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Sample records for gamma-ray burst models

  1. Gamma-ray burst models.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts. PMID:17293332

  2. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  3. Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors: Merger Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffert, Maximilian

    2002-04-01

    The mergers of neutron stars and black holes remain a viable model for gamma-ray burst central engines, at least for the class of short bursts: their time scales, occurrence rates and energy output seem to be consistent with observations. We will present results of our latest simulations showing how the orbit of a neutron star around a black hole shrinks due to gravitational radiation, how the neutron star's matter gets accreted by the black hole, and how the tidal forces of the black hole finally shred the neutron star into a thick disk. In this process, huge amounts of energy are radiated away by gravitational waves and by neutrinos emitted from the hot disk. The neutrino luminosities are so large that an appreciable fraction (some few percent!) of neutrinos annihilate with antineutrinos creating the clean fireball necessary to power gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Emission model of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    The emission mechanisms of cosmic gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. In particular, the thermal synchrotron model is discussed as the most viable mechanism for the majority of the continuum emission. Within this framework various information about the source region can be extracted. The picture that emerges is that of a hot (kT = .2 - 1.0 sq mc), thin sheet of dense pair-dominated plasma emitting via cyclo-synchrotron radiation in a strong magnetic field (B approximately one-hundred billion to one trillion gauss). Speculations on the origin and structure of this sheet are attempted. The problem of high-energy photons above pair production threshold escaping from the source is also considered.

  5. THE ORTHOGONAL GAMMA-RAY BURST MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Pugliese, Daniela; Nathanail, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    We explore the analogy between a rotating magnetized black hole and an axisymmetric pulsar and derive the black hole's electromagnetic spindown after its formation in the core collapse of a supermassive star. The spindown shows two characteristic phases: an early Blandford-Znajek phase that lasts a few hundred seconds and a late pulsar-like afterglow phase that lasts much longer. During the first phase, the spindown luminosity decreases almost exponentially, whereas during the afterglow phase it decreases as t {sup –a} with 1 ≲ a ≲ 1.5. We associate our findings with long duration gamma-ray bursts and compare them with observations.

  6. An iron absorption model of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.; Kargatis, Vincent E.

    1994-01-01

    Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibit deficits of X-rays below approximately 200 keV. Here we consider a spectral model in which the burst source is shielded by an optically thick layer of circumburster material (CBM) rich in iron-group elements whose photoelectric absorption opacity exceeds the Thomson opacity below approximately 120 keV. For power-law distributions of absorption depths along the lines of sight the absorbed spectrum can indeed mimic the typial GRB spectrum. This model predicts that (a) the spectrum should evolve monotonically from hard to soft during each energy release, which is observed in most bursts, especially in fast rise exponential decay bursts; (b) Fe spectral features near 7 keV may be present in some bursts; and (c) the ratio of burst distances to the CBM and to Earth should be approximately 10(exp -11) if the spectral evolution is purely due to Fe stripping by the photons.

  7. Gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow. PMID:22923573

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  10. GRO: Black hole models for gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1995-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has established that the distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) is isotropic but is bound radially. This finding suggests that the bursts are either cosmological or they originate from an extended Galactic halo. The implied luminosities and the observed variability of the GRB's on time scales as short as one millisecond suggest that they originate from compact objects. We are presently studying black hole models for GRB's. Any such model must produce a non-thermal photon spectrum to agree with the observed properties. For a wide range of burst parameters the assumed bursting source consists of a non-thermal electron-positron-photon plasma of very high density. It seems possible to produce such a plasma in accretion onto black holes. In our on-going work, we are developing the kinetic theory for a non-equilibrium pair plasma. The main new features of our work are as follows: (1) We do not assume the presence of a thermal electron bath. (2) Non-thermal, high-energy pairs are allowed to have an arbitrary concentration and energy distribution. (3) There is no soft photon source in our model; initially all the photons in the plasma are either energetic X-rays or gamma-rays. (4) The initial energy distribution of the pairs as well as photons is arbitrary. (5) We collect the analytical expressions for the kinetic kernels for all relevant processes. And (6) we present a different approach to finding the time-evolution of pair and photon spectra, which is a combination of the kinetic-theory and the non-linear Monte-Carlo schemes. We have developed many Monte-Carlo programs to model various process, to take into account the time evolution, and to incorporate various physical effects which are unique to non-thermal plasmas. The hydrodynamics of fireballs in GRB's was studied before. Applying results from kinetic theory will improve our understanding of these systems.

  11. Models for Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, Stan

    Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are the brightest stellar mass explosions in the universe. As such, they serve as cosmic beacons for probing cosmic structure and diagnosing the properties of stars and the universe when it was young. They also produce black holes and neutron stars, interesting in themselves as laboratories where exotic physics comes into play, and they make the elements from which life arises. Consequently, supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are subject to intense study by many NASA missions. We propose focused studies in five areas of supernova research that are directly relevant to NASA's missions, especially SWIFT, HST, JWST, and planning for WFIRST. Our specific topics are a) models for Type Ia supernovae; b) extreme supernovae and first supernovae; c) magnetar-powered supernovae; d) ultra-long duration gamma-ray bursts; and e) shock breakout in supernovae. These phenomena all have in common their importance to NASA missions and the fact that they can be studied using similar tools - computer codes that do radiation hydrodynamics. Our two principal codes, KEPLER (one-dimension) and CASTRO (one to three dimensions), have been honed to the task by years of supernova modeling, and have some unique capabilities. Type Ia supernovae have long been of interest to NASA, but their importance has increased lately because of their utility in determining cosmic distances and because a string of recent observational breakthroughs has severely limited their progenitors. Responding to these developments, we propose to focus on a class of model we have previously neglected, the merger of two white dwarfs. The mergers will be studied with KEPLER and CASTRO in one and two dimensions, and the spectra and light curves determined. The library of model results will be useful in interpreting the results of present NASA missions and planning new ones. A second important area of investigation will be the study of first generation stars and the supernovae that they produce

  12. Models for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Diverse Transients

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Zhang, Weiqun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-17

    The observational diversity of ''gamma-ray bursts'' (GRBs) has been increasing, and the natural inclination is a proliferation of models. We explore the possibility that at least part of this diversity is a consequence of a single basic model for the central engine operating in a massive star of variable mass, differential rotation rate, and mass loss rate. Whatever that central engine may be--and here the collapsar is used as a reference point--it must be capable of generating both a narrowly collimated, highly relativistic jet to make the GRB, and a wide angle, sub-relativistic outflow responsible for exploding the star and making the supernova bright. To some extent, the two components may vary independently, so it is possible to produce a variety of jet energies and supernova luminosities. We explore, in particular, the production of low energy bursts and find a lower limit, {approx} 10{sup 48} erg s{sup -1} to the power required for a jet to escape a massive star before that star either explodes or is accreted. Lower energy bursts and ''suffocated'' bursts may be particularly prevalent when the metallicity is high, i.e., in the modern universe at low redshift.

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Afterglow and Prompt Emission Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2008-10-01

    Swift observations have revealed interesting but puzzling data that demand a rethink of the origins of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows. The chromatic breaks in X-ray/optical afterglow lightcurves stimulated several innovative suggestions, most invoking a non-forward-shock origin of the X-ray afterglows. The status of both the observational facts and the theoretical models is critically reviewed. Besides the late ``internal'' emission from a long-live central engine, most observed X-ray afterglows likely still include the contribution of the traditional forward shock component. The physical nature (e.g. energy dissipation mechanism, emission site, and radiation mechanism) of the GRB prompt emission is currently not identified. The motivations and issues of three proposed prompt emission sites are reviewed. Several independent methods, invoking prompt gamma-ray, X-ray, optical and GeV emission information, respectively, have been applied to constrain the unknown emission site. Tentative evidence suggests a large prompt emission radius. Finally, the implications of the broad band high quality data of the ``naked eye'' GRB 080319B for our understanding of the afterglow and prompt emission mechanisms are discussed.

  14. GRO: Black hole models for gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of creating gamma ray bursts (GRB's) from accretion flows on to black holes is investigated. The mechanism of initial energy release in the form of a burst is not understood yet. The typical time scales involved in this energy release and the initial distribution of photons as a function of energy are studied. As a first step the problem is formulated in the Minkowski spacetime for a homogeneous and isotropic burst. For an arbitrary initial distribution of photons, the equations of relativistic kinetic theory are formulated for nonequilibrium plasmas which can take into account various particle creation and annihilation processes and various scattering processes.

  15. A MAD model for gamma-ray burst variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole M.; Dolence, Joshua C.; Fryer, Christopher L.

    2016-09-01

    We present a model for the temporal variability of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt phase (the highly variable first 100 s or so), in the context of a magnetically arrested disc (MAD) around a black hole. In this state, sufficient magnetic flux is held on to the black hole such that it stalls the accretion near the inner region of the disc. The system transitions in and out of the MAD state, which we relate to the variable luminosity of the GRB during the prompt phase, with a characteristic time-scale defined by the free-fall time in the region over which the accretion is arrested. We present simple analytic estimates of the relevant energetics and time-scales, and compare them to GRB observations. In particular, we show how this model can reproduce the characteristic one second time-scale that emerges from various analyses of the prompt emission light curve. We also discuss how our model can accommodate the potentially physically important correlation between a burst quiescent time and the duration of its subsequent pulse.

  16. GRO: Black hole models for gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1993-01-01

    This grant deals with the production of gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) close to horizons of black holes (BH's), mainly via accretion of small chunks of matter onto extreme Kerr BH's. In the past year, we laid the ground work for actual calculations close to Kerr BH's. Because of technical reasons, actual work has only started very recently. Following the detailed list of research subprojects as per our original proposal, we have performed research in the following areas: spectrum calculation; burst dynamics; tidal capture and primordial cloud collapse; halo density profile; and capture of other objects.

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  18. Two populations and models of gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1993-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst statistics are best explained by a source population at cosmological distances, while spectroscopy and intensity histories of some individual bursts imply an origin on Galactic neutron stars. To resolve this inconsistency I suggest the presence of two populations, one at cosmological distances and the other Galactic. I build on ideas of Shemi and Piran (1990) and of Rees and Mesozaros (1992) involving the interaction of fireball debris with surrounding clouds to explain the observed intensity histories in bursts at cosmological distances. The distances to the Galactic population are undetermined because they are too few to affect the statistics of intensity and direction; I explain them as resulting from magnetic reconnection in neutron star magnetospheres. An appendix describes the late evolution of the debris as a relativistic blast wave.

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    1995-01-01

    A history and overview of the observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are presented. The phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts is without precedent in astronomy, having no observed property that would be a direct indicator of their distance and no counterpart object in another wavelength region. Their brief, random appearance only in the gamma-ray region has made their study difficult. The observed time profiles, spectral properties, and durations of gamma-ray bursts cover a wide range. All proposed models for their origin must be considered speculative. It is humbling to think that even after 25 years since their discovery, the distance scale of gamma-ray bursts is still very much debatable.

  20. A LEPTONIC-HADRONIC MODEL FOR THE AFTERGLOW OF GAMMA-RAY BURST 090510

    SciTech Connect

    Razzaque, Soebur

    2010-11-20

    We model multiwavelength afterglow data from the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 090510 using a combined leptonic-hadronic model of synchrotron radiation from an adiabatic blast wave. High-energy, {approx_gt}100 MeV, emission in our model is dominated by proton-synchrotron radiation, while electron-synchrotron radiation dominates in the X-ray and ultraviolet wavelengths. The collimation-corrected GRB energy, depending on the jet-break time, in this model could be as low as 3 x 10{sup 51} erg but two orders of magnitude larger than the absolute {gamma}-ray energy. We also calculated the opacities for electron-positron pair production by {gamma}-rays and found that TeV {gamma}-rays from proton-synchrotron radiation can escape the blast wave at early time, and their detection can provide evidence of a hadronic emission component dominating at high energies.

  1. Physics of the synchrotron model of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, E.P.

    1983-09-27

    We review the theoretical arguments leading to the thermal synchrotron model of cosmic gamma-ray bursts. We propose a magnetic flare-resonant absorption mechanism for the production of the hot electrons that can account for most of the unusual properties of the emission layer.

  2. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  3. The limitations of resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant Compton upscattering is commended as a mechanism that produces a hard gamma-ray spectrum while suppressing X-rays. This model, however, has severe physical and observational limitations. Effective X-ray suppression places a lower limit on the electron density; above this limit X-rays scatter multiple times, so the single-scattering approximation of this mechanism is invalid. Multiple scattering produces a spectrum that is much harder than the single-scattering spectrum. As the Thomson optical depth of a power-law electron beam approaches unity, photon spawning commences at a high rate and physically invalidates the underlying electron distribution. The Compton upscattering model is therefore only valid over a narrow range of electron densities. An observational consequence of this model is the absence of the third cyclotron resonance. Resonant scattering produces gamma-rays that propagate nearly along the magnetic field. The resonant cross section of the third harmonic, which is strongly angle dependent, falls below the Compton continuum for these gamma rays. The observation of a third cyclotron resonance in a gamma-ray burst spectrum would eliminate resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst process.

  4. ADP study of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Don Q.; Wang, John C. L.; Heuter, Geoffry J.; Graziani, Carlo; Loredo, Tom; Freeman, Peter

    This grant supported study of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts through analysis of Ginga and HEAO-1 archival data, and modeling of the results in terms of radiation transfer calculations of cyclotron scattering in a strong magnetic field. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer code with which we are able to calculate the expected properties of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts was developed. The extensive software necessary in order to carry out fits of these model spectra to gamma-ray burst spectral data, including folding of the model spectra through the detector response functions was also developed. Fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB880205 were completed and fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB870303 are being carried out. These fits have allowed us to test our software, as well as to garner new scientific results. This work has demonstrated that cyclotron resonant scattering successfully accounts for the locations, strengths, and widths of the observed line features in GB870303 and GB880205. The success of the model provides compelling evidence that these gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin, resolving longstanding controversies about the nature and distance of the burst sources. These results were reported in two papers which are in press in the proceedings of the Taos Workshop on Gamma-Ray Bursts, and in a paper submitted for publication.

  5. ADP study of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Don Q.; Wang, John C. L.; Heuter, Geoffry J.; Graziani, Carlo; Loredo, Tom; Freeman, Peter

    1991-01-01

    This grant supported study of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts through analysis of Ginga and HEAO-1 archival data, and modeling of the results in terms of radiation transfer calculations of cyclotron scattering in a strong magnetic field. A Monte Carlo radiation transfer code with which we are able to calculate the expected properties of cyclotron scattering lines in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts was developed. The extensive software necessary in order to carry out fits of these model spectra to gamma-ray burst spectral data, including folding of the model spectra through the detector response functions was also developed. Fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB880205 were completed and fits to Ginga satellite data on burst GB870303 are being carried out. These fits have allowed us to test our software, as well as to garner new scientific results. This work has demonstrated that cyclotron resonant scattering successfully accounts for the locations, strengths, and widths of the observed line features in GB870303 and GB880205. The success of the model provides compelling evidence that these gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin, resolving longstanding controversies about the nature and distance of the burst sources. These results were reported in two papers which are in press in the proceedings of the Taos Workshop on Gamma-Ray Bursts, and in a paper submitted for publication.

