural radioactivity in Qatarian building materials using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Al-Dosari, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Bukhari, S.; Matthews, M.; Regan, P. H.; Santawamaitre, T.

    2011-10-01

    This study is aimed at the determination of the activity concentrations of naturally occurring and technically enhanced levels of radiation in building materials used across the State of Qatar. Samples from a range of common building materials, including Qatarian cement, Saudi cement, white cement, sand and washed sand, have been analyzed, in addition to other samples of cement's raw materials and additives collected from the main suppliers in Qatar. In order to establish the activity concentrations associated with the 235,8U and 232Th natural decay chains and 40K, the samples have been studied using a high-resolution, low-background gamma-ray spectrometry set-up. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented, together with the preliminary results of the activity concentrations associated with the naturally occurring radionuclide chains for the building materials collected across the Qatarian peninsula.

  3. Use of a Shielded High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry System to Segregate LLW from Contact Handleable ILW Containing Plutonium - 13046

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Rosemary; Wilkins, Colin; Chard, Patrick; Jaederstroem, Henrik; LeBlanc, Paul; Mowry, Rick; MacDonald, Sanders; Gunn, William

    2013-07-01

    Dounreay Site Restoration Limited (DSRL) have a number of drums of solid waste that may contain Plutonium Contaminated Material. These are currently categorised as Contact Handleable Intermediate Level Waste (CHILW). A significant fraction of these drums potentially contain waste that is in the Low Level Waste (LLW) category. A Canberra Q2 shielded high resolution gamma spectrometry system is being used to quantify the total activity of drums that are potentially in the LLW category in order to segregate those that do contain LLW from CHILW drums and thus to minimise the total volume of waste in the higher category. Am-241 is being used as an indicator of the presence of plutonium in the waste from its strong 59.54 keV gamma-ray; a knowledge of the different waste streams from which the material originates allows a pessimistic waste 'fingerprint' to be used in order to determine an upper limit to the activities of the weak and non-gamma-emitting plutonium and associated radionuclides. This paper describes the main features of the high resolution gamma spectrometry system being used by DSRL to perform the segregation of CHILW and LLW and how it was configured and calibrated using the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). It also describes how potential LLW drums are selected for assay and how the system uses the existing waste stream fingerprint information to determine a reliable upper limit for the total activity present in each measured drum. Results from the initial on-site commissioning trials and the first measurements of waste drums using the new monitor are presented. (authors)

  4. A rapid dissolution procedure to aid initial nuclear forensics investigations of chemically refractory compounds and particles prior to gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, David G; Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E; Britton, Richard

    2015-11-01

    A rapid and effective preparative procedure has been evaluated for the accurate determination of low-energy (40-200 keV) gamma-emitting radionuclides ((210)Pb, (234)Th, (226)Ra, (235)U) in uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The measurement of low-energy gamma photons is complicated in heterogeneous samples containing high-density mineral phases and in such situations activity concentrations will be underestimated. This is because attenuation corrections, calculated based on sample mean density, do not properly correct where dense grains are dispersed within a less dense matrix (analogous to a nugget effect). The current method overcomes these problems using a lithium tetraborate fusion that readily dissolves all components including high-density, self-attenuating minerals/compounds. This is the ideal method for dissolving complex, non-volatile components in soils, rocks, mineral concentrates, and other materials where density reduction is required. Lithium borate fusion avoids the need for theoretical efficiency corrections or measurement of matrix matched calibration standards. The resulting homogeneous quenched glass produced can be quickly dissolved in nitric acid producing low-density solutions that can be counted by gamma spectrometry. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated using uranium-bearing Certified Reference Materials and provides accurate activity concentration determinations compared to the underestimated activity concentrations derived from direct measurements of a bulk sample. The procedure offers an effective solution for initial nuclear forensic studies where complex refractory minerals or matrices exist. It is also significantly faster, safer and simpler than alternative approaches. PMID:26572834

  5. Inter-pulse high-resolution gamma-ray spectra using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, L.G.; Trombka, J.I.; Jensen, D.H.; Stephenson, W.A.; Hoover, R.A.; Mikesell, J.L.; Tanner, A.B.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron generator pulsed at 100 s-1 was suspended in an artificial borehole containing a 7.7 metric ton mixture of sand, aragonite, magnetite, sulfur, and salt. Two Ge(HP) gamma-ray detectors were used: one in a borehole sonde, and one at the outside wall of the sample tank opposite the neutron generator target. Gamma-ray spectra were collected by the outside detector during each of 10 discrete time windows during the 10 ms period following the onset of gamma-ray build-up after each neutron burst. The sample was measured first when dry and then when saturated with water. In the dry sample, gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering, neutron capture, and decay were counted during the first (150 ??s) time window. Subsequently only capture and decay gamma rays were observed. In the wet sample, only neutron capture and decay gamma rays were observed. Neutron capture gamma rays dominated the spectrum during the period from 150 to 400 ??s after the neutron burst in both samples, but decreased with time much more rapidly in the wet sample. A signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) analysis indicates that optimum conditions for neutron capture analysis occurred in the 350-800 ??s window. A poor S/N in the first 100-150 ??s is due to a large background continuum during the first time interval. Time gating can be used to enhance gamma-ray spectra, depending on the nuclides in the target material and the reactions needed to produce them, and should improve the sensitivity of in situ well logging. ?? 1984.

  6. Fieldable computer system for determining gamma-ray pulse-height distributions, flux spectra, and dose rates from Little Boy

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Our system consists of a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system with a built-in CAMAC crate and eight bismuth-germanate detectors 7.62 cm in diameter and 7.62 cm long. Gamma-ray pulse-height distributions are acquired simultaneously for up to eight positions. The system was very carefully calibrated and characterized from 0.1 to 8.3 MeV using gamma-ray spectra from a variety of radioactive sources. By fitting the pulse-height distributions from the sources with a function containing 17 parameters, we determined theoretical repsonse functions. We use these response functions to unfold the distributions to obtain flux spectra. A flux-to-dose-rate conversion curve based on the work of Dimbylow and Francis is then used to obtain dose rates. Direct use of measured spectra and flux-to-dose-rate curves to obtain dose rates avoids the errors that can arise from spectrum dependence in simple gamma-ray dosimeter instruments. We present some gamma-ray doses for the Little Boy assembly operated at low power. These results can be used to determine the exposures of the Hiroshima survivors and thus aid in the establishment of radation exposure limits for the nuclear industry.

  7. Effects induced by gamma-irradiation and thermal treatment on the infrared spectra of ferrocene in its disordered state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffar, M. A.; Abd-Elrahman, M. I.

    2004-10-01

    Lattice, rotation and intramolecular vibrations of ferrocene, Fe(C5H5)(2), crystallites of the C-2h(5) factor group in the disordered phase are calculated using the correlation theorem based on group theory. The correlation between the species of the C-1 site symmetry occupied by cyclopentadienyl molecules and those of the factor group C-2h, of the crystal are calculated. The number of lattice vibrations of the cyclopentadienyl molecules is found to be 12. with active modes in Raman and infrared (IR) spectra. The same number of rotations for the cyclopentadienyl molecules is expected to be allowed in both spectra. The active number of intramolecular vibrations for the cyclopentadienyl molecules having D-5 molecular symmetry is expected to be 80 vibrations in both the Raman and the IR spectra. The effect of gamma-irradiation with different doses and heat treatment at different temperatures on the IR spectra of ferrocene in the energy range 4000-200 cm(-1) is discussed. A number of bands continuously shifted their position, and a decrease in intensity with increasing gamma-dose is observed. New bands appeared in this spectral region for different annealing temperatures and different gamma-doses. These changes are discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions between molecules within the unit cell.

  8. Effect of gamma radiation on the electronic spectra of poly(methylmethacrylate) doped with some divalent nd10-cation dithizone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadly, M.; Dawy, M.

    1995-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of dithizone (H2DZ) and its metal complexes of Hg, Cd and Zn doped in poly(methylmethacrylate) PMMA has been investigated before and after gamma-irradiation. It is found that the complex formation resulted in significant changes in both the position and the intensity of the electronic bands of H2DZ. Gamma radiation causes remarkable decreases in the intensities of most of the absorption bands of the metal complexes. The rate of decrease depends on the nature of the metal ions.

  9. Numerical simulations of planetary gamma-ray spectra induced by galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

    1994-07-01

    The fluxes of cosmic-ray-produced gamma rays escaping from Mars were calculated using the LAHET Code System and basic nuclear data for {gamma}-ray production. Both surface water content and atmospheric thickness strongly affect the fluxes of {gamma}-ray lines escaping from Mars.

  10. Discriminating Nuclear Threats from Benign Sources in Gamma-ray Spectra using a Spectral Comparison Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kevin K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Mann, Matthew L.; Pfund, David M.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2008-06-15

    This manuscript presents a method for categorizing gamma-ray spectra as benign or threatening. It is widely believed that the goal of segregating gamma-ray spectra into benign and threatening populations can achieved with fewer counts than are required for confident characterization of a spectrum’s isotopic composition, while still providing improvement over count-based algorithms. This has potentially important implications on the detection of radiological and nuclear threats, where decisions must be made from analysis of count-starved spectra that dominate the landscape of monitoring special nuclear material transport and lost-or-stolen source search. We report here the method of Spectral Comparison Ratios (SCRs) which is useful in the targeted detection of specific gamma-ray signatures or signature classes. SCRs discriminate between benign and target sources by comparing counts in broad, pre-defined energy bins that are pre-determined using statistical discrimination criteria. The integral component of the SCR algorithm is the location and interdependence of the energy bins, and we discuss the statistical methods used for choosing their locations along with the decision criteria that maximally separate targets from benign sources.

  11. The effect of photon-axion-like particle conversions in galaxy clusters on very high energy {\\gamma}-ray spectra

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Manuel; Maccione, Luca; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Montanino, Daniele; Roncadelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Very high energy (VHE, energy >~ 100 GeV) {\\gamma}-rays originating from extragalactic sources interact with low energy photons of background radiation fields and produce electron-positron pairs. Alternatively, in the presence of ambient magnetic fields, they can convert into hypothetical axion-like particles (ALPs), pseudo-scalar spin-0 bosons, predicted by extensions of the standard model. These particles propagate unimpeded over cosmological distances. Here, the effect of photon-ALP oscillations in magnetic fields of galaxy clusters and the Milky Way on VHE {\\gamma}-ray spectra is studied. It is shown that this mechanism can lead to a substantial enhancement of the VHE flux and a spectral hardening, thus effectively reducing the opacity of the Universe to VHE {\\gamma}-rays.

  12. Single Nanoparticle Mass Spectrometry as a High Temperature Kinetics Tool: Sublimation, Oxidation, and Emission Spectra of Hot Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Howder, Collin R; Long, Bryan A; Gerlich, Dieter; Alley, Rex N; Anderson, Scott L

    2015-12-17

    In single nanoparticle mass spectrometry, individual charged nanoparticles (NPs) are trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected optically, allowing their mass, charge, and optical properties to be monitored continuously. Previous experiments of this type probed NPs that were either fluorescent or large enough to detect by light scattering. Alternatively, small NPs can be heated to temperatures where thermally excited emission is strong enough to allow detection, and this approach should provide a new tool for measurements of sublimation and surface reaction kinetics of materials at high temperatures. As an initial test, we report a study of carbon NPs in the 20-50 nm range, heated by 10.6 ?m, 532 nm, or 445 nm lasers. The kinetics for sublimation and oxidation of individual carbon NPs were studied, and a model is presented for the factors that control the NP temperature, including laser heating, and cooling by sublimation, buffer gas collisions, and radiation. The estimated NP temperatures were in the 1700-2000 K range, and the NP absorption cross sections ranged from ?0.8 to 0.2% of the geometric cross sections for 532 nm and 10.6 ?m excitation, respectively. Emission spectra of single NPs and small NP ensembles show a feature in the IR that appears to be the high energy tail of the thermal (blackbody-like) emission expected from hot particles but also a discrete feature peaking around 750 nm. Both the IR tail and 750 nm peak are observed for all particles and for both IR and visible laser excitation. No significant difference was observed between graphite and amorphous carbon NPs. PMID:26513667

  13. A method for the comparison of performance of gamma-ray spectrometry calibration cocktails.

    PubMed

    Legarda, F; Los Arcos, J M; Herranz, M

    2004-01-01

    In order to make quantitative assessments about the usefulness of different gamma-ray emitting radionuclide cocktails to carry out efficiency calibrations of gamma-ray spectrometers, a method has been developed that allows the comparison of their different performances and to optimize the choice of gamma energy lines for the radionuclides within a specific cocktail. The method has been applied to compare different cocktail configurations obtained from measurements made in the laboratory with monoenergetic radionuclides, and their relative performances are presented and discussed. PMID:14987701

  14. Spatially-Dependent Measurements of Surface and Near-Surface Radioactive Material Using In situ Gamma Ray Spectrometry (ISGRS) For Final Status Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Chapman, A. J. Boerner, E. W. Abelquist

    2006-11-15

    In-situ, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (ISGRS) measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) field laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of these tests was to provide analytical data for assessing how “fit for use” this technology is for detecting discrete particles in soil.

  15. Neutron-capture gamma-ray data for obtaining elemental abundances from planetary spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Robert; Frankle, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Determination of elemental abundances is a top scientific priority of most planetary missions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an excellent method to determine elemental abundances using gamma rays made by nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray particles and by the decay of radioactive nuclides [Re73,Re78]. Many important planetary gamma rays are made by neutron-capture reactions. However, much of the data for the energies and intensities of neutron-capture gamma rays in the existing literature [e.g. Lo81] are poor [RF99,RF00]. With gamma-ray spectrometers having recently returned data from Lunar Prospector and NEAR and soon to be launch to Mars, there is a need for good data for neutron-capture gamma rays.

  16. Cosmic-ray spectra of primary protons and high altitude muons deconvolved from observed atmospheric gamma rays

    E-print Network

    K. Yoshida; R. Ohmori; T. Kobayashi; Y. Komori; Y. Sato; J. Nishimura

    2006-09-30

    We have observed atmospheric gamma rays from 30GeV to 8TeV, using emulsion chambers at balloon altitudes, accumulating the largest total exposure in this energy range to date, SOT ~ 6.66m^2.sr.day. At very high altitudes, with residual overburden only a few g/cm^2, atmospheric gamma rays are mainly produced by a single interaction of primary cosmic rays with overlying atmospheric nuclei. Thus, we can use these gamma rays to study the spectrum of primary cosmic rays and their products in the atmosphere. From the observed atmospheric gamma ray spectrum, we deconvolved the primary cosmic-ray proton spectrum, assuming appropriate hadronic interaction models. Our deconvolved proton spectrum covers the energy range from 200GeV to 50TeV, which fills a gap in the currently available primary cosmic-ray proton spectra. We also estimated the atmospheric muon spectrum above 30GeV at high altitude from our gamma-ray spectrum, almost without reference to the primary cosmic rays, and compared the estimated flux with direct muon observations below 10GeV.

  17. gamma-Irradiation effects on the thermal decomposition behaviour and IR absorption spectra of piperacillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R. M.; Gaffar, M. A.; Abu El-Fadl, A.; Hamad, Ar. G. K.

    2003-11-01

    The thermal decomposition behaviour of unirradiated and pre-gamma-irradiated piperacillin (pipril) as a semi-synthetic penicillin antibiotic has been studied in the temperature range of (273-1072 K). The decomposition was found to proceed through three major steps both for unirradiated and gamma-irradiated samples. Neither appearance nor disappearance of new bands in the IR spectrum of piperacillin was recorded as a result of gamma-irradiation but only a decrease in the intensity of most bands was observed. A degradation mechanism was suggested to explain the bond rupture and the decrease in the intensities of IR bands of gamma-irradiated piperacillin.

  18. Gamma spectrometry and chemical characterization of ceramic seeds with samarium-153 and holmium-166 for brachytherapy proposal.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo S; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2010-12-01

    Ceramic seeds were synthesized by the sol-gel technique with Si:Sm:Ca and Si:Ho:Ca. One set of seeds was irradiated in the TRIGA type nuclear reactor IPR-R1 and submitted to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), K(0) method, to determine mass percentage concentration of natural samarium and holmium in the seed as well as to determine all existing radionuclides and their activities. Attention was paid to discrimination of Si-31, Ca-40, Ca-45, Ca-47, Ca-49, Sm-145, Sm-155, Sm-153 and Ho-166. A second sample was submitted to atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) also to determine samarium and holmium concentrations in weight. A third sample was submitted to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to qualitatively determine chemical composition. The measured activity was due to Sm-153 and Ho-166 with a well-characterized gamma spectrum. The X-ray fluorescence spectrum demonstrated that there is no discrepancy in seed composition. The maximum ranges in the water of beta particles from Sm-153 and Ho-166 decay were evaluated, as well as the dose rate and total dose delivered within the volume delimited by the range of the beta particles. The results are relevant for investigation of the viability of producing Sm-153 and Ho-166 radioactive seeds for use in brachytherapy. PMID:20685128

  19. Natural radioactivity of sand samples by low-level gamma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbady, A.; Saied, M. H.; El-Kamel, A. H.; El-Arabi, A.

    1994-07-01

    The natural radioactivities of compressed powdered sand samples from different locations along the Qena-Safaga highway were measured in face to face geometry applying a low-level ?-ray spectrometry method. The average measured values of U, Th and K are: 6.3, 6.2 and 1.5 × 104 ppm, respectively. Some samples were found to be free from thorium to the minimum detectable activity of the spectrometer. Results are discussed and compared with other results presented.

  20. Monte carlo simulation of in situ gamma-spectra recorded by NaI (Tl) detector in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Yingying; Wu, Ning; Wu, Bingwei; Liu, Yan; Cao, Xuan; Wang, Qian

    2015-06-01

    To develop a NaI (Tl) detector for in situ radioactivity monitoring in the marine environment and enhance the confidence of the probability of the gamma-spectrum analysis, Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-Particle ( MNCP ) code were performed to provide the response spectra of some interested radionuclides and the background spectra originating from the natural radionuclides in seawater recorded by a NaI (Tl) detector. A newly developed 75 mm × 75 mm NaI (Tl) detector was calibrated using four reference radioactive sources 137Cs, 60Co, 40K and 54Mn in the laboratory before the field measurements in seawater. A simulation model was established for the detector immersed in seawater. The simulated spectra were all broadened with Gaussian pulses to reflect the statistical fluctuations and electrical noise in the real measurement. The simulated spectra show that the single-energy photons into the detector are mostly scattering low-energy photons and the high background in the low energy region mainly originates from the Compton effect of the high energy ?-rays of natural radionuclides in seawater. The simulated background spectrum was compared with the experimental one recorded in field measurement and they seem to be in good agreement. The simulation method and spectra can be used for the accurate analysis of the filed measurement results of low concentration radioactivity in seawater.

  1. Neutron-Capture Gamma-Ray Data for Obtaining Elemental Abundances from Planetary Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankle, S. C.; Reedy, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Newly compiled and evaluated energies and intensities of gamma rays made by the capture of thermal neutrons by elements from H to Zn plus Ge, Sm, and Gd are reported for use in determining elemental composition by planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Mathematical model of gamma-ray spectrometry borehole logging for quantitative analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1981-01-01

    A technique for analyzing gamma-ray spectral-logging data has been developed, in which a digital computer is used to calculate the effects of gamma-ray attentuation in a borehole environment. The computer model allows for the calculation of the effects of lithology, porosity, density, and the thickness of a horizontal layer of uniformly distributed radioactive material surrounding a centralized probe in a cylindrical borehole. The computer program also contains parameters for the calculation of the effects of well casing, drilling fluid, probe housing, and losses through the sodium-iodide crystal. Errors associated with the commonly used mathematical assumption of a point detector are eliminated in this model. (USGS)

  3. The Application of High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (HRGS) to Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation, and Arms Control Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Walter R.; Lemley, James R.; Forman, Leon

    1997-12-31

    While well-developed methodologies exist for the employment of high- resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) in determining the isotopic composition of plutonium samples, the potential capabilities of such measurements in determining the properties of nuclear materials otherwise remain largely unexploited. These measurements contain information sufficiently detailed such that not only can the isotopic composition of uranium and plutonium materials be determined, but the details of the spectrum obtained will depend reproducibly upon other factors including the total mass, density, chemical composition, and geometrical configuration of the material, and for certain materials, the elapsed time since chemical processing. The potential thus exists to obtain a `gamma-ray fingerprint` for typical containers or assemblies of nuclear material which will then serve to identify that class of item in a later confirmatory measurement. These measurements have the additional advantage that, by comparison with active interrogation techniques which usually require the introduction of some extraneous form of radiation or other intrusive activity, they are totally passive, and thus impose only minimal additional safety or regulatory burdens on the operators. In the application of these measurements to the verification of treaty-limited items, where the information acquired may be sensitive in nature, the use of the CIVET (Controlled Intrusiveness Verification Technique) approach, where a computer-based interface is employed to limit access to the information obtained, may be followed.

  4. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  5. Structural Characterization of Methylenedianiline Regioisomers by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Strategies: I. Electrospray Spectra of 2-Ring Isomers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purified methylenedianiline (MDA) regioisomers were structurally characterized and differentiated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), and IM-MS/MS in conjunction with computational methods. It was determined that protonation sites on the isomers can vary depending on the position of amino groups, and the resulting protonation sites play a role in the gas-phase stability of the isomer. We also observed differences in the relative distributions of protonated conformations depending on experimental conditions and instrumentation, which is consistent with previous studies on aniline in the gas phase. This work demonstrates the utility of a multifaceted approach for the study of isobaric species and elucidates why previous MDA studies may have been unable to detect and/or differentiate certain isomers. Such analysis may prove useful in the characterization of larger MDA multimeric species, industrial MDA mixtures, and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) mixtures used in polyurethane synthesis. PMID:24678803

  6. Expanding the toolbox of tandem mass spectrometry with algorithms to identify mass spectra from more than one peptide

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jian

    sequence database searching in proteomics data analysis.database search of mixture tandem mass spectra”, Molecular & Cellular Proteomics,database search of mixture tandem mass spectra”, Molecular & Cellular Proteomics,

  7. Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using ?-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, B.; Dhavamani, V.; Ramkumar, S.; Philominathan, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 238U and 40K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using ?-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of 232Th, 238U and 40K is 42.9±9.4 Bq.kg?1, 14.7±1.7 Bq.kg?1 and 149.5±3.1 Bq.kg?1 respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of 232Th, 238U and 40K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h?1 and 59.1 nGy.h?1 with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 ±9 nGy.h?1. This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h?1. Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 ?Sv.y?1 with an arithmetic mean of 53.1±11 ?Sv.y?1. The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels. PMID:20177570

  8. Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Capture on 234,236,238U Measured with DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Mosby, S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C.-Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the 238U(n, ?) cross section using a thin 48 mg/cm2 target was made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE over the energy range from 10 eV to 500 keV. The results confirm earlier measurements. Measurements of the gamma-ray emission spectra were also made for 238U(n, ?) as well as 234,236U(n, ?). These measurements help to constrain the radiative strength function used in the cross-section calculations.

  9. TeV Gamma-Ray Spectra Unfolded for IR Absorption for a Sample of Low and High Red-Shifted AGN

    E-print Network

    A. Konopelko; A. Mastichiadis; F. W. Stecker

    2005-07-20

    The H.E.S.S. collaboration recently performed the accurate measurements of the gamma-ray spectra above 200 GeV for two BL Lac-type AGN in the Southern sky: PKS 2155-304 and PKS 2005-489. The TeV spectrum of the BL Lac object 1ES 2344+514 has also been recently measured by the Whipple collaboration. Using the results of phenomenological calculations of the SED of the EBL we have extracted the intrinsic gamma-ray spectra of these blazars. Consequently we have shown that these spectra can be fitted well by means of a synchrotron self Compton model.

  10. Hints of the Existence of Axion-Like-Particles From the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Cosmological Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; Paneque, D.; Bloom, E.; Prada, F.; Dominguez, A.; /IAA, Granada /Seville U.

    2009-06-23

    Axion Like Particles (ALPs) are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields. This effect may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as AGNs. Here we carry out a detailed study that for the first time simultaneously considers in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. An efficient photon/axion mixing in the source always means an attenuation in the photon flux, whereas the mixing in the intergalactic medium may result in a decrement and/or enhancement of the photon flux, depending on the distance of the source and the energy considered. Interestingly, we find that decreasing the value of the intergalactic magnetic field strength, which decreases the probability for photon/axion mixing, could result in an increase of the expected photon flux at Earth if the source is far enough. We also find a 30% attenuation in the intensity spectrum of distant sources, which occurs at an energy that only depends on the properties of the ALPs and the intensity of the intergalactic magnetic field, and thus independent of the AGN source being observed. Moreover, we show that this mechanism can easily explain recent puzzles in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources, like the possible detection of TeV photons from 3C 66A (a source located at z=0.444) by MAGIC and VERITAS, which should not happen according to conventional models of photon propagation over cosmological distances. Another puzzle is the recent published lower limit to the EBL intensity at 3.6 {micro}m (which is almost twice larger as the previous one), which implies very hard spectra for some detected TeV gamma-ray sources located at z=0.1-0.2. The consequences that come from this work are testable with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments, namely Fermi (formerly known as GLAST) and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like CANGAROO, HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma-ray spectra from natural radionuclides recorded by a NaI detector in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Vlastou, R; Ntziou, I Th; Kokkoris, M; Papadopoulos, C T; Tsabaris, C

    2006-01-01

    The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate gamma-ray spectra of natural radionuclides collected by a NaI scintillation detector immersed in seawater. The gamma-rays emitted from the decay of (40)K, and the series of (232)Th and (238)U, were used to describe the radioactive water source around the NaI crystal. The simulated gamma-ray spectra were compared with real data recorded in situ by a newly constructed NaI spectrometer and were found to be in good agreement. The NaI spectrometer was calibrated in the laboratory in a water tank, before its deployment in seawater. Activity concentrations were deduced from the gamma-ray spectra and discussed in comparison with results from the literature. PMID:16150599

  12. Spectra of Cosmic Ray Electrons and Diffuse Gamma Rays with the Constraints of AMS-02 and HESS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ding; Huang, Jing; Jin, Hong-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, AMS-02 reported their results of cosmic ray (CR) observations. In addition to the AMS-02 data, we add HESS data to estimate the spectra of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays above TeV. In the conventional diffusion model, a global analysis is performed on the spectral features of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays by the GALRPOP package. The results show that the spectrum structure of the primary component of CR electrons cannot be fully reproduced by a simple power law and that the relevant break is around 100 GeV. At the 99% confidence level (C.L.) the injection indices above the break decrease from 2.54 to 2.35, but the ones below the break are only in the range of 2.746-2.751. The spectrum of CR electrons does not need to add TeV cutoff to also match the features of the HESS data. Based on the difference between the fluxes of CR electrons and their primary components, the predicted excess of CR positrons is consistent with the interpretation that these positrons originate from a pulsar or dark matter. In the analysis of the Galactic diffuse gamma rays with the indirect constraint of AMS-02 and HESS data, it is found that the fluxes of Galactic diffuse gamma rays are consistent with the GeV data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the high-latitude regions. The results indicate that inverse Compton scattering is the dominant component in the range of hundreds of GeV to tens of TeV, respectively from the high-latitude regions to the low ones, and in all of the regions of the Galaxy the flux of diffuse gamma rays is less than that of CR electrons at the energy scale of 20 TeV.

  13. Effect of different thickness of material filter on Tc-99m spectra and performance parameters of gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazifah, A.; Norhanna, S.; Shah, S. I.; Zakaria, A.

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of material filter technique on Tc-99m spectra and performance parameters of Philip ADAC forte dual head gamma camera. Thickness of material filter was selected on the basis of percentage attenuation of various gamma ray energies by different thicknesses of zinc material. A cylindrical source tank of NEMA single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) Triple Line Source Phantom filled with water and Tc-99m radionuclide injected was used for spectra, uniformity and sensitivity measurements. Vinyl plastic tube was used as a line source for spatial resolution. Images for uniformity were reconstructed by filtered back projection method. Butterworth filter of order 5 and cut off frequency 0.35 cycles/cm was selected. Chang's attenuation correction method was applied by selecting 0.13/cm linear attenuation coefficient. Count rate was decreased with material filter from the compton region of Tc-99m energy spectrum, also from the photopeak region. Spatial resolution was improved. However, uniformity of tomographic image was equivocal, and system volume sensitivity was reduced by material filter. Material filter improved system's spatial resolution. Therefore, the technique may be used for phantom studies to improve the image quality.

  14. Modern aerial gamma-ray spectrometry and regional potassium map of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The aerial gamma-ray data were obtained as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy during the period 1975-1983. References for the Open-File Reports that describe the surveys and data collection can be found in Bendix Field Engineering Corp. (1983). The aerial surveys were flown by contractors using fixed-wing and helicopter systems with 33-50 L (liters) of thallium-activated sodium iodide (NaI (TI)) crystals. The nominal survey altitude used is 122 m. The survey lines were generally east-west with line spacings of 1.6-10 km. Tie lines were flown perpendicular to the flight lines at intervals of 16- 30 km. The data were corrected for background from aircraft contamination and cosmic rays, altitude variations, airborne 214Bi, and Compton scattering. The gamma-ray systems were calibrated using the calibrations pads at Grand Junction, Colorado (Ward, 1978 ) and the dynamic test strip at Lake Mead, Arizona (Geodata International, Inc., 1977).  

  15. Survey of the {sup 137}Cs contamination in Belgium by in-situ gamma spectrometry, a decade after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, J.; Pomme, S.; Hardenman, F.; Culot, J.P.

    1997-10-01

    The residual radiocesium concentration, nearly 10 y after the Chernobyl accident, is measured at different sites on the Belgian territory by means of in-situ gamma-spectrometry. A possible link between the rainfall at the beginning of May 1986 and the actual cesium concentration is investigated. The radiological impact of this contamination, even in the most affected regions in the Ardennes, is very small (<6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Detection of frozen salt in pipes using gamma-ray spectrometry of potassium self-activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grena, Roberto; Scafe, Raffaele; Pisacane, Fabrizio; Pilato, Renzo; Crescenzi, Tommaso; Mazzei, Domenico

    2010-01-15

    Solar plants that use molten salts as heat transfer fluid need careful control to avoid the freezing of the salt in the pipes; if such a problem occurs, a diagnostic instrument to localize where is the frozen salt plug and to determine its length is useful. If the salt contains potassium (as is the case of the most common mixture used in solar plants, NaNO{sub 3}/KNO{sub 3} 60/40% by weight), the gamma decay of the natural unstable isotope {sup 40}K can be exploited to detect the frozen salt in a non-invasive way. Simulations and experimental results regarding the detectability of such plugs with different masses/lengths are presented. (author)

  17. Cosmic Infrared Background From Population III Stars and Its Effect on Spectra of High-z Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the contribution of Population III stars to the near-IR (NIR) cosmic infrared background (CIB) and its effect on spectra of high-z, high-energy gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other sources. It is shown that if Population III is composed of massive stars, the claimed NIR CIB excess will be reproduced if only approx. 4% plus or minus 2% of all baryons went through these stars. Regardless of the precise amount of the NIR CIB due to them, they likely left enough photons to provide a large optical depth for high-energy photons from distant GRBs. Observations of such GRBs are expected following the planned launch of NASA's GLAST mission. Detecting such damping in the spectra of high-z GRBs will then provide important information on the emissions from the Population III epoch, and the location of this cutoff may serve as an indicator of the GRBs' redshifts. We also point out the difficulty of unambiguously detecting the CIB part originating from Population III in spectra of low-z blazars.

  18. Radon loss from encapsulated sediments in Ge gamma-ray spectrometry for the annual radiation dose determination in luminescence dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Corte, F.; Vandenberghe, D.; de Wispelaere, A.; Buylaert, J.-P.; van den Haute, P.

    2006-01-01

    In Ge gamma-ray spectrometry for the annual radiation dose determination in the luminescence dating of sediments, the picture of 226Ra enrichment or depletion (in the 238U decay series) obtained via measurement of its 214Pb and 214Bi daughters may be disturbed by the 222Rn-content of the sample being decreased due to manipulations such as drying and pulverizing. Therefore, it is common practice to start the measurement only about 1 month after encapsulating the material, after which the 226Ra(1600 a)- 222Rn(3.82 d) mother-daughter equilibrium is re-established. Evidently, this only holds on condition that no significant escape of Rn occurs out of the sediment after making it up for counting. In order to experimentally investigate this effect, in the present work measurements were carried out with various types of dried and pulverized sediments that were either encapsulated in screw-cap polystyrene vials or in sealed glass containers, or that were mixed with molten wax followed by solidification in a cylindrical geometry. From the results obtained, it could be concluded that preparation and counting of the sediment-wax mixture is the method of choice.

