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1

Airborne Gamma-Spectrometry in Switzerland  

SciTech Connect

Airborne gamma-spectrometry is able to obtain fast radiological information over large areas. The airborne gamma-spectrometry unit deployed in Switzerland by the Swiss National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC) consists of a Swiss army Super Puma helicopter equipped with four NaI-Detectors with a total volume of 17 liters, associated electronics and a real-time data evaluation and mapping unit developed by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The operational readiness of the airborne gamma-spectrometry system is validated in annual exercises of one week duration. Data from 2005 and 2006 exercises are represented in maps of {sup 137}Cs activity concentration for two towns located in southern and western Switzerland. An indicator of man-made radioactivity (MMGC ratio) is demonstrated for an area with four different types of nuclear installations. The intercomparison between airborne gamma-spectrometry and ground measurements showed good agreement between both methods.

Butterweck, Gernot [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bucher, Benno [Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, 5232 Villigen HSK (Switzerland); Rybach, Ladislaus [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Geophysics, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2008-08-07

2

GRABGAM Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level HPGe Gamma Spectra  

SciTech Connect

The GRABGAM code has been used successfully for ultra-low level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis since its development in 1985 at Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Although numerous gamma analysis codes existed at that time, reviews of institutional and commercial codes indicated that none addressed all features that were desired by SRTC. Furthermore, it was recognized that development of an in-house code would better facilitate future evolution of the code to address SRTC needs based on experience with low-level spectra. GRABGAM derives its name from Gamma Ray Analysis BASIC Generated At MCA/PC.

Winn, W.G.

1999-07-28

3

Nature of gamma-ray burst spectra  

SciTech Connect

The recent discovery of low-energy absorption features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) reported by Murakami et al. (1988) is discussed in the context of a new model for gamma-ray emission in isolated neutron-star sources. It is shown that the whole GRB spectrum may be due to irradiation of a reprocessing and reflecting boundary near a source of power-law gamma radiation. In this picture, the gamma-rays originate far above the surface of a magnetized neutron star where attenuation of the spectrum by pair production is minimal. The surface layers of the neutron star absorb a fraction of the gamma-ray energy and reflect some of the gamma-rays. The resultant spectrum is comprised of a power law at high energy, a steep component at intermediate energy, and a thermal component at low energy. There is a slight enhancement of the gamma-ray flux near E0 that may be the cause of the apparent d(-)d(+) annihilation line seen in some bursts. 27 references.

Melia, F.

1988-11-01

4

Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra  

SciTech Connect

The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J. [Special Technologies Laboratory of National Security Technologies, LLC, 5520 Ekwill Street, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States)

2013-01-15

5

Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra  

SciTech Connect

The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

2013-01-01

6

Composite mapping experiences in airborne gamma spectrometry.  

PubMed

During an international intercomparison exercise of airborne gamma spectrometry held in Switzerland 2007 teams from Germany, France and Switzerland were proving their capabilities. One of the tasks was the composite mapping of an area around Basel. Each team was mainly covering the part of its own country at its own flying procedures. They delivered the evaluated data in a data format agreed in advance. The quantities to be delivered were also defined in advance. Nevertheless, during the process to put the data together a few questions raised: Which dose rate was meant? Had the dose rate to be delivered with or without cosmic contribution? Activity per dry or wet mass? Which coordinate system was used? Finally, the data could be put together in one map. For working procedures in case of an emergency, quantities of interest and exchange data format have to be defined in advance. But the procedures have also to be proved regularly. PMID:24664949

Bucher, B

2014-08-01

7

Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

Baring, M. G.

1995-01-01

8

Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

Harding, A. K.

1980-01-01

9

A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

2010-06-28

10

Augmentation of ENDF/B fission product gamma-ray spectra by calculated spectra  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray spectral data of the ENDF/B-V fission product decay data file have been augmented by calculated spectra. The calculations were performed with a model using beta strength functions and cascade gamma-ray transitions. The calculated spectra were applied to individual fission product nuclides. Comparisons with several hundred measured aggregate gamma spectra after fission were performed to confirm the applicability of the calculated spectra. The augmentation was extended to a preliminary ENDF/B-VI file, and to beta spectra. Appendix C provides information on the total decay energies for individual products and some comparisons of measured and aggregate values based on the preliminary ENDF/B-VI files. 15 refs., 411 figs.

Katakura, J. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); England, T.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)) [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1991-11-01

11

The width of gamma-ray burst spectra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper, we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the EFE spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability <10-6). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes - synchrotron and blackbody radiation - the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78 per cent of long GRBs and 85 per cent of short GRBs are incompatible with the minimum width of standard slow cooling synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, with fast cooling spectra predicting even wider spectra. Photospheric emission can explain the spectra if mechanisms are invoked to give a spectrum much broader than a blackbody.

Axelsson, Magnus; Borgonovo, Luis

2015-03-01

12

New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

1969-01-01

13

Principles of UV-gamma coincidence spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With conventional methods, samples containing alpha-particle-emitting nuclides are difficult to detect and characterize from distances greater than a few centimetres. One promising technique is to observe alpha particles indirectly by utilizing alpha-induced ultraviolet (UV) photons. While absorbing in air, the energy of alpha particles is transferred to atmospheric molecules, leading to their ionization and excitation. In this work, UV photons generated in the relaxation of nitrogen molecules were used to trigger a gamma-ray spectrometer. This UV approach allows the focusing of gamma-ray measurements on a certain point containing alpha emitters. The present paper demonstrates that the new measurement principle works and has the potential to be developed for both in-field and laboratory applications.

Ihantola, Sakari; Sand, Johan; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Juha; Toivonen, Harri

2012-10-01

14

A dedicated LIMS for routine gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

We developed a Microsoft(®) Access-based LIMS (Laboratory Information and Management Systems), ?-LIMS, for the management of our gamma-spectrometry laboratory, in which thousands of routine, but high-quality analyses are performed each year. This paper explains the main features of the ?-LIMS and puts special attention on the interfacing methods and solutions for using the Genie™2000 spectrometry software in conjunction with the EFFTRAN package, which serves for efficiency transfer calculations, coincidence summing corrections and a procedure for uncertainty estimation. PMID:24332338

Bruggeman, M; Verheyen, L; Vidmar, T

2014-05-01

15

Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples  

SciTech Connect

A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

Winn, W.G.

1991-01-01

16

Gamma-ray spectrometry of LDEF samples  

SciTech Connect

A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectroscopy. The study quantified particle induced activations of (sup 22)Na, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 56}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which have been reported to collect noticeable {sup 7}Be on their leading surfaces. No significant {sup 7}Be was detected in the samples analyzed. The Underground Counting Facility at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) was used in this work. The facility is 50 ft. underground, constructed with low-background shielding materials, and operated as a clean room. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90%-efficient HPGe gamma-ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive shield. Each sample was counted for one to six days in two orientations to yield more representative average activities for the sample. The non-standard geometries of the LDEF samples prompted the development of a novel calibration method, whereby the efficiency about the samples surfaces (measured with point sources) predicted the efficiency for the bulk sample.

Winn, W.G.

1991-12-31

17

Monte Carlo calculations of coincidence-summing corrections for volume sources in gamma-ray spectrometry with Ge detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Monte Carlo simulation approach to solve the problem of measuring volume sources in gamma-ray spectrometry is described. The simulation package PENELOPE, with a cylindrical geometry tool was used to model two measurement systems and to calculate the detection efficiency for volume sources of ? emitters affected by coincidence-summing effects. ?-Ray spectra and experimental detection efficiencies from multi- ? emitting nuclides as 60Co, 88Y, 134Cs, 152Eu and 166mHo are compared to the simulation results.

García-Toraño, Eduardo; Pozuelo, Milagros; Salvat, Francesc

2005-06-01

18

Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A total of 31 samples from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of aluminum, vanadium, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultra-low-level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include end pieces, which were reported to collect noticeable Be-7 on their leading surfaces. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed.

Winn, Willard G.

1992-01-01

19

Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples at SRS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A total of 31 samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), including materials of Al, V, and steel trunnions were analyzed by ultralow level gamma spectrometry. The study quantified particle induced activations of Na-22, Sc-46, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, and Co-60. The samples of trunnion sections exhibited increasing activity toward the outer end of the trunnion and decreasing activity toward its radial center. The trunnion sections did not include an end piece that collects noticeable Be-7 on its leading surface. No significant Be-7 was detected in the samples analyzed. The most sensitive analyses were performed with a 90 pct. efficient HPGe gamma ray detector, which is enclosed in a purged active/passive active shield.

Winn, Willard G.

1991-01-01

20

Gamma-ray spectrometry with thick mercuric iodide detectors  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray spectra with energies up to 1.3 MeV have been detected for the first time with 1-cm-thick HgI/sub 2/ semiconductor detectors at room temperature. The spectra can be taken using a long, 10 ..mu..s, or a short, 0.5 ..mu..s, charge collection time. The latter has produced better results with better peak efficiency, higher peak-to-valley ratio, and fewer low energy counts with little sacrifice in resolution. Spectra for energies between 100 keV and 1.3 MeV and descriptions of the techniques for their acquisition are presented. The thick detectors need a conditioning treatment, which is described, prior to showing spectral response.

Beyerle, A.; Hull, K.; Markakis, J.; Lopez, B.; Szymczyk, W.M.

1982-01-01

21

Radon gamma-ray spectrometry with YAP:Ce scintillator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detection properties of a YAP:Ce scintillator (YAlO 3:Ce crystal) optically coupled to a Hamamatsu H5784 photomultiplier with standard bialkali photocathode have been analyzed. In particular, the application to radon and radon-daughters gamma-ray spectrometry was investigated. The crystal response has been studied under severe extreme conditions to simulate environments of geophysical interest, particularly those found in geothermal and volcanic areas. Tests in water up to a temperature of 100°C and in acids solutions such as HCl (37%), H 2SO 4 (48%) and HNO 3 (65%) have been performed. The measurements with standard radon sources provided by the National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiations (ENEA) have emphasized the non-hygroscopic properties of the scintillator and a small dependence of the light yield on temperature and HNO 3. The data collected in this first step of our research have pointed out that the YAP:Ce scintillator can allow high response stability for radon gamma-ray spectrometry in environments with large temperature gradients and high acid concentrations.

Plastino, Wolfango; De Felice, Pierino; de Notaristefani, Francesco

2002-06-01

22

Analysis of gamma-ray burst spectra with cyclotron lines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Motivated by the recent developments in the cyclotron resonance upscattering of soft photons or CUSP model of Gamma Ray Burst (GBR) continuum spectra, we revisit a select database of GRBs with credible cyclotron absorption features. We measure the break energy of the continuum, the slope below the break and deduce the soft photon energy or the electron beam Lorentz factor cutoff. We study the correlation (or lack of) between various parameters in the context of the CUSP model. One surprise result is that there appears to be marginal correlation between the break energy and the spectral index below the break.

Kargatis, Vincent; Liang, Edison P.

1992-01-01

23

NOTE: Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra

J. C. Polf; S. Peterson; M. McCleskey; B. T. Roeder; A. Spiridon; S. Beddar; L. Trache

2009-01-01

24

High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in uranium exploration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sedimentary-type uranium deposits accumulate at favorable sites along a migration path which may be kilometers in length. Their source is a large volume of rock from which the uranium has been leached. The geochemical mobilities and half lives of uranium and its daughter products vary widely so that they are transported from the source rocks, at different rates, along the migration path to their ultimate site. The radioactive disequilibrium resulting from this process has been well documented in the immediate vicinity of ore deposits, and disequilibrium is commonly recorded on gamma-ray logs up the hydraulic gradient from uranium ore. Little is known about the state of secular equilibrium in the leached host rocks, which often represent the only part of the migration path that is at or near the surface and is thus most accessible to the exploration geophysicist. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry provides a means of investigating the disequilibrium associated with uranium leaching and migration. Direct measurement of uranium can be made by this method, and the equivalent weight percents can be determined for six of the seven daughter-product decay groups that characterize the state of radioactive equilibrium. The technique has been used quantitatively in laboratory studies, where the results compare favorably with radiochemical analyses; field experiments suggest that semi-quantitative data may be obtained at the outcrop.

Moxham, Robert M.; Tanner, Allan B.

1977-01-01

25

Investigation of elemental analysis using neutron-capture gamma ray spectra  

E-print Network

This thesis evaluated the potential of neutron-capture gamma rays in elemental analysis. A large portion of the work was devoted to the development of a method for the analysis of weak peaks in gamma ray spectra. This was ...

Hamawi, John Nicholas

1969-01-01

26

Testing Reionization with Gamma Ray Burst Absorption Spectra  

E-print Network

We propose to study cosmic reionization using absorption line spectra of high-redshift Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) afterglows. We show that the statistics of the dark portions (gaps) in GRB absorption spectra represent exquisite tools to discriminate among different reionization models. We then compute the probability to find the largest gap in a given width range [Wmax, Wmax + dW] at a flux threshold Fth for burst afterglows at redshifts 6.3 < z < 6.7. We show that different reionization scenarios populate the (Wmax, Fth) plane in a very different way, allowing to distinguish among different reionization histories. We provide here useful plots that allow a very simple and direct comparison between observations and model results. Finally, we apply our methods to GRB 050904 detected at z = 6.29. We show that the observation of this burst strongly favors reionization models which predict a highly ionized intergalactic medium at z~6, with an estimated mean neutral hydrogen fraction xHI = 6.4 \\pm 0.3 \\times 10^-5 along the line of sight towards GRB 050904.

S. Gallerani; R. Salvaterra; A. Ferrara; T. Roy Choudhury

2008-05-23

27

Broadband Turbulent Spectra in Gamma-Ray Burst Light Curves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo

2014-05-01

28

Problems in the analysis of gamma-ray burst spectra  

SciTech Connect

Spectral measurements by the Solar Maximum Mission have been used to confirm the cyclotron lines in gamma-ray bursts reported from the Konus experiment. We present ISEE-3 data for the same burst (GB800419) during the same period of time which show no line. We discuss various problems in the analysis of scintillator spectra and point out that unfolded spectra are not necessarily unique and that the position of a data point in a deconvolved spectrum may vary depending on the assumed overall shape of the spectrum. As a result, if the analysis assumes a soft spectrum (such as optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung) an absorption feature might appear, whereas a harder spectrum (such as a Comptonized blackbody) would not require the feature. Since the continuum shape probably changes during the duration of a typical burst, the nonuniqueness of the spectral unfolding, combined with the assumption that the continuum is optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung, could give rise to spurious absorption features which vary on a time scale of seconds. Despite these problems, there is still some evidence for narrow spectral lines in the range 45 to 65 keV but not for the broad lines reported from the Konus experiment. Unfortunately, the range 45 to 65 keV is the most difficult spectral region to unfold.

Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Laros, J.G.

1982-01-01

29

Demonstration of lightweight gamma spectrometry systems in urban environments.  

PubMed

Urban areas present highly complex radiation environments; with small scale features resulting from different construction materials, topographic effects and potential anthropogenic inputs from past industrial activity or other sources. Mapping of the radiation fields in urban areas allows a detailed assessment of exposure pathways for the people who live and work there, as well as locating discrete sources of activity that may warrant removal to mitigate dose to the general public. These areas also present access difficulties for radiometric mapping using vehicles or aircraft. A lightweight portable gamma spectrometry system has been used to survey sites in the vicinity of Glasgow to demonstrate the possibilities of radiometric mapping of urban areas, and to investigate the complex radiometric features such areas present. Variations in natural activity due to construction materials have been described, the presence of (137)Cs used to identify relatively undisturbed ground, and a previously unknown NORM feature identified. The effect of topographic enclosure on measurements of activity concentration has been quantified. The portable system is compared with the outputs that might be expected from larger vehicular or airborne systems. For large areas airborne surveys are the most cost effective approach, but provide limited spatial resolution, vehicular surveys can provide sparse exploratory data rapidly or detailed mapping of open areas where off-road access is possible. Backpack systems are ideally suited to detailed surveys of small areas, especially where vehicular access is difficult. PMID:23639691

Cresswell, A J; Sanderson, D C W; Harrold, M; Kirley, B; Mitchell, C; Weir, A

2013-10-01

30

Cadium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) Gamma Ray Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

This report describes CZT crystals and their use in large arrays for generation of gamma ray spectra. Laboratory spectra will be shown together with spectra accumulated by various battery powered portable instruments (see Appendix A). One of these portable instruments was specifically constructed to minimize power consumption and yet provide reasonable isotope identification capability. Detailed data will be presented covering gamma energy resolution, gamma peak shapes, system background, and detector efficiency. Nearly all data were taken with very small crystals of CZT; cubes 5 mm on a side. A few spectra will be presented from cylindrical crystals of about the same size (see Appendix A). The small crystal size leads to low counting rates and extended counting times for reliable isotope identification. We have addressed this problem by using arrays of CZT crystals, initially two crystals and, at present, arrays of eight crystals. Data will be shown relating spectral parameters for these two arrays. System MDA is one way of combining resolution, efficiency, and background that will enable direct comparison of various detector types for individual isotope identification. We have calculated the MDA for an early dual crystal array and the current eight crystal array. Data derived from each array will be presented. In addition, it is possible to extrapolate the MDA methodology to much larger arrays. A 32-crystal array is under construction and extrapolations to 256 and 1024 crystals are considered possible. Estimated MDA values for these larger arrays are also presented. Several 8-crystal arrays have been constructed and versions have been incorporated into portable instruments. Descriptions of these small instruments are given covering physical size, weight, and general configuration. These instruments have been tested for shock and temperature effects and data will be presented on the results of these tests. The MDA concept will also allow extrapolation to large source to detector distances. The usual laboratory measurements are done with small sources at 20 to 50 cm ranges. Practical ranges for aerial work will be 50 to 100 meters or greater. These distances will require correction for air attenuation for most of the low energy isotopes. The approximations used in the present note for aerial measurements involve small diameter sources (diameter approximately equal to the altitude), a 1 kt pass, and a planar array with no aircraft attenuation material in the field of view. The array will have a collimator to limit the side-looking sensitivity to enable a more accurate extrapolation from the laboratory data. Large arrays will have significant physical size and weight compared to the small hand-held instruments thus far constructed. We estimate these parameters and extrapolate the power consumption to provide a realistic estimate of a suitable airborne system. In all cases these larger systems are lighter and physically more compact than the usual NaI or high purity Germanium (HPGe) systems used in aerial work. Thus deployment should be simple. The power consumption is much less as well.

William Quam

2001-09-01

31

Compression and Encryption of Search Survey Gamma Spectra using Compressive Sensing  

E-print Network

We have investigated the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) computational method to simultaneous compression and encryption of gamma spectra measured with NaI(Tl) detector during wide area search survey applications. Our numerical experiments have demonstrated secure encryption and nearly lossless recovery of gamma spectra coded and decoded with CS routines.

Alexander Heifetz; Sasan Bakhtiari; Apostolos C. Raptis

2015-01-21

32

Recovery and reanalysis of archived airborne gamma spectrometry data from the 1991 Dounreay survey.  

PubMed

Archived Airborne Gamma Spectrometry (AGS) data from the 1991 NIREX characterisations of Caithness have been recovered. The separate gamma spectrometry and positional data streams for approximately 120,000 measurements have been combined into a single data stream using the European Radiometrics and Spectrometry (ERS) data format. An analysis using working calibration coefficients and spectral stripping procedure has verified that the original survey recorded high quality data. The converted data stream is in a format more accessible to future research use, including evaluation of environmental change in the Caithness region. PMID:21798750

Cresswell, A J

2012-01-01

33

Early detection of radioactive fallout by gamma spectrometry.  

PubMed

Radioactive fallout should be detected as early as possible. A new and efficient method for detection of low-level irradiation from manmade radioactivity is developed. Radiation abnormalities are detectable down to air kerma rates of 0.5 to 1.0 nGy h(-1) for 137Cs and even lower for 131I. For multi-gamma energy radioactivity the detection level is 2.6-3.5 nGy h(-1). A standard NaI detector and a 512-channel analyser are used together with noise adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD). Statistical noise is removed and the measured spectra are reproduced using spectral components produced by NASVD. Stripping is not used and false alarms due to washout of atmospheric radon progeny are almost eliminated. Detection levels and the criteria for setting warning and alarm levels are discussed. The method may also be useful in other situations, for example where low-level signals from radioactive sources need to be detected. PMID:14653336

Aage, H K; Korsbech, U; Bargholz, K

2003-01-01

34

ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement  

SciTech Connect

ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

Pin, P. [AREVA NC La Hague - Nuclear Measurement Team, 50444 Beaumont-Hague Cedex (France); Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Electronics and Signal Processing Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Normand, S. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Sensors and Electronic Architectures Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2011-07-01

35

A simple method for the absolute determination of uranium enrichment by high-resolution gamma spectrometry.  

PubMed

A simple method for the determination of uranium enrichment using high-resolution gamma spectrometry is presented in this paper. The method relies solely on the gamma-ray emission probabilities of 235U and 234mPa, and an iterative procedure for the least squares fit of a polynomial to a set of experimentally determined data. To ensure the reliability of the 234mPa gamma-ray emission probabilities employed, a new determination of these probabilities was carried out using a combination of gamma spectrometry and Cerenkov counting of a purified 234Th solution. Using these new data, a maximum difference of approximately 5% has been found between the experimental and declared uranium enrichment in a set of solid and liquid samples containing uranium compounds. PMID:16311038

Korob, R O; Blasiyh Nuño, G A

2006-05-01

36

QUALITY CONTROL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS USING GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes the quality control procedures, calibration, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data in measuring the activity of gamma ray-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. Included in the appendices are basic data for selected gamma ray-emitting ra...

37

Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center  

DOE Data Explorer

A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

Greenwood, R.E.

38

Calculation of the decision thresholds in gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

A method was developed for calculating the decision thresholds for gamma-ray spectrometric measurements. At the energies where gamma-ray emitters that are present in the nuclide library, but were not identified in the spectrum, radiate, peaks are supposed to appear. The peak areas are calculated by fitting, using the method of least squares, the spectral region of the supposed peaks with a continuous background and the spectrometer response function at the gamma-ray energies where the supposed peaks are positioned. The null measurement uncertainty of a gamma-ray emitter is obtained as the uncertainty of the weighted average of the activities calculated from the areas of the supposed peaks in a spectrum where the specified activity of the gamma-ray emitter is zero. For the calculation of the decision threshold the null measurement uncertainty is used. These decision thresholds overestimate the critical limits calculated with the Currie formula by about 10% in the case of single gamma-ray emitters. For multi-gamma-ray emitters the decision thresholds yield smaller values than the Currie formula. The presence of a peaked background or peaks that are near the supposed peaks increases the decision threshold considerably. PMID:25233528

Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

2014-12-01

39

BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra. Part 3; Low-Energy Behavior of Time-Averaged Spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We analyze time-averaged spectra from 86 bright gamma-ray bursts from the first 5 years of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to determine whether the lowest energy data are consistent with a standard spectra form fit to the data at all energies. The BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors have the capability to observe photons as low as 5 keV. Using the gamma-ray burst locations obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors, the Spectroscopy Detectors' low-energy response can be modeled accurately. This, together with a postlaunch calibration of the lowest energy Spectroscopy Detector discriminator channel, which can lie in the range 5-20 keV, allows spectral deconvolution over a broad energy range, approx. 5 keV to 2 MeV. The additional coverage allows us to search for evidence of excess emission, or for a deficit, below 20 keV. While no burst has a significant (greater than or equal to 3 sigma) deficit relative to a standard spectra model, we find that 12 bursts have excess low-energy emission, ranging between 1.2 and 5.8 times the model flux, that exceeds 5 sigma in significance. This is evidence for an additional low-energy spectral component in at least some bursts, or for deviations from the power-law spectral form typically used to model gamma-ray bursts at energies below 100 keV.

Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Matteson, J. L.; Band, D. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Meegan, C. A.

1996-01-01

40

Small scale local gamma ray features. [galactic radiation spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to draw implications from nearby gamma-ray emission, the different ways that can be used to obtain an estimate of the amount of matter on each line of sight are investigated. It is shown that, within present uncertainties, the cosmic ray intensity inside molecular clouds within 1 kpc from the sun is the same as the cosmic ray intensity measured at the sun. In the last part, what can be learned from a comparison of far infrared and gamma-ray data is discussed.

Puget, J. L.; Ryter, C.; Serra, G.

1977-01-01

41

Pulser injection with subsequent removal for gamma-ray spectrometry  

DOEpatents

An improved system for gamma-ray spectroscopy characterized by an interface module that controls the injection of electronic pulses as well as separation logic that enables storage of pulser events in a region of the spectrum of a multichannel analyzer distinct from the region reserved for storage of gamma-ray events. The module accomplishes this by tagging pulser events (high or low) injected into the amplification circuitry, adding an offset to the events so identified at the time the events are at the output of the analog to digital converter, and storing such events in the upper portion of the spectrum stored in the multichannel analyzer. The module can be adapted for use with existing gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment to provide for automatic analyses of radioisotopes.

Hartwell, Jack K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodwin, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, Larry O. (Blackfoot, ID); Killian, E. Wayne (Idahoe Falls, ID)

1990-01-01

42

Spectra and Light Curves of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recently discovered gamma-ray burst afterglow is believed to be described reasonably well by synchrotron emission from a decelerating relativistic shell that collides with an external medium. To compare theoretical models with afterglow observations, we calculate here the broadband spectrum and corresponding light curve of synchrotron radiation from a power-law distribution of electrons in an expanding relativistic shock. Both the

Re'em Sari; Tsvi Piran; Ramesh Narayan

1998-01-01

43

Car-borne gamma spectrometry: a virtual exercise in emergency response.  

PubMed

In recent years car-borne gamma spectrometry has expanded from its role as a geological survey platform to being a useful asset in searching for orphan sources and for surveying in the aftermath of an incident involving the release of radioactive materials. The opportunities for gaining practical experience in the field however are limited by cost considerations and practicability. These limitations are exacerbated by the fact that field data can differ significantly from data generated in the laboratory. As a means of exercising existing emergency measuring/surveying capability and introducing car-borne measurements to a larger group, a virtual exercise was devised. The exercise ORPEX (Orphan Sources and Fresh Fallout Virtual Exercise in Mobile Measurement) featured two typical emergency scenarios: a search for orphan sources and surveying to delineate fallout from a local release point. Synthetic spectral data were generated for point sources and inserted into genuine car-borne measurement data. Participants were presented with a typical software tool and data and were asked to report source locations and isotopes within a time limit. In the second scenario, synthetic data representing fallout from a local fire involving radioactive material were added to real car-borne data, participants being asked to produce maps identifying and characterising the regions of contamination. Fourteen individual organisations from seven different countries supplied results which indicated that for strong sources of isotopes with simple spectra featuring high energy peaks, location and identification was not a problem. Problems arose for isotopes with low energy signals or that presented a weak signal even when visible for extended periods. Experienced analysts tended to perform better in identification of sources irrespective of experience with mobile measurements whereas those with experience in such measurements were more confident in providing more precise estimates of location. The results indicated the need for the inclusion of less frequently encountered sources in field exercise related to mobile measurements. PMID:22326718

Dowdall, M; Smethurst, M A; Watson, R; Mauring, A; Aage, H K; Andersson, K G; Pálsson, S E

2012-05-01

44

Measured neutron and gamma spectra from californium-252 in a tissue-equivalent medium  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of experimentally obtaining both neutron and gamma-ray spectra in a scattering medium is described. The method utilizes a liquid-organic scintillator (NE-213) coupled with a pulse-shape discrimination circuit. This allows the separation of the neutron-induced pulse-height data from the gamma-ray pulse-height data. Using mathematical unfolding techniques, the two sets of pulse-height data were transformed to obtain the neutron and

Howard R. Elson; Terry A. Stupar; Alvin Shapiro; James G. Kereiakes

1979-01-01

45

Study of total gamma spectra correlation for extending identification range over photopeak analysis. Master's thesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report shows that gamma spectra identification by total flux correlation can be used to extend identification range over photo peak methods. Identification was based on two decision rules both employing cross-correlation coefficients. The largest coefficient (first decision rule) matched the unknown spectra with the correct source thirty-seven out of thirty-eight trials. The proposed likelihood function (second decision rule) had

Dooley

1984-01-01

46

Study of total gamma spectra correlation for extending identification range over photopeak analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report shows that gamma spectra identification by total flux correlation can be used to extend identification range over photo peak methods. Identification was based on two decision rules both employing cross-correlation coefficients. The largest coefficient (first decision rule) matched the unknown spectra with the correct source thirty-seven out of thirty-eight trials. The proposed likelihood function (second decision rule) had

A. W. Dooley

1984-01-01

47

BATSE observations of gamma-ray burst spectra. I - Spectral diversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the time-averaged gamma-ray burst spectra accumulated by the spectroscopy detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment. The spectra are described well at low energy by a power-law continuum with an exponential cutoff and by a steeper power law at high energy. However, the spectral parameters vary from burst to burst with no universal values. The break in

D. Band; J. Matteson; L. Ford; B. Schaefer; D. Palmer; B. Teegarden; T. Cline; M. Briggs; W. Paciesas; G. Pendleton; G. Fishman; C. Kouveliotou; C. Meegan; R. Wilson; P. Lestrade

1993-01-01

48

Natural Radiation from Soil using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied the distribution of natural radioactivity in the soil of Interlagos, in São Paulo city and Billings Reservoir, in São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo, Brazil. The main contribution of the effective radiation dose is due to the elements of the 238Th decay series, with smaller contributions from 40K and the elements of the series of 238U. The results indicate the dose in all of the studied areas is around the average international dose due to external exposure to gamma rays (0.48 mSv/yr) proceeding from natural terrestrial elements.

Silveira, M. A. G.; Moreira, R. H.; de Paula, A. L. C.; Medina, N. H.

2009-06-01

49

Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy. PMID:19864704

Polf, J C; Peterson, S; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Beddar, S; Trache, L

2009-11-21

50

High resolution gamma-ray spectra for {sup 235}U(n{sub th},ff)  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution gamma ray spectra from thermal fission of {sup 235}U have been measured for 21 delay time intervals in the range 0.2s to nearly 100,000s. More than 170 gamma transitions have so far been studied out to 1000s in 27 different fission products. Relative line intensities and time evolutions for the gamma lines provide information on relative production probabilities for fission products, direct-vs.-beta chain production ratios, isomeric to ground-state production ratios, as well as precursor halflives, for comparison with ENDF/B-VI.

Pullen, D.J.; Campbell, J.M.; Couchell, G.P.; Li, Shengjie; Nguyen, Hung V.; Schier, W.A.; Seabury, E.H.; Tipnis, S.V. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States); England, T.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-12-31

51

Investigation of Failed TRISO Fuel Assay Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TRISO microsphere fuel is the fundamental fuel unit for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). A single TRISO particle consists of an inner kernel of Uranium Oxycarbide surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. The silicon carbide serves as the primary barrier to the release of fission products into the core. If the silicon carbide layer fails, fission gas, especially Kr and Xe, will begin to escape the failed particle. In order to understand the behavior of TRISO fuel under in-core conditions, a series of experiments is being conducted by Idaho National Lab at the Advanced Test Reactor. AGR-1 is the first of these experiments. It will measure fission product release due to failed TRISO particles. Simulations of this experiment have been conducted at North Carolina State University to develop a method for the analysis of the results of the experiment. The ATR core was simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP to calculate the expected neutron energy spectrum for the AGR-1 experimental test train. This spectrum was used to create one-group cross sections for implementation in ORIGEN calculations of the amount of activity produced in the experiment. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the phenomenon of gas release. While each model is based on similar physics, different models contain unique features that distinguish them from one another. These Release to Birth (R/B) models are developed and applied to the activity found in the ORIGEN calculations to create expected release activities. The release activity is used to create gamma-ray spectra that are representative of the different R/B models. Expected R/B due to a model can be calculated for comparison to the experiment with knowledge of the number of failed particles in the spectra. The comparison of measured to predicted R/B ratios gives insight into the physics of release and also helps validate specific models. Direct comparison is possible, but many of the uncertainties associated with direct comparison are nullified through the use of relative indicators. Each R/B model has a unique set of indicators that reflect the physical processes simulated in the model. Trends in the model indicators can be matched up with trends in indicators derived from the release spectra to validate either an entire model or validate the need to consider certain parameters in the creation of a complete and successful release to birth model. Gamma spectrometry is a useful tool for the understanding of fission gas release from failed TRISO particles. A better understanding of the processes that influence fission gas release will influence the fuel manufacturing and quality assurance protocols during the continued development of the VHTR. Future work in this area includes experiment in which the conditions can be better controlled to document the effects of temperature and fission rate in the fuel.

Harp, Jason Michael

52

Metrological characterization of the ADONIS system used in gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

In gamma-ray spectrometry, new acquisition systems based on digital signal processing are now commercially available. In order to determine their performance at high count rates, the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel has tested several of these systems. These tests have clearly shown that the performance levels announced by the manufacturers were generally not met. It was therefore a logical step to include the Atelier de DévelOppement Numérique pour l'Instrumentation en Spectrométrie (ADONIS) system in these tests. ADONIS is the new numerical system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by the CEA Service d'Instrumentation et d'Application des Rayonnements. PMID:14987639

Plagnard, J; Morel, J; Tuan, A Tran

2004-01-01

53

Advances in room-temperature solid-state gamma-ray spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a review and analysis of different concepts of gamma-ray spectrometry using room-temperature solid-state detectors. The classical approach involving the use of a charge-sensitive preamplifier and attempting to collect all the ionization charge produced by the gamma ray is analyzed and discussed in terms of the charge transport parameters of the most promising compound semiconductor materials. It is concluded that compound semiconductor detector materials having a large disparity between the ..mu.. tau products for electrons and holes (such as HgI/sub 2/ and CdTe) will have rather poor energy resolution if the classical method of spectrometry requiring full charge collection is employed. 30 references.

Iwanczyk, J.S.

1983-01-01

54

An iron absorption model of gamma-ray burst spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibit deficits of X-rays below approximately 200 keV. Here we consider a spectral model in which the burst source is shielded by an optically thick layer of circumburster material (CBM) rich in iron-group elements whose photoelectric absorption opacity exceeds the Thomson opacity below approximately 120 keV. For power-law distributions of absorption depths along the lines of sight the absorbed spectrum can indeed mimic the typial GRB spectrum. This model predicts that (a) the spectrum should evolve monotonically from hard to soft during each energy release, which is observed in most bursts, especially in fast rise exponential decay bursts; (b) Fe spectral features near 7 keV may be present in some bursts; and (c) the ratio of burst distances to the CBM and to Earth should be approximately 10(exp -11) if the spectral evolution is purely due to Fe stripping by the photons.

Liang, Edison P.; Kargatis, Vincent E.

1994-01-01

55

Characterization of gamma irradiated petrolatum eye ointment base by headspace–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of gamma irradiation on petrolatum eye ointment base (EOB) and its ingredients (white petrolatum, liquid paraffin, and wool fat) were studied at different irradiation doses. Forty-one volatile radiolysis products were detected and identified by a combined system of headspace–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS–GC–MS). The characteristics of the radiolysis products and the degradation pathway were discussed in each case, respectively.

Lan Hong; Hans Altorfer

2002-01-01

56

gamma. -ray spectrometry for determination of radium-228 and radium-226 in natural waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

A technique has been developed for the measurement of ²²⁸Ra and ²²⁶Ra in both fresh- and seawater using Ge(Li) ..gamma..-ray spectrometry. Radium isotopes are preconcentrated in the field from 100 to 1000 L onto Mn-impregnated acrylic fiber cartridges, leached from the fiber and coprecipitated with BaSOâ. Lower limits of detection are controlled by the volume of water processed through the

Jacqueline. Michel; Willard S. Moore; Philip T. King

1981-01-01

57

The potential of gamma-ray spectrometry as supplementary information for mapping central European soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Permanently updated soil maps are needed inter alia for the prediction of landslide hazards, flooding and drought effects, land degradation monitoring, and precision farming. Since comprehensive and intensive field mapping is not affordable, alternative mapping approaches are required. A promising tool, with quite unrecognised potential for modern soil science is gamma-ray spectrometry. As the radioelements potassium, thorium and uranium respond differently to soil forming processes, it should be possible to infer from their concentration on weathering status, and after calibration on soil properties and types. This paper aims to investigate the potential of airborne gamma spectrometry for mapping of central European soils and soil properties. The study was conducted for a test site in Southern Saxony, Germany, 140*85 km wide, representing diverse soil landscapes. Seven different petrographic training and validation areas were chosen each. To assess the potential of gamma-ray spectrometry as additional data layer, predictions were carried out (i) with and (ii) without radiometric data. The outputs were compared with independent soil information of the validation areas. Both prediction runs used the following predictors: elevation, slope, curvature, planform curvature, profile curvature, terrain ruggedness index, relative altitude, vertical distance above drainage network, wetness index, and convergence index. As additional predictor parent material derived from a reclassification of the official geological map (1:1M scale) was used. As radiometric properties potassium, thorium and uranium were used. The radiometric raster datasets were generated by universal kriging using relative altitude as covariate. Training and validation datasets were selected from a comprehensive dataset representing more than 14.000 point data. Point data include soil types and substrates, and for more than 800 sites soil profiles with analysed texture, pH, exchangeable cations, nutrients, and efficient cation exchange capacity. The study shows that gamma spectrometry is suitable to enhance the prediction of soil types and properties such as texture significantly.

Schuler, U.; Bock, M.; Baritz, R.; Willer, J.; Pickert, E.; Kardel, K.; Herrmann, L.

2012-04-01

58

Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core  

SciTech Connect

Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

James W. Sterbentz

2008-05-01

59

Energy Calibration of Gamma Spectra in Plastic Scintillators using Compton Kinematics  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a simple and practicable method for assigning energy values to gamma-ray pulse-height distributions measured with polyvinyl toluene based detectors. It is based upon the characteristic shape of the spectrum in the region of maximum energy deposition resulting from a single Compton scattering. The validity of this method is first demonstrated by applying it to a set of NaI(Tl) spectra, and comparing those results to the standard photo-peak method of calibrating the same spectra. The method is then applied to a set of polyvinyl toluene derived spectra.

Siciliano, Edward R.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.; Strachan, Denis M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2008-09-01

60

Study of total gamma spectra correlation for extending identification range over photopeak analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report shows that gamma spectra identification by total flux correlation can be used to extend identification range over photo peak methods. Identification was based on two decision rules both employing cross-correlation coefficients. The largest coefficient (first decision rule) matched the unknown spectra with the correct source thirty-seven out of thirty-eight trials. The proposed likelihood function (second decision rule) had a success rate of thirty-five out of thirty-eight trials. These results were based on spectra generated by the transport code, Morse.

Dooley, A. W.

1984-03-01

61

Use of Gamma Spectrometry Method for Environmental Monitoring in the area of NPP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is generally not possible to correctly determine the long and short term impact of human activity upon the environment, without thorough processing of data, obtained through monitoring. It was confirmed that such impact on the environment must be monitored over a long time period. The data obtained must be of high quality, an attribute assured by present state of scientific knowledge. One of the well established methods for monitoring atmospheric deposition of radionuclides in the environment is laboratory and in situ gamma spectrometry. With the aim to monitor an occurrence of a one-time escape or persistent release of fission products into the air, resulting from an operation of a nuclear plant, two types of monitoring are performed: i/ measurement of samples from the environment (Schreber moss, forest humus, pine bark, mushrooms and forest berries) using laboratory gamma spectrometry method in the range up to 3 MeV (those data are used for the trend analysis and for the construction of the contaminationmaps); ii/ in situ gama spectrometry for assessment dosimetry and spectrometry characteristic of photon-fields (those data are used for the dose rate calculation).

Thinova, L.; Cechak, T.; Kluson, J.; Trojek, T.

2006-05-01

62

Decomposition of the laboratory gamma irradiation component of angular ESR spectra of fossil tooth enamel fragments  

E-print Network

Decomposition of the laboratory gamma irradiation component of angular ESR spectra of fossil tooth Enamel fragment COÃ? 2 radicals a b s t r a c t Spectrum decomposition of the angular measurements follows our earlier studies on the spectrum decomposition of fossil tooth enamel fragments (Joannes

Bodin, Thomas

63

LEAST-SQUARES RESOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTRA IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

The use of ALPHA-M, a least squares computer program for analyzing NaI (Tl) gamma spectra of environmental samples, is evaluated. Included is a comprehensive set of program instructions, listings, and flowcharts. Two other programs, GEN4 and SIMSPEC, are also described. GEN4 is u...

64

An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra  

SciTech Connect

A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The program titled IAEAPU consists of three separate applications: a data-transfer application for transferring spectral data from a CICERO multichannel analyzer to a binary data file, a data-analysis application to analyze plutonium gamma-ray spectra, for plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percents of total plutonium, and a data-quality assurance application to check spectral data for proper data-acquisition setup and performance. Volume 3 contains the software listings for these applications.

Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

1989-09-07

65

Gamma-Ray Burst Synthetic Spectra from Collisionless Shock PIC Simulations  

E-print Network

The radiation from afterglows of gamma-ray bursts is generated in the collisionless plasma shock interface between a relativistic outflow and a quiescent circum-burst medium. The two main ingredients responsible for the radiation are high-energy, non-thermal electrons and a strong magnetic field. In this Letter we present, for the first time, synthetic spectra extracted directly from first principles particle-in-cell simulations of relativist collisionless plasma shocks. The spectra are generated by a numerical Fourier transformation of the electrical far-field from each of a large number of particles, sampled directly from the particle-in-cell simulations. Both the electromagnetic field and the non-thermal particle acceleration are self-consistent products of the Weibel two-stream instability. We find that the radiation spectrum from a $\\Gamma=15$ shock simulation show great resemblance with observed GRB spectra -- we compare specifically with that of GRB000301C.

Christian Busk Hededal; Åke Nordlund

2005-11-23

66

Effects of Compton scattering on the Gamma Ray Spectra of Solar flares  

E-print Network

Using fully relativistic GEANT4 simulation tool kit, the transport of energetic electrons generated in solar flares was Monte-Carlo simulated, and resultant bremsstrahlung gamma-ray spectra were calculated. The solar atmosphere was approximated by 10 vertically-stacked zones. The simulation took into account two important physical processes,that the bremsstrahlung photons emitted by precipitating relativistic electrons are strongly forward beamed toward the photosphere, and that the majority of these gamma-rays must be Compton back-scattered by the solar atmosphere in order to reach the observer. Then, the Compton degradation was found to make the observable gamma-ray spectra much softer than is predicted by simple analytic calculations. The gamma-ray signals were found to be enhanced by several conditions, including a broad pitch-angle distribution of the electrons, a near-limb flare longitude, and a significant tilt in the magnetic field lines if the flare longitude is rather small. These results successfully explain several important flare properties observed in the hard X-ray to gamma-ray range, including in particular those obtained with Yohkoh. A comparison of the Yohkoh spectrum from a GOES X3.7 class limb flare on 1998 November 22, with a simulation assuming a broad electron pitch-angle distribution, suggests that gamma-rays from this particular solar flare were a mixture of direct bremsstrahlung photons and their Comptonization.

Jun'ichi Kotoku; Kazuo Makishima; Yukari Matsumoto; Mitsuhiro Kohama; Yukikatsu Terada; Toru Tamagawa

2007-08-01

67

ON WEAK REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS  

SciTech Connect

Line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays provide a natural explanation of the hard gamma-ray spectra of distant blazars, which are believed to be capable of producing both gamma rays and cosmic rays. For sources with redshifts z {approx}> 0.1, secondary gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray interactions with background photons close to an observer can dominate over primary gamma rays originating at the source. The transition from one component to another is accompanied by a change in the spectral index depending on the source redshift. We present theoretical predictions and show that they agree with the data from Fermi Large Area Telescope. This agreement, combined with the spectral data from Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, provides evidence of cosmic-ray acceleration by active galactic nuclei and opens new opportunities for studying photon backgrounds and intergalactic magnetic fields.