  6. Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

  7. Statistics of cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model of gamma-ray burst spectra is used to calculate the statistics of gamma-ray bursts originating at cosmological distances. A model of bursters with no source evolution in a q sub 0 = 1/2 Friedmann cosmology is in accord with recent observations of the differential V/Vmax distribution. The data are best fit with an average peak-burst luminosity of (4 +/- 2) x 10 exp 51 ergs/s and a present-day source emissivity of 940 +/- 440 bursts/(10 exp 10 yr) cu Mpc. A spectral test of the cosmological hypothesis is proposed.

  8. Cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    The distribution in angle and flux of gamma-ray bursts indicates that the majority of gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, i.e., at z of about 1. The rate is then about 10 exp -8/yr in a galaxy like the Milky Way, i.e., orders of magnitude lower than the estimated rate for collisions between neutron stars in close binary systems. The energy per burst is about 10 exp 51 ergs, assuming isotropic emission. The events appear to be less energetic and more frequent if their emission is strongly beamed. Some tests for the distance scale are discussed: a correlation between the burst's strength and its spectrum; the absorption by the Galactic gas below about 2 keV; the X-ray tails caused by forward scattering by the Galactic dust; about 1 month recurrence of some bursts caused by gravitational lensing by foreground galaxies; and a search for gamma-ray bursts in M31. The bursts appear to be a manifestation of something exotic, but conventional compact objects can provide an explanation. The best possibility is offered by a decay of a bindary composed of a spinning-stellar-mass black-hole primary and a neutron or a strange-quark star secondary. In the final phase the secondary is tidally disrupted, forms an accretion disk, and up to 10 exp 54 ergs are released. A very small fraction of this energy powers the gamma-ray burst.

  9. Multiple resonant scattering in the Compton upscatter model of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant Compton scattering, an increasingly popular mechanism for suppressing X-rays and producing gamma rays, must be treated as a multiple-scattering process for conditions thought characteristic of gamma-ray bursts. Photons that multiply scatter with a beamed power-law electron distribution in a uniform magnetic field produce a flat spectrum between the cyclotron frequency and an optical-depth-dependent critical energy; this critical energy ranges between several hundred keV and several MeV. Above this critical energy, the gamma-ray spectrum has a shape determined by the electron distribution and described by a single-scattering model. Only electron distributions that are nearly proportional to the electron momentum are able to simultaneously suppress X-rays and produce a single-scattering spectrum. As the Thomson optical depth approaches unity, photons that experience multiple scatterings often spawn additional photons at a rate that makes the model unphysical.

  10. Spectral properties of blast-wave models of gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.; Papathanassiou, H.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the spectrum of blast-wave models of gamma-ray burst sources, for various assumptions about the magnetic field density and the relativistic particle acceleration efficiency. For a range of physically plausible models we find that the radiation efficiency is high and leads to nonthermal spectra with breaks at various energies comparable to those observed in the gamma-ray range. Radiation is also predicted at other wavebands, in particular at X-ray, optical/UV, and GeV/TeV energies. We discuss the spectra as a function of duration for three basic types of models, and for cosmological, halo, and galactic disk distances. We also evaluate the gamma-ray fluences and the spectral characteristics for a range of external densities. Impulsive burst models at cosmological distances can satisfy the conventional X-ray paucity constraint S(sub x)/S(sub gamma)less than a few percent over a wide range of durations, but galactic models can do so only for bursts shorter than a few seconds, unless additional assumptions are made. The emissivity is generally larger for bursts in a denser external environment, with the efficiency increasing up to the point where all the energy input is radiated away.

  11. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedrenne, G.

    1981-06-01

    The general characteristics of gamma-ray bursts are considered. During the period from 1967 to 1977 62 gamma-ray bursts were discovered. Between September 1978 and December 1980 more than 40 bursts were observed with the aid of interplanetary spacecraft, including the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, ISEE-C, Helios B, Vela, Prognoz 7, Venera 11, and Venera 12. The time structures are discussed along with the spectra, and the burst intensity distribution. Attention is given to events observed on March 5, April 6, November 4, and November 19, 1979, taking into account the location of each event. The implications of the more recent results are discussed. It is pointed out that for a better understanding of the origin of the emissions, it is necessary to have a coordinated observation program with several satellites separated by large distances.

  12. Cascade model of gamma-ray bursts: Power-law and annihilation-line components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.; Sturrock, P. A.; Daugherty, J. K.

    1988-01-01

    If, in a neutron star magnetosphere, an electron is accelerated to an energy of 10 to the 11th or 12th power eV by an electric field parallel to the magnetic field, motion of the electron along the curved field line leads to a cascade of gamma rays and electron-positron pairs. This process is believed to occur in radio pulsars and gamma ray burst sources. Results are presented from numerical simulations of the radiation and photon annihilation pair production processes, using a computer code previously developed for the study of radio pulsars. A range of values of initial energy of a primary electron was considered along with initial injection position, and magnetic dipole moment of the neutron star. The resulting spectra was found to exhibit complex forms that are typically power law over a substantial range of photon energy, and typically include a dip in the spectrum near the electron gyro-frequency at the injection point. The results of a number of models are compared with data for the 5 Mar., 1979 gamma ray burst. A good fit was found to the gamma ray part of the spectrum, including the equivalent width of the annihilation line.

  13. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Blumenthal, G.; Brock, M.

    1994-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic ad the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the bursts cannot be excluded.

  14. Magnetospheric Interactions of Binary Pulsars as a Model for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vietri, Mario

    1996-11-01

    I consider a model of gamma -ray bursts in which they arise right before the merging of binary pulsars. A binary pulsar moving through its companion's magnetic field experiences a large, motional electric field E = v X B/c, which leads to the release in the pulsar's magnetosphere of a pair cascade and the acceleration of a wind of pure pairs. The energy and energy deposition rate of the wind are those of gamma -ray bursts, provided the pulsars have a field of ~1015 G. Baryon contamination is small and dominated by tidal heating, leading to Mbaryon ~ 10-6 Msolar, as required by the dirty-fireball model of Meszaros, Laguna, & Rees.

  15. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  16. The Quark-Deconfinement Nova model for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Bombaci, I.

    2005-10-21

    We report on a new model which is able to explain how a gamma-ray burst (GRB) can take place days or years after a supernova explosion. We show that above a threshold value of the gravitational mass a pure hadronic star ('neutron star') is metastable to the conversion into a quark star (hybrid star or strange star), i.e. a star made at least in part of deconfined quark matter. The stellar conversion process can be delayed if finite size effects at the interface between hadronic and deconfined quark matter phases are taken into account. A huge amount of energy, on the order of 1052 - 1053 ergs, is released during the conversion process and can produce a powerful gamma-ray burst. The delay between the supernova explosion generating the metastable neutron star and the new collapse can explain the delay inferred in GRB 990705 and in GRB 011211.

  17. RHESSI TESTS OF QUASI-THERMAL GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Bellm, Eric C.

    2010-05-01

    Prompt gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra evolve on short timescales, suggesting that time-resolved spectral fits may help diagnose the still unknown prompt emission mechanism. We use broadband gamma-ray data from the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager spacecraft to test quasi-thermal models with high signal-to-noise time-resolved spectra of nine bright GRBs. In contrast to results reported in more narrow energy bands, the quality of the fits of quasi-thermal models is poor in relation to fits of the phenomenological Band function. Moreover, the best-fit parameters for the simplest quasi-thermal model, a blackbody plus a nonthermal power law, show significant dependence on the fit band. Models that replace the power law with more complicated nonthermal functions are not robust for the data considered here and decrease the physical relevance of the fit blackbody.

  18. Gamma-ray burst populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgili, Francisco Javier

    Over the last fifty years the field of gamma-ray bursts has shown incredible growth, but the amassing of data has also left observers and theorists alike wondering about some of the basic questions surrounding these phenomena. Additionally, these events show remarkable individuality and extrema, ranging in redshift throughout the observable universe and over ten orders of magnitude in energy. This work focuses on analyzing groups of bursts that are different from the general trend and trying to understand whether these bursts are from different intrinsic populations and if so, what can be said about their progenitors. This is achieved through numerical Monte Carlo simulations and statistical inference in conjunction with current GRB observations. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction of gamma-ray burst theory and observations in a semi-historical context. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the theory and practical issues surrounding the numerical simulations and statistics. Chapters 3--5 are each dedicated to a specific problem relating to a different type of GRB population: high-luminosity v. low-luminosity bursts, constraints from high-redshift bursts, and Type I v. Type II bursts. Chapter 6 follows with concluding remarks.

  19. A flare-induced cascade model of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for the source of gamma ray bursts as a stellar flare in the magnetosphere of a neutron star. It is suggested that the loss of energy through synchrotron radiation experienced by electrons moving through a sufficiently strong magnetic field at a large pitch angle may not be regained. Instead, pulsar theory is applied to show that the acceleration of electrons in an electric field parallel to the magnetic field will rapidly be inhibited by curvature radiation as the loop experiences a reconnection. It is shown that electrons passing through a curvature with a radius of one million with an electric field strength of 10 billion e.s.u. will emit photons with energies of up to 10 to the 12.6 eV by curvature radiation. The photons, gamma rays, would annihilate in the magnetosphere, which they cannot escape. The resulting cascade of electron-positron particles would eventually produce photons of sufficiently low energy to escape. Upper and low bounds are estimated for the resulting emission spectrum, which would vary according to the magnetic field geometry. The model explains the observed 511 keV annihilation line and the optical radiation which at times accompanies gamma-ray bursts.

  20. ON THE EXTERNAL SHOCK SYNCHROTRON MODEL FOR GAMMA-RAY BURSTS' GeV EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Piran, Tsvi; Nakar, Ehud E-mail: udini@wise.tau.ac.i

    2010-08-01

    The dominant component of the GeV gamma-ray burst emission detected by the Large Area Telescope begins after the prompt soft (sub-MeV) gamma rays and lasts longer. This has led to the intriguing suggestion that the GeV emission is generated via synchrotron emission of the external shock. Moreover, the limits on the MeV afterglow emission lead to the suggestion that at least in bright GeV bursts the field is not amplified beyond compression in the shock. We show here that considerations of confinement (within the decelerating shock), efficiency, and cooling of the emitting electrons constrain, within this model, the magnetic fields that arise in both the upstream (unshocked circumburst) and downstream (shocked circumburst) regions, allowing us to put direct limits on their values. The well-known limit on the maximal synchrotron emission, when combined with the blast wave evolution, implies that late photons (arriving more than {approx}100 s after the burst) with energies higher than {approx}10 GeV do not arise naturally from an external shock synchrotron and almost certainly have a different origin. Finally, even a modest seed flux (a few mJy) in IR-optical would quench, via Inverse Compton cooling, the GeV emission unless the magnetic field is significantly amplified behind the shock. An observation of a burst with simultaneous IR-optical and GeV emission will rule out this model.

  1. Monte Carlo models and analysis of galactic disk gamma-ray burst distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkila, Jon

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are transient astronomical phenomena which have no quiescent counterparts in any region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although temporal and spectral properties indicate that these events are likely energetic, their unknown spatial distribution complicates astrophysical interpretation. Monte Carlo samples of gamma-ray burst sources are created which belong to Galactic disk populations. Spatial analysis techniques are used to compare these samples to the observed distribution. From this, both quantitative and qualitative conclusions are drawn concerning allowed luminosity and spatial distributions of the actual sample. Although the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment on Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) will significantly improve knowledge of the gamma-ray burst source spatial characteristics within only a few months of launch, the analysis techniques described herein will not be superceded. Rather, they may be used with BATSE results to obtain detailed information about both the luminosity and spatial distributions of the sources.

  2. Naked-Eye Gamma-ray Burst Model for GRB 080319B

    NASA Video Gallery

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that are longer than two seconds are caused by the detonation of a rapidly rotating massive star at the end of its life. Jets of particles and gamma radiation are emitted in...

  3. Tests and consequences of disk plus halo models of gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.

    1995-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst observations made by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and by previous experiments are still consistent with a combined Galactic disk (or Galactic spiral arm) plus extended Galactic halo model. Testable predictions and consequences of the disk plus halo model are discussed here; tests performed on the expanded BATSE database in the future will constrain the allowed model parameters and may eventually rule out the disk plus halo model. Using examples, it is shown that if the halo has an appropriate edge, BATSE will never detect an anisotropic signal from the halo of the Andromeda galaxy. A prediction of the disk plus halo model is that the fraction of the bursts observed to be in the 'disk' population rises as the detector sensitivity improves. A careful reexamination of the numbers of bursts in the two populations for the pre-BATSE databases could rule out this class of models. Similarly, it is predicted that different satellites will observe different relative numbers of bursts in the two classes for any model in which there are two different spatial distribiutions of the sources, or for models in which there is one spatial distribution of the sources that is sampled to different depths for the two classes. An important consequence of the disk plus halo model is that for the birthrate of the halo sources to be small compared to the birthrate of the disk sources, it is necessary for the halo sources to release many orders of magnitude more energy over their bursting lifetime than the disk sources. The halo bursts must also be much more luminous than the disk bursts; if this disk-halo model is correct, it is necessary to explain why the disk sources do not produce halo-type bursts.

  4. Tidal heating and mass loss in neutron star binaries - Implications for gamma-ray burst models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    A neutron star in a close binary orbit around another neutron star (or stellar-mass black hole) spirals inward owing to gravitational radiation. We discuss the effects of tidal dissipation during this process. Tidal energy dissipated in the neutron star's core escapes mainly as neutrinos, but heating of the crust, and outward diffusion of photons, blows off the outer layers of the star. This photon-driven mass loss precedes the final coalescence. The presence of this eject material impedes the escape of gamma-rays created via neutrino interactions. If an e(+) - e(-) fireball, created in the late stages of coalescence, were loaded with (or surrounded by) material with the mean column density of the ejecta, it could not be an efficient source of gamma-rays. Models for cosmologically distant gamma-rays burst that involve neutron stars must therefore be anisotropic, so that the fireball expands preferentially in directions where the column density of previously blown-off material is far below the spherically averaged value which we have calculated. Some possible 'scenarios' along these lines are briefly discussed.

  5. MAGNETICALLY AND BARYONICALLY DOMINATED PHOTOSPHERIC GAMMA-RAY BURST MODEL FITS TO FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Veres, Peter; Meszaros, Peter; Zhang, Bin-Bin

    2013-02-10

    We consider gamma-ray burst models where the radiation is dominated by a photospheric region providing the MeV Band spectrum, and an external shock region responsible for the GeV radiation via inverse Compton scattering. We parameterize the initial dynamics through an acceleration law {Gamma}{proportional_to}r {sup {mu}}, with {mu} between 1/3 and 1 to represent the range between an extreme magnetically dominated and a baryonically dominated regime, depending also on the magnetic field configuration. We compare these models to several bright Fermi-LAT bursts, and show that both the time-integrated and the time-resolved spectra, where available, can be well described by these models. We discuss the parameters which result from these fits, and discuss the relative merits and shortcomings of the two models.