  19. LAFARA: a new underground laboratory in the French Pyrénées for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Beek, P; Souhaut, M; Lansard, B; Bourquin, M; Reyss, J-L; von Ballmoos, P; Jean, P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new underground laboratory, namely LAFARA (for "LAboratoire de mesure des FAibles RAdioactivités"), that was recently created in the French Pyrénées. This laboratory is primarily designed to analyze environmental samples that display low radioactivity levels using gamma-ray spectrometry. Two high-purity germanium detectors were placed under 85 m of rock (ca. 215 m water equivalent) in the tunnel of Ferrières (Ariège, France). The background is thus reduced by a factor of ?20 in comparison to above-ground laboratories. Both detectors are fully equipped so that the samples can be analyzed in an automatic mode without requiring permanent presence of a technician in the laboratory. Auto-samplers (twenty positions) and systems to fill liquid nitrogen automatically provide one month of autonomy to the spectrometers. The LAFARA facility allows us to develop new applications in the field of environmental sciences based on the use of natural radionuclides present at low levels in the environment. As an illustration, we present two of these applications: i) dating of marine sediments using the decay of (226)Ra in sedimentary barite (BaSO(4)), ii) determination of (227)Ac ((231)Pa) activities in marine sediment cores. PMID:23164692

  20. International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics: Workshop Results and Next Steps

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Brent R; Solodov, Alexander A; Shipwash, Jacqueline L; Zhernosek, Alena V; McKinney, Teressa L; Pickett, Chris A; Peerani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In November 2008, the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA) co-hosted the International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This workshop was conducted in response to needs expressed by the international safeguards community to understand better the capabilities and limitations of the codes; to ensure these codes are sustained; and to ensure updates or revisions are performed in a controlled manner. The workshop was attended by approximately 100 participants. The participants included code developers, code suppliers, safeguards specialists, domestic and international inspectors, process operators, regulators, and programme sponsors from various government agencies. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for code developers, commercial distributors and end users to interact in a hands-on laboratory environment to develop solutions for programmatic and technical issues associated with the various codes. The workshop also provided an international forum for discussing development of an internationally accepted standard test method. This paper discusses the organization of the workshop, its goals and objectives and feedback received from the participants. The paper also describes the significance of the working group's contribution to improving codes that are commonly used during inspections to verify that nuclear facilities are compliant with treaty obligations that ensure nuclear fuel cycle facilities are used for peaceful purposes.

  1. [The triboluminescent spectra of the blood of gamma-irradiated rats].

    PubMed

    Orel, V E; Dziatkovskaia, N N; Afonin, A N; Mazurik, V K

    1991-01-01

    Triboluminescence (TL) of rat blood 3 h after whole-body single exposure to gamma-radiation (0.25, 1, 3, and 5 Gy) exhibited positive coefficient of correlation r = 0.99 (at a wave length of 412 nm) with radiation dose. The effect of ionizing radiation on the animal body caused changes in blood TL within the fixed areas of the spectral range, whose fluctuation parameters were conditioned by specifically significant radiobiological changes and nonspecific adaptive reactions. PMID:1887011

  2. Absorption-Mode Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: the Effects of Apodization and Phasing on Modified Protein Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yulin; Li, Huilin; Wills, Rebecca H.; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Yu, Xiang; Kilgour, David. P. A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Lin, Cheng; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    The method of phasing broadband FT-ICR spectra allows plotting the spectra in the absorption-mode; this new approach significantly improves the quality of the data at no extra cost. Herein, an internal calibration method for calculating the phase function has been developed, and successfully applied to the top-down spectra of modified proteins, where the peak intensities vary by >100×. The result shows that the use of absorption-mode spectra allows more peaks to be discerned within the recorded data, and this can reveal much greater information about the protein and modifications under investigation. In addition, noise and harmonic peaks can be assigned immediately in the absorption-mode. PMID:23568027

  3. Comparison between the Spectra of Gamma Radiation for Climate Dry Periods and Rainy in the Southeast of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, M. P.; Martin, I. M.

    2013-05-01

    Through this work, present themselves the results obtained for the spectra of ionizing radiation (X-rays and gamma) environmental southeast Brazil for the periods of dry and rainy climate, respectively. One of the objectives this work is promoting through analysis of the results a better understand, in the educational area, the physical processes related to the background radiation of the places where measurements were made. In Brazil, there is still little information about the radiation from soil, radon gas atmospheric, cosmic and artificial origin. Measurements of gamma radiation spectra were performed with a scintillator of NaI (Tl) (volume 300 cm3) mounted within an aluminum cell and coupled to a photomultiplier tube, which in turn is coupled through an interface to specify a notebook for storage of data. The measurement of X and gamma rays photons occur of way omnidirectional without distinction as to direction. The data acquisition was performed at fixed intervals of 1 minute continuously for the entire period of dry climate (June to October) and rainy (December 2012 to January 2013). Figures 1 and 2 show the results obtained for both periods, dry and rainy, respectively. Regarding the graph of Figure 1, is evidenced a cycle of 24 hours in the radiation spectrum. In this period without rain the radiation increases always between sunrise sunset until 11 - 12 hours local, due to the increased presence of radon gas (222Rn) which decays after 3.8 days in 214Pb and 214Bi, emitting photons in the range of energy the detector is measuring (0.030 to 3.0 MeV). The graph in Figure 2 shows that during the rainy period, there was a significant increase in radiation intensity, in addition to that already shown in the dry times that for certain time intervals. This increase is due to when occurs precipitation, the amount of radon gas increases because of the phenomenon of washing the lower atmosphere where the gas is suspended and diluted in water droplets. In the rainy period, the periodicity that is present in the spectrum of the dry climate is practically destroyed due to the interference of photons gamma of radon gas from the rain.

  4. The Gamma Ray Spectra Measurement in Reactor Pressure Vessel Simulator in WWER-1000 Engineering Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ošmera, B.; Kyncl, J.; Ma?ík, M.; Cvachovec, F.; Smutný, V.; Králík, M.

    2003-06-01

    The space - energy distribution of the mixed neutron - photon radiation field has been measured over the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) simulator thickness in the WWER-1000 engineering benchmark assembly in the LR-0 experimental reactor (in Nuclear Research Institute ?ež plc) with a scintillation spectrometer. The spectra have been measured before the RPV in one quarter, one half, and three quarters of its thickness and behind the RPV in the energy range 0.5 - 10 MeV. The evaluated integral fluxes above 1 MeV and their ratio are compared with the MCNP and DORT calculation, the measured spectra are presented graphically. The measurements are being performed in the frame of the project REDOS [1], 5th Framwork Programme of the European Community 1998 - 2002.

  5. Analyses of the gamma-ray pulse-height spectra from the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The method of inferring photon spectra from an analysis of the measured pulse-height spectrum is considered along with the spectrum shape and its variation energy. The case is examined where photoelastic absorption predominates, and Compton scattering and pair production are negligible. The analytic method for obtaining the elemental composition from the observed lunar surface spectrum is described, and theoretical and calculated weight fraction fluxes for average lunar composition are tabulated.

  6. Gannet: A Batch-Processing Tool for the Quantitative Analysis of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid–Edited MR Spectroscopy Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Edden, Richard A.E.; Puts, Nicolaas A.J.; Harris, Ashley D.; Barker, Peter B.; Evans, C. John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe the Gannet toolkit for the quantitative batch analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) -edited MRS data. Materials and Methods Using MEGA-PRESS editing and standard acquisition parameters, four MEGA-PRESS spectra were acquired in three brain regions in 10 healthy volunteers. These 120 datasets were processed without user intervention with Gannet, a Matlab-based tool that takes raw time-domain data input, processes it to generate the frequency-domain edited spectrum, and applies a simple modeling procedure to estimate GABA concentration relative to the creatine or, if provided, the unsuppressed water signal. A comparison of four modeling approaches is also presented. Results All data were successfully processed by Gannet. Coefficients of variation across subjects ranged from 11% for the occipital region to 17% for the dorsolateral prefrontal region. There was no clear difference in fitting performance between the simple Gaussian model used by Gannet and the other more complex models presented. Conclusion Gannet, the GABA Analysis Toolkit, can be used to process and quantify GABA-edited MRS spectra without user intervention. PMID:25548816

  7. ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2013-02-20

    The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

  8. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity ratios showed distinct differences between the closed CANDU primary coolant system and radiopharmaceutical production releases. According to the concept proposed by Kalinowski and Pistner (2006), the relationship between different isotopic activity ratios based on three or four radioxenon isotopes was plotted in a log-log diagram for source characterisation (civil vs. nuclear test). The multiple isotopic activity ratios were distributed in three distinct areas: HC atmospheric monitoring ratios extended to far left; the CANDU primary coolant system ratios lay in the middle; and 99Mo stack monitoring ratios for ANSTO and CRL were located on the right. The closed CANDU primary coolant has the lowest logarithmic mean ratio that represents the nuclear power reactor operation. The HC atmospheric monitoring exhibited a broad range of ratios spreading over several orders of magnitude. In contrast, the ANSTO and CRL stack emissions showed the smallest range of ratios but the results indicate at least two processes involved in the 99Mo productions. Overall, most measurements were found to be shifted towards the reactor domain. The hypothesis is that this is due to an accumulation of the isotope 131mXe in the stack or atmospheric background as it has the longest half-life and extra 131mXe emissions from the decay of 131I. The contribution of older 131mXe to a fresh release shifts the ratio of 133mXe/131mXe to the left. It was also very interesting to note that there were some situations where isotopic ratios from 99Mo production emissions fell within the nuclear test domain. This is due to operational variability, such as shorter target irradiation times. Martin B. Kalinowski and Christoph Pistner, (2006), Isotopic signature of atmospheric xenon released from light water reactors, Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 88, 215-235.

  9. The Need to Represent Raindrop Size Spectra as Normalized Gamma Distributions for the Interpretation of Polarization Radar Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Anthony J.; Blackman, T. Mark

    2002-03-01

    Polarization radar techniques essentially rely on detecting the oblateness of raindrops to provide a measure of mean raindrop size and then using this information to give a better estimate of rainfall rate R than is available from radar reflectivity Z alone. To derive rainfall rates from these new parameters such as differential reflectivity ZDR and specific differential phase shift KDP and to gauge their performance, it is necessary to know the range of naturally occurring raindrop size spectra. A three parameter gamma function is in widespread use, with the three variables No, Do, and providing a measure of drop concentration, mean size, and spectral shape, respectively. It has become standard practice to derive the range of these three variables in rain by comparing the 69 published values of the constants a and b in the empirical relationships Z = aRb with the values of a and b obtained when R and Z are derived by integrating the appropriately weighted gamma function. The relationships in common use both for inferring R from Z, ZDR, and KDP, and for developing attenuation correction routines have been derived from a best fit through the values obtained by cycling over these predicted ranges of No, Do, and . It is pointed out that this derivation of the predicted range of No, Do, and arises using a flawed logic for a particular nonnormalized form of the gamma function, and it is shown that the predicted ranges give rise to some very unrealistic drop spectra, including many with high rainfall and very small drop sizes. It is suggested that attenuation correction routines relying on differential phase may be suspect and the commonly used relationships between rainfall rate and Z, ZDR, and KDP need to be reexamined. When more realistic drop shapes are also used, it may be that published relationships for deriving R from Z and ZDR are in error by over a factor of 2; a new equation is proposed that, in the absence of hail and attenuation, should yield values of R accurate to 25%, provided that ZDR can be estimated to 0.2 dB and Z is calibrated to 1 dB. Relationships of the form R = aKbDP, with b = 1.15, are in widespread use, but more realistic drop spectra and drop shapes yield a value of b closer to 1.4, similar to the exponent in Z-R relationships. In accord, although KDP has the advantage of insensitivity to hail, it may have the same sensitivity to variations in drop spectra as Z does. In addition, the higher value of the exponent b implies that the proposed use of the total phase shift to give the path-integrated total rainfall is also questionable. However, the consistency of Z, ZDR, and KDP in rain can be used to provide absolute calibration of Z to 0.5 dB (12%), and when it fails it indicates that hail is present, in which case a relationship of the form KDP = aR1.4 should be used. The technique should work at S, C, and X band, but, in all cases, paths should be chosen so that the total phase shift is not large enough to introduce significant attenuation of Z and ZDR.

  10. Building-up a code for the purpose of TRUE coincidence summing correction in gamma-ray spectrometry with EGS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Necati; Altin, Duygu; Cevik, Ugur

    2015-10-01

    In the presented study, a code was created for the purpose of true coincidence summing (TCS) correction factors for 134Cs. The created code was implemented in EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation package. TCS factors were determined for nine different energies for different detector-source geometries. The calculated results were successfully validated by an empirical method using a point 134Cs radioactive source and a p-type HPGe detector having 55% relative efficiency. Although the code created gives TCS factors only for 134Cs, the technique presented can be used to obtain the factors for any radionuclide used in gamma-ray spectrometry.

  11. Gamma-irradiated dry fruits. An example of a wide variety of long-time dependent EPR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Pachova, Zdravka

    2006-03-01

    EPR spectra of dry, sugar containing fruits—raisins, sultanas, figs, dates, peaches, blue plums and chokeberry recorded before and after irradiation with gamma-rays, are reported. It is shown that weak singlet EPR line with 2.0031 ± 0.0005 can be recorded before irradiation of seeds, stones or skin of chokeberry, figs and raisins as well as flesh of blue plum, raisins and peaches. EPR signals of various shape are distinguished after irradiation in different parts of the fruits, as well as in randomly cut pieces of them: Seeds of raisins, chokeberry and figs give a singlet line. Stones from blue plums and peaches exhibit typical "cellulose-like" EPR signal consisting of an intense singlet line with g = 2.0033 ± 0.0005 and 2 week satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. Stones of dates are the only sample in which "sugar-like" spectrum is recorded. Skin of raisins and figs exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum whereas that of dates and chokeberry—a singlet line. Under the same experimental conditions skin of sultanas, peaches and blue plums are EPR silent. Flesh of raisins, sultanas, figs, dates and peaches exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum, flesh of blue plums gives a singlet EPR line and that of chokeberry is EPR silent. As a result, randomly cut pieces of dry fruits suitable for EPR studies, containing various constituents, exhibit different in shape and intensity EPR spectra. Kinetic studies followed for 1 year on the time stability of all reported EPR signals indicate that intensity ratio between the simultaneously appearing EPR signals in particular fruit varies from 1:20 immediately after irradiation to 1:0.5 at the end of the period. These observations open a new possibility for identification of irradiated fruits - using the magnitude of the intensity ratio to find the approximate date of radiation processing in the first ca. 30-100 days.

  12. Measurement of {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al{sup g} resonance strengths via accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arazi, A.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Poutivtsev, M.; Rugel, G.; Richter, E.; Wallner, A.

    2006-08-15

    The strengths of resonances located at center-of-mass energies of E{sub c.m.}=189, 304, 374, and 418 keV for the {sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}) reaction have been measured for the first time with an off-line method: Mg targets were firstly activated with protons at the resonance energies and the produced {sup 26}Al{sup g} nuclei were counted by means of highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Thus, the production of {sup 26}Al in its ground state is determined independently from the {gamma}-decay branching ratio. While the 304, 374, and 418 keV resonances show fair agreement with previous measurements, the 189 keV resonance yield a significantly less strength. In addition, an experimental upper limit for the E{sub c.m.}=92 keV resonance was determined.

  13. Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. Semiannual technical report, 1 March-31 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rester, A.C. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

  14. Optical and infrared absorption spectra of 3d transition metal ions-doped sodium borophosphate glasses and effect of gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, A M; ElBatal, F H; Azooz, M A; Ouis, M A; ElBatal, H A

    2012-12-01

    Undoped and transition metals (3d TM) doped sodium borophosphate glasses were prepared. UV-visible absorption spectra were measured in the region 200-900nm before and after gamma irradiation. Experimental optical data indicate that the undoped sodium borophosphate glass reveals before irradiation strong and broad UV absorption and no visible bands could be identified. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for preparation of this base borophosphate glass. The TMs-doped glasses show absorption bands within the UV and/or visible regions which are characteristic to each respective TM ion in addition to the UV absorption observed from the host base glass. Infrared absorption spectra of the undoped and TMs-doped glasses reveal complex FTIR consisting of extended characteristic vibrational bands which are specific for phosphate groups as a main constituent but with the sharing of some vibrations due to the borate groups. This criterion was investigated and approved using DAT (deconvolution analysis technique). The effects of different TMs ions on the FTIR spectra are very limited due to the low doping level (0.2%) introduced in the glass composition. Gamma irradiation causes minor effect on the FTIR spectra specifically the decrease of intensities of some bands. Such behavior is related to the change of bond angles and/or bond lengths of some structural building units upon gamma irradiation. PMID:22995547

  15. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume I. Data analysis methodology and hardware description

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and had dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  16. Application of spectrum shifting methodology to restore NaI(Tl)-recorded gamma spectra, shifted due to temperature variations in the environment.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pratip; Singha Roy, Arup; Verma, Amit K; Pant, Amar D; Prakasha, M S; Anilkumar, S; Vinod Kumar, A

    2016-01-01

    A method has been standardized for restoring a shifted differential pulse height spectrum from a scintillator based gamma ray spectrometer recorded at measurement temperature, to the position of a desired spectrum, recorded at a reference temperature. The method is based on the assumption that the spectrum obtained at measurement temperature represents the same statistical distribution as that at reference temperature but with different energy scales. A computer program has been developed for calculation of the transformation between the energy scales and for the restoration of the shifted spectrum. The method developed has been successfully applied for the restoration of gamma spectra measured at different temperatures. PMID:26492324

  17. A mass spectrometric analysis of {gamma}-GPS films

    SciTech Connect

    Dillingham, R.G.; Boerio, F.J.; Bertelsen, C.; Savina, M.R.; Lykke, K.R.; Calaway, W.F.

    1996-06-01

    {gamma}-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane ({gamma}-GPS) is used for pre-treatment of grit-blasted aluminum before adhesive bonding. This paper discusses analysis of non-reflective grit-blasted surfaces using mass spectrometry of species that were either sputtered off using an ion beam or thermally desorbed as neutrals using a pulsed laser and then post-ionized using a secondary laser. Results show that fragmentation is excessive and structural information is difficult to obtain from the spectra.

  18. Updated summary of measurements and calculations of neutron and gamma-ray emission spectra from spheres pusled with 14-MeV neutrons: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.; Goldberg, E.; Howerton, R.J.; Komoto, T.T.; Pohl, B.A.

    1989-01-19

    New measurements of the neutron and gamma-ray emission spectra from materials of interest to thermonuclear reactors with a 14 MeV neutron source were done during 1986 and 1987. These measurements characterized by better resolution than those reported in the Summary published in 1982, were performed using the pulsed sphere and time-of-flight techniques. The detector used in these measurements was a NE-213 cylinder, 5.08 cm in diameter by 5.08 cm thick. The new measurements include the following materials: Be, C, N, H/sub 2/O, C/sub 2/F/sub 4/ (teflon), Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Cu, Ta, W, Au, Pb, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U. For all these materials, both the neutron and gamma emission spectra were measured. A complete tabulation of all the measurements done under the Pulse Sphere Program is presented. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Verification of Monte Carlo Calculations by Means of Neutron and Gamma Fluence Spectra Measurements behind and inside of Iron-Water Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Bertram; Konheiser, Joerg; Noack, Klaus; Rogov, Anatoli; Grantz, Martin; Mehner, Hans-Christoph; Hinke, Dietmar; Unholzer, Siegfried

    2005-05-24

    Neutron and gamma spectra were measured behind and inside of modules consisting of variable iron and water slabs that were installed in radial beams of the zero-power training and research reactors AKR of the Technical University Dresden and ZLFR of the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz. The applied NE-213 scintillation spectrometer did allow the measurement of gamma and neutron fluence spectra in the energy regions 0.3-10 MeV for photons and 1.0-20 MeV for neutrons. The paper describes the experiments and presents important results of the measurements. They are compared with the results of Monte Carlo transport calculations made by means of the codes MCNP and TRAMO on an absolute scale of fluences.

  20. ROLE OF LINE-OF-SIGHT COSMIC-RAY INTERACTIONS IN FORMING THE SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS IN TeV GAMMA RAYS AND HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander; Kalashev, Oleg; Beacom, John F.

    2011-04-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. The observed high-energy gamma-ray signals from distant blazars may be dominated by secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. This explains the surprisingly low attenuation observed for distant blazars, because the production of secondary gamma rays occurs, on average, much closer to Earth than the distance to the source. Thus, the observed spectrum in the TeV range does not depend on the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum, while it depends on the output of the source in cosmic rays. We apply this hypothesis to a number of sources and, in every case, we obtain an excellent fit, strengthening the interpretation of the observed spectra as being due to secondary gamma rays. We explore the ramifications of this interpretation for limits on the extragalactic background light and for the production of cosmic rays in AGNs. We also make predictions for the neutrino signals, which can help probe the acceleration of cosmic rays in AGNs.

  1. Determination of thorium-232 in Canadian soils by gamma-ray spectrometry via lead-212 and actinium-228, interference from uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Zikovsky, L.; Blagoeva, R.

    1994-12-31

    Thorium-232 background levels in non-cultivated Canadian soils (southern and northern Quebec and the Northwest Territories) are presented. Gamma-ray spectrometry was used to determine the activity of {sup 232}Th by measuring the activities of {sup 228}Ac and {sup 212}Pb at 37 sites. The specific activity levels ranged from 2.7 to 95.5 Bq/kg with an overall mean of 24.0 {+-} 15.4 Bq/kg. This activity generated an annual absorbed dose equivalent in air of 0.1 mSv. The activities of {sup 228}Ac and {sup 212}Pb in the soil increased with increasing depth. IT was found that uranium, via its decay product radium, can interfere with the determination of thorium in the soil.

  2. Intercomparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Schütz, C L; Brochhausen, C; Hampel, G; Iffland, D; Kuczewski, B; Otto, G; Schmitz, T; Stieghorst, C; Kratz, J V

    2012-10-01

    Boron determination in blood and tissue samples is a crucial task especially for treatment planning, preclinical research, and clinical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Comparison of clinical findings remains difficult due to a variety of analytical methods, protocols, and standard reference materials in use. This paper addresses the comparability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, quantitative neutron capture radiography, and prompt gamma activation analysis for the determination of boron in biological samples. It was possible to demonstrate that three different methods relying on three different principles of sample preparation and boron detection can be validated against each other and yield consistent results for both blood and tissue samples. The samples were obtained during a clinical study for the application of BNCT for liver malignancies and therefore represent a realistic situation for boron analysis. PMID:22918535

  3. Empirical classification of VLT/Giraffe stellar spectra in the wavelength range 6440-6810 A in the gamma Vel cluster, and calibration of spectral indices

    E-print Network

    Damiani, F; Micela, G; Randich, S; Gilmore, G; Drew, J E; Jeffries, R D; Frémat, Y; Alfaro, E J; Bensby, T; Bragaglia, A; Flaccomio, E; Lanzafame, A C; Pancino, E; Recio-Blanco, A; Sacco, G G; Smiljanic, R; Jackson, R J; de Laverny, P; Morbidelli, L; Worley, C C; Hourihane, A; Costado, M T; Jofré, P; Lind, K; Maiorca, E

    2014-01-01

    We study spectral diagnostics available from optical spectra with R=17000 obtained with the VLT/Giraffe HR15n setup, using observations from the Gaia-ESO Survey, on the gamma Vel young cluster, in order to determine the fundamental parameters of these stars. We define a set of spectroscopic indices, sampling TiO bands, H-alpha core and wings, and many temperature- and gravity-sensitive lines. Combined indices tau (gamma) are also defined as Teff (log g) indicators over a wide spectral-type range. H-alpha emission-line indices are also chromospheric activity or accretion indicators. A metallicity-sensitive index is also defined. These indices enable us to find a clear difference between gravities of main-sequence and pre-main-sequence stars (as well as giant stars): the (gamma,tau) diagram is thus argued to be a promising distance-independent age measurement tool for young clusters. Our indices were quantitatively calibrated by means of photometry and literature reference spectra (from UVES-POP and ELODIE 3.1 ...

  4. "Discrepant hardenings" in cosmic ray spectra: a first estimate of the effects on secondary antiproton and diffuse gamma-ray yields

    E-print Network

    Fiorenza Donato; Pasquale D. Serpico

    2011-01-19

    Recent data from CREAM seem to confirm early suggestions that primary cosmic ray (CR) spectra at few TeV/nucleon are harder than in the 10-100 GeV range. Also, helium and heavier nuclei spectra appear systematically harder than the proton fluxes at corresponding energies. We note here that if the measurements reflect intrinsic features in the interstellar fluxes (as opposed to local effects) appreciable modifications are expected in the sub-TeV range for the secondary yields, such as antiprotons and diffuse gamma-rays. Presently, the ignorance on the origin of the features represents a systematic error in the extraction of astrophysical parameters as well as for background estimates for indirect dark matter searches. We find that the spectral modifications are appreciable above 100 GeV, and can be responsible for ~30% effects for antiprotons at energies close to 1 TeV or for gamma's at energies close to 300 GeV, compared to currently considered predictions based on simple extrapolation of input fluxes from low energy data. Alternatively, if the feature originates from local sources, uncorrelated spectral changes might show up in antiproton and high-energy gamma-rays, with the latter ones likely dependent from the line-of-sight.

  5. Standard test method for nondestructive analysis of special nuclear materials in homogeneous solutions by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the concentration of gamma-ray emitting special nuclear materials dissolved in homogeneous solutions. The test method corrects for gamma-ray attenuation by the solution and its container by measurement of the transmission of a beam of gamma rays from an external source (Refs. (1), (2), and (3)). 1.2 Two solution geometries, slab and cylinder, are considered. The solution container that determines the geometry may be either a removable or a fixed geometry container. This test method is limited to solution containers having walls or a top and bottom of equal transmission through which the gamma rays from the external transmission correction source must pass. 1.3 This test method is typically applied to radionuclide concentrations ranging from a few milligrams per litre to several hundred grams per litre. The assay range will be a function of the specific activity of the nuclide of interest, the physical characteristics of the solution container, counting equip...

  6. A unifying explanation of complex frequency spectra of gamma Dor, SPB and Be stars: combination frequencies and highly non-sinusoidal light curves

    E-print Network

    Kurtz, Donald W; Murphy, Simon J; Bedding, Timothy R; Bowman, Dominic M

    2015-01-01

    There are many Slowly Pulsating B (SPB) stars and gamma Dor stars in the Kepler Mission data set. The light curves of these pulsating stars have been classified phenomenologically into stars with symmetric light curves and with asymmetric light curves. In the same effective temperature ranges as the gamma Dor and SPB stars, there are variable stars with downward light curves that have been conjectured to be caused by spots. Among these phenomenological classes of stars, some show `frequency groups' in their amplitude spectra that have not previously been understood. While it has been recognised that nonlinear pulsation gives rise to combination frequencies in a Fourier description of the light curves of these stars, such combination frequencies have been considered to be a only a minor constituent of the amplitude spectra. In this paper we unify the Fourier description of the light curves of these groups of stars, showing that many of them can be understood in terms of only a few base frequencies, which we at...

  7. Direct determination of half-life of (214)Pb by gamma spectrometry and comparison with previous indirect measurements.

    PubMed

    Voltaggio, M; Spadoni, M

    2011-04-01

    A new value of half-life of (214)Pb was determined using (214)Pb-enriched radioactive sources made of polyurethane foam filters treated with Rn-enriched water. Measurements based on cumulative gamma rays countings yielded a value of 27.06 (7) min. This result is 0.17 min longer than the most recent value measured by indirect methods reported in the scientific literature (Martz et al., 1991). The difference between these two measurements is caused by beta recoil whose effects in glass substrates had been neglected. PMID:21236689

  8. New Levels in 151-153Pr by Combining High Statistics Gamma Coincidence Data and Mass/z Gated Gamma Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, E. H.; Lemasson, A.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Eldridge, J. M.; Navin, A.; Rejmund, M.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Liu, S. H.; Brewer, N. T.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Zhu, S. J.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.

    2015-06-01

    The previously reported levels and assignments to 151,152,153Pr have recently been called into question about the mass assignment to the reported bands. Recently prompt ?-rays in coincidence with isotopically-identified fission fragments using VAMOS++ and EXOGAM, produced using 238U on a 9Be target have been reported. To clarify the recently questioned mass assignments of 151,152,153Pr, the ?-?-?-? data from 252Cf (SF) by using Gammasphere and the GANIL in-beam mass- and Z-gated ?-spectra were combined to assign transitions and levels in these Pr isotopes. The transitions and levels previously assigned to 151,153Pr have been confirmed by the M-Z gated spectra. The transitions previously assigned to 152Pr are now assigned to 151Pr by using the M-Z gated spectra. Three new bands with 24 new transitions in 152Pr and one new band with 7 new transitions in 153Pr are identified. The Yttrium fission partners of all the 151,152,153Pr have Gaussian yield distributions that peak at the 3n channel.

  9. The natural radioactivity measurements in coastal sediment samples along the East Coast of Tamilnadu using gamma spectrometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramohan, J.; Tholkappian, M.; Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R.

    2015-08-01

    The natural radioactivity concentration in beach sediment samples collected from Pattipulam to Devanampattinam of East Coast of Tamilnadu have been determined by NaI (TI) gamma ray spectrometer. The specific activity concentrations range from ? 2.21 (BDL) to 37.02 Bq kg-1 with a mean of 3.79 Bqkg-1 for 238U, ? 2.11 (BDL) to 643.77 Bqkg-1 with a mean of 49.60 Bqkg-1 for 232Th and 300.34 Bqkg-1 to 449.08 Bqkg-1 with a mean of 360.23 Bqkg-1 for 40K. The potential radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides content such as Radium Equivalent activity (Raeq), Representative level index (RLI), External hazard index (Hex), absorbed gamma does rate (DR), and Annual effective dose rate (AEDR) are estimated to assess the radiation hazard associated with the sediments. The obtained data are compared with the recommended safety limits and international approved values. All the values are well below the recommended safety limits indicating that radiation levels do not poses any significant health hazard to the public in the area as a result of the natural radioactivity of beach sediments. This study may help the baseline data for more extensive works in the same subjects of future studies.

  10. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat spectrum radio quasar in fast-cooling regime

    E-print Network

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    In external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of the very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution $N'_{\\rm e}(\\gp)\\propto\\gp^{-p}$ with the spectral index $p\\sim1.3$ is formed below the minimum energy of injection electron when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e., inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum, and can reasonably explain the very hard \\emph{Fermi}-LAT spectrum of the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December. We examine the impact of gamma-ray emission site on the evolution of electron distribution and their radiative output in detail. We find that such hard \\emph{Fermi}-LAT spectrum and simultaneous X-ray observations can put a stringent constraint on the gamma-ray emission site. Variabil...