Essey, Warren [International Center for Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kusenko, Alexander [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

2012-05-20

68

Anomaly Detection in Gamma-Ray Vehicle Spectra with Principal Components Analysis and Mahalanobis Distances  

SciTech Connect

The goal of primary radiation monitoring in support of routine screening and emergency response is to detect characteristics in vehicle radiation signatures that indicate the presence of potential threats. Two conceptual approaches to analyzing gamma-ray spectra for threat detection are isotope identification and anomaly detection. While isotope identification is the time-honored method, an emerging technique is anomaly detection that uses benign vehicle gamma ray signatures to define an expectation of the radiation signature for vehicles that do not pose a threat. Newly acquired spectra are then compared to this expectation using statistical criteria that reflect acceptable false alarm rates and probabilities of detection. The gamma-ray spectra analyzed here were collected at a U.S. land Port of Entry (POE) using a NaI-based radiation portal monitor (RPM). The raw data were analyzed to develop a benign vehicle expectation by decimating the original pulse-height channels to 35 energy bins, extracting composite variables via principal components analysis (PCA), and estimating statistically weighted distances from the mean vehicle spectrum with the mahalanobis distance (MD) metric. This paper reviews the methods used to establish the anomaly identification criteria and presents a systematic analysis of the response of the combined PCA and MD algorithm to modeled mono-energetic gamma-ray sources.

Tardiff, Mark F.; Runkle, Robert C.; Anderson, K. K.; Smith, L. E.

2006-01-23

69

Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

Rester, A. C., Jr.

1994-01-01

70

Prompt Fission Gamma-ray Spectra and Multiplicities for Various Fissioning Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prompt fission gamma spectra (PFGS) and multiplicities (PFGM) are investigated from a Monte Carlo simulation of the fission fragment deexcitation. The fission fragment characteristics are sampled from mass, charge, kinetic energy, spin and parity distributions from experimental data or theoretical models. Initial excitation energy is shared between the two complementary fragments using a mass dependent temperature ratio law and a level density parameter law based on Ignatyuk's prescription. Details can be found elsewhere in the literature. The deexcitation process can be performed with different calculation schemes. The first one is based on a Weisskopf model for neutron evaporation and nuclear transition sampling (from level density and strength function models) for gamma evaporation. In this case, the competition between neutrons and gammas is taken into account by using a spin dependent excitation energy limit under which gamma emission takes place. The second one is based on an Hauser-Feshbach model for neutron/gamma evaporation based on neutron transmission coefficients (from optical model calculations) and the same model as above for gammas. The n/? competition is then automatically taken into account at the very beginning of the primary fission fragments evaporation process. Fission observables, especially related to prompt fission gammas are presented and discussed for spontaneous fission (252Cf, 240Pu), thermal fission (235U+nth) and fast fission (238U+n1.8MeV). Comparisons with experimental data are shown when available.

Litaize, Olivier; Regnier, David; Serot, Olivier

71

Assay for uranium and determination of disequilibrium by means of in situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two sealed sondes, using germanium gamma-ray detectors cooled by melting propane, have been field tested to depths of 79 m in water-filled boreholes at the Pawnee Uranium Mine in Bee Co., Texas. When, used as total-count devices, the sondes are comparable in logging speed and counting rate with conventional scintillation detectors for locating zones of high radioactivity. When used with a multichannel analyzer, the sondes are detectors with such high resolution that individual lines from the complex spectra of the uranium and thorium series can be distinguished. Gamma rays from each group of the uranium series can be measured in ore zones permitting determination of the state of equilibrium at each measurement point. Series of 10-minute spectra taken at 0.3- to 0.5-m intervals in several holes showed zones where maxima from the uranium group and from the 222Rn group were displaced relative to each other. Apparent excesses of 230Th at some locations suggest that uranium-group concentrations at those locations were severalfold greater some tens of kiloyears, ago. At the current state of development a 10-minute count yields a sensitivity of about 80 ppm U308. Data reduction could in practice be accomplished in about 5 minutes. The result is practically unaffected by disequilibrium or radon contamination. In comparison with core assay, high-resolution spectrometry samples a larger volume; avoids problems due to incomplete core recovery, loss of friable material to drilling fluids, and errors in depth and marking; and permits use of less expensive drilling methods. Because gamma rays from the radionuclides are accumulated simultaneously, it also avoids the problems inherent in trying to correlate logs made in separate runs with different equipment. Continuous-motion delayed-gamma activation by a 163-?g 252Cf neutron source attached to the sonde yielded poor sensitivity. A better neutron-activation method, in which the sonde is moved in steps so as to place the detector at the previous activation point, could not be evaluated because of equipment failure.

Tanner, Allan B.; Moxham, Robert M.; Senftle, F.E.

1977-01-01

72

A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580  

SciTech Connect

HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were calculated. From the scanning data, locations with observed Cs-137 ratios exceeding six standard deviations above the mean ratio were mapped in high resolution [2]. Field teams returned to those locations to collect static count measurements using the same detection systems. Soil surface samples were collected at 30 locations and analyzed for Cs-137. An exponential correlation was identified between Cs-137 concentrations in surface soil and field-scanned Cs-137 ratios. The data indicate field minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of Cs-137 at 0.02 Bq/g (0.5 pCi/g) or lower depending on contaminant distribution in soil. (authors)

Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 400, Reston, VA 20190 (United States)] [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 11107 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 400, Reston, VA 20190 (United States); Lit, Peter [Nomad Science Group, 7738 Nautilus Shell Street, Las Vegas, NV 89139 (United States)] [Nomad Science Group, 7738 Nautilus Shell Street, Las Vegas, NV 89139 (United States)

2013-07-01

73

An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques  

SciTech Connect

AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

2014-10-01

74

Modeling of the Lyman gamma satellites in FUSE spectra of DA white dwarfs  

E-print Network

We present new theoretical calculations of the line profile of Lyman gamma that include transitions in which a photon is absorbed by a neutral hydrogen atom while it interacts with a proton. Models show that two absorption features located near 992 A and 996 A are due to H-H^+ collisions. These quasi-molecular satellites are similar to those that were identified in the wings of Lyman alpha and Lyman beta lines of hydrogen-rich white dwarfs. We compute synthetic spectra that take account of these new theoretical profiles and compare them to the spectra of four DA white dwarfs that were observed with FUSE. The models predict the absorption features that are observed in the wing of Lyman gamma near 995 A, and confirm that these features are quasi-molecular satellites.

G. Hébrard; N. F. Allard; J. F. Kielkopf; P. Chayer; J. Dupuis; J. W. Kruk; I. Hubeny

2003-05-20

75

Influence of the background approximation methods on the analysis of gamma-ray spectra.  

PubMed

In any X- or gamma-ray spectrometry measurement, the approximation of the continuum background is important, because it influences strongly the net area values and the associated uncertainties of the total absorption peaks and consequently, the activity determination. Two mathematical methods to describe the background under the peaks have been tested: the first one uses a step function, and the second one-orthogonal polynomials. Both methods were applied to different spectral regions having multiple peaks. The results obtained from this work and the main conclusions are presented here. PMID:14987649

Luca, Aurelian; Morel, Jean

2004-01-01

76

Intrinsic spectra and energetics of BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Bursts with known redshifts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the main results of a study of spectral and energetics properties of twelve gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with redshift estimates. All GRBs in our sample were detected by BeppoSAX in a broad energy range (2-700 keV). From the redshift estimates and the good-quality BeppoSAX time-integrated spectra we deduce the main properties of GRBs in their cosmological rest frames. All

L. Amati; F. Frontera; M. Tavani; J. J. M. in't Zand; A. Antonelli; E. Costa; M. Feroci; C. Guidorzi; J. Heise; N. Masetti; E. Montanari; L. Nicastro; E. Palazzi; E. Pian; L. Piro; P. Soffitta

2002-01-01

77

Measurements of the Martian Gamma/Neutron Spectra with MSL/RAD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard Mars Science Laboratory's rover curiosity measures the energetic charged and neutral particle spectra and the radiation dose rate on the Martian surface. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the Martian surface radiation is the specific contribution of neutrons, which possess a high biological effectiveness. In contrast to charged particles, neutrons and gamma rays are generally only measured indirectly. Their measurement is the result of a complex convolution of the incident particle spectrum with the measurement process. We apply an inversion method to calculate the gamma/neutron spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. Here we show first measurements of the Martian gamma/neutron spectra and compare them to theoretical predictions. We find that the shape of the gamma spectrum is very similar to the predicted one, but with a ~50% higher intensity. The measured neutron spectrum agrees well with prediction up to ~100 MeV, but shows a considerably increased intensity for higher energies. The measured neutron spectrum translates into a radiation dose rate of 25 ?Gy/day and a dose equivalent rate of 106 ?Sv/day. This corresponds to 10% of the total surface dose rate, and 15% of the biological relevant surface dose equivalent rate on Mars. Measuring the Martian neutron spectra is an essential step for determining the mutagenic influences to past or present life at or beneath the Martian surface as well as the radiation hazard for future human exploration, including the shielding design of a potential habitat. The contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent increases considerably with shielding thickness, so our measurements provide an important figure to mitigate cancer risk.

Kohler, J.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Ehresmann, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D.; Reitz, G.; Brinza, D.; Weigle, E.; Boettcher, S.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Boehm, E.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Kortmann, O.

2013-12-01

78

The spectra program library: A PC based system for gamma-ray spectra analysis and INAA data reduction  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A PC based system has been developed for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra and for the complete reduction of data from INAA experiments, including software to average the results from mulitple lines and multiple countings and to produce a final report of analysis. Graphics algorithms may be called for the analysis of complex spectral features, to compare the data from alternate photopeaks and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. A database of results for control samples can be used to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systemic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. The entire software library can be accessed through a user-friendly menu interface with internal help.

Baedecker, P.A.; Grossman, J.N.

1995-01-01

79

Measuring the radium quartet (228Ra, 226Ra, 224Ra, 223Ra) in seawater samples using gamma spectrometry.  

PubMed

Radium isotopes are widely used in marine studies (eg. to trace water masses, to quantify mixing processes or to study submarine groundwater discharge). While 228Ra and 226Ra are usually measured using gamma spectrometry, short-lived Ra isotopes (224Ra and 223Ra) are usually measured using a Radium Delayed Coincidence Counter (RaDeCC). Here we show that the four radium isotopes can be analyzed using gamma spectrometry. We report 226Ra, 228Ra, 224Ra, 223Ra activities measured using low-background gamma spectrometry in standard samples, in water samples collected in the vicinity of our laboratory (La Palme and Vaccarès lagoons, France) but also in seawater samples collected in the plume of the Amazon river, off French Guyana (AMANDES project). The 223Ra and 224Ra activities determined in these samples using gamma spectrometry were compared to the activities determined using RaDeCC. Activities determined using the two techniques are in good agreement. Uncertainties associated with the 224Ra activities are similar for the two techniques. RaDeCC is more sensitive for the detection of low 223Ra activities. Gamma spectrometry thus constitutes an alternate method for the determination of short-lived Ra isotopes. PMID:20106569

van Beek, P; Souhaut, M; Reyss, J-L

2010-07-01

80

PHASE-AVERAGED SPECTRA AND LUMINOSITIES OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS FROM YOUNG ISOLATED PULSARS  

SciTech Connect

We study the phase-averaged spectra and luminosities of {gamma}-ray emissions from young, isolated pulsars within a revised outer gap model. In the revised version of the outer gap, there are two possible cases for the outer gaps: the fractional size of the outer gap is estimated through the photon-photon pair process in the first case (Case I), and is limited by the critical field lines in the second case (Case II). The fractional size is described by Case I if the fractional size at the null charge surface in Case I is smaller than that in Case II, and vice versa. Such an outer gap can extend from the inner boundary, whose radial distance to the neutron star is less than that of the null charge surface to the light cylinder for a {gamma}-ray pulsar with a given magnetic inclination. When the shape of the outer gap is determined, assuming that high-energy emission at an averaged radius of the field line in the center of the outer gap, with a Gaussian distribution of the parallel electric field along the gap height, represents typical emission, the phase-averaged {gamma}-ray spectrum for a given pulsar can be estimated in the revised model with three model parameters. We apply the model to explain the phase-averaged spectra of the Vela (Case I) and Geminga (Case II) pulsars. We also use the model to fit the phase-averaged spectra of 54 young, isolated {gamma}-ray pulsars, and then calculate the {gamma}-ray luminosities and compare them with the observed data from Fermi-LAT.

Li, X.; Jiang, Z. J.; Zhang, L., E-mail: lizhang@ynu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming (China)

2013-03-10

81

Use of MCNP + GADRAS in Generating More Realistic Gamma-Ray Spectra for Plutonium and HEU Objects  

SciTech Connect

The ability to accurately simulate high-resolution gamma spectra from materials that emit both neutrons and gammas is very important to the analysis of special nuclear materials (SNM), e.g., uranium and plutonium. One approach under consideration has been to combine MCNP and GADRAS. This approach is expected to generate more accurate gamma ray spectra for complex three-dimensional geometries than can be obtained from one-dimensional deterministic transport simulations (e.g., ONEDANT). This presentation describes application of combining MCNP and GADRAS in simulating plutonium and uranium spectra.

Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mattingly, John [North Carolina State University; Mitchell, Dean [Sandia National Laboratory

2012-08-07

82

Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using gamma-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure.  

PubMed

This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K is 42.9+/-9.4 Bq.kg(-1), 14.7+/-1.7 Bq.kg(-1) and 149.5+/-3.1 Bq.kg(-1) respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h(-1) and 59.1 nGy.h(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 +/-9 nGy.h(-1). This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h(-1). Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 muSv.y(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 53.1+/-11 muSv.y(-1). The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels. PMID:20177570

Senthilkumar, B; Dhavamani, V; Ramkumar, S; Philominathan, P

2010-01-01

83

Use of delayed gamma spectra for detection of actinides (U,Pu) by photofission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of non-destructive methods to inspect nuclear waste containers is important for radioactive waste management and non proliferation purposes. Among methods using nuclear radiation as a probe, instrumental photon activation analysis (IPAA) seems to be a promising way forward. We have previously developed an IPAA method to determine the mass of actinides in radioactive waste sealed in concrete by counting the delayed neutron emission after photofission. This method does not determine the nature of the actinides detected. Such additional useful information may, however, be derived from analysis of the delayed gamma emission spectrum. The main topic of this paper is to show how analysis of the delayed gamma spectra may overcome some of the limitations of delayed neutron analysis. Target samples of 93% and 25% enriched 235U and Pu were irradiated with bremsstrahlung gamma-rays produced by 15-MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. The gamma-rays spectra for each of the two uranium isotopes studied reveals a distinctive intensity distribution which is the consequence of modification of light-wing fission products distribution.

Gmar, M.; Capdevila, J. M.

1999-02-01

84

GEANT4 calibration of gamma spectrometry efficiency for measurements of airborne radioactivity on filter paper.  

PubMed

A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring airborne radioactivity collected on filter paper, was based on Monte Carlo simulations using the toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of an HPGe detector were calculated for a multi-gamma disk source. These efficiency values were compared to their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Such comparison revealed biases of 24, 10, 1, 3, 7, and 3% for the radionuclides (photon energies in keV) of Ce (166), Sn (392), Cs (662), Co (1,173), Co (1,333), and Y (1,836), respectively. The output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method. PMID:25271933

Alrefae, Tareq

2014-11-01

85

Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry  

E-print Network

1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1994-01-01

86

A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium by gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

A convenient method for discriminating between natural and depleted uranium reagent was developed by measuring and analyzing the gamma-ray spectra of some reagents with no standard source. The counting rates (R) of photoelectric peaks of gamma-rays from nuclides with the same radioactivity divided by their emission probability (B) are expressed as a function of gamma-ray energy. The radioactivities of 234Th and 234mPa and 21.72 times that of 235U are equal to the radioactivity of 235U in natural uranium. Therefore, the plot of 21.72-fold R/B for 235U should be on a curve fitted to the points for 234Th and 234mPa in natural uranium. Depleted uranium with a 235U isotopic composition of less than 0.68% could be discriminated from natural uranium in the case of a reagent containing 4.0 g of uranium. PMID:11393763

Shoji, M; Hamajima, Y; Takatsuka, K; Honoki, H; Nakajima, T; Kondo, T; Nakanishi, T

2001-08-01

87

Radioactivity Levels and Gamma-Ray Dose Rate in Soil Samples from Kohistan (Pakistan) Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) and an anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs is carried out in some soil samples collected from Kohistan district of N.W.F.P. (Pakistan), using gamma-ray spectrometry. The gamma spectrometry is operated using a high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector coupled with a computer based high resolution multi channel analyzer. The specific activity in soil ranges from 24.72 to 78.48Bq·kg-1 for 226Ra, 21.73 to 75.28Bq·kg-1 for 232Th, 7.06 to 14.9Bq·kg-1 for 137Cs and 298.46 to 570.77Bq·kg-1 for 40K with the mean values of 42.11, 43.27, 9.5 and 418.27Bq·kg-1, respectively. The radium equivalent activity in all the soil samples is lower than the safe limit set in the OECD report (370Bq·kg-1). Man-made radionuclide 137Cs is also present in detectable amount in all soil samples. Presence of 137Cs indicates that the samples in this remote area also receive some fallout from nuclear accident in Chernobyl power plant in 1986. The internal and external hazard indices have the mean values of 0.48 and 0.37 respectively. Absorbed dose rates and effective dose equivalents are also determined for the samples. The concentration of radionuclides found in the soil samples during the present study is nominal and does not pose any potential health hazard to the general public.

Hasan, M. Khan; Ismail, M.; K., Khan; Akhter, P.

2011-01-01

88

Calculation of the total gamma-spectra of the fast neutrons capture in the isotopes 117,119Sn for the different parameters of cascade gamma-decay  

E-print Network

The gamma-spectra were calculated for the set of different level densities and radiative strength functions. The sufficiently precise reproduction of the experiment is impossible without taking into account the influence of the process of the nucleons Cooper pairs breaking on any nuclei cascade gamma-decay parameters.

A. M. Sukhovoj; V. A. Khitrov

2008-09-15

89

X-ray and soft gamma-ray spectra of Broad-Line Radio Galaxies  

E-print Network

We study X-ray and soft gamma-ray spectral properties of BLRGs using data from Ginga, ASCA, OSSE and EXOSAT. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by an intrinsic power-law continuum with an energy index of alpha ~ 0.7, moderately absorbed by a cold medium. In addition, the Ginga spectra show Fe K-alpha lines with an average equivalent width of ~ 100 eV, and, in some cases, Compton reflection humps. However, the latter components are significantly weaker than both those seen in radio-quiet Seyferts and those expected if the Fe K-alpha lines were due to reflection. Some ASCA and EXOSAT spectra show soft X-ray excesses below ~ 3 keV. When that component is taken into account, the Fe K-alpha lines in the ASCA data become unresolved with equivalent widths 10^23 cm^-2. Such a medium is in the line-of-sight in 3C 445 but it has to be out of it in other objects, in which the observed N_H are substantially lower. Thus, a cold medium with that N_H and covering a large solid angle is out of the line-of-sight in most objects. The spectra of BLRGs break and become softer above ~ 100 keV, as shown by a simultaneous ASCA/OSSE observation of 3C 120 and by the OSSE spectra being on average much softer than the X-ray spectra. Finally, we find the X-ray and gamma-ray spectral properties of Cen A intrinsically very similar to BLRGs studied here.

Przemyslaw R. Wozniak; Andrzej A. Zdziarski; David Smith; Greg M. Madejski; W. Neil Johnson

1998-05-12

90

Some problems of extracting level density and radiative strength functions from the gamma-spectra in nuclear reactions  

E-print Network

The most important systematical errors in determination of level density and radiative strength functions for deformed nuclei have been estimated from the gamma-ray spectra in nuclear reactions like the stripping or pickup reactions.

V. A. Khitrov; A. M. Sukhovoj; Pham Dinh Khang; Vo Thi Anh; Vuong Huu Tan; Nguyen Canh Hai; Nguyen Xuan Hai

2003-05-13

91

The interference of medical radionuclides with occupational in vivo gamma spectrometry.  

PubMed

Radiation workers undergo routine monitoring for the evaluation of external and internal radiation exposures. The monitoring of internal exposures involves gamma spectrometry of the whole body (whole body counting) and measurements of excreta samples. Medical procedures involving internal administration of radioactive radionuclides are widely and commonly used. Medical radionuclides are typically short-lived, but high activities are generally administered, whereas occupational radionuclides are mostly long-lived and, if present, are found generally in relatively smaller quantities. The aim of the present work was to study the interference of some common medical radionuclides (201Tl, 9mTc, 57Co, and 131I) with the detection of internal occupational exposures to natural uranium and to 137Cs. Workers having undergone a medical procedure with one of the radionuclides mentioned above were asked to give frequent urine samples and to undergo whole body and thyroid counting with phoswich detectors operated at the Nuclear Research Center Negev. Urine and whole body counting monitoring were continued as long as radioactivity was detectable by gamma spectrometry. The results indicate that the activity of medical radionuclides may interfere with interpretation of occupational intakes for months after administration. PMID:12822585

Kol, R; Pelled, O; Canfi, A; Gilad, Y; German, U; Laichter, Y; Lantsberg, S; Fuksbrauner, R; Gold, B

2003-06-01

92

Extragalactic background light absorption signal in the TeV gamma-ray spectra of blazars  

E-print Network

Recent observations of the TeV gamma-ray spectra of the two closest active galactic nuclei (AGNs), Markarian 501 (Mrk 501) and Markarian 421 (Mrk 421), by the Whipple and HEGRA collaborations have stimulated efforts to estimate or limit the spectral energy density (SED) of extragalactic background light (EBL) which causes attenuation of TeV photons via pair-production when they travel cosmological distances. In spite of the lack of any distinct cutoff-like feature in the spectra of Mrk 501 and Mrk 421 (in the interval 0.26-10 TeV) which could clearly indicate the presence of such a photon absorption mechanism, we demonstrate that strong EBL attenuation signal (survival probability of 10 TeV photon <10^{-2}) may still be present in the spectra of these AGNs. By estimating the minimal and maximal opacity of the universe to TeV gamma-ray photons, we calculate the visibility range for current and future gamma-ray observatories. Finally, we show that the proposed experiments, VERITAS, HESS, and MAGIC, may even be able to actually measure the EBL SED because their observations extend to the critical 75-150 GeV regime. In this transition region a distinct ``knee-like'' feature should exist in the spectra of blazars, which is invariant with respect to their intrinsic properties. The change of the spectral index and flux amplitude across this knee, if observed for several blazars, will provide missing pieces of information needed to measure EBL in the wavelength range 0.1-30 $\\mu$m.

V. V. Vassiliev

1999-08-09

93

Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection  

SciTech Connect

This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were unaffected by the presence of injected 137Cs contamination.

Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

2009-05-29

94

GAUSS6; batch analysis of gamma-ray spectra. [IBM360\\/75; FORTRAN IV, BAL, PL\\/1  

Microsoft Academic Search

GAUSS6 is used for the production analysis of gamma-ray spectra obtained with a Ge(Li) detector and a multichannel pulse-height analyzer system. In addition to determining gamma-ray energies and intensities, it provides isotopic identification, decay corrections and correlation of data from different peaks and different spectra to obtain isotopic decay rates.IBM360\\/75; FORTRAN IV, BAL, PL\\/1; OS\\/360 MVT; GAUSS6 requires storage devices

T. B. Fowler; M. L. Tobias; J. N. Fox; B. E. Lawler; J. U. Koppel; J. R. Triplett; L. L. Lynn; L. A. Waldman; I. Goldberg; P. Greebler; M. D. Kelley; R. A. Davis; C. E. Keck; J. A. Redfield; M. H. Putnam

2008-01-01

95

Monte Carlo calculations of neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra for fusion-reactor shield design: Comparison with experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Neutron and gamma-ray spectra resulting from the interactions of approx. 14-MeV neutrons in laminated slabs of stainless steel type-304 and borated polyethylene were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The calculated spectra are compared with measured data as a function of slab thickness and material composition and as a function of detector location behind the slabs. Comparisons of the differential energy spectra are made for neutrons with energies above 850 keV and for gamma rays with energies above 750 keV. The measured neutron spectra and those calculated using Monte Carlo methods agree within 5% to 50% depending on the slab thickness and composition and neutron energy. The agreement between the measured and calculated gamma-ray energy spectra is also within this range. The MCNP data are also in favorable agreement with attenuated data calculated previously by discrete ordinates transport methods and the Monte Carlo code SAM-CE.

Santoro, R. T.; Barnes, J. M.

1983-08-01

96

A search for narrow lines in the gamma spectra from overlinePD annihilation at rest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ? ray spectrum from overlinepd annhilations at rest was studied by stopping antiprotons in liquid deuterium and analyzing the gamma rays using a magnetic pair spectrometer. No clear evidence is found for monochromatic ? rays and the upper limit for the branching ratio poverlinep ? ?X with 1100 MeV/c2 < mx < 1770 MeV/c2 is less than 5 × 103 at the 95% confidence level. The search for narrow lines in the gamma ray spectrum produced in antiproton-proton annihilations at rest has been intense. Despite the predictions of various models1 and earlier experimental evidence for their existence,2 exotic four quark states (qqoverlineqoverlineq), known as baryonium, have not been confirmed by recent experiments.3 Evidence for bound overlinepN states has also been claimed in the pionic and gamma ray spectra resulting from the annihilation of antiprotons in deuterium.4 Prompted by such claims, we conducted an experiment to measure the inclusive gamma ray spectrum from the annihilation of antiprotons at rest in liquid deuterium. In this report we present the results of a high-resolution, high-statistics measurement of the gamma spectrum from the annihilation of antiprotons at rest in liquid deuterium, using the well-understood PS183 magnetic pair spectrometer. The 350 MeV/c antiproton beam entered a 7 cm diameter, 70 cm long liquid deuterium target and the antiprotons annihilated at rest after ranging through approximately 17 cm of deuterium. A cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber surrounding the target was used to measure the charged multiplicity of each event and planar drift chambers were used to determine the stopping vertex. The gamma rays from the annihilation were converted into electron-positron pairs in a thin lead foil (10% of a radiation length) which was situated at the front of the magnet aperture and subtended 1.5% of 4? solid angle. Depending upon the momentum of the particle, the magnetic field of 7.5 kG either reflected the particle back out of the magnet (R track), trapped it within the magnet aperture (T track), or allowed it to penetrate (P track). The gamma ray events analysed in this report fall into one of three different types; RR, RT, TT. The acceptance for penetrating tracks was too low at this magnetic field setting to accumulate sufficient statistics. Details of the detector can be found elsewhere.6 The momentum of a particle was reconstructed using the radius of a circle fit to the multiwire proportional chamber hits times a correction factor to correct for the inhomogeneities in the field. Hit patterns in the chambers and time-of-flight between various scintillators ensured a high-quality sample of events from annihilations at rest. Of 2.8 million gamma-triggered events written to tape, 750000 survived all the cuts and made their way into the spectra presented in Figure 1. The acceptance and resolution functions of the spectrometer were obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation of the detector using the GEANT3 code developed at CERN. The spectra were fit with low-order polynomials and the search for narrow states was carried out by stepping through the spectra bin-by-bin and fitting with the global polynomial plus a gaussian constrained to have a width consistent with the spectrometer resolution at the energy of the bin. No clear evidence for narrow structures is seen in the spectra. Figure 2 shows the 95% confidence level upper limits on the yield of narrow structure.

Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Armstrong, T. A.; Bassalleck, B.; Bueche, G.; Fero, M.; Gee, M.; Graf, N. A.; Koch, H.; Lewis, R. A.; Mandelkern, M.; Poth, H.; Rozaki, H.; Sakelliou, L.; Schultz, J.; Schwertel, J.; Smith, G. A.; Soulliere, M. J.; Usher, T.; Wolfe, D. M.

1989-06-01

97

Analyses of uranium and actinium gamma spectra: an application to measurements of environmental contamination  

SciTech Connect

A system for the reduction of the complex gamma spectra of nuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series, tailored to calculation of line intensities, analyses of errors, and identification of nuclides is described. This system provides an efficient technique for characterizing contamination in the environs of uranium mines and mills. Identification of the nuclides and calculation of their concentrations require accurate knowledge of gamma energies and absolute quantum intensities. For some spectral lines, there are no reported measurements of absolute quantum intensities and in some cases where reports are available the measured intensities are not in agreement. In order to improve this data base, the spectra of gamma rays (of nuclides in the uranium and actinium series) with energies between 40 and 1400 keV were measured using high-resolution germanium detectors. A brief description of the spectroscopy system, computational algorithms for deconvolution, and methods of calibration for energy and efficiency, are described. The measured energies and absolute quantum intensities are compared with those reported in the literature.

Momeni, M.H.

1981-01-01

98

Examination of level density prescriptions in the interpretation of high energy gamma-ray spectra  

E-print Network

High energy $\\gamma$-ray spectra measured by our group involving the compound nuclei (CN) $^{63}$Cu at excitation energy ($E^*$) $\\sim$ 36 MeV with average angular momentum ($J$) = 12 - 17 $\\hbar$, $^{97}$Tc at $E^* \\sim$ 29 - 50 MeV with $J$ = 12 - 14 $\\hbar$, $^{113}$Sb at $E^*$ = 109 MeV and 121 MeV with $J$ = 49 - 59 $\\hbar$ and $^{201}$Tl at $E^*$ = 39.5, 47.5 MeV with $J$ = 18 - 24 $\\hbar$ have been analyzed utilizing the level density prescriptions of (i)Ignatyuk, Smirenkin and Tishin (IST), (ii)Budtz-Jorgensen and Knitter (BJK), and (iii) Kataria, Ramamurthy and Kapoor (KRK). These three prescriptions have been tested for correct statistical model description of high energy $\\gamma$-rays in the light of extracting the giant dipole resonance (GDR) parameters at low excitation energy and spin where shell effects might play an important role as well as at high excitation energy where shell effects have melted. Interestingly, only the IST level density prescription could explain the high energy $\\gamma$-ray spectra with reasonable GDR parameters for all the four nuclei.

Srijit Bhattacharya; Deepak Pandit; Balaram Dey; Debasish Mondal; S. Mukhopadhyay; Surajit Pal; A. De; S. R. Banerjee

2014-11-05

99

Experimental and MCNP simulated gamma-ray spectra for the UNCOSS neutron-based explosive detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the frame of the FP7 UNCOSS project (Underwater Coastal Sea Surveyor), whose aim is to develop a neutron-based explosive detection system to identify unexploded ordnance (UXO) lying on the sea bottom, the choice of the gamma-ray detector is essential to reach the optimal performances. This paper presents comparative tests between the two candidates: NaI(Tl) and LaBr 3(Ce) detectors, in favour to the 3 in.×3 in. LaBr 3(Ce); thus, confirming the choice previously performed by numerical simulation because of its higher fast timing properties, spectral resolution, and efficiency per volume unit. The gamma-ray spectra produced by 14 MeV tagged neutron beams on the elements of interest (C, O, N, Al, Fe, Si, and Ca) have also been recorded with this detector in order to unfold the spectrum of the interrogated object into elementary contributions. A qualitative comparison with the gamma-ray spectra simulated with the MCNPX computer code and the ENDFB/VII.0 nuclear library has also been performed to validate the numerical model. An additional quantitative validation has been performed with an explosive-like material (ammonium acetate).

Eleon, C.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Valkovic, V.

2011-02-01

100

Superluminal cascade spectra of TeV {gamma}-ray sources  

SciTech Connect

Astrophysical radiation sources are scrutinized in search of superluminal {gamma}-rays. The tachyonic spectral densities generated by ultra-relativistic electrons in uniform motion are fitted to the high-energy spectra of Galactic supernova remnants, such as RX J0852.0-4622 and the pulsar wind nebulae in G0.9+0.1 and MSH 15-52. The superluminal spectral maps of the unidentified TeV {gamma}-ray sources HESS J1303-631, TeV J2032+4130 and HESS J1825-137 are inferred from EGRET, HEGRA and HESS data. Tachyonic cascade spectra are quite capable of generating the spectral curvature seen in double-logarithmic plots, as well as the extended spectral plateaus defined by EGRET flux points in the GeV band. The curvature of the TeV spectra is intrinsic, caused by the Boltzmann factor in the source densities. The spectral averaging with thermal and exponentially cut power-law electron densities can be done in closed form, and systematic high- and low-temperature expansions of the superluminal spectral densities are derived. Estimates on the electron/proton populations generating the tachyon flux are obtained from the spectral fits, such as power-law indices, temperature and source counts. The cutoff temperatures of the source densities suggest ultra-high-energy protons in MSH 15-52, HESS J1825-137 and TeV J2032+4130.

Tomaschitz, Roman [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagami-yama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)]. E-mail: tom@geminga.org

2007-03-15

101

The 124Sb activity standardization by gamma spectrometry for medical applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work describes a metrological activity determination of 124Sb, which can be used as radiotracer, applying gamma spectrometry methods with hyper pure germanium detector and efficiency curves. This isotope with good activity and high radionuclidic purity is employed in the form of meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) or sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) to treat leishmaniasis. 124Sb is also applied in animal organ distribution studies to solve some questions in pharmacology. 124Sb decays by ?-emission and it produces several photons (X and gamma rays) with energy varying from 27 to 2700 keV. Efficiency curves to measure point 124Sb solid sources were obtained from a 166mHo standard that is a multi-gamma reference source. These curves depend on radiation energy, sample geometry, photon attenuation, dead time and sample-detector position. Results for activity determination of 124Sb samples using efficiency curves and a high purity coaxial germanium detector were consistent in different counting geometries. Also uncertainties of about 2% ( k=2) were obtained.

de Almeida, M. C. M.; Iwahara, A.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; da Silva, R. L.

2010-07-01

102

Axion-like particles explain the unphysical redshift-dependence of AGN gamma-ray spectra  

E-print Network

Blazars are a class of AGN known to be powerful very-high-energy (VHE, 100 GeV - 100 TeV) celestial gamma-ray emitters. At the time of writing, 41 blazars, spread all over the sky and with known redshift in the range $0.0215 \\leq z \\leq 0.635$ have been observed in the VHE band by the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Thus, they represent an isotropic and relatively local extragalactic sample, unaffected by significant cosmological evolution. The blazar emitted spectra are well fitted by a power law with index $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$. We show that the $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$ distribution exhibits an unexpected and previously unnoticed unphysical redshift-dependence. We demonstrate that this result is not due to any selection effect. It is difficult to imagine an intrinsic mechanism which could lead to such a spectral variation, and so this result seriously challenges the conventional view. We propose that such a behaviour is explained by oscillations between the VHE gamma-rays and Axio...

Galanti, Giorgio; De Angelis, Alessandro; Bignami, Giovanni F

2015-01-01

103

Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

1973-01-01

104

The probability of detecting absorption features in gamma-ray burst spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It has recently been suggested that several mechanisms for the primary release of energy in gamma-ray bursts may result in the excitation of magnetospheric plasma oscillations (MPO) above the polar cap of a neutron star. The basic MPO idea is refined by determining the soft photon source (which damps the particle motion via inverse Compton scattering interactions) self-consistently by means of a Monte Carlo simulation for the deposition of back-scattered gamma-ray energy below the stellar photosphere. The observed fraction of bursts displaying low-energy absorption features may be understood in the context of a model wherein the overall spectrum changes with inclination angle due to the superposition of several components with different angular distributions. GRB spectra should display these cyclotron lines about 18 percent of the time, which is consistent with the KONUS and Ginga sets of data.

Melia, F.

1989-01-01

105

X-ray and gamma-ray spectra of Cyg X-1 in the soft state  

E-print Network

We present X-ray/gamma-ray observations of Cyg X-1 in the soft state during 1996 May-June. We analyze ASCA, RXTE and OSSE data. The spectrum consists of soft X-ray blackbody emission of an optically thick accretion disk in the vicinity of a black hole and a power law with an energy index alpha around 1.2-1.5 extending to at least several hundred keV. In the spectra, we find the presence of strong Compton reflection, which probably comes from the disk.

Marek Gierlinski; Andrzej A. Zdziarski; Tadayasu Dotani; Ken Ebisawa; Keith Jahoda; W. Neil Johnson

1997-07-19

106

Hyperfine splitting of EPR spectra of paramagnetic centers created by gamma irradiation of cesium trihydrogen selenite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The EPR spectra of gamma irradiated cesium trihydrogen selenite at 25 °C were analyzed to determine g and hyperfine tensor principal values and direction cosines. The observed spectra were from a single type of center with g11, g22, and g33 equal to 1.995, 2.031, and 2.007 (±0.002), respectively. Hyperfine splitting from 133Cs and from 77Se was observed with A11, A22, A33 values of 11.9, -7.7, -7.2 G and 263, ±85, ±100 G, respectively. The principal axes of g and the 77Se hyperfine tensor are nearly aligned with the special directions of one face of one of the SeO3 pyramids, indicating that the center is an SeO-2 radical.

Gade, S.; Johnson, B.; Halvorsen, A.; Knispel, R.

1981-03-01

107

Cosmic infrared background from Population III and spectra of high z gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss the contribution of Population III stars to the near-IR (NIR) cosmic infrared background (CIB) and its e®ect on spectra of high-z high- energy gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other sources. If Population III were massive stars, the claimed NIR CIB excess will be reproduced if only » 4 § 2% of all baryons went through these stars. Regardless of the precise amount of the NIR CIB from them, they likely left enough photons to provide a large optical depth for high-energy photons from distant GRBs. Observations of such GRBs are expected following the planned launch of NASA's GLAST mission. Detecting such damping in the spectra of high-z GRBs will then provide important information on the emissions from the Population III epoch and location of this cutoff may serve as an indicator of the GRB's redshift.

Kashlinsky, A.

2006-08-01

108

Photon and Neutrino Spectra of Time-Dependent Photospheric Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

Thermal photons from the photosphere may be the primary source of the observed prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to produce the observed non-thermal spectra, some kind of dissipation mechanism near the photosphere is required. In this paper we numerically simulate the evolution of the photon spectrum in a relativistically expanding shell with a time-dependent numerical code. We consider two basic models. One is a leptonic model, where a dissipation mechanism heats the thermal electrons maintaining their high temperature. The other model involves a cascade process induced by $pp$($pn$)-collisions which produce high-energy electrons, modify the thermal spectrum, and emit neutrinos. The qualitative properties of the photon spectra are mainly determined by the optical depth at which the dissipation mechanism sets in. Too large optical depths lead to a broad and curved spectrum contradicting the observations, while for optical depths smaller than unity the spectral hardness becomes softer than o...

Asano, K

2013-01-01

109

VAXGAP: A code for the routine analysis of gamma-ray pulse-height spectra on a VAX computer  

SciTech Connect

VAXGAP (VAX Gamma-ray Analysis Package) is a collection of computer programs for the analysis of pulse height spectra acquired on Ge detector-based spectrometers. VAXGAP was written to provide the operators of a radiation measurements laboratory with the necessary software tools for routine analysis of radioactive samples through the analysis of gamma-ray pulse-height spectra. A detailed description of the algorithms used in VAXGAP is presented elsewhere. This paper summarizes the unique features and the organization of VAXGAP which makes it of particular value in the routine analysis of spectra. 1 ref., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Killian, E.W.; Hartwell, J.K.

1988-01-01

110

On the categorization of uranium materials using low resolution gamma ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

In order to characterize uranium materials during e.g. nuclear safeguards inspections and in initial stages of nuclear forensic investigations, hand-held low resolution gamma ray detection instruments with automatic uranium categorization capabilities may be used. In this paper, simulated response curves for a number of matrices applied on NaI(Tl) scintillation detector spectra show that the result of the categorization is strongly dependent on the physical properties of the uranium material. Recommendations on how to minimize the possibility of misclassification are discussed. PMID:23208231

Vesterlund, A; Ulvsand, T; Lidström, K; Skarnemark, G; Ekberg, C; Ramebäck, H

2013-02-01

111

Anomalies in low-energy Gamma-Ray Burst spectra with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor  

E-print Network

A Band function has become the standard spectral function used to describe the prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, deviations from this function have previously been observed in GRBs detected by BATSE and in individual GRBs from the \\textit{Fermi} era. We present a systematic and rigorous search for spectral deviations from a Band function at low energies in a sample of the first two years of high fluence, long bursts detected by the \\textit{Fermi} Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The sample contains 45 bursts with a fluence greater than 2$\\times10^{-5}$ erg / cm$^{2}$ (10 - 1000 keV). An extrapolated fit method is used to search for low-energy spectral anomalies, whereby a Band function is fit above a variable low-energy threshold and then the best fit function is extrapolated to lower energy data. Deviations are quantified by examining residuals derived from the extrapolated function and the data and their significance is determined via comprehensive simulations which account for the ...

Tierney, Dave; Preece, Robert D; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Guiriec, Sylvain; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McGlynn, Sinead; Paciesas, William S; Pelassa, Veronique; von Kienlin, Andreas

2013-01-01

112

Gamma-ray Burst Spectra and Spectral Correlations from Sub-photospheric Comptonization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most important unresolved issues in gamma-ray burst (GRB) physics is the origin of the prompt gamma-ray spectrum. Its general non-thermal character and the softness in the X-ray band remain unexplained. We tackle these issues by performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation–matter interactions in a scattering dominated photon–lepton plasma. The plasma—initially in equilibrium—is driven to non-equilibrium conditions by a sudden energy injection in the lepton population, mimicking the effect of a shock wave or the dissipation of magnetic energy. Equilibrium restoration occurs due to an energy exchange between the photons and leptons. While the initial and final equilibrium spectra are thermal, the transitional photon spectra are characterized by non-thermal features such as power-law tails, high energy bumps, and multiple components. Such non-thermal features are observed at infinity if the dissipation occurs at small to moderate optical depths, and the spectrum is released before thermalization is complete. We model the synthetic spectra with a Band function and show that the resulting spectral parameters are similar to observations for a frequency range of 2–3 orders of magnitude around the peak. In addition, our model predicts correlations between the low-frequency photon index and the peak frequency as well as between the low- and high-frequency indices. We explore baryon and pair-dominated fireballs and reach the conclusion that baryonic fireballs are a better model for explaining the observed features of GRB spectra.

Chhotray, Atul; Lazzati, Davide

2015-04-01

113

Initial recommendations for restricting gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of radionuclides for on-site inspections  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US paper �Radionuclide Sampling, Sample Handling and Analytical Laboratory Equipment for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspections,� CTBT\\/PC\\/V\\/OSI\\/WSII\\/PR\\/29 identified the radionuclides of interest to an OS1 as 144<\\/sup>Ce, 147<\\/sup>Nd, 141<\\/sup>Ce, 149<\\/sup>Ba140<\\/sup>La), 95<\\/sup> Zr(95<\\/sup>Nb), 131m<\\/sup>Xe, 133m<\\/sup>Xe, 133g<\\/sup>Xe, 135g<\\/sup>Xe, and 37<\\/sup>Ar. All of these nuclides (except 37<\\/sup>Ar) can be measured via some form of conventional or coincidence-based gamma-ray spectrometry. The non-gaseous

W. F. Buckley; S. A. Kreek; J. F. Wild

1998-01-01

114

Gamma-ray spectrometry with solid-state detectors by current pulse-height analysis  

SciTech Connect

The traditional way of doing gamma-ray spectrometry with semiconductor detectors depends on being able to collect the ionization charge. In most cases, hole trapping limits the spectrometric performance of room-temperature detectors made from compound semiconductors. Recently it has been shown for thick HgI/sub 2/ detectors that significant improvement can be produced by using a technique of unconventionally short differentiation of the detector pulses. The present paper presents the concept underlying the technique and gives its theoretical background. The method consists of measuring the amplitude of ionization current pulses before charge collection is completed rather than measuring the amount of charge collected. Hole collection is obviated, and the transport of electrons becomes the most-important consideration. The conditions under which this novel method can be applied to various semiconductor materials are discussed. Two different approaches toward the electronic implementation of the technique are compared.