  6. REVISITING THE LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE RELATIVISTIC TURBULENCE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Da-Bin; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Liu, Tong; Sun, Mou-Yuan; Lu, Ju-Fu E-mail: lujf@xmu.edu.cn

    2013-10-10

    Rapid temporal variability has been widely observed in the light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One possible mechanism for such variability is related to the relativistic eddies in the jet. In this paper, we include the contribution of the inter-eddy medium together with the eddies to the gamma-ray emission. We show that the gamma-ray emission can either lead or lag behind the observed synchrotron emission, where the latter originates in the inter-eddy medium and provides most of the seed photons for producing gamma-ray emission through inverse Compton scattering. As a consequence, we argue that the lead/lag found in non-stationary short-lived light curves may not reveal the intrinsic lead/lag of different emission components. In addition, our results may explain the lead of gamma-ray emission with respect to optical emission observed in GRB 080319B.

  7. Corequake and shock heating model of the 5 March 1979 gamma ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, D. C.; Kazanas, D.

    1983-01-01

    Ramatry, et al. proposed a model to account for the 5 March 1979 gamma ray burst in terms of a neutron star corequake and subsequent shock heating of the neutron star atmosphere. This model is extended by examining the overall energetics and characteristics of these shocks, taking into account the e(+)-e(-) pair production behind the shock. The effects of a dipole magnetic field in the shock jump conditions are also examined and it is concluded that the uneven heating produced by such a field can account for the temperature difference between pole and equator implied by the pulsating phase of the burst. The overall energetics and distribution of energy between e(+)-e(-) pairs and photons appear to be in agreement with observations if this event is at a distance of 55 kpc as implied by its association with the Large Magellanic Cloud. Previously announced in STAR as N83-31568

  8. Corequake and shock heating model of the 5 March 1979 gamma ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, D. C.; Kazanas, D.

    1983-01-01

    Ramatry, et al. proposed a model to account for the 5 March 1979 gamma ray burst in terms of a neutron star corequake and subsequent shock heating of the neutron star atmosphere. This model is extended by examining the overall energetics and characteristics of these shocks, taking into account the e(+)-e(-) pair production behind the shock. The effects of a dipole magnetic field in the shock jump conditions are also examined and it is concluded that the uneven heating produced by such a field can account for the temperature difference between pole and equator implied by the pulsating phase of the burst. The overall energetics and distribution of energy between e(+)-(-) pairs and photons appears to be in agreement with observations if this event is at a distance of 55 kpc as implied by its association with the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  9. A Model for Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Heated Neutron Stars in Close Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J.D.; Wilson, J.R.

    2001-12-17

    In this paper we present a model for the short (< second) population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model heated neutron stars in a close binary system near their last stable orbit emit neutrinos at large luminosities ({approx} 10{sup 53} ergs/sec). A fraction of these neutrinos will annihilate to form an e{sup +}e{sup -} pair plasma wind which will, in turn, expand and recombine to photons which make the gamma-ray burst. We study neutrino annihilation and show that a substantial fraction ({approx}1/2) of energy deposited comes from inter-star neutrinos, where each member of the neutrino pair originates from each neutron star. Thus, in addition to the annihilation of neutrinos blowing off of a single star, we have a new source of baryon free energy that is deposited between the stars. To model the e{sup +}e{sup -} pair plasma wind between stars, we do three-dimensional relativistic numerical hydrodynamic calculations. Preliminary results are also presented of new, fully general relativistic calculations of gravitationally attracting stars falling from infinity with no angular momentum. These simulations exhibit a compression effect.

  10. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb, 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter, 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al., 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the observed bursts cannot be excluded.

  11. Constraints on Short Gamma-ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Melinder, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Starling, R.; Thomsen, B.

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at approx. 2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5(sigma) limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type IC hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or IC SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts - supernovae

  12. Modeling Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Flares Within the Internal Shock Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxham, Amanda; Zhang, Bing

    2009-12-01

    X-ray afterglow light curves have been collected for over 400 Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with nearly half of them having X-ray flares superimposed on the regular afterglow decay. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge, and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares, but do not calculate the shock dynamics and radiation processes in detail. Using the empirical Ep -E iso (Amati) relation with an assumed Band function spectrum for each collision and an empirical flare temporal profile, we calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width, and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width, and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. The same shell model predicts an external shock X-ray afterglow component, which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave. However, the predicted X-ray afterglow is too bright as compared with the observed flux level, unless epsilon e is

  13. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Some basic observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Although some properties were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the Compton Observatory in the past three years. The new observation with the greatest impact has been the observed isotropic distribution of bursts along with a deficiency of weak bursts which would be expected from a homogeneous burst distribution. This is not compatible with any known Galactic population of objects. Gamma-ray bursts show an enormous variety of burst morphologies and a wide spread in burst durations. The spectra of gamma-ray bursts are characterized by rapid variations and peak power which is almost entirely in the gamma-ray energy range. Delayed gamma-ray burst photons extending to GeV energies have been detected for the first time. A time dilation effect has also been reported to be observed in gamma-ray, bursts. The observation of a gamma-ray burst counterpart in another wavelength region has yet to be made.

  14. Gamma ray bursts of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2015-07-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, Zhang recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which has only a single postulate but is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain existing observations of the universe. In the previous studies, we have explained the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, quasar, and acceleration of black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates gamma ray bursts of black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the energy and spectrum measurements of gamma ray bursts according to the black hole universe model. The results indicate that gamma ray bursts can be understood as emissions of dynamic star-like black holes. A black hole, when it accretes its star or merges with another black hole, becomes dynamic. A dynamic black hole has a broken event horizon and thus cannot hold the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation, which flows or leaks out and produces a GRB. A star when it collapses into its core black hole produces a long GRB and releases the gravitational potential energy of the star as gamma rays. A black hole that merges with another black hole produces a short GRB and releases a part of their blackbody radiation as gamma rays. The amount of energy obtained from the emissions of dynamic star-like black holes are consistent with the measurements of energy from GRBs. The GRB energy spectra derived from this new emission mechanism are also consistent with the measurements.

  15. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  16. Optical search for gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Ceplecha, Z.; Ehrlich, J.; Borovicka, J.; Hurley, K.; Ateia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Estulin, I. V.

    Preliminary results from an optical search for light pulses associated with gamma-ray bursts by means of the Czechoslovak Fireball Network plate collection at the Ondřejov Observatory are given. Optical monitoring represents more than 7700 hours, but no real optical counterpart was found. Problems associated with the optical search for gamma-ray bursts are discussed.

  17. Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 10(exp 12) Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

  18. Cloaked Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, David

    2014-06-01

    It is suggested that many gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cloaked by an ultrarelativistic baryonic shell that has high optical depth when the photons are manufactured. Such a shell would not fully block photons reflected or emitted from its inner surface, because the radial velocity of the photons can be less than that of the shell. This avoids the standard problem associated with GRBs that the thermal component should be produced where the flow is still obscured by high optical depth. The radiation that escapes high optical depth obeys the Amati relation. Observational implications may include (1) anomalously high ratios of afterglow to prompt emission, such as may have been the case in the recently discovered PTF 11agg, and (2) ultrahigh-energy neutrino pulses that are non-coincident with detectable GRB. It is suggested that GRB 090510, a short, very hard GRB with very little afterglow, was an exposed GRB, in contrast to those cloaked by baryonic shells.

  19. CLOAKED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David

    2014-06-01

    It is suggested that many gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cloaked by an ultrarelativistic baryonic shell that has high optical depth when the photons are manufactured. Such a shell would not fully block photons reflected or emitted from its inner surface, because the radial velocity of the photons can be less than that of the shell. This avoids the standard problem associated with GRBs that the thermal component should be produced where the flow is still obscured by high optical depth. The radiation that escapes high optical depth obeys the Amati relation. Observational implications may include (1) anomalously high ratios of afterglow to prompt emission, such as may have been the case in the recently discovered PTF 11agg, and (2) ultrahigh-energy neutrino pulses that are non-coincident with detectable GRB. It is suggested that GRB 090510, a short, very hard GRB with very little afterglow, was an exposed GRB, in contrast to those cloaked by baryonic shells.

  20. PROGENITOR MODELS OF THE ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSIENT ASSOCIATED WITH THE SHORT GAMMA RAY BURST 130603B

    SciTech Connect

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Tanaka, Masaomi; Wanajo, Shinya; Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru

    2013-11-20

    An electromagnetic transient powered by the radioactive decay of r-process elements, a so-called kilonova/macronova, is one of the possible observable consequences of compact binary mergers including at least one neutron star. Recent observations strongly suggest the discovery of the first electromagnetic transient, which is associated with the short gamma ray burst 130603B. We explore a possible progenitor of this event by combining numerical-relativity simulations and radiative transfer simulations of the dynamical ejecta of binary neutron star and black hole-neutron star mergers. We show that the ejecta models within a realistic parameter range consistently reproduce the observed near-infrared excess. We also show that the soft equation-of-state models for binary neutron star mergers and the stiff equation-of-state models for black hole-neutron star mergers are suitable for reproducing the observed luminosity.

  1. Cosmological models and gamma-ray bursts calibrated by using Padé method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wei, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most powerful sources in the universe. In the recent years, GRBs have been proposed as a complementary probe to type Ia supernovae. However, as is well known, there is a circularity problem in the use of GRBs to study cosmology. In this work, based on the Padé approximant, we propose a new cosmology-independent method to calibrate GRBs. We consider a sample consisting of 138 long Swift GRBs and obtain 79 calibrated long GRBs at high-redshift z>1.4 (named Mayflower sample) which can be used to constrain cosmological models without the circularity problem. Then, we consider the constraints on several cosmological models with these 79 calibrated GRBs and other observational data. We show that GRBs are competent to be a complementary probe to the other well-established cosmological observations.

  2. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general. PMID:23630379

  3. Inferring the Spatial and Energy Distribution of Gamma-Ray Burst Sources. II. Isotropic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Wasserman, Ira M.

    1998-07-01

    We use Bayesian methods to analyze the distribution of gamma-ray burst intensities reported in the Third BATSE Catalog (3B catalog) of gamma-ray bursts, presuming the distribution of burst sources (``bursters'') is isotropic. We study both phenomenological and cosmological source distribution models, using Bayes's theorem both to infer unknown parameters in the models and to compare rival models. We analyze the distribution of the time-averaged peak photon number flux, Φ, measured on both 64 ms and 1024 ms timescales, performing the analysis of data based on each timescale independently. Several of our findings differ from those of previous analyses that modeled burst detection less completely. In particular, we find that the width of the intrinsic luminosity function for bursters is unconstrained, and the luminosity function of the actually observed bursts can be extremely broad, in contrast to the findings of all previous studies. Useful constraints probably require observation of bursts significantly fainter than those visible to BATSE. We also find that the 3B peak flux data do not usefully constrain the redshifts of burst sources; useful constraints require the analysis of data beyond that in the 3B catalog (such as burst time histories) or data from brighter bursts than have been seen by BATSE (such as those observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter). In addition, we find that an accurate understanding of the peak flux distributions reported in the 3B almost certainly requires consideration of data on the temporal and spectral properties of bursts beyond that reported in the 3B catalog and more sophisticated modeling than has so far been attempted. We first analyze purely phenomenological power-law and broken power-law models for the distribution of observed peak fluxes. We find that the 64 ms data are adequately fitted by a single power law, but that the 1024 ms data significantly favor models with a sharp, steep break near the highest observed fluxes. At

  4. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The End Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Don

    1997-11-01

    The nature of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in astrophysics for more than a quarter century. A major reason for this is that no definite counterparts to the bursts could be found at other wavelengths, despite intense efforts spanning more than two decades. Consequently, the study of gamma-ray bursts has been isolated from the rest of astronomy. Scientists studying them have had only the laws of physics and the bursts themselves to guide them in attempting to solve the burst mystery. All of this changed dramatically with the discovery earlier this year of fading X-ray and optical sources in the arcminute-sized positional error boxes of several gamma-ray bursts. For the first time, temporal, as well as spatial, coincidence could be used to associate these X-ray and optical sources with the gamma-ray bursts. As a result, the odds are great that the fading X-ray and optical sources are counterparts of the bursts, and that the study of gamma-ray bursts has finally been connected with the rest of astronomy. In this talk, we describe the dramatic new information about the nature of gamma-ray bursts that the X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the fading sources have provided, and emphasize the implications that this information has for the distance scale to the bursts.

  5. Corequake and shock heating model of the 5 March 1979 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, D. C.; Kazanas, D.

    1983-01-01

    Ramaty et al. (1980) have proposed a model of a neutron-star corequake and subsequent shock heating of the atmosphere to account for the gamma-ray burst of March 5, 1979. This model is elaborated by examining the overall energetics and characteristics of the radiation-dominated gas shocks under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium, taking into account the electron-positron pair production behind the shock. Using values for the density typical of those expected for neutron-star crusts (100-10,000 g/cu cm) and shock velocities characteristic of the sound speed (40,000-100,000), shock luminosities are obtained comparable to those required if the burst originated in the LMC. In addition, the fraction of energy deposited in electron-positron pairs is in good agreement with observation. Uneven shock heating between the polar and equatorial regions of the neutron star due to the presence of a dipole magnetic field, coupled with a rotation rate of 8 s, can also naturally account for the pulsating phase of the burst.

  6. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bianco, C. L.; Caito, L.; Chardonnet, P.; Cherubini, C.; Dainotti, M. G.; Fraschetti, F.; Geralico, A.; Guida, R.; Patricelli, B.; Rotondo, M.; Rueda Hernandez, J. A.; Vereshchagin, G.; Xue, S.-S.

    2008-09-01

    We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the process of gravitational collapse, leading to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma: the basic self-accelerating system explaining both the energetics and the high energy Lorentz factor observed in GRBs. We then turn to recall the two basic interpretational paradigms of our GRB model: 1) the Relative Space-Time Transformation (RSTT) paradigm and 2) the Interpretation of the Burst Structure (IBS) paradigm. These paradigms lead to a "canonical" GRB light curve formed from two different components: a Proper-GRB (P-GRB) and an extended afterglow comprising a raising part, a peak, and a decaying tail. When the P-GRB is energetically predominant we have a "genuine" short GRB, while when the afterglow is energetically predominant we have a so-called long GRB or a "fake" short GRB. We compare and contrast the description of the relativistic expansion of the electron-positron plasma within our approach and within the other ones in the current literature. We then turn

  7. The Synchrotron Shock Model Confronts a "Line of Death" in the BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The synchrotron shock model (SSM) for gamma-ray burst emission makes a testable prediction: that the observed low-energy power-law photon number spectral index cannot exceed -2/3 (where the photon model is defined with a positive index: $dN/dE \\propto E{alpha}$). We have collected time-resolved spectral fit parameters for over 100 bright bursts observed by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment on board the {\\it Compton Gamma Ray Observatory}. Using this database, we find 23 bursts in which the spectral index limit of the SSM is violated, We discuss elements of the analysis methodology that affect the robustness of this result, as well as some of the escape hatches left for the SSM by theory.