  11. First search for double beta decay of platinum by ultra-low background HP Ge gamma spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Belli, P; Cappella, F; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Di Marco, A; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Nagorny, S S; Nisi, S; Polischuk, O G; Tretyak, V I

    2011-01-01

    A search for double beta processes in 190Pt and 198Pt was realized with the help of ultra-low background HP Ge 468 cm^3 gamma spectrometer in the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy). After 1815 h of data taking with 42.5 g platinum sample, T_{1/2} limits on 2beta processes in 190Pt (\\epsilon\\beta^+ and 2\\epsilon) have been established on the level of 10^{14}-10^{16} yr, 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than those known previously. In particular, a possible resonant double electron capture in 190Pt was restricted on the level of 2.9 \\times 10^{16} yr at 90% C.L. In addition, T_{1/2} limit on 2 beta^- decay of 198Pt (2\

  12. First search for double beta decay of platinum by ultra-low background HP Ge gamma spectrometry

    E-print Network

    P. Belli; R. Bernabei; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; F. A. Danevich; A. Di Marco; A. Incicchitti; M. Laubenstein; S. S. Nagorny; S. Nisi; O. G. Polischuk; V. I. Tretyak

    2011-04-29

    A search for double beta processes in 190Pt and 198Pt was realized with the help of ultra-low background HP Ge 468 cm^3 gamma spectrometer in the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the INFN (Italy). After 1815 h of data taking with 42.5 g platinum sample, T_{1/2} limits on 2beta processes in 190Pt (\\epsilon\\beta^+ and 2\\epsilon) have been established on the level of 10^{14}-10^{16} yr, 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than those known previously. In particular, a possible resonant double electron capture in 190Pt was restricted on the level of 2.9 \\times 10^{16} yr at 90% C.L. In addition, T_{1/2} limit on 2 beta^- decay of 198Pt (2\

  13. Evaluation of natural radioactivity content in high-volume surface water samples along the northern coast of Oman Sea using portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Omidi, Zohre; Khorambagheri, Mahdi; Mortazavi, Mohammad Seddigh; Ebrahimi, Mahmood; Akbarzadeh, Gholamali

    2015-06-01

    Portable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry was carried out to determine the natural radioactivity levels in high volume surface water samples of the northern coast of Oman Sea, covering the coastal strip from Hormoz strait to Goatr seaport, for the first time. The water samples from 36 coastal and near shore locations were collected for analysis. Analyses on the samples collected were carried out to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K contents. The concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in surface water samples ranged between 2.19 and 2.82 Bq/L, 1.66-2.17 Bq/L and 132.6-148.87 Bq/L, respectively. The activity profile of radionuclides shows low activity across the study area. The study also examined some radiation hazard indices. The external hazard index was found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. The results of measurements will serve as background reference level for Oman Sea coastlines. PMID:25847859

  14. Development of a neural network approach to characterise (226)Ra contamination at legacy sites using gamma-ray spectra taken from boreholes.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul

    2015-02-01

    There are a large number of sites across the UK and the rest of the world that are known to be contaminated with (226)Ra owing to historical industrial and military activities. At some sites, where there is a realistic risk of contact with the general public there is a demand for proficient risk assessments to be undertaken. One of the governing factors that influence such assessments is the geometric nature of contamination particularly if hazardous high activity point sources are present. Often this type of radioactive particle is encountered at depths beyond the capabilities of surface gamma-ray techniques and so intrusive borehole methods provide a more suitable approach. However, reliable spectral processing methods to investigate the properties of the waste for this type of measurement have yet to be developed since a number of issues must first be confronted including: representative calibration spectra, variations in background activity and counting uncertainty. Here a novel method is proposed to tackle this issue based upon the interrogation of characteristic Monte Carlo calibration spectra using a combination of Principal Component Analysis and Artificial Neural Networks. The technique demonstrated that it could reliably distinguish spectra that contained contributions from point sources from those of background or dissociated contamination (homogenously distributed). The potential of the method was demonstrated by interpretation of borehole spectra collected at the Dalgety Bay headland, Fife, Scotland. Predictions concurred with intrusive surveys despite the realisation of relatively large uncertainties on activity and depth estimates. To reduce this uncertainty, a larger background sample and better spatial coverage of cores were required, alongside a higher volume better resolution detector. PMID:25461525

  15. Broad screening and identification of ?-agonists in feed and animal body fluid and tissues using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry combined with spectra library search.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Cao, Jingjing; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xian; He, Pingli

    2016-02-01

    Broad screening and identification of ?-agonists in feed, serum, urine, muscle and liver samples was achieved in a quick and highly sensitive manner using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap HRMS) combined with a spectra library search. Solid-phase extraction technology was employed for sample purification and enrichment. After extraction and purification, the samples were analyzed using a Q-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer under full-scan and data-dependent MS/MS mode. The acquired mass spectra were compared with an in-house library (compound library and MS/MS mass spectral library) built with TraceFinder Software which contained the M/Z of the precursor ion, chemical formula, retention time, character fragment ions and the entire MS/MS spectra of 32 ?-agonist standards. Screening was achieved by comparing 5 key mass spectral results and positive matches were marked. Using the developed method, the identification results from 10 spiked samples and 238 actual samples indicated that only 2% of acquired mass spectra produced false identities. The method validation results showed that the limit of detection ranged from 0.021-3.854 ?g kg(-1)and 0.015-1.198 ng mL(-1) for solid and liquid samples, respectively. PMID:26304337

  16. Multiparameter Multichannel Analyser System for Characterisation of Mixed Neutron - Gamma Field in the Experimental Reactor Lr-O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureš, Z.; Cvachovec, J.; Cvachovec, F.; ?eleda, P.; Ošmera, B.

    2003-06-01

    A multiparameter spectrometry system for neutron and gamma spectra measurement is described with the organic scintillator stilbene or NE-213 scintillator. The control logic has been realized with the Field Programmable Gate Array. The spectrometer was tested at the Nuclear Research Institute Rez. Measurements in the VVER - 1000 type reactor pressure vessel dosimetry benchmark in the LR-0 experimental reactor have been performed.

  17. Measurement of the 238U neutron-capture cross section and gamma-emission spectra from 10 eV to 100 keV using the DANCE detector at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John L; Couture, A J; Keksis, A L; Vieira, D J; O' Donnell, J M; Jandel, M; Haight, R C; Rundberg, R S; Kawano, T; Chyzh, A; Baramsai, B; Wu, C Y; Mitchell, G E; Becker, J A; Krticka, M

    2010-01-01

    A careful new measurement of the {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}) cross section from 10 eV to 100 keV has been made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. DANCE is a 4{pi} calorimetric scintillator array consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} crystals. Measurements were made on a 48 mg/cm{sup 2} depleted uranium target. The cross sections are in general good agreement with previous measurements. The gamma-ray emission spectra, as a function of gamma multiplicity, were also measured and compared to model calculations.

  18. Neutron spectrometry for UF6 enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principalmore »component analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.« less

  19. Size Effect on Nuclear Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra Acquired by Different Sized CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan, Ding; Beller, Denis; Cutler, Matthew; Contreras, Chris; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wilde, Scott UNLV

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-ray energy spectra were acquired for different sizes of cerium tribromide (CeBr3), cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), and thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) detectors. A comparison was conducted of the energy resolution and detection efficiency of these scintillator detectors for different sizes of detectors. The results of this study are consistent with the observation that for each size detector, LaBr3:Ce offers better resolution than either a CeBr3 or NaI:Tl detector of the same size. In addition, CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks in the spectra of several radioisotopes that NaI:Tl could not. As the detector size increased, all three detector materials exhibited higher efficiency, albeit with slightly reduced resolution. Significantly, the very low intrinsic activity of CeBr3 is also demonstrated in this study, which, when combined with energy resolution characteristics for a range of detector sizes, could lead to an improved ability to detect special nuclear materials compared to the other detectors.

  20. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Ion Recovery and Clean-Up of MS and MS/MS Spectra Obtained from Low Abundance Viral Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Crispin, Max; Bonomelli, Camille; Scrivens, Jim H.

    2015-07-01

    Many samples of complex mixtures of N-glycans released from small amounts of material, such as glycoproteins from viruses, present problems for mass spectrometric analysis because of the presence of contaminating material that is difficult to remove by conventional methods without involving sample loss. This study describes the use of ion mobility for extraction of glycan profiles from such samples and for obtaining clean CID spectra when targeted m/z values capture additional ions from those of the target compound. N-glycans were released enzymatically from within SDS-PAGE gels, from the representative recombinant glycoprotein, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus, and examined by direct infusion electrospray in negative mode followed by ion mobility with a Waters Synapt G2 mass spectrometer (Waters MS-Technologies, Manchester, UK). Clean profiles of singly, doubly, and triply charged N-glycans were obtained from samples in cases where the raw electrospray spectra displayed only a few glycan ions as the result of low sample concentration or the presence of contamination. Ion mobility also enabled uncontaminated CID spectra to be obtained from glycans when their molecular ions displayed coincidence with ions from fragments or multiply charged ions with similar m/z values. This technique proved to be invaluable for removing extraneous ions from many CID spectra. The presence of such ions often produces spectra that are difficult to interpret. Most CID spectra, even those from abundant glycan constituents, benefited from such clean-up, showing that the extra dimension provided by ion mobility was invaluable for studies of this type.

  1. Using Gamma ray and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) to Evaluate Elemental Sequences in Cap-carbonates and Cap-like Carbonates of the Death Valley Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holter, S. A.; Theissen, K. M.; Hickson, T. A.; Bostick, B.

    2004-12-01

    The Snowball Earth theory of Hoffman et al. (1998) proposes dramatic post-glacial chemical weathering as large concentrations of carbon were removed from the atmosphere. This would result in a large input of terrigenous material into the oceans; hence, we might expect that carbonates formed under these conditions would demonstrate elevated K, U, Th levels in comparison to carbonates formed under more typical conditions. In January of 2004 we collected spectral gamma data (K, U, Th) and hand samples from cap carbonates (Noonday Dolomite) and cap-like carbonates (Beck Spring Dolomite) of the Death Valley region in order to explore elemental changes in post-snowball Earth oceans. Based on our spectral gamma results, Th/U ratio trends suggested variations in the oxidation state of the Precambrian ocean. We pursued further investigations of trace elements to ascertain the reliability of these results by using ICP-OES. A suite of 25 trace elements was measured, most notably including U and Th. The ICP-OES data not only allow us to compare elemental changes between cap-carbonates and cap-like carbonates, but they also allow for a comparison of optical emission spectrometry and hand held gamma spectrometry methods. Both methods show similar trends in U and Th values for both the cap-carbonates and cap-like carbonates.

  2. Ion Momentum Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Bapat, Bhas

    Ion Momentum Spectrometry Bhas Bapat Fragmentation of Molecular Ions multi-fold differential cross data acquisition sample spectra Momentum Maps multi-ion-coincidence momentum analysis Issues and Examples Electron-impact DI of methanol Photoionisation of CO2 DI of CCl + 4 Summary Ion Momentum

  3. Raman spectra of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersed on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Scheithauer, M.; Knoezinger, H.; Vannice, M.A.

    1998-09-10

    Lanthanum oxide dispersed on alumina is a system of considerable interest for at least two reasons. First, it has been stated that La{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the best-known inhibitor of sintering in {gamma}- and other transition aluminas, thus it can have a role in automotive exhaust catalysts. Second, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been found to be a selective catalyst for the reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} with CH{sub 4} in excess O{sub 2}. Raman spectra have been obtained for La{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, but only after La{sub 2}O{sub 3} coverages reach one theoretical monolayer or higher. Sharp peaks at 104, 191, and 408 cm{sup {minus}1} were observed, which are in excellent agreement with previous studies of bulk La{sub 2}O{sub 3}; however, two additional broader, but intense bands not previously reported were also observed at 322 and 935 cm{sup {minus}1}. These latter two bands disappear at temperatures of 450 K or higher, but they returned with full intensity upon cooling to 300 K. A sample of bulk La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (a-form) with a low surface/volume ratio also exhibited weak peaks at these latter two positions. Raman spectra taken with different exciting laser lines showed that the bands at 322 and 935 cm{sup {minus}1} can be attributed to a laser-excited luminescence. It is inferred that these luminescence bands are evidence for the presence of oxygen anion vacancies. After exposure to NO at 300 K, two peaks developed at 747 and 1047 cm{sup {minus}1} which can be assigned to a surface nitrate species.

  4. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.

    E-print Network

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  5. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields

    E-print Network

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  6. Formation and reactions of negative ions relevant to chemical ionization mass spectrometry. I. Cl mass spectra of organic compounds produced by F? reactions

    PubMed Central

    Tiernan, T. O.; Chang, C.; Cheng, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic study of the negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectra produced by the reaction of F? with a wide variety of organic compounds has been accomplished. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with a modified high pressure ion source was employed for these experiments. The F? reagent ion was generated from CF3H or NF3, typically at an ion source pressure of 100 ?m. In pure NF3, F? is the major ion formed and constitutes more than 90% of the total ion intensity. While F? is also the major primary ion formed in pure CF3H, it undergoes rapid ion-molecule reactions at elevated source pressures, yielding (HF)nF? (n = 1?3) ions, which makes CF3H less suitable as a chemical ionization reagent gas. Among the organic compounds investigated were carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, esters, alcohols, phenols, halides, nitriles, nitrobenzene, ethers, amines and hydrocarbons. An intense (M ? 1)? ion was observed in the F? chemical ionization mass spectra of carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes and phenols. Alcohols yield only (M + F)? ions upon reaction with F?. A weaker (M + F)? ion was also detected in the F? chemical ionization spectra of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones and nitriles. The F? chemical ionization mass spectra of esters, halides, nitriles, nitrobenzene and ethers are characterized primarily by the ions, RCOO?, X?, CN?, NO2?, and OR?, respectively. In addition, esters show a very weak (M ? 1)? ion (except formates). In the F? chemical ionization spectra of some aliphatic alkanes and o-xylene, a very weak (M + F)? ion was observed. Amines and aliphatic alkenes exhibit only insignificant fragment ions under similar conditions, while aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene and toluene are not reactive at all with the F? ion. The mechanisms of the various reactions mentioned are discussed, and several experimental complications are noted. In still other studies, the effects of varying several experimental parameters, including source pressure, relative proportions of the reagent and analyte, and other ion source parameters, on the observed chemical ionization mass spectra were also investigated. In a mixture of NF3 and n-butanol, for example, the ratio of the intensities of the ions characteristic of the alcohol to that of the (HF)nF? ion was found to decrease with increasing sample pressure, with increasing NF3 pressure, and with increasing electron energy. No significant effects on the spectra were observed to result from variation of the source repeller field or the source temperature. The addition of argon to the source as a potential moderator did not alter the F? chemical ionization spectrum significantly, but the use of oxygen appears to inhibit formation of the (HF)nF? cluster ion. The advantages of using F? as a chemical ionization reagent are discussed, and comparisons are made with other reagent ions. PMID:7428746

  7. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the ?-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  8. Radiation metabolomics. 3. Biomarker discovery in the urine of gamma-irradiated rats using a simplified metabolomics protocol of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with random forests machine learning algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Christian; Patterson, Andrew D; Slavík, Josef; Krausz, Kristopher W; Ledermann, Monika; Gonzalez, Frank J; Idle, Jeffrey R

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Radiation metabolomics employing mass spectral technologies represents a plausible means of high-throughput minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. A simplified metabolomics protocol is described that employs ubiquitous gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and open source software including random forests machine learning algorithm to uncover latent biomarkers of 3 Gy gamma radiation in rats. Urine was collected from six male Wistar rats and six sham-irradiated controls for 7 days, 4 prior to irradiation and 3 after irradiation. Water and food consumption, urine volume, body weight, and sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, phosphate and urea excretion showed major effects from exposure to gamma radiation. The metabolomics protocol uncovered several urinary metabolites that were significantly up-regulated (glyoxylate, threonate, thymine, uracil, p-cresol) and down-regulated (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, adipate, pimelate, suberate, azelaate) as a result of radiation exposure. Thymine and uracil were shown to derive largely from thymidine and 2'-deoxyuridine, which are known radiation biomarkers in the mouse. The radiation metabolomic phenotype in rats appeared to derive from oxidative stress and effects on kidney function. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a promising platform on which to develop the field of radiation metabolomics further and to assist in the design of instrumentation for use in detecting biological consequences of environmental radiation release. PMID:19630524

  9. Free electron laser-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry facility for obtaining infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra of gaseous ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, Jose J.; Eyler, John R.; Oomens, Jos; Moore, David T.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Helden, Gert von; Meijer, Gerard; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.; Blakney, Gregory T.

    2005-02-01

    A Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer has been installed at a free electron laser (FEL) facility to obtain infrared absorption spectra of gas phase ions by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The FEL provides continuously tunable infrared radiation over a broad range of the infrared spectrum, and the FT-ICR mass spectrometer, utilizing a 4.7 Tesla superconducting magnet, permits facile formation, isolation, trapping, and high-mass resolution detection of a wide range of ion classes. A description of the instrumentation and experimental parameters for these experiments is presented along with preliminary IRMPD spectra of the singly-charged chromium-bound dimer of diethyl ether (Cr(C{sub 4}H{sub 10}O){sub 2}{sup +}) and the fluorene molecular ion (C{sub 13}H{sub 10}{sup +}). Also presented is a brief comparison of the fluorene cation spectrum obtained by the FT-ICR-FEL with an earlier spectrum recorded using a quadrupole ion trap (QIT)

  10. Effects of Fe as a physical filter on spectra of Technitium- 99m, uniformity, system volume sensitivity and spatial resolution of Philip ADAC Forte dual-head gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohaimi, N.; Abdullah, N.; Shah, S. I.; Zakaria, A.

    2014-11-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging inherits some limitations, i.e., due to scattered gamma photons which degrade spatial resolution causes poor image quality. This study attempts to reduce a fraction of scattered gamma photons before reaching gamma camera detector by using Fe sheet (0.35 mm and 0.40 mm) as a physical filter. Also investigate the effects on spectra of Tc-99m, spatial resolution, system volume sensitivity and uniformity. The thickness of Fe physical filter is selected on the basis of percentage attenuation calculations of different gamma ray energies by various thicknesses of material. Data were acquired using Philip ADAC forte dual-head gamma camera without and with physical filter with LEHR collimator installed. For spectra, uniformity and system volume sensitivity, a cylindrical source tank filled with water added with Tc-99m was scanned. Uniformity and system volume sensitivity images were reconstructed with FBP method by applying Butterworth filter of order 5, cut-off frequency 0.35 cycles/cm and Chang's attenuation correction method using 0.13 cm-1 linear attenuation coefficient. Spatial resolution study was done by scanning a line source (0.8 mm inner diameter) of Tc-99m at various source-to-collimator distances in air and in scattering medium without and with physical filter. A substantial reduction in count rate from Compton and photopeak regions of Tc-99m spectra with physical filter is recorded. Improvement in spatial resolution with physical filter up to 4 cm source-to-collimator distance is obtained. System volume sensitivity was reduced and no improvement in uniformity. These thicknesses of physical filter may be tested further by scanning different planar/SPECT phantoms in Tc-99m imaging.

  11. Neutron spectrometry for UF6 enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.

  12. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  13. Exposure Dose Reconstruction from EPR Spectra of Tooth Enamel Exposed to the Combined Effect of X-rays and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, J. I.

    2014-09-01

    We have used EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel to show that the combined effect of x-rays with effective energy 34 keV and gamma radiation with average energy 1250 keV leads to a significant increase in the reconstructed absorbed dose compared with the applied dose from a gamma source or from an x-ray source or from both sources of electromagnetic radiation. In simulation experiments, we develop an approach to estimating the contribution of diagnostic x-rays to the exposure dose formed in the tooth enamel by the combined effect of x-rays and gamma radiation.

  14. Effects on the thermally stimulated discharge-current spectra of a cured epoxy resin system exposed to up to 2 MGy of gamma and neutron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouracre, R. A.; Al-Attabi, A.; Given, M. J.; Banford, H. M.; Tedford, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of high radiation doses of both ? and neutron radiation on the thermally stimulated discharge spectra of an epoxy resin system have been investigated. The glass transition temperature was found to depend both on the dose level and the nature of the radiation. Thermal cleaning techniques have been applied to the measured TSDC spectra which were shown to be due to charge migration. Modelling of ion charge transport showed that resultant TSDC spectra behaved in a similar fashion to dipolar processes, allowing a similar analysis. As a result data pertaining to the relaxation process can be derived and from which it was shown that the same compensation law operated for both irradiated and pristine samples. This relationship between the activation entropy and activation enthalpy held for both thermally cleaned TSDC spectra and for spectra obtained at different polarisation voltages.

  15. Raman Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Derek J.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews mainly quantitative analytical applications in the field of Raman spectrometry. Includes references to other reviews, new and analytically untested techniques, and novel sampling and instrument designs. Cites 184 references. (CS)

  16. Low-spin states of /sup 250/Cf populated in the electron capture decay of 2. 22-h /sup 250/Es. [ULTIPOLE TRANSITIONS; PARITY; ROTATIONAL STATES; SPIN; VIBRATIONAL STATES; GAMMA SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Sjoblom, R.K.

    1980-09-01

    Low-spin states of /sup 250/Cf have been investigated by measuring ..gamma.. rays and conversion electrons associated with the electron capture decay of 2.22-h /sup 250/Es. Mass-separated /sup 250/Es samples produced by the /sup 249/Cf(d,n) reaction were used for these measurements. The ..gamma..-ray spectra were measured with a 25-cm/sup 3/ coaxial Ge(Li) spectrometer and the electron spectra were measured with a cooled Si(Li) detector. Multipolarities of intense transitions in /sup 250/Cf were deduced and logft values of electron capture transitions were derived from measured electron capture intensities. On the basis of the results of the present investigation the following bandheads were identified in /sup 250/Cf: E (keV),K,I..pi..=871.6, 2,2-; 1031.9, 2,2+; 1154.2, 0,0+; 1175.5, 1,1-; 1210.0, 2,2-; 1244.4, 2,2+; 1266.5, 0,0+; and 1658.1, 2,2+. The 2.22-h state in /sup 250/Es has been given a spin-parity assignment of 1- with configuration )n(734)9/2-; p(633)7/2+)/sub 1//sub -/.

  17. Spatial mapping of soil and radioactivity redistribution at the hillslope scale using in-situ gamma spectrometry, terrestrial laser scanning and RFID tags after the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, Jeremy; Onda, Yuichi; Noguchi, Takehiro; Parsons, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    In March 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, triggered by the Tohoku earthquake and the consequent tsunami, released a large amount of radionuclides in the environment. To provide a rapid assessment of the soil contamination and its potential redistribution, intensive scientific monitoring has been conducted since July 2011 in our study site, located in the Yamakiya district of Kawamata town, in Fukushima prefecture, Japan, about 37 km from the power plant. In this paper, we summarize and analyze a dataset combining multiple innovative methods deployed inside a 5m x 22m bounded hillslope plot. In addition to runoff volumes and sediments radiocesium concentrations, each major rainfall event was followed by in situ gamma spectrometry measurements. In 2012, to trace the complex behavior of sediments inside the plot, about 300 RFID (Radio-Frequency IDentification) tags representing coarse sediments were scattered and their spatial position was periodically checked using a total station. Finally, several high resolutions Digital Elevation Models were acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner to assess the surface structure and changes. The observed processes at the event scale include interrill and rill erosion, as well as local deposition and remobilization phenomenon. Not only do they directly provide information on the erosion spatio-temporal variability and the associated radionuclides transfers, but combined together they can constitute a solid basis to improve and challenge process-based distributed erosion models.

  18. Small Scale Assessment of Spatial and Vertical Redistribution of Fukushima Fallouts Radiocaesium in Contaminated Soil Using in-situ HPGe Gamma Ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, J.; Onda, Y.; Yoda, H.; Kato, H.

    2011-12-01

    After Tohoku earthquake on March 11th 2011, the subsequent tsunami and the resulting Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, gamma emitting particles, first release into the atmosphere, were quickly deposited on the soil surface, with potentially harmful level in the surroundings of the nuclear power plant. Thus, the evaluation of soil deposition pattern, depth migration and afterward radionuclides redistribution and export by erosion and hydrological processes is fundamental for contamination assessments and to plan future actions. Our study site is located 37km from Fukushima power plant, inside the evacuated zone. In this study, we used a bounded erosion plot of 22.1m x 5m to assess global export of sediments and 137Cs. This plot, previously cropped with tobacco, is morphologically divided into inter-rill areas separated by rills that formed into former wheel tracks. The bottom of the plot is subject to deposition of sediments. In order to determine and quantify the internal processes responsible of the export of sediment, the depth distribution of 137Cs is estimated using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Such a portable device, associated to the high radiation levels, allow an acquisition of spatially distributed data within the plot in a reasonable time (1 min/sample). At the same time, depth distribution of 137Cs are measured using the scrapper plate technique, adapted to obtain a fine resolution in the first, highly contaminated, centimeters of soil. Finally, 137Cs depth profiles, associated with in situ and laboratory gamma spectrums acquired with the portable detector, allow for the detector calibration. Although the initial deposit can reasonably be supposed homogeneous at the plot scale, the dataset obtained 3 months later shows high spatial and temporal variability due to erosion processes. Measurements with the portable HPGe detector proved to be useful at this small scale, avoiding the needs of a large number of soil samples, and our results are promising to understand erosion at larger scale where horizontal patterns of deposition and redistribution are usually supposed homogeneous over quite larger areas.

  19. Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using ?-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Mandakini; Krishnan, Narayani; Sengupta, D.

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K were determined by a gamma ray spectrometer using the HPGe detector with 50% relative efficiency, and the radiation dose to the local population was estimated. The average estimated activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in the surface soil were 53.8, 44.2 and 464.2 Bq kg?1 respectively. The average absorbed dose rate in the study area was estimated to be 72.5 nGy h-1, where as the annual effective dose to the population was 0.09 mSv y-1. A correlation analysis was made between measured dose rate and individual radionuclides, in order to delineate the contribution of the respective nuclides towards dose rate. The radio-elemental concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium estimated for the soils, in the study area, indicated the enrichment of uranium series nuclide. The results of the present study were subsequently compared with international and national recommended values. PMID:21170189

  20. Spectra and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma rays from 0.3 to 10 MeV at lambda = 40 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, J. C.; Gruber, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the spectral and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma sq cm rays in the energy range 0.3-10 MeV over Palestine, Texas, at residual depths of 2.5 and 70 g/sq cm are reported. In confirmation of the general features of a model prediction, the measurements show at 2.5 g/sq cm upward moving fluxes greater than the downward moving fluxes, the effect increasing with energy, and approximate isotropy at 70 g/sq cm. Numerous characteristic gamma-ray lines were observed, most prominently at 0.511, 1.6, 2.3, 4.4, and 6.1 MeV. Their intensities were also compared with model predictions. Observations were made with an actively shielded scintillator counter with two detectors, one of aperture 50 deg FWHM and the other of 120 deg FWHM. Above 1 MeV, contributions to the counting rate from photons penetrating the shield annulus and from neutron interactions were large; they were studied by means of a Monte Carlo code and are extensively discussed.

  1. Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

  2. Alpha particle analysis using PEARLS spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha particle assay by conventional plate-counting methods is difficult because chemical separation, tracer techniques, and/or self-absorption losses in the final sample may cause either non-reproducible results or create unacceptable errors. PEARLS (Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) Spectrometry is an attractive alternative since radionuclides may be extracted into a scintillator in which there would be no self-absorption or geometry problems and in which up to 100% chemical recovery and counting efficiency is possible. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic-phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillator. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination to provide discrete alpha spectra and virtual absence of beta and gamma backgrounds. Backgrounds on the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 100 +-1% range. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium, and polonium assay. This paper will review liquid scintillation alpha counting methods and reference some of the specific applications. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Formation of the 0.511.-MeV line in solar flares. [statistical mechanics of line spectra for gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Joyce, G.; Ramaty, R.; Werntz, C.

    1976-01-01

    The gamma-ray line produced at 0.51-MeV was studied and is shown to be the result of either of free annihilation of positrons with electrons or of the decay of positronium by 2-photon emission. Positron annihilation from the bound state of positronium may also proceed by 3-photon emission, resulting in a continuum with energies up to 0.51-MeV. Accurate calculations of the rates of free annihilation and positronium formation in a solar-flare plasma are presented. Estimates of the positronium-formulation rates by charge exchange and the rates of dissociation and quenching are also considered. The temperature and density dependence of the ratio of 3-photon to 2-photon emission was obtained. It is shown that when the ratio of free electrons to neutral atoms in the plasma is approximately unity or greater, the Doppler width of the 0.51-MeV line is a function of the temperature of the annihilation region. For the small ion densities characteristics of the photosphere, the width is predominantly a function of the density.

  4. A MACHINE LEARNING APPROACH TO PREDICTING PEPTIDE FRAGMENTATION SPECTRA

    E-print Network

    Radivojac, Predrag

    Accurate peptide identification from tandem mass spectrometry experiments is the cornerstone of proteomics. Although various approaches for matching database sequences with experimental spectra have been developed pep- tide database searches and that the most useful rules of fragmentation significantly differ

  5. EPR study of free radicals in non- and gamma-irradiated nutritive supplements containing anthocyanins concentrate from lyophilized red wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenova, Ralitsa B.; Firzov, Cyril; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2010-09-01

    Nutritive supplements Enoviton, Enoviton C and Enoviton CE containing standardized anthocyanins from lyophilized red wine, vitamins (some of them) and excipients were investigated by EPR spectrometry before and after gamma-irradiation. Non-irradiated samples exhibit one singlet line with g=2.0039±0.0002, most probably due to free radicals from anthocyanins. After irradiation with 10 kGy gamma-rays, tablets of ?noviton, ?noviton ? and ?noviton ??, all exhibit complex EPR signals centered at a g-value of g=2.0034. The EPR spectrum of irradiated Enoviton is different from that of ?noviton ? or ?noviton ?? due to the overlap of the spectra of microcrystalline cellulose and the background singlet spectrum present in all tablets with the EPR resonance due to irradiated ascorbic acid (in ?noviton ? and ?noviton ??). Gamma-induced free radicals exhibit long time stability—for a six months period the intensity of central peak decrease with 30-40%.

  6. The development of a new edition of the gamma-ray spectrum catalogues designed for presentation in electronic format

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, R.L.

    1997-05-01

    New editions of the original Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogues are being prepared for publication in electronic format. The objective of this program is to produce versions of the Catalogues in CD-ROM format and as an Internet resource. Additions to the original content of the Catalogues will include integrated decay scheme drawings, tables of related decay data, and updated text on the techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry. Related decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) are then added, and all data converted to the Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format for CD-ROM production and availability on the Internet. At a later date the catalogues will be expanded to include spectra representing the response of large-volume Ge detectors, alpha-particle spectra, prompt neutron capture and inelastic scattering gamma-ray spectra, and gross fission product spectra characteristic of fuel cycle waste materials. Characterization of radioactivity in materials is a requirement in many phases of radioactive waste management. Movement, shipping, treatment, all activities which involve handling of mixed waste or TRU categories of waste at all DOE sites will require that measurements and assessment documentation utilize basic nuclear data which are tracable to internationally accepted standard values. This program will involve the identification of data needs unique to the development and application of specialized detector systems for radioactive waste characterization.

  7. Gamma spectroscopy of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2013-05-01

    We describe experiments for the undergraduate laboratory that use a high-resolution gamma detector to measure radiation in environmental samples. The experiments are designed to instruct the students in the quantitative analysis of gamma spectra and secular equilibrium. Experiments include the radioactive dating of Brazil nuts, determining radioisotope concentrations in natural samples, and measurement of the 235U abundance in uranium rich rocks.

  8. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  9. Infrared spectra of U.S. automobile original finishes (1998-2000). IX. identification of bismuth oxychloride and silver/white mica pearlescent pigments using extended range FT-IR spectroscopy, XRF spectrometry, and SEM/EDS analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Edward M

    2014-09-01

    Bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl) was the first viable synthetic pearl pigment developed 50 years ago. It was only used for a limited time period in automotive paint (model years 1998-2000), serving to produce luster for a single Chrysler black metallic color. Identification of this pigment in an unknown automotive paint can thus facilitate determination of the vehicle of origin. Bismuth oxychloride imparts effects similar to those produced by silver/white mica pearlescent pigments, and such a pigment was used together with bismuth oxychloride in at least one original equipment manufacturer (OEM) basecoat. Silver/white micas are now used primarily in white pearl tricoat systems. This article describes the identification of bismuth oxychloride and silver/white mica pearlescent pigments in automotive finishes using FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry, and SEM/EDS analysis. Data for some cadmium pigments, which were used in automotive paint several decades ago, are also presented as they produce infrared absorptions similar to that of bismuth oxychloride. PMID:24646090

  10. Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

  11. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L. (editor); Ramaty, R. (editor)

    1978-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

  12. Infrared spectra of olivine polymorphs - Alpha, beta phase and spinel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.

    1980-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of several olivines (alpha phase) and their corresponding beta phase (modified spinel) and spinel (gamma) high-pressure polymorphs are determined. Spectra were measured for ground and pressed samples of alpha and gamma A2SiO4, where A = Fe, Ni, Co; alpha and gamma Mg2GeO4; alpha Mg2SiO4; and beta Co2SiO4. The spectra are interpreted in terms of internal, tetrahedral and octagonal, and lattice vibration modes, and the spinel results are used to predict the spectrum of gamma Mg2SiO4. Analysis of spectra obtained from samples of gamma Mg2GeO4 heated to 730 and 1000 C provides evidence that partial inversion could occur in silicate spinels at elevated temperatures and pressures.

  13. Single-protein nanomechanical mass spectrometry in real time

    PubMed Central

    Hanay, M.S.; Kelber, S.; Naik, A.K.; Chi, D.; Hentz, S.; Bullard, E.C.; Colinet, E.; Duraffourg, L.; Roukes, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) resonators can detect mass with exceptional sensitivity. Previously, mass spectra from several hundred adsorption events were assembled in NEMS-based mass spectrometry using statistical analysis. Here, we report the first realization of single-molecule NEMS-based mass spectrometry in real time. As each molecule in the sample adsorbs upon the NEMS resonator, its mass and the position-of-adsorption are determined by continuously tracking two driven vibrational modes of the device. We demonstrate the potential of multimode NEMS-based mass spectrometry by analyzing IgM antibody complexes in real-time. NEMS-MS is a unique and promising new form of mass spectrometry: it can resolve neutral species, provides resolving power that increases markedly for very large masses, and allows acquisition of spectra, molecule-by-molecule, in real-time. PMID:22922541

  14. The development of a new edition of the gamma-ray spectrum catalogues designed for presentation in electronic format

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, R.L.