Szymczyk, W.M.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Kusmiss, J.H.; Huth, G.C.; Hull, K.; Beyerle, A.; Markakis, J.

1982-01-01

115

Axion-like particles explain the unphysical redshift-dependence of AGN gamma-ray spectra  

E-print Network

Blazars are a class of AGN known to be powerful very-high-energy (VHE, 100 GeV - 100 TeV) celestial gamma-ray emitters. At the time of writing, 41 blazars, spread all over the sky and with known redshift in the range $0.0215 \\leq z \\leq 0.635$ have been observed in the VHE band by the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Thus, they represent an isotropic and relatively local extragalactic sample, unaffected by significant cosmological evolution. The blazar emitted spectra are well fitted by a power law with index $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$. We show that the $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$ distribution exhibits an unexpected and previously unnoticed unphysical redshift-dependence. We demonstrate that this result is not due to any selection effect. It is difficult to imagine an intrinsic mechanism which could lead to such a spectral variation, and so this result seriously challenges the conventional view. We propose that such a behaviour is explained by oscillations between the VHE gamma-rays and Axion-Like Particles (ALPs), taking place in extragalactic magnetic fields. We recall that ALPs are predicted by several extensions of the Standard Model and especially by those based on superstring theories. Moreover, they are attracting growing interest being also good candidates for cold dark matter. As a consequence of the photon-ALP oscillation mechanism, the $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$ distribution becomes redshift-independent, indeed in agreement with the physical expectation. This is a highly nontrivial fact, which therefore provides a preliminary evidence for the existence of ALPs. Thus, besides physics laboratory data, astrophysical VHE data from e.g. the upcoming CTA can settle this issue. Our Universe may in this way be offering us a compelling reason to push physics beyond the Standard Model along a very specific direction and can shed light on the nature of cold dark matter.

Giorgio Galanti; Marco Roncadelli; Alessandro De Angelis; Giovanni F. Bignami

2015-03-30

116

Axion-like particles explain the unphysical redshift-dependence of AGN gamma-ray spectra  

E-print Network

Blazars are a class of AGN known to be powerful very-high-energy (VHE, 100 GeV - 100 TeV) celestial gamma-ray emitters. At the time of writing, 41 blazars, spread all over the sky and with known redshift in the range $0.0215 \\leq z \\leq 0.635$ have been observed in the VHE band by the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Thus, they represent an isotropic and relatively local extragalactic sample, unaffected by significant cosmological evolution. The blazar emitted spectra are well fitted by a power law with index $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$. We show that the $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$ distribution exhibits an unexpected and previously unnoticed unphysical redshift-dependence. We demonstrate that this result is not due to any selection effect. It is difficult to imagine an intrinsic mechanism which could lead to such a spectral variation, and so this result seriously challenges the conventional view. We propose that such a behaviour is explained by oscillations between the VHE gamma-rays and Axion-Like Particles (ALPs), taking place in extragalactic magnetic fields. We recall that ALPs are predicted by several extensions of the Standard Model and especially by those based on superstring theories. Moreover, they are attracting growing interest being also good candidates for cold dark matter. As a consequence of the photon-ALP oscillation mechanism, the $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$ distribution becomes redshift-independent, indeed in agreement with the physical expectation. This is a highly nontrivial fact, which therefore provides a preliminary evidence for the existence of ALPs. Thus, besides physics laboratory data, astrophysical VHE data from e.g. the upcoming CTA can settle this issue. Our Universe may in this way be offering us a compelling reason to push physics beyond the Standard Model along a very specific direction and can shed light on the nature of cold dark matter.

Giorgio Galanti; Marco Roncadelli; Alessandro De Angelis; Giovanni F. Bignami

2015-03-15

117

Cyclotron resonant scattering in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fits of theoretical spectra from Monte Carlo radiation-transfer calculations to dips at approximately 20 and 40 keV in a spectrum of the gamma-ray burst source GB 880 205 give best-fit values and 68 percent-confidence intervals for the magnetic field of (1.71 + or - 0.07) x 10 to the 12th G, the electron density of (1.2 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the 21st electrons/cm-squared, and the cosine of the viewing angle relative to the field of 0.31 + or - 0.05. The dips observed at approximately 20 keV in the spectra are interpreted as cyclotron resonant scattering, in which electrons undergo radiative 0 to 1 to 0 Landau transitions initiated by photons near the first harmonic. Physical self-consistency fixes the temperature, and the equilibrium temperature equals 5.3 + 0.3 or - 0.2 keV. These results suggest that this gamma-ray burst and many others which exhibit a low-energy dip originate from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin.

Wang, J. C. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Loredo, T. J.; Wasserman, I. M.; Salpeter, E. E.

1989-01-01

118

Gamma-ray spectra of methane in the positron-electron annihilation process  

E-print Network

Bound electron contribution to the Doppler-shift of gamma-ray spectra in the positron-electron annihilation process of molecular methane has been studied in gas phase. Two accurate ab initio quantum mechanical schemes, i.e. the delocalized molecular orbital (MO) and the localized natural bond orbital (NBO) schemes, are applied to study the multi-centred methane molecule. The present ab initio calculations of methane indicate that the C-H bonds are polarized with the partial negative charge of -0.36 a.u. on the carbon atom and the partial positive charge of +0.09 a.u. on each of the hydrogen atoms. The positively charged hydrogen atoms produce repulsive Coulomb potentials to a positron. Both the MO and NBO schemes further reveal that the 2a1 electrons of methane, that is, the 2a1 electron component of the C-H bonds rather than the whole C-H bonds of methane, predominates the positron-electron annihilation gamma-ray spectra of the molecule. Electrons of a molecule which are dominant the positron-electron annihi...

Ma, Xiaoguang

2012-01-01

119

Gamma-ray spectra of methane in the positron-electron annihilation process  

E-print Network

Bound electron contribution to the Doppler-shift of gamma-ray spectra in the positron-electron annihilation process of molecular methane has been studied in gas phase. Two accurate ab initio quantum mechanical schemes, i.e. the delocalized molecular orbital (MO) and the localized natural bond orbital (NBO) schemes, are applied to study the multi-centred methane molecule. The present ab initio calculations of methane indicate that the C-H bonds are polarized with the partial negative charge of -0.36 a.u. on the carbon atom and the partial positive charge of +0.09 a.u. on each of the hydrogen atoms. The positively charged hydrogen atoms produce repulsive Coulomb potentials to a positron. Both the MO and NBO schemes further reveal that the 2a1 electrons of methane, that is, the 2a1 electron component of the C-H bonds rather than the whole C-H bonds of methane, predominates the positron-electron annihilation gamma-ray spectra of the molecule. Electrons of a molecule which are dominant the positron-electron annihilation processes are called positrophilic electrons in the present study. It is further shown that the negative electrostatic potential (ESP) of methane facilitates with the density of the positrophilic 2a1 electrons of methane. Other valence electrons (e.g. 1t2) in the C-H bonds play a minor spectator role in the annihilation process of methane.

Xiaoguang Ma; Feng Wang

2013-03-20

120

Gamma-ray burst spectra and spectral correlations from sub-photospheric Comptonization  

E-print Network

One of the most important unresolved issues in gamma-ray burst physics is the origin of the prompt gamma-ray spectrum. Its general non-thermal character and the softness in the X-ray band remain unexplained. We tackle these issues by performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation-matter interactions in a scattering dominated photon-lepton plasma. The plasma -- initially in equilibrium -- is driven to non-equilibrium conditions by a sudden energy injection in the lepton population, mimicking the effect of a shock wave or the dissipation of magnetic energy. Equilibrium restoration occurs due to energy exchange between the photons and leptons. While the initial and final equilibrium spectra are thermal, the transitional photon spectra are characterized by non-thermal features such as power-law tails, high energy bumps, and multiple components. Such non-thermal features are observed at infinity if the dissipation occurs at small to moderate optical depths, and the spectrum is released before thermalization is co...

Chhotray, Atul

2015-01-01

121

EPR spectra induced by gamma-irradiation of some dry medical herbs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radiation-induced EPR spectra in some medical herbs are reported. The samples studied are: (i) leaves of nettle, common balm, peppermint and thyme; (ii) stalks of common balm, thyme, milfoil, yarrow and marigold; (iii) blossoms of yarrow and marigold; (iv) blossoms and leaves of hawthorn and tutsan; and (v) roots of common valerian, nettle, elecampane (black and white), restharrows and carlina. Before irradiation all samples exhibit one weak anisotropic singlet EPR line with effective g-value of 2.0050±0.0002. The radiation-induced spectra fall into three groups. EPR spectra of irradiated blossoms of yarrow and marigold, stalks of common balm, thyme, tutsan and yarrow as well as roots of common valerian, nettle and elecampane (black and white) show "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum typical for irradiated plants. It is characterized by one intense central line with g=2.0050±0.0005 and two weak satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. EPR spectra of gamma-irradiated restharrows and carlina are complex. They may be represented by one triplet corresponding to the "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum, one relatively intense singlet, situated in the center of the spectrum, and five weak additional satellite lines left and right to the center. The last spectrum was assigned as "carbohydrate-like" type. Only one intense EPR singlet with g=2.0048±0.0005 was recorded after irradiation of leaves of nettle and common balm. The lifetime of the radiation-induced EPR spectra was followed for a period of 3 months.

Yordanov, N. D.; Lagunov, O.; Dimov, K.

2009-04-01

122

Determination of the stellar (n,gamma) cross section of 40Ca with accelerator mass spectrometry  

E-print Network

The stellar (n,gamma) cross section of 40Ca at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing gamma-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic 40Ca is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, 40Ca can also play a secondary role as "neutron poison" for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based on time-of-flight measurements. Our method uses an independent approach, and yields for the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV a value of 30 keV= 5.73+/-0.34 mb.

I. Dillmann; C. Domingo-Pardo; M. Heil; F. Käppeler; A. Wallner; O. Forstner; R. Golser; W. Kutschera; A. Priller; P. Steier; A. Mengoni; R. Gallino; M. Paul; C. Vockenhuber

2009-07-01

123

Spectra  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learners construct a spectroscope out of a shoe box or mailing tube, diffraction grating, and other simple materials. They then use their spectroscope to observe spectra, the colors that make up light. Learners compare the spectra of various light sources. Use this activity to introduce learners to basic principles of light and color. Also, look at a related page about auroras to understand how distinguishing spectra of different atoms helps scientists understand the universe.

The Exploratorium

2012-06-26

124

The time evolution of GRB spectra by a precessing lighthouse $\\gamma$ jet  

E-print Network

Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) by a relativistic electron beam jet at GeV energies (emitted by a compact object as a NS, BH,...), a NSJ, onto thermal BBR photons (from a nearby stellar companion) may originate a collinear gamma jet (GJ). Due to the binary system interaction the GJ precession would blaze suddenly toward the observer leading to a GRB event. The internal GJ cone structure is ruled by relativistic kinematics into a concentric onion-like sequence of photon rings, the softer in the external boundaries, the harder in the inner cone. The pointing and the crossing of such different GJ photon rings to the detector lead to a GRB hardness spectra evolution nearly corresponding to most observed ones. Moreover expected time integral spectra are also comparable with known GRB spectra. The total energy input of tens of thousands of such NSJ in an extended galactic halo, mainly cosmic rays electrons, should be reflected into the recent observational evidence (COMPTEL) of a diffused relic extended halo. Evid...

Fargion, D

1996-01-01

125

The time evolution of GRB spectra by a precessing lighthouse Gamma Jet  

E-print Network

Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) by a relativistic electron beam jet at GeV energies (emitted by a compact object as a NS, BH,...), a NSJ, onto thermal BBR photons (from a nearby stellar companion) may originate a collinear gamma jet (GJ). Due to the binary system interaction the GJ precession would blaze suddenly toward the observer leading to a GRB event. The internal GJ cone structure is ruled by relativistic kinematics into a concentric onion-like sequence of photon rings, the softer in the external boundaries, the harder in the inner cone. The pointing and the crossing of such different GJ photon rings to the detector lead to a GRB hardness spectra evolution nearly corresponding to most observed ones. Moreover expected time integral spectra are also comparable with known GRB spectra. The total energy input of tens of thousands of such NSJ in an extended galactic halo, mainly cosmic rays electrons, should be reflected into the recent observational evidence (COMPTEL) of a diffused relic extended halo. Evidences of such precessing jets are offered by the discover of galactic superluminal sources, recent HH jets, SN1987A outer rings, Hourglass Nebula, planetary Egg Nebula, GROJ1744-28 binary X-rays pulsar.

D. Fargion; A. Salis

1996-05-28

126

Optical and FTIR spectra of NdF3-doped borophosphate glasses and effect of gamma irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

UV-visible, FTIR absorption spectra of some prepared undoped and NdF3-doped borophosphate glasses with varying dopant contents were studied before and after gamma irradiation. The base undoped borophosphate glass exhibits strong UV absorption which is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the chemicals used for the preparation of such glass. NdF3-doped samples show characteristic bands specifically at high concentration which are attributed to the Nd3+ ions. Gamma irradiation on the undoped borophosphate glass causes no obvious induced defects. On the other hand, the low NdF3 content glass produces extended UV absorption together with the resolution of an extra induced visible at about 500 nm. On increasing the NdF3 content, gamma irradiation retains the characteristic bands due to Nd3+ ions. Infrared absorption spectra of undoped and NdF3-doped glasses reveal characteristic IR vibrational bands due to the combination of both phosphate and borate groups (BO3 and BO4) with the first phosphate partner dominating in response to the high percent (50 mol%). The introduction of NdF3 within the dopant level (1.5-6%) produces no distinct effect on the FTIR spectra. Gamma irradiation is observed to cause no obvious effects on the FTIR spectra which is related to the stability of mixed phosphate and borate units causing the compactness and resistance towards gamma irradiation.

ElBatal, F. H.; Ibrahim, S.; Abdelghany, A. M.

2012-12-01

127

PC based analysis of gamma ray spectra generated by semiconductor detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report describes a spectrum analysis method and computer program for analysis of gamma spectra obtained by using semiconductor detectors and multichannel analyzers. The analysis steps incorporated are: smoothing; peak location using signal processing method of convolution; selectable background subtraction viz linear; polynomial and step like; peak fitting both for singlets and doublets using Mukoyama's method for evaluation of full width at half maximum; and areaevaluation including errors in its evaluation. The program also provides a facility for energy calibration. Typical results of analysis for singlets and doublets are included. This report is based on Wilson's report which has been modified and extended. The program is written in BASIC and its listing is included in the appendices.

Abani, M. C.; Madan, V. K.

128

Effective absorbing column density in the gamma-ray burst afterglow X-ray spectra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the scaling relation between the observed amount of absorption in the X-ray spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows and the absorber redshift. Through dedicated numerical simulations of an ideal instrument, we establish that this dependence has a power-law shape with index 2.4. However, for real instruments, this value depends on their low-energy cut-off, spectral resolution and on the detector spectral response in general. We thus provide appropriate scaling laws for specific instruments. Finally, we discuss the possibility to measure the absorber redshift from X-ray data alone. We find that 105-106 counts in the 0.3-10 keV band are needed to constrain the redshift with 10 per cent accuracy. As a test case, we discuss the XMM-Newton observation of GRB 090618 at z = 0.54. We are able to recover the correct redshift of this burst with the expected accuracy.

Campana, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Braito, V.; Cusumano, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

2014-07-01

129

ON THE X-RAY SPECTRA OF ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA REPEATERS  

SciTech Connect

We revisit the apparent correlation between soft X-ray band photon index and spin-down rate {nu}-dot previously reported for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) by Marsden and White. Our analysis, improved thanks to new source discoveries, better spectral parameter measurements in previously known sources, and the requirement of source quiescence for parameter inclusion, shows evidence for the previously noted trend, although with greater scatter. This trend supports the twisted magnetosphere model of magnetars although the scatter suggests that factors other than {nu}-dot are also important. We also note possible correlations involving the spectra of AXPs and SGRs in the hard X-ray band. Specifically, the hard-band photon index shows a possible correlation with inferred {nu}-dot and B, as does the degree of spectral turnover. If the former trend is correct, then the hard-band photon index for AXP 1E 1048.1 - 5937 should be {approx}0-1. This may be testable with long integrations by the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, or by the upcoming focusing hard X-ray mission NuSTAR.

Kaspi, V. M.; Boydstun, K. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)], E-mail: vkaspi@physics.mcgill.ca

2010-02-20

130

X-ray and soft gamma-ray spectra of broad-line radio galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study X-ray and soft gamma-ray spectral properties of nearby broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs) using data from GingaASCA, OSSE and EXOSAT. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by an intrinsic power-law continuum with an energy index of alpha~0.7, moderately absorbed by a cold medium. In addition, the Ginga spectra show fluorescent Fe Kalpha lines with an average equivalent width of ~100 eV, and, in some cases, Compton reflection humps. However, the latter are significantly weaker than both those seen in radio-quiet Seyfert 1s and those expected if the Fe Kalpha lines were due to reflection. We find that this weakness of reflection cannot be explained by dilution by another continuum component, e.g. from a jet. Some ASCA and EXOSAT spectra show soft X-ray excesses below ~3 keV. When that component is taken into account, the Fe Kalpha lines in the ASCA data are found to be unresolved in most cases, and to have equivalent widths <~200 eV, consistent with the Ginga data. Multiple observations of 3C 382 and 390.3 show the Fe Kalpha line approximately constant in flux but accompanied by strong continuum variations. This indicates the bulk of the line is formed by matter at a distance much larger than an accretion-disc scale, consistent with the ASCA line width measurements. The column density of the matter required to account for the observed line fluxes is N_H>~10^23 cm^-2. Such a medium is in the line of sight of 3C 445, but it has to be out of it in other objects in which the observed N_H are substantially lower. Thus a cold medium with that N_H and covering a large solid angle is common in BLRGs, but in most objects it is out of the line of sight, consistent with the unified AGN model. The spectra of BLRGs break and become softer above ~100 keV, as shown by a simultaneous ASCA/OSSE observation of 3C 120 and by the OSSE spectra being on average much softer than the X-ray spectra. Finally, we find the X-ray and gamma-ray spectral properties of Cen A, a bright narrow-line radio galaxy - alpha~=0.8, no or weak Compton reflection, N_H>~10^23 cm^-2 (which is consistent with its Fe Kalpha line flux), and a high-energy break at ~100 keV - consistent with Cen A being intrinsically very similar to BLRGs studied here, again in agreement with the unified model.

Wozniak, Przemyslaw R.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Smith, David; Madejski, Greg M.; Johnson, W. Neil

1998-09-01

131

Elemental analysis of process streams in advanced coal utilization plants using neutron-induced gamma spectrometry with californium-252 sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of techniques of neutron-induced gamma spectrometry for non-invasive on-line instrumental analysis of coal for application to process streams in coal conversion plants is described. Using ²⁵²Cf sources and Ge(Li) detector based spectrometers, it appears feasible to monitor most of the elements in coal present in concentrations of 0.1 weight percent or more, including S, Fe, Si, Ca, Al, N,

C. L. Herzenberg; C. E. Cohn; S. A. Cox; R. W. Doering; N. M. OFallon; D. Duffey

1978-01-01

132

X-ray fluorescence and gamma-ray spectrometry combined with multivariate analysis for topographic studies in agricultural soil.  

PubMed

Physical and chemical properties of soils play a major role in the evaluation of different geochemical signature, soil quality, discrimination of land use type, soil provenance and soil degradation. The objectives of the present study are the soil elemental characterization and soil differentiation in topographic sequence and depth, using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) as well as gamma-ray spectrometry data combined with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The study area is an agricultural region of Boa Vista catchment which is located at Guamiranga municipality, Brazil. PCA analysis was performed with four different data sets: spectral data from EDXRF, spectral data from gamma-ray spectrometry, concentration values from EDXRF measurements and concentration values from gamma-ray spectrometry. All PCAs showed similar results, confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis, allowing the data grouping into top, bottom and riparian zone samples, i.e. the samples were separated due to its landscape position. The two hillslopes present the same behavior independent of the land use history. There are distinctive and characteristic patterns in the analyzed soil. The methodologies presented are promising and could be used to infer significant information about the region to be studied. PMID:25464179

de Castilhos, Natara D B; Melquiades, Fábio L; Thomaz, Edivaldo L; Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

2014-10-15

133

Low-background gamma-ray spectrometry in the Garching underground laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe two setups that were built for low-background gamma-ray spectrometry in the Garching Underground Laboratory (˜ 10 m.w.e.). Both setups are based on HPGe detectors surrounded by several layers of passive shielding as well as an active muon veto. The first setup (GEM) comprises a single HPGe detector surrounded by a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector that serves as anti-Compton veto. The second setup (LoAx) consists of two smaller HPGe detectors which are arranged face-to-face to cover a large solid angle around the sample. The detection efficiency of both systems is determined using a calibrated Monte-Carlo simulation. The count rate finally achieved in the energy range 40-2700keV is 10250±26cts/day for the GEM setup, and 5258±27cts/day and 6876±31cts/day between 20-1500keV for the two detectors of the LoAx setup. This leads to detection sensitivities of a few mBq/kg for U and Th at both screening stations.

Hofmann, M.; Mannel, T.; Sivers, M. V.

2013-08-01

134

Comparison of airborne and terrestrial gamma spectrometry measurements - evaluation of three areas in southern Sweden.  

PubMed

The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU) has been conducting airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of natural radioactivity in Sweden for more than 40 years. Today, the database covers about 80% of the country's land surface. This article explores the first step of putting this data into use in radioactive source search at ground level. However, in order to be able to use the airborne background measurements at ground level, SGU data must be validated against terrestrial data. In this work, we compare the SGU data with data measured by a portable backpack system. This is done for three different areas in southern Sweden. The statistical analysis shows that a linear relationship and a positive correlation exist between the air and ground data. However, this linear relationship could be revealed only when the region possessed large enough variations in areal activity. Furthermore, the activity distributions measured show good agreement to those of SGU. We conclude that the SGU database could be used for terrestrial background assessment, given that a linear transfer function is established. PMID:21481503

Kock, Peder; Samuelsson, Christer

2011-06-01

135

Performance of cerium-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG:Ce) scintillator in gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Performance of cerium-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG:Ce) scintillator in gamma-ray spectrometry has been investigated. The measurements of two samples of GAGG:Ce cover the tests of emission spectra (maximum of emission at about 530 nm), light output, non-proportionality, energy resolution, time resolution and decay time of light pulses. We compare the results with commonly known scintillators, such as NaI(Tl), LSO, LuAG etc. The results show that GAGG:Ce has a high light yield of about 33000 ph/MeV as measured with Hamamatsu S3590-18 Si PiN photodiode [1]. The total energy resolution for 662 keV gamma-rays from 137Cs source is equal to about 6%, whereas intrinsic resolution is equal to 5.2%. Additionally, we made basic measurements of photoelectron yield, non-proportionality and total energy resolution of small sample (5×5×5 mm3) of GAGG:Ce crystal coupled to Hamamatsu MPPC array (6×6 mm2). The results show that the performance of GAGG:Ce measured with the MPPC array are similar to those measured with the PMT.

Iwanowska, Joanna; Swiderski, Lukasz; Szczesniak, Tomasz; Sibczynski, Pawel; Moszynski, Marek; Grodzicka, Martyna; Kamada, Kei; Tsutsumi, Kousuke; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

2013-06-01

136

\\Gamma\\Gamma \\Gamma\\Gamma  

E-print Network

\\Gamma\\Gamma @@@ @@@ ### ### ### ### \\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma \\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma @@@ @@@ ### ### ### ### \\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma \\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma yyy yyy \\Gamma\\Gamma@@####\\Gamma\\Gamma@@####\\Gamma\\Gamma@@####\\Gamma\\Gamma@@####\\Gamma\\Gamma@@####\\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma @@@ @@@ ### ### ### ### \\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma \\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma @@@ @@@ ### ### ### ### \\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma \\Gamma\\Gamma\\Gamma yyy

Laske, Gabi

137

A NEW METHDOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FISSILE MASS IN INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTING ITEMS WITH THE USE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY.  

SciTech Connect

In the safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes measurements are required which give the quantity of fissile material in an accounting item, e.g., a standard container of plutonium or uranium oxide. Because of the complexity of modeling the absorption of gamma rays in high-Z materials, gamma-ray spectrometry is not customarily used for this purpose. Gamma-ray measurements can be used to determine the fissile mass when two conditions are met: (1) The material is in a standard container, and (2) The material is finely divided, or a solid item with a reproducible shape. The methodology consists of: (A) Measurement of the emitted gamma rays, and (B) Measurement of the transmission through the item of the high-energy gamma rays of Co-60 and Th-228. We have demonstrated that items containing nuclear materials possess a characteristic ''fingerprint'' of gamma rays which depends not only on the nuclear properties, but also on the mass, density, shape, etc.. The material's spectrum confirms its integrity, homogeneity, and volume as well. While there is attenuation of radiation from the interior, the residual radiation confirms the homogeneity of the material throughout the volume. Transmission measurements, where the attenuation depends almost entirely on Compton scattering, determine the material mass. With well-characterized standards, this methodology can provide an accurate measure of the contained fissile material.

KANE,W.R.; VANIER,P.E.; ZUHOSKI,P.B.; LEMLEY,J.R.

2000-07-16

138

Estimation of maximum permissible errors in the total gamma-spectra intensities at determination from them of level density and radiative strength functions  

E-print Network

From a comparison of the total gamma-spectra calculated for different functional dependencies of level density and radiative strength functions, there were obtained both their square root relative differences and analogous data for the used parameters. The analysis of these data showed that the total uncertainty in determination of gamma-spectra intensities which is necessary to obtain reliable values of parameters of cascade gamma-decay, most probably, must not exceed one percent.

A. M. Sukhovoj; V. A. Khitrov

2010-09-24

139

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-print Network

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Cong Tam Nguyen

2005-08-29

140

Verification of the content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu-Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

E-print Network

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu-Be neutron sources has been developed. It is also shown that the isotopic composition and the age of plutonium (Pu) can be determined in the intensive neutron field of these sources by the ``Multi-Group Analysis'' method. Gamma spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The isotopic composition and the age of Pu were determined using a commercial implementation of the Multi-Group Analysis algorithm. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector parallel to each other. The determination of the specific neutron yields and the problem of neutron damage to the detector are also discussed.

Nguyen, C T

2006-01-01

141

Breaks in gamma-ray spectra of distant blazars and transparency of the Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energetic gamma rays scatter on soft background radiation when propagating through the Universe, producing electron-positron pairs (A.I. Nikishov, Sov. Phys. JETP 14, 393 (1962)). Gamma rays with energies between 100 GeV and a few TeV interact mostly with infrared background photons whose amount is poorly known experimentally but safely constrained from below by account of the contribution of observed light from known galaxies (R.C. Keenan, A.J. Barger, L.L. Cowie, and W.-H. Wang, Astrophys. J. 723, 40 (2010); arXiv: 1102.2428). The expected opacity of the intergalactic space limits the mean free path of TeV gamma rays to dozens of Megaparsecs. However, TeV photons from numerous more distant sources have been detected (S.P. Wakely and D. Horan, http://tevcat.uchicago.edu/). This might be interpreted, in each particular case, in terms of hardening of the emitted spectrum caused by presently unknown mechanisms at work in the sources (S. Archambault et al. (VERITAS and Fermi LAT Collaborations), Astrophys. J. 785, L16 (2014); arXiv: 1403.4308). Here we show that this interpretation is not supported by the analysis of the ensemble of all observed sources. In the frameworks of an infrared-background model with the lowest opacity (R.C. Gilmore, R.S. Somerville, J.R. Primack, and A. Dominguez, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 422, 3189 (2012); arXiv: 1104.0671), we reconstruct the emitted spectra of distant blazars and find that upward spectral breaks appear precisely at those energies where absorption effects are essential. Since these energies are very different for similar sources located at various distances, we conclude that the breaks are artefacts of the incorrect account of absorption and, therefore, the opacity of the Universe for gamma rays is overestimated even in the most conservative model. This implies that some novel physical or astrophysical phenomena should affect long-distance propagation of gamma rays. A scenario in which a part of energetic photons is converted to an inert new particle in the vicinity of the source and reconverts back close to the observer (M. Simet, D. Hooper, and P. Serpico, Phys. Rev. D 77, 063001 (2008); arXiv: 0712.2825; M. Fairbairn, T. Rashba, and S. Troitsky, Phys. Rev. D 84, 125019 (2011); arXiv:0901.4085) does not contradict our results. This new axion-like particle appears in several extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics (J. Jaeckel and A. Ringwald, Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 60, 405 (2010); arXiv: 1002.0329) and may constitute the dark matter (P. Arias et al., JCAP 1206, 013 (2012); arXiv: 1201.5902).

Rubtsov, G. I.; Troitsky, S. V.

2014-11-01

142

Neanderthal skeleton from Tabun: U-series data by gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

The Neanderthal hominid Tabun C1, found in Israel by Garrod & Bate, was attributed to either layer B or C of their stratigraphic sequence. We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the 230Th/234U and 231Pa/235U ratios of two bones from this skeleton, the mandible and a femur. The ages calculated from these ratios depend on the uranium uptake history of the bones. Assuming a model of early U (EU) uptake the age of the Tabun C1 mandible is 34+/-5 ka. The EU age of the femur is 19+/-2 ka. The femur may have experienced continuous (linear) U uptake which would give an age of 33+/-4 ka, in agreement with the mandible's EU age, but implies marked inhomogeneity in U uptake history at the site. These new age estimates for the skeleton suggest that it was younger than deposits of layer C. This apparent age is less than those of other Neanderthals found in Israel, and distinctly younger than the ages of the Skhul and Qafzeh burials. This suggests that Neanderthals did not necessarily coexist with the earliest modern humans in the region. All of the more complete Neanderthal fossils from Israel are now dated to the cool period of the last glacial cycle, suggesting that Neanderthals may have arrived in this region as a result of the southward expansion of their habitable range. The young age determined for the Tabun skeleton would suggest that Neanderthals survived as late in the Levant as they did in Europe. PMID:9929173

Schwarcz, H P; Simpson, J J; Stringer, C B

1998-12-01

143

Hydride formation and thermal desorption spectra of hydrogen of cathodically charged single-phase gamma titanium aluminide  

SciTech Connect

The authors have previously reported thermal desorption spectra of hydrogen obtained from cathodically charged two-phase (Ti{sub 3}Al ({alpha}{sub 2}) + TiAl ({gamma})) titanium aluminides by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), in which hydrogen ion current (H{sub 2}{sup +}) corresponding to hydrogen evolution rate during heating was measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer in an ultra-high vacuum condition. Several accelerated hydrogen evolutions (TDS peak temperatures) have been observed in a series of TDS measurement, and then the authors have suggested that these peaks were dependent on the microstructures ({alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} phases) as well as dissociation of the hydride phase which formed during cathodic charging. A comparison with the TDS spectra from other series of titanium aluminides, such as a single-phase {gamma} alloy, might give clearer views of the microstructural dependence on hydrogen evolution kinetics. In this paper, hydride formation, hydrogen uptake and hydrogen evolution kinetic of a cathodically charged single-phase {gamma} titanium aluminide are investigated, and these results are compared with the previous ones obtained in two-phase ({alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma}) titanium aluminides.

Takasaki, Akito [Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Omiya, Saitama (Japan)] [Shibaura Inst. of Tech., Omiya, Saitama (Japan); Furuya, Yoshio [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)] [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)

1999-02-05

144

Optimizing fits of Geant4 simulations to measured gamma-ray spectra on a parallel computing cluster  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed software to find the best fit between simulated and measured gamma-ray spectra, by varying the energies of the gamma rays and the lifetimes of the states that they de-excite. Using a grid search algorithm based on a chi squared analysis, we identify the energies and lifetimes that provide the best fit. Separate simulations of each energy lifetime pair must be run, each requiring a significant amount of computing resources, so we implemented the Ursinus College parallel computing cluster. The software can be used with simulations of any detector system, but in the present work, we consider Geant4 simulations of the CAESAR array at the NSCL.

Agiorgousis, Michael

2011-10-01

145

Verification of the 239Pu content, isotopic composition and age of plutonium in Pu–Be neutron sources by gamma-spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for verifying the plutonium content of Pu–Be neutron sources has been developed. Gamma-spectra were taken in the far-field of the sample, which was assumed to be cylindrical. The Pu content of the sources was evaluated from the count rates of the gamma-peaks of 239Pu, relying on the assumption that the gamma-rays are coming to the detector

Cong Tam Nguyen

2006-01-01

146

A search for narrow lines in the gamma spectra from PD annihilation at rest  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gamma ray spectrum from pd annhilations at rest was studied by stopping antiprotons in liquid deuterium and analyzing the gamma rays using a magnetic pair spectrometer. No clear evidence is found for monochromatic gamma rays and the upper limit for the branching ratio pp --> gammaX with 1100 MeV\\/c2 < mx < 1770 MeV\\/c2 is less than 5 ×

A. Angelopoulos; A. Apostolakis; T. A. Armstrong; B. Bassalleck; G. Bueche; M. Fero; M. Gee; N. A. Graf; H. Koch; R. A. Lewis; M. Mandelkern; H. Poth; H. Rozaki; L. Sakelliou; J. Schultz; J. Schwertel; G. A. Smith; M. J. Soulliere; T. Usher; D. M. Wolfe

1989-01-01

147

Solubilized liquid scintillator for beta spectrometry and gamma dosimetry of uniformly distributed gamma sources in aqueous solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The detection and the spectrometry of $beta$-radiation in aqueous ; solutions by the scintillation counting technique is studied with a water ; fraction (30-100%) high enough to bar the use of the scintillators otherwise ; customarily employed. The following possibilities are investigated and ; delineated in terms of their applicabilities: 1) Cerenkov count. 2) Emulsion ; count (emulsification of a

Lahmann

1974-01-01

148

Numerical simulations of planetary gamma-ray spectra induced by galactic cosmic rays  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of cosmic-ray-produced gamma rays escaping from Mars were calculated using the LAHET Code System and basic nuclear data for {gamma}-ray production. Both surface water content and atmospheric thickness strongly affect the fluxes of {gamma}-ray lines escaping from Mars.

Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

1994-07-01

149

Methylation of gamma-carboxylated Glu (Gla) allows detection by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the identification of Gla residues in the gamma-glutamyl carboxylase  

PubMed Central

Gamma-carboxylated Glu (Gla) is a post-translational modification required for the activity of vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins that has been difficult to study by mass spectrometry due to the properties of this negatively-charged residue. Gla is generated by a single enzyme, the gamma-glutamyl carboxylase, which has broad biological impact because VKD proteins have diverse functions that include hemostasis, apoptosis, and growth control. The carboxylase also contains Glas, of unknown function, and is an integral membrane protein with poor sequence coverage. To locate these Glas, we first established methods that resulted in high coverage (92%) of uncarboxylated carboxylase. Subsequent analysis of carboxylated carboxylase identified a Gla-peptide (729-758) and a missing region (625-647) that was detected in uncarboxylated carboxylase. We therefore developed an approach to methylate Gla, which efficiently neutralized Gla and improved mass spectrometric analysis. Methylation eliminated CO2 loss from Gla, increased the ionization of Gla-containing peptide, and appeared to facilitate trypsin digestion. Methylation of a carboxylated carboxylase tryptic digest identified Glas in the 625-647 peptide. These studies provide valuable information for testing the function of carboxylase carboxylation. The methylation approach for studying Gla by mass spectrometry is an important advance that will be broadly applicable to analyzing other VKD proteins. PMID:22536908

Hallgren, K. W.; Zhang, D.; Kinter, M.; Willard, B.; Berkner, K. L.

2013-01-01

150

CHIH-DFT determination of the molecular structure and infrared and ultraviolet spectra of gamma-solanine.  

PubMed

Glycoalkaloids are toxic secondary plant metabolites found in potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants and they are considered potential precursors of steroids for applications in bionanotechnology. In this work, we make use of a new model chemistry within density functional theory, which is called CHIH-DFT, to calculate the molecular structure of gamma-solanine, as well to predict its infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV-vis) spectra, and some other electronic parameters. PMID:16859976

Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

2007-01-01

151

Gamma spectrometry efficiency calibration using Monte Carlo methods to measure radioactivity of 137Cs in food samples.  

PubMed

A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring the radioactivity of (137)Cs in food samples, was based on Monte Carlo simulations available in the free-of-charge toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of a high-purity germanium detector were calculated for three reference materials representing three different food items. These efficiency values were compared with their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Interestingly, the output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method. PMID:24214912

Alrefae, T

2014-12-01

152

Use of a Shielded High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry System to Segregate LLW from Contact Handleable ILW Containing Plutonium - 13046  

SciTech Connect

Dounreay Site Restoration Limited (DSRL) have a number of drums of solid waste that may contain Plutonium Contaminated Material. These are currently categorised as Contact Handleable Intermediate Level Waste (CHILW). A significant fraction of these drums potentially contain waste that is in the Low Level Waste (LLW) category. A Canberra Q2 shielded high resolution gamma spectrometry system is being used to quantify the total activity of drums that are potentially in the LLW category in order to segregate those that do contain LLW from CHILW drums and thus to minimise the total volume of waste in the higher category. Am-241 is being used as an indicator of the presence of plutonium in the waste from its strong 59.54 keV gamma-ray; a knowledge of the different waste streams from which the material originates allows a pessimistic waste 'fingerprint' to be used in order to determine an upper limit to the activities of the weak and non-gamma-emitting plutonium and associated radionuclides. This paper describes the main features of the high resolution gamma spectrometry system being used by DSRL to perform the segregation of CHILW and LLW and how it was configured and calibrated using the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). It also describes how potential LLW drums are selected for assay and how the system uses the existing waste stream fingerprint information to determine a reliable upper limit for the total activity present in each measured drum. Results from the initial on-site commissioning trials and the first measurements of waste drums using the new monitor are presented. (authors)

Lester, Rosemary; Wilkins, Colin [Canberra UK Ltd, Unit 1 B528.1, Harwell Science Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DF (United Kingdom)] [Canberra UK Ltd, Unit 1 B528.1, Harwell Science Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DF (United Kingdom); Chard, Patrick [Canberra UK Ltd, Forss Business and Technology park, Thurso, Caithness KW14 7UZ (United Kingdom)] [Canberra UK Ltd, Forss Business and Technology park, Thurso, Caithness KW14 7UZ (United Kingdom); Jaederstroem, Henrik; LeBlanc, Paul; Mowry, Rick [Canberra Industries, Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, Connecticut, 06450 (United States)] [Canberra Industries, Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, Connecticut, 06450 (United States); MacDonald, Sanders; Gunn, William [Dounreay Site Restoration Limited, Dounreay, Thurso, Caithness, KW14 7TZ (United Kingdom)] [Dounreay Site Restoration Limited, Dounreay, Thurso, Caithness, KW14 7TZ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01

153

Modeling of the $\\gamma$-ray pulsed spectra of Geminga, Crab, and Vela with synchro-curvature radiation  

E-print Network

$\\gamma$-ray spectra of pulsars have been mostly studied in a phenomenological way, by fitting them to a cut-off power-law function. Here, we analyze a model where pulsed emission comes from synchro-curvature processes in a gap. We calculate the variation of kinetic energy of magnetospheric particles along the gap and the associated radiated spectra, considering an effective particle distribution. We fit the phase-averaged and phase-resolved {\\em Fermi}-LAT spectra of the three brightest $\\gamma$-ray pulsars: Geminga, Crab, and Vela, and constrain the three free parameters we leave free in the model. Our best-fit models well reproduce the observed data, apart from residuals above a few GeV in some cases, range for which the inverse Compton scattering likely becomes the dominant mechanism. In any case, the flat slope at low-energy ($\\lesssim$ GeV) seen by {\\it Fermi}-LAT both in the phase-averaged and phase-resolved spectra of most pulsars, including the ones we studied, requires that most of the detected radi...

Viganò, Daniele

2015-01-01

154

Cosmic-ray spectra of primary protons and high altitude muons deconvolved from observed atmospheric gamma rays  

SciTech Connect

We have observed atmospheric gamma rays from 30 GeV to 8 TeV, using emulsion chambers at balloon altitudes, accumulating the largest total exposure in this energy range to date, S{omega}T{approx}6.66 m{sup 2} sr day. At very high altitudes, with residual overburden only a few g cm{sup -2}, atmospheric gamma rays are mainly produced by a single interaction of primary cosmic rays with overlying atmospheric nuclei. Thus, we can use these gamma rays to study the spectrum of primary cosmic rays and their products in the atmosphere. From the observed atmospheric gamma-ray spectrum, we deconvolved the primary cosmic-ray proton spectrum, assuming appropriate hadronic interaction models. Our deconvolved proton spectrum covers the energy range from 200 GeV to 50 TeV, which fills a gap in the currently available primary cosmic-ray proton spectra. We also estimated the atmospheric muon spectrum above 30 GeV at high altitude from our gamma-ray spectrum, almost without reference to the primary cosmic rays, and compared the estimated flux with direct muon observations below 20 GeV.

Yoshida, K. [Department of Electronic Information Systems, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan); Ohmori, R.; Sato, Y. [Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Sagamihara (Japan); Komori, Y. [Kanagawa University of Human Services, Yokosuka (Japan); Nishimura, J. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, Sagamihara (Japan)

2006-10-15

155

Cosmic-ray spectra of primary protons and high altitude muons deconvolved from observed atmospheric gamma rays  

E-print Network

We have observed atmospheric gamma rays from 30GeV to 8TeV, using emulsion chambers at balloon altitudes, accumulating the largest total exposure in this energy range to date, SOT ~ 6.66m^2.sr.day. At very high altitudes, with residual overburden only a few g/cm^2, atmospheric gamma rays are mainly produced by a single interaction of primary cosmic rays with overlying atmospheric nuclei. Thus, we can use these gamma rays to study the spectrum of primary cosmic rays and their products in the atmosphere. From the observed atmospheric gamma ray spectrum, we deconvolved the primary cosmic-ray proton spectrum, assuming appropriate hadronic interaction models. Our deconvolved proton spectrum covers the energy range from 200GeV to 50TeV, which fills a gap in the currently available primary cosmic-ray proton spectra. We also estimated the atmospheric muon spectrum above 30GeV at high altitude from our gamma-ray spectrum, almost without reference to the primary cosmic rays, and compared the estimated flux with direct muon observations below 10GeV.

K. Yoshida; R. Ohmori; T. Kobayashi; Y. Komori; Y. Sato; J. Nishimura

2006-09-30

156

Quantitative analysis of gamma-hydroxybutyrate at endogenous concentrations in hair using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

A method capable of quantifying endogenous concentrations of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in human head hair was developed and validated using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Hair was digested under alkaline conditions, and GHB was isolated using liquid-liquid extraction. LC/MS/MS was performed using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in the negative mode, multiple reaction monitoring, and deuterated internal standard (GHB-D(6)). Linearity was observed between 0.1 and 100 ng/mg GHB (R(2) = 1.000). The limits of detection and quantitation in human hair were 0.2 and 0.4 ng/mg, respectively. Accuracy at 2 ng/mg and 10 ng/mg was determined to be 97% and 94%, and intra-assay CVs at these concentrations were 5.2% and 7.4% (n = 4). Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), alpha-hydroxybutyrate, gamma-butyrolactone, and 1,4-butanediol did not produce an interference, and there was negligible ion suppression or enhancement from the matrix. PMID:20141559

Stout, Phillip A; Simons, Kelsie D; Kerrigan, Sarah

2010-03-01

157

gamma-Irradiation effects on the thermal decomposition behaviour and IR absorption spectra of piperacillin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thermal decomposition behaviour of unirradiated and pre-gamma-irradiated piperacillin (pipril) as a semi-synthetic penicillin antibiotic has been studied in the temperature range of (273-1072 K). The decomposition was found to proceed through three major steps both for unirradiated and gamma-irradiated samples. Neither appearance nor disappearance of new bands in the IR spectrum of piperacillin was recorded as a result of gamma-irradiation but only a decrease in the intensity of most bands was observed. A degradation mechanism was suggested to explain the bond rupture and the decrease in the intensities of IR bands of gamma-irradiated piperacillin.