  8. Modeling Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift-Fermi era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hascoet, Romain

    2012-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short flashes (10 ms-100 s) of gamma-rays (keV-MeV). These very bright and variable events are followed by an afterglow detected from the X-ray to the optical and radio domains, which decays rapidly and vanishes in a few days/weeks. Their extreme luminosity make them detectable up to cosmological distances (at least to a redshift of 9). They are produced by relativistic jets launched by a newborn compact object. The gamma-ray emission is attributed to internal mechanisms occurring within the jet and the afterglow to the deceleration by the circumburst medium. The Swift satellite launched in 2004 has improved our knowledge of the afterglow (especially the early phase), while the Fermi satellite launched in 2008 has opened a new spectral window at high energy (above 100 MeV). My research work is in line with these recent observational breakthroughs which challenge the " standard " GRB model that was established in the 90s. I have developed numerical tools that are well adapted to model in a consistent way the different emission phases experienced by the relativistic jet, from the photosphere to the deceleration. Using these tools, I have obtained several results that contribute to a better understanding of GRB physics. Regarding the GRB itself, I developed a new approach to compute precisely the opacity seen by a high-energy photon that propagates within a ultra-relativistic jet. By comparing predictions to Fermi observations, I obtain critical constraints on the physical conditions in the relativistic jet (especially the Lorentz factor). I have also tried to identify observational signatures that could help to discriminate between different emission models : spectral (optical and high energy emission, thermal component) and temporal (transition to the afterglow) signatures. Regarding the afterglow, I have carried on the development of an alternative model - the 'reverse shock' model - recently proposed to explain ! the phenomenological

  9. Extension of an exponential light-curve gamma-ray burst pulse model across energy bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    A simple mathematical model of gamma-ray burst(GRB) pulses in time, suggested by Norris et al., is extended across energy. For a class of isolated pulses, two fit parameters appear to be effectively independent of energy. Specifically, statistical fits indicate that pulse amplitude A and pulse width τ are energy dependent, while pulse start time and pulse shape are effectively energy independent. These results bolster the pulse start and pulse scale conjectures of Nemiroff and add a new pulse shape conjecture which states that a class of pulses all have the same shape. The simple resulting pulse counts model is P(t, E) =A(E) exp[ -t/τ(E) -τ(E)/t], where t is the time since the start of the pulse. This pulse model is found to be an acceptable statistical fit to many of the fluent separable Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) pulses listed by Norris et al. Even without theoretical interpretation, this cross-energy extension may be immediately useful for fitting prompt emission from GRB pulses across energy channels with a minimal number of free parameters.

  10. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with SWIFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. There has been tremendous recent progress in our understanding of bursts with the new data from the SWIFT mission. SWIFT was launched in November 2004 and is an international multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Findings from the mission will be presented with emphasis on the relativistic outflows from GRBs. A huge step forward has been made in our understanding of the mysterious short GRBs. High redshift bursts have been detected from enormous explosions early in the universe. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow, challenging predictions of the fireball model. These, and other topics, will be discussed.

  11. Gamma-ray burst cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Liang, E. W.

    2015-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to 8.8 × 1054 erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it is possible to extract intergalactic medium (IGM) absorption features. We also present the capability of high-redshift GRBs to probe the pre-galactic metal enrichment and the first stars.

  12. Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Rodriguez, Mariangelly; Smith, M.; Tešic, G.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are known to be bright, irregular flashes of gamma rays that typically last just a few seconds, believed to be caused by stellar collapse or the merger of a pair of compact objects. Through previous work, it has been found that GRBs are distributed roughly uniformly over the entire sky, rather than being confined to the relatively narrow band of the Milky Way. Using the Python programming language, we generated a model of GRBs over cosmological distances, based on current empirical GRB distributions. The grbsim python module uses the acceptance-rejection Monte Carlo method to simulate the luminosity and redshift of a large population of GRBs, including cosmological effects such as dark energy and dark matter terms that modify the large-scale structure of space-time. The results of running grbsim are demonstrated to match the distribution of GRBs observed by the Burst Alert Telescope on NASA’s Swift satellite. The grbsim module will subsequently be used to simulate gamma ray and neutrino events for the Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network.

  13. Overview Animation of Gamma-ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the cosmos. Astronomers think most occur when the core of a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel, collapses under its own weight, and forms a b...

  14. Model-dependent high-energy neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Kumar, Pawan

    2013-03-22

    The IceCube Collaboration recently reported a stringent upper limit on the high energy neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which provides a meaningful constraint on the standard internal shock model. Recent broadband electromagnetic observations of GRBs also challenge the internal shock paradigm for GRBs, and some competing models for γ-ray prompt emission have been proposed. We describe a general scheme for calculating the GRB neutrino flux, and compare the predicted neutrino flux levels for different models. We point out that the current neutrino flux upper limit starts to constrain the standard internal shock model. The dissipative photosphere models are also challenged if the cosmic ray luminosity from GRBs is at least 10 times larger than the γ-ray luminosity. If the neutrino flux upper limit continues to go down in the next few years, then it would suggest the following possibilities: (i) the photon-to-proton luminosity ratio in GRBs is anomalously high for shocks, which may be achieved in some dissipative photosphere models and magnetic dissipation models; or (ii) the GRB emission site is at a larger radius than the internal shock radius, as expected in some magnetic dissipation models such as the internal collision-induced magnetic reconnection and turbulence model. PMID:25166786

  15. The rotation curve conspiracy and neutron star/asteroid models for Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpeter, Edwin E.; Wasserman, Ira

    1993-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) were analyzed using new GRO/BATSE results in conjunction with older PVO and KONUS data. It is suggested that the distribution in space of the GRB sources must have an outer bounding surface which is approximately a sphere centered on the location. Neutron stars in some kind of extended halo around the Galaxy with the required mass of an infalling object of order about 10 exp 21 to 10 exp 23 gm are considered.

  16. Observations of short gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Fox, Derek B; Roming, Peter W A

    2007-05-15

    We review recent observations of short-hard gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. The launch and successful ongoing operations of the Swift satellite, along with several localizations from the High-Energy Transient Explorer mission, have provoked a revolution in short-burst studies: first, by quickly providing high-quality positions to observers; and second, via rapid and sustained observations from the Swift satellite itself. We make a complete accounting of Swift-era short-burst localizations and proposed host galaxies, and discuss the implications of these observations for the distances, energetics and environments of short bursts, and the nature of their progenitors. We then review the physical modelling of short-burst afterglows: while the simplest afterglow models are inadequate to explain the observations, there have been several notable successes. Finally, we address the case of an unusual burst that threatens to upset the simple picture in which long bursts are due to the deaths of massive stars, and short bursts to compact-object merger events. PMID:17293336

  17. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    The unrivalled, extreme luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make them the favored beacons for sampling the high redshift Universe. To employ GRBs to study the cosmic terrain -- e.g., star and galaxy formation history -- GRB luminosities must be calibrated, and the luminosity function versus redshift must be measured or inferred. Several nascent relationships between gamma-ray temporal or spectral indicators and luminosity or total energy have been reported. These measures promise to further our understanding of GRBs once the connections between the luminosity indicators and GRB jets and emission mechanisms are better elucidated. The current distribution of 33 redshifts determined from host galaxies and afterglows peaks near z $\\sim$ 1, whereas for the full BATSE sample of long bursts, the lag-luminosity relation predicts a broad peak z $\\sim$ 1--4 with a tail to z $\\sim$ 20, in rough agreement with theoretical models based on star formation considerations. For some GRB subclasses and apparently related phenomena -- short bursts, long-lag bursts, and X-ray flashes -- the present information on their redshift distributions is sparse or entirely lacking, and progress is expected in Swift era when prompt alerts become numerous.

  18. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  19. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-01

    I'll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ˜ 0.4% - 3%.

  20. Photon and neutrino spectra of time-dependent photospheric models of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, K.; Mészáros, P. E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.edu

    2013-09-01

    Thermal photons from the photosphere may be the primary source of the observed prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In order to produce the observed non-thermal spectra, some kind of dissipation mechanism near the photosphere is required. In this paper we numerically simulate the evolution of the photon spectrum in a relativistically expanding shell with a time-dependent numerical code. We consider two basic models. One is a leptonic model, where a dissipation mechanism heats the thermal electrons maintaining their high temperature. The other model involves a cascade process induced by pp(pn)-collisions which produce high-energy electrons, modify the thermal spectrum, and emit neutrinos. The qualitative properties of the photon spectra are mainly determined by the optical depth at which the dissipation mechanism sets in. Too large optical depths lead to a broad and curved spectrum contradicting the observations, while for optical depths smaller than unity the spectral hardness becomes softer than observed. A significant shift of the spectral peak energy to higher energies due to a large energy injection can lead to an overly broad spectral shape. We show ideal parameter ranges for which these models are able to reproduce the observed spectra. For the pn-collision model, the neutrino fluence in the 10–100 GeV range is well above the atmospheric neutrino fluence, but its detection is challenging for presently available detectors.

  1. Testing Models for the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with Polarization Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray afterglows of almost one-half of gamma-ray bursts have been discovered by the Swift satellite to have a shallow decay phase of which the origin remains mysterious. Two main models have been proposed to explain this phase: relativistic wind bubbles (RWBs) and structured ejecta, which could originate from millisecond magnetars and rapidly rotating black holes, respectively. Based on these models, we investigate polarization evolution in the shallow decay phase of X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that in the RWB model, a significant bump of the polarization degree evolution curve appears during the shallow decay phase of both optical and X-ray afterglows, while the polarization position angle abruptly changes its direction by 90°. In the structured ejecta model, however, the polarization degree does not evolve significantly during the shallow decay phase of afterglows whether the magnetic field configuration in the ejecta is random or globally large-scale. Therefore, we conclude that these two models for the shallow decay phase and relevant central engines would be testable with future polarization observations.

  2. Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

  3. Gamma-ray burst theory after Swift.

    PubMed

    Piran, Tsvi; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2007-05-15

    Afterglow observations in the pre-Swift era confirmed to a large extend the relativistic blast wave model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Together with the observations of properties of host galaxies and the association with (type Ic) SNe, this has led to the generally accepted collapsar origin of long GRBs. However, most of the afterglow data was collected hours after the burst. The X-ray telescope and the UV/optical telescope onboard Swift are able to slew to the direction of a burst in real time and record the early broadband afterglow light curves. These observations, and in particular the X-ray observations, resulted in many surprises. While we have anticipated a smooth transition from the prompt emission to the afterglow, many observed that early light curves are drastically different. We review here how these observations are changing our understanding of GRBs. PMID:17293324

  4. Towards a Unified Model for the Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiriec, Sylvain

    2015-08-01

    We suggest here to replace the historical spectral model (Band function) for the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) prompt emission (keV-MeV energy regime) with a new one. We show that the complex GRB spectral shapes are well described with a combination of three separate components: (i) a thermal-like component that we interpret as emission from the GRB jet photosphere, (ii) a non-thermal component that we interpret as synchrotron radiation from charged particles propagating and accelerated within the GRB jet, and (iii) a second non-thermal component that is not always present or detectable and which is most likely of inverse Compton origin. The smooth evolution of all three components during the burst duration reinforces the validity of this new model. Detailed studies of the evolution of these components provide insights on the nature and composition of GRB jets as well as on their magnetic fields. Moreover, this new model enables a new luminosity-hardness relation based on the first non-thermal component showing that GRBs may be standard candles. If statistically confirmed, this relation will be used to (i) constrain the mechanisms powering GRB jets, (ii) estimate GRB distances, (iii) probe the early Universe, and (iv) constrain the cosmological parameters in complement to the Type Ia SNe sample. I will present this new model using analysis of GRBs detected with various observatories and instruments such as Fermi and CGRO/BATSE. I will discuss here the striking similarities of GRB spectral shapes as well as the possible universality of the proposed luminosity-hardness relation in the context of the new model.

  5. Toward cosmological-model-independent calibrations for the luminosity relations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuheng; Li, Zhengxiang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), have been widely used as distance indicators to measure the cosmic expansion and explore the nature of dark energy. A popular method adopted in previous works is to calibrate the luminosity relations which are responsible for distance estimation of GRBs with more primary (low redshift) cosmic distance ladder objects, type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Since distances of SNe Ia in all SN Ia samples used to calibrate GRB luminosity relations were usually derived from the global fit in a specific cosmological model, the distance of GRB at a given redshift calibrated with matching SNe Ia was still cosmological-model-dependent. In this paper, we first directly determine the distances of SNe Ia with the Angular Diameter Distances (ADDs) of galaxy clusters without any assumption for the background of the universe, and then calibrate GRB luminosity relations with our cosmology-independent distances of SNe Ia. The results suggest that, compared to the previous original manner where distances of SNe Ia used as calibrators are determined from the global fit in a particular cosmological model, our treatments proposed here yield almost the same calibrations of GRB luminosity relations and the cosmological implications of them do not suffer any circularity.

  6. Radiative Transfer In Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei

    We propose to develop state-of-the-art numerical tools for radiative transfer calculations in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We will investigate two problems: (1) Production and heating of photons at the early (opaque) stage of the explosion, which controls the brightness and spectral shape of the jet photospheric emission. (2) Transfer of GRB radiation through the external blast wave. Our recent results suggest that this transfer generates the GeV flash observed in GRBs, providing key information on the explosion and its progenitor. We will test our models against observations.

  7. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  8. An external-shock model for gamma-ray burst afterglow 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T.; Woźniak, P.

    2013-12-01

    The complex multiwavelength emission of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow 130427A (monitored in the radio up to 10 d, in the optical and X-ray until 50 d, and at GeV energies until 1 d) can be accounted for by a hybrid reverse-forward shock synchrotron model, with inverse-Compton emerging only above a few GeV. The high ratio of the early optical to late radio flux requires that the ambient medium is a wind and that the forward-shock synchrotron spectrum peaks in the optical at about 10 ks. The latter has two consequences: the wind must be very tenuous and the optical emission before 10 ks must arise from the reverse-shock, as suggested also by the bright optical flash that Raptor has monitored during the prompt emission phase (<100 s). The Very Large Array radio emission is from the reverse-shock, the Swift X-ray emission is mostly from the forward-shock, but the both shocks give comparable contributions to the Fermi GeV emission. The weak wind implies a large blast-wave radius (8 t_day^{1/2} pc), which requires a very tenuous circumstellar medium, suggesting that the massive stellar progenitor of GRB 130427A resided in a superbubble.

  9. Constraints on Short Gamma-Ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Melinder, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Starling, R.; Thomsen, B.; Andersen, M.I.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Jensen, B.L.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Castro-Ceron, J.M.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A.; Pedersen, K.; Rhoads, J.E.; Tanvir, N.R.; Watson, D.; /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /IAA, Granada /KIPAC, Menlo Park /TLS, Tautenburg /NASA, Marshall /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Amsterdam U., Astron. Inst. /Aarhus U. /Potsdam, Astrophys. Inst. /European Southern Obs., Chile /Leicester U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Hertfordshire U.

    2005-06-15

    We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at {approx}2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5{sigma} limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type Ic hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or Ic SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB.

  10. Gamma-ray burst theory: Back to the drawing board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts have always been intriguing sources to study in terms of particle acceleration, but not since their discovery two decades ago has the theory of these objects been in such turmoil. Prior to the launch of Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and observations by Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), there was strong evidence pointing to magnetized Galactic neutron stars as the sources of gamma-ray bursts. However, since BATSE the observational picture has changed dramatically, requiring much more distant and possibly cosmological sources. I review the history of gamma-ray burst theory from the era of growing consensus for nearby neutron stars to the recent explosion of halo and cosmological models and the impact of the present confusion on the particle acceleration problem.