    1997-11-01

    New editions of the original Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogues are being prepared for publication in electronic format. The objective of this program is to produce versions of the Catalogues in CD-ROM format and as an Internet resource. Additions to the original content of the Catalogues will include integrated decay scheme drawings, tables of related decay data, and updated text on the techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry. Related decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) are then added, and all data converted to the Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format for CD-ROM production and availability on the large-volume Ge detectors, alpha-particle spectra, prompt neutron capture and inelastic scattering gamma-ray spectra, and gross fission product spectra characteristic of fuel cycle waste materials. Characterization of radioactivity in materials is a requirement in many phases of radioactive waste management. Movement, shipping, treatment, all activities which involve handling of mixed waste or TRU categories of waste at all DOE sites will require that measurements and assessment documentation utilize basic nuclear data which are tracable to internationally accepted standard values. This program will involve the identification of data needs unique to the development and application of specialized detector systems for radioactive waste characterization. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Xgremlin: Interferograms and spectra from Fourier transform spectrometers analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, G.; Griesmann, U.; Brault, J. W.; Abrams, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Xgremlin is a hardware and operating system independent version of the data analysis program Gremlin used for Fourier transform spectrometry. Xgremlin runs on PCs and workstations that use the X11 window system, including cygwin in Windows. It is used to Fourier transform interferograms, plot spectra, perform phase corrections, perform intensity and wavenumber calibration, and find and fit spectral lines. It can also be used to construct synthetic spectra, subtract continua, compare several different spectra, and eliminate ringing around lines.

  16. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  17. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A.M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A.I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approx. 0.01 deg (E(sub gamma) > 100 GeV), the energy resolution approx. 1% (E(sub gamma) > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approx 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  18. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  19. MCMC-based inversion algorithm dedicated to NEMS mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérenon, R.; Mohammad-Djafari, A.; Sage, E.; Duraffourg, L.; Hentz, S.; Brenac, A.; Morel, R.; Grangeat, P.

    2013-08-01

    Nano Electro Mechanical Systems (NEMS) provide new perspectives in the mass spectrometry field. This new generation of sensors is sensitive enough to detect a single molecule. Thus, it is possible to estimate a concentration profile in a counting-mode which brings a reduced noise and a higher sensitivity. In this paper, first, we briefly describe the measurement system. Then we propose a probabilistic model of the acquisition system in the form of an input-output system from which we can deduce the likelihood of the unknowns in the data and a Bayesian inference approach with a hierarchical Bernoulli-Gamma prior model. To do the computation we propose the use of a Multiple-Try Metropolis Monte-Carlo Markov-Chain algorithm. Multiple-Try Metropolis proposal functions are adapted to the model, especially to the discrete nature of the problem. Our approach provides an automatic robust estimation of mass spectra. We test the proposed algorithm both on experimental and on simulated data. We discuss the performances of the algorithm and the robustness of the estimation.

  20. BIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Single Crystal X-ray Diffractometry Mass Spectrometry Elemental Analysis (CHN) Other Analytical Methods chamber with Near field scanner Superconductor Chamber Microwave Network Analysers OPTICAL DIAGNOSTICS

  1. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from a single wheat cultivar facilitates interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data and discrimination of gamma gliadin proteins that may play different functional roles in flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complement of gamma gliadin genes expressed in the wheat cultivar Butte 86 was evaluated by analyzing publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST) data. Eleven contigs were assembled from 153 Butte 86 ESTs. Nine of the contigs encoded full-length proteins and four of the proteins contained an...

  2. Radiation Metabolomics. 3. Biomarker Discovery in the Urine of Gamma-Irradiated Rats Using a Simplified Metabolomics Protocol of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Combined with Random Forests Machine Learning Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Christian; Patterson, Andrew D.; Slavík, Josef; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Ledermann, Monika; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation metabolomics employing mass spectral technologies represents a plausible means of high-throughput minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. A simplified metabolomics protocol is described that employs ubiquitous gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and open source software including random forests machine learning algorithm to uncover latent biomarkers of 3 Gy ? radiation in rats. Urine was collected from six male Wistar rats and six sham-irradiated controls for 7 days, 4 prior to irradiation and 3 after irradiation. Water and food consumption, urine volume, body weight, and sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, phosphate and urea excretion showed major effects from exposure to ? radiation. The metabolomics protocol uncovered several urinary metabolites that were significantly up-regulated (glyoxylate, threonate, thymine, uracil, p-cresol) and down-regulated (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, adipate, pimelate, suberate, azelaate) as a result of radiation exposure. Thymine and uracil were shown to derive largely from thymidine and 2?-deoxyuridine, which are known radiation biomarkers in the mouse. The radiation metabolomic phenotype in rats appeared to derive from oxidative stress and effects on kidney function. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a promising platform on which to develop the field of radiation metabolomics further and to assist in the design of instrumentation for use in detecting biological consequences of environmental radiation release. PMID:19630524

  3. Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

  4. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  5. {gamma} ray astronomy with muons

    SciTech Connect

    Halzen, F.; Stanev, T.; Yodh, G.B.

    1997-04-01

    Although {gamma} ray showers are muon poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard {gamma} ray spectra there is a relative {open_quotes}enhancement{close_quotes} of muons from {gamma} ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower {gamma} rays above the photoproduction threshold contribute to the number of muons N{sub {mu}}, which is thus proportional to the primary {gamma} ray energy. With {gamma} ray energy 50 times higher than the muon energy and a probability of muon production by the {gamma}{close_quote}s of about 1{percent}, muon detectors can match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector if their effective area is larger by 10{sup 4}. The muons must have enough energy for sufficiently accurate reconstruction of their direction for doing astronomy. These conditions are satisfied by relatively shallow neutrino detectors such as AMANDA and Lake Baikal, and by {gamma} ray detectors such as MILAGRO. TeV muons from {gamma} ray primaries, on the other hand, are rare because they are only produced by higher energy {gamma} rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy with the AMANDA, Lake Baikal, and MILAGRO detectors. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These images, taken with the LEISA infrared camera on the New Horizons Ralph instrument, show fine details in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere using light that can only be seen using infrared sensors. These are 'false color' pictures made by assigning infrared wavelengths to the colors red, green and blue. LEISA (Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array) takes images across 250 IR wavelengths in the range from 1.25 to 2.5 microns, allowing scientists to obtain an infrared spectrum at every location on Jupiter. A micron is one millionth of a meter.

    These pictures were taken at 05:58 UT on February 27, 2007, from a distance of 2.9 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). They are centered at 8 degrees south, 32 degrees east in Jupiter 'System III' coordinates. The large oval-shaped feature is the well-known Great Red Spot. The resolution of each pixel in these images is about 175 kilometers (110 miles); Jupiter's diameter is approximately 145,000 kilometers (97,000 miles).

    The image on the left is an altitude map made by assigning the color red to 1.60 microns, green to 1.89 microns and blue to 2.04 microns. Because Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light strongly at 2.04 microns, only clouds at very high altitude will reflect light at this wavelength. Light at 1.89 microns can go deeper in the atmosphere and light at 1.6 microns can go deeper still. In this map, bluish colors indicate high clouds and reddish colors indicate lower clouds. This picture shows, for example, that the Great Red Spot extends far up into the atmosphere.

    In the image at right, red equals 1.28 microns, green equals 1.30 microns and blue equals 1.36 microns, a range of wavelengths that similarly probes different altitudes in the atmosphere. This choice of wavelengths highlights Jupiter's high-altitude south polar hood of haze. The edge of Jupiter's disk at the bottom of the panel appears slightly non-circular because the left-hand portion is the true edge of the disk, while the right portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  7. C NMR Spectra C NMR Spectra

    E-print Network

    Collum, David B.

    S16 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S3) Me N-i-Pr #12;S17 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S3) Me NBn #12;S18 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) NBn #12;S19 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) NBn Me Me Me #12;S20 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) N-n-Bu Me Me Me #12;S21 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra

  8. Study on Raman spectra of synthetic celluloses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Changjun; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of aliphatic polyamide fiber and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The results show that Raman peaks beyond 1200 cm-1 appear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sodium hydroxide, while the Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sulfuric acid. Raman peaks beyond 1750 cm-1 decrease for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sodium hydroxide, while Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear, except weak peaks around 3000 cm-1 , for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sulfuric acid. The variations of the Raman spectra are primarily related to the changes of chemical bonds and molecular structures.

  9. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  10. Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for $0 < z < 6$ and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays

    E-print Network

    F. W. Stecker; M. A. Malkan; S. T. Scully

    2006-05-25

    We calculate the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0 intergalactic space owing to interactions with low energy photons and the 2.7 K cosmic background radiation. We calculate the optical depth of the universe, tau, for gamma-rays having energies from 4 GeV to 100 TeV emitted by sources at redshifts from ~0 to 5. We also give an analytic fit with numerical coefficients for approximating $\\tau(E_{\\gamma}, z)$. As an example of the application of our results, we calculate the absorbed spectrum of the blazar PKS 2155-304 at z = 0.117 and compare it with the spectrum observed by the H.E.S.S. air Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope array.

  11. Online Spectral Fit Tool for Analyzing Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, A.; Kohout, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Online Spectral Fit Tool is developed for analyzing Vis-NIR spectral behavior of asteroids and meteorites. Implementation is done using JavaScript/HTML. Fitted spectra consist of spline continuum and gamma distributions for absorption bands.

  12. Preliminary results from the first satellite of a high-resolution germanium gamma-ray spectrometer: Description of instrument, some activation lines encountered, and studies of the diffuse spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.; Reagan, J. B.; Johnson, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Gamma radiation from terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources were investigated with a high resolution Ge(Li) spectrometer-cryogen system flown onboard a low altitude, spin stabilized, polar orbiting satellite. A brief description is given of the instrument and preliminary results obtained from earth orbit are discussed. Attempts were made to use angular distributions and geomagnetic latitude spectral variations to determine diffuse background spectrum, detect gamma ray line emissions from solar flares, and search for positron annihilation radiation coming from the direction of the galactic center.

  13. High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-07-01

    Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations and experiments, using fission-spectrum neutron sources to assess neutron transmission through composite low-Z attenuators.

  14. Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far-IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High-Energy Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0Gamma-rays in intergalactic space owing to interactions with low-energy photons and the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation. We calculate the optical depth of the universe, Tau , for Gamma-rays having energies from 4 GeV to 100 TeV emitted by sources at redshifts from 0 to 5. We also give an analytic fit with numerical coefficients for approximating (E(Gamma), z). As an example of the application of our results, we calculate the absorbed spectrum of the blazar PKS 2155-304 at z=0.117 and compare it with the spectrum observed by the HESS air Cerenkov Gamma-ray telescope array.

  15. Erratum: Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2007-01-01

    Table 1 in our paper had erroneous numbers for the coefficients fitting the parametric form for the optical depth of the universe to gamma-rays; tau. The correct values for these parameters as described in the original text are given in the table for various redshifts for the baseline model (upper row) and fast evolution (lower row) for each individual redshift.

  16. The 2002 IAEA intercomparison of software for low-level ?-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Dirk; Blaauw, Menno; Fazinic, Stjepko; Kolotov, Vladimir P.

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA 2002 set of test spectra for low-level ?-ray spectrometry, reported on in a separate paper, was used in an intercomparison of widely available software packages, i.e. Anges 1.0, GammaVision 5.3, Gamma-W 1.68 for Windows, Ganaas 3.11, Genie2000 2.1, Hyperlab 2002.3.2.18, Interwinner 5.0 and UniSampo 1.97. With each program, efficiency curves were obtained for the two counting geometries (a 500 ml Marinelli beaker on a 33% relative efficiency HPGe detector, and a 100 ml pillbox on a 96.3% HPGe detector) and subsequently used to obtain radionuclide activities for the unknown samples. Both the calibration sources and the unknown samples contained radionuclides giving rise to cascade summing effects. Cascade summing correction factors as obtained with some of these programs, as well as with GESPECOR, were compared directly. After the intercomparison meeting, the activities obtained were compared with the certified activities that had been kept secret until then. In this paper, the results will be presented and suggestions made for further improvement of the software.

  17. Comparison of Measured and Calculated Mixed Neutron and Gamma Fields in Iron and Water Benchmark Assemblies Driven by CF-252 Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jánský, B.; Novák, E.; Turzík, Z.; Kyncl, J.; Cvachovec, F.; Kluso?, J.; Trykov, L. A.; Volkov, V. S.; ?uda, P.

    2003-06-01

    Iron and water are two main shielding materials used in nuclear reactors, therefore these two materials have been studied from the point of view of neutron and gamma radiation transport. WWER-440 and WWER-1000 mock-up arrangements have been assembled at the LR-0 experimental reactor in NRI Rez plc before with the purpose to study neutron and gamma flux impinging the reactor pressure vessel. In parallel, the neutron and gamma radiation transport have been studied on the simplest spherical geometry, i.e. on benchmark assemblies located in the LR-0 reactor hall. Iron spheres of 30, 50 and 100 cm in diameter and water spheres of 30 and 50 cm in diameter were used for that benchmark. A Cf-252 neutron source with emission of 3×108 n/s was each time positioned in the centre of a sphere. The leakage neutron and gamma spectra were measured by independent neutron and gamma spectrometers of the different laboratories. Neutron spectra were measured by proportional counters filled with hydrogen and by scintillation detectors of stilbene type in the energy range of 0.01-20 MeV. Gamma spectra were measured by detectors of stilbene, germanium and silicon type, in the energy range of 0.4-12 MeV. All the important parameters of the experimental assemblies, necessary for the computation (geometry, material composition, neutron source input spectra), were summarised. The calculations of neutron and gamma spectra were performed with the MCNP code using the ENDF/B-VI data library. The intercomparison of measured and calculated data has been done. In view of the good reproducibility of mixed neutron and gamma (n,g) field parameters and exact data setting for calculation the experimental assembly can be used for the following purposes:. - testing of spectrometry and dosimetry equipment in mixed n,g fields. - testing of calculation methods and small-group data libraries for Fe and H2O. In addition, upon a careful analysis of the obtained results, the neutron spectrum of the iron sphere with a diameter of 50 cm is proposed for an international standard of the moderated neutron field.

  18. Gamma Ray Pulsars: Multiwavelength Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The seven or more pulsars seen by instruments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. For all the known gamma-ray pulsars, multiwavelength observations and theoretical models based on such observations offer the prospect of gaining a broad understanding of these rotating neutron stars. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2006, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

  19. Gamma-ray spectral analysis algorithm library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-05-06

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithms library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  20. Gamma-ray Spectral Analysis Algorithm Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-09-25

    The routines of the Gauss Algorithm library are used to implement special purpose products that need to analyze gamma-ray spectra from GE semiconductor detectors as a part of their function. These routines provide the ability to calibrate energy, calibrate peakwidth, search for peaks, search for regions, and fit the spectral data in a given region to locate gamma rays.

  1. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.

  2. Mass spectrometry and hyphenated instruments in food analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has come a long way since the record of the first mass spectra of a simple low molecular weight substance by J.J. Thomson in 1912. Especially over the past decades, MS has been the subject of many developments. Particularly, the hyphenation of MS to gas chromatography (GC) a...

  3. Mass Spectrometry Based Identifications of LMW Glutenin Subunits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is routinely used to identify wheat endosperm proteins. In this method, peptide fragmentation patterns generated by MS/MS are identified using a ‘search engine’ to compare the spectra to those generated in silico from protein sequence databases. Trypsin is a commonly...

  4. Gamma rays from the de-excitation of C-12 resonance 15.11 MeV and C-12 resonance 4.44 MeV as probes of energetic particle spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The flux of 15.11 MeV gamma rays relative to the flux 4.44 MeV gamma rays was calculated from measured cross sections for excitation of the corresponding states of C-12 and from experimental determinations of the branching ratios for direct de-excitation of these states to the ground state. Because of the difference in threshold energies for excitation of these two levels, the relative intensities in the two lines are particularly sensitive to the spectral distribution of energetic particles which excite the corresponding nuclear levels. For both solar and cosmic emission, the observability of the 15.11 MeV line is expected to be enhances by low source-background continuum in this energy range.

  5. Compact multi-functional skin spectrometry set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmina, Ilona; Lihachev, Alexey; Gailite, Lasma; Spigulis, Janis

    2007-02-01

    A portable fibre-optic spectrometry set-up has been assembled and tested for applications in skin diffuse reflectance spectrometry, laser fluorescence spectrometry and multi-wavelength reflection photoplethysmography (multi-PPG) studies. The spectrometry set was tested by diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements for diagnostics of skin vascular malformations and pigmented diseases such as nevi and melanoma. In addition, studies of microcirculation in blood vessels located at different depths from the skin surface were performed by the multi-PPG method. The results of skin diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence showed differences in spectra of healthy and pathologic skin. The parameter ratio "pathologic/healthy" has been calculated in order to check the possibility of quantifying the specific pathology. The autofluorescence fading effect was observed. Our studies of the blood volume pulsations confirmed the possibility to separate the time-variable PPG component from the total skin diffuse reflectance signal.

  6. NEAR Gamma Ray Spectrometer Characterization and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Joel Lee; Vajda, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the work completed in the third year of the contract. The principle activities during this period were (1) the characterization of the NEAR 2 Gamma Ray Spectrometer using a neutron generator to generate complex gamma ray spectra and a large Ge Detecter to identify all the major peaks in the spectra; (2) the evaluation and repair of the Engineering Model Unit of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer for the NEAR mission; (3) the investigation of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray detection; and (4) technology transfer from NASA to forensic science.

  7. The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Galactic Diffuse Gamma-ray Spectrum from Cosmic-ray In-

    E-print Network

    Mori, Masaki

    The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Galactic Diffuse Gamma-ray Spectrum from Cosmic-ray In- teractions with Gas Clouds Michiko OHISHI and Masaki MORI Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University, Australia Abstract Gamma-ray spectra from cosmic-ray proton and electron interactions with gas clouds have

  8. Thermal radiation spectra of individual subwavelength microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Yat-Yin; Skulason, Helgi Skuli; Ingvarsson, Snorri; Klein, Levente J.; Hamann, Hendrik F.

    2008-08-01

    Polarization resolved spectra of infrared radiation from individual electrically driven platinum microheaters have been measured by Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry as a function of heaters’ width. When the heater width approaches zero, the signal with polarization parallel to the heater long axis converges to a finite value, while its perpendicularly polarized counterpart drops below our detection limit. As a result this leads to strongly polarized radiation for very narrow heaters. Further, while the parallel polarized radiation spectra appear to be insensitive to heater width variation (at least within the sensitive range of our light detector), the perpendicular polarized spectra were heavily affected. We observed a ?/2 -like resonance that we attribute to correlation of charge oscillations across the heater’s width, which are possibly mediated by surface plasmons. These findings provide implications for fabrication of nanoscale electrically driven thermal antennas.

  9. Alpha particle induced gamma yields in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Miller, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine has a relatively large (?,n) production cross-section in the MeV range, the energy range of interest for special nuclear materials. In the uranium fuel cycle enriched UF6 in particular is a reasonably prolific source of (?,n) neutrons because along with 235U, 234U becomes enriched and it has a relatively short half-life. This enables the mass content of storage cylinders containing UF6 to be verified by neutron counting methods. In association with such measurements high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (HRGS) measurements using a high-purity Ge detector are often undertaken to determine the 235U enrichment based off the intensity of the direct 186 keV line. The specific (?,n) neutron production, neutrons per second per gram of U, is sensitive to the relative isotopic composition, particularly the 234U concentration, and the traditional gross neutron counting approach is needed to quantitatively interpret the data. In addition to F(?,n) neutrons, ?-induced reaction ?-rays are generated, notably at 110, 197, 582, 891, 1236 and 1275 keV. If one could observe 19F(?,x?) gamma-lines in the HRGS spectra the thought was that perhaps the ?-activity could be estimated directly, and in turn the 234U abundance obtained. For example, by utilizing the ratio of the detected 197-186 keV full energy peaks. However, until now there has been no readily available estimate of the expected strength of the reaction gamma-rays nor any serious consideration as to whether they might be diagnostic or not. In this work we compute the thick target yields of the chief reaction gamma-rays in UF6 using published thin target data. Comparisons are made to the neutron production rates to obtain ?/n estimates, and also to the 235U decay line at 186 keV which we take as a fiducial line. It is shown that the reaction gamma-rays are produced but are far too weak for practical safeguards purposes. Now that the underlying numerical data is readily available however, it can be used to support neutron and gamma production calculations in other fluorine compounds, for example impure plutonium reference materials where fluorine may be present only at the parts per million by weight level yet still present a serious nuisance addition to the neutron production rate.

  10. Uncoiling collagen: a multidimensional mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Simon, H J; van Agthoven, M A; Lam, P Y; Floris, F; Chiron, L; Delsuc, M-A; Rolando, C; Barrow, M P; O'Connor, P B

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry can be used to determine structural information about ions by activating precursors and analysing the resulting series of fragments. Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS) is a technique that correlates the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of fragment and precursor ions in a single spectrum. 2D FT-ICR MS records the fragmentation of all ions in a sample without the need for isolation. To analyse specific precursors, horizontal cross-sections of the spectrum (fragment ion scans) are taken, providing an alternative to conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. In this work, 2D FT-ICR MS has been used to study the tryptic digest of type I collagen, a large protein. Fragment ion scans have been extracted from the 2D FT-ICR MS spectrum for precursor m/z ratios: 951.81, 850.41, 634.34, and 659.34, and 2D FT-ICR MS spectra are compared with a set of 1D MS/MS spectra using different fragmentation methods. The results show that two-dimensional mass spectrometry excells at MS/MS of complex mixtures, simplifying spectra by eliminating contaminant peaks, and aiding the identification of species in the sample. Currently, with desktop computers, 2D FT-ICR MS is limited by data processing power, a limitation which should be alleviated using cluster parallel computing. In order to explore 2D FT-ICR MS for collagen, with reasonable computing time, the resolution in the fragment ion dimension is limited to 256k data points (compared to 4M data points in 1D MS/MS spectra), but the vertical precursor ion dimension has 4096 lines, so the total data set is 1G data points (4 Gbytes). The fragment ion coverage obtained with a blind, unoptimized 2D FT-ICR MS experiment was lower than conventional MS/MS, but MS/MS information is obtained for all ions in the sample regardless of selection and isolation. Finally, although all 2D FT-ICR MS peak assignments were made with the aid of 1D FT-ICR MS data, these results demonstrate the promise of 2D FT-ICR MS as a technique for studying complex protein digest mixtures. PMID:26568361

  11. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  12. Status of the GAMMA-400 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Farber, M. O.; Fradkin, M. I.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leoniv, A. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mazets, E. P.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.

    2013-01-01

    The preliminary design of the new space gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 for the energy range 100 MeV-3 TeV is presented. The angular resolution of the instrument, 1-2 deg at E(gamma) approximately 100 MeV and approximately 0.01 at E(gamma) greater than 100 GeV, its energy resolution is approximately 1% at E(gamma) greater than 100 GeV, and the proton rejection factor is approximately 10(exp 6) are optimized to address a broad range of science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of cosmic-ray electrons, positrons, and nuclei.

  13. Line positions and intensities for the gamma 1 + gamma 2 and gamma 2 + gamma 3 bands of (16)O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Flaud, J.-M.; Canypeyret, C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.

    1988-01-01

    Using 0.005 cm-resolution Fourier transform spectra of (16)O3, generated by electric discharge from a greater than 99.98 percent pure sample of (16)O3, an extensive analysis of the gamma 1 + gamma 2 and the gamma 2 + gamma 3 bands in the 5.7 micron region was performed. The rotational energy levels of the upper (110) and (011) vibrational states of (16)O3 were reproduced within their experimental uncertainties using a Hamiltonian which takes explicitly into account the Coriolis-type interaction occurring between the rotational energy levels of both states. Improved vibrational energies and rotational and coupling constants were also derived for the (110) and (011) states. Precise transition moment constants for these two bands were deduced from analysis of 220 measured line intensities. Finally, a complete list of line positions, intensities, and lower state energies for both bands has been generated.

  14. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  15. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  16. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  17. Photon spectra from quark generation by WIMPs

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Dobado, A.; Lineros, R.

    2011-05-23

    If the present dark matter (DM) in the Universe annihilates into Standard Model (SM) particles, it must contribute to the gamma ray fluxes that are detected on the Earth. The magnitude of such contribution depends on the particular DM candidate, but certain features of these spectra may be analyzed in a model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the fitting formula valid for the simulated photon spectra from WIMP annihilation into light quark-anti quark (qq-bar) channels in a wide range of WIMP masses. We illustrate our results for the cc-bar channel.

  18. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  19. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  20. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  1. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  2. before and after gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Zubida; Ikram, M.; Majid, Kowsar; Asokan, K.

    2014-09-01

    A series of samples of HoFe1- x Ni x O3 ( x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3) were prepared using the solid-state reaction technique to understand the structural, dielectric and conductivity properties before and after gamma irradiation of accumulated dose of 625 KGy. The X-ray diffraction confirms that all the samples exist in single-phase orthorhombic structure having space group Pbnm. With increasing dopant Ni, the unit cell volume and lattice parameters undergo small change. X-ray analysis show change in the interplanar spacing and full width at half maximum values after gamma irradiation. The Raman spectra of the samples show modifications after gamma irradiation. It can be easily seen that after gamma irradiation intensity, peak width are completely altered by gamma-absorbed dose. Measurement of dielectric loss and dielectric constant at room temperature was performed before and after gamma irradiation in the frequency range of 20 Hz-1 MHz. It is observed that the value of dielectric constant decreases after irradiation. The ac conductivity is estimated from the dielectric constant and loss tangent. Exposure to gamma radiation results in substantial modification in the physical properties of the Ni-doped Ho-based orthoferrites.

  3. Novel Features of Gamma Ray from Dark Matter

    E-print Network

    Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present some general and novel features of gamma ray from dark matter. We find that gamma-ray spectra with sharp features exist in a wide class of dark matter models and mimic the gamma line signals. The generated gamma rays would generally have polynomial-type spectra or power-law with positive index. We illustrate our results in a model-independent framework with generic kinematic analysis. Similar results can also apply for cosmic rays or neutrino cases.

  4. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  5. Identification of Highly Pathogenic Microorganisms by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry: Results of an Interlaboratory Ring Trial.

    PubMed

    Lasch, Peter; Wahab, Tara; Weil, Sandra; Pályi, Bernadett; Tomaso, Herbert; Zange, Sabine; Kiland Granerud, Beathe; Drevinek, Michal; Kokotovic, Branko; Wittwer, Matthias; Pflüger, Valentin; Di Caro, Antonino; Stämmler, Maren; Grunow, Roland; Jacob, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    In the case of a release of highly pathogenic bacteria (HPB), there is an urgent need for rapid, accurate, and reliable diagnostics. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is a rapid, accurate, and relatively inexpensive technique that is becoming increasingly important in microbiological diagnostics to complement classical microbiology, PCR, and genotyping of HPB. In the present study, the results of a joint exercise with 11 partner institutions from nine European countries are presented. In this exercise, 10 distinct microbial samples, among them five HPB, Bacillus anthracis, Brucella canis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Yersinia pestis, were characterized under blinded conditions. Microbial strains were inactivated by high-dose gamma irradiation before shipment. Preparatory investigations ensured that this type of inactivation induced only subtle spectral changes with negligible influence on the quality of the diagnosis. Furthermore, pilot tests on nonpathogenic strains were systematically conducted to ensure the suitability of sample preparation and to optimize and standardize the workflow for microbial identification. The analysis of the microbial mass spectra was carried out by the individual laboratories on the basis of spectral libraries available on site. All mass spectra were also tested against an in-house HPB library at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI). The averaged identification accuracy was 77% in the first case and improved to >93% when the spectral diagnoses were obtained on the basis of the RKI library. The compilation of complete and comprehensive databases with spectra from a broad strain collection is therefore considered of paramount importance for accurate microbial identification. PMID:26063856

  6. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  7. Implications for High Energy Blazar Spectra from Intergalactic Absorption Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F

    2008-01-01

    Given a knowledge of the density spectra intergalactic low energy photons as a function of redshift, one can derive the intrinsic gamma-ray spectra and luminosities of blazars over a range of redshifts and look for possible trends in blazar evolution. Stecker, Baring & Summerlin have found some evidence hinting that TeV blazars with harder spectra have higher intrinsic TeV gamma-ray luminosities and indicating that there may be a correlation of spectral hardness and luminosity with redshift. Further work along these lines, treating recent observations of the blazers lES02291+200 and 3C279 in the TeV and sub-TeV energy ranges, has recently been explored by Stecker & Scully. GLAST will observe and investigate many blazars in the GeV energy range and will be sensitive to blazers at higher redshifts. I examine the implications high redshift gamma-ray absorption for both theoretical and observational blazer studies.

  8. Mid-Infrared Spectra of Be Stars

    E-print Network

    S. A. Rinehart; J. R. Houck; J. D. Smith

    1999-10-11

    We present the first medium-resolution ($R\\sim 600$) mid-infrared (8-13.3\\micron) spectra of 11 Be stars. A large number of lines are observed and identified in these spectra, including, as an example, 39 hydrogen recombination lines in the spectrum of $\\gamma$ Cas. In the majority of our spectra, all of the observed lines are attributable to hydrogen recombination. Two of the sources, $\\beta$ Lyr and MWC 349 also show emission from other species. Both of these objects show evidence of [Ne II] emission, and $\\beta$ Lyr also shows evidence of He I emission. We tabulate the effective line strength and line widths for the observed lines, and briefly discuss the physical implications of the observed line series. We also use a simple model of free-free emission to characterize the disks around these sources.

  9. Nanopore Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Derek; Bush, Joseph; Mihovilovic, Mirna; Maulbetsch, William; Moon, Wooyoung; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene; Weber, Peter

    2012-02-01

    We describe a concept for single-DNA analysis called nanopore mass spectrometry, which seeks to combine the benefits of nanopores with the speed, sensitivity, and robustness of single base detection by mass spectrometry. The basic idea is to cleave the individual nucleotides from a DNA polymer as they transit a nanopore in sequence, and to identify each one by determining its charge-to-mass ratio in a mass spectrometer. We describe how nanopore mass spectrometry can addresse the challenges faced by other nanopore-based DNA analysis approaches. We also describe the design, construction, and testing of a prototype instrument that interfaces a nanopore ion source with a quadrupole mass filter and a single ion detector. We are using this new instrument to test the key scientific questions bearing on our analysis strategy: 1) Can DNA nucleotides be reliably transferred from their native liquid phase into the vacuum environment of a mass spectrometer? 2) Can nucleotides be detected with near 100% efficiency? 3) Can DNA polymers be controllably cleaved to isolate ionized bases or nucleotides in the mass spectrometer?

  10. Study of gamma-ray strength functions

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Dietrich, F.S.

    1980-08-07

    The use of gamma-ray strength function systematics to calculate neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra is discussed. The ratio of the average capture width, GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar, to the average level spacing, D/sub obs/, both at the neutron separation energy, can be derived from such systematics with much less uncertainty than from separate systematics for values of GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar and D/sub obs/. In particular, the E1 gamma-ray strength function is defined in terms of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR line shape is modeled with the usual Lorentzian function and also with a new energy-dependent, Breit-Wigner (EDBW) function. This latter form is further parameterized in terms of two overlapping resonances, even for nuclei where photonuclear measurements do not resolve two peaks. In the mass ranges studied, such modeling is successful for all nuclei away from the N = 50 closed neutron shell. Near the N = 50 shell, a one-peak EDBW appears to be more appropriate. Examples of calculated neutron capture excitation functions and capture gamma-ray spectra using the EDBW form are given for target nuclei in the mass-90 region and also in the Ta-Au mass region. 20 figures.

  11. Gamma-ray emission from thermonuclear supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Isern, J.; Bravo, E.; Hirschmann, A.

    2007-08-21

    The explosion mechanism associated with thermonuclear supernovae (SNIa) is still a matter of debate. Nevertheless, there is a wide agreement that high amounts of radioactive nuclei are produced during these events and that they are expected to be strong {gamma}-ray emitters. In this paper we investigate the use of this {gamma}-rays as a diagnostic tool. For this purpose we have performed a complete study of the {gamma}-ray spectra associated with all the different scenarios currently proposed: detonation, deflagration, delayed detonation, and pulsating delayed detonation. Our study shows that the {gamma}-ray emission from SNIa is, effectively, a promising tool but that has to be carefully used since it can lead to misinterpretations. We also show that 3D effects can be relevant in some circumstances and that they can provide important information about the exploding system and the thermonuclear burning front mechanism if high resolution spectra could be obtained.

  12. Z{gamma}{gamma}{gamma} {yields} 0 Processes in SANC

    SciTech Connect

    Bardin, D. Yu. Kalinovskaya, L. V. Uglov, E. D.

    2013-11-15

    We describe the analytic and numerical evaluation of the {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}Z process cross section and the Z {yields} {gamma}{gamma}{gamma} decay rate within the SANC system multi-channel approach at the one-loop accuracy level with all masses taken into account. The corresponding package for numeric calculations is presented. For checking of the results' correctness we make a comparison with the other independent calculations.