Mahfouz, R. M.; Gaffar, M. A.; Abu El-Fadl, A.; Hamad, Ar. G. K.

2003-11-01

158

Radioactive contamination measurements of the primary sodium pipes in FBTR by gamma spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma spectrometric measurements were carried out in the primary sodium pipes of FBTR, twice during shut down state of the reactor with sodium circulating at 180°C and once after draining the primary sodium from pipes. However, the first two measurements were mainly the feasibility studies of undertaking gamma spectrometric measurements inside the primary sodium cells and to establish a reference

M. T. Jose; T. Ravi; D. N. Krishnakumar; V. Meenakshisundaram

2009-01-01

159

Measurement of Short-Lived Fission-Product Yields of URANIUM-235 Using High-Resolution Gamma Spectra.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Independent yields of short-lived fission products produced by the thermal neutron induced fission of ^{235}U were determined from the measurements of high resolution gamma spectra. Comparisons were made to the recommended yield values tabulated in the ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-product data base. Measurements of the gamma spectra were made with a high purity germanium detector (HPGe) using a NaI(Tl) annulus for Compton suppression. Use of beta-gamma coincidence reduced the random background and also allowed a precise definition of the delay time. The experiment was carried out at the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff facility at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. Rapid transfer of the fission fragments to a low background counting environment, a crucial factor in determining the yields of short-lived fission products, was enabled by a helium -jet tape transport system. The recommended yields in the evaluated data file are a combination of experimental and model-predicted values. The latter source is used since data from many short-lived fission products is still missing or poorly known. The results presented here, especially the ones for the very short-lived isotopes may be used to reduce the uncertainties associated with some of the existing values or to replace model-predicted yields. Gaussian distributions of elemental yields, based on the set of experimentally determined independent yields were examined. The feasibility of predicting unmeasured yields on the basis of charge and mass complementarity was also addressed.

Tipnis, Sameer Vijay

160

Calibration of the well-type germanium gamma-ray detector employing two gamma-ray spectra  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1992, a method has been under development at IRI to characterise a well-type gamma-ray detector by determination of a peak efficiency and a peak-to-total efficiency curve through measurement of a radionuclide emitting coincident photons, and to compute radionuclide specific counting efficiencies from those curves for “real” peaks as well as for “sum” peaks. Recent improvements to this method have

M. Blaauw

1998-01-01

161

Determination of fluorine by the spectrometry of prompt gamma-rays  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use, for analysis, of prompt gamma-rays excited by 5 MeV alpha-particles from the reactions19F(?,???)19F,19F(?, n?)22Na and19F(?, p?)22NE, was studied. The precision of the analyses depended on the gamma-ray energy used for the measurement. Relative standard\\u000a deviations were ±1.8, ±0.9 and ±1.3% using the 110-, 197- or 1275 keV gamma-rays. The method was tested with N. I. M. standard\\u000a materials

I. S. Giles; M. Peisach

1976-01-01

162

Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Capture on 234,236,238U Measured with DANCE  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new measurement of the 238U(n, ?) cross section using a thin 48 mg/cm2 target was made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE over the energy range from 10 eV to 500 keV. The results confirm earlier measurements. Measurements of the gamma-ray emission spectra were also made for 238U(n, ?) as well as 234,236U(n, ?). These measurements help to constrain the radiative strength function used in the cross-section calculations.

Ullmann, J. L.; Mosby, S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C.-Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

2014-05-01

163

Hints of the Existence of Axion-Like-Particles From the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Cosmological Sources  

SciTech Connect

Axion Like Particles (ALPs) are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields. This effect may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as AGNs. Here we carry out a detailed study that for the first time simultaneously considers in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. An efficient photon/axion mixing in the source always means an attenuation in the photon flux, whereas the mixing in the intergalactic medium may result in a decrement and/or enhancement of the photon flux, depending on the distance of the source and the energy considered. Interestingly, we find that decreasing the value of the intergalactic magnetic field strength, which decreases the probability for photon/axion mixing, could result in an increase of the expected photon flux at Earth if the source is far enough. We also find a 30% attenuation in the intensity spectrum of distant sources, which occurs at an energy that only depends on the properties of the ALPs and the intensity of the intergalactic magnetic field, and thus independent of the AGN source being observed. Moreover, we show that this mechanism can easily explain recent puzzles in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources, like the possible detection of TeV photons from 3C 66A (a source located at z=0.444) by MAGIC and VERITAS, which should not happen according to conventional models of photon propagation over cosmological distances. Another puzzle is the recent published lower limit to the EBL intensity at 3.6 {micro}m (which is almost twice larger as the previous one), which implies very hard spectra for some detected TeV gamma-ray sources located at z=0.1-0.2. The consequences that come from this work are testable with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments, namely Fermi (formerly known as GLAST) and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like CANGAROO, HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS.

Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; /IAA, Granada /SLAC; Paneque, D.; Bloom, E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Prada, F.; /IAA, Granada /UC, Santa Cruz; Dominguez, A.; /IAA, Granada /Seville U.; ,

2009-06-23

164

Determination of gamma radioactivity levels and associated dose rates of soil samples of the Akkuyu/Mersin using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

In this study several soil samples were collected from the Büyükeceli district where Turkey's first nuclear power plant will be built and radioactivity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were determined by gamma spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector. The measured activity concentrations in soil samples ranged from 9.8 ± 0.7 to 258.6 ± 15.8, 11.7 ± 0.9 to 85.6 ± 5.0, 173.8 ± 2.1 to 1949.5 ± 14.7 and 0.4 ± 0.1 to 72.2 ± 2.2 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. Findings are in good agreement with the published results of neighbouring areas. The absorbed gamma dose rate (D) in air and the annual effective dose of soil samples were calculated to be 80.2 nGy h(-1) and 98.3 mSv y(-1), respectively. The results show that the radiation hazard in the Büyükeceli district is insignificant. The data presented in this study would be very useful to determine the future effects of the nuclear power plant to the environment. PMID:24214909

Ozmen, S F; Boztosun, I; Yavuz, M; Tunç, M R

2014-03-01

165

Spatially-Dependent Measurements of Surface and Near-Surface Radioactive Material Using In situ Gamma Ray Spectrometry (ISGRS) For Final Status Surveys  

SciTech Connect

In-situ, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (ISGRS) measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) field laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of these tests was to provide analytical data for assessing how “fit for use” this technology is for detecting discrete particles in soil.

J. A. Chapman, A. J. Boerner, E. W. Abelquist

2006-11-15

166

Evaluation of an automated assay system to measure soil radionuclides by L x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

An automated radionuclide assay system for conducting soil radioassays using L x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry was evaluated. Wet chemistry assay procedures were shown to be considerably more time consuming than similar analyses of soil on this radionuclide assay system. The detection limits of /sup 241/Am and plutonium were determined, as well as the reproducibility of radionuclide assay results. The L x-ray spectrometric measurements were compared with radiochemical analyses on several tuff samples. The assay system's intrinsic germanium detector was found to respond linearly to varying low concentrations of /sup 241/Am and plutonium, both of which were easily detected in the presence of elevated concentrations of /sup 137/Cs.

Nyhan, J.W.; Drennon, B.J.; Crowell, J.M.

1982-08-01

167

Continuous measurement of radiation from radionuclides deposited on the ground using in situ gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

Until recently, in situ measurements in a network of radiation-measuring sites at the Deutscher Wetterdienst could only be started if all components had been put up in an instrumentation shelter and the detector had been cooled for ?6 h. Within a project on partial automation of radioactivity monitoring, it has now become possible to permanently equip the measuring sites, i.e. the instrumentation shelter, with the components for in situ gamma-ray spectrometry. The cooling technology of the detectors changed from liquid nitrogen based to an electric system and the instrumentation shelters could be fixed with air conditioning to minimise the influence of changes in the outside temperature. PMID:24812073

Mirsch, M; Barth, J; Dalheimer, A; Steinkopff, T

2014-08-01

168

Dose rate constant of a cesium-131 interstitial brachytherapy seed measured by thermoluminescent dosimetry and gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

The aim of this work was to conduct an independent determination of the dose rate constant of the newly introduced Model CS-1 131Cs seed. A total of eight 131Cs seeds were obtained from the seed manufacturer. The air-kerma strength of each seed was measured by the manufacturer whose calibration is traceable to the air-kerma strength standard established for the 131Cs seeds at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (1 sigma uncertainty < 1%). The dose rate constant of each seed was measured by two independent methods: One based on the actual photon energy spectrum emitted by the seed using gamma-ray spectrometry and the other based on the dose-rate measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) in a Solid Water phantom. The dose rate constant in water determined by the gamma-ray spectrometry technique and by the TLD dosimetry are 1.066 +/- 0.064 cGyh(-1)U(-1) and 1.058 +/- 0.106 cGyh(-1)U(-1), respectively, showing excellent agreement with each other. These values, however, are approximately 15% greater than a previously reported value of 0.915 cGyh(-1)U(-1) [Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)]. Although low-energy fluorescent x rays at 16.6 and 18.7 keV, originating from niobium present in the seed construction, were measured in the energy spectrum of the 131Cs seeds, their yields were not sufficient to lower the dose rate constant to the value of 0.915 cGyh(-1)U(-1). Additional determinations of the dose rate constant may be needed to establish an AAPM recommended consensus value for routine clinical use of the 131Cs seed. PMID:16372409

Chen, Z; Bongiorni, P; Nath, R

2005-11-01

169

Effect of different thickness of material filter on Tc-99m spectra and performance parameters of gamma camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aimed to investigate the effects of material filter technique on Tc-99m spectra and performance parameters of Philip ADAC forte dual head gamma camera. Thickness of material filter was selected on the basis of percentage attenuation of various gamma ray energies by different thicknesses of zinc material. A cylindrical source tank of NEMA single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) Triple Line Source Phantom filled with water and Tc-99m radionuclide injected was used for spectra, uniformity and sensitivity measurements. Vinyl plastic tube was used as a line source for spatial resolution. Images for uniformity were reconstructed by filtered back projection method. Butterworth filter of order 5 and cut off frequency 0.35 cycles/cm was selected. Chang's attenuation correction method was applied by selecting 0.13/cm linear attenuation coefficient. Count rate was decreased with material filter from the compton region of Tc-99m energy spectrum, also from the photopeak region. Spatial resolution was improved. However, uniformity of tomographic image was equivocal, and system volume sensitivity was reduced by material filter. Material filter improved system's spatial resolution. Therefore, the technique may be used for phantom studies to improve the image quality.

Nazifah, A.; Norhanna, S.; Shah, S. I.; Zakaria, A.

2014-11-01

170

Modern aerial gamma-ray spectrometry and regional potassium map of the conterminous United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Aerial gamma-ray surveys of the natural environment measure the flux of gamma rays produced by the radioactive decay of 40K, 214Bi, and 208Tl in the upper 10-20 cm of surface materials. 40K is a radioactive potassium isotope which can be used to estimate the total amount of potassium in the soils and rocks. 214Bi is a decay product of the 238U radioactive decay series and is used to estimate the uranium concentrations, and 208Tl, a decay product of the 232Th radioactive decay series, is used to estimate thorium concentrations. Aerial gamma-ray data covering the 48 contiguous states of the United States have been compiled to produce maps showing the distributions of equivalent uranium, equivalent thorium, and potassium. This compilation involved processing the aerial survey data from about 470 1?? ?? 2?? quadrangle maps. ?? 1990.

Duval, J.S.

1990-01-01

171

Mathematical model of gamma-ray spectrometry borehole logging for quantitative analysis  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A technique for analyzing gamma-ray spectral-logging data has been developed, in which a digital computer is used to calculate the effects of gamma-ray attentuation in a borehole environment. The computer model allows for the calculation of the effects of lithology, porosity, density, and the thickness of a horizontal layer of uniformly distributed radioactive material surrounding a centralized probe in a cylindrical borehole. The computer program also contains parameters for the calculation of the effects of well casing, drilling fluid, probe housing, and losses through the sodium-iodide crystal. Errors associated with the commonly used mathematical assumption of a point detector are eliminated in this model. (USGS)

Schimschal, Ulrich

1981-01-01

172

Consistent analysis and evaluation of prompt fission neutron and gamma-ray spectra and multiplicities  

SciTech Connect

A simple, approach for consistent analysis and evaluation of prompt fission emission characteristics is presented. The approach is mainly based on Madland-Nix model for neutrons and empiric systematic for gamma rays. The comparison with experimental and evaluated data is given. To use this approach for minor actinides prompt fission emission data evaluation is proposed.

Klepatskij, A.B. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute, Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)

1994-12-31

173

Toward a More Standardized Candle Using Gamma?Ray Burst Energetics and Spectra  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT The use of gamma-ray burst (GRB) energetics for cosmography,has long been advanced as a means to probe out to high redshifts, to the epoch of deceleration. However, although relatively immune tosystematic biases from dust extinction, the prompt energy release in GRBs, even when corrected for jetting geometry, is far from being a standard candle. In this work we explore

Andrew S. Friedman; Joshua S. Bloom

2005-01-01

174

Toward a More Standardized Candle Using Gamma-Ray Burst Energetics and Spectra  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of gamma-ray burst (GRB) energetics for cosmography has long been advanced as a means to probe out to high redshifts, to the epoch of deceleration. However, although relatively immune to systematic biases from dust extinction, the prompt energy release in GRBs, even when corrected for jetting geometry, is far from being a standard candle. In this work we

Andrew S. Friedman; Joshua S. Bloom

2005-01-01

175

The Application of High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (HRGS) to Nuclear Safeguards, Nonproliferation, and Arms Control Activities  

SciTech Connect

While well-developed methodologies exist for the employment of high- resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) in determining the isotopic composition of plutonium samples, the potential capabilities of such measurements in determining the properties of nuclear materials otherwise remain largely unexploited. These measurements contain information sufficiently detailed such that not only can the isotopic composition of uranium and plutonium materials be determined, but the details of the spectrum obtained will depend reproducibly upon other factors including the total mass, density, chemical composition, and geometrical configuration of the material, and for certain materials, the elapsed time since chemical processing. The potential thus exists to obtain a `gamma-ray fingerprint` for typical containers or assemblies of nuclear material which will then serve to identify that class of item in a later confirmatory measurement. These measurements have the additional advantage that, by comparison with active interrogation techniques which usually require the introduction of some extraneous form of radiation or other intrusive activity, they are totally passive, and thus impose only minimal additional safety or regulatory burdens on the operators. In the application of these measurements to the verification of treaty-limited items, where the information acquired may be sensitive in nature, the use of the CIVET (Controlled Intrusiveness Verification Technique) approach, where a computer-based interface is employed to limit access to the information obtained, may be followed.

Kane, Walter R.; Lemley, James R.; Forman, Leon

1997-12-31

176

Determination of the stellar (n,{gamma}) cross section of {sup 40}Ca with accelerator mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The stellar (n,{gamma}) cross section of {sup 40}Ca at kT=25 keV has been measured with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This combination is required when direct off-line counting of the produced activity is compromised by the long half-life and/or missing {gamma}-ray transitions. The neutron activations were performed at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using the quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. The subsequent AMS measurements were carried out at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) with a 3 MV tandem accelerator. The doubly magic {sup 40}Ca is a bottle-neck isotope in incomplete silicon burning, and its neutron capture cross section determines the amount of leakage, thus impacting on the eventual production of iron group elements. Because of its high abundance, {sup 40}Ca can also play a secondary role as ''neutron poison'' for the s-process. Previous determinations of this value at stellar energies were based on time-of-flight measurements. Our method uses an independent approach, and yields for the Maxwellian-averaged cross section at kT=30 keV a value of <{sigma}>{sub 3}0 keV=5.73{+-}0.34 mb.

Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Wallner, A.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Mengoni, A.; Gallino, R.; Paul, M.; Vockenhuber, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Wien (Austria); International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Wien (Austria); Dipartimento di Fisica Generale, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, IL-Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B. C., V6T 2A3 (Canada)

2009-06-15

177

Computers in activation analysis and gamma-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Seventy-three papers are included under the following session headings: analytical and mathematical methods for data analysis; software systems for ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectrometry; ..gamma..-ray spectra treatment, peak evaluation; least squares; IAEA intercomparison of methods for processing spectra; computer and calculator utilization in spectrometer systems; and applications in safeguards, fuel scanning, and environmental monitoring. Separate abstracts were prepared for 72 of those papers. (DLC)

Carpenter, B.S.; D'Agostino, M.D.; Yule, H.P. (eds.)

1979-01-01

178

The influence of exogenous conditions on mobile measured gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past, gamma ray measurements have been used for geological surveys and exploration using airborne and borehole logging systems. For these applications, the relationships between the measured physical parameter - the concentration of natural gamma emitters 40K, 238U and 232Th - and geological origin or sedimentary developments are well described. Based on these applications and knowledge in combination with adjusted sensor systems, gamma ray measurements are used to derive soil parameters to create detailed soil maps e.g., in digital soil mapping (DSM) and monitoring of soils. Therefore, not only qualitative but also quantitative comparability is necessary. Grain size distribution, type of clay minerals and organic matter content are soil parameters which directly influence the gamma ray emitter concentration. Additionally, the measured concentration is influenced by endogenous processes like soil moisture variation due to raining events, foggy weather conditions, or erosion and deposition of material. A time series of gamma ray measurements was used to observe changes in gamma ray concentration on a floodplain area in Central Germany. The study area is characterised by high variations in grain size distribution and occurrence of flooding events. For the survey, we used a 4l NaI(Tl) detector with GPS connection mounted on a sledge, which is towed across the field sites by a four-wheel-vehicle. The comparison of data from different time steps shows similar structures with minor variation between the data ranges and shape of structures. However, the data measured during different soil moisture contents differ in absolute value. An average increase of soil moisture of 36% leads to a decrease of Th (by 20%), K (by 29%), and U (by 41%). These differences can be explained by higher attenuation of radiation during higher soil moisture content. The different changes in nuclide concentration will also lead to varying ratios. We will present our experiences concerning the measurement under variable field conditions and their impacts on gamma ray data quality. These activities are done within the iSOIL project. iSOIL- Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities of the FP7 Thematic Priority Environment; iSOIL is one member of the SOIL TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER of Research Projects funded by the EC.

Dierke, C.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.

2012-12-01

179

The VHE gamma-ray spectra of several hard-spectrum blazars from long-term observations with the VERITAS telescope array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analysis is presented on VERITAS observations of the very high energy gamma-ray spectra of five high frequency peaked BL Lac objects over a range of redshifts. Each object has an unusually hard intrinsic GeV spectrum, and is expected to produce TeV gamma-ray emission into the optically- thick regime of the universe's diffuse extragalactic background light (EBL). Hard spectrum HBLs have recently emerged as an effective tool for measurement of the EBL spectrum, due to extinction of gamma-ray signals from blazars via the pair production interaction gamma-TeVgamma EBL ? e+e -. The VERITAS collaboration has approved long term observations on several of these sources, with the specific intent of studying their spectra to probe for absorption features resulting from these interactions. An introduction to the field of particle astrophysics is presented, followed by an overview of the EBL and its relation to the evolution of the universe. The VERITAS gamma-ray telescope is described in detail, followed by a full overview of the analysis techniques used to derive gamma-ray spectra from VERITAS data. The analyses of the blazars themselves are presented, followed by a discussion of their application to further constraints of the EBL. Each blazar is de-absorbed with an assumed EBL spectrum. In each case the intrinsic TeV spectrum is consistent with lower-energy gamma-ray emission in the optically-thin regime of the EBL.

Madhavan, Arun

180

Cosmic Infrared Background From Population III Stars and Its Effect on Spectra of High-z Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We discuss the contribution of Population III stars to the near-IR (NIR) cosmic infrared background (CIB) and its effect on spectra of high-z, high-energy gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other sources. It is shown that if Population III is composed of massive stars, the claimed NIR CIB excess will be reproduced if only approx. 4% plus or minus 2% of all baryons went through these stars. Regardless of the precise amount of the NIR CIB due to them, they likely left enough photons to provide a large optical depth for high-energy photons from distant GRBs. Observations of such GRBs are expected following the planned launch of NASA's GLAST mission. Detecting such damping in the spectra of high-z GRBs will then provide important information on the emissions from the Population III epoch, and the location of this cutoff may serve as an indicator of the GRBs' redshifts. We also point out the difficulty of unambiguously detecting the CIB part originating from Population III in spectra of low-z blazars.

Kashlinsky, A.

2005-01-01

181

Gamma-ray bursts from magnetospheric plasma oscillations. II. Model spectra  

SciTech Connect

Several mechanisms for the primary release of energy in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may result in the excitation of relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations above the polar cap of a neutron star. This paper presents a survey of detailed calculations of the inverse Compton scattering interaction between the sinusoidally accelerated particles in relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations and the self-consistently determined thermal radiation from the stellar surface. The upscattered photons are boosted to gamma-ray energies and a Monte Carlo simulation is used to obtain the spectrum for different viewing angles relative to the magnetic field in the oscillating region. It is shown that several GRB spectral characteristics may be understood in the context of a model wherein the overall spectrum changes with aspect angle as a result of the superposition of four components with different angular distributions. 52 refs.

Melia, F. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

1990-07-01

182

Gamma-ray bursts from magnetospheric plasma oscillations. II - Model spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several mechanisms for the primary release of energy in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may result in the excitation of relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations above the polar cap of a neutron star. This paper presents a survey of detailed calculations of the inverse Compton scattering interaction between the sinusoidally accelerated particles in relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations and the self-consistently determined thermal radiation from the stellar surface. The upscattered photons are boosted to gamma-ray energies and a Monte Carlo simulation is used to obtain the spectrum for different viewing angles relative to the magnetic field in the oscillating region. It is shown that several GRB spectral characteristics may be understood in the context of a model wherein the overall spectrum changes with aspect angle as a result of the superposition of four components with different angular distributions.

Melia, Fulvio

1990-01-01

183

Jitter Radiation as a Possible Mechanism for Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows: Spectra and Light Curves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The standard model of gamma-ray burst afterglows assumes that the radiation observed as a delayed emission is of synchrotron origin, which requires the shock magnetic field to be relatively homogeneous on small scales. An alternative mechanism-jitter radiation, which traditionally has been applied to the prompt emission-substitutes for synchrotron when the magnetic field is tangled on a microscopic scale. Such are

Mikhail V. Medvedev; Davide Lazzati; Brian C. Morsony; Jared C. Workman

2007-01-01

184

Gamma ray spectrometry logs as a hydrocarbon indicator for clastic reservoir rocks in Egypt.  

PubMed

Petroleum oil is an important source for the energy in the world. The Gulf of Suez, Nile Delta and South Valley are important regions for studying hydrocarbon potential in Egypt. A thorium normalization technique was applied on the sandstone reservoirs in the three regions to determine the hydrocarbon potentialities zones using the three spectrometric radioactive gamma ray-logs (eU, eTh and K% logs). The conventional well logs (gamma-ray, deep resistivity, shallow resistivity, neutron, density and sonic logs) are analyzed to determine the net pay zones in these wells. Indices derived from thorium normalized spectral logs indicate the hydrocarbon zones in petroleum reservoirs. The results of this technique in the three regions (Gulf of Suez, Nile Delta and South Valley) are in agreement with the results of the conventional well log analyses by ratios of 82%, 78% and 71% respectively. PMID:23306160

Al-Alfy, I M; Nabih, M A; Eysa, E A

2013-03-01

185

Measurement of Danube sediment radioactivity in Serbia and Montenegro using gamma ray spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radionuclide content of 54 sediment samples collected from 18 locations distributed along the Vojvodina part of the Danube was determined by means of low-level, high-resolution gamma-spectroscopy. Beside the members of the natural radioactive chains of 238U, 232Th and the natural 40K, 137Cs content of Chernobyl origin was also detected. The data obtained are compared with those collected during four

I. Bikit; J. Slivka; M. Veskovi?; E. Varga; N. Žiki?-Todorovi?; D. Mr?a; S. Forkapi?

2006-01-01

186

Gamma-ray spectrometry of humans at the University of Utah  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A human total-body counter was designed and built with two 20 × 10 cm NaI (Tl) crystals suspended over an “isoresponse surface” upon which the subject reclines. This surface is curved from head to knee and from left to right, so that a gamma-ray emitting object is detected with equal efficiency when placed anywhere upon it. The positioner and

Ray D. Lloyd; Charles W. Mays; David H. Taysum

1979-01-01

187

Mass spectrometry.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

1972-01-01

188

Two lines or not two lines? That is the question of gamma ray spectra  

SciTech Connect

Lines in the spectrum of cosmic gamma rays are considered one of the more robust signatures of dark matter annihilation. We consider such processes from an effective field theory vantage, and find that generically, two or more lines are expected, providing an interesting feature that can be exploited for searches and reveal details about the underlying theory of dark matter. Using the 130 GeV feature recently reported in the Fermi-LAT data as an example, we analyze the energy spectrum in the multi-line context and find the data to be consistent with a single ?? line, a single ?Z line or both a ?? and a ?Z line.

Rajaraman, Arvind; Tait, Tim M.P.; Whiteson, Daniel, E-mail: arajaram@uci.edu, E-mail: ttait@uci.edu, E-mail: daniel@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States)

2012-09-01

189

Gamma-ray burst spectra from photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Consideration is given to a model of gamma-ray burst sources based on repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons. Relativistic electrons which are continuously produced in the source radiate the total power L supplied to them. Higher order Compton scatterings, which occur when L(soft) is much less than L make the model distinct. The spectrum having an X-ray energy index of about one results from the superposition of the spectral components from several orders of Compton scattering; the change of the slope at several hundred keV arises from the Klein-Nishina decline of the scattering cross section.

Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

1986-01-01

190

Coincidence summing effects in gamma-ray spectrometry using a Marinelli beaker.  

PubMed

The coincidence summing effects on a HPGe spectrometer have been studied by using Marinelli beakers containing (133)Ba and (152)Eu solutions. The coincidence summing effects were calculated from the ratio of full-energy peak efficiency and total efficiency. The peak efficiency values for (133)Ba and (152)Eu corrected by using the peak-to-total ratio were found to be in good agreement (within 3%) as compared with the efficiency values from Marinelli beakers containing single gamma-ray emitters. PMID:18430578

Lee, Mosung; Park, Tae Soon; Woo, Jong-Kwan

2008-01-01

191

The use of mercury as a supplementary inner shielding material for low-background gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements of low-level environmental samples require the reduction of the background as low as practicable. In the present work, we investigate the advantages of adding Hg passive shielding inside a low-background Pb-shield to further reduce the background radiation. The background count rate achieved by the Pb-shield alone over the energy interval from 25 to 2700 keV, amounts to 8.4 × 10-4 counts/s.keV which is ~ 1.5% of the normal background. The introduction of Hg-shield adds another 15% reduction. On the average, the Hg-shield suppresses the net peak areas of X- and gamma-rays to < 3 and 1% of the normal background, respectively. On the other hand, the reduction in the count rate of these peaks due to the addition of Hg-shield varies according to the energy. The measurements showed no evidence of the presence of cosmogenically produced 194Hg in the measured spectra. An additional 2% reduction was achieved by using neutron moderators.

Al-Sharkawy, A.; Sharshar, T.; Badran, H. M.

2013-07-01

192

Intercomparison of methods for coincidence summing corrections in gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

A comparison of the coincidence summing correction methods is presented. Since there are several ways for computing these corrections, each method has advantages and drawbacks that could be compared. This part of the comparison was restricted to point sources. The same experimental spectra, decay scheme and photon emission intensities were used by all the participants. The results were expressed as coincidence summing correction factors for several energies of (152)Eu and (134)Cs, and three source-to-detector distances. They are presented and discussed. PMID:20117939

Lépy, M-C; Altzitzoglou, T; Anagnostakis, M J; Arnold, D; Capogni, M; Ceccatelli, A; De Felice, P; Dersch, R; Dryak, P; Fazio, A; Ferreux, L; Guardati, M; Han, J B; Hurtado, S; Karfopoulos, K L; Klemola, S; Kovar, P; Lee, K B; Ocone, R; Ott, O; Sima, O; Sudar, S; Svec, A; Tao, Chau Van; Thanh, Tran Thien; Vidmar, T

2010-01-01

193

On the Non-existence of a Sharp Cooling Break in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Spectra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the widely used analytical afterglow model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) predicts a sharp cooling break ? c in its afterglow spectrum, the GRB observations so far rarely show clear evidence for a cooling break in their spectra or a corresponding temporal break in their light curves. Employing a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. We precisely follow the cooling history of non-thermal electrons accelerated into each Lagrangian shell. We show that a detailed calculation of afterglow spectra does not in fact give rise to a sharp cooling break at ? c . Instead, it displays a very mild and smooth transition, which occurs gradually over a few orders of magnitude in energy or frequency. The main source of this slow transition is that different mini shells have different evolutionary histories of the comoving magnetic field strength B, so that deriving the current value of ? c of each mini shell requires an integration of its cooling rate over the time elapsed since its creation. We present the time evolution of optical and X-ray spectral indices to demonstrate the slow transition of spectral regimes and discuss the implications of our result in interpreting GRB afterglow data.

Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

2014-01-01

194

On the Light Curve and Spectra of X-Rays and Gamma-Rays from the Crab Pulsar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a three-dimensional pulsar magnetosphere model to study the light curve and spectra of x-rays and gamma-rays from the Crab pulsar. In this model, the vertical size of the outer gap is first determined by a self-consistent model in which the outer gap is limited by pair production from collisions of thermal photons produced by polar cap heating of backflow outer gap current and curvature photons emitted by gap accelerated charged particles. The transverse size of the outer gap is determined by local pair production conditions. In principle, there are two topologically disconnected outer gaps present in the magnetosphere of a pulsar, and both incoming and outgoing particle flows are allowed. However, double-peak light curves with strong bridges are most common, Making use of the three-dimensional structure of the outer gap and its local properties, we compare the results of our model with the light curve and phase-resolved spectra of the Crab pulsar.

Zhang, Li; K, Cheng S.; Mei, Dong-Cheng

2000-07-01

195

Survey of the {sup 137}Cs contamination in Belgium by in-situ gamma spectrometry, a decade after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The residual radiocesium concentration, nearly 10 y after the Chernobyl accident, is measured at different sites on the Belgian territory by means of in-situ gamma-spectrometry. A possible link between the rainfall at the beginning of May 1986 and the actual cesium concentration is investigated. The radiological impact of this contamination, even in the most affected regions in the Ardennes, is very small (<6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Uyttenhove, J. [Univ. of Gent (Belgium); Pomme, S.; Hardenman, F. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang (Belgium); Culot, J.P. [A.V. Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)] [and others

1997-10-01

196

ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)] [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Lyubarsky, Yuri, E-mail: indrek.vurm@gmail.com [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)] [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2013-02-20

197

Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity ratios showed distinct differences between the closed CANDU primary coolant system and radiopharmaceutical production releases. According to the concept proposed by Kalinowski and Pistner (2006), the relationship between different isotopic activity ratios based on three or four radioxenon isotopes was plotted in a log-log diagram for source characterisation (civil vs. nuclear test). The multiple isotopic activity ratios were distributed in three distinct areas: HC atmospheric monitoring ratios extended to far left; the CANDU primary coolant system ratios lay in the middle; and 99Mo stack monitoring ratios for ANSTO and CRL were located on the right. The closed CANDU primary coolant has the lowest logarithmic mean ratio that represents the nuclear power reactor operation. The HC atmospheric monitoring exhibited a broad range of ratios spreading over several orders of magnitude. In contrast, the ANSTO and CRL stack emissions showed the smallest range of ratios but the results indicate at least two processes involved in the 99Mo productions. Overall, most measurements were found to be shifted towards the reactor domain. The hypothesis is that this is due to an accumulation of the isotope 131mXe in the stack or atmospheric background as it has the longest half-life and extra 131mXe emissions from the decay of 131I. The contribution of older 131mXe to a fresh release shifts the ratio of 133mXe/131mXe to the left. It was also very interesting to note that there were some situations where isotopic ratios from 99Mo production emissions fell within the nuclear test domain. This is due to operational variability, such as shorter target irradiation times. Martin B. Kalinowski and Christoph Pistner, (2006), Isotopic signature of atmospheric xenon released from light water reactors, Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 88, 215-235.

Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

2013-04-01

198

Detection of frozen salt in pipes using gamma-ray spectrometry of potassium self-activity  

SciTech Connect

Solar plants that use molten salts as heat transfer fluid need careful control to avoid the freezing of the salt in the pipes; if such a problem occurs, a diagnostic instrument to localize where is the frozen salt plug and to determine its length is useful. If the salt contains potassium (as is the case of the most common mixture used in solar plants, NaNO{sub 3}/KNO{sub 3} 60/40% by weight), the gamma decay of the natural unstable isotope {sup 40}K can be exploited to detect the frozen salt in a non-invasive way. Simulations and experimental results regarding the detectability of such plugs with different masses/lengths are presented. (author)

Grena, Roberto; Scafe, Raffaele; Pisacane, Fabrizio; Pilato, Renzo; Crescenzi, Tommaso; Mazzei, Domenico [ENEA, Casaccia Research Centre, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)

2010-01-15

199

Determination of sedimentation rates in Eastern sea areas of Hong Kong with gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cylindrical samples of sediments have been obtained from four sea areas adjacent to the Mirs Bay to the east of Hong Kong. An n-type HPGe low background ?-ray spectrometry system has been employed to measure the Pb-210 and Cs-137 concentrations in the samples simultaneously. The distribution of the specific activities with depth were also acquired. Using the least squares fit method, the sedimentation rate at the four sampling sites have been evaluated. The results show that the sedimentation rate decreases when the sampling sites are further away from the Mirs Bay into the South China Sea. In particular, the rate calculated using the Pb-210 activities decreases from 0.46 to 0.27 cm/y, and that using the Cs-137 method from 0.35 to 0.086 cm/y. The Cs-137 method yields results which are subjected to external disturbance to a greater extent, and is thus less reliable than the Pb-210 method.

Yu, K. N.; Young, E. C. M.; Stokes, M. J.; Guan, Z. J.

1995-02-01

200

LAFARA: a new underground laboratory in the French Pyrénées for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

We describe a new underground laboratory, namely LAFARA (for "LAboratoire de mesure des FAibles RAdioactivités"), that was recently created in the French Pyrénées. This laboratory is primarily designed to analyze environmental samples that display low radioactivity levels using gamma-ray spectrometry. Two high-purity germanium detectors were placed under 85 m of rock (ca. 215 m water equivalent) in the tunnel of Ferrières (Ariège, France). The background is thus reduced by a factor of ?20 in comparison to above-ground laboratories. Both detectors are fully equipped so that the samples can be analyzed in an automatic mode without requiring permanent presence of a technician in the laboratory. Auto-samplers (twenty positions) and systems to fill liquid nitrogen automatically provide one month of autonomy to the spectrometers. The LAFARA facility allows us to develop new applications in the field of environmental sciences based on the use of natural radionuclides present at low levels in the environment. As an illustration, we present two of these applications: i) dating of marine sediments using the decay of (226)Ra in sedimentary barite (BaSO(4)), ii) determination of (227)Ac ((231)Pa) activities in marine sediment cores. PMID:23164692

van Beek, P; Souhaut, M; Lansard, B; Bourquin, M; Reyss, J-L; von Ballmoos, P; Jean, P

2013-02-01

201

Stability of plasma gamma-hydroxybutyrate determined by gas chromatography-positive ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

An effective method for the determination of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in human plasma is described that utilizes a simple liquid-liquid extraction procedure and gas chromatography-positive ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-PCI-MS). The method has been used to study the stability of plasma GHB under several storage conditions. Following the extraction with acetonitrile, GHB and deuterated GHB (GHB-d(6)) were derivatized with N,O-bis[trimethylsilyl] trifluoroacetamide (BSFTA). After the separation on a capillary GC column, the derivatives were ionized with ammonia reagent gas and analyzed by MS. The lower limit of quantitation in 100 microL of plasma was 2.5 microg/mL, over a range from 2.5 to 250 microg/mL. The coefficients of variation did not exceed 3.9% and the mean measured concentrations did not deviate more than 8% from the target for both intra- and interassay precision and accuracy. Plasma GHB was found to be stable at -20 degrees C for up to 9 months, at room temperature for 48 h, and after 3 freeze/thaw cycles. It was also found to be stable in processed samples stored at room temperature for 5 days and for 15 days at -20 degrees C. PMID:14606997

Chen, Meng; Andrenyak, David M; Moody, David E; Foltz, Rodger L

2003-10-01

202

In situ gamma spectrometry measurements and Monte Carlo computations for the detection of radioactive sources in scrap metal.  

PubMed

A very limited number of field experiments have been performed to assess the relative radiation detection sensitivities of commercially available equipment used to detect radioactive sources in recycled metal scrap. Such experiments require the cooperation and commitment of considerable resources on the part of vendors of the radiation detection systems and the cooperation of a steel mill or scrap processing facility. The results will unavoidably be specific to the equipment tested at the time, the characteristics of the scrap metal involved in the tests, and to the specific configurations of the scrap containers. Given these limitations, the use of computer simulation for this purpose would be a desirable alternative. With this in mind, this study sought to determine whether Monte Carlo simulation of photon flux energy distributions resulting from a radiation source in metal scrap would be realistic. In the present work, experimental and simulated photon flux energy distributions in the outer part of a truck due to the presence of embedded radioactive sources in the scrap metal load are compared. The experimental photon fluxes are deduced by in situ gamma spectrometry measurements with portable Ge detector and the calculated ones by Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNP code. The good agreement between simulated and measured photon flux energy distributions indicate that the results obtained by the Monte Carlo simulations are realistic. PMID:15650590

Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Takoudis, G; Potiriadis, C; Silva, J

2005-02-01

203

Absorption-Mode Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: the Effects of Apodization and Phasing on Modified Protein Spectra  

PubMed Central

The method of phasing broadband FT-ICR spectra allows plotting the spectra in the absorption-mode; this new approach significantly improves the quality of the data at no extra cost. Herein, an internal calibration method for calculating the phase function has been developed, and successfully applied to the top-down spectra of modified proteins, where the peak intensities vary by >100×. The result shows that the use of absorption-mode spectra allows more peaks to be discerned within the recorded data, and this can reveal much greater information about the protein and modifications under investigation. In addition, noise and harmonic peaks can be assigned immediately in the absorption-mode. PMID:23568027

Qi, Yulin; Li, Huilin; Wills, Rebecca H.; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Yu, Xiang; Kilgour, David. P. A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Lin, Cheng; O’Connor, Peter B.

2014-01-01

204

Compton scattering effects in the spectra of soft gamma-ray repeaters  

E-print Network

The association of all three soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) with supernova remnants has made possible estimates of the distance to and luminosity of the sources of SGRs, which have provided a starting point for detailed modeling. One of the most popular classes of models involves strongly magnetized neutron stars, with surface dipole fields $B\\sim 10^{14}-10^{15}$ G. In these ``magnetar" models, many otherwise negligible processes can play an important role. Here we consider the spectral effects of strong-field modifications to Compton scattering, in particular those related to the contribution of vacuum polarization to the dielectric tensor. Vacuum polarization introduces a density-dependent photon frequency, called the second vacuum frequency, at which the normal modes of polarization become nonorthogonal and the mean free path of photons decreases sharply. Monte Carlo simulations of photon propagation through a magnetized plasma show that this effect leads, under a wide range of physical conditions, to a broad absorption-like feature in the energy range $\\sim$5 keV---40 keV.

M. Coleman Miller; Tomasz Bulik

1995-12-18

205

Determination of radionuclides and elemental composition of clay soils by gamma- and X-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

Radiochemical and elemental analysis of clay soils collected from different locations within Ekiti State have been performed in this study using gamma and XRF spectrometric measurements. The results of this study show that the mean concentrations of uranium ranged from 2.2?±?1.0 mg/kg to 3.2?±?1.1 mg/kg, that of thorium ranged from 4.0?±?0.5 mg/kg to 5.7?±?1.7 mg/kg, while potasium presented in % by weight ranged from 0.4?±?0.2 to 1.3?±?0.3 in all the locations. The overall mean concentrations of these radionuclides are comparable to values from other locations around the world. The XRF analysis revealed 4 major elements and 11 minor or trace elements present in the clay samples. The distribution of the various major and trace elements in all the sampling sites do not follow any systematic trend but vary from point to point. To assess the level of contamination and the possible anthropogenic impact in the clay soils, the enrichment factor (EF) and the geoaccumulation index (Igeo) were estimated for some potential hazardous elements. The results indicate that Cu, Zn, Ni and Mn have EF?

Omoniyi, Isinkaye M; Oludare, Shitta M B; Oluwaseyi, Oderinde M

2013-12-01

206

Martian surface heat production and crustal heat flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Martian thermal state and evolution depend principally on the radiogenic heat-producing element (HPE) distributions in the planet's crust and mantle. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft has mapped the surface abundances of HPEs across Mars. From these data, we produce the first models of global and regional surface heat production and crustal heat flow. As previous studies have suggested that the crust is a repository for approximately 50% of the radiogenic elements on Mars, these models provide important, directly measurable constraints on Martian heat generation. Our calculations show considerable geographic and temporal variations in crustal heat flow, and demonstrate the existence of anomalous heat flow provinces. We calculate a present day average surface heat production of 4.9 ± 0.3 × 10-11 W · kg-1. We also calculate the average crustal component of heat flow of 6.4 ± 0.4 mW · m-2. The crustal component of radiogenically produced heat flow ranges from <1 mW · m-2 in the Hellas Basin and Utopia Planitia regions to ˜13 mW · m-2 in the Sirenum Fossae region. These heat production and crustal heat flow values from geochemical measurements support previous heat flow estimates produced by different methodologies.

Hahn, B. C.; McLennan, S. M.; Klein, E. C.

2011-07-01

207

Gamma-ray spectrometry of humans at the University of Utah.  

PubMed

A human total-body counter was designed and built with two 20 X 10 cm NaI (Tl) crystals suspended over an "isoresponse surface" upon which the subject reclines. This surface is curved from head to knee and from left to right, so that a gamma-ray emitting object is detected with equal efficiency when placed anywhere upon it. The positioner and detectors are housed in a low background enclosure constructed of steel 31 cm thick with a graded inner lining of lead + cadmium + copper. Calibration of the system was accomplished by administering trace amounts of various radionuclides to 48 human subjects of various sizes, ranging in age from 4--80 years. Counting rates per retained muCi at 0.53, 0.66, 1.53, and 2.75 MeV (83Rb, 137Cs, 42K, and 24Na) were determined as a function of body size and were compared with counting rates per muCi of corresponding emitters centered in a polyethylene cylinder of radius 10.3 cm. Limits of detection, corresponding to three times the standard deviation of a 50 min background, were 170 nCi 90Sr (via Bremsstrahlung X-rays), 0.78 nCi 131I, 0.48 nCi 83Rb, 0.52 nCi 137 Cs, 4.9 nCi 40K (or 5.8 g of natural potassium) and 1.7 nCi 222Rn. PMID:112640

Lloyd, R D; Mays, C W; Taysum, D H

1979-04-30

208

Regional Crustal Components of Martian Heat Flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (GRS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Martian thermal state and evolution depend principally on the heat-producing element distributions in the planet’s crust and mantle, specifically the incompatible radiogenic isotopes of K, Th, and U. Normally these elements are preferentially sequestered into a planet’s crust during differentiation, and this is especially true for Mars, which possesses a thick and mostly ancient crust that is proportionally large with respect to the planet’s total volume. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) instrument on board the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft can detect all three of these elements and has been used to map the K and Th abundances across nearly the entire Martian surface. It has been estimated that as much as 50% or more of the Martian planetary budget of heat producing elements has seen sequestered into the crust during planetary differentiation due to their incompatibility in igneous processes; a process that mostly took place very early in Martian geological history. As such, the crustal component of heat flow represents as much as half of the total planetary output of radiogenic heat. While GRS measurements can not constrain heat flow from mantle sources, previous work calculated the average crustal component of heat flow of 6.43 mW/m2 based on radiogenic elemental abundances. Orbital GRS data are of lower spatial resolution (5°x5° per pixel) than most other orbital remote sensing instruments and, accordingly, are best suited for global or large, regional-scale studies, rather than detailed, local analyses of geographically small features and landforms. Here we present detailed calculations for specific, areally-large, regions and geologic provinces on Mars, reporting the present-day crustal component of heat flow, the crustal heat flow at time of regional formation, and constraints of geothermal gradients from these measurements.