  11. Physics issues of gamma ray burst emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison

    1987-01-01

    The critical physics issues in the interpretation of gamma-ray-burst spectra are reviewed. An attempt is made to define the emission-region parameter space satisfying the maximum number of observational and theoretical constraints. Also discussed are the physical mechanisms responsible for the bursts that are most consistent with the above parameter space.

  12. On the nature of gamma-ray burst time dilations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery that faint gamma-ray bursts are stretched in time relative to bright ones has been interpreted as support for cosmological distances: faint bursts have their durations redshifted relative to bright ones. It was pointed out, however, that the relative time stretching can also be produced by an intrinsic correlation bewteen duration and luminosity of gamma-ray bursts in a nearby, bounded distribution. While both models can explain the average amount of time stretching, we find a difference between them in the way the duration distribution of faint bursts deviates from that of bright ones, assuming the luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts is independent of distance. This allows us to distinguish between these two broad classes of model on the basis of the duration distributions of gamma-ray bursts, leading perhaps to an unambiguous determination of the distance scale of gamma-ray bursts. We apply our proposed test to the second Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) catalog and conclude, with some caution, that the data favor a cosmological interpretation of the time dilation.

  13. Stirling Colgate and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Donald

    2014-10-01

    Even before the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), Stirling Colgate proposed that bursts of x rays and gamma rays might be produced by a relativistic shock created in the supernova explosion of a massive star. We trace the scientific story of GRBs from their detection to the present, highlighting along the way Stirling's interest in them and his efforts to understand them. We summarize our current understanding that short, soft, repeating bursts are produced by magnetic neutron stars; short, hard bursts are produced by the mergers of neutron star-neutron star binaries; and long, hard bursts are produced by the core collapse of massive stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes. We then discuss some important open questions about GRBs and how they might be answered. We conclude by describing the recent serendipitous discovery of an x-ray burst of exactly the kind he proposed, and the insights into core collapse supernovae and GRBs that it provided.

  14. Gravitational waves within the magnetar model of superluminous supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2016-08-01

    The light curve of many supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be explained by a sustained injection of extra energy from its possible central engine, a rapidly rotating strongly magnetic neutron star (i.e., magnetar). The magnetic dipole radiation power that the magnetar supplies comes at the expense of the star's rotational energy. However radiation by gravitational waves (GWs) can be more efficient than magnetic dipole radiation because of its stronger dependence on neutron star spin rate Ω, i.e., Ω6 (for a static "mountain") or Ω8 (for a r-mode fluid oscillation) versus Ω4 for magnetic dipole radiation. Here we use the magnetic field B and initial spin period P0 inferred from SN and GRB observations to obtain simple constraints on the dimensionless amplitude of the mountain of ε < 0.01 and r-mode oscillation of α < 1, the former being similar to that obtained by recent works. We then include GW emission within the magnetar model. We show that when ε > 10-4(B/1014G)(P0/1ms) or α > 0.01(B/1014G)(P0/1ms)2, light curves are strongly affected, with significant decrease in peak luminosity and increase in time to peak luminosity. Thus the GW effects studied here are more pronounced for low B and short P0 but are unlikely to be important in modeling SN and GRB light curves since the amplitudes needed for noticeable changes are quite large.

  15. The supercritical pile gamma-ray burst model: The GRB afterglow steep decline and plateau phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.

    2013-12-10

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the 'supercritical pile' GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E {sub pk} ∼ m{sub e}c {sup 2}. We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Γ to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (∼25%) decrease in Γ at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R{sub D} . Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the 'supercritical pile' is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by ∼m{sub p} /m{sub e} than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R{sub D} , the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Γ and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R{sub D} is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the 'unexpected' XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R ≅ R{sub D} , the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a 'plateau,' consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R ≅ R{sub D} , thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  16. The Supercritical Pile Gamma-Ray Burst Model: The GRB Afterglow Steep Decline and Plateau Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the "supercritical pile" GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E pk ~ mec 2. We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Γ to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (~25%) decrease in Γ at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius RD . Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the "supercritical pile" is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by ~mp /me than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than RD , the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Γ and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until RD is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the "unexpected" XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R ~= RD , the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a "plateau," consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R ~= RD , thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  17. The Supercritical Pile Gamma-Ray Burst Model: The GRB Afterglow Steep Decline and Plateau Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the "supercritical pile" GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E(sub pk) is approx. m(sub e)C(exp 2). We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Gamma to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (approx. 25%) decrease in Gamma at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R(sub D). Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the "supercritical pile" is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by approx. m(sub p)/m(sub e) than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R(sub D), the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Gamma and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R(sub D) is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the "unexpected" XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R is approx. equal to R(sub D), the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a "plateau," consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R is approx. equal to R(sub D), thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  18. Gamma-Ray Burst Class Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Roiger, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Guided by the supervised pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 developed by Quinlan in 1986, we examine the three gamma-ray burst classes identified by Mukherjee et al. in 1998. C4.5 provides strong statistical support for this classification. However, with C4.5 and our knowledge of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument, we demonstrate that class 3 (intermediate fluence, intermediate duration, soft) does not have to be a distinct source population: statistical/systematic errors in measuring burst attributes combined with the well-known hardness/intensity correlation can cause low peak flux class 1 (high fluence, long, intermediate hardness) bursts to take on class 3 characteristics naturally. Based on our hypothesis that the third class is not a distinct one, we provide rules so that future events can be placed in either class 1 or class 2 (low fluence, short, hard). We find that the two classes are relatively distinct on the basis of Band's work in 1993 on spectral parameters alpha, beta, and E (sub peak) alone. Although this does not indicate a better basis for classification, it does suggest that different physical conditions exist for class 1 and class 2 bursts. In the process of studying burst class characteristics, we identify a new bias affecting burst fluence and duration measurements. Using a simple model of how burst duration can be underestimated, we show how this fluence duration bias can affect BATSE measurements and demonstrate the type of effect it can have on the BATSE fluence versus peak flux diagram.

  19. Gamma-Ray Burst Class Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Roiger, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    Guided by the Supervised pattern recognition algorithm C4.5, we examine the three gamma-ray burst classes identified by Mukherjee et al. C4.5 provides strong statistical support for this classification. However, with C4.5 and our knowledge of the BATSE instrument, we demonstrate that Class 3 (intermediate fluence, intermediate duration, soft) does not have to be a distinct source population: statistical/systematic errors in measuring burst attributes combined with the well-known hardness/intensity correlation can cause low peak flux Class I (high fluence, long, intermediate hardness) bursts to take on Class 3 characteristics naturally. Based on our hypothesis that the third class is not a distinct one, we provide rules so that future events can be placed in either Class I or Class 2 (low fluence, short, hard). Using classified bursts from the BATSE 4B Catalog, we plot log(N>P) vs. log(P) curves and study spectral features of each class. We find that the two classes are relatively distinct on the basis of spectral parameters, alpha, Beta, and E(sub peak) alone. Although this does not indicate a better basis for classification, it does suggest that different physical conditions exist for Class I and Class 2 bursts. In the process of studying burst class characteristics, we identify a new bias that affects measurement of burst fluences and durations. Using a simple model of how burst duration can be underestimated, we generally characterize how this fluence duration bias affects BATSE measurements, and demonstrate the type of effect it can have on the BATSE fluence vs. peak flux diagram.

  20. Gamma Ray Bursts: a 1983 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect; energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all; burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective; finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

  1. Gamma ray bursts: a 1983 overview

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L.

    1983-10-01

    Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect. Energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all. Burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective. Finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

  2. Observing Gamma-ray Bursts with GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) is a satellite-based observatory to study the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The Large Area Telescope, the main instrument, is a pair-conversion telescope which will survey the sky in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. The LAT's wide field of view (greater than 2 sr), large effective area and low deadtime combine to provide excellent high-energy gamma-ray observations of GRB. To tie these frontier high-energy observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 8 keV to 30 MeV range. Upon detection of a GRB by the LAT or the GBM, the spacecraft can autonomously repoint to keep the GRB location within the LAT field of view, allowing high-energy afterglow observations. We describe how the instruments, spacecraft, and ground system work together to provide observations of gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to over 300 GeV and provide rapid notification of these observations to the wider gamma-ray burst community. Analysis and simulation tools dedicated to the GRB science have been developed. In this contribution we show the expected LAT sensitivity obtained with such simulations, and illustrate the results we expect from GLAST observations with spectral and temporal analysis of simulated GRB.

  3. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SYNCHROTRON SHOCK MODEL FOR THE FERMI GRB 090820A OBSERVED BY GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Guiriec, Sylvain; Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Baring, Matthew G.; Meegan, Charles A.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Fishman, Gerald J.; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty E-mail: baring@rice.edu

    2011-11-01

    Discerning the radiative dissipation mechanism for prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) requires detailed spectroscopic modeling that straddles the {nu}F{sub {nu}} peak in the 100 keV-1 MeV range. Historically, empirical fits such as the popular Band function have been employed with considerable success in interpreting the observations. While extrapolations of the Band parameters can provide some physical insight into the emission mechanisms responsible for GRBs, these inferences do not provide a unique way of discerning between models. By fitting physical models directly, this degeneracy can be broken, eliminating the need for empirical functions; our analysis here offers a first step in this direction. One of the oldest, and leading, theoretical ideas for the production of the prompt signal is the synchrotron shock model. Here we explore the applicability of this model to a bright Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) burst with a simple temporal structure, GRB 090820A. Our investigation implements, for the first time, thermal and non-thermal synchrotron emissivities in the RMFIT forward-folding spectral analysis software often used in GBM burst studies. We find that these synchrotron emissivities, together with a blackbody shape, provide at least as good a match to the data as the Band GRB spectral fitting function. This success is achieved in both time-integrated and time-resolved spectral fits.

  4. Constraints on the Synchrotron Shock Model for the Fermi GRB 090820A Observed by Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Baring, Matthew G.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Guiriec, Sylvain; Paciesas, William S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; van der Horst, Alexander J.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-11-01

    Discerning the radiative dissipation mechanism for prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) requires detailed spectroscopic modeling that straddles the νF ν peak in the 100 keV-1 MeV range. Historically, empirical fits such as the popular Band function have been employed with considerable success in interpreting the observations. While extrapolations of the Band parameters can provide some physical insight into the emission mechanisms responsible for GRBs, these inferences do not provide a unique way of discerning between models. By fitting physical models directly, this degeneracy can be broken, eliminating the need for empirical functions; our analysis here offers a first step in this direction. One of the oldest, and leading, theoretical ideas for the production of the prompt signal is the synchrotron shock model. Here we explore the applicability of this model to a bright Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) burst with a simple temporal structure, GRB 090820A. Our investigation implements, for the first time, thermal and non-thermal synchrotron emissivities in the RMFIT forward-folding spectral analysis software often used in GBM burst studies. We find that these synchrotron emissivities, together with a blackbody shape, provide at least as good a match to the data as the Band GRB spectral fitting function. This success is achieved in both time-integrated and time-resolved spectral fits.

  5. Iron K Lines from Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, T. R.; Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    We present models for reprocessing of an intense flux of X-rays and gamma rays expected in the vicinity of gamma ray burst sources. We consider the transfer and reprocessing of the energetic photons into observable features in the X-ray band, notably the K lines of iron. Our models are based on the assumption that the gas is sufficiently dense to allow the microphysical processes to be in a steady state, thus allowing efficient line emission with modest reprocessing mass and elemental abundances ranging from solar to moderately enriched. We show that the reprocessing is enhanced by down-Comptonization of photons whose energy would otherwise be too high to absorb on iron, and that pair production can have an effect on enhancing the line production. Both "distant" reprocessors such as supernova or wind remnants and "nearby" reprocessors such as outer stellar envelopes can reproduce the observed line fluxes with Fe abundances 30-100 times above solar, depending on the incidence angle. The high incidence angles required arise naturally only in nearby models, which for plausible values can reach Fe line to continuum ratios close to the reported values.

  6. How Bad or Good Are the External Forward Shock Afterglow Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Gao; Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei; Gao, He; Li, Liang; Deng, Can-Min; Qin, Song-Mei; Tang, Qing-Wen; Kann, D. Alexander; Ryde, Felix; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-07-01

    The external forward shock models have been the standard paradigm to interpret the broadband afterglow data of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One prediction of the models is that some afterglow temporal breaks at different energy bands should be achromatic; that is, the break times should be the same in different frequencies. Multiwavelength observations in the Swift era have revealed chromatic afterglow behaviors at least in some GRBs, casting doubts on the external forward shock origin of GRB afterglows. In this paper, using a large sample of GRBs with both X-ray and optical afterglow data, we perform a systematic study to address the question: how bad or good are the external forward shock models? Our sample includes 85 GRBs up to 2014 March with well-monitored X-ray and optical light curves. Based on how well the data abide by the external forward shock models, we categorize them into five grades and three samples. The first two grades (Grade I and II) include 45 of 85 GRBs. They show evidence of, or are consistent with having, an achromatic break. The temporal and spectral behaviors in each afterglow segment are consistent with the predictions (the “closure relations”) of the forward shock models. These GRBs are included in the Gold sample. The next two grades (Grade III and IV) include 37 of 85 GRBs. They are also consistent with having an achromatic break, even though one or more afterglow segments do not comply with the closure relations. These GRBs are included in the Silver sample. Finally, Grade V (3/85) shows direct evidence of chromatic behaviors, suggesting that the external shock models are inconsistent with the data. These are included in the Bad sample. We further perform statistical analyses of various observational properties (temporal index α, spectral index β, break time tb) and model parameters (energy injection index q, electron spectral index p, jet opening angle {θ }j, radiative efficiency ηγ, and so on) of the GRBs in the Gold sample

  7. Is there cosmological time dilation in gamma-ray bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. report that the temporal structure of faint gamma-ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  8. Properties of multiple event gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lochner, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    We present results from a study of 37 multiple event gamma ray bursts found in the monitoring data of the PVO gamma ray burst detector. We define these bursts as those which have two or more distinct emission events separated by a return to the background intensity. Significant correlation exists between the duration of the first event and the duration of the second event, while some correlation exists between the hardness of the events and only weak correlation exists in the intensity of the events. Although the time profiles of events in a burst may be similar, as measured in the phase portrait, there is no general rule about the degree of similarity of the time profiles. Subdividing the data according to the recurrence time, we find a tendency for the strength of the correlation in the hardness to increase with decreasing separation between the events. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Properties of multiple event gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lochner, J.C.

    1991-12-31

    We present results from a study of 37 multiple event gamma ray bursts found in the monitoring data of the PVO gamma ray burst detector. We define these bursts as those which have two or more distinct emission events separated by a return to the background intensity. Significant correlation exists between the duration of the first event and the duration of the second event, while some correlation exists between the hardness of the events and only weak correlation exists in the intensity of the events. Although the time profiles of events in a burst may be similar, as measured in the phase portrait, there is no general rule about the degree of similarity of the time profiles. Subdividing the data according to the recurrence time, we find a tendency for the strength of the correlation in the hardness to increase with decreasing separation between the events. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Spectral evolution in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Matz, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) and the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite have independently monitored cosmic gamma-ray bursts since launch in February 1980. Several bursts with relatively simple pulse structure and sufficient intensity have been analyzed for evidence of spectral variability on time scales shorter than the pulse durations. In many of these bursts pulse structures are found, ranging in duration from 1 to 10 seconds, which exhibit a trend of hard-to-soft spectral evolution. No significant evidence for soft-to-hard evolution has been found. The HXRBS data above 100 keV and the GRS data above 1 MeV indicate that the spectral evolution generally is not due to time-varying absorption features at energies below 100 keV.