  13. Mass spectrometry with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Litherland, A E; Zhao, X-L; Kieser, W E

    2011-01-01

    As one in a series of articles on Canadian contributions to mass spectrometry, this review begins with an outline of the history of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), noting roles played by researchers at three Canadian AMS laboratories. After a description of the unique features of AMS, three examples, (14)C, (10)Be, and (129)I are given to illustrate the methods. The capabilities of mass spectrometry have been extended by the addition of atomic isobar selection, molecular isobar attenuation, further ion acceleration, followed by ion detection and ion identification at essentially zero dark current or ion flux. This has been accomplished by exploiting the techniques and accelerators of atomic and nuclear physics. In 1939, the first principles of AMS were established using a cyclotron. In 1977 the selection of isobars in the ion source was established when it was shown that the (14)N(-) ion was very unstable, or extremely difficult to create, making a tandem electrostatic accelerator highly suitable for assisting the mass spectrometric measurement of the rare long-lived radioactive isotope (14)C in the environment. This observation, together with the large attenuation of the molecular isobars (13)CH(-) and (12)CH?2(-) during tandem acceleration and the observed very low background contamination from the ion source, was found to facilitate the mass spectrometry of (14)C to at least a level of (14)C/C ~ 6 × 10(-16), the equivalent of a radiocarbon age of 60,000 years. Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, or AMS, has now made possible the accurate radiocarbon dating of milligram-sized carbon samples by ion counting as well as dating and tracing with many other long-lived radioactive isotopes such as (10)Be, (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (129)I. The difficulty of obtaining large anion currents with low electron affinities and the difficulties of isobar separation, especially for the heavier mass ions, has prompted the use of molecular anions and the search for alternative methods of isobar separation. These techniques are discussed in the latter part of the review. PMID:22031277

  14. Charge Prediction of Lipid Fragments in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schrom, Brian T.; Kangas, Lars J.; Ginovska, Bojana; Metz, Thomas O.; Miller, John H.

    2011-12-18

    An artificial neural network is developed for predicting which fragment is charged and which fragment is neutral for lipid fragment pairs produced from a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry simulation process. This charge predictor is integrated into software developed at PNNL for in silico spectra generation and identification of metabolites known as Met ISIS. To test the effect of including charge prediction in Met ISIS, 46 lipids are used which show a reduction in false positive identifications when the charge predictor is utilized.

  15. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  16. Gamma rays from molecular clouds

    E-print Network

    Stefano Gabici; Felix Aharonian; Pasquale Blasi

    2006-10-02

    It is believed that the observed diffuse gamma ray emission from the galactic plane is the result of interactions between cosmic rays and the interstellar gas. Such emission can be amplified if cosmic rays penetrate into dense molecular clouds. The propagation of cosmic rays inside a molecular cloud has been studied assuming an arbitrary energy and space dependent diffusion coefficient. If the diffusion coefficient inside the cloud is significantly smaller compared to the average one derived for the galactic disk, the observed gamma ray spectrum appears harder than the cosmic ray spectrum, mainly due to the slower penetration of the low energy particles towards the core of the cloud. This may produce a great variety of gamma ray spectra.

  17. Auroral electron spectra. [differential energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. H.; Maeda, K.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the suitability of available differential electron flux data for auroral analyses. The differential energy spectra of auroral electrons at several altitudes computed by Berger et al. (1973) and Rees and Jones (1973) for initial electron energies of 10, 5, and 2 keV are reviewed, and it is concluded that they are suitable for auroral analyses.

  18. Elevated temperature reference spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Phillips, B.; Tussey, L.

    1997-12-31

    A compilation of infrared spectra at elevated temperatures is required for the accurate quantification of gas concentrations for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extractive sampling of stack gases and FTIR in-situ process monitoring. Analysis of high temperature gases utilizing ambient temperature reference spectra can result in significant quantification errors. The US Air Force`s Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is currently assisting the EPA in measuring reference spectra and making existing and new data available to the public through two ongoing efforts. One of these efforts is the measurement of elevated temperature infrared reference spectra of the low vapor pressure hazardous air pollutants (HAP) compounds, as well as spectral interfering compounds. The equipment and procedures used for the elevated temperature reference spectra measurements is described as well as some of the challenges encountered in these measurements. Examples of the reference spectra are also presented. To make the reference spectra developed by AEDC and other EPA programs easily accessible, AEDC has also been tasked to maintain a site on the World Wide Web containing reference spectra, reports, and software tools of interest to the optical sensing community. This web site has seen increased use during the three years that it has been in existence with users from academia, commercial, and government, both domestic and foreign. The site has undergone several improvements since inception and actively solicits inputs for further improvements from its users. A description of this web site and recent improvements and additions is given in this paper.

  19. HEAO-1 observations of gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, G. J.; Matteson, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A search of data from the High Energy X-Ray and Low Energy Gamma Ray Experiment on HEAO-1 uncovered 14 gamma ray bursts. Nine of these events are reported for the first tiome. Except for the faintest events, all of the bursts detected by this experiment have been measured above an MeV, thereby confirming the hard spectral character of gamma ray burst spectra reported by SMM. Results give a burst rate of at least 105 per year above 6 times 10 to the minus 7th power ergs, which is consistent with previous measurements of burst frequency.

  20. Detecting axionlike particles with gamma ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2007-12-01

    We propose that axionlike particles (ALPs) with a two-photon vertex, consistent with all astrophysical and laboratory bounds, may lead to a detectable signature in the spectra of high-energy gamma-ray sources. This occurs as a result of gamma rays being converted into ALPs in the magnetic fields of efficient astrophysical accelerators according to the "Hillas criterion", such as jets of active galactic nuclei or hot spots of radio galaxies. The discovery of such an effect is possible by GLAST in the 1-100 GeV range and by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes in the TeV range. PMID:18233353

  1. Gamma watermarking

    DOEpatents

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  2. The gamma 1 and gamma 3 bands of (16)O3: Line positions and intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Devi, V. Malathy; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.

    1988-01-01

    Using 0.005/cm-resolution Fourier transform spectra of samples of ozone, the gamma 1 and gamma 3 bands of (16)O3 have been reanalyzed to obtain accurate line positions and an extended set of upper state rotational levels (J up to 69, K sub a up to 20). Combined with the available microwave data, these upper state rotational levels were satisfactorily fitted using a Hamiltonian which takes explicitly into account the strong Coriolis interaction affecting the rotational levels of these two interacting states. In addition, 350 relative line intensities were measured from which the rotational expansions of the transition moment operators for the gamma 1 and gamma 3 states have been deduced. Finally, a complete listing of line positions, intensities, and lower state energies of the gamma 1 and gamma 3 bands of (16)O3 has been generated.

  3. Atmospheric gamma-ray and neutron flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L. P. Kudryavtsev, A. Yu. Kudryavtseva, M. L. Kutsyk, I. M.

    2008-01-15

    Gamma-ray pulses are calculated from 2D numerical simulations of an upward atmospheric discharge in a self-consistent electric field using the multigroup approach to the kinetics of relativistic runaway electrons (REs). Computed {gamma}-ray numbers and spectra are consistent with those of terrestrial {gamma}-ray flashes (TGFs) observed aboard spacecrafts. The RE flux is concentrated mainly within the domain of the Blue Jet fluorescence. This confirms that exactly the domain adjacent to a thundercloud is the source of the observed {gamma}-ray flashes. The yield of photonuclear neutrons is calculated. One {gamma}-ray pulse generates {approx}10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} neutrons. The possibility of the direct deposition of REs to the detector readings and the origin of the lightning-advanced TGFs are discussed.

  4. Determination of IRT-2M fuel burnup by gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koleška, Michal; Viererbl, Ladislav; Marek, Milan; Ernest, Jaroslav; Šunka, Michal; Vinš, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    A spectrometric system was developed for evaluating spent fuel in the LVR-15 research reactor, which employs highly enriched (36%) IRT-2M-type fuel. Such system allows the measurement of detailed fission product profiles. Within these measurements, nuclides such as (137)Cs, (134)Cs, (144)Ce, (106)Ru and (154)Eu may be detected in fuel assemblies with different cooling times varying between 1.67 and 7.53 years. Burnup calculations using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code data showed good agreement with measurements, though some discrepancies were observed in certain regions. These discrepancies are attributed to the evaluation of irradiation history, reactor regulation pattern and buildup schemes. PMID:26474208

  5. Selected overtone mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Michael A; Conant, Christopher R P; Zucker, Steven M; Griffith, Kent J; Clemmer, David E

    2015-01-01

    A new means of acquiring overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) data sets that allows distributions of ions for a prescribed overtone number is described. In this approach, the drift fields applied to specific OMS drift regions are varied to make it possible to select different ions from a specific overtone that is resonant over a range of applied frequencies. This is accomplished by applying different fields for fixed ratios of time while scanning the applied frequency. The ability to eliminate peaks from all but a single overtone region overcomes a significant limitation associated with OMS analysis of unknowns, especially in mixtures. Specifically, a priori knowledge via selection of the overtone used to separate ions makes it possible to directly determine ion mobilities for unknown species and collision cross sections (assuming that the ion charge state is known). We refer to this selection method of operation as selected overtone mobility spectrometry (SOMS). A simple theoretical description of the SOMS approach is provided. Simulations are carried out and discussed in order to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of SOMS compared with traditional OMS. Finally, the SOMS method (and its distinction from OMS) is demonstrated experimentally by examining a mixture of peptides generated by enzymatic digestion of the equine cytochrome c with trypsin. PMID:25892116

  6. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  7. Gamma Ray Astrophysics: New insight into the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Trombka, J. I.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma ray observations of the solar system, the galaxy and extragalactic radiation are reported. Topics include: planets, comets, and asteroids; solar observations; interstellar medium and galactic structure; compact objects; cosmology; and diffuse radiation. The instrumentation used in gamma ray astronomy in covered along with techniques for the analysis of observational spectra.

  8. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  9. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  10. Indexing and Searching a Mass Spectrometry Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besenbacher, Søren; Schwikowski, Benno; Stoye, Jens

    Database preprocessing in order to create an index often permits considerable speedup in search compared to the iterated query of an unprocessed database. In this paper we apply index-based database lookup to a range search problem that arises in mass spectrometry-based proteomics: given a large collection of sparse integer sets and a sparse query set, find all the sets from the collection that have at least k integers in common with the query set. This problem arises when searching for a mass spectrum in a database of theoretical mass spectra using the shared peaks count as similarity measure. The algorithms can easily be modified to use the more advanced shared peaks intensity measure instead of the shared peaks count. We introduce three different algorithms solving these problems. We conclude by presenting some experiments using the algorithms on realistic data showing the advantages and disadvantages of the algorithms.

  11. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  12. Mass spectrometry in ionospheric research.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Eldon E

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry played a key role in the development of the understanding of the earth's ionosphere. Of primary importance was its use for in situ atmospheric measurements of the ion and neutral composition of the atmosphere. Mass spectrometry has also played an essential role in the laboratory measurement of critical ionospheric molecular processes. Examples of both are given. PMID:17099890

  13. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K.

    2014-03-15

    We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

  14. A gamma-gamma coincidence/anticoincidence spectrometer for low-level cosmogenic (22)Na/(7)Be activity ratio measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Ungar, Kurt; Stukel, Matthew; Mekarski, Pawel

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a digital gamma-gamma coincidence/anticoincidence spectrometer was developed and examined for low-level cosmogenic (22)Na and (7)Be in air-filter sample monitoring. The spectrometer consists of two bismuth germanate scintillators (BGO) and an XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The spectrometer design allows a more selective measurement of (22)Na with a significant background reduction by gamma-gamma coincidence events processing. Hence, the system provides a more sensitive way to quantify trace amounts of (22)Na than normal high resolution gamma spectrometry providing a critical limit of 3 mBq within a 20 h count. The use of a list-mode data acquisition technique enabled simultaneous determination of (22)Na and (7)Be activity concentrations using a single measurement by coincidence and anticoincidence mode respectively. PMID:24412563

  15. Measurement of the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter array

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.; Becvar, F.; Kroll, J.; Krticka, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2011-07-15

    The {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction was measured with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter (consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The multiplicity distributions of the {gamma} decay were used to determine the resonance spins up to E{sub n}=300 eV. The {gamma}-ray energy spectra for different multiplicities were measured for the s-wave resonances. The shapes of these spectra were compared with simulations based on the use of the DICEBOX statistical model code. Simulations showed that the scissors mode is required not only for the ground-state transitions but also for transitions between excited states.

  16. Gamma-gamma interaction region design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J

    2001-01-12

    An initial design of the optics required for producing gamma-gamma collisions was produced for the NLC Zeroth Order Design Report (ZDR) submitted to the 1996 Snowmass workshop. The design incorporated only loose constraints from the interaction region requirements. In this paper we report progress on a design of a gamma-gamma interaction region which incorporates all constraints.

  17. Gamma-gamma interaction region design issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronberg, Jeff

    2001-07-01

    An initial design of the optics required for producing gamma-gamma collisions was produced for the NLC Zeroth Order Design Report (ZDR) submitted to the 1996 Snowmass workshop. The design incorporated only loose constraints from the interaction region requirements. In this paper we report progress on a design of a gamma-gamma interaction region which incorporates all constraints.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F.

    2008-04-01

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra—the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the ?3 statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic "internal energy" and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is ?3, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  19. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  20. Methods to Collect, Compile, and Analyze Observed Short-lived Fission Product Gamma Data

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Ellis, Tere A.

    2011-09-29

    A unique set of fission product gamma spectra was collected at short times (4 minutes to 1 week) on various fissionable materials. Gamma spectra were collected from the neutron-induced fission of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium isotopes at thermal, epithermal, fission spectrum, and 14-MeV neutron energies. This report describes the experimental methods used to produce and collect the gamma data, defines the experimental parameters for each method, and demonstrates the consistency of the measurements.

  1. Theta-Modulated Input Reduces Intrinsic Gamma Oscillations in a Hippocampal Model

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Ashlie B.; Levy, William B

    2009-01-01

    Introducing theta-modulated input into a minimal model of the CA3 region of the hippocampus has significant effects on gamma oscillations. In the absence of theta-modulated input, the gamma oscillations are robust across a range of parameters. Introducing theta-modulated input weakens the gamma oscillations to a power more consistent with power spectra acquired from laboratory animals. With these changes, simulations of the hippocampal model are able to reproduce hippocampal power spectra measured in awake mice. PMID:19593393

  2. Theta-Modulated Input Reduces Intrinsic Gamma Oscillations in a Hippocampal Model.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Ashlie B; Levy, William B

    2007-06-01

    Introducing theta-modulated input into a minimal model of the CA3 region of the hippocampus has significant effects on gamma oscillations. In the absence of theta-modulated input, the gamma oscillations are robust across a range of parameters. Introducing theta-modulated input weakens the gamma oscillations to a power more consistent with power spectra acquired from laboratory animals. With these changes, simulations of the hippocampal model are able to reproduce hippocampal power spectra measured in awake mice. PMID:19593393

  3. Spectral feature of 31 December 1981 gamma-ray burst not confirmed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Share, G. H.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Matz, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of a gamma ray burst at 01:37 UT on December 31, 1981 using the SMM gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) are compared with those made by the Konus instruments on Veneras 11-14. Burst time profiles, photon spectra, and detector energy loss spectra for three time intervals are compared for the GRS and the Konus instruments. It is concluded that the SMM spectra exhibit no evidence for the presence of emission features reported by the Konus group.

  4. Measurement of ²²?Ra in soil from oil field: advantages of ?-ray spectrometry and application to the IAEA-448 CRM.

    PubMed

    Ceccatelli, A; Katona, R; Kis-Benedek, G; Pitois, A

    2014-05-01

    The analytical performance of gamma-ray spectrometry for the measurement of (226)Ra in TENORM (Technically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) soil was investigated by the IAEA. Fast results were obtained for characterization and certification of a new TENORM Certified Reference Material (CRM), identified as IAEA-448 (soil from oil field). The combined standard uncertainty of the gamma-ray spectrometry results is of the order of 2-3% for massic activity measurement values ranging from 16500 Bq kg(-1) to 21500 Bq kg(-1). Methodologies used for the production and certification of the IAEA-448 CRM are presented. Analytical results were confirmed by alpha spectrometry. The "t" test showed agreement between alpha and gamma results at 95% confidence level. PMID:24332337

  5. Application of Laser Mass Spectrometry to Art and Archaeology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulian, Lase Lisa E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Muliadi, Sarah; Owens, Shawn; McGovern, Patrick E.; Schmidt, Catherine M.; Trentelman, Karen A.; deVries, Mattanjah S.

    2011-01-01

    REMPI laser mass spectrometry is a combination of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and time of flight mass spectrometry, This technique enables the collection of mass specific optical spectra as well as of optically selected mass spectra. Analytes are jet-cooled by entrainment in a molecular beam, and this low temperature gas phase analysis has the benefit of excellent vibronic resolution. Utilizing this method, mass spectrometric analysis of historically relevant samples can be simplified and improved; Optical selection of targets eliminates the need for chromatography while knowledge of a target's gas phase spectroscopy allows for facile differentiation of molecules that are in the aqueous phase considered spectroscopically indistinguishable. These two factors allow smaller sample sizes than commercial MS instruments, which in turn will require less damage to objects of antiquity. We have explored methods to optimize REMPI laser mass spectrometry as an analytical tool to archaeology using theobromine and caffeine as molecular markers in Mesoamerican pottery, and are expanding this approach to the field of art to examine laccaic acid in shellacs.

  6. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ? 100 M?) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ? 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ? 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] ??7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  7. Typical uncertainties in alpha-particle spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommé, S.

    2015-06-01

    Alpha-particle spectrometry is routinely performed with the aim of measuring absolute activities, activity ratios between different alpha-emitting nuclides or decay data such as branching factors, alpha emission probabilities and relative half-lives. It is most commonly performed with ion-implanted silicon detectors. Strong features of the technique are the low background levels that can be achieved due to low sensitivity to other types of radiation, the intrinsic efficiency close to 1 which reduces the efficiency calculations to a geometrical problem and the uniqueness of the energy spectra for each ?-decaying nuclide. The main challenge is the limitation to the attainable energy resolution, even with thin and homogenous sources, which causes alpha energy peaks to be partially unresolved due to their width and low-energy tailing. The spectral deconvolution often requires fitting of analytical functions to each peak in the alpha spectrum. True coincidence effects between alpha particles and subsequently emitted conversion electrons cause distortions of the alpha spectra which lead to significant changes in the apparent peak area ratios. Optimum energy resolution can only be achieved on very thin sources, which puts constraints on the source preparation techniques. Radiochemical separations may be needed to extract the alpha emitters from voluminous matrices and efficiency tracing is performed by adding in another isotope by known amounts. Typical uncertainty components are discussed by means of some hypothetical examples.

  8. Determinations of photon spectra. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wannigman, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    A method is developed to unfold photon spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with probability distributions of path lengths for incident and internally generated photons in the energy range 0-2.8 MeV. This matrix is inverted and multiplied by a measured pulse height spectrum to obtain the photon energy distribution incident upon the detector. This deconvolution procedure provides improved information about the energy continuum of incident photons and can enhanced the identification of discrete gamma energies. Experiments were performed to verify the unfolding methodology and to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of this technique. Measured spectra were acquired from indoor and outdoor environments and unfolded. The results show that measured spectra overestimate the number of photons below 240 keV by up to 30 %. When the total exposure was calculated directly from the measured spectra, the low energy contribution was overestimated by a factor of two. This may have implications on the interpretation and calibration of energy dependent dosimeters used for occupational and environmental monitoring.

  9. System and method for resolving gamma-ray spectra

    DOEpatents

    Gentile, Charles A.; Perry, Jason; Langish, Stephen W.; Silber, Kenneth; Davis, William M.; Mastrovito, Dana

    2010-05-04

    A system for identifying radionuclide emissions is described. The system includes at least one processor for processing output signals from a radionuclide detecting device, at least one training algorithm run by the at least one processor for analyzing data derived from at least one set of known sample data from the output signals, at least one classification algorithm derived from the training algorithm for classifying unknown sample data, wherein the at least one training algorithm analyzes the at least one sample data set to derive at least one rule used by said classification algorithm for identifying at least one radionuclide emission detected by the detecting device.

  10. Induced Radioactivity in Recovered Skylab Materials. [gamma ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Four radioactive isotopes found in aluminum and stainless steel samples from Skylab debris were recovered in Australia. The low-level activity was induced by high-energy protons and neutrons in the space environment. Measurements of the specific activities are given.

  11. Thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry approach for characterization of the volatile fraction from amber specimens: a possibility of tracking geological origins.

    PubMed

    Vîrgolici, Marian; Ponta, Corneliu; Manea, Mihaela; Negu?, Daniel; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Moise, Ioan; Suv?il?, Rare?; Teodor, Eugen; Sârbu, Costel; Medvedovici, Andrei

    2010-03-19

    Research on the chemical composition of fossil resins has evolved during the last decades as a multidisciplinary field and is strongly oriented toward the correlation with their geological and botanical origin. Various extraction procedures and chromatographic techniques have been used together for identifying the volatile compounds contained in the fossil resin matrix. Hyphenation between thermal desorption (TD), gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry detection (MS) has been chosen to investigate the volatile compounds fraction from ambers with a focus on Romanite (Romanian amber) and Baltic amber species. A data analysis procedure was developed for the main purpose of fingerprinting ambers based on the MS identity of the peaks generated by the volatile fraction, together with their relative percentual area within the chromatogram. Chromatographic data analysis was based entirely on Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution &Identification System (AMDIS) software to produce deconvoluted mass spectra which were used to build-up a mixed mass spectra and relative retention scale library. Multivariate data analysis was further applied on AMDIS results with successful discrimination between Romanite and Baltic ambers. A special trial was conducted to generate pyrolysis "like" macromolecular structure breakdown to volatile compounds by gamma irradiation with a high absorbed dose of 500 kGy. Contrary to our expectations the volatile fraction fingerprints were not modified after irradiation experiments. A complementary non-destructive new approach by ESR spectroscopy was also proposed for discriminating between Romanite and Baltic ambers. PMID:20149381

  12. Resonant Two-Photon Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Jet-Cooled Phenolic Acids and

    E-print Network

    de Vries, Mattanjah S.

    Resonant Two-Photon Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Jet-Cooled Phenolic Acids and Polyphenols¨tvo¨s Lora´nd University, 1/A Pa´zma´ny P. stny. Budapest, Hungary 1117 A method for analyzing phenolic acids and super- sonic jet cooling is described. The R2PI spectra of gallic acid, 3-O-methylgallic acid

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF POLLUTANTS IN A MUNICIPAL WELL USING HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An elevated incidence of childhood cancer was observed near a contaminated site. Trace amounts of several isomeric compounds were detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in a concentrated extract of municipal well water. No matching library mass spectra were foun...

  14. Biomarker Discovery for Arsenic Exposure Using Functional Data Analysis and Feature Learning of Mass Spectrometry Proteomic

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xihong

    Biomarker Discovery for Arsenic Exposure Using Functional Data Analysis and Feature Learning. This article presents a case study for measuring arsenic concen- trations in a population residing in an As spectra and extract MS features and to associate the selected mass spectrometry features with arsenic

  15. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 24812487

    E-print Network

    Kim, Myung Soo

    , with better than unit mass resolution even in the low m/z range, could be recorded with this instrument atRAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 2481 of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization photodissociation tandem time-of-flight mass spectra

  16. Using Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Carbon in Native Prairie Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to characterize soil organic carbon (SOC) with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) and then to determine correlations between the mass spectra and associated soil characterization data. Both soil carbon chemistry and the organic forms in which SOC is...

  17. Determination of microelements in uncontaminated natural water from the Baikal region by atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, A.I.; Chumakova, N.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, concentration by evaporation was used to determine 17 microelements (B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Mo, Ag, Sn, Ba, and Pb) in water from Lake Baikal and its tributaries by atomic-emission spectrometry with the arc excitation of spectra.

  18. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF GC/MS (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY) DATA ANALYSIS PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectra obtained by fused silica capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/data system (GC/MS/DS) analysis of mixtures of organic chemicals adsorbed on Tenax GC cartridges was subjected to manual and automated interpretative techniques. Synthetic mixtures (85 chemicals ...

  19. High resolution mass spectrometry for the characterization of complex, fossil organic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R.E.; Haas, G.W.; Kim, Yeonhee L.; Hunt, J.E.

    1995-08-01

    High resolution chemical ionization mass spectrometry data support the notion that the size of the stable aromatic clusters is not large in coals except the very high rank coals and inertinite macerals. The desorption chemical ionization spectra appear representative of the sample with little discrimination for molecular types such as aliphatics.

  20. Detection of trace levels of volatile organic compounds using fiber optic Raman spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, K.J.; Bilodeau, T.; Nau, G.; Bucholtz, F.; Aggarwal, I.D.

    1995-12-31

    Raman spectrometry has significant advantages over other spectroscopic techniques when used as an in situ, real time sensor system. Raman spectrometry is highly selective since the vibrational characteristics of the compound being detected produces a unique Raman spectra which is readily identifiable. Another advantage of Raman spectrometry is that commercially available silica optical fibers can be used to obtain the unique Raman fingerprint of a compound, whereas infrared spectra require specialized long wavelength transmitting optical fibers. A novel fiber optic Raman probe for determination of organic vapors is described. The probe utilizes an absorbent resin, C-18, to concentrate the organic vapors in the optical path of the Raman probe. The probe exhibits a fully reversible response to organic vapors such as carbon tetrachloride or benzene.

  1. Underwater gamma surveys of Mururoa and Fangataufa lagoons.

    PubMed

    Osvath, I; Povinec, P; Huynh-Ngoc, L; Comanducci, J F

    1999-09-30

    Underwater gamma-ray spectrometry is an effective alternative or complement to traditional sampling and laboratory analyses for applications such as contamination assessment in emergency situations, long-term monitoring of radioactive releases or investigation of sunken radioactive objects. This technique was recently used in a seabed contamination study undertaken at the South Pacific nuclear weapons test sites of the Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls in order to guide and focus sediment core sampling in the areas with highest gamma-emitting radionuclide levels. 60Co inventories estimated on the basis of the underwater gamma-ray spectrometry survey were in good agreement with results previously obtained by traditional sediment sampling and laboratory analysis. PMID:10568282

  2. Development of {gamma}-ray detectors for {sup 16}O(p,p'{gamma}) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Ou, I.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M.; Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2012-11-12

    The {gamma} ray production in neutral-current (NC) neutrino-oxygen interaction is very important to the detection of neutrinos from supernova explosion in a neutrino experiment, since those {gamma} rays can become extra signals or unexpected background in the energy region from 5 MeV to 30 MeV. We propose the experiment to measure {gamma} rays in {sup 16}O(p,p') reaction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP, Osaka) to provide good information on the {gamma}-ray emission spectra in neutrino-oxygen reactions. We present the design of {gamma}-ray detectors (NaI, CsI, HPGe), which will be used in proposed experiment.

  3. Gridless Overtone Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Steven M.; Ewing, Michael A.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel overtone mobility spectrometry (OMS) instrument utilizing a gridless elimination mechanism and cooperative radio frequency confinement is described. The gridless elimination region uses a set of mobility-discriminating radial electric fields that are designed so that the frequency of field application results in selective transmission and elimination of ions. To neutralize ions with mobilities that do not match the field application frequency, active elimination regions radially defocus ions towards the lens walls. Concomitantly, a lens-dependent radio frequency waveform is applied to the transmission regions of the drift tube resulting in radial confinement for mobility-matched ions. Compared with prior techniques, which use many grids for ion elimination, the new gridless configuration substantially reduces indiscriminate ion losses. A description of the apparatus and elimination process, including detailed simulations showing how ions are transmitted and eliminated is presented. A prototype 28 cm long OMS instrument is shown to have a resolving power of 20 and is capable of attomole detection limits of a model peptide (angiotensin I) spiked into a complex mixture (in this case peptides generated from digestion of ?-casein with trypsin). PMID:24125033

  4. Nanoscience, nanotechnology and spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Freddy C.; Barbante, Carlo

    2013-08-01

    Nanoscience has outgrown its infancy, and nanotechnology has found important applications in our daily life — with many more to come. Although the central concepts of the nano world, namely the changes of particular physical properties on the length scale of individual atoms and molecules, have been known and developed for quite some time already, experimental advances since the 1980s and recognition of the potential of nanomaterials led to a genuine breakthrough of the inherently multidisciplinary nanoscience field. Analytical nanoscience and nanotechnology and especially the use of micro and nano electro mechanical systems, of the quantum dots and of mass spectrometry, currently provide one of the most promising avenues for developments in analytical science, derived from their two main fields of action, namely (a) the analysis of nano-structured materials and (b) their use as new tools for analysis. An overview is given of recent developments and trends in the field, highlighting the importance and point out future directions, while also touching drawbacks, such as emerging concerns about health and environmental issues.

  5. Puzzling {gamma}-ray strength functions in {sup 44,45}Sc and {sup 50,51}V

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Ingebretsen, F.; Messelt, S.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Syed, N. U. H.; Chankova, R.; Loennroth, T.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2008-05-12

    The nuclear physics group at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory (OCL) has developed a method to extract nuclear level density and {gamma}-ray strength function simultaneously from primary {gamma}-ray spectra. The resulting {gamma}-ray strength functions of {sup 44,45}Sc and {sup 50,51}V show an unexpected, large enhancement at low {gamma}-ray energies, indicating an increased probability of emitting low-energy {gamma} rays in the quasi-continuum.

  6. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  7. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry to electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, J. M.; Matteson, S. E.; Marble, D. K.; Duggan, J. L.; Mcdaniel, F. C.; Donahue, D. J.

    1990-04-01

    Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to stable-element detection in electronic materials are being explored. Conventional AMS hardware at the University of Arizona has been used to profile shallow semiconductor structures (ion-implanted samples) and to establish minimum values of system efficiency for several ions in Si and/or GaAs. A custom instrument under development at the University of North Texas has been used to generate molecule free mass spectra which can be directly compared with secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data. Elemental fragments associated with molecular dissociation after passage through the accelerator are shown to constitute a source of system "background" which can be removed through clever selection of charge states.

  8. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  9. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  10. Mass spectrometry of nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Houska, Jan; Panyala, Nagender Reddy; Peña-Méndez, Eladia Maria; Havel, Josef

    2009-04-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) were studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS). The formation of singly charged carbon clusters, C(n) (+), with groups of clusters at n = 1-35, n approximately 160-400 and clusters with n approximately 8000 was observed. On applying either high laser energy or ultrasound, the position and intensity of the maxima change and a new group of clusters at n approximately 70-80 is formed. High carbon clusters consist of an even number of carbons while the percentage of odd-numbered clusters is quite low (< or =5-10%). On increasing the laser energy, the maximum of ionization (at n approximately 200 carbons) is shifted towards the lower m/z values. It is suggested that this is mainly due to the disaggregation of the original NDs. However, the partial destruction of NDs is also possible. The carbon clusters (n approximately 2-35) are partially hydrogenated and the average value of the hydrogenation was 10-30%. Trace impurities in NDs like Li, B, Fe, and others were detected at high laser energy. Several matrices for ionizing NDs were examined and NDs themselves can also be used as a matrix for the ionization of various organic compounds. When NDs were used as a matrix for gold nanoparticles, the formation of various gold carbides Au(m)C(n) was detected and their stoichiometry was determined. It was demonstrated that TOF MS can be used advantageously to analyze NDs, characterize their size distribution, aggregation, presence of trace impurities and surface chemistry. PMID:19280609

  11. Hadamard Transform Infrared Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhou

    The primary objective of this research is the design and application of a stationary mask Hadamard transform infrared (HT-IR) spectrometer. Previous research in the area of stationary Hadamard encoding focused on the use of switching materials for the masks. However, these masks could not pass infrared radiation and, as a result, the advantages of stationary Hadamard encoding could not be applied to infrared spectrometry. A nontraditional mask, called a thermo-optic array for the stationary encoding of radiation (TOASTER), was proposed and implemented to perform the stationary Hadamard encoding. The Hadamard encoding procedure was performed with an array of electrically controlled IR sources. Operated with a reversed Czerny -Turner system, the source array was switched on or off according to the Hadamard functions. In this manner, the wavelength limitation to stationary Hadamard encoding was totally lifted. The research presented in this dissertation addresses two other aspects of stationary mask HT-IR. First, since the optical encoding of the TOASTER was thermally operated, the thermo-optic behavior of the electrically controlled IR sources was studied based on the theory of heat conduction. Secondly, a LiTaO_3 pyroelectric detector was employed in our prototype HT-IR spectrometer and as a result, the feasibility of low cost pyroelectric IR detectors for spectrometric use was investigated and discussed. The results of this work showed that the thermo -optic array and the corresponding optical design of the HT-IR could allow the prototype instrument to work in the IR region with a transform multiplex advantage. The thermo -optic stationary encoding method also provided frequency precision with experimental results of spectral subtraction. With regards to the thermo-optic behavior of the electrically controlled IR sources, the experimental data verified the physical and mathematical analysis proposed. In addition, the low cost pyroelectric IR detector, with proper signal processing, was found to be useful for spectrometric use under certain application requirements.