Hahn, B. C.; McLennan, S. M.

2009-12-01

209

Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. Semiannual technical report, 1 March-31 August 1994  

SciTech Connect

The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

Rester, A.C. Jr.

1994-12-01

210

Optical and infrared absorption spectra of 3d transition metal ions-doped sodium borophosphate glasses and effect of gamma irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undoped and transition metals (3d TM) doped sodium borophosphate glasses were prepared. UV-visible absorption spectra were measured in the region 200-900 nm before and after gamma irradiation. Experimental optical data indicate that the undoped sodium borophosphate glass reveals before irradiation strong and broad UV absorption and no visible bands could be identified. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for preparation of this base borophosphate glass. The TMs-doped glasses show absorption bands within the UV and/or visible regions which are characteristic to each respective TM ion in addition to the UV absorption observed from the host base glass. Infrared absorption spectra of the undoped and TMs-doped glasses reveal complex FTIR consisting of extended characteristic vibrational bands which are specific for phosphate groups as a main constituent but with the sharing of some vibrations due to the borate groups. This criterion was investigated and approved using DAT (deconvolution analysis technique). The effects of different TMs ions on the FTIR spectra are very limited due to the low doping level (0.2%) introduced in the glass composition. Gamma irradiation causes minor effect on the FTIR spectra specifically the decrease of intensities of some bands. Such behavior is related to the change of bond angles and/or bond lengths of some structural building units upon gamma irradiation.

Abdelghany, A. M.; ElBatal, F. H.; Azooz, M. A.; Ouis, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.

2012-12-01

211

Optical and infrared absorption spectra of 3d transition metal ions-doped sodium borophosphate glasses and effect of gamma irradiation.  

PubMed

Undoped and transition metals (3d TM) doped sodium borophosphate glasses were prepared. UV-visible absorption spectra were measured in the region 200-900nm before and after gamma irradiation. Experimental optical data indicate that the undoped sodium borophosphate glass reveals before irradiation strong and broad UV absorption and no visible bands could be identified. Such UV absorption is related to the presence of unavoidable trace iron impurities within the raw materials used for preparation of this base borophosphate glass. The TMs-doped glasses show absorption bands within the UV and/or visible regions which are characteristic to each respective TM ion in addition to the UV absorption observed from the host base glass. Infrared absorption spectra of the undoped and TMs-doped glasses reveal complex FTIR consisting of extended characteristic vibrational bands which are specific for phosphate groups as a main constituent but with the sharing of some vibrations due to the borate groups. This criterion was investigated and approved using DAT (deconvolution analysis technique). The effects of different TMs ions on the FTIR spectra are very limited due to the low doping level (0.2%) introduced in the glass composition. Gamma irradiation causes minor effect on the FTIR spectra specifically the decrease of intensities of some bands. Such behavior is related to the change of bond angles and/or bond lengths of some structural building units upon gamma irradiation. PMID:22995547

Abdelghany, A M; ElBatal, F H; Azooz, M A; Ouis, M A; ElBatal, H A

2012-12-01

212

Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume I. Data analysis methodology and hardware description  

SciTech Connect

A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and had dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

Ruhter, W.D.

1984-05-01

213

Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings. [IAEAPU  

SciTech Connect

A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

Ruhter, W.D.

1984-05-01

214

An analytic function fit to Monte-Carlo X- and gamma-ray spectra from Thomson thick thermal/nonthermal hybrid plasmas  

E-print Network

We suggest a simple fitting formula to represent Comptonized X- and gamma-ray spectra from a hot ($kT_e \\gtrsim 10$ keV), Thomson thick ($\\tau_T \\gtrsim 5$) hybrid thermal/nonthermal plasma in spherical geometry with homogeneous soft-photon injection throughout the Comptonizing region. We have used this formula to fit a large data base of Monte-Carlo generated photon spectra, and provide correlations between the physical parameters of the plasma and the fit parameters of our analytic fit function. These allow us to construct Thomson thick Comptonization spectra without performing computer intensive Monte Carlo simulations of the high-Thomson-depth hybrid-plasma Comptonization problem. Our formulae can easily be used in data analysis packages such as XSPEC, thus rendering rapid $\\chi^2$ fitting of such spectra to real data feasible.

M. Boettcher; R. Saxena; A. W. Crider

2001-02-16

215

Verification of Monte Carlo Calculations by Means of Neutron and Gamma Fluence Spectra Measurements behind and inside of Iron-Water Configurations  

SciTech Connect

Neutron and gamma spectra were measured behind and inside of modules consisting of variable iron and water slabs that were installed in radial beams of the zero-power training and research reactors AKR of the Technical University Dresden and ZLFR of the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz. The applied NE-213 scintillation spectrometer did allow the measurement of gamma and neutron fluence spectra in the energy regions 0.3-10 MeV for photons and 1.0-20 MeV for neutrons. The paper describes the experiments and presents important results of the measurements. They are compared with the results of Monte Carlo transport calculations made by means of the codes MCNP and TRAMO on an absolute scale of fluences.

Boehmer, Bertram; Konheiser, Joerg; Noack, Klaus; Rogov, Anatoli [FZ Rossendorf, Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Grantz, Martin; Mehner, Hans-Christoph [HS Zittau/Goerlitz, FB Maschinenwesen, Theodor-Koerner-Allee 16, D-02763 Zittau (Germany); Hansen, Wolfgang; Stephan, Ingrid [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Energietechnik, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Hinke, Dietmar; Unholzer, Siegfried [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

2005-05-24

216

ROLE OF LINE-OF-SIGHT COSMIC-RAY INTERACTIONS IN FORMING THE SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS IN TeV GAMMA RAYS AND HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINOS  

SciTech Connect

Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. The observed high-energy gamma-ray signals from distant blazars may be dominated by secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. This explains the surprisingly low attenuation observed for distant blazars, because the production of secondary gamma rays occurs, on average, much closer to Earth than the distance to the source. Thus, the observed spectrum in the TeV range does not depend on the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum, while it depends on the output of the source in cosmic rays. We apply this hypothesis to a number of sources and, in every case, we obtain an excellent fit, strengthening the interpretation of the observed spectra as being due to secondary gamma rays. We explore the ramifications of this interpretation for limits on the extragalactic background light and for the production of cosmic rays in AGNs. We also make predictions for the neutrino signals, which can help probe the acceleration of cosmic rays in AGNs.

Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Kalashev, Oleg [Institute for Nuclear Research, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Beacom, John F. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2011-04-10

217

COMPUTER GRAPHICS TO SEPARATE neutron from gamma-ray spectra, applied to the measurement of neutron attenuation coefficients using an NE213 scintillator  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach is described in the use of NE-213 detectors to perform neutron spectra measurements, which have been developed jointly by the U.S. Naval Academy and the Naval Surface Weapons Center. The approach is based on collecting a three-dimensional matrix of neutron and gamma-ray data. The dimensional plots of the collected data, which are computer generated, are used to

M. E. Nelson; D. A. Miller; G. Riel; T. D. Strickler; P. F. Wiggins

1985-01-01

218

Ultraviolet and infrared absorption spectra of Cr2O3 doped-sodium metaphosphate, lead metaphosphate and zinc metaphosphate glasses and effects of gamma irradiation: a comparative study.  

PubMed

The effects of gamma irradiation on spectral properties of Cr2O3-doped phosphate glasses of three varieties, namely sodium metaphosphate, lead metaphosphate and zinc metaphosphate have been investigated. Optical spectra of the undoped samples reveal strong UV absorption bands which are attributed to the presence of trace iron impurities in both the sodium and zinc phosphate glasses while the lead phosphate glass exhibits broad UV near visible bands due to combined absorption of both trace iron impurities and divalent lead ions. The effect of chromium oxide content has been investigated. The three different Cr2O3-doped phosphate glasses reveal spectral visible bands varying in their position and intensity and splitting due to the different field strengths of the Na(+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+) cations, together with the way they are housed in the network and their effects on the polarisability of neighboring oxygens ligands. The effects of gamma irradiation on the optical spectral properties of the various glasses have been compared. The different effects for lead and zinc phosphate are related to the ability of Pb(2+), and Zn(2+) to form additional structural units causing stability of the network towards gamma irradiation. Also, the introduction of the transition metal chromium ions reveals some shielding behavior towards irradiation. Infrared absorption spectra of the three different base phosphate glasses show characteristic vibrations due to various phosphate groups depending on the type of glass and Cr2O3 is observed to slightly affect the IR spectra. Gamma irradiation causes minor variations in some of the intensities of the IR spectra but the main characteristic bands due to phosphate groups remain in their number and position. PMID:23816486

Marzouk, M A; ElBatal, F H; Abdelghany, A M

2013-10-01

219

Ultraviolet and infrared absorption spectra of Cr2O3 doped - Sodium metaphosphate, lead metaphosphate and zinc metaphosphate glasses and effects of gamma irradiation: A comparative study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of gamma irradiation on spectral properties of Cr2O3-doped phosphate glasses of three varieties, namely sodium metaphosphate, lead metaphosphate and zinc metaphosphate have been investigated. Optical spectra of the undoped samples reveal strong UV absorption bands which are attributed to the presence of trace iron impurities in both the sodium and zinc phosphate glasses while the lead phosphate glass exhibits broad UV near visible bands due to combined absorption of both trace iron impurities and divalent lead ions. The effect of chromium oxide content has been investigated. The three different Cr2O3-doped phosphate glasses reveal spectral visible bands varying in their position and intensity and splitting due to the different field strengths of the Na+, Pb2+, Zn2+ cations, together with the way they are housed in the network and their effects on the polarisability of neighboring oxygens ligands. The effects of gamma irradiation on the optical spectral properties of the various glasses have been compared. The different effects for lead and zinc phosphate are related to the ability of Pb2+, and Zn2+ to form additional structural units causing stability of the network towards gamma irradiation. Also, the introduction of the transition metal chromium ions reveals some shielding behavior towards irradiation. Infrared absorption spectra of the three different base phosphate glasses show characteristic vibrations due to various phosphate groups depending on the type of glass and Cr2O3 is observed to slightly affect the IR spectra. Gamma irradiation causes minor variations in some of the intensities of the IR spectra but the main characteristic bands due to phosphate groups remain in their number and position.

Marzouk, M. A.; ElBatal, F. H.; Abdelghany, A. M.

2013-10-01

220

Gamma-ray spectrometry method used for radioactive waste drums characterization for final disposal at National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste--Baita, Romania.  

PubMed

The Radioactive Waste Management Department from IFIN-HH, Bucharest, performs the conditioning of the institutional radioactive waste in concrete matrix, in 200 l drums with concrete shield, for final disposal at DNDR - Baita, Bihor county, in an old exhausted uranium mine. This paper presents a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the characterization of the radioactive waste drums' radionuclides content, for final disposal. In order to study the accuracy of the method, a similar concrete matrix with Portland cement in a 200 l drum was used. PMID:24331854

Done, L; Tugulan, L C; Dragolici, F; Alexandru, C

2014-05-01

221

Derivation of a Relation for the Steepening of TeV Selected Blazar Gamma-Ray Spectra with Energy and Redshift  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We derive a relation for the steepening of blazar gamma-ray spectra between the multi-GeV Fermi energy range and the TeV energy range observed by atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes. The change in spectral index is produced by two effects: (1) an intrinsic steepening, independent of redshift, owing to the properties of emission and absorption in the source, and (2) a redshift-dependent steepening produced by intergalactic pair production interactions of blazar gamma-rays with low energy photons of the "intergalactic background light" (IBL). Given this relation, with good enough data on the mean gamma-ray SED of TeV Selected BL Lacs, the redshift evolution of the IBL can, in principle, be determined independently of stellar evolution models. We apply our relation to the results of new Fermi observations of TeV selected blazars.

Stecker, F.

2010-01-01

222

Determination of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in plasma and urine by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/positive ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

A new method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in plasma and urine samples is described. It involves the conversion of GHB to gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), its subsequent headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME), and detection by gas chromatography/positive ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC/PICI-MS), using D(6)-GBL as internal standard. The assay is linear over a plasma GHB range of 1-100 microg/mL (n = 5, r = 0.999) and a urine GHB range of 5-150 microg/mL (n = 5, r = 0. 998). Relative intra- and inter-assay standard deviations, determined for plasma and urine samples at 5 and 50 microg/mL, are all below 5%. The method is simple, specific and reasonably fast. It may be applied for clinical and forensic toxicology as well as for purposes of therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:11114057

Frison, G; Tedeschi, L; Maietti, S; Ferrara, S D

2000-01-01

223

Cyclodextrin--piroxicam inclusion complexes: analyses by mass spectrometry and molecular modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mass spectrometry has been used to investigate the natures of non-covalent complexes formed between the anti-inflammatory drug piroxicam and [alpha]-, [beta]- and [gamma]-cyclodextrins. Energies of these complexes have been calculated by means of molecular modelling. There is a correlation between peak intensities in the mass spectra and the calculated energies.

Gallagher, Richard T.; Ball, Christopher P.; Gatehouse, Deborah R.; Gates, Paul J.; Lobell, Mario; Derrick, Peter J.

1997-11-01

224

On background radiation gradients--the use of airborne surveys when searching for orphan sources using mobile gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

Systematic background radiation variations can lead to both false positives and failures to detect an orphan source when searching using car-borne mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. The stochastic variation at each point is well described by Poisson statistics, but when moving in a background radiation gradient the mean count rate will continually change, leading to inaccurate background estimations. Airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) surveys conducted on the national level, usually in connection to mineral exploration, exist in many countries. These data hold information about the background radiation gradients which could be used at the ground level. This article describes a method that aims to incorporate the systematic as well as stochastic variations of the background radiation. We introduce a weighted moving average where the weights are calculated from existing AGS data, supplied by the Geological Survey of Sweden. To test the method we chose an area with strong background gradients, especially in the thorium component. Within the area we identified two roads which pass through the high-variability locations. The proposed method is compared with an unweighted moving average. The results show that the weighting reduces the excess false positives in the positive background gradients without introducing an excess of failures to detect a source during passage in negative gradients. PMID:24321866

Kock, Peder; Rääf, Christopher; Samuelsson, Christer

2014-02-01

225

Measurement of Radionuclides and Gamma-Ray Dose Rate in Soil and Transfer of Radionuclides from Soil to Vegetation, Vegetable of Some Northern Area of Pakistan Using ?-Ray Spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of gamma emitters natural radionuclides, i.e., 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K, has been carried out in soil, vegetation, vegetable, and water samples collected from some Northern area of Pakistan, using\\u000a gamma-ray spectrometry. The ?-ray spectrometry was carried out using high-purity Germanium detector coupled with a computer-based\\u000a high-resolution multi-channel analyzer. The activity concentrations in soil ranges from 24.7 to 78.5 Bq?kg?1,

Hasan M. Khan; M. Ismail; Khalid Khan; Perveen Akhter

2011-01-01

226

Empirical classification of VLT/Giraffe stellar spectra in the wavelength range 6440-6810 A in the gamma Vel cluster, and calibration of spectral indices  

E-print Network

We study spectral diagnostics available from optical spectra with R=17000 obtained with the VLT/Giraffe HR15n setup, using observations from the Gaia-ESO Survey, on the gamma Vel young cluster, in order to determine the fundamental parameters of these stars. We define a set of spectroscopic indices, sampling TiO bands, H-alpha core and wings, and many temperature- and gravity-sensitive lines. Combined indices tau (gamma) are also defined as Teff (log g) indicators over a wide spectral-type range. H-alpha emission-line indices are also chromospheric activity or accretion indicators. A metallicity-sensitive index is also defined. These indices enable us to find a clear difference between gravities of main-sequence and pre-main-sequence stars (as well as giant stars): the (gamma,tau) diagram is thus argued to be a promising distance-independent age measurement tool for young clusters. Our indices were quantitatively calibrated by means of photometry and literature reference spectra (from UVES-POP and ELODIE 3.1 ...

Damiani, F; Micela, G; Randich, S; Gilmore, G; Drew, J E; Jeffries, R D; Frémat, Y; Alfaro, E J; Bensby, T; Bragaglia, A; Flaccomio, E; Lanzafame, A C; Pancino, E; Recio-Blanco, A; Sacco, G G; Smiljanic, R; Jackson, R J; de Laverny, P; Morbidelli, L; Worley, C C; Hourihane, A; Costado, M T; Jofré, P; Lind, K; Maiorca, E

2014-01-01

227

Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Identification of Yeasts Is Contingent on Robust Reference Spectra  

PubMed Central

Background Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for yeast identification is limited by the requirement for protein extraction and for robust reference spectra across yeast species in databases. We evaluated its ability to identify a range of yeasts in comparison with phenotypic methods. Methods MALDI-TOF MS was performed on 30 reference and 167 clinical isolates followed by prospective examination of 67 clinical strains in parallel with biochemical testing (total n?=?264). Discordant/unreliable identifications were resolved by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rRNA gene cluster. Principal Findings Twenty (67%; 16 species), and 24 (80%) of 30 reference strains were identified to species, (spectral score ?2.0) and genus (score ?1.70)-level, respectively. Of clinical isolates, 140/167 (84%) strains were correctly identified with scores of ?2.0 and 160/167 (96%) with scores of ?1.70; amongst Candida spp. (n?=?148), correct species assignment at scores of ?2.0, and ?1.70 was obtained for 86% and 96% isolates, respectively (vs. 76.4% by biochemical methods). Prospectively, species-level identification was achieved for 79% of isolates, whilst 91% and 94% of strains yielded scores of ?1.90 and ?1.70, respectively (100% isolates identified by biochemical methods). All test scores of 1.70–1.90 provided correct species assignment despite being identified to “genus-level”. MALDI-TOF MS identified uncommon Candida spp., differentiated Candida parapsilosis from C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis and distinguished between C. glabrata, C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis. Yeasts with scores of <1.70 were rare species such as C. nivariensis (3/10 strains) and C. bracarensis (n?=?1) but included 4/12 Cryptococcus neoformans. There were no misidentifications. Four novel species-specific spectra were obtained. Protein extraction was essential for reliable results. Conclusions MALDI-TOF MS enabled rapid, reliable identification of clinically-important yeasts. The addition of spectra to databases and reduction in identification scores required for species-level identification may improve its utility. PMID:22022438

Pinto, Angie; Halliday, Catriona; Zahra, Melissa; van Hal, Sebastian; Olma, Tom; Maszewska, Krystyna; Iredell, Jonathan R.; Meyer, Wieland; Chen, Sharon C.-A.

2011-01-01

228

Gamma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Geometric Algorithms for Modeling, Motion, and Animation (GAMMA) research group is part of the Department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina. Some of the topics of research include haptics, "robot motion planning," collision detection, and "real-time interaction with virtual environments." There are several projects that are described in detail for each of the main areas of investigation. Many recent papers are offered that describe the progress and findings of the group's research. Additionally, there is a large collection of videos demonstrating computer animation, simulation, and interactive applications. Some software can also be downloaded for the GAMMA Web site; however, access to a few of the titles must first be approved by the system administrator.

229

Ion suppression effects in liquid chromatography–electrospray-ionisation transport-region collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry with different serum extraction methods for systematic toxicological analysis with mass spectra libraries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ion suppression effects during electrospray-ionsation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) caused by different sample preparation procedures for serum were investigated. This topic is of importance for systematic toxicological analysis for which LC–ESI-MS has been developed with transport-region collision-induced dissociation (ECI-CID) and mass spectra library searching. With continuous postcolumn infusion of two test compounds—codeine and glafenine—the ion suppression effects of extracted biological matrix

Claudia Müller; Patrick Schäfer; Mylène Störtzel; Susanne Vogt; Wolfgang Weinmann

2002-01-01

230

Determination of attenuation coefficient for self-absorption correction in routine gamma ray spectrometry of environmental bulk sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple method to determine -ray attenuation coefficients using Ba-133 -rays has been developed and applied to self-absorption correction in routine -ray spectrometry for environmental samples composed of unknown matrix elements. Experimental values of the mass attenuation coefficient obtained by the method agree well with calculated values for samples of known elemental composition which was determined by means of chemical

K. Satoh; N. Ohashi; H. Higuchi; M. Noguchi

1984-01-01

231

Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Resonances in 234,236,238U Measured Using the Dance Detector at Lansce  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An accurate knowledge of the radiative strength function and level density is needed to calculate of neutron-capture cross sections. An additional constraint on these quantities is provided by measurements of ?-ray emission spectra following capture. We present ?-emission spectra from several neutron resonances in 234,236,238U, measured using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. The measurements are compared to preliminary calculations of the cascade. It is observed that the generalized Lorentzian form of the E1 strength function cannot reproduce the shape of the emission spectra, but a better description is made by adding low-lying M1 Lorentzian strength.

Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

2013-03-01

232

Systematic Measurements of keV-NEUTRON Capture Cross Sections and Capture Gamma-Ray Spectra of pd Isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The capture cross sections and capture ?-ray spectra of 104,105Pd were measured in the neutron energy region of 15-100 keV as a part of systematic series of measurements. A neutron time-of-flight method was adopted, using a ns pulsed neutron source via the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction. The capture ?-rays from the samples were measured with an anti-Compton NaI(Tl) spectrometer. The capture yields were obtained by applying a pulse-height weighting technique to the net capture ?-ray pulse-height spectra. The capture cross sections of 104,105Pd were derived with errors less than 5%, using the standard capture cross sections of 197Au. The capture ?-ray spectra of 104,105Pd were also derived by un-folding the respective observed capture ?-ray pulse-height spectra.

Terada, K.; Igashira, M.; Matsuhashi, T.; Katabuchi, T.; Anh, T. T.

2013-03-01

233

COMPUTATION OF EARLY-TIME FISSION PRODUCT DOSE-RATE SPECTRA AND GAMMA-RAY AIR ATTENUATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the basis of photon spectra measurement for shorttime irradiations of ; U\\/sup 235, fission-product dose-rate spectra are computed for 1.7 to 1550 seconds ; after fission. Airattenuation curves that would result from point-isotropic ; sources having such spectral distributions are then coinputed. The fact that the ; attenuation curves are nearly straight lines when plotted against distance from ;

C. F. Ksanda; E. Lauments

1959-01-01

234

Nondestructive and quantitative characterization of TRU and LLW mixed-waste using active and passive gamma-ray spectrometry and computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

The technology being proposed by LLNL is an Active and Passive Computed Tomography (A P CT) Drum Scanner for contact-handled (CH) wastes. It combines the advantages offered by two well-developed nondestructive assay technologies: gamma-ray spectrometry and computed tomography (CT). Coupled together, these two technologies offer to nondestructively and quantitatively characterize mixed- wastes forms. Gamma-ray spectroscopy uses one or more external radiation detectors to passively and nondestructively measure the energy spectrum emitted from a closed container. From the resulting spectrum one can identify most radioactivities detected, be they transuranic isotopes, mixed-fission products, activation products or environmental radioactivities. Spectral libraries exist at LLNL for all four. Active (A) or transmission CT is a well-developed, nondestructive medical and industrial technique that uses an external-radiation beam to map regions of varying attenuation within a container. Passive (P) or emission CT is a technique mainly developed for medical application, e.g., single-photon emission CT. Nondestructive industrial uses of PCT are under development and just coming into use. This report discuses work on the A P CT Drum Scanner at LLNL.

Camp, D.C.; Martz, H.E.

1991-11-12

235

Measurements of keV-NEUTRON Capture Cross Section and Gamma-Ray Spectra of 142Nd  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The neutron capture cross section and capture ?-ray spectra of 142Nd in the neutron energy ranges from 15 to 95 keV, and around 550 keV have been measured by the time-of-flight method. Capture ?-rays were detected with an anti-Compton NaI(Tl) spectrometer, and the pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the neutron capture cross section. The capture ?-ray spectra were obtained by unfolding the detector pulse-height spectra with the detector response matrix. The results were compared with previous measurements and cross section data in the evaluated nuclear data libraries, JENDL-4.0 and ENDF/B-VII.0.

Katabuchi, T.; Igashira, M.; Tajika, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kamada, S.; Terada, K.

2013-03-01

236

Standard test method for nondestructive analysis of special nuclear materials in homogeneous solutions by Gamma-Ray spectrometry  

E-print Network

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the concentration of gamma-ray emitting special nuclear materials dissolved in homogeneous solutions. The test method corrects for gamma-ray attenuation by the solution and its container by measurement of the transmission of a beam of gamma rays from an external source (Refs. (1), (2), and (3)). 1.2 Two solution geometries, slab and cylinder, are considered. The solution container that determines the geometry may be either a removable or a fixed geometry container. This test method is limited to solution containers having walls or a top and bottom of equal transmission through which the gamma rays from the external transmission correction source must pass. 1.3 This test method is typically applied to radionuclide concentrations ranging from a few milligrams per litre to several hundred grams per litre. The assay range will be a function of the specific activity of the nuclide of interest, the physical characteristics of the solution container, counting equip...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01

237

Broad-band X-ray/gamma-ray spectra and binary parameters of GX 339-4 and their astrophysical implications  

E-print Network

We present X-ray/gamma-ray spectra of the binary GX 339-4 observed in the hard state simultaneously by Ginga and CGRO OSSE during an outburst in 1991 September. The Ginga spectra are well represented by a power law with a photon spectral index of 1.75 and a moderately-strong Compton reflection component with a fluorescent Fe K alpha line. The OSSE data require a sharp high-energy cutoff in the power-law spectrum. The broad-band spectra are very well modelled by repeated Compton scattering in a thermal plasma with tau=1 and kT=50 keV. We also find the distance to the system to be > 3 kpc, ruling out earlier determinations of 1.3 kpc. Using this limit, the observed reddening and the orbital period, we find the allowed range of the mass of the primary is consistent with it being a black hole. The data are inconsistent with models of either homogenous or patchy coronae above the surface of an accretion disc. Rather, they are consistent with the presence of a hot inner hot disc accreting at a rate close to the maximum set by advection and surrounded by a cold outer disc. The seed photons for Comptonization are supplied by the outer cold disc and/or cold clouds within the hot disc. Pair production is negligible if electrons are thermal. The hot disc model, which scaled parameters are independent of the black-hole mass, is supported by the similarity of the spectrum of GX 339-4 to those of other black-hole binaries and Seyfert 1s. On the other hand, their spectra in the soft gamma-ray regime are significantly harder than those of weakly-magnetized neutron stars. Based on this difference, we propose that the presence of broad-band spectra corresponding to thermal Comptonization with kT of 50 keV or more represents a black-hole signature.

Andrzej A. Zdziarski; Juri Poutanen; Joanna Mikolajewska; Marek Gierlinski; Ken Ebisawa; W. Neil Johnson

1998-07-29

238

Development of a neural network approach to characterise (226)Ra contamination at legacy sites using gamma-ray spectra taken from boreholes.  

PubMed

There are a large number of sites across the UK and the rest of the world that are known to be contaminated with (226)Ra owing to historical industrial and military activities. At some sites, where there is a realistic risk of contact with the general public there is a demand for proficient risk assessments to be undertaken. One of the governing factors that influence such assessments is the geometric nature of contamination particularly if hazardous high activity point sources are present. Often this type of radioactive particle is encountered at depths beyond the capabilities of surface gamma-ray techniques and so intrusive borehole methods provide a more suitable approach. However, reliable spectral processing methods to investigate the properties of the waste for this type of measurement have yet to be developed since a number of issues must first be confronted including: representative calibration spectra, variations in background activity and counting uncertainty. Here a novel method is proposed to tackle this issue based upon the interrogation of characteristic Monte Carlo calibration spectra using a combination of Principal Component Analysis and Artificial Neural Networks. The technique demonstrated that it could reliably distinguish spectra that contained contributions from point sources from those of background or dissociated contamination (homogenously distributed). The potential of the method was demonstrated by interpretation of borehole spectra collected at the Dalgety Bay headland, Fife, Scotland. Predictions concurred with intrusive surveys despite the realisation of relatively large uncertainties on activity and depth estimates. To reduce this uncertainty, a larger background sample and better spatial coverage of cores were required, alongside a higher volume better resolution detector. PMID:25461525

Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul

2015-02-01

239

Mass Spectra Alignments and their Significance  

E-print Network

¨ocker, Kaltenbach Mass Spectra Alignments CPM 2005 #12;Overview Mass Spectrometry in Proteomics Protein Alignments CPM 2005 #12;Overview Mass Spectrometry in Proteomics Protein Identification via MS Alignment Mass Spectrometry in Proteomics Protein Identification via MS Alignment of Spectra Score Significance

Lonardi, Stefano

240

Intercomparison of methods for coincidence summing corrections in gamma-ray spectrometry--part II (volume sources).  

PubMed

The second part of an intercomparison of the coincidence summing correction methods is presented. This exercise concerned three volume sources, filled with liquid radioactive solution. The same experimental spectra, decay scheme and photon emission intensities were used by all the participants. The results were expressed as coincidence summing corrective factors for several energies of (152)Eu and (134)Cs, and different source-to-detector distances. They are presented and discussed. PMID:22445105

Lépy, M-C; Altzitzoglou, T; Anagnostakis, M J; Capogni, M; Ceccatelli, A; De Felice, P; Djurasevic, M; Dryak, P; Fazio, A; Ferreux, L; Giampaoli, A; Han, J B; Hurtado, S; Kandic, A; Kanisch, G; Karfopoulos, K L; Klemola, S; Kovar, P; Laubenstein, M; Lee, J H; Lee, J M; Lee, K B; Pierre, S; Carvalhal, G; Sima, O; Tao, Chau Van; Thanh, Tran Thien; Vidmar, T; Vukanac, I; Yang, M J

2012-09-01

241

Photon acceleration in variable ultra-relativistic outflows and high-energy spectra of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

MeV seed photons produced in shocks in a variable ultra-relativistic outflow gain energy by the Fermi mechanism, because the photons Compton scatter off relativistically colliding shells. The Fermi-modified high-energy photon spectrum has a non-universal slope and a universal cutoff. A significant increase in the total radiative efficiency is possible. In some gamma ray bursts, most of the power might be emitted at the high-energy cutoff for this mechanism, which would be close to 100 MeV for outflows with a mean bulk Lorentz factor of 100.

Andrei Gruzinov; Peter Meszaros

2000-04-25

242

Determination of the natural radioactivity levels in north west of Dukhan, Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

This study is aimed at the determination of the activity concentrations of naturally occuring and technologically enhanced levels of radiation in 34 representative soil samples that have been collected from an inshore oil field area which was found to have, in a previous study, the highest observed value of 226Ra concentration among 129 soil samples. The activity concentrations of 238U and 226Ra have been inferred from gamma-ray transitions associated with their decay progenies and measured using a hyper-pure germanium detector. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented, together with the values of the activity concentrations associated with the naturally occuring radionuclide chains for all the samples collected from NW Dukhan. Discrete-line, gamma-ray energy transitions from spectral lines ranging in energy from ?100 keV up to 2.6 MeV have been associated with characteristic decays of the various decay products within the 235.8U and 232Th radioactive decay chains. These data have been analyzed, under the assumption of secular equilibrium for the U and Th decay chains. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented. The weighted mean value of the activity concentrations of 226Ra in one of the samples was found to be around a factor of 2 higher than the values obtained in the previous study and approximately a factor of 10 higher than the accepted worldwide average value of 35 Bq/kg. The weighted mean values of the activity concentrations of 232Th and 40K were also deduced and found to be within the worldwide average values of 30 and 400 Bq/kg, respectively. Our previous study reported a value of 201.9±1.5Stat.±13Syst.Bq/kg for 226Ra in one sample and further investigation in the current work determined a measured value for 226Ra of 342.00±1.9Stat.±25Syst.Bq/kg in a sample taken from the same locality. This is significantly higher than all the other investigated soil samples in the current and previous works. Notably, the Th levels in the same sample are within the worldwide average expectations, implying that the increased 226Ra concentration arises from TENORM processes. PMID:22244196

Al-Sulaiti, Huda; Nasir, Tabassum; Al Mugren, K S; Alkhomashi, N; Al-Dahan, N; Al-Dosari, M; Bradley, D A; Bukhari, S; Matthews, M; Regan, P H; Santawamaitre, T; Malain, D; Habib, A

2012-07-01

243

Measurement of the 238U neutron-capture cross section and gamma-emission spectra from 10 eV to 100 keV using the DANCE detector at LANSCE  

SciTech Connect

A careful new measurement of the {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}) cross section from 10 eV to 100 keV has been made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. DANCE is a 4{pi} calorimetric scintillator array consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} crystals. Measurements were made on a 48 mg/cm{sup 2} depleted uranium target. The cross sections are in general good agreement with previous measurements. The gamma-ray emission spectra, as a function of gamma multiplicity, were also measured and compared to model calculations.

Ullmann, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, A J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keksis, A L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vieira, D J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jandel, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haight, R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rundberg, R S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kawano, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chyzh, A [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Baramsai, B [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Wu, C Y [LLNL; Mitchell, G E [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Becker, J A [LLNL; Krticka, M [CHARLES UNIV

2010-01-01

244

Rapid determination of radon daughters and of artificial radionuclides in air by online gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

For the determination of airborne radionuclide concentrations in real time, a fixed filter device was constructed which fits directly onto a germanium detector with standard nuclear electronics and a multichannel analyzer buffer connected via a data line to a personal computer for remote control and on-line spectrum evaluation. The on-line gamma-ray spectrometer was applied to the study of radon decay product concentrations in ground-level air and to the rapid detection of any contamination of the environmental air by artificial radionuclides. At Munich-Neuherberg, depending on the meterological conditions, the measured air concentrations of 214Pb, the first gamma-ray-emitting member of the 222Rn decay series, varied from about 1 to 50 Bq m-3. For the artificial radionuclides 60Co, 131I and 137Cs the detection limits were determined as a function of the varying natural radon daughter concentrations at sampling and counting times of 1 h or 1 day. For these radionuclides minimum detectable air activity concentrations of 0.3 or 0.001 Bq m-3, respectively, were obtained at low radon daughter levels. At high radon daughter levels the respective detection limits were found to be higher by a factor of only about 2. PMID:8393198

Hötzl, H; Winkler, R

1993-01-01

245

Gamma-induced absorption spectra as a new method for RE-ion environment study in fluorophosphate glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Doped fluorophosphate glasses based on pseudo-binary system: barium metaphosphate Ba(PO 3) 2- usovite MgCaSrBaAl 2F 14, are studied by means of fluorescence, induced ESR and optical absorption spectra. Doping the glass, containing 5 and 7 mol% Ba(PO 3) 2 with TbF 3 and EuF 3 results in drastic changes of color and paramagnetic center numbers correspondingly. Post-irradiation process results in separation of the spectra analyzed into groups in dependence of Tb 3+ ion concentration. The crucial concentration, dividing two concentration ranges is not more than 0.02 mol%. It is supposed that the local environment of Tb 3+ ion doped up to concentration mentioned is preferably phosphate. Estimates of Eu 3+ ion concentration that have preferably phosphate groupings in their environment result from concentration dependence of PO42- centers and produce the value of approximately 0.01 mol%. Close values of two crucial concentrations is interpreted in terms of doped ion segregation model.

Bocharova, T. V.; Karapetyan, G. O.; Mironov, A. M.; Khalilev, V. D.; Tagil'tseva, N. O.

2006-08-01

246

The average X-ray/gamma-ray spectra of Seyfert galaxies from Ginga and OSSE and the origin of the cosmic X-ray background  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have obtained the first average 2-500 keV spectra of Seyfert galaxies, using the data from Ginga and Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory's (CGRO) Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE). Our sample contains three classes of objects with markedly different spectra: radio-quiet Seyfert 1's and 2's, and radio-loud Seyfert 1's. The average radio-quiet Seyfert 1 spectrum is well-fitted by a power law continuum with the energy spectral index alpha approximately equals 0.9, a Compton reflection component corresponding to a approximately 2 pi covering solid angle, and ionized absorption. There is a high-energy cutoff in the incident power law continuum: the e-folding energy is E(sub c) approximately equals 0.6(sup +0.8 sub -0.3) MeV. The simplest model that describes this spectrum is Comptonization in a relativistic optically-thin thermal corona above the surface of an accretion disk. Radio-quiet Seyfert 2's show strong netural absorption, and there is an indication that their X-ray power laws are intrinsically harder. Finally, the radio-loud Seyfert spectrum has alpha approximately equals 0.7, moderate neutral absorption E(sub C) = 0.4(sup +0.7 sub -0.2) MeV, and no or little Compton reflection. This is incompatible with the radio-quiet Seyfert 1 spectrum, and probably indicating that the X-rays are beamed away from the accretion disk in these objects. The average spectra of Seyferts integrated over redshift with a power-law evolution can explain the hard X-ray spectrum of the cosmic background.

Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Johnson, W. Neil; Done, Chris; Smith, David; Mcnaron-Brown, Kellie

1995-01-01

247

The use of the bulk properties of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra for the study of cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of bulk spectral properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is important to understanding the physics behind these powerful explosions and may even be an aide in studying cosmology. The prompt emission spectral properties have long been studied by a growing community of researchers, and many theories have been developed since the discovery of GRBs. Even though the exact physics of these phenomena is not completely understood, GRBs have been proposed to give insight on other astrophysical phenomena from dark matter to the expansion of the universe. Obviously, using GRBs to study cosmology requires a large sample size to adequately constrain results and provide confident conjectures. For this reason, BATSE and GBM results are paramount to the study of the prompt emission of GRBs. Using results from both instruments, I study the bulk spectral properties of GRBs and describe analysis techniques that can be used to study cosmology.

Goldstein, Adam

248

Size Effect on Nuclear Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra Acquired by Different Sized CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Gamma-Ray Detectors  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray energy spectra were acquired for different sizes of cerium tribromide (CeBr3), cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), and thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) detectors. A comparison was conducted of the energy resolution and detection efficiency of these scintillator detectors for different sizes of detectors. The results of this study are consistent with the observation that for each size detector, LaBr3:Ce offers better resolution than either a CeBr3 or NaI:Tl detector of the same size. In addition, CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks in the spectra of several radioisotopes that NaI:Tl could not. As the detector size increased, all three detector materials exhibited higher efficiency, albeit with slightly reduced resolution. Significantly, the very low intrinsic activity of CeBr3 is also demonstrated in this study, which, when combined with energy resolution characteristics for a range of detector sizes, could lead to an improved ability to detect special nuclear materials compared to the other detectors.

Guss, Paul [NSTec; Reed, Michael [NSTec; Yuan, Ding [NSTec; Beller, Denis [UNLV; Cutler, Matthew [UNLV; Contreras, Chris [UNLV; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy [NSTec; Wilde, Scott UNLV

2014-03-01

249

The use of MCNP and gamma spectrometry in supporting the evaluation of NORM in Libyan oil pipeline scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The accumulation of scales in production pipes is a common problem in the oil industry, reducing fluid flow and also leading to costly remedies and disposal issues. Typical materials found in such scale are sulphates and carbonates of calcium and barium, or iron sulphide. Radium arising from the uranium/thorium present in oil-bearing rock formations may replace the barium or calcium in these salts to form radium salts. This creates what is known as technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM or simply NORM). NORM is a serious environmental and health and safety issue arising from commercial oil and gas extraction operations. Whilst a good deal has been published on the characterisation and measurement of radioactive scales from offshore oil production, little information has been published regarding NORM associated with land-based facilities such as that of the Libyan oil industry. The ongoing investigation described in this paper concerns an assessment of NORM from a number of land based Libyan oil fields. A total of 27 pipe scale samples were collected from eight oil fields, from different locations in Libya. The dose rates, measured using a handheld survey meter positioned on sample surfaces, ranged from 0.1-27.3 ?Sv h -1. In the initial evaluations of the sample activity, use is being made of a portable HPGe based spectrometry system. To comply with the prevailing safety regulations of the University of Surrey, the samples are being counted in their original form, creating a need for correction of non-homogeneous sample geometries. To derive a detection efficiency based on the actual sample geometries, a technique has been developed using a Monte Carlo particle transport code (MCNPX). A preliminary activity determination has been performed using an HPGe portable detector system.

Habib, Ahmed S.; Bradley, D. A.; Regan, P. H.; Shutt, A. L.

2010-07-01

250

Open Mass Spectrometry Search Algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large numbers of MS\\/MS peptide spectra generated in proteomics experiments require efficient, sensitive and specific algorithms for peptide identification. In the Open Mass Spectrometry Search Algorithm [OMSSA], specificity is calculated by a classic probability score using an explicit model for matching experimental spectra to sequences. At default thresholds, OMSSA matches more spectra from a standard protein cocktail than a comparable

Lewis Y. Geer; Sanford P. Markey; Jeffrey A. Kowalak; Lukas Wagner; Ming Xu; Dawn M. Maynard; Xiaoyu Yang; Wenyao Shi; Stephen H. Bryant

2004-01-01

251

Performance of FBK high-density SiPMs in scintillation spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this work is to provide the characteristics of two samples of Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) high-density SiPMs with an active area of 2.2 × 2.2 mm2 (15 × 15 ?m2 single cell size) and 4 × 4 mm2 (30 × 30 ?m2 single cell size) in gamma-ray spectrometry with LSO and CsI:Tl scintillators. The measurements presented in this work covered: measurements of spectra with low number of detected photons (one to a few fired APD cells), characteristics of the breakdown voltage versus temperature, verification of the excess noise factor, selection of the optimum operating voltage for energy resolution, verification of the linearity of the SiPM response for both used scintillators, verification of the number of fired APD cells and gamma-ray spectrometry for a wide range of X and gamma ray energies from 22.1 to 1408 keV.

Grodzicka, M.; Moszy?ski, M.; Szcz??niak, T.; Ferri, A.; Piemonte, C.; Szaw?owski, M.; Gola, A.; Grodzicki, K.; Tarolli, A.

2014-08-01

252

Evaluating airborne and ground based gamma spectrometry methods for detecting particulate radioactivity in the environment: a case study of Irish Sea beaches.  

PubMed

In several places, programmes are in place to locate and recover radioactive particles that have the potential to cause detrimental health effects in any member of the public who may encounter them. A model has been developed to evaluate the use of mobile gamma spectrometry systems within such programmes, with particular emphasis on large volume (16l) NaI(Tl) detectors mounted in low flying helicopters. This model uses a validated Monte Carlo code with assessment of local geochemistry and natural and anthropogenic background radiation concentrations and distributions. The results of the model, applied to the example of particles recovered from beaches in the vicinity of Sellafield, clearly show the ability of rapid airborne surveys conducted at 75 m ground clearance and 120 kph speeds to demonstrate the absence of sources greater than 5 MBq (137)Cs within large areas (10-20 km(2)h(-1)), and identify areas requiring further ground based investigation. Lowering ground clearance for airborne surveys to 15m whilst maintaining speeds covering 1-2 km(2) h(-1) can detect buried (137)Cs sources of 0.5MBq or greater activity. A survey design to detect 100 kBq (137)Cs sources at 10 cm depth has also been defined, requiring surveys at <15m ground clearance and <2 ms(-1) ground speed. The response of airborne systems to the Sellafield particles recovered to date has also been simulated, and the proportion of the existing radiocaesium background in the vicinity of the nuclear site has been established. Finally the rates of area coverage and sensitivities of both airborne and ground based approaches are compared, demonstrating the ability of airborne systems to increase the rate of particle recovery in a cost effective manner. The potential for equipment and methodological developments to improve performance are discussed. PMID:22947616

Cresswell, A J; Sanderson, D C W

2012-10-15

253

Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.  