  11. The Gamma-Ray Burst Next Door

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    I hesitate to spawn a thousand bad sci-fi flicks, but here it goes: Scientists now say that some gamma-ray bursts, the most powerful explosions in the universe, originate in nearby galaxy clusters. If one were to occur nearby, it could wipe out life on Earth. Fortunately, the chances of mass extinction are slimmer than the Chicago Cubs meeting the Boston Red Sox in the World Series (. . . and the Red Sox winning). But a new analysis of over 1400 archived gamma-ray bursts reveals that about 100 bursts originated within 325 million light-years of Earth, and not billions of light-years away as previously thought. If so, there's no reason why a burst couldn't go off in our galaxy.

  12. Observational properties of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazets, E. P.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview of the major observational results obtained in gamma-ray burst studies is presented. Also discussed is to what extent the thermonuclear model, which appears at present to be the most plausible, can account for the observed properties of the bursts. The investigation of gamma-ray bursts should cover observations of the time histories of events, energy spectra, and their variablility, source localization, and inspection of the localization regions during the active and quiescent phases of the source in other wavelengths, as well as, evaluation of the statistical distributions of the data obtained.

  13. POPULATION III GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    2010-06-01

    We discuss a model of Poynting-dominated gamma-ray bursts from the collapse of very massive first generation (Pop. III) stars. From redshifts of order 20, the resulting relativistic jets would radiate in the hard X-ray range around 50 keV and above, followed after roughly a day by an external shock component peaking around a few keV. On the same timescales an inverse Compton component around 75 GeV may be expected, as well as a possible infrared flash. The fluences of these components would be above the threshold for detectors such as Swift and Fermi, providing potentially valuable information on the formation and properties of what may be the first luminous objects and their black holes in the high redshift universe.

  14. "Short, Hard Gamma-Ray Bursts - Mystery Solved?????"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.

    2006-01-01

    After over a decade of speculation about the nature of short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the recent detection of afterglow emission from a small number of short bursts has provided the first physical constraints on possible progenitor models. While the discovery of afterglow emission from long GRBs was a real breakthrough linking their origin to star forming galaxies, and hence the death of massive stars, the progenitors, energetics, and environments for short gamma-ray burst events remain elusive despite a few recent localizations. Thus far, the nature of the host galaxies measured indicates that short GRBs arise from an old (> 1 Gyr) stellar population, strengthening earlier suggestions and providing support for coalescing compact object binaries as the progenitors. On the other hand, some of the short burst afterglow observations cannot be easily explained in the coalescence scenario. These observations raise the possibility that short GRBs may have different or multiple progenitors systems. The study of the short-hard GRB afterglows has been made possible by the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer, launched in November of 2004. Swift is equipped with a coded aperture gamma-ray telescope that can observe up to 2 steradians of the sky and can compute the position of a gamma-ray burst to within 2-3 arcmin in less than 10 seconds. The Swift spacecraft can slew on to this burst position without human intervention, allowing its on-board x ray and optical telescopes to study the afterglow within 2 minutes of the original GRB trigger. More Swift short burst detections and afterglow measurements are needed before we can declare that the mystery of short gamma-ray burst is solved.

  15. Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

  16. A MULTIVARIATE FIT LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND WORLD MODEL FOR LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmoradi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    It is proposed that the luminosity function, the rest-frame spectral correlations, and distributions of cosmological long-duration (Type-II) gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) may be very well described as a multivariate log-normal distribution. This result is based on careful selection, analysis, and modeling of LGRBs' temporal and spectral variables in the largest catalog of GRBs available to date: 2130 BATSE GRBs, while taking into account the detection threshold and possible selection effects. Constraints on the joint rest-frame distribution of the isotropic peak luminosity (L{sub iso}), total isotropic emission (E{sub iso}), the time-integrated spectral peak energy (E{sub p,z}), and duration (T{sub 90,z}) of LGRBs are derived. The presented analysis provides evidence for a relatively large fraction of LGRBs that have been missed by the BATSE detector with E{sub iso} extending down to {approx}10{sup 49} erg and observed spectral peak energies (E{sub p} ) as low as {approx}5 keV. LGRBs with rest-frame duration T{sub 90,z} {approx}< 1 s or observer-frame duration T{sub 90} {approx}< 2 s appear to be rare events ({approx}< 0.1% chance of occurrence). The model predicts a fairly strong but highly significant correlation ({rho} = 0.58 {+-} 0.04) between E{sub iso} and E{sub p,z} of LGRBs. Also predicted are strong correlations of L{sub iso} and E{sub iso} with T{sub 90,z} and moderate correlation between L{sub iso} and E{sub p,z}. The strength and significance of the correlations found encourage the search for underlying mechanisms, though undermine their capabilities as probes of dark energy's equation of state at high redshifts. The presented analysis favors-but does not necessitate-a cosmic rate for BATSE LGRBs tracing metallicity evolution consistent with a cutoff Z/Z{sub Sun} {approx} 0.2-0.5, assuming no luminosity-redshift evolution.

  17. THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Lichti, Giselher; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Steinle, Helmut; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, Robert; Wilson, Robert B.; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; McBreen, Sheila

    2009-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data sets exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations onboard to allow re-orienting the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of 12 sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from {approx}8 keV to {approx}40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The onboard trigger threshold is {approx}0.7 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates onboard triggers for {approx}250 GRBs per year.

  18. Gamma-ray Burst Energetics an the Gamma-ray Burst Hubble Diagram: Promises and Limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, J. S.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present a complete sample of 29 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which it has been possible to determine temporal breaks (or limits) from their afterglow light curves. We interpret these breaks within the framework of the uniform conical jet model, incorporating realistic estimates of the ambient density and propagating error estimates on the measured quantities. In agreement with our previous analysis of a smaller sample, the derived jet opening angles of those 16 bursts with redshifts result in a narrow clustering of geometrically corrected gamma-ray energies about 1.33 x 10(exp 51) ergs; the burst-to-burst variance about this value is 0.35 dex, a factor of 2.2. Despite this rather small scatter, we demonstrate in a series of GRB Hubble diagrams that the current sample cannot place meaningful constraints upon the fundamental parameters of the universe. Indeed, for GRBs to ever be useful in cosmographic measurements, we argue the necessity of two directions. First, GRB Hubble diagrams should be based upon fundamental physical quantities such as energy, rather than empirically derived and physically ill-understood distance indicators (such as those based upon prompt burst time-profiles and spectra). Second, a more homogeneous set should be constructed by culling subclasses from the larger sample. These subclasses, although now first recognizable by deviant energies, ultimately must be identifiable by properties other than those directly related to energy. We identify a new subclass of GRBs (" f-GRBs ") that appear both underluminous by factors of at least 10 and exhibit a rapid fading (f(sub nu is proportional to t(sup -2) at early times (t < or = 0.5 day). About 10%-20% of observed long-duration bursts appear to be f-GRBs.

  19. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized. PMID:17293337

  20. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  1. Plasma Instabilities in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, Robert C.

    2008-12-24

    Magnetic fields are important in a variety of astrophysical scenarios, ranging from possible creation mechanisms of cosmological magnetic fields through relativistic jets such as that from Active Galactic Nuclei and gamma-ray bursts to local phenomena in the solar system. Here, the outstanding importance of plasma instabilities to astrophysics is illustrated by applying the so-called neutral point method to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are assumed to have a homogeneous background magnetic field. It is shown how magnetic turbulence, which is a prerequisite for the creation of dissipation and, subsequently, radiation, is created by the highly relativistic particles in the GRB jet. Using the fact that different particle compositions lead to different instability conditions, conclusions can be drawn about the particle composition of the jet, showing that it is more likely of baryonic nature.

  2. Early optical polarization of a gamma-ray burst afterglow.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Carole G; Steele, Iain A; Smith, Robert J; Kobayashi, Shiho; Melandri, Andrea; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Gomboc, Andreja; Mottram, Chris J; Clarke, David; Monfardini, Alessandro; Carter, David; Bersier, David

    2007-03-30

    We report the optical polarization of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow, obtained 203 seconds after the initial burst of gamma-rays from GRB 060418, using a ring polarimeter on the robotic Liverpool Telescope. Our robust (2sigma) upper limit on the percentage of polarization, less than 8%, coincides with the fireball deceleration time at the onset of the afterglow. The combination of the rate of decay of the optical brightness and the low polarization at this critical time constrains standard models of GRB ejecta, ruling out the presence of a large-scale ordered magnetic field in the emitting region. PMID:17363631

  3. Physics of Gamma Ray Burst Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Peter

    2004-01-01

    During this grant period, the physics of gamma-ray bursts was investigated. A number of new results have emerged. The importance of pair formation in high compactness burst spectra may help explain x-ray flashes; a universal jet shape is a likely explanation for the distribution of jet break times; gravitational waves may be copiously produced both in short bursts from compact mergers and in long bursts arising from collapsars; x-ray iron lines are likely to be due to interaction with the stellar atmosphere of the progenitor; prompt optical flashes from reverse shocks will give diagnostics on the Lorentz factor and the environment; GeV and TeV emission from bursts may be expected in the external shock; etc. The group working with the PI included postdocs Dr. Bing Zhang (now assistant professor at University of Nevada); Dr. Shiho Kobayashi; graduate student Lijun Gou; collaborators Drs. Tim Kallman and Martin Rees. Meszaros shared with Rees and Dr. Bohan Paczynsky the AAS Rossi Prize in 2000 for their work on the theory of gamma ray bursts. The refereed publications and conference proceedings resulting from this research are summarized below. The PI gave a number of invited talks at major conferences, also listed.

  4. Radio Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1-1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  5. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Mystery Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Ann

    2007-01-01

    With the success of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer currently in orbit, this is quite an exciting time in the history of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The study of GRBs is a modern astronomical mystery story that began over 30 years ago with the serendipitous discovery of these astronomical events by military satellites in the late 1960's. Until the launch of BATSE on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, astronomers had no clue whether GRBs originated at the edge of our solar system, in our own Milky Way Galaxy or incredibly far away near the edge of the observable Universe. Data from BATSE proved that GRBs are distributed isotropically on the sky and thus could not be the related to objects in the disk of our Galaxy. Given the intensity of the gamma-ray emission, an extragalactic origin would require an astounding amount of energy. Without sufficient data to decide the issue, a great debate continued about whether GRBs were located in the halo of our own galaxy or were at extragalactic - even cosmological distances. This debate continued until 1997 when the BeppoSAX mission discovered a fading X-ray afterglow signal in the same location as a GRB. This discovery enabled other telescopes, to observe afterglow emission at optical and radio wavelengths and prove that GRBs were at cosmological distances by measuring large redshifts in the optical spectra. Like BeppoSAX Swift, slews to new GRB locations to measure afterglow emission. In addition to improved GRB sensitivity, a significant advantage of Swift over BeppoSAX and other missions is its ability to slew very quickly, allowing x-ray and optical follow-up measurements to be made as early as a minute after the gamma-ray burst trigger rather than the previous 6-8 hour delay. Swift afterglow measurements along with follow-up ground-based observations, and theoretical work have allowed astronomers to identify two plausible scenarios for the creation of a GRB: either through core collapse of super massive stars or

  6. Prompt GeV emission in the synchrotron self-Compton model for gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, Alin

    2008-01-01

    The detection in 10 bursts of an optical counterpart emission (i.e. during the prompt GRB phase) that is 10-10000 brighter than the extrapolation of the burst spectrum to optical frequencies suggests a synchrotron self-Compton origin for the GRB emission, synchrotron producing the optical counterpart emission. In this model, the second upscattering of the burst photons yields a prompt GeV-TeV emission, whose brightness depends strongly on an unknown quantity, the peak energy of the primary synchrotron spectrum. Measurements of the optical, gamma-ray, and GeV prompt fluxes can be used to test the synchrotron self-Compton model for GRBs and to determine directly the total radiative output of GRBs. For a set of 29 GRBs with optical counterpart detections, we find that the expected GeV photon flux should correlate with the fluence of the sub-MeV emission and should anticorrelate with the brightness of the optical counterpart, the strength of these correlations decreasing for an increasing width of the synchrotron peak energy distribution. The detection of a GeV prompt emission consistent with the extrapolation of the burst spectrum to higher energies would rule out the synchrotron self-Compton model if the sub-MeV burst emission were very bright and the (intrinsic) optical counterpart were very dim.

  7. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    ESO Telescopes Observe "Lightning" in the Young Universe Summary Observations with telescopes at the ESO La Silla and Paranal observatories (Chile) have enabled an international team of astronomers [1] to measure the distance of a "gamma-ray burst", an extremely violent, cosmic explosion of still unknown physical origin. It turns out to be the most remote gamma-ray burst ever observed . The exceedingly powerful flash of light from this event was emitted when the Universe was very young, less than about 1,500 million years old, or only 10% of its present age. Travelling with the speed of light (300,000 km/sec) during 11,000 million years or more, the signal finally reached the Earth on January 31, 2000. The brightness of the exploding object was enormous, at least 1,000,000,000,000 times that of our Sun, or thousands of times that of the explosion of a single, heavy star (a "supernova"). The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) was also involved in trail-blazing observations of another gamma-ray burst in May 1999, cf. ESO PR 08/99. PR Photo 28a/00 : Sky field near GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28b/00 : The fading optical counterpart of GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28c/00 : VLT spectrum of GRB 000131 . What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the mysterious events known as "gamma-ray bursts" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by instruments on orbiting satellites. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite much effort, it is only within the last few years that it has become possible to locate the sites of some of these events (e.g. with the Beppo-Sax satellite ). Since the beginning of 1997, astronomers have identified about twenty optical sources in the sky that are associated with gamma-ray bursts. They have been found to be situated at extremely large (i.e., "cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy release during a gamma-ray burst within a few

  8. Observing gamma-ray bursts with the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, G. K.; Connell, P. H.; Naya, J. E.; Seifert, H.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    The spectrometer for INTEGRAL (SPI) is a germanium spectrometer with a wide field of view and will provide the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission with the opportunity of studying gamma ray bursts. Simulations carried out to assess the response of the instrument using data from real burst data as input are reported on. It is shown that, despite the angular resolution of 3 deg, it is possible to locate the direction of bursts with an accuracy of a few arcmin, while offering the high spectral resolution of the germanium detectors. It is remarked that the SPI field of view is similar to the size of the halo of bursts expected around M 31 on galactic models. The detectability of bursts with such a halo is discussed.

  9. MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS PROBED BY GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Morihara, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Takuya; Wakashima, Yudai; Yonemochi, Hajime; Sakashita, Tomonori; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Kodama, Yoshiki; Gunji, Shuichi; Toukairin, Noriyuki; Mihara, Tatehiro; Toma, Kenji

    2012-10-10

    We report polarization measurements in two prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110301A and GRB 110721A, observed with the gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP) on borad the IKAROS solar sail mission. We detected linear polarization signals from each burst with polarization degree of {Pi} = 70 {+-} 22% with statistical significance of 3.7{sigma} for GRB 110301A, and {Pi} = 84{sup +16}{sub -28}% with 3.3{sigma} confidence level for GRB 110721A. We did not detect any significant change of polarization angle. These two events had shorter durations and dimmer brightness compared with GRB 100826A, which showed a significant change of polarization angle, as reported in Yonetoku et al. Synchrotron emission model can be consistent with the data of the three GRBs, while the photospheric quasi-thermal emission model is not favored. We suggest that magnetic field structures in the emission region are globally ordered fields advected from the central engine.