  12. \\Gamma \\Gamma` A A \\Delta \\Delta

    E-print Network

    Kurth, Winfried

    ­ ­ ­ \\Gamma \\Gamma \\Gamma` @ @ @R 6 ? (1.) (2.) (3.) ? A A \\Delta \\Delta A A \\Delta \\Delta A A \\Delta \\Delta A A \\Delta \\Delta A A \\Delta \\Delta A A \\Delta \\Delta A A \\Delta \\Delta A A \\Delta \\Delta

  13. Experimental simulation of negative ion chemistry in Martian atmosphere using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabo, Martin; Lichvanová, Zuzana; Orszagh, Juraj; Mason, Nigel; Matej?ík, Štefan

    2014-08-01

    We have studied the formation of negative ions in a negative Corona Discharge (CD) fed by CO2/N2 mixtures (with 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10% N2) using the technique of ion mobility spectrometry-orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry (IMS-oaTOF). The composition of the negative ions was found to be dependent on the initial gas composition, the gas flow regime, the concentrations of neutral reactive species formed in the discharge and the trace amounts on water in the gases were found to play an important role in the negative ions formation. In a pure CO2 discharge operating under standard gas flow conditions of IMS (associated with strong interaction of ions with neutral reactive species formed in discharge) the ions CO3 - (H2O) and CO4 -(H2O) dominated the measured negative ion spectrum while in CO2/N2 mixtures NO3 -(H2O) n , NO3 -(HNO3) ( n = 0, 1) ions prevailed. In the case of reverse gas flow regime (low interaction of ions with neutral reactive species formed in discharge), the negative ions detected were O2 -(H2O) n , and O2 -.CO2(H2O) n both in pure CO2 and N2/CO2 mixtures. The spectra of negative ions recorded for a gas mixture containing 4% N2 in CO2 were compared with theoretical predictions of negative ion composition in the lower atmosphere of Mars.

  14. Magnetic Microcalorimeter Gamma Detectors for High-Precision Non-Destructive Analysis, FY14 Extended Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S.

    2015-02-06

    Cryogenic gamma (?) detectors with operating temperatures of ~0.1 K or below offer 10× better energy resolution than conventional high-purity germanium detectors that are currently used for non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. This can greatly increase the accuracy of NDA, especially at low-energies where gamma rays often have similar energies and cannot be resolved by Ge detectors. We are developing cryogenic ?–detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), which have the potential of higher resolution, faster count rates and better linearity than other cryogenic detector technologies. High linearity is essential to add spectra from different pixels in detector arrays that are needed for high sensitivity. Here we discuss the fabrication of a new generation of MMC ?–detectors in FY2014, and the resulting improvements in energy resolution and linearity of the new design. As an example of the type of NDA that cryogenic detectors enable, we demonstrate the direct detection of Pu-242 emissions with our MMC ?–detectors in the presence of Pu-240, and show that a quantitative NDA analysis agrees with the mass spectrometry

  15. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Some basic observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Although some properties were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the Compton Observatory in the past three years. The new observation with the greatest impact has been the observed isotropic distribution of bursts along with a deficiency of weak bursts which would be expected from a homogeneous burst distribution. This is not compatible with any known Galactic population of objects. Gamma-ray bursts show an enormous variety of burst morphologies and a wide spread in burst durations. The spectra of gamma-ray bursts are characterized by rapid variations and peak power which is almost entirely in the gamma-ray energy range. Delayed gamma-ray burst photons extending to GeV energies have been detected for the first time. A time dilation effect has also been reported to be observed in gamma-ray, bursts. The observation of a gamma-ray burst counterpart in another wavelength region has yet to be made.

  16. Vegetation Biochemistry: What Can Imaging Spectrometry Tell Us About Canopies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Wessman, Carol

    1991-01-01

    Changes in ecosystem processes such as productivity and decomposition may be expressed in the canopy foliar chemistry resulting from altered carbon allocation patterns, metabolic processes and nutrient availability. Understanding carbon balance on land over large regions requires quantitative determination of leaf constituents such as lignin and total nitrogen from remote sensing imaging systems. Results from spectral reflectance measurements of stacked leaves in the laboratory show that spectrum matching techniques are applicable to the derivation of the equivalent liquid water thickness in plants as well as to the extraction of dry leaf matter reflectance spectra from spectra of green leaves. The residual spectra derived by subtracting water spectra from the spectra of green leaves shows a feature at 1.72 micrometers that can be related to the lignin content of the leaves. Oak leaves have a deeper residual absorption feature than do cotton leaves which is consistent with their relative lignin content. Similar results are achieved when deriving the residuals from images taken over areas of grass and pine trees. Imaging spectrometry provides promise in developing images of various foliar biochemical constituents.

  17. Brain G protein gamma subunits contain an all-trans-geranylgeranylcysteine methyl ester at their carboxyl termini

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, H.K.; Farnsworth, C.C.; Xie, H.Y.; Howald, W.; Fung, B.K.; Clarke, S.; Gelb, M.H.; Glomset, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    We have shown previously that guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) beta gamma complexes purified from bovine brain membranes are methyl esterified on a C-terminal cysteine residue of the gamma polypeptide. In the present study, 3H-methylated G beta gamma complexes cleaved to their constituent amino acids by exhaustive proteolysis were shown to contain radiolabeled material that coeluted with geranylgeranylcysteine methyl ester on reversed-phase HPLC and two TLC systems. Further treatment by performic acid oxidation yielded radiolabeled material that coeluted with L-cysteic acid methyl ester, verifying that the prenyl modification occurs on a C-terminal cysteine residue. Analysis by gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry of material released from purified G beta gamma by treatment with Raney nickel positively identified the covalently bound lipid as an all-trans-geranylgeranyl (C20) isoprenoid moiety. To delineate the distribution of this modification among gamma subunits, purified G beta gamma complexes were separated into 5-kDa (gamma 5) and 6-kDa (gamma 6) forms of the gamma polypeptide by reversed-phase HPLC. Gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry analyses of Raney nickel-treated purified gamma 5 and gamma 6 subunits showed that both polypeptides were modified by geranylgeranylation. These results demonstrate that at least two forms of brain gamma subunit are posttranslationally modified by geranylgeranylation and carboxyl methylation. These modifications may be important for targeting G beta gamma complexes to membranes.

  18. Mass spectrometry of 1,3- and 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids.

    PubMed

    Schram, Karl; Miketova, Petra; Slanina, Jiri; Humpa, Otakar; Taborska, Eva

    2004-04-01

    Samples of 1,3- (1) and 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (2) and their hexaacetate derivatives were examined using positive and negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. Differences in the various spectra allow the discrimination of each of the isomers. Specific losses in the spectra of 2 also permit the identification of the site of substitution of one of the caffeic acid moieties as being at the 5-position. The spectra of 3,5- (3) and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic (4) acids and their hexaacetate derivatives were compared with those of 1 and 2 and their derivatives, and differences in ion abundances or the presence/absence of specific ions can be used to identify uniquely each of the compounds. PMID:15103652

  19. Cluster analysis on mass spectra of biogenic secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindler, C.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Mensah, A.; Mentel, T.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOA) are of high importance in the atmosphere. The formation of SOA from the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of selected trees was investigated in the JPAC (Jülich Plant Aerosol Chamber) facility. The VOC (mainly monoterpenes) were transferred into a reaction chamber where vapors were photo-chemically oxidized and formed BSOA. The aerosol was characterized by aerosol mass spectrometry (Aerodyne Quadrupol-AMS). Inside the AMS, flash-vaporization of the aerosol particles and electron impact ionization of the evaporated molecules cause a high fragmentation of the organic compounds. Here, we present a classification of the aerosol mass spectra via cluster analysis. Average mass spectra are produced by combination of related single mass spectra to so-called clusters. The mass spectra were similar due to the similarity of the precursor substances. However, we can show that there are differences in the BSOA mass spectra of different tree species. Furthermore we can distinguish the influence of the precursor chemistry and chemical aging. BSOA formed from plants exposed to stress can be distinguished from BSOA formed under non stressed conditions. Significance and limitations of the clustering method for very similar mass spectra will be demonstrated and discussed.

  20. Magnetic texture in metallic amorphous wires studied by Mössbauer spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gal, G.; Varret, F.

    1992-06-01

    To determine their magnetic texture, Mössbauer spectrometry is applied to metallic amorphous wires obtained by the in-rotating-water spinning process. Inhomogeneous thickness effects associated with a magnetic texture govern the line intensities of the Mössbauer spectrum. So we have developed a method which consists in simulating standard densities of resonant absorption from a powder Mössbauer spectrum. Then, the fitting of the experimental spectra leads to the values of N, Nr and Nt representing, respectively, the mean discrete axial, radial and tangential spin populations. Finally, the analysis on wires of different diameters shows that the magnetic texture is preferentially radial (axial) in the skin (bulk).

  1. Fission Yield Measurements by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irina Glagolenko; Bruce Hilton; Jeffrey Giglio; Daniel Cummings; Karl Grimm; Richard McKnight

    2009-11-01

    Correct prediction of the fission products inventory in irradiated nuclear fuels is essential for accurate estimation of fuel burnup, establishing proper requirements for spent fuel transportation and storage, materials accountability and nuclear forensics. Such prediction is impossible without accurate knowledge of neutron induced fission yields. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the fission yields reported in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library is not uniform across all of the data and much of the improvement is desired for certain isotopes and fission products. We discuss our measurements of cumulative fission yields in nuclear fuels irradiated in thermal and fast reactor spectra using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

  2. HUMIDITY EFFECTS ON THE MASS SPECTRA OF SINGLE AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-line laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry has developed into a widely used method for chemical characterization of individual aerosol particles. In the present study, the spectra of laboratory-generated particles were obtained as a function of relative humidity to elu...

  3. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  4. Mass Spectrometry for Large Undergraduate Laboratory Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illies, A.; Shevlin, P. B.; Childers, G.; Peschke, M.; Tsai, J.

    1995-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is routinely covered in undergraduate organic chemistry courses and a number of valuable laboratory experiments featuring its use have been discussed (1-7). Although such experiments work well at institutions with limited laboratory enrollments, we typically teach laboratories with enrollments of 160 or more in which it is difficult to allow each student to carry out a meaningful "hands on" mass spectrometry experiment. Since we feel that some practical experience with this technique is important, we have designed a simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (gc/ms) exercise that allows each student to analyze the products of a simple synthesis that they have performed. The exercise starts with the microscale SN2 synthesis of 1-bromobutane from 1-butanol as described by Williamson (8). The students complete the synthesis and place one drop of the distilled product in a screw capped vial. The vials are then sealed, labeled with the students name and taken to the mass spectrometry laboratory by a teaching assistant. Students are instructed to sign up for a 20-min block of time over the next few days in order to analyze their sample. When the student arrives at the laboratory, he or she adds 1 ml CH2Cl2 to the sample and injects 0.3 microliters of the solution into the gas chromatograph. The samples typically contain the 1-butanol starting material and the 1-bromobutane product along with traces of dibutyl ether. The figure shows a mass chromatogram along with the mass spectra of the starting material and product from an actual student run. For this analysis to be applicable to large numbers of students, the gc separation must be as rapid as possible. We have been able to analyze each sample in 6 minutes on a 30 m DB-5 capillary column with the following temperature program: 70 oC for 1 min, 70-80 oC at 10 oC/min, 86-140 oC at 67.5 oC/min, 140-210 oC at 70 oC/min, and 210 oC for 1 min. A mass range of 20-200 amu is scanned with a solvent delay of 2 min. Under these conditions each analysis takes the student about 10 min and two students are scheduled per 20 min block. Since the instrument is under computer control, students operate the computer during the run. As the peaks appear on the mass chromatogram, their mass spectra are obtained and the student decides which corresponds to product and evaluates product purity and the structure of impurities. There is ample time to display all spectra, conduct library searches, and print data. This relatively simple laboratory exercise has the advantage of allowing each student to carry out an analysis on his or her own product. The fact that a brominated product is obtained introduces a discussion of isotopic patterns in mass spectrometry. The experiment is scheduled to coincide with the lecture discussion of spectroscopic structure determination and after SN2 reactions have been covered. One of our mass spectrometer satellite data stations is interfaced with a "3-gun" projector in a large lecture hall allowing the display of actual mass spectra from our instrument to lecture sections. AcknowlegementThis work was partially supported by a grant, DUE9350846, from the National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement Program. Literature Cited Brush, R. C.; Rice, G. W. J. Chem. Educ. 1994, 71, A293-A294. Asleson, G. L.; Doig, M. T.; Heldrich, F. J. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, A290. Novak, M.; Heinrich, J. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, A150. (b) Novak, M.; Heinrich, J.; Martin, K. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, A103-104. Harman, C. S.; Myers, D. P.; Rittle, K. J. J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, 438-42. Mabbott, G. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1990, 67, 441-5. Hill, D. W.; McSharry, B. T.; Trzupek. J. Chem. Educ. 1988, 65, 907-10. Williamson, K. L. Macroscale and Microscale Organic Experiments, 2nd ed.; D. C. Heath: Lexington, MA, 1994; pp 247-51.

  5. Chemical recoveries of technetium-99 for various procedures using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ihsanullah; East, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    The procedure for the determination of {sup 99}Tc inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was based on the modification of a variety of available separation techniques. Standard Ru and Rh solutions were used for checking decontaminations and instrument response respectively. Technetium-99 and {sup 95m}Tc tracers were applied as yield monitors using ICP-MS and gamma-ray spectrometry respectively. Percent recoveries are reported for a variety of radiochemical separation procedures for water (58-83%), seaweed (10-76%), and for soil matrices (19-79%).

  6. Gamma radiation background measurements from Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Gregory, John C.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    1988-01-01

    A Nuclear Radiation Monitor incorporating a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission, July 29 to August 6, 1985. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with better than 20 s resolution throughout most of the mission in the energy range 0.1 to 30 MeV. Knowledge of the decay characteristics and the geomagnetic dependence of the counting rates enable measurement of the various components of the Spacelab gamma-ray background: prompt secondary radiation, Earth albedo, and delayed induced radioactivity. The status of the data analysis and present relevant examples of typical background behavior are covered.

  7. Gamma radiation background measurements from Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Gregory, John C.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    1989-01-01

    A Nuclear Radiation Monitor incorporating a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission, July 29 to August 6, 1985. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with better than 20 s resolution throughout most of the mission in the energy range 0.1 to 30 MeV. Knowledge of the decay characteristics and the geomagnetic dependence of the counting rates enable measurement of the various components of the Spacelab gamma-ray background: prompt secondary radiation, earth albedo, and delayed induced radioactivity. The status of the data analysis and present relevant examples of typical background behavior are covered.

  8. Imaging mass spectrometry in microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry tools which allow for the 2-D visualization of the distribution of trace metals, metabolites, surface lipids, peptides and proteins directly from biological samples without the need for chemical tagging or antibodies are becoming increasingly useful for microbiology applications. These tools, comprised of different imaging mass spectrometry techniques, are ushering in an exciting new era of discovery by allowing for the generation of chemical hypotheses based on of the spatial mapping of atoms and molecules that can correlate to or transcend observed phenotypes. In this review, we explore the wide range of imaging mass spectrometry techniques available to microbiologists and describe their unique applications to microbiology with respect to the types of microbiology samples to be investigated. PMID:21822293

  9. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  10. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  11. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P.; Griffee, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Gamma-ray burst data from DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, J.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Lee, P. ); Griffee, J.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by means of gamma-ray detectors aboard three Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, in polar orbits at 800 km altitude. The gamma-ray data have a 2-second resolving time, and are usually telemetered in 5 energy bins in the range 50--1000 keV. Although it is not possible to detect gamma-ray bursts when the DMSP satellites are passing through the radiation belt or the South Atlantic Anomaly, or when the source is obscured by the Earth, a number of gamma-ray bursts have been detected by two or even three of the satellites. The DMSP data may be of considerable, assistance in evaluating time histories, locations, and spectra of gamma-ray bursts.

  13. IMPLEMENTING THE STANDARD SPECTRUM METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF ?-? COINCIDENCE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, S.; Flory, Adam E.; Schrom, Brian T.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.

    2011-09-14

    The standard deconvolution analysis tool (SDAT) algorithms were developed and tested at the University of Texas at Austin. These algorithms utilize the standard spectrum technique for spectral analysis of {beta}-{gamma} coincidence spectra for nuclear explosion monitoring. Work has been conducted under this contract to implement these algorithms into a useable scientific software package with a graphical user interface. Improvements include the ability to read in PHD formatted data, gain matching, and data visualization. New auto-calibration algorithms were developed and implemented based on 137Cs spectra for assessment of the energy vs. channel calibrations. Details on the user tool and testing are included.

  14. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  15. High LET, passive space radiation dosimetry and spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Keegan, R. P.; Frigo, L. A.; Sanner, D.; Rowe, V.

    1995-01-01

    The development of high linear energy transfer (LET), passive radiation dosimetry and spectrometry is needed for the purpose of accurate determination of equivalent doses and assessment of health risks to astronauts on long duration missions. Progress in the following research areas is summerized: intercomparisons of cosmic ray equivalent dose and LET spectra measurements between STS missions and between astronauts; increases LET spectra measurement accuracy with ATAS; space radiation measurements for intercomparisons of passive (PNTD, TLD, TRND, Emulsion) and active (TEPC, RME-111) dosimeters; interaction of cosmic ray particles with nuclei in matter; radiation measurements after long duration space exposures; ground based dosimeter calibrations; neutron detector calibrations; radiation measurements on Soviet/Russian spacecraft; space radiation measurements under thin shielding; and space radiation.

  16. High LET, passive space radiation dosimetry and spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.; Benton, E.R.; Keegan, R.P.; Frigo, L.A.; Sanner, D.; Rowe, V.

    1995-03-01

    The development of high linear energy transfer (LET), passive radiation dosimetry and spectrometry is needed for the purpose of accurate determination of equivalent doses and assessment of health risks to astronauts on long duration missions. Progress in the following research areas is summerized: intercomparisons of cosmic ray equivalent dose and LET spectra measurements between STS missions and between astronauts; increases LET spectra measurement accuracy with ATAS; space radiation measurements for intercomparisons of passive (PNTD, TLD, TRND, Emulsion) and active (TEPC, RME-111) dosimeters; interaction of cosmic ray particles with nuclei in matter; radiation measurements after long duration space exposures; ground based dosimeter calibrations; neutron detector calibrations; radiation measurements on Soviet/Russian spacecraft; space radiation measurements under thin shielding; and space radiation. Separate abstracts were prepared for articles from this report.

  17. Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Analysis of Intact Proteins from Biological Substrates.

    PubMed

    Sarsby, Joscelyn; Griffiths, Rian L; Race, Alan M; Bunch, Josephine; Randall, Elizabeth C; Creese, Andrew J; Cooper, Helen J

    2015-07-01

    Previously we have shown that liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry is suitable for the analysis of intact proteins from a range of biological substrates. Here we show that LESA mass spectrometry may be coupled with high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for top-down protein analysis directly from thin tissue sections (mouse liver, mouse brain) and from bacterial colonies (Escherichia coli) growing on agar. Incorporation of FAIMS results in significant improvements in signal-to-noise and reduced analysis time. Abundant protein signals are observed in single scan mass spectra. In addition, FAIMS enables gas-phase separation of molecular classes, for example, lipids and proteins, enabling improved analysis of both sets of species from a single LESA extraction. PMID:26066713

  18. Gamma ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  19. Mono-isotope Prediction for Mass Spectra Using Bayes Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Rwebangira, Mugizi Robert; Burge, Legand

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is one of the widely utilized important methods to study protein functions and components. The challenge of mono-isotope pattern recognition from large scale protein mass spectral data needs computational algorithms and tools to speed up the analysis and improve the analytic results. We utilized naïve Bayes network as the classifier with the assumption that the selected features are independent to predict mono-isotope pattern from mass spectrometry. Mono-isotopes detected from validated theoretical spectra were used as prior information in the Bayes method. Three main features extracted from the dataset were employed as independent variables in our model. The application of the proposed algorithm to publicMo dataset demonstrates that our naïve Bayes classifier is advantageous over existing methods in both accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:25620856

  20. Advances -ray spectrometry for environmental radioactivity monitoring

    E-print Network

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Advances -ray spectrometry for environmental radioactivity monitoring University of Ferrara Ph;· Environmental radioactivity monitoring: social, scientific and technological motivations · -ray spectrometry application [Xhixha et al. 2012] Environmental radioactivity monitoring: social, scientific and technological

  1. Characterization of Compounds in Psoralea corylifolia Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Diode Array Detection, Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry and Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangguo; Yang, Tiehong; Miao, Huayan; Chen, Hao; Chai, Yifeng; Wu, Hong

    2015-10-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD), time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-TOFMS) and quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-QITMS) were used for separation and identification of multi-components in Psoralea corylifolia. Benefiting from combining the accurate mass measurement of HPLC-TOFMS to generate elemental compositions, the complementary multilevel structural information provided by HPLC-QITMS and the characteristic UV spectra obtained from HPLC-DAD, 24 components in P. corylifolia were identified. The five groups of isomers were differentiated based on the fragmentation behaviors in QITMS and UV spectra. It can be concluded that an effective method based on the combination of HPLC-DAD, HPLC-TOFMS and HPLC-QITMS for identification of chemical components in P. corylifolia was established. The results provide essential data for further pharmacological and clinical studies of P. corylifolia and facilitate the rapid quality control of the crude drug. PMID:25903696

  2. Quasar Composite Spectra With BOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David; Dawson, K. S.; Myers, A. D.

    2013-06-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) has collected over 100,000 $z>2$ quasar spectra since 2009. Using this unprecedented sample, we have created a composite spectrum at a signal-to-noise ratio of well over 500 per pixel. Using subsamples of BOSS spectra, we have also generated composite quasar spectra binned by luminosity and redshift. We present an analysis of quasar evolution, systematic lineshifts with luminosity, and line equivalent widths from these composite spectra.

  3. Gamma ray bursts: a 1983 overview

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L.

    1983-10-01

    Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect. Energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all. Burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective. Finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts: a 1983 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect; energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all; burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective; finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

  5. Synchrotron emission and gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Brainerd, J.J.; Lamb, D.Q.

    1987-02-01

    The parameter space within which synchrotron emission models for gamma-ray burst spectra are valid is evaluated in the cases of thermal and power-law particle distributions. The spectra emitted by noncooling and cooling thermal and power-law particle distributions are modeled numerically over relativistic and nonrelativistic regimes. The structure of the radiation is defined near the fundamental and the continuum up to the 1000th harmonic. Comparisons are made with burst event data collected during the Apollo 16, Venera, SMM, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Hackucho missions. A two-component synchrotron model is proposed for gamma-ray burst events. The electron-positron distribution is projected to have a thermal component and a nonthermal power-law tail. 71 references.

  6. Study of Simvastatin Self-Association Using Electrospray-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrova, E. V.; Lekar, A. V.; Filonova, O. V.; Borisenko, S. N.; Maksimenko, E. V.; Borisenko, N. I.

    2015-07-01

    Self-association of simvastatin, which is widely used to treat coronary heart disease, was investigated using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry. Formation of simvastatin self-associates in various solvents was demonstrated using mass spectrometry. Solvation effects were shown to play a special role in the formation of the self-associates. Self-associates containing from two to fi ve simvastatin molecules were detected in mass spectra of an aqueous MeOH (20%) solution of simvastatin. The formation of simvastatin self-associates could compete with the complexation of supramolecular structures during the synthesis of new generation drugs.

  7. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  8. Stability of an injectable disulfiram formulation sterilized by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.; Agarwal, R.P.; Brodeur, R.J.; Garagusi, V.F.; Mossman, K.L.

    1985-02-01

    Stability of an injectable disulfiram suspension sterilized by gamma(gamma) irradiation was tested. Single doses of disulfiram powder in plastic syringes were subjected to 50,000 rads of gamma radiation. Culture media were inoculated with the irradiated drug to test for growth of bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. The irradiated drug and nonirradiated controls were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for disulfiram and its major degradation product, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC). Ultraviolet absorption spectra of irradiated and nonirradiated disulfiram were obtained. No organisms grew in any of the culture media. HPLC analysis indicated that disulfiram content of the irradiated specimens was not reduced, and DDC was not detected. There were no important differences between the ultraviolet spectra of the irradiated and nonirradiated samples. Disulfiram can be sterilized by gamma irradiation without chemical degradation.

  9. [Gamma-enolase (gamma-eno)].

    PubMed

    Koyama, R

    1995-05-01

    Enolase catalyzes the interconversion of 2-phosphoglycelate and phosphoenolpyruvate in the glycolytic pathway. Enolase isozymes are dimers formed from three subunits (alpha, beta, and gamma). The gamma subunit, containing enolase (gamma-enolase) in serum, is important in the diagnosis of tumors originating from APUD (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation) cells, like neuroblastoma, small cell carcinoma for the lung and certain carcinomas of the thyroid, the pancreas and the gut. Therefore, the determination of serum gamma-enolase levels is useful as a tumor marker of these neoplasms. On the other hand, raised gamma-enolase levels in cerebrospinal fluid have been demonstrated in patients suffering from various neurological disorders. In this paper, the author reviews the results of some of many studies related to gamma-enolase, up to now. PMID:7602791

  10. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  11. Mass Spectrometry & Proteomics Services Unit

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    Mass Spectrometry & Proteomics Services Unit Peptide and Protein Submission Form Website: http for analysis is dependent on sample complexity. Normally it takes 1-2 days for mass determination, and 3-5 days for protein identification by in-gel digestion and LC MS/MS analysis. 2. Mass spectrometric analysis Operator

  12. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Nordholt, Jane E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  13. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  14. Degradation pathways of PCB upon gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, F. ); Masse, R. )

    1990-11-01

    In order to understand the modifications of the chromatographic profile of Aroclor 1260 upon gamma irradiation, a total of 14 pure polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were separately irradiated in solution. Dechlorination was observed, and the generated products were investigated by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Degradation proceeds more rapidly in methanol/water mixture than in petroleum ether, but the relative amount of ortho-dechlorinated congeners formed upon irradiation was smaller in the former solvent Ortho chlorines are preferentially lost in petroleum ether except when they are involved in a 2,5 (or 3,6) substitution pattern, in which case para dechlorination becomes predominant. The precursors of some toxicologically important congeners such as congeners 77, 118, 167, and 189 have been identified. These data are useful to rationalize the modifications of the chromatographic profile of PCB complex mixture upon gamma irradiation.

  15. Gamma-ray albedo of the moon

    E-print Network

    Igor V. Moskalenko; Troy A. Porter

    2007-08-15

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalisation; this makes it a useful "standard candle" for gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo gamma rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  16. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  17. Cosmic Ray Spectra in Nambu-Goldstone Dark Matter Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, Masahiro; Murayama, Hitoshi; Shirai, Satoshi; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; ,

    2010-06-11

    We discuss the cosmic ray spectra in annihilating/decaying Nambu-Goldstone dark matter models. The recent observed positron/electron excesses at PAMELA and Fermi experiments are well fitted by the dark matter with a mass of 3TeV for the annihilating model, while with a mass of 6TeV for the decaying model. We also show that the Nambu-Goldstone dark matter models predict a distinctive gamma-ray spectrum in a certain parameter space.

  18. Cosmic Ray Spectra in Nambu-Goldstone Dark Matter Models

    E-print Network

    Masahiro Ibe; Hitoshi Murayama; Satoshi Shirai; Tsutomu T. Yanagida

    2009-08-25

    We discuss the cosmic ray spectra in annihilating/decaying Nambu-Goldstone dark matter models. The recent observed positron/electron excesses at PAMELA and Fermi experiments are well fitted by the dark matter with a mass of 3TeV for the annihilating model, while with a mass of 6 TeV for the decaying model. We also show that the Nambu-Goldstone dark matter models predict a distinctive gamma-ray spectrum in a certain parameter space.

  19. Toward single-molecule nanomechanical mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Naik, A. K.; Hanay, M. S.; Hiebert, W. K.; Feng, X. L.; Roukes, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides rapid and quantitative identification of protein species with relatively low sample consumption. Yet with the trend toward biological analysis at increasingly smaller scales, ultimately down to the volume of an individual cell, MS with few-to-single molecule sensitivity will be required. Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) provide unparalleled mass sensitivity, which is now sufficient for the detection of individual molecular species in real time. Here we report the first demonstration of MS based on single-biological-molecule detection with NEMS. In our NEMS-MS system, nanoparticles and protein species are introduced by electrospray injection from fluid phase in ambient conditions into vacuum and subsequently delivered to the NEMS detector by hexapole ion optics. Precipitous frequency shifts, proportional to the mass, are recorded in real time as analytes adsorb, one-by-one, onto a phase-locked, ultrahigh frequency NEMS resonator. These first NEMS-MS spectra, obtained with modest mass sensitivity from only several hundred mass adsorption events, presage the future capabilities of this approach. We also outline the substantial improvements that are feasible in the near term, some of which are unique to NEMS-MS. PMID:19581898

  20. Neutral particle mass spectrometry with nanomechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Sage, Eric; Brenac, Ariel; Alava, Thomas; Morel, Robert; Dupré, Cécilia; Hanay, Mehmet Selim; Roukes, Michael L; Duraffourg, Laurent; Masselon, Christophe; Hentz, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to mass spectrometry (MS) require ionization of the analytes of interest. For high-mass species, the resulting charge state distribution can be complex and difficult to interpret correctly. Here, using a setup comprising both conventional time-of-flight MS (TOF-MS) and nano-electromechanical systems-based MS (NEMS-MS) in situ, we show directly that NEMS-MS analysis is insensitive to charge state: the spectrum consists of a single peak whatever the species' charge state, making it significantly clearer than existing MS analysis. In subsequent tests, all the charged particles are electrostatically removed from the beam, and unlike TOF-MS, NEMS-MS can still measure masses. This demonstrates the possibility to measure mass spectra for neutral particles. Thus, it is possible to envisage MS-based studies of analytes that are incompatible with current ionization techniques and the way is now open for the development of cutting-edge system architectures with unique analytical capability. PMID:25753929

  1. Multi-Epoch Multiwavelength Spectra and Models for Blazar 3C 279

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Boettcher, M.; Aldering, G.; Aller, H.; Aller, M.; Backman, D. E.; Balonek, T. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Bock, H.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Of the blazars detected by EGRET in GeV gamma-rays, 3C 279 is not only the best-observed by EGRET, but also one of the best-monitored at lower frequencies. We have assembled eleven spectra, from GHz radio through GeV gamma-rays, from the time intervals of EGRET observations. Although some of the data have appeared in previous publications, most are new, including data taken during the high states in early 1999 and early 2000. All of the spectra show substantial gamma-ray contribution to the total luminosity of the object; in a high state, the gamma-ray luminosity dominates over that at all other frequencies by a factor of more than 10. There is no clear pattern of time correlation; different bands do not always rise and fall together, even in the optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. The spectra are modeled using a leptonic jet, with combined synchrotron self-Compton + external Compton gamma-ray production. Spectral variability of 3C 279 is consistent with variations of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet, accompanied by changes in the spectral shape of the electron distribution. Our modeling results are consistent with the UV spectrum of 3C 279 being dominated by accretion disk radiation during times of low gamma-ray intensity.

  2. Formation of gamma'-Ni3Al via the Peritectoid Reaction: gamma plus beta (+Al2O3) equals gamma'(+Al2O3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2008-01-01

    The activities of Al and Ni were measured using multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8 - 32 at.%Al and temperature range T = 1400 - 1750 K in the Ni-Al-O system. These measurements establish that equilibrium solidification of gamma'-Ni3Al-containing alloys occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ Al2O3) = gamma + beta (+ Al2O3), at 1640 plus or minus 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 plus or minus 0.2 at.%Al (at an unknown oxygen content). The {gamma + beta + Al2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633 - 1640 K, and gamma'-Ni3Al forms via the peritectiod, gamma + beta (+ Al2O3) = gamma'(+ Al2O3), at 1633 plus or minus 1 K. This behavior is inconsistent with the current Ni-Al phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-Al phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma'-Ni3Al phase field.

  3. Formation of gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al via the Peritectoid Reaction: gamma + beta (+ Al2O3)=gamma(sup prime)(+ Al2O3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Evan

    2008-01-01

    The activities of Al and Ni were measured using multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8-32 at.%Al and temperature range T=1400-1750 K in the Ni-Al-O system. These measurements establish that equilibrium solidification of gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al-containing alloys occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ Al2O3)=gamma + Beta(+ Al2O3), at 1640 +/- 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 +/- 0.2 at.%al (at an unknown oxygen content). The {gamma + Beta (+Al2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633-1640 K, and gamma(sup prime)-Ni3Al forms via the peritectoid, gamma + Beta (+ Al2O3)=gamma(sup prime) (+ Al2O3), at 1633 +/- 1 K. This behavior is consistent with the current Ni-Al phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-Al phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady-state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma(sup prime)-Ni2Al phase field.