E-print Network

A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

Harper, Thomas Lawrence

1969-01-01

254

Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields  

E-print Network

A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

Harper, Thomas Lawrence

1969-01-01

255

Crystallization of a recombinant form of the complete sequence of human gamma-interferon: characterization by small-angle X-ray scattering, mass spectrometry and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies.  

PubMed

The crystallization conditions of a recombinant form of the complete sequence of human gamma-interferon, designated r-hu IFN-gamma (RU 42369), have been determined after studying the behaviour of this protein in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as a function of pH and salt type. IFN-gamma is difficult to crystallize without truncating at least the last five amino acids of the C-terminus; the SAXS results suggest viable crystallization conditions that led to crystals of r-hu IFN-gamma suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystals were grown in the presence of ammonium sulfate using vapour-diffusion techniques. The crystals, which diffract to 5 A resolution at best, belong to the primitive tetragonal space group P42(1)2 and have unit-cell parameters a = b = 123.4, c = 93.4 A. The protein contained in these crystals was analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), which verified the presence of the complete amino-acid sequence of r-hu IFN-gamma. PMID:11375524

Budayova-Spano, M; Shepard, W; Schoot, B; Astier, J P; Veesler, S

2001-06-01

256

Effects of Fe as a physical filter on spectra of Technitium- 99m, uniformity, system volume sensitivity and spatial resolution of Philip ADAC Forte dual-head gamma camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging inherits some limitations, i.e., due to scattered gamma photons which degrade spatial resolution causes poor image quality. This study attempts to reduce a fraction of scattered gamma photons before reaching gamma camera detector by using Fe sheet (0.35 mm and 0.40 mm) as a physical filter. Also investigate the effects on spectra of Tc-99m, spatial resolution, system volume sensitivity and uniformity. The thickness of Fe physical filter is selected on the basis of percentage attenuation calculations of different gamma ray energies by various thicknesses of material. Data were acquired using Philip ADAC forte dual-head gamma camera without and with physical filter with LEHR collimator installed. For spectra, uniformity and system volume sensitivity, a cylindrical source tank filled with water added with Tc-99m was scanned. Uniformity and system volume sensitivity images were reconstructed with FBP method by applying Butterworth filter of order 5, cut-off frequency 0.35 cycles/cm and Chang's attenuation correction method using 0.13 cm?1 linear attenuation coefficient. Spatial resolution study was done by scanning a line source (0.8 mm inner diameter) of Tc-99m at various source-to-collimator distances in air and in scattering medium without and with physical filter. A substantial reduction in count rate from Compton and photopeak regions of Tc-99m spectra with physical filter is recorded. Improvement in spatial resolution with physical filter up to 4 cm source-to-collimator distance is obtained. System volume sensitivity was reduced and no improvement in uniformity. These thicknesses of physical filter may be tested further by scanning different planar/SPECT phantoms in Tc-99m imaging.

Sohaimi, N.; Abdullah, N.; Shah, S. I.; Zakaria, A.

2014-11-01

257

Purification of pharmaceutical preparations using thin-layer chromatography to obtain mass spectra with Direct Analysis in Real Time and accurate mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Forensic analysis of pharmaceutical preparations requires a comparative analysis with a standard of the suspected drug in order to identify the active ingredient. Purchasing analytical standards can be expensive or unattainable from the drug manufacturers. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART™) is a novel, ambient ionization technique, typically coupled with a JEOL AccuTOF™ (accurate mass) mass spectrometer. While a fast and easy technique to perform, a drawback of using DART™ is the lack of component separation of mixtures prior to ionization. Various in-house pharmaceutical preparations were purified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectra were subsequently obtained using the AccuTOF™- DART™ technique. Utilizing TLC prior to sample introduction provides a simple, low-cost solution to acquiring mass spectra of the purified preparation. Each spectrum was compared against an in-house molecular formula list to confirm the accurate mass elemental compositions. Spectra of purified ingredients of known pharmaceuticals were added to an in-house library for use as comparators for casework samples. Resolving isomers from one another can be accomplished using collision-induced dissociation after ionization. Challenges arose when the pharmaceutical preparation required an optimized TLC solvent to achieve proper separation and purity of the standard. Purified spectra were obtained for 91 preparations and included in an in-house drug standard library. Primary standards would only need to be purchased when pharmaceutical preparations not previously encountered are submitted for comparative analysis. TLC prior to DART™ analysis demonstrates a time efficient and cost saving technique for the forensic drug analysis community. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21548141

Wood, Jessica L; Steiner, Robert R

2011-06-01

258

Formation and reactions of negative ions relevant to chemical ionization mass spectrometry. I. Cl mass spectra of organic compounds produced by F? reactions  

PubMed Central

A systematic study of the negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectra produced by the reaction of F? with a wide variety of organic compounds has been accomplished. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with a modified high pressure ion source was employed for these experiments. The F? reagent ion was generated from CF3H or NF3, typically at an ion source pressure of 100 ?m. In pure NF3, F? is the major ion formed and constitutes more than 90% of the total ion intensity. While F? is also the major primary ion formed in pure CF3H, it undergoes rapid ion-molecule reactions at elevated source pressures, yielding (HF)nF? (n = 1?3) ions, which makes CF3H less suitable as a chemical ionization reagent gas. Among the organic compounds investigated were carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, esters, alcohols, phenols, halides, nitriles, nitrobenzene, ethers, amines and hydrocarbons. An intense (M ? 1)? ion was observed in the F? chemical ionization mass spectra of carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes and phenols. Alcohols yield only (M + F)? ions upon reaction with F?. A weaker (M + F)? ion was also detected in the F? chemical ionization spectra of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones and nitriles. The F? chemical ionization mass spectra of esters, halides, nitriles, nitrobenzene and ethers are characterized primarily by the ions, RCOO?, X?, CN?, NO2?, and OR?, respectively. In addition, esters show a very weak (M ? 1)? ion (except formates). In the F? chemical ionization spectra of some aliphatic alkanes and o-xylene, a very weak (M + F)? ion was observed. Amines and aliphatic alkenes exhibit only insignificant fragment ions under similar conditions, while aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene and toluene are not reactive at all with the F? ion. The mechanisms of the various reactions mentioned are discussed, and several experimental complications are noted. In still other studies, the effects of varying several experimental parameters, including source pressure, relative proportions of the reagent and analyte, and other ion source parameters, on the observed chemical ionization mass spectra were also investigated. In a mixture of NF3 and n-butanol, for example, the ratio of the intensities of the ions characteristic of the alcohol to that of the (HF)nF? ion was found to decrease with increasing sample pressure, with increasing NF3 pressure, and with increasing electron energy. No significant effects on the spectra were observed to result from variation of the source repeller field or the source temperature. The addition of argon to the source as a potential moderator did not alter the F? chemical ionization spectrum significantly, but the use of oxygen appears to inhibit formation of the (HF)nF? cluster ion. The advantages of using F? as a chemical ionization reagent are discussed, and comparisons are made with other reagent ions. PMID:7428746

Tiernan, T. O.; Chang, C.; Cheng, C. C.

1980-01-01

259

Ion Momentum Spectrometry  

E-print Network

Ion Momentum Spectrometry Bhas Bapat Fragmentation of Molecular Ions multi-fold differential cross data acquisition sample spectra Momentum Maps multi-ion-coincidence momentum analysis Issues and Examples Electron-impact DI of methanol Photoionisation of CO2 DI of CCl + 4 Summary Ion Momentum

Bapat, Bhas

260

Ion mobility mass spectrometry for extracting spectra of N-glycans directly from incubation mixtures following glycan release: application to glycans from engineered glycoforms of intact, folded HIV gp120.  

PubMed

The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the ?-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein. PMID:21472575

Harvey, David J; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N; Scarff, Charlotte A; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H

2011-03-01

261

Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the ?-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

2011-03-01

262

Free electron laser-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry facility for obtaining infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra of gaseous ions  

SciTech Connect

A Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer has been installed at a free electron laser (FEL) facility to obtain infrared absorption spectra of gas phase ions by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). The FEL provides continuously tunable infrared radiation over a broad range of the infrared spectrum, and the FT-ICR mass spectrometer, utilizing a 4.7 Tesla superconducting magnet, permits facile formation, isolation, trapping, and high-mass resolution detection of a wide range of ion classes. A description of the instrumentation and experimental parameters for these experiments is presented along with preliminary IRMPD spectra of the singly-charged chromium-bound dimer of diethyl ether (Cr(C{sub 4}H{sub 10}O){sub 2}{sup +}) and the fluorene molecular ion (C{sub 13}H{sub 10}{sup +}). Also presented is a brief comparison of the fluorene cation spectrum obtained by the FT-ICR-FEL with an earlier spectrum recorded using a quadrupole ion trap (QIT)

Valle, Jose J.; Eyler, John R.; Oomens, Jos; Moore, David T.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Helden, Gert von; Meijer, Gerard; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.; Blakney, Gregory T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, P.O. Box 117200, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7200 (United States); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Edisonbaan 14, NL-3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Edisonbaan 14, NL-3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310-4005 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310-4005 (United States)

2005-02-01

263

Iterative method for mass spectra recalibration via empirical estimation of the mass calibration function for Fourier transform mass spectrometry-based petroleomics.  

PubMed

We describe a mass spectra recalibration method, which enables analysis of petroleum samples with Orbitrap FTMS. In this method, the mass calibration function is estimated on the basis of mass-to-charge ratios and abundances of internal calibrants without a need for theoretical description of residual mass errors. Importantly, to maximize the estimation accuracy of the mass calibration function, an iterative approach is implemented to obtain sufficiently high number of internal calibrants covering the entire ranges of mass-to-charge ratios and abundances of interest. For petroleomic samples, the method routinely provides root-mean-square (RMS) mass accuracies at sub-ppm level and hence allows for reliable assignment of elemental compositions. Moreover, since the achieved mass accuracies are normally limited only by random errors of low-abundance analytes, the method maximizes the range of abundances of assignable species for a given signal-to-noise ratio of experimental data. Additionally, despite being initially developed for Orbitrap FTMS, the method is likewise applicable for ion cyclotron resonance FTMS. PMID:23730691

Kozhinov, Anton N; Zhurov, Konstantin O; Tsybin, Yury O

2013-07-01

264

The role of mass spectrometry in medicinal plant research.  

PubMed

In phytochemical and chemotaxonomic research work mass spectrometry plays an outstandingly important role. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) we established the chemotaxa of Tanacetum vulgare L. Chemotypes with essential oils containing 60-90% of artemisia ketone, carveol, dihydrocarvone, myrtenol, umbellulone, terpinen-4-ol, davanone, and Tagetes species containing various essential oils can be clearly distinguished by their spectra; we examined many variations of Tagetes erecta, T. lucida, T. minuta, T. patula and T. tenuifolia. We have identified alpha-beta-pinene-, 1,8-cineol-, linalool-, camphor-, nerol-, geraniol- and gamma-gurjonene as components of Achillea distans L. Injecting the essential oil direct from the oil-secreting organs of T. minuta plants we identified using GC/MS 6-10 and 16% eugenol from the involucral bract and hypsophyll, respectively, as well as beta-ocimene, dihydrotagetone, tagetone, Z- and E-ocimenones. In the course of studies on essential fatty acids Borago officinalis and Lappula squarrosa were selected from 70 species of the family Boraginaceae to obtain seed oil as a source of gamma-linolenic acid, and for the PG synthesis we isolated several grams of gamma-linolenic acid, as well as C18:4, i.e. octadecatetraenic acid, from L. squarrosa on the basis of the mass spectra. From the seed oil of Aquilegia vulgaris C18:3 (5) from the oil of Limnanthes dougloasii C20:1 (5) and from the seed oils of Delphinium consolida and of Tropaeolum species (T. majus, T. minus, T. peregrinum) C20:1 (11) fatty acids were identified on the basis of spectra. PMID:2962668

Héthelyi, E; Tétényi, P; Dabi, E; Dános, B

1987-11-01

265

Toward prompt gamma spectrometry for monitoring boron distributions during extra corporal treatment of liver metastases by boron neutron capture therapy: a Monte Carlo simulation study.  

PubMed

A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of extra corporal liver phantom. The present paper describes the basis for a subsequent clinical application of the prompt gamma spectroscopy set-up aimed at in vivo monitoring of boron distribution. MCNP code was used first to validate the homogeneity in thermal neutron field in the liver phantom and simulate the gamma ray detection system (collimator and detector) in the treatment room. The gamma ray of 478 keV emitted by boron in small specific region can be detected and a mathematical formalism was used for the tomography image reconstruction. PMID:19394243

Khelifi, R; Nievaart, V A; Bode, P; Moss, R L; Krijger, G C

2009-07-01

266

Distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples of Kalpakkam (India) using hyper pure germanium (HPGe) gamma ray spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pre-operational survey at Kalpakkam coast, indicated elevated gamma background radiation levels in the range of 100–4000nGyh?1 over the large tracts of the coastal sands due to the presence of pockets of monazite mineral in beach sands. In view of the prevalence of monazite, a systematic gamma spectrometric study of distribution of natural radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples collected

V Kannan; M. P Rajan; M. A. R Iyengar; R Ramesh

2002-01-01

267

gamma ray astronomy with muons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although gamma ray showers are muon poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard gamma ray spectra there is a relative ``enhancement'' of muons from gamma ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower gamma rays above the

Francis Halzen; Todor Stanev; Gaurang B. Yodh

1997-01-01

268

Multivariate curve resolution of wavelet and Fourier compressed spectra.  

PubMed

The multivariate curve resolution method SIMPLe to use Interactive Self-Modeling Mixture Analysis (SIMPLISMA) was applied to Fourier and wavelet compressed ion-mobility spectra. The spectra obtained from the SIMPLISMA model were transformed back to their original representation, that is, uncompressed format. SIMPULSMA was able to model the same pure variables for the partial wavelet transform, although for the Fourier and complete wavelet transforms, satisfactory pure variables and models were not obtained. Data were acquired from two samples and two different ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) sensors. The first sample was thermally desorbed sodium gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and the second sample was a liquid mixture of dicyclohexylamine (DCHA) and diethylmethylphosphonate (DEMP). The spectra were compressed to 6.3% of their original size. SIMPLISMA was applied to the compressed data in the Fourier and wavelet domains. An alternative method of normalizing SIMPLISMA spectra was devised that removes variation in scale between SIMPLISMA results obtained from uncompressed and compressed data. SIMPLISMA was able to accurately extract the spectral features and concentration profiles directly from daublet compressed IMS data at a compression ratio of 93.7% with root-mean-square errors of reconstruction < 3%. The daublet wavelet filters were selected, because they worked well when compared to coiflet and symmlet. The effects of the daublet filter width and compression ratio were evaluated with respect to reconstruction errors of the data sets and SIMPLISMA spectra. For these experiments, the daublet 14 filter performed well for the two data sets. PMID:11476222

Harrington, P B; Rauch, P J; Cai, C

2001-07-15

269

Distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples of Kalpakkam (India) using hyper pure germanium (HPGe) gamma ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

Pre-operational survey at Kalpakkam coast, indicated elevated gamma background radiation levels in the range of 100-4000 nGy h(-1) over the large tracts of the coastal sands due to the presence of pockets of monazite mineral in beach sands. In view of the prevalence of monazite, a systematic gamma spectrometric study of distribution of natural radionuclides in soil and beach sand samples collected from the terrestrial and coastal environment of Kalpakkam was performed and concentrations of primordial radionuclides such as 238U, 232Th and 40K and anthropogenic radionuclide 137Cs were determined. The concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K in soil samples were 5-71, 15-776 and 200-854 Bq kg(-1) dry, respectively. In beach sand samples, 238U, 232Th and 40K contents varied in the range of 36-258, 352-3872 and 324-405 Bq kg(-1) dry, respectively. The total absorbed gamma dose rate in air due to the presence of 238U, 232Th and 40K in Kalpakkam soil samples varied between 24 and 556 nGy h(-1) with a mean of 103 nGy h(-1). The contribution to the total absorbed gamma dose rate in air in the decreasing order was due to the presence of 232Th (76.4%), followed by 40K (16.9%) and 238U (6.7%) in Kalpakkam soils. However, in beach areas of Kalpakkam, the presence of 232Th in beach sand contributed maximum (94.0%) to the total absorbed gamma dose rate in air followed by 238U (4.7%) and minimum contribution was by 40K (1.3%). 137Cs in Kalpakkam soils ranged from < or = 1.0 to 2.8 Bq kg(-1) dry, which was 1-3 order of magnitude less than the concentration of primordial radionuclides in soil. PMID:12137019

Kannan, V; Rajan, M P; Iyenga, M A R; Ramesh, R

2002-07-01

270

Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

Cotter, Robert J.

1988-01-01

271

Gamma II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

2011-05-01

272

Effect of gamma rays absorbed doses and heat treatment on the optical absorption spectra of silver ion-exchanged silicate glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Samples of a commercial silicate glass have been subjected to ion exchange at 320 °C in a molten mixture of AgNO3 and NaNO3 with molar ratio of 1:99 and 5:95 for 60 min. The ion exchange process was followed by gamma irradiation in the dose range of 1-250 kGy and heating at the temperature of 550 °C for different time periods ranging from 10 to 582 min. The spectral absorption in UV-Vis range of the Ag-Na ion exchanged glass was measured and used to determine the states of silver prevailing in the glass during the ion exchange, the gamma irradiation and the heat treatment. The gamma irradiation induced holes and electrons in the glass structure leading to the creation of a brown colour, and silver ions trapped electrons to form silver atoms. We observed the first stage of aggregation after irradiation, as well as after heating. The silver atoms diffused and then aggregated to form nanoclusters after heating at 550 °C. A characteristic band at about 430 nm was induced. The surface Plasmon absorption of silver nanoclusters in the glass indicated that the nanoclusters radius grew between 0.9 and 1.43 nm with increasing of annealing time from 10 to 242 min and then saturated. We also found that the size of aggregates depends on the value of gamma radiation absorbed dose. Contrary to what was expected, we found that 20 kGy is the optimal absorbed dose corresponding to the larger size of the aggregates which decreases for absorbed doses above 20 kGy.

Farah, Khaled; Hosni, Faouzi; Mejri, Arbi; Boizot, Bruno; Hamzaoui, Ahmed Hichem; Ben Ouada, Hafedh

2014-03-01

273

atomic spectra 1 Atomic Spectra  

E-print Network

Physics, pp. 88-93 (Rutherford nuclear model), 93-106 (atomic structure and electron spectra) 2. D. Watomic spectra 1 Atomic Spectra '96, THK-MRM Object To become familiar with the construction and interpret spin-orbit doublets and triplets in alkali spectra. References 1. Serway, Moses and Moyer: Modern

Glashausser, Charles

274

Assessment of Radionuclides, Trace Metals and Radionuclide Transfer from Soil to Food of Jhangar Valley (Pakistan) Using Gamma-Ray Spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gamma spectrometric analysis of soil and essential foodstuffs, e.g., wheat, millet, potato, lentils and cauliflower, which\\u000a form the main component of the daily diet of the local public, was carried out using high purity germanium (HpGe) detector\\u000a coupled with a computer based high-resolution multi-channel analyzer. The activity concentration in soil samples for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K ranged from 30.0 Bq kg?1

Hasan M. Khan; Zahid S. Chaudhry; Muhammad Ismail; Khalid Khan

2010-01-01

275

Spectra and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma rays from 0.3 to 10 MeV at lambda = 40 deg  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of the spectral and angular distributions of atmospheric gamma sq cm rays in the energy range 0.3-10 MeV over Palestine, Texas, at residual depths of 2.5 and 70 g/sq cm are reported. In confirmation of the general features of a model prediction, the measurements show at 2.5 g/sq cm upward moving fluxes greater than the downward moving fluxes, the effect increasing with energy, and approximate isotropy at 70 g/sq cm. Numerous characteristic gamma-ray lines were observed, most prominently at 0.511, 1.6, 2.3, 4.4, and 6.1 MeV. Their intensities were also compared with model predictions. Observations were made with an actively shielded scintillator counter with two detectors, one of aperture 50 deg FWHM and the other of 120 deg FWHM. Above 1 MeV, contributions to the counting rate from photons penetrating the shield annulus and from neutron interactions were large; they were studied by means of a Monte Carlo code and are extensively discussed.

Ling, J. C.; Gruber, D. E.

1977-01-01

276

Assay of uranium in U-bearing waste produced at natural uranium metal fuel fabrication plants by gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A passive gamma measurement technique is investigated for the assay of U-bearing wastes generated at the Natural Uranium Metal Fuel Fabrication Plants. A 3 in. × 3 in. NaI(Tl) detector was used in conjunction with a multichannel analyzer (MCA). The observed count rate of the 1 MeV ?-ray from the 238U in the sample was corrected for sample self-absorption and for absorption in the walls of the sample container. These correction factors were determined using one reference standard and from a knowledge of the sample weight, composition and the geometry of the sample container made of pure aluminium. The amount of 238U in the samples were measured by comparing the corrected area under the 1 MeV gamma ray peak of the known reference standard with the corresponding corrected peak areas of the samples to be measured. To compare the nondestructive assay (NDA) results with another independent method, chemical analysis of all the U-bearing waste samples was also carried out. The NDA results were found to agree within ±15% with the chemical analysis results. To make the method cost-effective, rapid and useful for plant operation on a routine basis, all the measurements were repeated using a single channel analyzer (SCA) also. The NDA results obtained with SCA agree within ±30% with the chemical analysis results.

Kalsi, P. C.; Pandey, A. K.; Iyer, R. H.

1994-01-01

277

Deuterium/hydrogen ratio analysis of thymol, carvacrol, gamma-terpinene and p-cymene in thyme, savory and oregano essential oils by gas chromatography-pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Isotope ratio mass spectrometry online coupled with capillary gas chromatography (GC-Py-IRMS) on column INNOWAX is used in the origin specific analysis and the authenticity control of the phenolic essential oils (EOs). Isotopic data delta(2)H(V-SMOW) of thymol and carvacrol in natural essential oils were evidently more depleted than synthetic products (from -49 to 7 per thousand for thymol and -61 per thousand for carvacrol). delta(2)H(V-SMOW) values of p-cymene, gamma-terpinene and thymol in authentic thyme oils (Thymus vulgaris L. and Thymus zygis L.) were found from -300 to -270 per thousand, from -285 to -248 per thousand and from -259 to -234 per thousand, respectively. delta(2)H(V-SMOW) values of carvacrol and p-cymene in authentic oregano oils (Origanum heracleoticum L., Coridothymus capitatus L. and Origanum compactum L.) varied from -223 to -193 per thousand and from -284 to -259 per thousand, respectively. For authentic Satureja montana subsp. montana essential oils, the mean delta(2)H(V-SMOW) value for aromatic compounds were found to be the following: gamma-terpinene -273 per thousand (SD=4.6 per thousand) and p-cymene -283 per thousand (SD=3.0 per thousand), thymol -245 per thousand (SD=1.8 per thousand) and carvacrol -226 per thousand (SD=1.7 per thousand). In addition, p-cymene was previously found as a precursor of the biosynthesis of thymol and carvacrol in thyme oil, thus, we considered p-cymene as an endogenous reference compound (ERC) for D/H ratio analysis. The isotopic fractionation factors alpha(thymol/p-cymene)=1.05 and alpha(carvacrol/p-cymene)=1.08 were obtained and also used to control the authenticity of the phenolic EOs. PMID:16945376

Nhu-Trang, Tran-Thi; Casabianca, Hervé; Grenier-Loustalot, Marie-Florence

2006-11-01

278

Potential of natural gamma-ray spectrometry for mapping and environmental monitoring of black-sand beach deposits on the northern coast of Sinai, Egypt.  

PubMed

The concentrations and distributions of naturally occurring radioactive materials were studied with the aim of detecting and mapping radioactive anomalies as well as monitoring the environment for black-sand beach deposits in Northern Sinai, Egypt. For this purpose, ground gamma-ray spectrometric surveys were conducted using a portable GS-512 spectrometer, with an NaI (Tl) detector, on an area 77.5 km(2) in surface area located between the cities of Rafah and Elareish on the Mediterranean Sea coast. The results revealed that the black-sand beach deposits could be differentiated according to their total-count (TC) radioactivity into five normally distributed interpreted radiometric lithologic (IRL) units denoted by U1, U2, U3, U4 and U5. The computed characteristic TC radiometric statistics of these five IRL units range from 4.67  to 9.96 Ur for their individual arithmetic means. The computed arithmetic means for the three radioelements K, eU and eTh reach 0.46 %, 2.25 and 6.17 ppm, respectively for the whole study area. Monitoring the environmental effects of radioelement concentrations on the study area showed that the mean natural equivalent radiation dose rate from the terrestrial gamma-radiation of the whole area attains 0.33 mSv y(-1). This average value remains on the safe side and within the maximum permissible safe radiation dose (<1.0 mSv y(-1)) without harm to the individual, except at three scattered points reaching more than these values. Some of the local inhabitants in the region sometimes use black sands as a building material. Consequently, they are not recommended for use as building materials, because the inhabitants will, then, receive a relatively high radioactive dose generated mainly by monazite and zircon minerals, two of the main constituents of black sands. PMID:22869819

Aboelkhair, Hatem; Zaaeimah, Mostafa

2013-04-01

279

Exposure of the lysine in the gamma chain dodecapeptide of human fibrinogen is not enhanced by adsorption to poly(ethylene terephthalate) as measured by biotinylation and mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Conformational changes in adsorbed fibrinogen may enhance the exposure of platelet adhesive sites that are inaccessible in solution. To test this hypothesis, mass spectrometric methods were developed to quantify chemical modification of lysine residues following adsorption of fibrinogen to biomaterials. The quantitative method used an internal standard consisting of isotope-labeled fibrinogen secreted by human HepG2 cells in culture. Lysine residues in the internal standard were partially reacted with NHS-biotin. For the experimental samples, normal human fibrinogen was adsorbed to poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) particles. The adsorbed fibrinogen was reacted with NHS-biotin and then eluted from the particles. Constant amounts of internal standard were added to sample fibrinogen and analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Biotinylation of the lysine residue in the platelet-adhesive gamma chain dodecapeptide (GCDP) was quantified by comparison with the internal standard. Approximately 80% of the GCDP peptides were biotinylated when fibrinogen was reacted with NHS-biotin in solution or adsorbed onto PET. These results are generally consistent with previous antibody binding studies and suggest that other regions of fibrinogen may be crucial in promoting platelet adhesion to materials. The results do not directly address but are consistent with the hypothesis that only activated platelets adhere to adsorbed fibrinogen. PMID:22213354

Ovod, Vitaliy; Scott, Evan A; Flake, Megan M; Parker, Stanley R; Bateman, Randall J; Elbert, Donald L

2012-03-01

280

Spatial mapping of soil and radioactivity redistribution at the hillslope scale using in-situ gamma spectrometry, terrestrial laser scanning and RFID tags after the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In March 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, triggered by the Tohoku earthquake and the consequent tsunami, released a large amount of radionuclides in the environment. To provide a rapid assessment of the soil contamination and its potential redistribution, intensive scientific monitoring has been conducted since July 2011 in our study site, located in the Yamakiya district of Kawamata town, in Fukushima prefecture, Japan, about 37 km from the power plant. In this paper, we summarize and analyze a dataset combining multiple innovative methods deployed inside a 5m x 22m bounded hillslope plot. In addition to runoff volumes and sediments radiocesium concentrations, each major rainfall event was followed by in situ gamma spectrometry measurements. In 2012, to trace the complex behavior of sediments inside the plot, about 300 RFID (Radio-Frequency IDentification) tags representing coarse sediments were scattered and their spatial position was periodically checked using a total station. Finally, several high resolutions Digital Elevation Models were acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner to assess the surface structure and changes. The observed processes at the event scale include interrill and rill erosion, as well as local deposition and remobilization phenomenon. Not only do they directly provide information on the erosion spatio-temporal variability and the associated radionuclides transfers, but combined together they can constitute a solid basis to improve and challenge process-based distributed erosion models.

Patin, Jeremy; Onda, Yuichi; Noguchi, Takehiro; Parsons, Anthony

2013-04-01

281

Determination of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in biofluids using a one-step procedure with "in-vial" derivatization and headspace-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

A headspace-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-trap GC-MS) method was developed to determine GHB, a low molecular weight compound and drug of abuse, in various biological fluids. Combining this relatively novel and fully automated headspace technique with "in-vial" methylation of GHB allowed for a straightforward approach. One single method could be used for all biofluids (urine, plasma, serum, whole blood or lyzed blood), requiring only 100?l of sample. Moreover, our approach involves mere addition of all reagents and sample into one vial. Following optimization of headspace conditions and trap settings, validation was performed. Although sample preparation only consists of the addition of salt and derivatization reagents directly to a 100?l-sample in a HS-vial, adequate method sensitivity and selectivity was obtained. Calibration curves ranged from 5 to 150?g/ml GHB for urine, from 2 to 150?g/ml for plasma, and from 3.5 to 200?g/ml for whole blood. Acceptable precision and accuracy (<13% bias and imprecision) were seen for all quality controls (QC's) (LLOQ-level, low, medium, high), including for the supplementary serum- and lyzed blood-based QC's, using calibration curves prepared in plasma or whole blood, respectively. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated assay reproducibility, while cross-validation with another GC-MS method demonstrated that our method is a valuable alternative for GHB determination in toxicological samples, with the advantage of requiring only 100?l and minimal hands-on time, as sample preparation is easy and injection automated. PMID:23664352

Ingels, Ann-Sofie M E; Neels, Hugo; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

2013-06-28

282

Small Scale Assessment of Spatial and Vertical Redistribution of Fukushima Fallouts Radiocaesium in Contaminated Soil Using in-situ HPGe Gamma Ray Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

After Tohoku earthquake on March 11th 2011, the subsequent tsunami and the resulting Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, gamma emitting particles, first release into the atmosphere, were quickly deposited on the soil surface, with potentially harmful level in the surroundings of the nuclear power plant. Thus, the evaluation of soil deposition pattern, depth migration and afterward radionuclides redistribution and export by erosion and hydrological processes is fundamental for contamination assessments and to plan future actions. Our study site is located 37km from Fukushima power plant, inside the evacuated zone. In this study, we used a bounded erosion plot of 22.1m x 5m to assess global export of sediments and 137Cs. This plot, previously cropped with tobacco, is morphologically divided into inter-rill areas separated by rills that formed into former wheel tracks. The bottom of the plot is subject to deposition of sediments. In order to determine and quantify the internal processes responsible of the export of sediment, the depth distribution of 137Cs is estimated using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Such a portable device, associated to the high radiation levels, allow an acquisition of spatially distributed data within the plot in a reasonable time (1 min/sample). At the same time, depth distribution of 137Cs are measured using the scrapper plate technique, adapted to obtain a fine resolution in the first, highly contaminated, centimeters of soil. Finally, 137Cs depth profiles, associated with in situ and laboratory gamma spectrums acquired with the portable detector, allow for the detector calibration. Although the initial deposit can reasonably be supposed homogeneous at the plot scale, the dataset obtained 3 months later shows high spatial and temporal variability due to erosion processes. Measurements with the portable HPGe detector proved to be useful at this small scale, avoiding the needs of a large number of soil samples, and our results are promising to understand erosion at larger scale where horizontal patterns of deposition and redistribution are usually supposed homogeneous over quite larger areas.

Patin, J.; Onda, Y.; Yoda, H.; Kato, H.

2011-12-01

283

Detection of pulsed, bremsstrahlung-induced, prompt neutron capture gamma-rays with HPGe detector  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing a novel photoneutron-based nondestructive evaluation technique which uses a pulsed, high-energy (up to 8-MeV) electron accelerator and gamma-ray spectrometry. Highly penetrating pulses of bremsstrahlung photons are produced by each pulse of electrons. Interrogating neutrons are generated by the bremsstrahlung photons interacting within a photoneutron source material. The interactions of the neutrons within a target result in the emission of elemental characteristic gamma-rays. Spectrometry is performed by analyzing the photoneutron-induced prompt gamma-rays acquired between accelerator pulses with a unique, high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detection system using a modified transistor reset preamplifier. The detection system, the experimental configuration, and the accelerator operation used to characterize the detection system performance are described. Using a 6.5 MeV electron accelerator and a beryllium metal photoneutron source, gamma-ray spectra were successfully acquired for Al, Cu, polyethylene, NaC1, and depleted uranium targets as soon as 30 {mu}s after each bremsstrahlung (or x-ray) flash.

Jones, J.L.

1996-08-01

284

Formation of the 0.511.-MeV line in solar flares. [statistical mechanics of line spectra for gamma rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gamma-ray line produced at 0.51-MeV was studied and is shown to be the result of either of free annihilation of positrons with electrons or of the decay of positronium by 2-photon emission. Positron annihilation from the bound state of positronium may also proceed by 3-photon emission, resulting in a continuum with energies up to 0.51-MeV. Accurate calculations of the rates of free annihilation and positronium formation in a solar-flare plasma are presented. Estimates of the positronium-formulation rates by charge exchange and the rates of dissociation and quenching are also considered. The temperature and density dependence of the ratio of 3-photon to 2-photon emission was obtained. It is shown that when the ratio of free electrons to neutral atoms in the plasma is approximately unity or greater, the Doppler width of the 0.51-MeV line is a function of the temperature of the annihilation region. For the small ion densities characteristics of the photosphere, the width is predominantly a function of the density.

Crannell, C. J.; Joyce, G.; Ramaty, R.; Werntz, C.

1976-01-01

285

Can We Probe the Lorentz Factor of Gamma-ray Bursts from GeV-TeV Spectra Integrated Over Internal Shocks?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We revisit the high-energy spectral cutoff originating from the electron-positron pair creation in the prompt phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with numerical and analytical calculations. We show that the conventional exponential and/or broken power-law cutoff should be drastically modified to a shallower broken power law in practical observations that integrate emissions from different internal shocks. Since the steepening is tiny for observations, this "smearing" effect can generally reduce the previous estimates of the Lorentz factor of the GRB outflows. We apply our formulation to GRB 080916C, recently detected by the Large Area Telescope detector on the Fermi satellite, and find that the minimum Lorentz factor can be ~600 (or even smaller values), which is below but consistent with the previous result of ~900. Observing the steepening energy (the so-called "pair-break energy") is crucial to diagnosing the Lorentz factor and/or the emission site in future observations, especially current and future Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC, VERITAS, and CTA.

Aoi, Junichi; Murase, Kohta; Takahashi, Keitaro; Ioka, Kunihito; Nagataki, Shigehiro

2010-10-01

286

Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using ?-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population  

PubMed Central

The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K were determined by a gamma ray spectrometer using the HPGe detector with 50% relative efficiency, and the radiation dose to the local population was estimated. The average estimated activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in the surface soil were 53.8, 44.2 and 464.2 Bq kg?1 respectively. The average absorbed dose rate in the study area was estimated to be 72.5 nGy h-1, where as the annual effective dose to the population was 0.09 mSv y-1. A correlation analysis was made between measured dose rate and individual radionuclides, in order to delineate the contribution of the respective nuclides towards dose rate. The radio-elemental concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium estimated for the soils, in the study area, indicated the enrichment of uranium series nuclide. The results of the present study were subsequently compared with international and national recommended values. PMID:21170189

Maharana, Mandakini; Krishnan, Narayani; Sengupta, D.

2010-01-01

287

Spatial distribution of gamma radiation levels in surface soils from Jaduguda uranium mineralization zone, Jharkhand, India, using ?-ray spectrometry, and determination of outdoor dose to the population.  

PubMed

The concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface soil samples around selected villages of Jaduguda were investigated and compared with the radioactivity level in the region. Concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, and (40)K were determined by a gamma ray spectrometer using the HPGe detector with 50% relative efficiency, and the radiation dose to the local population was estimated. The average estimated activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, and (40)K in the surface soil were 53.8, 44.2 and 464.2 Bq kg(-1) respectively. The average absorbed dose rate in the study area was estimated to be 72.5 nGy h-1, where as the annual effective dose to the population was 0.09 mSv y-1. A correlation analysis was made between measured dose rate and individual radionuclides, in order to delineate the contribution of the respective nuclides towards dose rate. The radio-elemental concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium estimated for the soils, in the study area, indicated the enrichment of uranium series nuclide. The results of the present study were subsequently compared with international and national recommended values. PMID:21170189

Maharana, Mandakini; Krishnan, Narayani; Sengupta, D

2010-10-01

288

A preliminary report on the determination of natural radioactivity levels of the State of Qatar using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study is aimed at the determination of the activity concentrations of naturally occuring and technically enhanced levels of radiation in soil samples collected across the landscape of Qatar. Representative soil samples from various locations across the Qatarian peninsula have been collected and analyzed in order to establish activity concentrations associated with the 235,8U and 232Th natural decay chains and also the long-lived naturally occurring radionuclide 40K. The activity concentrations have been measured using a hyper-pure germanium detector. Details of the sample preparation and the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis techniques are presented, together with the preliminary values of the activity concentrations associated with the naturally occuring radionuclide chains for six soil samples collected from the Qatarian peninsula. Sample 228, which has been collected from an inshore oil-field area, was observed to have the highest observed value of 226Ra concentration among the six samples. The weighted mean values of the activity concentrations of the radionuclides 238U, 232Th and 40K in one particular sample (sample 228) were, respectively, found to be 213.9±1.4, 4.55±0.11 and 111.4±3.6 Bq/kg, which compare with the worldwide weighted mean values in soil samples, 33, 45 and 420 Bq/kg, respectively. The deduced activity concentration of 238U in sample 228 in the current work was found to be significantly higher than the worldwide average value and was also significantly higher than the values determined for the five other initial samples discussed here. The mean values of the activity concentration of the 232Th series, 40K and 137Cs in Bq/kg from the six investigated soil samples were found to be 9.4±1.3, 204±22 and 5.8±5.6, respectively, with the quoted uncertainty referring to the standard deviation among these measurements.

Al-Sulaiti, H.; Regan, P. H.; Bradley, D. A.; Malain, D.; Santawamaitre, T.; Habib, A.; Matthews, M.; Bukhari, S.; Al-Dosari, M.

2010-07-01

289

In-situ high-resolution gamma-spectrometric survey of burial ground-monitoring wells  

SciTech Connect

In situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry with an intrinsic germanium detector assembly of special design surveyed the burial ground monitoring wells to locate and identify gamma emitters that may have migrated from the burial trenches toward the water table. Gamma-ray spectra were acquired as a function of depth in each well and recorded on magnetic tape. These spectra were reduced by a series of computer programs to produce count rate versus depth profiles for natural and man-made activities. The original spectra and the profiles have been archived on magnetic tape for comparison with similar future surveys. Large amounts of man-made activities were observed in some of the burial trenches; however, below the trench bottoms, only very low but detectable amounts of /sup 60/Co and /sup 137/Cs were observed in eleven wells. The highest level of man-made gamma activity observed below the trench bottoms has a count rate roughly equal to that observed for uranium daughter activities which are natural to the subsoil.

Bowman, W.W.

1981-09-01

290

Antagonistic properties of a natural product - Bicuculline with the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor: Studied through electrostatic potential mapping, electronic and vibrational spectra using ab initio and density functional theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

(+)-Bicuculline (hereinafter referred to as bicuculline), a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid is of current interest as an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Its inhibitor properties have been studied through molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping of this molecule and GABA receptor. The hot site on the potential surface of bicuculline, which is also isosteric with GABA receptor, has been used to interpret the inhibitor property. A systematic quantum chemical study of the possible conformations, their relative stabilities, FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of bicuculline has been reported. The optimized geometries, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of all the conformers of bicuculline have been calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Mulliken atomic charges, HOMO-LUMO gap ? E, ionization potential, dipole moments and total energy have also been obtained for the optimized geometries of both the molecules. TD-DFT method is used to calculate the electronic absorption parameters in gas phase as well as in solvent environment using integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) employing 6-31G basis set and the results thus obtained are compared with the UV absorption spectra. The combination of experimental and calculated results provides an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of bicuculline.

Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha; Asthana, B. P.

2011-12-01

291

Alpha particle analysis using PEARLS spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Alpha particle assay by conventional plate-counting methods is difficult because chemical separation, tracer techniques, and/or self-absorption losses in the final sample may cause either non-reproducible results or create unacceptable errors. PEARLS (Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) Spectrometry is an attractive alternative since radionuclides may be extracted into a scintillator in which there would be no self-absorption or geometry problems and in which up to 100% chemical recovery and counting efficiency is possible. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic-phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillator. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination to provide discrete alpha spectra and virtual absence of beta and gamma backgrounds. Backgrounds on the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 100 +-1% range. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium, and polonium assay. This paper will review liquid scintillation alpha counting methods and reference some of the specific applications. 8 refs., 1 fig.

McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

1984-01-01

292

Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

Colony, J. A.

1976-01-01

293

Modifications induced by gamma irradiation to Makrofol polymer nuclear track detector  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was extended from obtaining information about the interaction of gamma rays with Makrofol DE 7-2 track detector to introduce the basis that can be used in concerning simple sensor for gamma irradiation and bio-engineering applications. Makrofol polymer samples were irradiated with 1.25 MeV 60Co gamma radiations at doses ranging from 20 to 1000 kG y. The modifications of irradiated samples so induced were analyzed using UV–vis spectrometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the measurements of Vickers’ hardness. Moreover, the change in wettability of irradiated Makrofol was investigated by the contact angle determination of the distilled water. UV–vis spectroscopy shows a noticeable decrease in the energy band gap due to gamma irradiation. This decrease could be attributed to the appearance of a shift to UV spectra toward higher wavelength region after irradiation. Photoluminescence spectra reveal a remarkable change in the integrated photoluminescence intensity with increasing gamma doses, which may be resulted from some matrix disorder through the creation of some defected states in the irradiated polymer. The hardness was found to increase from 4.78 MPa for the unirradiated sample to 23.67 MPa for the highest gamma dose. The contact angle investigations show that the wettability of the modified samples increases with increasing the gamma doses. The result obtained from present investigation furnishes evidence that the gamma irradiations are a successful technique to modify the Makrofol DE 7-2 polymer properties to use it in suitable applications.

Tayel, A.; Zaki, M.F.; El Basaty, A.B.; Hegazy, Tarek M.

2014-01-01

294

Modifications induced by gamma irradiation to Makrofol polymer nuclear track detector.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was extended from obtaining information about the interaction of gamma rays with Makrofol DE 7-2 track detector to introduce the basis that can be used in concerning simple sensor for gamma irradiation and bio-engineering applications. Makrofol polymer samples were irradiated with 1.25 MeV (60)Co gamma radiations at doses ranging from 20 to 1000 kG y. The modifications of irradiated samples so induced were analyzed using UV-vis spectrometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the measurements of Vickers' hardness. Moreover, the change in wettability of irradiated Makrofol was investigated by the contact angle determination of the distilled water. UV-vis spectroscopy shows a noticeable decrease in the energy band gap due to gamma irradiation. This decrease could be attributed to the appearance of a shift to UV spectra toward higher wavelength region after irradiation. Photoluminescence spectra reveal a remarkable change in the integrated photoluminescence intensity with increasing gamma doses, which may be resulted from some matrix disorder through the creation of some defected states in the irradiated polymer. The hardness was found to increase from 4.78 MPa for the unirradiated sample to 23.67 MPa for the highest gamma dose. The contact angle investigations show that the wettability of the modified samples increases with increasing the gamma doses. The result obtained from present investigation furnishes evidence that the gamma irradiations are a successful technique to modify the Makrofol DE 7-2 polymer properties to use it in suitable applications. PMID:25750755

Tayel, A; Zaki, M F; El Basaty, A B; Hegazy, Tarek M

2015-03-01

295

Mass spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in

A. L. Burlingame; Cedric H. L. Shackleton; Ian. Howe; O. S. Chizhov

1978-01-01

296

Topics in gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of gamma rays from solar flares, gamma ray bursts, the Galactic center, galactic nucleosynthesis, SS433, and Cygnus X-3, and their effects on astrophysical problems are discussed. It is observed that gamma ray spectra from solar flares are applicable to the study of particle acceleration and confinement and the determination of chemical abundances in the solar atmosphere. The gamma ray lines from the compact galactic object SS433 are utilized to examine the acceleration of jets, and analysis of the gamma ray lines of Cygnus X-3 reveal that particles can be accelerated in compact sources to ultrahigh energies.

Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1986-01-01

297

[Growth and red luminescence suppression of gamma-Cu I single crystal].  

PubMed

Transparent gamma-Cu I crystal with size about 9 mm x 9 mm x 1 mm was grown by using optimized solvent evaporation method with gamma-Cu I powders as raw material and acetonitrile as solvent. The results of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) showed that the proportions of copper and iodine in as-grown gamma-Cu I crystal were 53.1 and 46.9 mol%, respectively. By iodine doping into growth solution, the proportions of copper and iodine were adjusted to 50.4 and 49.6 mol%, respectively. Photoluminescence (PL) showed that the as-grown gamma-Cu I crystal had an emission at 410 nm and an emission band around 720 nm. After iodine doping, the emission band around 720 nm was suppressed while other two weak emissions at 424 and 474 nm appeared. X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) showed that the as-grown gamma-Cu I crystal had an emission at 435 nm and an emission band around 720 nm. After iodine doping, the emission band around 720 nm was suppressed. Comparing the emission spectra before and after iodine doping, it is clear that red luminescence in gamma-Cu I crystal could be suppressed by iodine doping. The effect originated from the reduction of iodine vacancy in the crystal, but not from the iodine adsorbtion on the surface. PMID:23697096

Cai, Zu-Xu; Gu, Mu; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Bo; Huang, Shi-Ming; Ni, Chen

2013-02-01

298

Atomic Spectra  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from Hyperphysics contains images depicting the light emitted by several elements and their respective spectra. The page also provides a description of how the size of a holographic image scales with the wavelength of the light used to observe it.

Nave, Carl R.

299

Search for the decays J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{phi} and J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{omega}  

SciTech Connect

Using 58x10{sup 6} J/{psi} events collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESII) at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, the decays J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{phi}{rho} and J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{omega}{rho} are searched for, and upper limits on their branching fractions are reported at the 90% C.L. No clear structures are observed in the {gamma}{rho}, {gamma}{phi}, or {rho}{phi} mass spectra for J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{phi}{rho} nor in the {gamma}{rho}, {gamma}{omega}, or {rho}{omega} mass spectra for J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{omega}{rho}.

Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

2008-01-01

300

The development of a new edition of the gamma-ray spectrum catalogues designed for presentation in electronic format  

SciTech Connect

New editions of the original Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogues are being prepared for publication in electronic format. The objective of this program is to produce versions of the Catalogues in CD-ROM format and as an Internet resource. Additions to the original content of the Catalogues will include integrated decay scheme drawings, tables of related decay data, and updated text on the techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry. Related decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) are then added, and all data converted to the Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format for CD-ROM production and availability on the Internet. At a later date the catalogues will be expanded to include spectra representing the response of large-volume Ge detectors, alpha-particle spectra, prompt neutron capture and inelastic scattering gamma-ray spectra, and gross fission product spectra characteristic of fuel cycle waste materials. Characterization of radioactivity in materials is a requirement in many phases of radioactive waste management. Movement, shipping, treatment, all activities which involve handling of mixed waste or TRU categories of waste at all DOE sites will require that measurements and assessment documentation utilize basic nuclear data which are tracable to internationally accepted standard values. This program will involve the identification of data needs unique to the development and application of specialized detector systems for radioactive waste characterization.

Heath, R.L.

1997-05-01

301

Galaxies and gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comparisons between the recently measured X-ray spectra of active galaxies, the intensity upper limits to the ..gamma..-ray emission above 35 MeV from the same objects obtained from data from SAS 2, and other ..gamma..-ray data are used to address the nature of the high-energy spectra of several types of active galaxies, their contribution to the measured diffuse ..gamma..-ray emission between

G. F. Bignami; C. E. Fichtel; R. C. Hartman; D. J. Thompson

1979-01-01

302

Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a final report for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program from 06/01/91-07/31/97. The topics include: 1) Solar Flare Neutron Spectra and Accelerated Ions; 2) Gamma Ray Lines From The Orion Complex; 3) Implications of Nuclear Line Emission From The Orion Complex; 4) Possible Sites of Nuclear Line Emission From Massive OB Associations; 5) Gamma-Ray Burst Repitition and BATSE Position Uncertainties; 6) Effects of Compton Scattering on BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra; and 7) Selection Biases on the Spectral and Temporal Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts.

Lingenfelter, Richard E.

1997-01-01

303

Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

Cline, T. L. (editor); Ramaty, R. (editor)

1978-01-01

304

Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1978-01-01

305

Mass Spectrometry Mass spectrometry has emerged as  

E-print Network

Mass Spectrometry Mass spectrometry has emerged as the key technology for proteomics experiments 3D protein structures at a proteome scale using mass spectrometry experiments. Data Analysis Data and the development of suitable data analysis routines is a major challenge. Structural Proteomics Proteomics

Heermann, Dieter W.

306

Analysis of Peptide MS/MS Spectra from Large-Scale Proteomics Experiments Using  

E-print Network

combines tandem mass spectrometry and database search software to yield mass spectra with identified possible the characterization of thousands of proteins from a single 24-h mass spectrometry run. Database, large curated reference libraries have been developed for use by the general mass spectrometry community

Noble, William Stafford

307

Infrared spectra of U.S. automobile original finishes (post - 1989). VIII: In situ identification of bismuth vanadate using extended range FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.  

PubMed

Chrome Yellow (PbCrO4 ·xPbSO4 ) was a common pigment in U.S. automobile OEM finishes for more than three decades, but in the early 1990s its use was discontinued. One of its main replacements was Bismuth Vanadate (BiVO4 ·nBi2 MoO6 , n = 0-2), which was commercially introduced in 1985, as this inorganic pigment also produces a very bright hue and has excellent outdoor durability. This paper describes the in situ identification of Bismuth Vanadate in automotive finishes using FT-IR and dispersive Raman spectroscopy and XRF spectrometry. Some differentiation of commercial formulations of this pigment is possible based on far-infrared absorptions, Raman data, and elemental analysis. The spectral differences arise from the presence or absence of molybdenum, the use of two crystal polymorphs of BiVO4 , and differences in pigment stabilizers. Bismuth Vanadate is usually not used alone, and it is typically found with Isoindoline Yellow, hydrous ferric oxide, rutile, Isoindolinone Yellow 3R, or various combinations of these. PMID:24261821

Suzuki, Edward M

2014-03-01

308

Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For twenty years or so now, mass spectrometry has been used to get exact measurements of the mass of biological molecules such as proteins, nucleic acids,oligosaccharides, and so on. Over the past ten years, this technology has followed the trend toward miniaturisation and the samples required can be much smaller. In particular, the nanoelectrospray source (online or by needle) allow one to work at flow rates of a few tens of nanolitres/min. There are many applications, both in the field of proteomics and in the analysis of protein structure, dynamics, and interactions. Combining this source with nanoHPLC, complex mixtures only available in small quantities can be separated and analysed online. There are also some advantages over conventional HPLC, despite a set of constraints related to the small dimensions and low flow rates. Combining capillary electrophoresis with the electrospray source also gives useful results, with its own set of advantages and constraints. Finally, developments are currently underway to combine this source with chips, providing a means of separation and analysis online.

Pflieger, D.; Forest, E.; Vinh, J.

309

NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES  

EPA Science Inventory

Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

310

Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approx. 0.01 deg (E(sub gamma) > 100 GeV), the energy resolution approx. 1% (E(sub gamma) > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approx 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

Galper, A.M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A.I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.; Picozza, P.; Rodin, V. G.; Runtso, M. F.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Suchkov, S. I.; Tavani, M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Vacchi, A.

2012-01-01

311

Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

2012-01-01

312

k e h k k e h k k e h k \\Gamma4 2 \\Gamma6 \\Gamma6 \\Gamma2 \\Gamma9 \\Gamma8 9 \\Delta 2 \\Gamma14  

E-print Network

\\Delta 2 \\Gamma14 \\Gamma3 0 \\Gamma5 0 \\Gamma7 0 \\Gamma2 \\Gamma2 \\Gamma3 \\Gamma4 9 \\Delta 2 \\Gamma8 \\Gamma6 \\Gamma35 \\Delta 2 \\Gamma12 \\Gamma1 2 \\Gamma2 \\Gamma3 \\Gamma2 \\Gamma5 \\Gamma5 9 \\Delta 2 \\Gamma10 0 23 \\Delta 2 \\Gamma5 \\Gamma2 \\Gamma63 \\Delta 2 \\Gamma9 \\Gamma4 189 \\Delta 2 \\Gamma12 1 2 \\Gamma2

Sweldens, Wim

313

C NMR Spectra C NMR Spectra  

E-print Network

S16 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S3) Me N-i-Pr #12;S17 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S3) Me NBn #12;S18 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) NBn #12;S19 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) NBn Me Me Me #12;S20 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) N-n-Bu Me Me Me #12;S21 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra

Collum, David B.

314

{gamma} ray astronomy with muons  

SciTech Connect

Although {gamma} ray showers are muon poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard {gamma} ray spectra there is a relative {open_quotes}enhancement{close_quotes} of muons from {gamma} ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower {gamma} rays above the photoproduction threshold contribute to the number of muons N{sub {mu}}, which is thus proportional to the primary {gamma} ray energy. With {gamma} ray energy 50 times higher than the muon energy and a probability of muon production by the {gamma}{close_quote}s of about 1{percent}, muon detectors can match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector if their effective area is larger by 10{sup 4}. The muons must have enough energy for sufficiently accurate reconstruction of their direction for doing astronomy. These conditions are satisfied by relatively shallow neutrino detectors such as AMANDA and Lake Baikal, and by {gamma} ray detectors such as MILAGRO. TeV muons from {gamma} ray primaries, on the other hand, are rare because they are only produced by higher energy {gamma} rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy with the AMANDA, Lake Baikal, and MILAGRO detectors. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Halzen, F. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Stanev, T. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)] [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Yodh, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92715 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92715 (United States)

1997-04-01

315

Gamma Ray Astronomy with Muons  

E-print Network

Although gamma ray showers are muon-poor, they still produce a number of muons sufficient to make the sources observed by GeV and TeV telescopes observable also in muons. For sources with hard gamma ray spectra there is a relative `enhancement' of muons from gamma ray primaries as compared to that from nucleon primaries. All shower gamma rays above the photoproduction threshold contribute to the number of muons $N_\\mu$, which is thus proportional to the primary gamma ray energy. With gamma ray energy 50 times higher than the muon energy and a probability of muon production by the gammas of about 1\\%, muon detectors can match the detection efficiency of a GeV satellite detector if their effective area is larger by $10^4$. The muons must have enough energy for sufficiently accurate reconstruction of their direction for doing astronomy. These conditions are satisfied by relatively shallow neutrino detectors such as AMANDA and Lake Baikal and by gamma ray detectors like MILAGRO. TeV muons from gamma ray primaries, on the other hand, are rare because they are only produced by higher energy gamma rays whose flux is suppressed by the decreasing flux at the source and by absorption on interstellar light. We show that there is a window of opportunity for muon astronomy with the AMANDA, Lake Baikal and MILAGRO detectors.

F. Halzen; T. Stanev; G. B. Yodh

1996-08-29

316

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1984, 106, 1931-1938 1931 252CfFission Fragment Ionization Mass Spectrometry of  

E-print Network

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1984, 106, 1931-1938 1931 252CfFission Fragment Ionization Mass Spectrometry is known about the detailed mass spectrometry of this important compound. Recently spectra have been obtained by Hunt, Macfarlane, Katz, and Dougherty',2 using fission fragment ion- ization mass spectrometry

Chait, Brian T.

317

Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far-IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High-Energy Gamma Rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We calculate the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0Gamma-rays in intergalactic space owing to interactions with low-energy photons and the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation. We calculate the optical depth of the universe, Tau , for Gamma-rays having energies from 4 GeV to 100 TeV emitted by sources at redshifts from 0 to 5. We also give an analytic fit with numerical coefficients for approximating (E(Gamma), z). As an example of the application of our results, we calculate the absorbed spectrum of the blazar PKS 2155-304 at z=0.117 and compare it with the spectrum observed by the HESS air Cerenkov Gamma-ray telescope array.

Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

2006-01-01

318

Erratum: Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Table 1 in our paper had erroneous numbers for the coefficients fitting the parametric form for the optical depth of the universe to gamma-rays; tau. The correct values for these parameters as described in the original text are given in the table for various redshifts for the baseline model (upper row) and fast evolution (lower row) for each individual redshift.

Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

2007-01-01

319

Analysis of expressed sequence tags from a single wheat cultivar facilitates interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data and discrimination of gamma gliadin proteins that may play different functional roles in flour  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The complement of gamma gliadin genes expressed in the wheat cultivar Butte 86 was evaluated by analyzing publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST) data. Eleven contigs were assembled from 153 Butte 86 ESTs. Nine of the contigs encoded full-length proteins and four of the proteins contained an...

320

Gamma rays from the de-excitation of C-12 resonance 15.11 MeV and C-12 resonance 4.44 MeV as probes of energetic particle spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flux of 15.11 MeV gamma rays relative to the flux 4.44 MeV gamma rays was calculated from measured cross sections for excitation of the corresponding states of C-12 and from experimental determinations of the branching ratios for direct de-excitation of these states to the ground state. Because of the difference in threshold energies for excitation of these two levels, the relative intensities in the two lines are particularly sensitive to the spectral distribution of energetic particles which excite the corresponding nuclear levels. For both solar and cosmic emission, the observability of the 15.11 MeV line is expected to be enhances by low source-background continuum in this energy range.

Crannell, C. J.; Crannell, H.; Ramaty, R.

1977-01-01

321

Radiation Metabolomics. 3. Biomarker Discovery in the Urine of Gamma-Irradiated Rats Using a Simplified Metabolomics Protocol of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Combined with Random Forests Machine Learning Algorithm  

PubMed Central

Radiation metabolomics employing mass spectral technologies represents a plausible means of high-throughput minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. A simplified metabolomics protocol is described that employs ubiquitous gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and open source software including random forests machine learning algorithm to uncover latent biomarkers of 3 Gy ? radiation in rats. Urine was collected from six male Wistar rats and six sham-irradiated controls for 7 days, 4 prior to irradiation and 3 after irradiation. Water and food consumption, urine volume, body weight, and sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, phosphate and urea excretion showed major effects from exposure to ? radiation. The metabolomics protocol uncovered several urinary metabolites that were significantly up-regulated (glyoxylate, threonate, thymine, uracil, p-cresol) and down-regulated (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, adipate, pimelate, suberate, azelaate) as a result of radiation exposure. Thymine and uracil were shown to derive largely from thymidine and 2?-deoxyuridine, which are known radiation biomarkers in the mouse. The radiation metabolomic phenotype in rats appeared to derive from oxidative stress and effects on kidney function. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a promising platform on which to develop the field of radiation metabolomics further and to assist in the design of instrumentation for use in detecting biological consequences of environmental radiation release. PMID:19630524

Lanz, Christian; Patterson, Andrew D.; Slavík, Josef; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Ledermann, Monika; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Idle, Jeffrey R.

2009-01-01

322

NEAR Gamma Ray Spectrometer Characterization and Repair  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report covers the work completed in the third year of the contract. The principle activities during this period were (1) the characterization of the NEAR 2 Gamma Ray Spectrometer using a neutron generator to generate complex gamma ray spectra and a large Ge Detecter to identify all the major peaks in the spectra; (2) the evaluation and repair of the Engineering Model Unit of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer for the NEAR mission; (3) the investigation of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray detection; and (4) technology transfer from NASA to forensic science.

Groves, Joel Lee; Vajda, Stefan

1998-01-01

323

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Galactic Diffuse Gamma-ray Spectrum from Cosmic-ray In-  

E-print Network

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Galactic Diffuse Gamma-ray Spectrum from Cosmic-ray In- teractions with Gas Clouds Michiko OHISHI and Masaki MORI Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University, Australia Abstract Gamma-ray spectra from cosmic-ray proton and electron interactions with gas clouds have

Mori, Masaki

324

Quantum synchrotron spectra from semirelativistic electrons in teragauss magnetic fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Synchrotron spectra are calculated from quantum electrodynamic transition rates for thermal and power-law electron distributions. It is shown that quantum effects appear in thermal spectra when the photon energy is greater than the electron temperature, and in power-law spectra when the electron energy in units of the electron rest mass times the magnetic field strength in units of the critical field strength is of order unity. These spectra are compared with spectra calculated from the ultrarelativistic approximation for synchrotron emission. It is found that the approximation for the power-law spectra is good, and the approximation for thermal spectra produces the shape of the spectrum accurately but fails to give the correct normalization. Single photon pair creation masks the quantum effects for power-law distributions, so only modifications to thermal spectra are important for gamma-ray bursts.

Brainerd, J. J.

1987-01-01

325

Detection and Identification of Protein Isoforms Using Cluster Analysis of MALDI-MS Mass Spectra  

E-print Network

for protein isoforms in any proteomics data set using mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. We describe. Keywords: hierarchical clustering · proteomics · mass spectra · protein identification · isoforms of several hundreds or thousands of proteins simultaneously.1,2 Mass spectrometry is a central tool

Lunds Universitet,

326

Peak Height Precision in Hadamard Transform Time-of-Flight Mass Spectra  

E-print Network

­1130) © 2005 American Society for Mass Spectrometry H adamard transform time-of-flight mass spec- trometry (HTPeak Height Precision in Hadamard Transform Time-of-Flight Mass Spectra Joel R. Kimmel,* Oh Kyu University, Stanford, California, USA Hadamard transform (HT) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS

Zare, Richard N.

327

Status of the GAMMA-400 Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The preliminary design of the new space gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 for the energy range 100 MeV-3 TeV is presented. The angular resolution of the instrument, 1-2 deg at E(gamma) approximately 100 MeV and approximately 0.01 at E(gamma) greater than 100 GeV, its energy resolution is approximately 1% at E(gamma) greater than 100 GeV, and the proton rejection factor is approximately 10(exp 6) are optimized to address a broad range of science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of cosmic-ray electrons, positrons, and nuclei.

Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Gusakov, Yu. V.; Farber, M. O.; Fradkin, M. I.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leoniv, A. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mazets, E. P.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Papini, P.

2013-01-01

328

Response to Comment on ``Protein Sequences from Mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex Revealed by Mass Spectrometry''  

Microsoft Academic Search

Endogenous peptide sequences extracted from a 68-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex fossil bone and obtained by mass spectrometry have been shown to be statistically significant based on protein database searches using two different search engines and similarity comparisons to authentic tandem mass spectrometry spectra. Specifically, we have validated the sequence GVVGLP(OH)GQR.

John M. Asara; Mary H. Schweitzer; Lewis C. Cantley; John S. Cottrell

2008-01-01

329

High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification  

SciTech Connect

Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations and experiments, using fission-spectrum neutron sources to assess neutron transmission through composite low-Z attenuators.

David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

2012-07-01

330

What is Mass Spectrometry?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry includes information about what mass spectometry is and how it is used. It has many useful figures and references to other materials. The material answers questions such as "What is mass spectrometry and what can it do for you?"

Chiu, Chia M.

331

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews current research in NMR spectrometry, in the areas of apparatus and techniques, spectral analysis, computer applications, analytical applications, and selected organic and inorganic systems. Various aspects of NMR spectrometry are presented in tabular form, with 133 references. Listed also are 124 references from the discussions in the…

Wasson, John R.; Salinas, Jorge E.

1980-01-01

332

Precursors in Swift Gamma Ray Bursts with Redshift  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study a sample of gamma-ray bursts detected by the Swift satellite with known redshift which show a precursor in the Swift BAT light curve. We analyze the spectra of the precursors and compare them with the time-integrated spectra of the prompt emission. We find neither a correlation between the two slopes nor a tendency for the precursors spectra to

D. Burlon; G. Ghirlanda; G. Ghisellini; D. Lazzati; L. Nava; M. Nardini; A. Celotti

2008-01-01

333

The use of low-level liquid scintillation spectrometry for rapid measurement and decision making  

SciTech Connect

Liquid scintillation spectrometry (LSC) has proved over the last fifteen years to be an excellent tool for low-level counting of beta- and alpha-particle emitters. Using low-level instruments the determination of, for instance {sup 90}Sr, could be considerably simplified in the laboratory, saving time and also money for chemicals and manpower. Furthermore, low-level instruments have been successfully used for measurements when fast analysis was required. The four instruments (Quantulus, Wallac Oy), that the author uses, have not only very low background, which cuts measurement time considerably; but from the pulse- height spectra much information about the nature of the radionuclides present and the absence of specific radionuclides can be extracted. From the absence of high-energy beta-particle activity in the pulse-height spectra of precipitation in the first days after the Chernobyl accident the author could draw the conclusion, that practically no {sup 90}Y was present and therefore only small amounts of {sup 90}Sr, if any, could be expected in precipitation and later in food. This enabled them to make the decision not to waste time with a large number of {sup 90}Sr analyses. Large numbers of drinking water samples could be screened for contamination much more sensitively and faster than by gamma-ray spectrometry. More examples will be presented of cases where rapid information was needed; how contamination and nuclear installations can be easily checked and how LSC helped to cut down the time required, the manpower and the costs for radon measurements and environmental surveillance.

Schoenhofer, F. [Federal Inst. for Food Control and Research (Austria)

1998-12-31

334

Simultaneous beta/gamma digital spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) built in our laboratory. The DPP board was designed to digitally capture the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfer valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A MATLAB algorithm was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimum crosstalk. The spectrometer proved to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

Farsoni, Abdollah T.

335

Gamma-Ray Burst Lines  

E-print Network

The evidence for spectral features in gamma-ray bursts is summarized. As a guide for evaluating the evidence, the properties of gamma-ray detectors and the methods of analyzing gamma-ray spectra are reviewed. In the 1980's, observations indicated that absorption features below 100 keV were present in a large fraction of bright gamma-ray bursts. There were also reports of emission features around 400 keV. During the 1990's the situation has become much less clear. A small fraction of bursts observed with BATSE have statistically significant low-energy features, but the reality of the features is suspect because in several cases the data of the BATSE detectors appear to be inconsistent. Furthermore, most of the possible features appear in emission rather than the expected absorption. Analysis of data from other instruments has either not been finalized or has not detected lines.

Michael S. Briggs

1999-10-20

336

Gamma ray astronomy and black hole astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The study of soft gamma emissions from black-hole candidates is identified as an important element in understanding black-hole phenomena ranging from stellar-mass black holes to AGNs. The spectra of Cyg X-1 and observations of the Galactic Center are emphasized, since thermal origins and MeV gamma-ray bumps are evident and suggest a thermal-pair cloud picture. MeV gamma-ray observations are suggested for studying black hole astrophysics such as the theorized escaping pair wind, the anticorrelation between the MeV gamma bump and the soft continuum, and the relationship between source compactness and temperature.

Liang, Edison P.

1990-01-01

337

Measurement of radionuclide activities induced in target components of an IBA CYCLONE 18/9 by gamma-ray spectrometry with HPGe and LaBr3: Ce detectors.  

PubMed

Cyclotrons are used worldwide to produce radiopharmaceuticals by proton irradiation of a suitable target. The intense secondary neutron beam generated by proton interactions with the target induce high radionuclide activities in the target assembly parts that may result in an exposure to high dose levels of the operators during maintenance. The main goal of this work is to evaluate gamma-emitting radionuclide activities induced in Havar foils and titanium windows of a target assembly and carousel stripper forks of an IBA CYCLONE 18/9 cyclotron. The knowledge of radionuclide inventory for each component is required by many companies to assess risk for operators before waste handling and disposal. Gamma-ray spectrometric analyses were carried out with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillation detectors. HPGe is the most used detector for its high energy resolution although it is more suitable for use in a laboratory. The use of LaBr3:Ce can be considered a viable option, particularly in realizing a portable spectrometric system to perform "on-site" measurements and a fast dose rate evaluation before the disposal of activated parts. Due to a high activity of target assembly components replaced after a typical irradiation cycle (about 5000 ?Ah integrated beam current), gamma-ray spectrometric measurements were performed at a large distance from the detector, even more than 100 cm, or by using a purposely realized Lead-walled collimator. The identification of some key-radionuclides allows to evaluate through simple formulations the dose rate behavior for each component as function of decay time from the last irradiation. The knowledge of the dose rate behavior is a significant piece of information to health physicists for waste handling with safety at work. For an Havar™ foil, the dose rate will be reduced to about 1/1,000 of the starting value after a decay period of approximately 4 y (about 1,500 d), with a relatively safety at product disposal work. For a longer time, only long-lived radionuclides (57)Co, (60)Co, and (54)Mn contribute to dose rate. PMID:24949919

Tomarchio, Elio

2014-08-01

338

Humidity effects on the mass spectra of single aerosol particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

On-line laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry has developed into a widely used method for chemical characterization of individual aerosol particles. In the present study, the spectra of laboratorygenerated particles were obtained as a function of relative humidity to elucidate potential artifacts associated with ambient measurements. Several anionic electrolytes typically found in marine aerosols were studied, including chloride, nitrate, sulfate and

Kenneth R Neubauer; Murray V Johnston; Anthony S Wexler

1998-01-01

339

Improved Classification of Mass Spectrometry Database Search Results Using Newer  

E-print Network

thousand spectra per day, detecting subfemtomolar lev- els of peptide at 10 ppm mass accuracy or betterImproved Classification of Mass Spectrometry Database Search Results Using Newer Machine Learning Approaches* Peter J. Ulintz§¶, Ji Zhu , Zhaohui S. Qin§**, and Philip C. Andrews§ Manual analysis of mass

Zhu, Ji

340

Mass Spectrometry Based Identifications of LMW Glutenin Subunits  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is routinely used to identify wheat endosperm proteins. In this method, peptide fragmentation patterns generated by MS/MS are identified using a ‘search engine’ to compare the spectra to those generated in silico from protein sequence databases. Trypsin is a commonly...

341

Hadamard Transform Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry  

E-print Network

of a time-of-flight mass spec- trometer (TOFMS) is described and demonstrated. A continuous ion beamHadamard Transform Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Ansgar Brock, Nestor Rodriguez, and Richard N of applications at little additional cost. Positive mode electrospray ionization mass spectra of tetrabutylammo

Zare, Richard N.

342

Optical Spectra of Supernovae  

E-print Network

Supernova flux and polarization spectra bring vital information on the geometry, physical conditions, and composition structure of the ejected matter. For some supernovae the circumstellar matter is also probed by the observed spectra. Some of this information can be inferred directly from the observed line profiles and fluxes, but because of the Doppler broadening and severe line blending, interpretation often involves the use of synthetic spectra. The emphasis in this Chapter is on recent results obtained with the help of synthetic spectra.

David Branch; E. Baron; David J. Jeffery

2001-11-30

343

Mass Spectrometry for Proteomics  

PubMed Central

Summary Mass spectrometry has been widely used to analyze biological samples and has evolved into an indispensable tool for proteomics research. Our desire to understand the proteome has led to new technologies that push the boundary of mass spectrometry capabilities, which in return has allowed mass spectrometry to address an ever-increasing array of biological questions. The recent development of a novel mass spectrometer (Orbitrap) and new dissociation methods such as electron transfer dissociation have made possible exciting new areas of proteomic application. Although bottom-up proteomics (analysis of proteolytic peptide mixtures) remains the workhorse for proteomic analysis, middle- and top-down strategies (analysis of longer peptides and intact proteins, respectively) should allow more complete characterization of protein isoforms and post-translational modifications. Finally, stable isotope labeling strategies have transformed mass spectrometry from merely descriptive to a tool for measuring dynamic changes in protein expression, interaction and modification. PMID:18718552

Han, Xuemei; Aslanian, Aaron; Yates, John R.

2008-01-01

344

Orbitrap mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Orbitrap is the newest addition to the family of high-resolution mass spectrometry analyzers. With its revolutionarily new, miniature design, Orbitrap combines high speed with excellent quantification properties, ranking favorably in many analytical applications. PMID:23590404

Zubarev, Roman A; Makarov, Alexander

2013-06-01

345

Gamma Rays  

MedlinePLUS

... Atoms Radioactive? Radiation and Radioactivity Half-Life Decay Chains Radioactive Equilibrium Curies Alpha Particles Beta Particles Gamma ... Radium-226 is part of the uranium decay chain and commonly occurs with uranium. Top of page ...

346

Gamma Knife  

MedlinePLUS

... blood vessel defects (arteriovenous malformations) and functional problems (trigeminal neuralgia). Possible future uses are being evaluated for epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. Single-session Gamma Knife® treatment is usually unsuitable for targets larger than three ...

347

A separation of electrons and protons in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope  

E-print Network

The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific goals: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in the total flux is ~10E-3 for high energies. In present paper, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The individual contribution to the proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray tel...

Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

2015-01-01

348

Physical constraints on models of gamma-ray bursters  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with the constraints that can be placed on models of gamma-ray burst sources based on only the well-established observational facts and physical principles. The premise is developed that the very hard x-ray and gamma-ray continua spectra are well-established aspects of gamma-ray bursts. Recent theoretical work on gamma-ray bursts are summarized with emphasis on the geometrical properties of the models. Constraints on the source models which are implied by the x-ray and gamma-ray spectra are described. The allowed ranges for the luminosity and characteristic dimension for gamma-ray burst sources are shown. Some of the deductions and inferences about the nature of the gamma-ray burst sources are summarized. 67 refs., 3 figs.

Epstein, R.I.

1985-01-01

349

Mid-Infrared Spectra of Be Stars  

E-print Network

We present the first medium-resolution ($R\\sim 600$) mid-infrared (8-13.3\\micron) spectra of 11 Be stars. A large number of lines are observed and identified in these spectra, including, as an example, 39 hydrogen recombination lines in the spectrum of $\\gamma$ Cas. In the majority of our spectra, all of the observed lines are attributable to hydrogen recombination. Two of the sources, $\\beta$ Lyr and MWC 349 also show emission from other species. Both of these objects show evidence of [Ne II] emission, and $\\beta$ Lyr also shows evidence of He I emission. We tabulate the effective line strength and line widths for the observed lines, and briefly discuss the physical implications of the observed line series. We also use a simple model of free-free emission to characterize the disks around these sources.

S. A. Rinehart; J. R. Houck; J. D. Smith

1999-10-11

350

Galaxies and gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nature of the high-energy spectra of several types of active galaxies and their contribution to the measured diffuse gamma-ray emission between 1 and 150 MeV are considered, using X-ray spectra of active galaxies and SAS 2 data regarding the intensity upper limits to the gamma-ray emission above 35 MeV. It is found that a substantial increase in slope of the photon energy spectrum must occur in the low energy gamma-ray region for Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and emission line galaxies; the power-law spectra observed in the X-ray range must steepen substantially between 50 keV and 50 MeV. In addition, a cosmological integration shows that Seyfert galaxies, BL Lac objects, and quasars may account for most of the 1-150 MeV diffuse background, even without significant evolution.

Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

1979-01-01

351

The influence of structural features on facile McLafferty-type, even-electron rearrangements in tandem mass spectra of carboxylate anions.  

PubMed

In contrast to the well-described McLafferty rearrangement in odd-electron cations, relatively little has been reported on comparable rearrangements in even-electron ions, especially negative ions. This work reports a systematic study using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) fragment ion spectra of carboxylate anions having a suitably acidic proton in the gamma position. The rearrangement process was studied in both ion trap and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers; characteristic enolate anions and stable neutral products were formed at low collision energies. The process has diagnostic and analytical potential in, for example, the analysis of peptides having C-terminal serine residues and of 3-hydroxy- or 3-aminocarboxylic acids in complex mixtures. PMID:16628561

Grossert, J Stuart; Cook, Matthew C; White, Robert L

2006-01-01

352

Discrimination of multilocus sequence typing-based Campylobacter jejuni subgroups by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry  

PubMed Central

Background Campylobacter jejuni, the most common bacterial pathogen causing gastroenteritis, shows a wide genetic diversity. Previously, we demonstrated by the combination of multi locus sequence typing (MLST)-based UPGMA-clustering and analysis of 16 genetic markers that twelve different C. jejuni subgroups can be distinguished. Among these are two prominent subgroups. The first subgroup contains the majority of hyperinvasive strains and is characterized by a dimeric form of the chemotaxis-receptor Tlp7m+c. The second has an extended amino acid metabolism and is characterized by the presence of a periplasmic asparaginase (ansB) and gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (ggt). Results Phyloproteomic principal component analysis (PCA) hierarchical clustering of MALDI-TOF based intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) spectra was able to group particular C. jejuni subgroups of phylogenetic related isolates in distinct clusters. Especially the aforementioned Tlp7m+c+ and ansB+/ ggt+ subgroups could be discriminated by PCA. Overlay of ICMS spectra of all isolates led to the identification of characteristic biomarker ions for these specific C. jejuni subgroups. Thus, mass peak shifts can be used to identify the C. jejuni subgroup with an extended amino acid metabolism. Conclusions Although the PCA hierarchical clustering of ICMS-spectra groups the tested isolates into a different order as compared to MLST-based UPGMA-clustering, the isolates of the indicator-groups form predominantly coherent clusters. These clusters reflect phenotypic aspects better than phylogenetic clustering, indicating that the genes corresponding to the biomarker ions are phylogenetically coupled to the tested marker genes. Thus, PCA clustering could be an additional tool for analyzing the relatedness of bacterial isolates. PMID:24195572

2013-01-01

353

Study of gamma-ray strength functions  

SciTech Connect

The use of gamma-ray strength function systematics to calculate neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra is discussed. The ratio of the average capture width, GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar, to the average level spacing, D/sub obs/, both at the neutron separation energy, can be derived from such systematics with much less uncertainty than from separate systematics for values of GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar and D/sub obs/. In particular, the E1 gamma-ray strength function is defined in terms of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR line shape is modeled with the usual Lorentzian function and also with a new energy-dependent, Breit-Wigner (EDBW) function. This latter form is further parameterized in terms of two overlapping resonances, even for nuclei where photonuclear measurements do not resolve two peaks. In the mass ranges studied, such modeling is successful for all nuclei away from the N = 50 closed neutron shell. Near the N = 50 shell, a one-peak EDBW appears to be more appropriate. Examples of calculated neutron capture excitation functions and capture gamma-ray spectra using the EDBW form are given for target nuclei in the mass-90 region and also in the Ta-Au mass region. 20 figures.

Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Dietrich, F.S.

1980-08-07

354

Z{gamma}{gamma}{gamma} {yields} 0 Processes in SANC  

SciTech Connect

We describe the analytic and numerical evaluation of the {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}Z process cross section and the Z {yields} {gamma}{gamma}{gamma} decay rate within the SANC system multi-channel approach at the one-loop accuracy level with all masses taken into account. The corresponding package for numeric calculations is presented. For checking of the results' correctness we make a comparison with the other independent calculations.

Bardin, D. Yu., E-mail: bardin@nu.jinr.ru; Kalinovskaya, L. V., E-mail: kalinov@nu.jinr.ru; Uglov, E. D., E-mail: corner@nu.jinr.ru [JINR, Dzhelepov Laboratory for Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15

355

Crack spectra analysis  

SciTech Connect

Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

Tiernan, M.

1980-09-01

356

Binary collision rates of relativistic thermal plasmas. II - Spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spectra of importance for the analysis of relativistic thermal plasmas are numerically calculated assuming a thermal form for the particle distribution functions. Complete sets of optically thin thermal electron-proton, electron-electron, and electron-positron bremsstrahlung spectra are calculated throughout the transrelativistic regime of electron temperatures and compared with approximate expressions for the spectra in the nonrelativistic and extreme relativistic regimes of temperature. A method for calculating accurate secondary particle production spectra in proton-proton collisions from threshold to the highest energies is presented based on an isobaric model near threshold and scaling representations at high energies. The production spectra of charged and neutral pions resulting from proton-proton collisions in relativistic proton plasmas are calculated, and the resultant electron, positron, and gamma-ray spectra from the decay of secondary pions are presented.

Dermer, C. D.

1986-01-01

357

ADP study of gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This grant supported study of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts through analysis of Ginga and HEAO-1 archival data, and modeling of the results in terms of radiation transfer calculations of cyclotron scattering in a strong magnetic field. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer code with which we are able to calculate the expected properties of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts was developed. The extensive software necessary in order to carry out fits of these model spectra to gamma-ray burst spectral data, including folding of the model spectra through the detector response functions was also developed. Fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB880205 were completed and fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB870303 are being carried out. These fits have allowed us to test our software, as well as to garner new scientific results. This work has demonstrated that cyclotron resonant scattering successfully accounts for the locations, strengths, and widths of the observed line features in GB870303 and GB880205. The success of the model provides compelling evidence that these gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin, resolving longstanding controversies about the nature and distance of the burst sources. These results were reported in two papers which are in press in the proceedings of the Taos Workshop on Gamma-Ray Bursts, and in a paper submitted for publication.

Lamb, Don Q.; Wang, John C. L.; Heuter, Geoffry J.; Graziani, Carlo; Loredo, Tom; Freeman, Peter

1991-01-01

358

Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules  

PubMed Central

The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

2013-01-01

359

Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

1983-01-01

360

Gamma ray bursts from magnetospheric plasma oscillations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neutron star Magnetospheric Plasma Oscillations (MPO), can account for the energetics, decay time scale, and spectra of typical Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The soft photon source is likely to be due to backwarming of the reprocessing boundary by the incipient gamma rays. It is shown that the observed fraction of bursts displaying low energy absorption features may be understood in the context of an MPO model. Moreover, it is found that GRB spectra should display these cyclotron lines about 18 percent of the time, which is consistent with the KONUS and Ginga sets of data.

Melia, Fulvio

1989-01-01

361

An integrated method for spectrum extraction and compound identification from gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry data  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is presented for extracting individual component spectra from gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS) data files\\u000a and then using these spectra to identify target compounds by matching spectra in a reference library. It extends a published\\u000a “model peak” approach which uses selected ion chromatograms as models for component shape. On the basis of this shape, individual\\u000a mass spectral peak abundance

S. E. Stein

1999-01-01

362

Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess gamma-ray emission ≳1GeV relative to diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called ``EGRET GeV excess''). The Large Area Telescope

A. A. Abdo; M. Ackermann; M. Ajello; B. Anderson; W. B. Atwood; M. Axelsson; L. Baldini; J. Ballet; G. Barbiellini; D. Bastieri; B. M. Baughman; K. Bechtol; R. Bellazzini; B. Berenji; R. D. Blandford; E. D. Bloom; E. Bonamente; A. W. Borgland; J. Bregeon; A. Brez; M. Brigida; P. Bruel; T. H. Burnett; G. A. Caliandro; R. A. Cameron; P. A. Caraveo; J. M. Casandjian; C. Cecchi; E. Charles; A. Chekhtman; C. C. Cheung; J. Chiang; S. Ciprini; R. Claus; J. Cohen-Tanugi; J. Conrad; H. Dereli; C. D. Dermer; A. de Angelis; F. de Palma; S. W. Digel; G. di Bernardo; M. Dormody; E. Do Couto E Silva; P. S. Drell; R. Dubois; D. Dumora; Y. Edmonds; C. Farnier; C. Favuzzi; S. J. Fegan; W. B. Focke; M. Frailis; Y. Fukazawa; S. Funk; P. Fusco; D. Gaggero; F. Gargano; N. Gehrels; S. Germani; B. Giebels; N. Giglietto; F. Giordano; T. Glanzman; G. Godfrey; I. A. Grenier; M.-H. Grondin; J. E. Grove; L. Guillemot; S. Guiriec; Y. Hanabata; A. K. Harding; M. Hayashida; E. Hays; R. E. Hughes; G. Jóhannesson; A. S. Johnson; R. P. Johnson; T. J. Johnson; W. N. Johnson; T. Kamae; H. Katagiri; J. Kataoka; N. Kawai; M. Kerr; J. Knödlseder; M. L. Kocian; F. Kuehn; M. Kuss; J. Lande; L. Latronico; F. Longo; F. Loparco; B. Lott; M. N. Lovellette; P. Lubrano; G. M. Madejski; A. Makeev; M. N. Mazziotta; W. McConville; J. E. McEnery; C. Meurer; P. F. Michelson; W. Mitthumsiri; T. Mizuno; A. A. Moiseev; C. Monte; M. E. Monzani; A. Morselli; I. V. Moskalenko; S. Murgia; P. L. Nolan; E. Nuss; T. Ohsugi; A. Okumura; N. Omodei; E. Orlando; J. F. Ormes; D. Paneque; J. H. Panetta; D. Parent; V. Pelassa; M. Pepe; M. Pesce-Rollins; F. Piron; T. A. Porter; S. Rainò; R. Rando; M. Razzano; A. Reimer; O. Reimer; T. Reposeur; S. Ritz; A. Y. Rodriguez; M. Roth; F. Ryde; H. F.-W. Sadrozinski; D. Sanchez; A. Sander; P. M. Saz Parkinson; J. D. Scargle; A. Sellerholm; C. Sgrò; D. A. Smith; P. D. Smith; G. Spandre; P. Spinelli; J.-L. Starck; F. W. Stecker; E. Striani; M. S. Strickman; A. W. Strong; D. J. Suson; H. Tajima; H. Takahashi; T. Tanaka; J. B. Thayer; J. G. Thayer; D. J. Thompson; L. Tibaldo; D. F. Torres; G. Tosti; A. Tramacere; Y. Uchiyama; T. L. Usher; V. Vasileiou; N. Vilchez; V. Vitale; A. P. Waite; P. Wang; B. L. Winer; K. S. Wood; T. Ylinen; M. Ziegler

2009-01-01

363

Fourier transform mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

2011-07-01

364

Nevan Krogan: Mass Spectrometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lecture from the iBioSeminars project, presented by Nevan Krogan of the Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology at UC-San Francisco, covers mass spectrometry and its application to molecular biology. Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for elucidating the elemental composition of a sample or molecule. More recently, it has been used to characterize biological material, in particular proteins and protein complexes, in a variety of organisms. This lecture will review the underlying principles of how a mass spectrometer works, discuss up to date instrumentation that is presently being used in the biological research setting and provide specific examples of how mass spectrometry is being used to reveal functional insight into different biological systems. The video runs 27:36 and can be downloaded in a number of formats: QuickTime, MP4, M4V, and PPT. The video can also be streamed through YouTube or iTunes U.