  10. CONSTRAINING DARK ENERGY WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Samushia, Lado; Ratra, Bharat E-mail: ratra@phys.ksu.ed

    2010-05-10

    We use the measurement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) distances to constrain dark energy cosmological model parameters. We employ two methods for analyzing GRB data-fitting luminosity relation of GRBs in each cosmology and using distance measures computed from binned GRB data. Current GRB data alone cannot tightly constrain cosmological parameters and allow for a wide range of dark energy models.

  11. Gravitational waves and short gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi, Valeriu

    2012-07-01

    Short hard gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are believed to be produced by compact binary coalescences (CBC) { either double neutron stars or neutron star{black hole binaries. The same source is expected to emit strong gravitational radiation, detectable with existing and planned gravitational wave observatories. The focus of this work is to describe a series of searches for gravitational waves (GW) from compact binary coalescence (CBC) events triggered by short gamma-ray burst detections. Specifically, we will present the motivation, frameworks, implementations and results of searches for GW associated with short gamma-ray bursts detected by Swift, Fermi{GBM and the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) gamma-ray detectors. We will begin by presenting the main concepts that lay the foundation of gravitational waves emission, as they are formulated in the theory of General Relativity; we will also brie y describe the operational principles of GW detectors, together with explaining the main challenges that the GW detection process is faced with. Further, we will motivate the use of observations in the electromagnetic (EM) band as triggers for GW searches, with an emphasis on possible EM signals from CBC events. We will briefly present the data analysis techniques including concepts as matched{filtering through a collection of theoretical GW waveforms, signal{to{ noise ratio, coincident and coherent analysis approaches, signal{based veto tests and detection candidates' ranking. We will use two different GW{GRB search examples to illustrate the use of the existing coincident and coherent analysis methods. We will also present a series of techniques meant to improve the sensitivity of existing GW triggered searches. These include shifting background data in time in order to obtain extended coincident data and setting a prior on the GRB inclination angle, in accordance with astrophysical observations, in order to restrict the searched parameter space. We will describe the GW data analysis

  12. Comets, X-ray bursts, and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1986-01-01

    The proposal, revived by Tremaine and Zytkow (1985), that accretion of comets by neutron stars may be the origin of gamma-ray bursts is considered. This mechanism has difficulty accounting for the observed gamma-ray spectrum and optical counterparts of the bursts. The survival of comets near supernovae is investigated. Ablation rates and the thermal structure of an ablating surface layer are calculated. In some circumstances, mechanical disruption will erode a comet more rapidly than evaporation. The accretion of comets by neutron stars may produce a class of X-ray burst sources with novel properties.

  13. Swift: A Gamma Ray Bursts Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2003-01-01

    Swift is a NASA gamma-ray burst MIDEX mission that is in development for launch in December 2003. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. It will also.perform a survey of the hard X-ray sky to a sensitivity level of -1 mCrab. A wide-field camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 5 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled 'swift' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many of the bursts. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approximately 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The hardware is currently in final stages of fabrication and initial stages of integration and test. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift.

  14. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F.; Gruber, D.; Kippen, R. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  15. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  16. Gravitational-wave Observations May Constrain Gamma-Ray Burst Models: The Case of GW150914–GBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, P.; Preece, R. D.; Goldstein, A.; Mészáros, P.; Burns, E.; Connaughton, V.

    2016-08-01

    The possible short gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by Fermi/GBM in coincidence with the first gravitational-wave (GW) detection offers new ways to test GRB prompt emission models. GW observations provide previously inaccessible physical parameters for the black hole central engine such as its horizon radius and rotation parameter. Using a minimum jet launching radius from the Advanced LIGO measurement of GW 150914, we calculate photospheric and internal shock models and find that they are marginally inconsistent with the GBM data, but cannot be definitely ruled out. Dissipative photosphere models, however, have no problem explaining the observations. Based on the peak energy and the observed flux, we find that the external shock model gives a natural explanation, suggesting a low interstellar density (∼10‑3 cm‑3) and a high Lorentz factor (∼2000). We only speculate on the exact nature of the system producing the gamma-rays, and study the parameter space of a generic Blandford–Znajek model. If future joint observations confirm the GW–short-GRB association we can provide similar but more detailed tests for prompt emission models.

  17. Gravitational-wave Observations May Constrain Gamma-Ray Burst Models: The Case of GW150914–GBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, P.; Preece, R. D.; Goldstein, A.; Mészáros, P.; Burns, E.; Connaughton, V.

    2016-08-01

    The possible short gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by Fermi/GBM in coincidence with the first gravitational-wave (GW) detection offers new ways to test GRB prompt emission models. GW observations provide previously inaccessible physical parameters for the black hole central engine such as its horizon radius and rotation parameter. Using a minimum jet launching radius from the Advanced LIGO measurement of GW 150914, we calculate photospheric and internal shock models and find that they are marginally inconsistent with the GBM data, but cannot be definitely ruled out. Dissipative photosphere models, however, have no problem explaining the observations. Based on the peak energy and the observed flux, we find that the external shock model gives a natural explanation, suggesting a low interstellar density (˜10‑3 cm‑3) and a high Lorentz factor (˜2000). We only speculate on the exact nature of the system producing the gamma-rays, and study the parameter space of a generic Blandford–Znajek model. If future joint observations confirm the GW–short-GRB association we can provide similar but more detailed tests for prompt emission models.

  18. Statistical properties of the time histories of cosmic gamma-ray bursts detected by the BATSE experiment of the Compton gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagdeev, Roald

    1995-01-01

    The main scientific objectives of the project were: (1) Calculation of average time history for different subsets of BATSE gamma-ray bursts; (2) Comparison of averaged parameters and averaged time history for different Burst And Transient Source Experiments (BASTE) Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB's) sets; (3) Comparison of results obtained with BATSE data with those obtained with APEX experiment at PHOBOS mission; and (4) Use the results of (1)-(3) to compare current models of gamma-ray bursts sources.

  19. Cosmic-Rays and Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, A.

    2013-07-01

    Cosmic-rays are subatomic particles of energies ranging between a few eV to hundreds of TeV. These particles register a power-law spectrum, and it seems that most of them originate from astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The shock acceleration in superalfvenic astrophysical plasmas, is believed to be the main mechanism responsible for the production of the non-thermal cosmic-rays. Especially, the importance of the very high energy cosmic-ray acceleration, with its consequent gamma-ray radiation and neutrino production in the shocks of the relativistic jets of Gamma Ray Bursts, is a favourable theme of study. I will discuss the cosmic-ray shock acceleration mechanism particularly focusing on simulation studies of cosmic-ray acceleration occurring in the relativistic shocks of GRB jets.

  20. SuperAGILE and Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Pacciani, Luigi; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Frutti, Massimo; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Lapshov, Igor; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Tavani, Marco; Barbiellini, Guido; Mastropietro, Marcello; Morelli, Ennio; Rapisarda, Massimo

    2006-05-19

    The solid-state hard X-ray imager of AGILE gamma-ray mission -- SuperAGILE -- has a six arcmin on-axis angular resolution in the 15-45 keV range, a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. The instrument is very light: 5 kg only. It is equipped with an on-board self triggering logic, image deconvolution, and it is able to transmit the coordinates of a GRB to the ground in real-time through the ORBCOMM constellation of satellites. Photon by photon Scientific Data are sent to the Malindi ground station at every contact. In this paper we review the performance of the SuperAGILE experiment (scheduled for a launch in the middle of 2006), after its first onground calibrations, and show the perspectives for Gamma Ray Bursts.

  1. The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Swift is an international mission managed by NASA as part of its MIDEX program. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy that will launch in 2004. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. A wide field gamma-ray camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 2-5 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray, and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 75 sec by an autonomously controlled 'swift' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/x-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many of the bursts. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approx. 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The instruments have now completed their fabrication phase and are integrated on the observatory for final testing. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift. The talk will describe the mission and its status and give a summary of our plans for GRB operations.

  2. Pulses in gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Norris, Jay P.; Bonnell, Jerry T.

    1996-04-01

    If typical GRBs have X-ray counterparts similar to those detected by GINGA, then existing focussing X-ray telescopes will be able to detect GRBs three orders of magnitude fainter than the detection limit of BATSE. The EINSTEIN Observatory observed nearby galaxies for approximately 2 million seconds, during which time only one burstlike X-ray transient occurred. From this result we determine that GRBs cannot originate in a Galactic halo population with a limiting radius between 150 and 400 kpc. Inasmuch as halos with limiting radii outside of this range are excluded by BATSE isotropy measurements, our result indicates that all halo models are excluded.

  3. Cosmological aspects of gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behkam, Razieh

    Gamma-ray burst observations provide a great opportunity for cosmography in high redshift. Some tight correlations between different physical properties of GRBs are discovered and used for cosmography. However, data selection, assumptions, systematic uncertainty and some other issues affect most of them. Most importantly, until the physical origin of a relation is understood, one should be cautious to employ the relation to utilize Gamma ray bursts for cosmography. In the first part of this dissertation, I use Liang-Zhang correlation to constrain Λ Cold Dark Matter standard cosmology and a particular class of brane cosmology (brane-induced gravity model). With the most probable model being Om = 0.23 and O Λ = 0.77 for flat ΛCDM cosmology and O m = 0.18 and Wrc = 0.17 for flat brane-induced gravity cosmology, my result for the energy components of these two models is comparable with the result from SNIa observation. With average uncertainty of distance modulus being 0.2771, the two discussed cosmologies are indistinguishable using my current sample of GRB with redshift ranging between 0.1685 and 3.2. I argue that by expanding my sample and adding more low and high redshift GRBs and also with improvement in using GRB for cosmography, we might be able to distinguish between different cosmological models and tighten the most probable model. Looking into correlation and evolution of GRB prompt emission and afterglow has many advantages. It helps to open windows to comprehend the physics of GRBs and examine different GRB models. It is also possible to use GRB correlation as an accurate redshift estimator and more importantly to constrain the cosmological parameters. XRT flares of GRB afterglow are thought to be the result of central engine activity. Studying this component leads us to understand GRB flare and central engine nature. In the next part of this dissertation, I study the correlation and evolution of different prompt emission and afterglow GRB properties and

  4. Supernovae, hypernovae and gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Arnon

    2001-05-01

    Recent observations suggest that gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows are produced by highly relativistic jets emitted in core collapse supernova explosions (SNe). The result of the event, probably, is not just a compact object plus a spherical ejecta: within a day, a fraction of the parent star falls back to produce a thick accretion disk around the compact object. Instabilities in the disk induce a sudden collapse with ejection of jets of highly relativistic ``cannonballs'' of plasma in opposite directions, similar to those ejected by microquasars. The jet of cannonballs exit the supernova shell/ejecta reheated by their collision with it, emitting highly forward-collimated radiation which is Doppler shifted to γ-ray energy. Each cannonball corresponds to an individual pulse in a GRB. They decelerate by sweeping up the ionized interstellar matter in front of them, part of which is accelerated to cosmic-ray energies and emits synchrotron radiation: the afterglow. The Cannonball Model cannot predict the timing sequence of these pulses, but it fares very well in describing the total energy, energy spectrum, and time-dependence of the individual γ-ray pulses and afterglows. It also predicts that GRB pulses are accompanied by detectable short pulses of TeV neutrinos and sub TeV γ-rays, that are much more energetic and begin and peak a little earlier. .

  5. Long-Lag, Wide-pulse Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.; Kazanas, D.; Scargle, . D.; Hakkila, J.; Giblin, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the best available probe of the early phase of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet attributes is the prompt gamma-ray emission, in which several intrinsic and extrinsic variables determine GRB pulse evolution. Bright, usually complex bursts have many narrow pulses that are difficult to model due to overlap. However, the relatively simple, long spectral lag, wide-pulse bursts may have simpler physics and are easier to model. In this work we analyze the temporal and spectral behavior of wide pulses in 24 long-lag bursts, using a pulse model with two shape parameters - width and asymmetry - and the Band spectral model with three shape parameters. We find that pulses in long-lag bursts are distinguished both temporally and spectrally from those in bright bursts: the pulses in long spectral lag bursts are few in number, and approximately 100 times wider (10s of seconds), have systematically lower peaks in vF(v), harder low-energy spectra and softer high-energy spectra. We find that these five pulse descriptors are essentially uncorrelated for our long-lag sample, suggesting that at least approximately 5 parameters are needed to model burst temporal and spectral behavior. However, pulse width is strongly correlated with spectral lag; hence these two parameters may be viewed as mutual surrogates. We infer that accurate formulations for estimating GRB luminosity and total energy will depend on several gamma-ray attributes, at least for long-lag bursts. The prevalence of long-lag bursts near the BATSE trigger threshold, their predominantly low vF(v) spectral peaks, and relatively steep upper power-law spectral indices indicate that Swift will detect many such bursts.

  6. Gamma-ray bursts during neutron star formation. Gamma-ray bursts and transient X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Desai, U. D.; Holt, S. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discussions are presented of the associations between cosmic gamma ray bursts and transient X-ray sources, and the release of gravitational binding energy during the formation of neutron stars. The model for studying the associations is described along with the release of neutrinos during the collapse of white dwarfs.

  7. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Matteson, J.; Ford, L.; Schaefer, B.; Teegarden, B.; Cline, T.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1992-01-01

    BATSE's Spectral Detectors provide a series of high resolution spectra over the duration of a gamma-ray burst; fits to these spectra show the evolution of the continuum as the burst progresses. The burst continuum can usually be fit by the spectral form AE sup alpha exp(-E/kT) from around 25 keV to more than 3 MeV, with varying trends in the value and evolution of the spectral parameters. As a result of limited statistics for E greater than 1 - 2 MeV in the individual spectra, a high energy power law is not required. Only long duration strong bursts can be studied by fitting a series of spectra, and therefore our conclusions concern only this class of burst. The bursts we analyzed tend to be characterized by a hard-to-soft trend both for individual intensity spikes and for the burst as a whole: the hardness leads the count rate in spectra which resolve the temporal variations, while the hardness of successive spikes decreases. We also summarize the performance of the Spectral Detectors and the development of analysis tools to date.