  4. X-Ray Spectra of Young Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae: Dependence on Spin-Down Energy Loss Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.

    2003-01-01

    An observational model is presented for the spectra of young rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae based on a study of nine bright Crab-like pulsar systems observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. A significant correlation is discovered between the X-ray spectra of these pulsars and that of their associated pulsar wind nebulae, both of which are observed to be a function of the spin-down energy loss rate, E. The 2-10 keV spectra of these objects are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices, Gamma, in the range of 0.6 < Gamma (sub PSR) < 2.1 and 1.3 < Gamma(sub PWN) < 2.3, for the pulsars and their nebulae, respectively. A linear regression fit relating these two sets of indexes yields Gamma(sub PWN) = 0.91 +/- 0.18 + (0.66 +/- 0.11) Gamma (sub PSR), with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.97. The spectra of these pulsars are found to steepen as Gamma = Gamma(sub max) + alpha E (exp -1/2), with Gamma(sub max) providing an observational limit on the spectral slopes of young rotation-powered pulsars. These results reveal basic properties of young pulsar systems, allow new observational constraints on models of pulsar wind emission, and provide a means of predicting the energetics of pulsars lacking detected pulsations.

  5. Long-term spectral stability of HgI2 gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, Fred P.; Van den Berg, Lodewijk; Szubart, Laurel A.; Vigil, Ronald D.; DeVito, Raymond P.; Johnson, Craig

    2001-12-01

    An evaluation of the spectral performance of eight planar mercuric iodide (HgI2) gamma-ray detectors under continuous bias voltage for a duration of up to 2000 hours has demonstrated the high degree of long-term stability of mercuric iodide as a radiation detector material. Spectral parameters determined in this evaluation include the %FWHM, the peak-to-valley and peak-to-background ratios, the gain stability of the full energy peak, and the preamplifier offset voltages. Isotopes with three distinct energies were used for these measurements: 137Cs (662 keV), 57Co (122 keV) and 241Am (59 keV). The spectra were analyzed and spectral parameters were generated using Robwin, a spectral analysis program developed by Constellation Technology. Robwin performs simultaneous non-linear fitting of several key elements of the spectrum, emphasizing the continuum for the entire spectrum, the photopeak response function of all lines in the spectrum, the relative intrinsic efficiency of the detector and the photopeak resolution width. These findings provide further support for the widespread use of mercuric iodide as a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector material for energy spectrometry.

  6. Advances in structure elucidation of small molecules using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The structural elucidation of small molecules using mass spectrometry plays an important role in modern life sciences and bioanalytical approaches. This review covers different soft and hard ionization techniques and figures of merit for modern mass spectrometers, such as mass resolving power, mass accuracy, isotopic abundance accuracy, accurate mass multiple-stage MS(n) capability, as well as hybrid mass spectrometric and orthogonal chromatographic approaches. The latter part discusses mass spectral data handling strategies, which includes background and noise subtraction, adduct formation and detection, charge state determination, accurate mass measurements, elemental composition determinations, and complex data-dependent setups with ion maps and ion trees. The importance of mass spectral library search algorithms for tandem mass spectra and multiple-stage MS(n) mass spectra as well as mass spectral tree libraries that combine multiple-stage mass spectra are outlined. The successive chapter discusses mass spectral fragmentation pathways, biotransformation reactions and drug metabolism studies, the mass spectral simulation and generation of in silico mass spectra, expert systems for mass spectral interpretation, and the use of computational chemistry to explain gas-phase phenomena. A single chapter discusses data handling for hyphenated approaches including mass spectral deconvolution for clean mass spectra, cheminformatics approaches and structure retention relationships, and retention index predictions for gas and liquid chromatography. The last section reviews the current state of electronic data sharing of mass spectra and discusses the importance of software development for the advancement of structure elucidation of small molecules. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12566-010-0015-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21289855

  7. (n,{gamma}) Experiments on tin isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Rusev, G.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Dashdorj, D.; Erdenehuluun, B.; Tsend-Ayush, T.

    2013-04-19

    Neutron capture experiments on highly enriched {sup 117,119}Sn isotopes were performed with the DANCE detector array located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The DANCE detector provides detailed information about the multi-step {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture. Analysis of the experimental data provides important information to improve understanding of the neutron capture reaction, including a test of the statistical model, the assignment of spins and parities of neutron resonances, and information concerning the Photon Strength Function (PSF) and Level Density (LD) below the neutron separation energy. Preliminary results for the (n,{gamma}) reaction on {sup 117,119}Sn are presented. Resonance spins of the odd-A tin isotopes were almost completely unknown. Resonance spins and parities have been assigned via analysis of the multi-step {gamma}-ray spectra and directional correlations.

  8. Separation of electrons and protons in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. A.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Topchiev, N. P.; Adriaini, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu. T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2015-10-01

    The GAMMA-400 telescope will measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. These measurements will allow it to achieve the following scientific objectives: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point-like and extended sources, study of the energy spectrum of the Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, study of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, together with high-precision measurements of the high-energy electrons and positrons spectra, protons and nuclei up to the knee. The bulk of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the lepton component in the total flux is ?10-3 at high energy. In the present paper, the simulated capability of the GAMMA-400 telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is addressed. The individual contribution to the proton rejection from each detector system of GAMMA-400 is studied separately. The use of the combined information from all detectors allows us to reach a proton rejection of the order of ?4 × 105 for vertical incident particles and ?3 × 105 for particles with initial inclination of 30° in the electron energy range from 50 GeV to 1 TeV.

  9. Scintillation detectors in gamma spectral logging; geometry, absorption and calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    The theory for the evaluation of the effects of geometry in gamma ray absorption is developed for cylindrical scintillation detectors as applicable to borehole gamma spectrometry. The results of a laboratory experiment are shown for comparison. A calibration procedure to determine detector efficiency is given for application to borehole probes. It is shown that the response of a crystal can be separated in terms of geometric effects and instrumentation effects. It is also shown that approximating crystal detectors with point detectors in mathematical theory is grossly oversimplified. (USGS)

  10. Beacons at the Gamma Ray Horizon

    E-print Network

    K. Mannheim; S. Westerhoff; H. Meyer; H. -H. Fink

    1996-05-17

    Blazars with redshifts z<0.1 are likely candidates for detection at energies in the range 300 GeV - 50 TeV with Cerenkov telescopes and scintillator arrays. We present gamma-ray flux predictions for a sample of 15 nearby flat-spectrum radio sources fitting the proton blazar model of Mannheim (1993a) to their observed broad-band spectral energy distributions. At high energies, we use fluxes or flux limits measured by ROSAT, CGRO and the Whipple Observatory to constrain their spectra. We take into account absorption of the gamma-rays by pair production with low energy photons of the diffuse infrared-to-optical photon background produced by galaxies (cosmic absorption) and with low energy synchrotron photons of the blazar radiation field (internal absorption). Typically, the theoretical spectra decrease much faster above TeV (photon index s~3) than between GeV and TeV (s~2) owing to internal absorption. The predicted fluxes are confronted with flux limits in the 20-50 TeV energy range obtained by the High Energy Gamma Ray Astronomy (HEGRA) experiment. Without cosmic absorption, the fluxes are about equal to the current sensitivity of HEGRA. Improved gamma/hadron separation techniques could render a detection by HEGRA possible, if cosmic absorption by the far-infrared background at wavelengths ~100 mu is not exceedingly strong.

  11. Radiation spectra and polarization in magnetar bursts

    E-print Network

    Jacek Niemiec; Tomasz Bulik

    2005-02-21

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transfer in magnetar atmospheres. We include the effects of vacuum polarization, electron and proton scattering, and free-free absorption. Simulations are performed for the atmosphere model with the magnetic field perpendicular and also tilted with respect to the neutron star surface, and we show that the average spectrum does not strongly depend on the orientation of the magnetic field. We investigate the region of the parameter space where the vacuum absorption-like feature appears in the spectrum and we analyze the shape of the proton cyclotron line. Our results indicate that the existence of the vacuum polarization feature should be a general attribute of soft gamma-ray repeaters burst spectra, provided that the energy release takes place at the sufficiently dense region, and the atmosphere scaleheight is large enough. We discuss the existence of such a feature in recent observational data on these sources.

  12. Fission Product Gamma-Ray Line Pairs Sensitive to Fissile Material and Neutron Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E; Norman, E B; Burke, J T; Macri, R A; Shugart, H A; Browne, E; Smith, A R

    2007-11-15

    The beta-delayed gamma-ray spectra from the fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu by thermal and near-14-MeV neutrons have been measured for delay times ranging from 1 minute to 14 hours. Spectra at all delay times contain sets of prominent gamma-ray lines with intensity ratios that identify the fissile material and distinguish between fission induced by low-energy or high-energy neutrons.

  13. Distinguishing fissions of 232Th, 237Np and 238U with beta-delayed gamma rays

    E-print Network

    A. Iyengar; E. B. Norman; C. Howard; C. Angell; A. Kaplan; J. J. Ressler; P. Chodash; E. Swanberg; A. Czeszumska; B. Wang; R. Yee; H. A. Shugart

    2012-12-29

    Measurements of beta-delayed gamma-ray spectra following 14-MeV neutron-induced fissions of 232Th, 237Np, and 238U were conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Spectra were collected for times ranging from 1 minute to 14 hours after irradiation. Intensity ratios of gamma-ray lines were extracted from the data that allow identification of the fissioning isotope.

  14. gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    gamma - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( gamma - HCH ) ; CASRN 58 - 89 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Asse

  15. TDS spectra analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomková, E.

    1996-05-01

    Methods of TDS spectra analysis start usually from the Polanyi-Wigner desorption rate equation. The Redhead approximative solution of the equation can be rearranged into a reduced form in which it serves as an analytical expression for the desorption rate versus time or temperature. Fitting the analytical form to an experimental curve we can confirm or deny the invariability of kinetic parameters — a desorption energy Ed and a preexponential factor ?l — and determine their values. If the parameters depend on surface coverage ? the application of the reduced form allows us to determine their values at ??0 and ?? ?0 and estimate the dependence Ed( ?), ?(?) from a single TDS spectrum. The method proposed in this paper is valid for the first-order kinetics of desorption; for the estimation mentioned above an assumption is made that desorption sites are identical and that E d as well as ?l changes with ? monotonously.

  16. Modeling Supernova Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John; Dessart, Luc; Li, Chendong

    2012-04-01

    We highlight results from a series of investigations into modeling spectra of core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We have explored the accuracy of the expanding-photosphere method, and found that it can be used to obtain distances to Type IIP SNe with an accuracy of <~10%. We confirm the result of Utrobin and Chugai (2005) that time-dependent terms must be included in the statistical equilibrium equations in order to model Hi line evolution in Type II SNe, and show that time-dependent terms influence other spectral features (e.g., He i lines). We have initiated a study of polarization signatures from aspherical but axially-symmetric Type II SN ejecta. Hillier and Li acknowledge support from STScI theory grant HST-AR-11756.01.A and NASA theory grant NNX10AC80G. Dessart acknowledges financial support from grant PIRG04-GA-2008-239184.

  17. Reflection spectra and magnetochemistry of iron oxides and natural surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic properties and spectral characteristics of iron oxides are distinctive. Diagnostic features in reflectance spectra (0.5 to 2.4 micron) for alpha Fe2O3, gamma Fe2O3, and FeOOH include location of Fe3(+) absorption features, intensity ratios at various wavelengths, and the curve shape between 1.2 micron and 2.4 micron. The reflection spectrum of natural rock surfaces are seldom those of the bulk rock because of weathering effects. Coatings are found to be dominated by iron oxides and clay. A simple macroscopic model of rock spectra (based on concepts of stains and coatings) is considered adequate for interpretation of LANDSAT data. The magnetic properties of materials associated with specific spectral types and systematic changes in both spectra and magnetic properties are considered.

  18. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org . PMID:21063949

  19. B American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2013 DOI: 10.1007/s13361-013-0636-7

    E-print Network

    Zare, Richard N.

    compounds as well as petroleum asphaltenes (a naturally occurring complex mixture) using two laser weight [9, 16­18]. In spectra of pure compounds or simple mixtures, knowledge of the ionization process mixtures can be challenging for mass spectrometry, as it requires ionization and detection with nearly

  20. A NEW HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING PHARMACEUTICALS AND POTENTIAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS IN DRINKING WATER SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A New High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Technique for Identifying Pharmaceuticals and Potential Endocrine Disruptors in Drinking Water Sources

    Andrew H. Grange and G. Wayne Sovocool U.S.EPA, ORD, NERL, ESD, ECB, P.O. Box 93478, Las Vegas, NV 891933478

    Mass spectra...

  1. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  2. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  3. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  4. Imaging spectrometry: Past, present, future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging spectrometry for the remote sensing of the Earth from aircraft and satellites is discussed. Results with an aircraft instrument show that remote, direct identification of surface materials is possible. The airborne and spaceborne sensors can acquire images in 100 to 200 spectral bands. The next generation aircraft scanner (AVIRIS) is expected to be operational in 1987. Plans are underway for a Shuttle instrument (SISEX) to fly in 1991.

  5. Elemental mapping of the moon using gamma rays : past, present, and future /

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    The energies and intensities of gamma rays From a planetary surface can be used to infer the elemental composition of an object with no or a thin atmosphere. The Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers in 1972 and 1973 produced many of the results for the distribution of elements in the Moon that are now generally well accepted. Lunar Prospector in 1998 and 1999 globally mapped the Moon with gamma rays and neutrons. Both missions used spectrometers with poor energy resolution ({approx}8-10%). The Japanese plan to send a high-resolution germanium gamma-ray spectrometer to the Moon in about 2004 on their SELENE mission. However, little has been done since the 1970s on the models used to unfold planetary gamma-ray spectra. More work needs to be done on understanding what to expect in future gamma-ray spectra and how to unfold such data.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR SECONDARY EMISSION AS THE ORIGIN OF HARD SPECTRA IN TeV BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. G.; Kang, T.

    2013-02-20

    We develop a model for the possible origin of hard, very high energy (VHE) spectra from a distant blazar. In the model, both the primary photons produced in the source and secondary photons produced outside it contribute to the observed high-energy {gamma}-ray emission. That is, the primary photons are produced through the synchrotron self-Compton process, and the secondary photons are produced through high-energy proton interactions with background photons along the line of sight. We apply the model to a characteristic case of VHE {gamma}-ray emission in the distant blazar 1ES 1101-232. Assuming suitable electron and proton spectra, we obtain excellent fits to the observed spectra of this blazar. This indicated that the surprisingly low attenuation of the high-energy {gamma}-rays, especially the shape of the VHE {gamma}-ray tail of the observed spectra, can be explained by secondary {gamma}-rays produced in interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons in intergalactic space.

  7. Rapid profiling and identification of anthocyanins in fruits with Hadamard transform ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H; Yin, Dulin

    2015-06-15

    The use of Hadamard transform ion mobility mass spectrometry (HT-IMMS) in the profiling of anthocyanins from different fruits is presented. Samples extracted with acidic methanol and purified with solid phase extraction were analyzed with direct IMMS infusion. The separation of various anthocyanins was achieved within 30s with resolving powers up to 110. The ion mobility drift times correlated with their mass-to-charge ratios with a correlation coefficient of 0.979 to produce a trend line that was characteristic for anthocyanins. Isomers with the same anthocyanidin but different hexoses were differentiated by ion mobility spectrometry. Furthermore, mobility separated ions underwent collision induced dissociation at the IMMS interface to provide MS/MS spectra. These fragmentation spectra aided in the identification of anthocyanidins via the loss of the saccharide groups. IMMS appears to be a rapid and efficient approach for profiling and identifying anthocyanins. PMID:25660880

  8. Spectra of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John

    2015-08-01

    Non-LTE modeling is essential for interpreting the spectra of O stars and their decendents, and much progress has been made. The major uncertainty associated with analyzing photospheric spectra of O stars arises from issues related to microturbulence and macroturbulence. Many supergiants, for example, have microturbulent velocities that approach the sound speed, while macroturbulent velocities are often several times the sound speed. The cause of this turbulence is unknown, but may be related to pulsation, an underlying convection zone associated with the Fe opacity bump, or feedback from the stellar wind. Determining accurate abundances in O stars is hampered by the lack of lines belonging to low-z elements. Many species only have a few observable lines, and some of these are subject to complex non-LTE effects. A characteristic of massive stars is the existence of a stellar wind which is driven by radiation pressure. Radiation driving is inherently unstable, and this leads to winds with an inhomogeneous structure. Major issues that are still unresolved include: How are winds driven through the sonic point? What is the nature of the inhomogeneities, and how do the properties of these inhomogeneities change with density and velocity? How important is spatial porosity, and porosity in velocity space? What is the structure of the shocks, and in what stars do the shocks fail to cool? With Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars the major uncertainty arises because the classic spectroscopic radius (i.e., the location where ? = 2/3) often refers to a location in the wind — not necessarily the stellar radius associated with stellar evolution models. Derived radii are typically several times those predicted by stellar evolution calculations, although for strong-lined W-R stars it is possible to construct models that are consistent with evolution calculations. The driving of the winds in these stars is strongly coupled to the closeness of the stars to the Eddington limit and to their inhomogeneities, and the latter have not been derived from first principles. Theoretically, it is possible that the radii of the stars are inflated due to the Fe opacity bump.

  9. The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.K.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n{prime}) gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC{sup 2}-2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations.

  10. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry using a spherical moderator with position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Taosheng; Yang, Lianzhen; Ma, Jizeng; Fang, Dong

    2007-01-01

    A neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurement system has been developed based on a different design of the divided regions for a sphere, with three position-sensitive counters. The characteristics of the measurement system have been investigated in the reference radiation fields of Am-Be and (252)Cf sources. When realistic input spectra are used for the unfolding, the overall deviations of the calculated results for four dosimetric quantities are less than +/-10%. The results of other input spectra are also discussed in this report. PMID:16822780

  11. Exploring the high-mass components of humic acid by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chilom, Gabriela; Chilom, Ovidiu; Rice, James A

    2008-05-01

    Leonardite and Elliot soil humic acids have been analyzed by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) in the m/z 4000-200,000 range. Positive ion mass spectra for each humic acid obtained under optimum conditions showed a broad high-mass distribution between m/z 20,000 and 80,000. The dependence of the mass distribution on instrumental parameters and solution conditions was used to investigate the nature of the high-mass peaks from humic acid spectra. Our data suggests that macromolecular ions and humic acid aggregates have the same probability of occurrence while cluster ion formation has a low probability of occurrence. PMID:18421699

  12. Characterization of exopolymers of aquatic bacteria by pyrolysis-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, T.; Sacco, E.; Black, J.; Kelley, T.; Goodacre, R.; Berkeley, R. C.; Mitchell, R.

    1991-01-01

    Exopolymers from a diverse collection of marine and freshwater bacteria were characterized by pyrolysis-mass spectrometry (Py-MS). Py-MS provides spectra of pyrolysis fragments that are characteristic of the original material. Analysis of the spectra by multivariate statistical techniques (principal component and canonical variate analysis) separated these exopolymers into distinct groups. Py-MS clearly distinguished characteristic fragments, which may be derived from components responsible for functional differences between polymers. The importance of these distinctions and the relevance of pyrolysis information to exopolysaccharide function in aquatic bacteria is discussed.

  13. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  14. Determination of sulfates and glucuronides of endogenic steroids in biofluids by high-performance liquid chromatography/orbitrap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenistaya, E. N.; Virus, E. D.; Rodchenkov, G. M.

    2009-04-01

    the possibility of selective determination of testosterone and epitestosterone glucuronides in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry using solid phase microextraction on a meps cartridge was studied. the effect of the biological matrix on the spectra of conjugated steroids can be taken into account by using the spectra of conjugates recorded for urine samples after hydrolysis as reference spectra. the conditions of fragmentation in the ion source were optimized for separate analytes. this method was used for analyzing real samples with different testosterone/epitestosterone ratios. variations in conjugate contents and qualitative changes in the steroid profile of endogenic compounds were observed.

  15. Dual Gamma Neutron Directional Elpasolite Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P. P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2013-09-01

    Some applications, particularly in homeland security, require detection of both neutron and gamma radiation. Typically, this is accomplished with a combination of two detectors registering neutrons and gammas separately. We have investigated a new type of neutron/gamma (n/?) directional detection capability. We explored a new class of scintillator, cerium (Ce)-doped Elpasolites such as Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC), Cs2LiLaCl6 (CLLC), Cs2LiLaBr6:Ce (CLLB), or Cs2LiYBr6:Ce (CLYB). These materials are capable of providing energy resolution as good as 2.9% at 662 keV (FWHM), which is better than that of NaI:Tl. Because they contain 6Li, Elpasolites can also detect thermal neutrons. In the energy spectra, the full energy thermal neutron peak appears near or above 3 GEEn MeV. Thus, very effective pulse height discrimination is possible. In addition, the core-to-valence luminescence (CVL) provides Elpasolites with different temporal responses under gamma and neutron excitation, and, therefore, may be exploited for effective pulse shape discrimination. For instance, the CLLC emission consists of two main components: (1) CVL spanning from 220 nm to 320 nm and (2) Ce emission found in the range of 350 to 500 nm. The former emission is of particular interest because it appears only under gamma excitation. It is also very fast, decaying with a 2 ns time constant. The n/? discrimination capability of Elpasolite detectors may be optimized by tuning the cerium doping content for maximum effect on n/? pulse shape differences. The resulting Elpasolite detectors have the ability to collect neutron and gamma data simultaneously, with excellent discrimination. Further, an array of four of these Elpasolites detectors will perform directional detection in both the neutron and gamma channels simultaneously.

  16. Gamma ray line shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors: An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1995-09-01

    CdZn telluride (CZT) gamma ray detectors, operating at ambient temperatures, are potentially useful for safeguards applications such as assay and isotopic analysis of nuclear materials in the field. To analyze the complex gamma spectra, the gamma line shapes, including the amplitude and shape of the tail, must be understood. We have studied the line shapes in spectra taken with a CZT 5x5x5 mm detector. Standard gamma sources covering the energy range 59 to 661 keV were used. After background subtraction, the peaks were fit to a sum of a Gaussian and an exponential tail confined to the lower energy side of the Gaussian. The energy dependence of the various parameters that describe the gamma lines are graphed. The variance of the Gaussian increases linearly with gamma energy. Slope of the exponential tail varies strongly with energy at low gamma energy and then becomes nearly constant. Tail amplitude is larger for CZT than for a Ge detector. Tail cutoff parameter is not a very sensitive parameter for describing the line shape. Using these line shape parameters, gamma spectra at 90-100 keV from small uranium samples with 2 to 75% 235U were analyzed: the x rays from 235U decay and the gammas from 238U-234Th were used to determine the 235/238 ratio. This ratio could be determined to a few percent accuracy if the 235U enrichment did not exceed about 50%.

  17. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  18. Formation of biologically relevant carboxylic acids during the gamma irradiation of acetic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid with gamma rays produced several carboxylic acids in small yield. Their identification was based on the technique of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Some of these acids are Krebs Cycle intermediates. Their simultaneous formation in experiments simulating the primitive conditions on the earth suggests that metabolic pathways may have had their origin in prebiotic chemical processes.

  19. PROTON INDUCED GAMMA-RAY ANALYSIS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS FOR CARBON, NITROGEN, AND SULFUR COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technique for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur using in-beam gamma-ray spectrometry has been developed for use with atmospheric aerosol samples. Samples are collected on quartz filters, and the aerosol composition is determined by analyzing...

  20. Tungsten devices in analytical atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiandeng; Jones, Bradley T.

    2002-04-01

    Tungsten devices have been employed in analytical atomic spectrometry for approximately 30 years. Most of these atomizers can be electrically heated up to 3000 °C at very high heating rates, with a simple power supply. Usually, a tungsten device is employed in one of two modes: as an electrothermal atomizer with which the sample vapor is probed directly, or as an electrothermal vaporizer, which produces a sample aerosol that is then carried to a separate atomizer for analysis. Tungsten devices may take various physical shapes: tubes, cups, boats, ribbons, wires, filaments, coils and loops. Most of these orientations have been applied to many analytical techniques, such as atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, atomic fluorescence spectrometry, laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry, metastable transfer emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and microwave plasma atomic spectrometry. The analytical figures of merit and the practical applications reported for these techniques are reviewed. Atomization mechanisms reported for tungsten atomizers are also briefly summarized. In addition, less common applications of tungsten devices are discussed, including analyte preconcentration by adsorption or electrodeposition and electrothermal separation of analytes prior to analysis. Tungsten atomization devices continue to provide simple, versatile alternatives for analytical atomic spectrometry.

  1. Using secondary-proton spectra to study the compression and symmetry of deuterium-filled capsules at OMEGA

    E-print Network

    Using secondary-proton spectra to study the compression and symmetry of deuterium-filled capsules With new measurement techniques, high-resolution spectrometry of secondary fusion protons has been used by the ratio of secondary-proton yield to primary-neutron yield and the total areal density determined

  2. From Raw Data to Biological Discoveries: A Computational Analysis Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; He, Lin; Yates, John R

    2015-11-01

    In the last two decades, computational tools for mass spectrometry-based proteomics data analysis have evolved from a few stand-alone software solutions serving specific goals, such as the identification of amino acid sequences based on mass spectrometry spectra, to large-scale complex pipelines integrating multiple computer programs to solve a collection of problems. This software evolution has been mostly driven by the appearance of novel technologies that allowed the community to tackle complex biological problems, such as the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in two samples under different conditions. The achievement of such objectives requires a large suite of programs to analyze the intricate mass spectrometry data. Our laboratory addresses complex proteomics questions by producing and using algorithms and software packages. Our current computational pipeline includes, among other things, tools for mass spectrometry raw data processing, peptide and protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis, and protein functional enrichment analysis. In this paper, we describe a suite of software packages we have developed to process mass spectrometry-based proteomics data and we highlight some of the new features of previously published programs as well as tools currently under development. Graphical Abstract ?. PMID:26002791

  3. A MASSive Laboratory Tour. An Interactive Mass Spectrometry Outreach Activity for Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Julia H.; Mascini, Nadine E.; Kiss, Andras; Smith, Donald F.; Klinkert, Ivo; Eijkel, Gert B.; Duursma, Marc C.; Cillero Pastor, Berta; Chughtai, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2013-07-01

    It is imperative to fascinate young children at an early stage in their education for the analytical sciences. The exposure of the public to mass spectrometry presently increases rapidly through the common media. Outreach activities can take advantage of this exposure and employ mass spectrometry as an exquisite example of an analytical science in which children can be fascinated. The presented teaching modules introduce children to mass spectrometry and give them the opportunity to experience a modern research laboratory. The modules are highly adaptable and can be applied to young children from the age of 6 to 14 y. In an interactive tour, the students explore three major scientific concepts related to mass spectrometry; the building blocks of matter, charged particle manipulation by electrostatic fields, and analyte identification by mass analysis. Also, the students carry out a mass spectrometry experiment and learn to interpret the resulting mass spectra. The multistage, inquiry-based tour contains flexible methods, which teach the students current-day research techniques and possible applications to real research topics. Besides the scientific concepts, laboratory safety and hygiene are stressed and the students are enthused for the analytical sciences by participating in "hands-on" work. The presented modules have repeatedly been successfully employed during laboratory open days. They are also found to be extremely suitable for (early) high school science classes during laboratory visit-focused field trips.

  4. From Raw Data to Biological Discoveries: A Computational Analysis Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; He, Lin; Yates, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last two decades, computational tools for mass spectrometry-based proteomics data analysis have evolved from a few stand-alone software solutions serving specific goals, such as the identification of amino acid sequences based on mass spectrometry spectra, to large-scale complex pipelines integrating multiple computer programs to solve a collection of problems. This software evolution has been mostly driven by the appearance of novel technologies that allowed the community to tackle complex biological problems, such as the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in two samples under different conditions. The achievement of such objectives requires a large suite of programs to analyze the intricate mass spectrometry data. Our laboratory addresses complex proteomics questions by producing and using algorithms and software packages. Our current computational pipeline includes, among other things, tools for mass spectrometry raw data processing, peptide and protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis, and protein functional enrichment analysis. In this paper, we describe a suite of software packages we have developed to process mass spectrometry-based proteomics data and we highlight some of the new features of previously published programs as well as tools currently under development.

  5. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James A.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Devary, Brooks J.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.

    2007-09-03

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane, (C6H6N12O12, MW 438) {CL-20}, is a high-energy propellent that has been recently developed and successfully tested (Nielsen et al. 1998). CL-20 releases more energy on ignition and is more stable to accidental detonation than currently used energetic materials. It is expected to replace many of the energetic materials currently being used by the Department of Defense (DoD). The EPA method 8330 (EPA 1997) for the analysis of explosives and metabolites in soils calls for the use of UV/Vis detection. High performance liquid chromatography has been used to quantify CL-20 and precursor concentration (Bazaki et al. 1998`) at relatively high concentrations. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to identify different crystal forms of CL-20 (4 isomers; Kim et al. 1998). Campbell et al. (1997) utilized particle beam mass spectrometry for the analysis of enzymatic degradation of explosives. Introduction and recent improvements of ionization techniques such as electrospray (ES) have allowed the mass spectrometer to become more widely used in liquid chromatography. Schilling(1996) also examined explosive components and metabolites using electrospray (ES) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Schilling’s results showed that compared to thermospray LC/MS, APCI and ES were more sensitive than thermospray by at least an order of magnitude. 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), 10 nitroso-RDX metabolites, and other munitions in ground water have been analyzed using solid phase extraction and isotope dilution liquid chromatography-APCI mass spectrometry (Cassada et al. 1999). The method detection limits indicate that nitramine and nitroaromatic compounds can be routinely determined in ground water samples using electrospray LC/MS with concentration techniques utilizing solid-phase extraction. Miller et al. (1996) studied nitrated explosives with mobile phase additives to enhance the ESI intensities and spectral consistencies. Several of the explosives gave nitrate adduct ions in the negative mode with ammonium nitrate as the mobile phase. The nitramines RDX and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7 tetraazacyclooctane (HMX) showed the greatest enhancement in response of the explosives. Ammonium nitrate was used as the mobile phase and made it possible to obtain consistent and interpretable LC/MS spectra at the nanogram level. Campbell et al. (1999), Shi et al. (2000), and Goheen et al. (1999) utilized electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the identification of degradation products of explosives. Yinon et al. (1997) used ESI and tandem mass spectrometry collision-induced dissociation to examine several nitramine compounds including trinitrotolutene (TNT), RDX, and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The results indicate that explosives can be detected in the negative ion mode and characterized by various adduct ions. As an example, for nitroglycerin, the major adduct ion observed was (M+ONO2)-. In addition, Harvey et al. (1992) have used direct probe mass spectrometry for the analysis of degradation products of tetryl and its transformation products in soil. The negative ion electrospray mass spectrum of CL-20 is reported here. The major adduct ions observed under negative ion conditions were (M+Cl)- at m/z 473 and (M+ONO2) – at m/z 500. In addition, the results of mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry studies are also discussed.

  6. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  7. Improvement of interface properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under gamma-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitusevich, S. A.; Kurakin, A. M.; Konakova, R. V.; Belyaev, A. E.; Klein, N.

    2008-11-01

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrate were studied before and after gamma irradiation treatment. The CL spectroscopy results reveal strong yellow and blue luminescence transformation under gamma radiation treatment. The changes in CL spectra are compared with changes in the electrical characteristics of two-dimensional gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. The origins of the observed improvement in properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures after gamma radiation treatment with 1 × 10 6 rad are discussed on the basis of compensation and structural ordering of native defects.

  8. Counting Molecules by Desorption Ionization and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, R. G.; Busch, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses two newer methods in mass spectrometry and shows how they can increase signal and signal-to-noise ratios, respectively. The first method, desorption ionization (DI), increases sensitivity while the second method, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), increases specificity. Together, the two methods offer improved analytical…

  9. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  10. Diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zybin, A.; Koch, J.; Wizemann, H. D.; Franzke, J.; Niemax, K.

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews the past 11 years of literature on the application of diode lasers in atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnaces (GF), plasmas and flames as atomizers. Experimental arrangements and techniques for powerful absorption measurements as well as the theoretical background are covered. The analytical possibilities of high-resolution spectroscopy, including Doppler-free techniques for isotope selective measurements and isotope dilution analysis are discussed and various applications of element-selective detection by diode laser atomic absorption in combination with separation techniques, such as liquid (LC) and gas chromatography (GC), and with laser ablation of solid samples, are presented.