Krogan, Nevan

365

Target-decoy search strategy for increased confidence in large-scale protein identifications by mass spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS\\/MS) has become the preferred method for conducting large-scale surveys of proteomes. Automated interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry (MS\\/MS) spectra can be problematic, however, for a variety of reasons. As most sequence search engines return results even for 'unmatchable' spectra, proteome researchers must devise ways to distinguish correct from incorrect peptide identifications. The target-decoy

Joshua E Elias; Steven P Gygi

2007-01-01

366

Optical Spectra of Supernovae  

Microsoft Academic Search

The temporal evolution of the optical spectra of various types of supernovae (SNe) is illustrated, in part to aid observers classifying supernova candidates. Type II SNe are defined by the presence of hydrogen, and they exhibit a very wide variety of photometric and spectroscopic properties. Among hydrogen-deficient SNe (Type I), three subclasses are now known: those whose early-time spectra show

Alexei V. Filippenko

1997-01-01

367

Analysis of deteriorated rubber-based pressure sensitive adhesive by pyrolysis-gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rubber-based pressure sensitive adhesives of three packing tapes were exposed to sunlight for 6 months to accelerate the oxidation of the adhesives. The exposed adhesives and the unexposed adhesives were analyzed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (ATR\\/FT-IR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry (Py-GC\\/MS). The ATR\\/FT-IR spectra and the pyrograms changed drastically after the exposure. The pyrolyzate peaks of

Y. Kumooka

2006-01-01

368

Understanding Chemistry: Mass Spectrometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website, which is part of a larger project "ChemGuide" provides a nice introduction to mass spectrometry that is suitable for use by introductory analytical chemistry students. Content includes an introduction to the instrumentation, explanation of fragmentation and how it can be used to identify compound structure, the origin of the M+ and (M+1)+ peaks. Each section is succinct, well written and provides a simple example. As such the site should be useful to faculty introducing mass spectrometry in the analytical classroom and to chemistry students.

Clark, Jim

369

Californium-252 plasma desorption mass spectrometry of aminoglycoside antibiotics.  

PubMed

This paper presents mass spectral data of eleven aminoglycoside antibiotics by using californium-252 plasma desorption (252Cf PD) mass spectrometry. This mass spectral data could be used to develop a confirmatory method for monitoring aminoglycoside antibiotic residues isolated from food products of animal origin. Mass spectra were determined by applying time-of-flight 252Cf PD mass spectrometry to eleven aminoglycoside antibiotics, namely: neomycin, kanamycin, paromomycin, tobramycin, apramycin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, amikacin, netilmicin, sisomicin and gentamicins. All eleven antibiotics yielded positive ion spectra. These hydrophilic antibiotics were derivitized to extractable chromopheric compounds. All but two antibiotics (streptomycin and dihydrostreptomycin) yielded nitrophenyl derivatives and spectra were obtained in both negative and positive ion modes. Derivatized aminoglycosides produced cation and anion spectra with quasimolecular ions corresponding to [M + H]+., M+, [M - H]-., [M + Na]+, [M + K]+ and M-. or [M - H]- and M-. or [M - H]-. Underivatized antibiotics were best examined in the positive ion mode. 252Cf PD mass spectrometry consistently produced very strong molecular or quasimolecular ions for all aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:3191259

Khan, A H; Shaikh, B; Allen, E H; Sokoloski, E A

1988-10-01

370

VMSL: Virtual Mass Spectrometry Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site presents a series of case studies that can be explored using modern mass spectrometry methods. The problem-solving nature of the site provides students a virtual laboratory experience that can supplement access to mass spectrometry instrumentation.

2011-07-05

371

Detecting axionlike particles with gamma ray telescopes.  

PubMed

We propose that axionlike particles (ALPs) with a two-photon vertex, consistent with all astrophysical and laboratory bounds, may lead to a detectable signature in the spectra of high-energy gamma-ray sources. This occurs as a result of gamma rays being converted into ALPs in the magnetic fields of efficient astrophysical accelerators according to the "Hillas criterion", such as jets of active galactic nuclei or hot spots of radio galaxies. The discovery of such an effect is possible by GLAST in the 1-100 GeV range and by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes in the TeV range. PMID:18233353

Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D

2007-12-01

372

Gamma watermarking  

DOEpatents

A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

2004-05-25

373

Gamma Experiment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource consists of a Java applet and expository text. The applet simulates the time of the k'th arrival in a Poisson process. The arrival number k and the rate of the Poisson process can be varied. The applet illustrates the gamma distribution and a special case of the central limit theorem.

Kyle Siegrist

374

SAMPI: Protein Identification with Mass Spectra Alignments  

PubMed Central

Background Mass spectrometry based peptide mass fingerprints (PMFs) offer a fast, efficient, and robust method for protein identification. A protein is digested (usually by trypsin) and its mass spectrum is compared to simulated spectra for protein sequences in a database. However, existing tools for analyzing PMFs often suffer from missing or heuristic analysis of the significance of search results and insufficient handling of missing and additional peaks. Results We present an unified framework for analyzing Peptide Mass Fingerprints that offers a number of advantages over existing methods: First, comparison of mass spectra is based on a scoring function that can be custom-designed for certain applications and explicitly takes missing and additional peaks into account. The method is able to simulate almost every additive scoring scheme. Second, we present an efficient deterministic method for assessing the significance of a protein hit, independent of the underlying scoring function and sequence database. We prove the applicability of our approach using biological mass spectrometry data and compare our results to the standard software Mascot. Conclusion The proposed framework for analyzing Peptide Mass Fingerprints shows performance comparable to Mascot on small peak lists. Introducing more noise peaks, we are able to keep identification rates at a similar level by using the flexibility introduced by scoring schemes. PMID:17386090

Kaltenbach, Hans-Michael; Wilke, Andreas; Böcker, Sebastian

2007-01-01

375

Atmospheric gamma-ray and neutron flashes  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray pulses are calculated from 2D numerical simulations of an upward atmospheric discharge in a self-consistent electric field using the multigroup approach to the kinetics of relativistic runaway electrons (REs). Computed {gamma}-ray numbers and spectra are consistent with those of terrestrial {gamma}-ray flashes (TGFs) observed aboard spacecrafts. The RE flux is concentrated mainly within the domain of the Blue Jet fluorescence. This confirms that exactly the domain adjacent to a thundercloud is the source of the observed {gamma}-ray flashes. The yield of photonuclear neutrons is calculated. One {gamma}-ray pulse generates {approx}10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} neutrons. The possibility of the direct deposition of REs to the detector readings and the origin of the lightning-advanced TGFs are discussed.

Babich, L. P., E-mail: babich@elph.vniief.ru; Kudryavtsev, A. Yu., E-mail: kay@sar.ru; Kudryavtseva, M. L., E-mail: kay@sar.ru; Kutsyk, I. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

2008-01-15

376

Characteristics of gamma-ray line flares  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of solar gamma rays by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) demonstrate that energetic protons and ions are rapidly accelerated during the impulsive phase. To understand the acceleration mechanisms for these particles, the characteristics of the gamma ray line flares observed by SMM were studied. Some very intense hard X-ray flares without detectable gamma ray lines were also investigated. Gamma ray line flares are distinguished from other flares by: (1) intense hard X-ray and microwave emissions; (2) delay of high energy hard X-rays; (3) emission of type 2 and/or type 4 radio bursts; and (4) flat hard X-ray spectra (average power law index: 3.1). The majority of the gamma ray line flares shared all these characteristics, and the remainder shared at least three of them. Positive correlations were found between durations of spike bursts and spatial sizes of flare loops as well as between delay times and durations of spike bursts.

Bai, T.; Dennis, B.

1983-01-01

377

Mass Spectrometry and Protein Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mass spectrometry is a central analytical technique for protein research and for the study of biomolecules in general. Driven by the need to identify, characterize, and quantify proteins at ever increasing sensitivity and in ever more complex samples, a wide range of new mass spectrometry-based analytical platforms and experimental strategies have emerged. Here we review recent advances in mass spectrometry

Bruno Domon; Ruedi Aebersold

2006-01-01

378

Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

1984-01-01

379

Mass Spectrometry Primer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website developed by Waters Corporation provides a brief primer on mass spectrometry which includes information on instrumentation, a discussion of mass accuracy, resolution, and LC-MS. As such the site should be a valuable resource for both students and faculty.

380

Gamma Ray Astrophysics: New insight into the universe  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray observations of the solar system, the galaxy and extragalactic radiation are reported. Topics include: planets, comets, and asteroids; solar observations; interstellar medium and galactic structure; compact objects; cosmology; and diffuse radiation. The instrumentation used in gamma ray astronomy in covered along with techniques for the analysis of observational spectra.

Fichtel, C. E.; Trombka, J. I.

1981-01-01

381

The particle-gamma coincidence method: A brief introduction  

SciTech Connect

Excitation energy information from particle detectors can significantly improve the analysis process of {gamma}-ray spectra and result in more detailed nuclear structure information. Therefore, a new setup at the HORUS {gamma}-ray spectrometer at the University of Cologne has been installed, housing silicon particle detectors at up to eight positions.

Mayer, J.; Derya, V.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Netterdon, L.; Pascu, S.; Pickstone, S. G.; Sauerwein, A.; Scholz, P.; Spieker, M.; Streit, T.-M.; Zilges, A. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany)

2013-06-10

382

Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

Weekes, Trevor C.

1994-01-01

383

Formation of an 8-hydroxyguanine moiety in deoxyribonucleic acid on gamma-irradiation in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect

Isolation and characterization of a novel radiation-induced product, i.e., the 8-hydroxyguanine residue, produced in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), 2'-deoxyguanosine, and 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate by gamma-irradiation in aqueous solution, are described. For this purpose, gamma-irradiated DNA was first hydrolyzed with a mixture of four enzymes, i.e., DNase I, spleen and snake venom exonucleases, and alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the resulting mixture by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after trimethylsilylation revealed the presence of a product, which was identified as 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine on the basis of the typical fragment ions of its trimethylsilyl (Me3Si) derivative. This product was then isolated by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The UV and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra taken from the isolated product confirmed the structure suggested by the mass spectrum of its Me3Si derivative. The yield of 8-hydroxyguanine was also measured. Its mechanism of formation is believed to involve OH radical addition to the C-8 position of guanine followed by oxidation of the radical adduct.

Dizdaroglu, M.

1985-07-30

384

Gamma spectroscopic analysis and associated radiation hazards of building materials used in Egypt.  

PubMed

Radiation exposure of the population can be increased appreciably by the use of building materials containing above-normal levels of naturally occurring radionuclides of terrestrial origin. Using gamma-ray spectrometry, the natural radioactivity levels of 55 samples of natural and manufactured Egyptian building materials have been investigated. The samples were collected from local market and construction sites. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined. The activities were in the ranges 11.7-35.6, 12.4-55.2 and 60-350 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The activities are compared with available reported data from other countries and with the world average value for soils. The radium equivalent activity Ra(eq), the external hazard index H(ex) and the absorbed dose rate in air D in each sample was evaluated to assess the radiation hazard for people living in dwellings made of the materials studied. All building materials have shown Ra(eq) (range from 37.76 to 116.87 Bq kg(-1)) lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1) adopted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The absorbed dose rate in indoor air is lower than the international recommended value of 55 nGy h(-1) for all test samples. All the materials examined are acceptable for use as building materials as defined by the OECD criterion. PMID:19841012

El-Taher, A

2010-02-01

385

Measurement of the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter array  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}) reaction was measured with the DANCE {gamma} calorimeter (consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The multiplicity distributions of the {gamma} decay were used to determine the resonance spins up to E{sub n}=300 eV. The {gamma}-ray energy spectra for different multiplicities were measured for the s-wave resonances. The shapes of these spectra were compared with simulations based on the use of the DICEBOX statistical model code. Simulations showed that the scissors mode is required not only for the ground-state transitions but also for transitions between excited states.

Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA, andTriangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States) andTriangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Becvar, F.; Kroll, J.; Krticka, M. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, CZ-180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-07-15

386

Time-of-flight discrimination between gamma-rays and neutrons by neural networks  

E-print Network

In gamma-ray spectroscopy, a number of neutrons are emitted from the nuclei together with the gamma-rays and these neutrons influence gamma-ray spectra. An obvious method of separating between neutrons and gamma-rays is based on the time-of-flight (tof) technique. This work aims obtaining tof distributions of gamma-rays and neutrons by using feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). It was shown that, ANN can correctly classify gamma-ray and neutron events. Testing of trained networks on experimental data clearly shows up tof discrimination of gamma-rays and neutrons.

Serkan Akkoyun

2012-08-13

387

Non-thermal radiative pair plasmas: processes and spectra  

E-print Network

We study the emission and absorption spectra due to various photon and pair processes in a non-equilibrium pair plasma containing a significant density of photons. We present here some preliminary results from Monte-Carlo simulations. These investigations are likely to be useful in understanding the radiation and relaxation mechanisms in non-thermal gamma-ray sources in astrophysics.

Ravi P. Pilla; Jacob Shaham

1995-05-17

388

Eigenvalue-dependent neutron energy spectra: Definitions, analyses, and applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general qualitative analysis of spectral effects that arise from solving the kappa-, ..cap alpha..-, ..gamma..-, and sigma-eigenvalue formulations of the neutron transport equation for nuclear systems that deviate (to first order) from criticality is presented. Hierarchies of neutron spectra softness are established and expressed concisely in terms of the newly introduced spatialdependent local spectral indices for the core and

D. G. Cacuci; Y. Ronen; Z. Shayer; J. J. Wagschal; Y. Yeivin

1982-01-01

389

A gamma-gamma coincidence/anticoincidence spectrometer for low-level cosmogenic (22)Na/(7)Be activity ratio measurement.  

PubMed

In this study, a digital gamma-gamma coincidence/anticoincidence spectrometer was developed and examined for low-level cosmogenic (22)Na and (7)Be in air-filter sample monitoring. The spectrometer consists of two bismuth germanate scintillators (BGO) and an XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The spectrometer design allows a more selective measurement of (22)Na with a significant background reduction by gamma-gamma coincidence events processing. Hence, the system provides a more sensitive way to quantify trace amounts of (22)Na than normal high resolution gamma spectrometry providing a critical limit of 3 mBq within a 20 h count. The use of a list-mode data acquisition technique enabled simultaneous determination of (22)Na and (7)Be activity concentrations using a single measurement by coincidence and anticoincidence mode respectively. PMID:24412563

Zhang, Weihua; Ungar, Kurt; Stukel, Matthew; Mekarski, Pawel

2014-04-01

390

Analysis of lipids: metal oxide laser ionization mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has been used for lipid analysis; however, one of the drawbacks of this technique is matrix interference peaks at low masses. Metal oxide surfaces are described here for direct, matrix-free analysis of small (MW < 1000 Da) lipid compounds, without interferences in the resulting spectra from traditional matrix background peaks. Spectra from lipid standards produced protonated and sodiated molecular ions. More complex mixtures including vegetable oil shortening and lipid extracts from bacterial and algal sources provided similar results. Mechanistic insight into the mode of ionization from surface spectroscopy, negative ion mass spectrometry, and stable isotope studies is also presented. The metal oxide system is compared to other reported matrix-free systems. PMID:22873784

McAlpin, Casey R; Voorhees, Kent J; Corpuz, April R; Richards, Ryan M

2012-09-18

391

Methods to Collect, Compile, and Analyze Observed Short-lived Fission Product Gamma Data  

SciTech Connect

A unique set of fission product gamma spectra was collected at short times (4 minutes to 1 week) on various fissionable materials. Gamma spectra were collected from the neutron-induced fission of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium isotopes at thermal, epithermal, fission spectrum, and 14-MeV neutron energies. This report describes the experimental methods used to produce and collect the gamma data, defines the experimental parameters for each method, and demonstrates the consistency of the measurements.

Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Ellis, Tere A.

2011-09-29

392

A jetdisk symbiosis model for Gamma Ray Bursts: fluence distribution, CRs  

E-print Network

A jet­disk symbiosis model for Gamma Ray Bursts: fluence distribution, CRs and š's G. Pugliese 1­disk symbiosis model to explain Gamma Ray Bursts and their afterglows. It is proposed that GRBs are created or the Galactic cosmic ray spectra. INTRODUCTION Gamma­Ray Bursts are short bursts that peak in the soft fl

Falcke, Heino

393

Measurement of Grüneisen parameter of tissue by photoacoustic spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Grüneisen parameter of tissue is a constitutive parameter in photoacoustic tomography. Here, we applied photoacoustic spectrometry (PAS) to directly measure the Grüneisen parameter. In our PAS system, laser pulses at wavelengths between 460 and 1600 nm were delivered to tissue samples, and photoacoustic signals were detected by a 20 MHz flat water-immersion ultrasonic transducer. By fitting photoacoustic spectra to light absorption spectra, we found that the Grüneisen parameter was 0.73 for porcine subcutaneous fat tissue, and 0.15 for oxygenated bovine red blood cells at room temperature (24°C).

Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

2013-03-01

394

Multiphoton effects in coherent radiation spectra  

E-print Network

At measurements of gamma-radiation spectra from ultra-relativistic electrons in periodic structures, pileup of events in the calorimeter may cause significant deviation of the detector signal from the classically evaluated spectrum. That requires appropriate resummation of multiphoton contributions. We describe the resummation procedure for the photon spectral intensity and for the photon multiplicity spectrum, and apply it to the study of spectra of coherent radiation with an admixture of incoherent component. Impact of multiphoton effects on the shape of the radiation spectrum is investigated. The limit of high photon multiplicity for coherent radiation is explored. A method for reconstruction of the underlying single-photon spectrum from the multiphoton one is proposed.

Bondarenco, M V

2013-01-01

395

Probabilistic Disease Classification of Expression-Dependent Proteomic Data from Mass Spectrometry of Human Serum  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed an algorithm called Q5 for probabilistic classification of healthy vs. disease whole serum samples using mass spectrometry. The algorithm employs Principal Components Analysis (PCA) followed by Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) on whole spectrum Surface- Enhanced Laser Desorption\\/Ionization Time of Flight (SELDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry (MS) data, and is demonstrated on four real datasets from complete, complex SELDI spectra

Ryan H. Lilien; Hany Farid; Bruce Randall Donald

2003-01-01

396

De Novo Peptide Sequencing via Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peptide sequencing via tandem mass spectrometry (MS\\/MS) is one of the most powerful tools in proteomics for identifying proteins. Because complete genome sequences are accumulat- ing rapidly, the recent trend in interpretation of MS\\/MS spectra has been database search. However, de novo MS\\/MS spectral interpretation remains an open problem typically involving manual interpretation by expert mass spectrometrists. We have developed

Vlado Dancík; Theresa A. Addona; Karl R. Clauser; James E. Vath; Pavel A. Pevzner

1999-01-01

397

Charge Prediction of Lipid Fragments in Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

An artificial neural network is developed for predicting which fragment is charged and which fragment is neutral for lipid fragment pairs produced from a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry simulation process. This charge predictor is integrated into software developed at PNNL for in silico spectra generation and identification of metabolites known as Met ISIS. To test the effect of including charge prediction in Met ISIS, 46 lipids are used which show a reduction in false positive identifications when the charge predictor is utilized.

Schrom, Brian T.; Kangas, Lars J.; Ginovska, Bojana; Metz, Thomas O.; Miller, John H.

2011-12-18

398

PAH Spectra for Everyone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ames Astrochemistry Laboratory now has PAH IR spectra of more than 220 laboratory measured and over 600 theoretically calculated IR spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a multitude of forms. The vast majority of these spectra are not readily accessible to the public. We propose to make the full collection of the Ames experimental and computational collection of PAH IR spectra available to the entire Spitzer community and accessible via the World Wide Web (WWW). The laboratory measured mid-IR spectral collection includes over 220 neutral, cationic, and anionic PAHs, PAHs with deuterium in place of hydrogen, PAHs containing oxygen, and PAHs containing nitrogen (PANHs). The formulae of the PAHs in the experimental data collection range from C10H8 to C50H22. Unfortunately, it is not possible to obtain physical samples of all of the types of PAHs that are of astrophysical interest for experimental study. We also have an extensive collection of accurate computational spectra to fill in gaps in the experimentally available spectra. Our theoretical PAH spectral collection includes very large PAHs, PAHs containing 40 to 132 carbon atoms which are comparable to the size of the PAHs thought to dominate the interstellar emission spectrum. Large PAHs might be multiply charged and these are also represented in the theoretical database. There is also observational evidence for PAH cations with nitrogen in the inner rings (PANHs) and interest in the spectroscopy of aromatic species containing oxygen and deuterium as well as PAH metal clusters. All of these types of PAHs are represented in the Ames computational PAH IR spectroscopic collection. If funded, we plan to make our entire inventory of the lab spectra available to the Spitzer community within the next two years.

Allamandola, Louis; Bauschlicher, Charlie, Jr.; Mattioda, Andrew

2007-05-01

399

Mass Spectrometry and Glycomics  

PubMed Central

Abstract Glycosylation defines the adhesive properties of animal cell surfaces and the surrounding extracellular environments. Because cells respond to stimuli by altering glycan expression, glycan structures vary according to spatial location in tissue and temporal factors. These dynamic structural expression patterns, combined with the essential roles glycans play in physiology, drive the need for analytical methods for glycoconjugates. In addition, recombinant glycoprotein drug products represent a multibillion dollar market. Effective analytical methods are needed to speed the identification of new targets and the development of industrial glycoprotein products, both new and biosimilar. Mass spectrometry is an enabling technology in glycomics. This review summarizes mass spectrometry of glycoconjugate glycans. The intent is to summarize appropriate methods for glycans given their chemical properties as distinct from those of proteins, lipids, and small molecule metabolites. Special attention is given to the uses of mass spectral profiling for glycomics with respect to the N-linked, O-linked, ganglioside, and glycosaminoglycan compound classes. Next, the uses of tandem mass spectrometry of glycans are summarized. The review finishes with an update on mass spectral glycoproteomics. PMID:20443730

2010-01-01

400

Microdosimetric spectra measurements of JANUS neutrons  

SciTech Connect

Neutron radiation from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory is being used with increasing frequency for major biological experiments. The fast neutron spectrum has a Kerma-weighted mean energy of 0.8 MeV and low gamma-ray contamination. In 1984 the JANUS fission converter plate of highly enriched uranium was replaced by one made of low-enriched uranium. We recorded microdosimetric spectra at several different positions in the high-flux irradiation room of JANUS before the change of the converter plate. Each set of measurements consisted of spectra taken at three different site diameters (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m) and in both ''attenuator up'' and ''attenuator down'' configurations. At two conventional dosimetry reference positions, two sets of measurements were recorded. At three biological reference positions, measurements simulating several biological irradiation conditions, were taken. The dose rate at each position was estimated and compared with dose rates obtained previously by conventional dosimetry. Comparison of the different measurements showed no major change in spectra as a function of position or irradiation condition. First results from similar sets of measurements recorded after the installment of the new converter plate indicate no major change in the spectra. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Marshall, I.R.; Williamson, F.S.

1985-01-01

401

Determinations of photon spectra. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

A method is developed to unfold photon spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with probability distributions of path lengths for incident and internally generated photons in the energy range 0-2.8 MeV. This matrix is inverted and multiplied by a measured pulse height spectrum to obtain the photon energy distribution incident upon the detector. This deconvolution procedure provides improved information about the energy continuum of incident photons and can enhanced the identification of discrete gamma energies. Experiments were performed to verify the unfolding methodology and to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of this technique. Measured spectra were acquired from indoor and outdoor environments and unfolded. The results show that measured spectra overestimate the number of photons below 240 keV by up to 30 %. When the total exposure was calculated directly from the measured spectra, the low energy contribution was overestimated by a factor of two. This may have implications on the interpretation and calibration of energy dependent dosimeters used for occupational and environmental monitoring.

Wannigman, D.L.

1989-01-01

402

System and method for resolving gamma-ray spectra  

DOEpatents

A system for identifying radionuclide emissions is described. The system includes at least one processor for processing output signals from a radionuclide detecting device, at least one training algorithm run by the at least one processor for analyzing data derived from at least one set of known sample data from the output signals, at least one classification algorithm derived from the training algorithm for classifying unknown sample data, wherein the at least one training algorithm analyzes the at least one sample data set to derive at least one rule used by said classification algorithm for identifying at least one radionuclide emission detected by the detecting device.

Gentile, Charles A.; Perry, Jason; Langish, Stephen W.; Silber, Kenneth; Davis, William M.; Mastrovito, Dana

2010-05-04

403

Induced Radioactivity in Recovered Skylab Materials. [gamma ray spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four radioactive isotopes found in aluminum and stainless steel samples from Skylab debris were recovered in Australia. The low-level activity was induced by high-energy protons and neutrons in the space environment. Measurements of the specific activities are given.

Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

1980-01-01

404

Gamma ray spectrometry of LDEF samples: Results of 1992 analyses  

SciTech Connect

In January 1990, NASA retrieved the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which had orbited the Earth since April 1984. The satellite had become slightly radioactive due to cosmic exposure, and the SRTC Underground Counting Facility was used to analyze LDEF samples of Al and Ta for activations of {sup 22}Na, {sup 172}Lu, and {sup 173}Lu. Background steel trunnion samples, not irradiated in space, were analyzed for {sup 60}Co. This report summarizes results for 15 samples analyzed in 1992.

Winn, W.G.

1993-09-01

405

Gamma-spectrometry with Compton suppressed detectors arrays  

SciTech Connect

Recent results of experiments performed with two different Compton-suppressed detectors arrays in Daresbury and Berkeley (/sup 163,164/Yb and /sup 154/Er, respectively), are presented together with a brief description of the national French array presently under construction in Strasbourg. 25 refs., 15 figs.

Schueck, C.; Hannachi, F.; Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N.; Paul, E.; Love, D.J.G.; Nolan, P.J.; Nelson, A.H.; Walker, P.M.

1985-01-01

406

A new versatile underground gamma-ray spectrometry system.  

PubMed

The newest development in IRMM's underground analytical facility is a large lead shield lined with copper that is versatile and can host several detectors of different types. The characteristics and the background performance of the shield are described for four different detector configurations involving HPGe-detectors and NaI-detectors. The shield has been designed to swap detectors, while still maintaining a low background. This enables testing of detectors for other experiments and optimisation of detection limits for specific radionuclides in different projects. PMID:23743483

Lutter, Guillaume; Hult, Mikael; Marissens, Gerd; Andreotti, Erica; Rosengård, Ulf; Misiaszek, Marcin; Yüksel, Ayhan; Sahin, Namik

2013-11-01

407

Spectral archives: extending spectral libraries to analyze both identified and unidentified spectra.  

SciTech Connect

Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments yield multiple, nearly identical spectra of the same peptide in various laboratories, but proteomics researchers typically do not leverage the unidentified spectra produced in other labs to decode spectra they generate. We propose a spectral archives approach that clusters MS/MS datasets, representing similar spectra by a single consensus spectrum. Spectral archives extend spectral libraries by analyzing both identified and unidentified spectra in the same way and maintaining information about peptide spectra that are common across species and conditions. Thus archives offer both traditional library spectrum similarity-based search capabilities along with new ways to analyze the data. By developing a clustering tool, MS-Cluster, we generated a spectral archive from ?1.18 billion spectra that greatly exceeds the size of existing spectral repositories. We advocate that publicly available data should be organized into spectral archives rather than be analyzed as disparate datasets, as is mostly the case today.

Frank, Ari M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shah, Anuj R.; Carver, Jeremy J.; Bandeira, Nuno; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

2011-07-01

408

Absolute intensities of {gamma} rays in {sup 182}Hf decay  

SciTech Connect

The absolute intensities of {gamma} rays produced in the decay of {sup 182}Hf were determined by measuring its {gamma}-ray spectra with high-resolution Ge spectrometers. Because the sample was chemically purified more than 30 years ago, the daughter {sup 182}Ta (t{sub 1/2}=114.43 d) was in secular equilibrium with {sup 182}Hf (t{sub 1/2}=8.90x10{sup 6} yr). The absolute intensities of {sup 182}Hf {gamma} rays were determined with respect to the intensities of {sup 182}Ta {gamma} lines. In order to minimize summing losses from the peak areas, spectra were measured at low absolute efficiencies. The absolute intensity of the 270.4-keV-{gamma} ray was found to be (79.0{+-}0.6)% per {sup 182}Hf {beta}{sup -} decay.

Ahmad, I.; Greene, J.P.; Moore, E.F.; Kutschera, W.; Vockenhuber, C. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Institute for Isotope Research and Nuclear Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

2004-10-01

409

A system for simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A state-of-the-art radiation detection system for real-time and simultaneous spectroscopy of beta-particles and gamma-rays has been developed. The system utilizes a triple-layer phoswich detector and a customized Digital Pulse Processor (DPP) designed and built in our laboratory. The DPP board digitally captures the analog signal pulses and, following several digital preprocessing steps, transfers valid pulses to the host computer for further digital processing. A resolving algorithm also was developed to digitally discriminate beta and gamma events, and reconstruct separate beta and gamma-ray energy spectra with minimal crosstalk. The spectrometer has proven to be an effective tool for recording separate beta and gamma-ray spectra from mixed radiation fields. The system as a beta-gamma spectrometer will have broad-ranging applications in nuclear non-proliferation, radioactive waste management, worker safety, systems reliability, dose assessment, and risk analysis.

Farsoni, A. T.; Hamby, D. M.

2007-08-01

410

Mass Spectrometry in the Postgenomic Era  

E-print Network

Mass Spectrometry in the Postgenomic Era Brian T. Chait Laboratory for Mass Spectrometry spectrometry, lipidomics Abstract Mass spectrometry (MS) is rapidly becoming an essential tool for bi- ologists building blocks after frag- mentation (1). Historically, this simple mass spectrometry (MS) approach proved

Chait, Brian T.

411

Gamma, Beta, Erf  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page includes the encyclopedia entries for gamma, beta and erf functions including factorials, binomials, gamma functions and inverses, differentiated gamma functions, beta functions and inverses, probability integrals and inverses, Frensnel integrals and exponential integrals.

412

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies with GLAST  

E-print Network

Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

D. J. Thompson

2007-11-27

413

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST  

SciTech Connect

Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

2011-11-23

414

Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets  

SciTech Connect

We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

Hirata, K., E-mail: k.hirata@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

2014-03-15

415

X-ray echoes from gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The identification of an echo of reflected radiation in time histories of gamma-ray burst spectra can provide important information about the existence of binary companions or accretion disks in gamma-ray burst systems. Because of the nature of Compton scattering, the spectrum of the echo will be attenuated at gamma-ray energies compared with the spectrum of the primary burst emission. The expected temporal and spectral signatures of the echo and a search for such echoes are described, and implications for gamma-ray burst models are discussed.

Dermer, Charles D.; Hurley, Kevin C.; Hartmann, Dieter H.

1991-01-01

416

The Study of the Cosmic Gamma-Emission Nonstationary Fluxes Characteristics by the AVS-F Apparatus Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AVS-F apparatus (Russian abbreviation for Amplitude-Time Spectrometry of the Sun) is intended for the solar flares' hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission characteristic studies and for the search and detection of the gamma-ray bursts (GRB). At present over 1,100 events with duration more than 2 s without any coordinate relations to Earth Radiation Belts and South Atlantic Anomaly were separated on the results of preliminary analysis of AVS-F experiment database.About 68 % of the identified events were associated with quasistationary equatorial precipitations-15-30 % count rate increases in the low-energy gamma-band of the AVS-F apparatus over its average value obtained by approximation of these parts with polynomials discovered on some equatorial segments in the ranges of geographic latitude of 25? up to +30?. Several short events with duration of 1-16 ms associated with terrestrial gamma-ray flashes were registered during the experiment. These events were detected above the powerful thunderstorm formations.Solar flares with classes stronger than M1.0 according to the GOES classification were about 7 % of the detected events. Solar flares' hard X-rays and ?-emission were mainly observed during the rise or maximum phases of the emission in the soft X-rays band according to the detectors on board the GOES series satellites data and duration of their registration is less than of the soft X-ray bands. According to the preliminary data analysis gamma-emission with energy over 10 MeV was registered during 12 % of the observed flares. The emission in the energy band E ¿ 100 keV was registered during over 60 faint solar flares (of B and C classes according to the GOES and from several ones ?-quanta with energy up to several tens of MeV were observed.Several spectral line complexes were observed in the spectra of some solar flares stronger than M1.0 in the low-energy gamma-range. Registered spectral features were corresponded to ? ?-lines, annihilation line, nuclear lines, and neutron capture line on1H (2.223 MeV). In the spectrum of the January 20, 2005 solar flare the feature in the range of 15-21 MeV was detected for the first time. It can be associated with lines of 15.11 MeV (12C +16O) or 20.58 MeV (from neutron radiative capture on3He), or with their combination. Also several e-dominant flares without any gamma-lines in energy spectra were identified. All detected faint solar flares were e-dominant according to the preliminary data analysis.Thin structure with characteristic timescale of 30-160 s was observed at 99 % significance level on some solar flares stronger than M1.0 temporal profiles in the low-energy gamma-band in the energy ranges corresponding to the identified spectral features or whole gamma-band energy boundaries. According to the results of the preliminary analysis during the flare of January 20, 2005, thin structure with timescale from 7 ms to 35 ms was detected at 99 % confidence level in the energy range of 0.1-20 MeV. Some thin structure with characteristic timescale 50-110 s was observed on temporal profiles of several faint events.About 3 % of the identified events were gamma-ray bursts. During some bursts high-energy gamma-emission was observed, for example Emax = 147 ± 3 MeV for GRB050525.

Kotov, Yu. D.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelsky, A. I.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Glyanenko, A. S.; Kalmykov, P. A.; Amandzholova, D. B.; Samoylenko, V. T.; Yurov, V. N.; Pavlov, A. V.; Chervyakova, O. I.; Afonina, I. V.

417

Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)  

National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

418

Spectra of coronae  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a new invariant, the coronal of a graph, and use it to compute the spectrum of the corona G?H of two graphs G and H. In particular, we show that this spectrum is completely determined by the spectra of G and H and the coronal of H. Previous work has computed the spectrum of a corona only in

Cam McLeman; Erin McNicholas

2011-01-01

419

Localization of inclusions in multiple prompt gamma ray analysis: a feasibility study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the feasibility of using low energy gamma rays from neutron capture to localize slabs inside samples. A new system based on two gamma ray detectors with 2D collimators to be tested at the INES beamline at the pulsed neutron source ISIS (Oxford, UK) is described. The system provides a localization of slabs inside extended samples by using gamma ray self-absorption. Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations of the beamline were carried out to model gamma spectra from test samples.

Miceli, A.; Festa, G.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Andreani, C.

2013-12-01

420

The POPOP4 library and codes for preparing secondary gamma-ray production cross sections  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The POPOP4 code for converting secondary gamma ray yield data to multigroup secondary gamma ray production cross sections and the POPOP4 library of secondary gamma ray yield data are described. Recent results of the testing of uranium and iron data sets from the POPOP4 library are given. The data sets were tested by comparing calculated secondary gamma ray pulse height spectra measured at the ORNL TSR-II reactor.

Ford, W. E., III

1972-01-01

421

Mass Spectrometry of Glycans  

PubMed Central

Powerful new strategies based on mass spectrometry are revolutionizing the structural analysis and profiling of glycans and glycoconjugates. We survey here the major biosynthetic pathways that underlie the biological diversity in glycobiology, with emphasis on glycoproteins, and the approaches that can be used to address the resulting heterogeneity. Included among these are derivatizations, on- and off-line chromatography, electrospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, and a variety of dissociation methods, the recently introduced electron-based techniques being of particular interest. PMID:24010834

Han, Liang; Costello, Catherine E.

2014-01-01

422

Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources  

SciTech Connect

Accurate determination of dose-rate constant ({lambda}) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (<50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of {lambda} taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of {lambda}. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in {lambda} determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it ideal to determine the dose-rate constant of each source model from a larger and more representative sample of actual sources and to use it as a quality assurance resource for periodic monitoring of the constancy of {lambda} for brachytherapy sources used in patient treatments.

Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2007-04-15

423

Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources.  

PubMed

Accurate determination of dose-rate constant (lambda) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (< 50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of lambda taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of lambda. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in lambda determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it ideal to determine the dose-rate constant of each source model from a larger and more representative sample of actual sources and to use it as a quality assurance resource for periodic monitoring of the constancy of lambda for brachytherapy sources used in patient treatments. PMID:17500473

Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

2007-04-01

424

Photon-photon absorption and the uniqueness of the spectra of active galactic nuclei  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of the feedback of e(+)-e(-) pair reinjection in a plasma due to photon-photon absorption of its own radiation was examined. Under the assumption of continuous electron injection with a power law spectrum E to the minus gamma power and Compton losses only, it is shown that for gamma 2 the steady state electron distribution function has a unique form independent of the primary injection spectrum. This electron distribution function can, by synchrotron emission, reproduce the general characteristics of the observed radio to optical active galactic nuclei spectra. Inverse Compton scattering of the synchrotron photons by the same electron distribution can account for their X-ray spectra, and also implies gamma ray emission from these objects. This result is invoked to account for the similarity of these spectra, and it is consistent with observations of the diffuse gamma ray background.

Kazanas, D.

1984-01-01

425

Indexing and Searching a Mass Spectrometry Database  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Database preprocessing in order to create an index often permits considerable speedup in search compared to the iterated query of an unprocessed database. In this paper we apply index-based database lookup to a range search problem that arises in mass spectrometry-based proteomics: given a large collection of sparse integer sets and a sparse query set, find all the sets from the collection that have at least k integers in common with the query set. This problem arises when searching for a mass spectrum in a database of theoretical mass spectra using the shared peaks count as similarity measure. The algorithms can easily be modified to use the more advanced shared peaks intensity measure instead of the shared peaks count. We introduce three different algorithms solving these problems. We conclude by presenting some experiments using the algorithms on realistic data showing the advantages and disadvantages of the algorithms.

Besenbacher, Søren; Schwikowski, Benno; Stoye, Jens

426

Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

2008-07-01

427

In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis  

SciTech Connect

The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

1993-01-01

428

Toward Single-Molecule Nanomechanical Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a preeminent methodology of proteomics since it provides rapid and quantitative identification of protein species with relatively low sample consumption. Yet with the trend toward biological analysis at increasingly smaller scales, ultimately down to the volume of an individual cell, MS with few-to-single molecule resolution will be required. We report the first realization of MS based on single-biological-molecule detection with nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). NEMS provide unparalleled mass resolution, now sufficient for detection of individual molecular species in real time. However, high sensitivity is only one of several components required for MS. We demonstrate a first complete prototype NEMS-MS system for single-molecule mass spectrometry providing proof-of-principle for this new technique. Nanoparticles and protein species are introduced by electrospray injection from the fluid phase in ambient conditions into vacuum and subsequently delivered to the NEMS detector by hexapole ion optics . Mass measurements are then recorded in real-time as analytes adsorb, one-by-one, onto a phase-locked, ultrahigh frequency (UHF) NEMS resonator. These first NEMS-MS spectra, obtained with modest resolution from only several hundred mass adsorption events, presage the future capabilities of this methodology. We outline the substantial improvements feasible in near term, through recent advances and technological avenues that are unique to NEMS-MS.

Roukes, Michael

2009-03-01

429

Differential mobility spectrometry-driven shotgun lipidomics.  

PubMed

The analysis of lipids by mass spectrometry (MS) can provide in-depth characterization for many forms of biological samples. However, such workflows can also be hampered by challenges like low chromatographic resolution for lipid separations and the convolution of mass spectra from isomeric and isobaric species. To address these issues, we describe the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a rapid and predictable separation technique within a shotgun lipidomics workflow, with a special focus on phospholipids (PLs). These analytes, ionized by electrospray ionization (ESI), are filtered using DMS prior to MS analysis. The observed separation (measured in terms of DMS compensation voltage) is affected by several factors, including the m/z of the lipid ion, the structure of an individual ion, and the presence of chemical modifiers in the DMS cell. Such DMS separations can simplify the analysis of complex extracts in a robust and reproducible manner, independent of utilized MS instrumentation. The predictable separation achieved with DMS can facilitate correct lipid assignments among many isobaric and isomeric species independent of the resolution settings of the MS analysis. This leads to highly comprehensive and quantitative lipidomic outputs through rapid profiling analyses, such as Q1 and MRM scans. The ultimate benefit of the DMS separation in this unique shotgun lipidomics workflow is its ability to separate many isobaric and isomeric lipids that by standard shotgun lipidomics workflows are difficult to assess precisely, for example, ether and diacyl species and phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SM) lipids. PMID:25160652

Lintonen, Tuulia P I; Baker, Paul R S; Suoniemi, Matti; Ubhi, Baljit K; Koistinen, Kaisa M; Duchoslav, Eva; Campbell, J Larry; Ekroos, Kim

2014-10-01

430

Mass Spectrometry Video  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video, distributed on YouTube by the Royal Society of Chemistry is on the basic principles of mass spectrometry, using a magnetic sector instrument to demonstrate how specific m/z ratios can be selected. The theory and operation of MS, including the chemistry of ionization and fragmentation is described at an introductory level. There is also an excellent example of the use of high resolution MS to differentiate between nominal mass and actual mass. The video does a very good job of explaining the concept such that only a little background knowledge is required. The video is short enough (6 mins), that it would be very useful in a class setting or for students outside of class. The ultimate strength of this video is the general nature of the content that makes it appealing to a wide audience. The video may be most appropriate in a lower-level general education science course (i.e forensic science) or as a quick orientation video for instrumental analysis students prior to introducing mathematical or operational concepts. This video would also be helpful for a lay science person who wishes to learn more about mass spectrometry from a general interest perspective.

431

Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.  

PubMed

Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is a specialized technique used to provide information about the geographic, chemical, and biological origins of substances. The ability to determine the source of an organic substance stems from the relative isotopic abundances of the elements which comprise the material. Because the isotope ratios of elements such as carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen can become locally enriched or depleted through a variety of kinetic and thermodynamic factors, measurement of the isotope ratios can be used to differentiate between samples which otherwise share identical chemical compositions. Several sample introduction methods are now available for commercial isotope ratio mass spectrometers. Combustion is most commonly used for bulk isotopic analysis, whereas gas and liquid chromatography are predominately used for the real-time isotopic analysis of specific compounds within a mixture. Here, highlights of advances in instrumentation and applications within the last three years are provided to illustrate the impact of this rapidly growing area of research. Some prominent new applications include authenticating organic food produce, ascertaining whether or not African elephants are guilty of night-time raids on farmers' crops, and linking forensic drug and soil samples from a crime scene to a suspected point of origin. For the sake of brevity, we focus this Minireview on the isotope ratio measurements of lighter-elements common to organic sources; we do not cover the equally important field of inorganic isotope ratio mass spectrometry. PMID:19173039

Muccio, Zeland; Jackson, Glen P

2009-02-01

432

Calibration of a field-portable gamma detector to obtain in situ measurements of the 137Cs inventories of cultivated soils and floodplain sediments.  

PubMed

Over the past 10 years, a number of studies have exploited the potential for using measurements of fallout 137Cs inventories to document rates and patterns of soil erosion on cultivated land and to estimate rates of overbank sedimentation on river floodplains. Traditional procedures for applying the 137Cs technique involve the collection of soil or sediment cores from a study site and their subsequent transfer to the laboratory for preparation and analysis by gamma spectrometry. Such procedures are time consuming and there may be a considerable delay before the results are available. It is therefore difficult to obtain preliminary results, which could be used to guide the development of an ongoing sampling programme. The use of in situ gamma spectrometry measurements to quantify 137Cs inventories in soils and sediments offers a number of potential advantages over traditional procedures. However, in order to derive a reliable estimate of the 137Cs inventory for a measurement point, it is necessary to take account of the attenuation of 137Cs gamma rays by the soil matrix and information on the depth distribution of 137Cs in the soil or sediment is therefore required. In the present study, empirical relationships between in situ measurements of 137Cs activity and total 137Cs inventories have been established for soils from a cultivated field and for floodplain sediments, based on information on the vertical distribution of 137Cs in the soils and sediments provided by the forward scattering ratio derived from the field measured spectra. These relationships have been used to estimate 137Cs inventories from in situ measurements of 137Cs activity at other locations. PMID:10800723

He, Q; Walling, D E

2000-04-01

433

Proteome Analysis by Mass Spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The coupling of high-performance mass spectrometry instrumentation with highly efficient chromatographic and electrophoretic separations has enabled rapid qualitative and quantitative analysis of thousands of proteins from minute samples of biological materials. Here, we review recent progress in the development and application of mass spectrometry-based techniques for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of global proteome samples. Techniques such as multidimensional peptide

Patrick L. Ferguson; Richard D. Smith

2003-01-01