  11. Diagram spaces, diagram spectra, and spectra of units

    E-print Network

    Lind, John

    2009-01-01

    We compare the infinite loop spaces associated to symmetric spectra, orthogonal spectra, and EKMM S-modules. Each of these categories of structured spectra has a corresponding category of structured spaces that receives the infinite loop space functor \\Omega^\\infty. We prove that these models for spaces are Quillen equivalent and that the infinite loop space functors \\Omega^\\infty agree. This comparison is then used to show that two different constructions of the spectrum of units gl_1 R of a structured ring spectrum R agree.

  12. Analysis of the Konus catalog of gamma-ray bursts with the thermal synchrotron model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P.; Jernigan, T. E.; Rodrigues, R.

    1983-01-01

    Approximately 150 reported gamma-ray burst spectra of the Konus catalog are analyzed using the thermal synchrotron model. An overwhelming majority of these spectra can be satisfactorily fitted by theoretical thermal synchrotron spectra of mildly relativistic electrons in strong magnetic fields, making the strong-field neutron star picture at least self-consistent. Valuable additional information is also extracted from various spectral features contained in many of the events.

  13. Paired ion chamber constants for fission gamma-neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlic, K. P.

    1984-12-01

    Paired ionization chamber constants are calculated for the 50 cc spherical ionization chambers used in dosimetry of the AFRRI TRIGA reactor. The calculations include the most recently available information on energy spectra for neutron and gamma radiation present in AFRRI reactor exposure rooms, as well as for kerma factors and W-values of neutrons. The constant kT, which expresses neutron sensitivity of the 50 cc tissue equivalent (TE) ion chamber filled with TE gas, ranged from 0.92 to 0.96 among the 18 different neutron spectra for which calculations were done. The constant kU, which expresses neutron sensitivity of the 50 cc graphite ion chamber filled with CO2, ranged from 0.07 to 0.11 among the same spectra. The constant hT, which expresses gamma sensitivity of the TE/TE ion chamber, was taken to be unity for all spectra. The constant hU, which expresses gamma sensitivity of the C/CO2 ion chamber, was 0.99 + or - 0.01(range) for all spectra. These calculations will serve as the basis for future dosimetry with the 50 cc ion chambers at the AFRRI TRIGA reactor.

  14. Gamma spectral analysis via neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.

    1994-10-01

    A system combining a portable gamma-ray spectrometer with a neural network is discussed. In this system, the neural network is used to automatically identify radioactive isotopes in real-time from their gamma-ray spectra. Two neural network paradigms are examined: the linear perceptron and the optimal linear associative memory (OLAM). A comparison of the two paradigms shows that OLAM is superior to linear perceptron for this application. Both networks have a linear response and are useful in determining the composition of an unknown sample when the spectrum of the unknown is a linear superposition of known spectra. One feature of this technique is that it uses the whole spectrum in the identification process instead of only the individual photo-peaks. For this reason, it is potentially more useful for processing data from lower resolution gamma-ray spectrometers. This approach has been successfully tested with data generated by Monte Carlo simulations and with field data from both sodium iodide and germanium detectors. With the neural network approach, the intense computation takes place during the training process. Once the network is trained, normal operation consists of propagating the data through the network, which results in rapid identification of samples in the field. This approach is useful in situations that require fast response but where precise quantification is less important.

  15. IntrAst2 (Petrovay) Spectra STELLAR SPECTRA

    E-print Network

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    , Fleming): Classes A, B, ... etc. by decreasing importance of Balmer lines. 1901: Annie J. Cannon arranges: infrared domain #12;IntrAst2 (Petrovay) Spectra The Balmer series: H: Balmer jump At shorter values

  16. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  17. Anomalous quartic boson couplings via gamma gamma --> WW and gamma gamma --> WWZ at the TESLA kinematics

    E-print Network

    I. B. Marfin; V. A. Mossolov; T. V. Shishkina

    2003-04-30

    The production of two and three electroweak gauge bosons in the high-energy $\\gamma\\gamma$ collisions gives the well opportunity to probe anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings. The influence of five possible anomalous couplings on the cross sections for $W^+W^-$, $W^+W^-\\gamma$, $W^+W^-Z$ productions has been investigated at the TESLA kinematics ($\\sqrt{S}\\sim 1$ TeV). There are the reasonable discriminations between various anomalous contributions.

  18. Gamma-ray fluxes in Oklo natural reactors

    E-print Network

    C. R. Gould; E. I. Sharapov; A. A. Sonzogni

    2012-11-21

    Uncertainty in the operating temperatures of Oklo reactor zones impacts the precision of bounds derived for time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. Improved $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu thermometry has been discussed but its usefulness may be complicated by photo excitation of the isomeric state $^{176m}$Lu by $^{176}$Lu($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) fluorescence. We calculate prompt, delayed and equilibrium $\\gamma$-ray fluxes due to fission of $^{235}$U in pulsed mode operation of Oklo zone RZ10. We use Monte Carlo modeling to calculate the prompt flux. We use improved data libraries to estimate delayed and equilibrium spectra and fluxes. We find $\\gamma$-ray fluxes as a function of energy and derive values for the coefficients $\\lambda_{\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime}$ that describe burn-up of $^{176}$Lu through the isomeric $^{176m}$Lu state. The contribution of the ($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) channel to the $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu isotopic ratio is negligible in comparison to the neutron burn-up channels. Lutetium thermometry is fully applicable to analyses of Oklo reactor data.

  19. Gamma-ray fluxes in Oklo natural reactors

    E-print Network

    Gould, C R; Sonzogni, A A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.054602

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty in the operating temperatures of Oklo reactor zones impacts the precision of bounds derived for time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. Improved $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu thermometry has been discussed but its usefulness may be complicated by photo excitation of the isomeric state $^{176m}$Lu by $^{176}$Lu($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) fluorescence. We calculate prompt, delayed and equilibrium $\\gamma$-ray fluxes due to fission of $^{235}$U in pulsed mode operation of Oklo zone RZ10. We use Monte Carlo modeling to calculate the prompt flux. We use improved data libraries to estimate delayed and equilibrium spectra and fluxes. We find $\\gamma$-ray fluxes as a function of energy and derive values for the coefficients $\\lambda_{\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime}$ that describe burn-up of $^{176}$Lu through the isomeric $^{176m}$Lu state. The contribution of the ($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) channel to the $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu isotopic ratio is negligible in comparison to the neutron burn-up channels. Lutetium...

  20. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  1. Cosmic ray spectral hardening due to dispersion in the source injection spectra

    E-print Network

    Qiang Yuan; Bing Zhang; Xiao-Jun Bi

    2011-07-26

    Recent cosmic ray (CR) experiments discovered that the CR spectra experience a remarkable hardening for rigidity above several hundred GV. We propose that this is caused by the superposition of the CR energy spectra of many sources that have a dispersion in the injection spectral indices. Adopting similar parameters as those of supernova remnants derived from the Fermi $\\gamma$-ray observations, we can reproduce the observational CR spectra of different species well. This may be interpreted as evidence to support the supernova remnant origin of CRs below the knee. We further propose that the same mechanism may explain the "ankle" of the ultra high energy CR spectrum.

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Paciesas, W.S. ); Fishman, G.J. )

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings represents the works presented at the Gamma-Ray Bursts Workshop -- 1991 which was held on the campus of theUniversity of Alabama in Huntsville, October 16-18. The emphasis ofthe Workshop was to present and discuss new observations of gamma-ray bursts made recently by experiments on the Compton Gamma-RayObservatory (CGRO), Granat, Ginga, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Prognozand Phobos. These presentations were complemented by some groundbased observations, reanalysis of older data, descriptions offuture gamma-ray burst experiments and a wide-ranging list oftheoretical discussions. Over seventy papers are included in theproceedings. Eleven of them are abstracted for the database. (AIP)

  3. Stereotactic radiosurgery - Gamma Knife

    MedlinePLUS

    Stereotactic radiotherapy; stereotactic radiosurgery; SRT; Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy; SRS ... being treated. As compared to other types of radiation therapy, Gamma Knife treatment is much less likely to ...

  4. Femtosecond filament-laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huaming; Chan, George C.-Y.; Mao, Xianglei; Zheng, Ronger; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    A new remote sensing technology for real-time isotopic analysis is introduced: Femtosecond Filament-Induced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (F2-LAMIS). The technique combines femtosecond (fs) laser filamentation and ablation-based molecular isotopic spectroscopy, thereby enabling isotopic analysis of samples at a distance, in ambient air and at ambient pressure conditions. Isotopic analysis of zirconium (Zr) samples by F2-LAMIS is demonstrated, and the molecular and atomic emission intensity, and properties of the filament-induced plasma generated at different filament propagation distances were investigated. Spectral fitting of F2-LAMIS spectra enabled semi-quantitative isotopic analysis without the use of calibration standards, which was independent of the filament propagation distance for the studied range. This technology provides new capabilities for direct isotopic ratio measurements at remote distances.

  5. Bayesian Peptide Peak Detection for High Resolution TOF Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqiu; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wang, Honghui; Suffredini, Anthony; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Yufei; Wong, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of peptide ion peak detection for high resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) data. A novel Bayesian peptide ion peak detection method is proposed for TOF data with resolution of 10 000–15 000 full width at half-maximum (FWHW). MS spectra exhibit distinct characteristics at this resolution, which are captured in a novel parametric model. Based on the proposed parametric model, a Bayesian peak detection algorithm based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling is developed. The proposed algorithm is tested on both simulated and real datasets. The results show a significant improvement in detection performance over a commonly employed method. The results also agree with expert’s visual inspection. Moreover, better detection consistency is achieved across MS datasets from patients with identical pathological condition. PMID:21544266

  6. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  7. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry for Untargeted Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Alan H B; Colby, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    While gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) continues to be the forensic standard for toxicology, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem MS offers significant operational advantages for targeted confirmatory analysis. LC-high-resolution (HR)-MS has recently been available that offers advantages for untargeted analysis. HR-MS analyzers include the Orbitrap and time-of-flight MS. These instruments are capable of detecting 1 ppm mass resolution. Following soft ionization, this enables the assignment of exact molecular formula, limiting the number of candidate compounds. With this technique, presumptive identification of unknowns can be conducted without the need to match MS library spectra or comparison against known standards. For clinical toxicology, this can greatly expand on the number of drugs and metabolites that can be detected and reported on a presumptive basis. Definitive assignments of the compound's identity can be retrospectively determined with acquisition of the appropriate reference standard. PMID:26660184

  8. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane by flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Silberring, Jerzy; Reszke, Edward; Kuc, Joanna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The first application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the chemical characterization and determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is presented. The samples of technical HBCD and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) containing HBCD as a flame retardant were prepared by dissolving the appropriate solids in dichloromethane. The ionization of HBCD was achieved with a prototype FAPA source. The ions were detected in the negative-ion mode. The ions corresponding to a deprotonated HBCD species (m/z 640.7) as well as chlorine (m/z 676.8), nitrite (m/z 687.8) and nitric (m/z 703.8) adducts were observed in the spectra. The observed isotope pattern is characteristic for a compound containing six bromine atoms. This technique is an effective approach to detect HBCD, which is efficiently ionized in a liquid phase, resulting in high detection efficiency and sensitivity. PMID:25059130

  9. Electron energy-loss spectrometry on lithiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, A.; Ahn, C. C.; Fultz, B.; Rez, P.

    2000-07-10

    Transmission electron energy-loss spectrometry was used to investigate the electronic states of metallic Li and LiC{sub 6}, which is the Li-intercalated graphite used in Li-ion batteries. The Li K edges of metallic Li and LiC{sub 6} were nearly identical, and the C K edges were only weakly affected by the presence of Li. These results suggest only a small charge transfer from Li to C in LiC{sub 6}, contrary to prior results from surface spectra obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Effects of radiation damage and sample oxidation in the transmission electron microscopy are also reported. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Laser ablation mass spectrometry of sodium penetrated petroleum cokes

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, G.D.; Hopwood, F.G.; Fisher, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    Potassium and sodium modification of metallurgical cokes and carbon anodes and cathodes is of considerable interest to the aluminum industry as it can ultimately lead to the destruction of these materials. The authors have undertaken a laser ablation Fourier transform mass spectrometry study of a variety of carbon based materials including graphite, thermal black, carbon fibre, pitch coke, petroleum coke and glassy carbons in an effort to obtain information concerning the mechanism of sodium modification of these materials. A systematic analysis of a series petroleum cokes and sodium penetrated petroleum cokes which have been graphitised to different extents over the temperature range 800-2100{degrees}C have revealed noticeable differences in their respective negative-ion laser ablation FT-mass spectra.

  11. Figures of merit for furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, R.E.; Willie, S.N.; Luong, V.; Berman, S.S. )

    1990-11-01

    Analytical figures of merit for nine elements (viz. Ag, Cd, Pb, Ni, Be, Fe, Bi, Cu, and P) are presented that serve to broadly characterize the furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometry technique. Detection power lies in the low picogram region; precision of replicate signals obtained with injection of samples by hand ranges from 2.2 to 12.1% relative standard deviation and the linear range of calibration spans 2-4 orders of magnitude. Relative sensitivities of alternative atom and ion lines are given for each element. Sufficient energy is available to efficiently detect analyte ion lines having excitation energies of up to 13 eV. Static and dynamic background spectra are presented which reveal broad-band contributions from molecular species such as CO, N{sub 2}, NO, and OH as well as atom lines from the He support gas.

  12. Considerations in the analysis of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    Wales, Thomas E.; Eggertson, Michael J.; Engen, John R.

    2013-01-01

    i. Summary A major component of a hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry experiment is the analysis of protein and peptide mass spectra to yield information about deuterium incorporation. The processing of data that are produced includes the identification of each peptic peptide to create a master table/array of peptide sequence, retention time and retention time range, mass range and undeuterated mass. The amount of deuterium incorporated into each of the peptides in this array must then be determined. Various software platforms have been developed in order to perform this specific type of data analysis. We describe the fundamental parameters to be considered at each step along the way and how data processing, either by an individual or by software, must approach the analysis. PMID:23666730

  13. Advances in Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry & Lab Automation

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    #12;Advances in Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry & Lab Automation 2 Publisher's Note Kevin Davies&EN Media Group 4 Top Ten Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry, and Lab Automation Papers APPLICATION NOTES 10 Detection Of Methylmalonic Acid (MMA) In Plasma Using Hydro- philic Interaction Liquid Chromatography (HILIC

  14. SYNCHROTRON POLARIZATION AND SYNCHROTRON SELF-ABSORPTION SPECTRA FOR A POWER-LAW PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION WITH FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S. E-mail: souichaoui@usthb.dz

    2011-12-10

    We have derived asymptotic forms for the degree of polarization of the optically thin synchrotron and for synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) spectra assuming a power-law particle distribution of the form N({gamma}) {approx} {gamma}{sup -p} with {gamma}{sub 1} < {gamma} < {gamma}{sub 2}, especially for a finite high-energy limit, {gamma}{sub 2}, in the case of an arbitrary pitch angle. The new results inferred concern more especially the high-frequency range x >> {eta}{sup 2} with parameter {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1}. The calculated SSA spectra concern instantaneous photon emission where cooling effects are not considered. They have been obtained by also ignoring likely effects such as Comptonization, pair creation and annihilation, as well as magnetic photon splitting. To that aim, in addition to the two usual absorption frequencies, a third possible one has been derived and expressed in terms of the Lambert W function based on the analytical asymptotic form of the absorption coefficient, {alpha}{sub {nu}}, for the high-frequency range {nu} >> {nu}{sub 2} (with {nu}{sub 2} the synchrotron frequency corresponding to {gamma}{sub 2}). We have shown that the latter frequency may not have realistic applications in astrophysics, except in the case of an adequate set of parameters allowing one to neglect Comptonization effects. More detailed calculations and discussions are presented.

  15. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol?shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  16. Laminar-flow torch for helium inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.; Chan, S.K.; Montaser, A.

    1988-11-15

    Helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) operated at atmospheric pressure, possess two advantages compared to Ar ICPs for atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). First, for the elements tested so far, the detection powers for the He ICPs are superior to those for an Ar discharge. Second, the emission background spectra of the He ICPs are quite simple in the red and the near-infrared regions, thus reducing the spectral interference problems encountered with the determination of halogens and other nonmetals. Relatedly, certain mass spectral interferences noted in the detection of monoisotopic elements are eliminated when helium is used as the plasma gas instead of argon. For the most recent studies of He ICPs, the authors used a tangential-flow torch to form an annular plasma at forward power of 1500 W with a total helium gas flow of 8 L/min. The present study is concerned with the formation and preliminary characterization of a He ICP using a laminar-flow torch. The total helium gas flow for this torch is less than 2 L/min. Studies of plasmas formed in laminar-flow torches are important because of the possibility to reduce one major source of noise resulting from the rotation of the plasma gas in tangential-flow torches.

  17. Analysis of metal-EDTA complexes by electrospray mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, D.; Hering, J.G.

    1998-07-01

    Solutions of the strong complexing agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and Cu, Pb, Cd, Al, and Fe(III) were examined by electrospray mass spectrometry (ES/MS). Uncomplexed EDTA and metal-EDTA complexes survive the electrospray process intact and can be detected simultaneously by mass spectrometry. Best sensitivity was achieved in the positive ion mode in which EDTA and EDTA-metal complexes (present in solution as anions) were detected as protonated species with a single positive charge. Except for the protonation, the aqueous metal-EDTA complexes are preserved and neither fragmentation of complexes nor formation of clusters with more than one metal or ligand were observed in the mass spectra. Detection limits are between approximately 1 to 2 {micro}M for uncomplexed EDTA and for the Cu-EDTA and Pb-EDTA complexes, with a linear range up to 10{sup {minus}4} M. Calibrations based on solutions with equimolar concentrations of EDTA and Cu or Pb can be used to quantify EDTA-metal complexes in solutions with excess EDTA or metal, and in solutions with more than one metal present. Isotopic signatures of metals in the metal-ligand complexes are preserved, allowing the identification of the metal in a metal-ligand complex. Isotopic signatures of metals can therefore aid in the identification of metal-ligand complexes in unknown samples.

  18. [A new imaging technique as a diagnostic tool: mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Germain, Dominique P; Laprévote, Olivier

    2007-03-01

    Moss spectrometry proceeds from the generation of gas-phase ions from the molecules present in a sample. Recent ionisation methods make use of a focalized energy transfer onto a surface, allowing the localized analysis of a solid sample. The signals recorded are all the more intense as the corresponding molecules are more abundant. The point-by-point recording of mass spectra thus enables to generate ion images inasmuch as the translation of ionic intensity variations in a colour code creates the visible contrast. By applying mass spectrometry imaging to thin tissue slices originating, for example, from biopsies, it is possible to detect and locate simultaneously on the tissue surface a variety of biomolecules such as lipids, metabolites, drugs or proteins. This method can either play a role of support to the clinical diagnostic or emerge as a new tool in metabolomic and proteomic studies. The particular case of the Fabry disease is presented here in order to illustrate the present capabilities of this novel chemical imaging approach. PMID:17546774

  19. Numerical least-square method for resolving complex pulse height spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmadebeck, R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1967-01-01

    Linear least-square method resolves complex pulse height spectra, allowing for calculation of relative intensity, of statistical variance based on counting statistics of the correlation between library components, and of the goodness-of-fit chi square. Some applications are to gamma-ray, X ray, and charged-particle spectroscopy.

  20. Automated Lipid A Structure Assignment from Hierarchical Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Ying S.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Jones, Jace W.; Ng, Wailap V.; Ernst, Robert K.; Goodlett, David R.

    2011-05-01

    Infusion-based electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry (MS n ) is a standard methodology for investigating lipid A structural diversity (Shaffer et al. J. Am. Soc. Mass. Spectrom. 18(6), 1080-1092, 2007). Annotation of these MS n spectra, however, has remained a manual, expert-driven process. In order to keep up with the data acquisition rates of modern instruments, we devised a computational method to annotate lipid A MS n spectra rapidly and automatically, which we refer to as hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. As a first-pass tool, HiTMS aids expert interpretation of lipid A MS n data by providing the analyst with a set of candidate structures that may then be confirmed or rejected. HiTMS deciphers the signature ions (e.g., A-, Y-, and Z-type ions) and neutral losses of MS n spectra using a species-specific library based on general prior structural knowledge of the given lipid A species under investigation. Candidates are selected by calculating the correlation between theoretical and acquired MS n spectra. At a false discovery rate of less than 0.01, HiTMS correctly assigned 85% of the structures in a library of 133 manually annotated Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida lipid A structures. Additionally, HiTMS correctly assigned 85% of the structures in a smaller library of lipid A species from Yersinia pestis demonstrating that it may be used across species.

  1. Enhanced acylcarnitine annotation in high-resolution mass spectrometry data: fragmentation analysis for the classification and annotation of acylcarnitines.

    PubMed

    van der Hooft, Justin J J; Ridder, Lars; Barrett, Michael P; Burgess, Karl E V

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite annotation and identification are primary challenges in untargeted metabolomics experiments. Rigorous workflows for reliable annotation of mass features with chemical structures or compound classes are needed to enhance the power of untargeted mass spectrometry. High-resolution mass spectrometry considerably improves the confidence in assigning elemental formulas to mass features in comparison to nominal mass spectrometry, and embedding of fragmentation methods enables more reliable metabolite annotations and facilitates metabolite classification. However, the analysis of mass fragmentation spectra can be a time-consuming step and requires expert knowledge. This study demonstrates how characteristic fragmentations, specific to compound classes, can be used to systematically analyze their presence in complex biological extracts like urine that have undergone untargeted mass spectrometry combined with data dependent or targeted fragmentation. Human urine extracts were analyzed using normal phase liquid chromatography (hydrophilic interaction chromatography) coupled to an Ion Trap-Orbitrap hybrid instrument. Subsequently, mass chromatograms and collision-induced dissociation and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragments were annotated using the freely available MAGMa software. Acylcarnitines play a central role in energy metabolism by transporting fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix. By filtering on a combination of a mass fragment and neutral loss designed based on the MAGMa fragment annotations, we were able to classify and annotate 50 acylcarnitines in human urine extracts, based on high-resolution mass spectrometry HCD fragmentation spectra at different energies for all of them. Of these annotated acylcarnitines, 31 are not described in HMDB yet and for only 4 annotated acylcarnitines the fragmentation spectra could be matched to reference spectra. Therefore, we conclude that the use of mass fragmentation filters within the context of untargeted metabolomics experiments is a valuable tool to enhance the annotation of small metabolites. PMID:25806366

  2. Enhanced Acylcarnitine Annotation in High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data: Fragmentation Analysis for the Classification and Annotation of Acylcarnitines

    PubMed Central

    van der Hooft, Justin J. J.; Ridder, Lars; Barrett, Michael P.; Burgess, Karl E. V.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite annotation and identification are primary challenges in untargeted metabolomics experiments. Rigorous workflows for reliable annotation of mass features with chemical structures or compound classes are needed to enhance the power of untargeted mass spectrometry. High-resolution mass spectrometry considerably improves the confidence in assigning elemental formulas to mass features in comparison to nominal mass spectrometry, and embedding of fragmentation methods enables more reliable metabolite annotations and facilitates metabolite classification. However, the analysis of mass fragmentation spectra can be a time-consuming step and requires expert knowledge. This study demonstrates how characteristic fragmentations, specific to compound classes, can be used to systematically analyze their presence in complex biological extracts like urine that have undergone untargeted mass spectrometry combined with data dependent or targeted fragmentation. Human urine extracts were analyzed using normal phase liquid chromatography (hydrophilic interaction chromatography) coupled to an Ion Trap-Orbitrap hybrid instrument. Subsequently, mass chromatograms and collision-induced dissociation and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragments were annotated using the freely available MAGMa software1. Acylcarnitines play a central role in energy metabolism by transporting fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix. By filtering on a combination of a mass fragment and neutral loss designed based on the MAGMa fragment annotations, we were able to classify and annotate 50 acylcarnitines in human urine extracts, based on high-resolution mass spectrometry HCD fragmentation spectra at different energies for all of them. Of these annotated acylcarnitines, 31 are not described in HMDB yet and for only 4 annotated acylcarnitines the fragmentation spectra could be matched to reference spectra. Therefore, we conclude that the use of mass fragmentation filters within the context of untargeted metabolomics experiments is a valuable tool to enhance the annotation of small metabolites. PMID:25806366

  3. Gamma Rays, Electrons, Hard X-Rays, and the Central Parsec of the Milky Way

    E-print Network

    Kistler, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The complex interplay of processes at the Galactic Center is at the heart of numerous past, present, and (likely) future mysteries. We aim at a more complete understanding of how spectra extending to >10 TeV result. We first construct a simplified model to account for the peculiar energy and angular dependence of the intense central parsec photon field. This allows for calculating anisotropic inverse Compton scattering and mapping gamma-ray extinction due to gamma gamma -> e^+ e^- attenuation. Coupling these with a method for evolving electron spectra, we examine several clear and present excesses, including the diffuse hard X-rays seen by NuSTAR and GeV gamma rays by Fermi. We address further applications to cosmic rays, dark matter, neutrinos, and gamma rays from the Center and beyond.

  4. Level density of $^{56}$Fe and low-energy enhancement of $\\gamma$-strength function

    E-print Network

    Voinov, A V; Agvaanluvsan, U; Algin, E; Belgya, T; Brune, C R; Guttormsen, M; Hornish, M J; Massey, T; Mitchell, G E; Rekstad, J; Schiller, A; Siem, S

    2006-01-01

    The $^{55}$Mn$(d,n)^{56}$Fe differential cross section is measured at $E_d=7$ MeV\\@. The $^{56}$Fe level density obtained from neutron evaporation spectra is compared to the level density extracted from the $^{57}$Fe$(^3$He,$\\alpha\\gamma)^{56}$Fe reaction by the Oslo-type technique. Good agreement is found between the level densities determined by the two methods. With the level density function obtained from the neutron evaporation spectra, the $^{56}$Fe $\\gamma$-strength function is also determined from the first-generation $\\gamma$ matrix of the Oslo experiment. The good agreement between the past and present results for the $\\gamma$-strength function supports the validity of both methods and is consistent with the low-energy enhancement of the $\\gamma$ strength below $\\sim 4$ MeV first discovered by the Oslo method in iron and molybdenum isotopes.

  5. Infrared spectra of joint fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eysel, Hans H.; Mantsch, Henry H.; Jackson, Michael

    1994-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the application of infrared spectroscopy to the diagnosis of arthritic conditions by analysis of joint fluids. The detection of carbon dioxide clathrates, their origin and the nature of the host material is discussed. The analytical sensitivity of mid IR second derivative spectra is demonstrated with the detection of the local anaesthetic lidocaine in some of the samples. Linear discriminant analysis and hierarchical clustering are successfully used to classify the spectra according to their respective clinical diagnosis.

  6. Mass spectrometry of beta-lactam antibiotics with special reference to ionization by fast atom bombardment (FAB).

    PubMed

    Casy, A F; Cryer, C; Ominde, E M

    1989-01-01

    The mass spectral characteristics of the majority of penicillin and cephalosporin beta-lactam antibiotics in world-wide clinical use are presented and reviewed. Special attention is given to the spectra recorded under fast atom bombardment (FAB) conditions and novel data on many penicillins and cephalosporins are included. Mass spectrometry features of common degradation products of benzylpenicillin and of some synthetic intermediates are also presented. The data illustrate the value of FAB mass spectrometry in identifying members of this closely related group of antibiotics without need for derivatization. PMID:2490371

  7. Monte Carlo Simulations of Background Spectra in Integral Imager Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Dietz, K. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Predictions of the expected gamma-ray backgrounds in the ISGRI (CdTe) and PiCsIT (Csl) detectors on INTEGRAL due to cosmic-ray interactions and the diffuse gamma-ray background have been made using a coupled set of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (HETC, FLUKA, EGS4, and MORSE) and a detailed, 3-D mass model of the spacecraft and detector assemblies. The simulations include both the prompt background component from induced hadronic and electromagnetic cascades and the delayed component due to emissions from induced radioactivity. Background spectra have been obtained with and without the use of active (BGO) shielding and charged particle rejection to evaluate the effectiveness of anticoincidence counting on background rejection.

  8. Gamma-ray Pulsars: Models and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding Alice K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is, dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10(exp 12) - 10(exp 13) G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers of the primary curvature emission around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. Next-generation gamma-ray telescopes sensitive to GeV-TeV emission will provide critical tests of pulsar acceleration and emission mechanisms.

  9. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; von Kienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed more than 77 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds. The energy spectra of some TGFs have strong 511 keV positron annihilation lines, indicating that these TGFs contain a large fraction of positrons

  10. Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Edward C.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Prince, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is research in cosmic ray and gamma ray astrophysics at the Space Radiation Laboratory (SRL) of the California Institute of Technology. The primary activities discussed involve the development of new instrumentation and techniques for future space flight. In many cases these instrumentation developments were tested in balloon flight instruments designed to conduct new investigations in cosmic ray and gamma ray astrophysics. The results of these investigations are briefly summarized. Specific topics include a quantitative investigation of the solar modulation of cosmic ray protons and helium nuclei, a study of cosmic ray positron and electron spectra in interplanetary and interstellar space, the solar modulation of cosmic rays, an investigation of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of cosmic ray isotopic abundances, and a balloon measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray boron, carbon, and nitrogen.

  11. Nitrogen incorporation in Titan's tholins inferred by high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Carrasco, Nathalie; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Touboul, David; Szopa, Cyril; Buch, Arnaud; Pernot, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    Influx of solar photons and heavy charged particles from Saturn's magnetosphere on Titan's atmosphere - mainly comprised of methane and nitrogen - induce an intense organic photochemistry which leads to the formation of a large amount of aerosols in suspension in the atmosphere. In order to infer the role of nitrogen in aerosol formation processes we produced laboratory analogs of Titan's aerosols. In this work, we compare the composition of different analogs by using high resolution mass spectrometry and propose an additional study using gas-chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry for a new kind of analog produced by polymerization of cryogenically trapped gaseous neutral species. The comparison of these materials emphasizes the importance of ion chemistry processes for the inclusion of nitrogen in molecules constituting Titan's tholins. A statistical approach is also used for the treatment of high resolution mass spectra of these highly complex organic materials. This method allows distinguishing molecular families that can be reconstructed by an ideal copolymer. We investigate several copolymer reconstructions, and we suggest that an HCN (or CH3CN)/C2H4 based copolymer agrees well with the polymeric structure of tholins produced with 5% of methane in nitrogen.

  12. The Extragalactic Gamma-ray Sky in the Fermi era

    E-print Network

    Massaro, F; Ferrara, E C

    2015-01-01

    The Universe is largely transparent to $\\gamma$ rays in the GeV energy range, making these high-energy photons valuable for exploring energetic processes in the cosmos. After seven years of operation, the Fermi {\\it Gamma-ray Space Telescope} has produced a wealth of information about the high-energy sky. This review focuses on extragalactic $\\gamma$-ray sources: what has been learned about the sources themselves and about how they can be used as cosmological probes. Active galactic nuclei (blazars, radio galaxies, Seyfert galaxies) and star-forming galaxies populate the extragalactic high-energy sky. Fermi observations have demonstrated that these powerful non-thermal sources display substantial diversity in energy spectra and temporal behavior. Coupled with contemporaneous multifrequency observations, the Fermi results are enabling detailed, time-dependent modeling of the energetic particle acceleration and interaction processes that produce the $\\gamma$ rays, as well as providing indirect measurements of t...

  13. Directional gamma detector

    DOEpatents

    LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  14. Muons in gamma showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.; Vankov, C. P.; Halzen, F.

    1985-01-01

    Muon production in gamma-induced air showers, accounting for all major processes. For muon energies in the GeV region the photoproduction is by far the most important process, while the contribution of micron + micron pair creation is not negligible for TeV muons. The total rate of muons in gamma showers is, however, very low.

  15. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  16. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (editor); Trombka, J. I. (editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  17. The solar gamma ray and neutron capabilities of COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.; Lockwood, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging Compton telescope COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has unusual spectroscopic capabilities for measuring solar gamma-ray and neutron emission. The launch of the GRO is scheduled for June 1990 near the peak of the sunspot cycle. With a 30 to 40 percent probability for the Sun being in the COMPTEL field-of-view during the sunlit part of an orbit, a large number of flares will be observed above the 800 keV gamma-ray threshold of the telescope. The telescope energy range extends to 30 MeV with high time resolution burst spectra available from 0.1 to 10 MeV. Strong Compton tail suppression of instrumental gamma-ray interactions will facilitate improved spectral analysis of solar flare emissions. In addition, the high signal to noise ratio for neutron detection and measurement will provide new neutron spectroscopic capabilities. Specifically, a flare similar to that of 3 June 1982 will provide spectroscopic data on greater than 1500 individual neutrons, enough to construct an unambiguous spectrum in the energy range of 20 to 200 MeV. Details of the instrument and its response to solar gamma-rays and neutrons will be presented.

  18. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  19. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D. (Pleasanton, CA); Fought, Eric R. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  20. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.