  8. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    5 August 2004 A gamma-ray burst detected by ESA's Integral gamma-ray observatory on 3 December 2003 has been thoroughly studied for months by an armada of space and ground-based observatories. Astronomers have now concluded that this event, called GRB 031203, is the closest cosmic gamma-ray burst on record, but also the faintest. This also suggests that an entire population of sub-energetic gamma-ray bursts has so far gone unnoticed... Gamma ray burst model hi-res Size hi-res: 22 KB Credits: CXC/M. Weiss Artist impression of a low-energy gamma-ray burst This illustration describes a model for a gamma-ray burst, like the one detected by Integral on 3 December 2003 (GRB 031203). A jet of high-energy particles from a rapidly rotating black hole interacts with surrounding matter. Observations with Integral on 3 December 2003 and data on its afterglow, collected afterwards with XMM-Newton, Chandra and the Very Large Array telescope, show that GRB 031203 radiated only a fraction of the energy of normal gamma-ray bursts. Like supernovae, gamma-ray bursts are thought to be produced by the collapse of the core of a massive star. However, while the process leading to supernovae is relatively well understood, astronomers still do not know what happens when a core collapses to form a black hole. The discovery of 'under-energetic' gamma-ray bursts, like GRB 031203, should provide valuable clues as to links between supernovae, black holes and gamma-ray bursts. Lo-res JPG (22 Kb) Hi-res TIFF (5800 Kb) Cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are flashes of gamma rays that can last from less than a second to a few minutes and occur at random positions in the sky. A large fraction of them is thought to result when a black hole is created from a dying star in a distant galaxy. Astronomers believe that a hot disc surrounding the black hole, made of gas and matter falling onto it, somehow emits an energetic beam parallel to the axis of rotation. According to the simplest picture, all GRBs

  9. Gamma ray bursts: Current status of observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts display a wide range of temporal and spectral characteristics, but typically last several seconds and emit most of their energy in a low energy, gamma ray region. The burst sources appear to be isotropically distributed on the sky. Several lines of evidence suggest magnetic neutron stars as sources for bursts. A variety of energy sources and emission mechanisms are proposed.

  10. High energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborra, Irene

    2016-05-01

    The diffuse high-energy neutrino emission from long and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is studied within the fireball emission model. By requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions, we find that GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, if the latter has a diffuse origin. Our findings suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect neutrinos from GRBs in future stacking searches.

  11. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Della Valle, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    In a few dozen seconds, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit up to 1054 erg in terms of an equivalent isotropically radiated energy Eiso, so they can be observed up to z 10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to describe the expansion rate history of the universe. Here, we review the use of the Ep,i-Eiso correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter ΩM. We show that the present data set of GRBs, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that ΩM 0.3. We show that current (e.g. Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and forthcoming gamma ray burst (GRB) experiments (e.g. CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO, LOFT/WFM) will allow us to constrain ΩM with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by Type Ia supernovae (SNe-Ia) and to study the properties of dark energy and their evolution with time.

  12. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  13. The Chase to Capture Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in the universe, thought to be the birth cries of black holes. It has taken 40 years of international cooperation and competition to begin to unravel the mystery of their origin. The most recent chapter in this field is being written by the SWIFT mission, a fast-response satellite with 3 power telescopes. An international team from countries all over the world participates in the chase to capture the fading light of bursts detected by SWIFT. This talk will discuss the challenges and excitement of building this space observatory. New results will be presented on our growing understanding of exploding stars and fiery mergers of orbiting stars.

  14. Analyses of the Konus catalogue of gamma-ray bursts with the thermal synchrotron model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P.; Jernigan, T.; Rodrigues, R.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 150 reported gamma bursts of the Konus catalogue using the thermal synchrotron model are analyzed. An overwhelming majority of these spectra can be satsifactorily fitted by theoretical thermal synchrotron spectra of mildly relativistic electrons in strong magnetic fields, making the strong-field neutron star picture at least self-consistent. Valuable additional information is also extracted from various spectral features contained in many of the events.

  15. Gamma-ray bursts and neutron star field decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter; Blumenthal, George; Chuang, Kuan-Wen; Hurley, Kevin; Kargatis, Vincent; Liang, Edison; Linder, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Assuming a Galactic origin of gamma-ray bursts, we use pulsar data to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron stars and determine the sampling depths of current detectors. Based on these distance limits, we calculate the corresponding age distribution of Galactic neutron stars and apply an exponential field decay model to test whether the observed high incidence rate of cyclotron lines is consistent with suggested field decay time scales of order 10 exp 7 years. We find that the properties of the observed population of gamma-ray bursts are inconsistent with the idea that bursts originate at arbitrary times on neutron stars whose fields decay on time scales shorter than about 10 exp 9 years. Possible interpretations of this inconsistency are discussed.

  16. MIRAX sensitivity for Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacahui, J. R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the detection capability of the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) experiment for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). MIRAX is an X-ray astronomy mission designed to perform a wide band hard X-ray (10-200 keV) survey of the sky, especially in the Galactic plane. With a total detection area of 169 cm2, large field of view (FoV, 20 ° × 20 °), angular resolution of 1°45‧ and good spectral and time resolution (∼8% at 60 keV, 10 μs), MIRAX will be optimized for the detection and study of transient sources, such as accreting neutron stars (NS), black holes (BH), Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and both short and long GRBs. This is especially important because MIRAX is expected to operate in an epoch when probably no other hard X-ray wide-field imager will be active. We have performed detailed simulations of MIRAX GRB observations using the GEANT4 package, including the background spectrum and images of GRB sources in order to provide accurate predictions of the sensitivity for the expected GRB rate to be observed. MIRAX will be capable of detecting ∼44 GRBs per year up to redshifts of ∼4.5. The MIRAX mission will be able to contribute significantly to GRB science by detecting a large number of GRBs per year with wide band spectral response. The observations will contribute mainly to the part of GRB spectra where a thermal emission is predicted by the Fireball model. We also discuss the possibility of detecting GRB afterglows in the X-ray band with MIRAX.

  17. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    ESO Telescopes Observe "Lightning" in the Young Universe Summary Observations with telescopes at the ESO La Silla and Paranal observatories (Chile) have enabled an international team of astronomers [1] to measure the distance of a "gamma-ray burst", an extremely violent, cosmic explosion of still unknown physical origin. It turns out to be the most remote gamma-ray burst ever observed . The exceedingly powerful flash of light from this event was emitted when the Universe was very young, less than about 1,500 million years old, or only 10% of its present age. Travelling with the speed of light (300,000 km/sec) during 11,000 million years or more, the signal finally reached the Earth on January 31, 2000. The brightness of the exploding object was enormous, at least 1,000,000,000,000 times that of our Sun, or thousands of times that of the explosion of a single, heavy star (a "supernova"). The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) was also involved in trail-blazing observations of another gamma-ray burst in May 1999, cf. ESO PR 08/99. PR Photo 28a/00 : Sky field near GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28b/00 : The fading optical counterpart of GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28c/00 : VLT spectrum of GRB 000131 . What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the mysterious events known as "gamma-ray bursts" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by instruments on orbiting satellites. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite much effort, it is only within the last few years that it has become possible to locate the sites of some of these events (e.g. with the Beppo-Sax satellite ). Since the beginning of 1997, astronomers have identified about twenty optical sources in the sky that are associated with gamma-ray bursts. They have been found to be situated at extremely large (i.e., "cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy release during a gamma-ray burst within a few

  18. NEUTRINO-COOLED ACCRETION MODEL WITH MAGNETIC COUPLING FOR X-RAY FLARES IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Yang; Gu Weimin; Liu Tong; Lu Jufu

    2013-08-20

    The neutrino-cooled accretion disk, which was proposed to work as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts, encounters difficulty in interpreting the X-ray flares after the prompt gamma-ray emission. In this paper, the magnetic coupling (MC) between the inner disk and the central black hole (BH) is taken into consideration. For mass accretion rates around 0.001 {approx} 0.1 M{sub Sun} s{sup -1}, our results show that the luminosity of neutrino annihilation can be significantly enhanced due to the coupling effects. As a consequence, after the gamma-ray emission, a remnant disk with mass M{sub disk} {approx}< 0.5 M{sub Sun} may power most of the observed X-ray flares with the rest frame duration less than 100 s. In addition, a comparison between the MC process and the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is shown on the extraction of BH rotational energy.

  19. Luminosity Distributions of Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Meegan, Charles A.; Horack, John M.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Thomas M.; Preece, Robert D.; Paciesas, William S.

    1996-05-01

    The intrinsic luminosities of gamma-ray bursts are found to be constrained by the BATSE/PVO combined intensity distribution, assuming that (1) bursts originate in {LAMBDA} = 0, {OMEGA} = 1 Friedmann cosmology with a nonevolving density distribution, (2) the nonevolving intrinsic luminosity function can be modeled as a truncated power law, and (3) burst spectra are modeled as power laws with identical spectral indices. These simplifying assumptions allow constraints to be placed on luminosity functions in cosmological gamma-ray burst scenarios and indicate that standard-candle sources are not favored. In general, either the minimum burst luminosity L_min_ or the maximum burst luminosity L_max_ are known, with the opposite end of the luminosity function unconstrained. Both L_max_ and L_min_ must be specified for luminosity power-law indices near 2. When these results are combined with other studies measuring other cosmological burst signatures, it is possible that the intrinsic luminosity function contains more low-luminosity bursts than high-luminosity ones.

  20. High-energy gamma rays from the intense 1993 January 31 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommer, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Hurley, K.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    The intense gamma-ray burst of 1993 January 31 was detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. Sixteen gamma rays above 30 MeV were imaged in the telescope when only 0.04 gamma rays were expected by chance. Two of these gamma rays have energies of approximately 1 GeV, and the five bin spectrum of the 16 events is fitted by a power law of photon spectral index -2.0 +/- 0.4. The high-energy emission extends for at least 25 s. The most probable direction for this burst is determined from the directions of the 16 gamma rays observed by Egret and also by requiring the position to lie on annulus derived by the Interplanetary Network.

  1. The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chincarini, G.; Giommi, P.; Mason, K. O.; Nousek, J. A.; Wells, A. A.; White, N. E.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift mission: scheduled for launch in early 2004: is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy. It is the first-of-its-kind autonomous rapid-slewing satellite for transient astronomy and pioneers the way for future rapid-reaction and multiwavelength missions. It will be far more powerful than any previous GRB mission, observing more than 100 bursts per year and performing detailed X-ray and UV/optical afterglow observations spanning timescales from 1 minute to several days after the burst. The objectives are to: 1) determine the origin of GFU3s; 2) classify GRBs and search for new types; 3) study the interaction of the ultra-relativistic outflows of GRBs with their surrounding medium; and 4) use GRBs to study the early universe out to z greater than 10. The mission is being developed by a NASA-led international collaboration. It will carry three instruments: a new-generation wide-field gamma-ray (15-150 keV) detector that will detect bursts, calculate 1-4 arcmin positions: and trigger autonomous spacecraft slews; a narrow-field X-ray telescope that will give 5 arcsec positions and perform spectroscopy in the 0.2 to 10 keV band; and a narrow-field UV/optical telescope that will operate in the 170-600 nm band and provide 0.3 arcsec positions and optical finding charts. Redshift determinations will be made for most bursts. In addition to the primary GRB science, the mission will perform a hard X-ray survey to a sensitivity of approx. 1 mCrab (approx. 2 x l0(exp -11) erg/sq cm s in the 15-150 keV band), more than an order of magnitude better than HEAO A-4. A flexible data and operations system will allow rapid follow-up observations of all types of high-energy transients. with rapid data downlink and uplink available through the NASA TDRSS system. Swift transient data will be rapidly distributed to the astronomical community and all interested observers are encouraged to participate in follow-up measurements. A Guest Investigator program

  2. Applying an accurate spherical model to gamma-ray burst afterglow observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventis, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; van Eerten, H. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2013-05-01

    We present results of model fits to afterglow data sets of GRB 970508, GRB 980703 and GRB 070125, characterized by long and broad-band coverage. The model assumes synchrotron radiation (including self-absorption) from a spherical adiabatic blast wave and consists of analytic flux prescriptions based on numerical results. For the first time it combines the accuracy of hydrodynamic simulations through different stages of the outflow dynamics with the flexibility of simple heuristic formulas. The prescriptions are especially geared towards accurate description of the dynamical transition of the outflow from relativistic to Newtonian velocities in an arbitrary power-law density environment. We show that the spherical model can accurately describe the data only in the case of GRB 970508, for which we find a circumburst medium density n ∝ r-2. We investigate in detail the implied spectra and physical parameters of that burst. For the microphysics we show evidence for equipartition between the fraction of energy density carried by relativistic electrons and magnetic field. We also find that for the blast wave to be adiabatic, the fraction of electrons accelerated at the shock has to be smaller than 1. We present best-fitting parameters for the afterglows of all three bursts, including uncertainties in the parameters of GRB 970508, and compare the inferred values to those obtained by different authors.

  3. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L.; Thompson, D. J.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  4. Gravitational wave: gamma-ray burst connections.

    PubMed

    Hough, Jim

    2007-05-15

    After 35 years of experimental research, we are rapidly approaching the point at which gravitational waves (GWs) from astrophysical sources may be directly detected by the long-baseline detectors LIGO (USA), GEO 600 (Germany/UK), VIRGO (Italy/France) and TAMA 300 (Japan), which are now in or coming into operation.A promising source of GWs is the coalescence of compact binary systems, events which are now believed to be the origin of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, a brief review of the state of the art in detector development and exploitation will be given, with particular relevance to a search for signals associated with GRBs, and plans for the future will be discussed. PMID:17293333

  5. Fast radio burst/gamma-ray burst cosmography

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-06-20

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM{sub IGM} as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value and luminosity distance (D {sub L}(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  6. Cosmological Distance Scale to Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, W. J.; Linder, E. V.; Petrosian, V.

    1993-05-01

    The source counts or the so-called log N -- log S relations are the primary data that constrain the spatial distribution of sources with unknown distances, such as gamma-ray bursts. In order to test galactic, halo, and cosmological models for gamma-ray bursts we compare theoretical characteristics of the log N -- log S relations to those obtained from data gathered by the BATSE instrument on board the Compton Observatory (GRO) and other instruments. We use a new and statistically correct method, that takes proper account of the variable nature of the triggering threshold, to analyze the data. Constraints on models obtained by this comparison will be presented. This work is supported by NASA grants NAGW 2290, NAG5 2036, and NAG5 1578.

  7. THE BATSE 5B GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2013-10-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC)

  8. The BATSE 5B Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Briggs, Michael S.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William S.; Burgess, J. Michael

    2013-10-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory during its entire nine years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 2145 GRBs, and fitted with five different spectral models resulting in a compendium of over 19,000 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedures and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the BATSE Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  9. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission, bursts of γ-rays lasting from shorter than one second to thousands of seconds, remains not fully understood after more than 40 years of observations. The uncertainties lie in several open questions in the GRB physics, including jet composition, energy dissipation mechanism, particle acceleration mechanism, and radiation mechanism. Recent broad-band observations of prompt emission with Fermi sharpen the debates in these areas, which stimulated intense theoretical investigations invoking very different ideas. I will review these debates, and argue that the current data suggest the following picture: A quasi-thermal spectral component originating from the photosphere of the relativistic ejecta has been detected in some GRBs. Even though in some cases (e.g. GRB 090902B) this component dominates the spectrum, in most GRBs, this component either forms a sub-dominant "shoulder" spectral component in the low energy spectral regime of the more dominant "Band" component, or is not detectable at all. The main "Band" spectral component likely originates from the optically thin region due to synchrotron radiation. The diverse magnetization in the GRB central engine is likely the origin of the observed diverse prompt emission properties among bursts.

  10. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2014-12-01

    The origin of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission, bursts of γ-rays lasting from shorter than one second to thousands of seconds, remains not fully understood after more than 40 years of observations. The uncertainties lie in several open questions in the GRB physics, including jet composition, energy dissipation mechanism, particle acceleration mechanism and radiation mechanism. Recent broad-band observations of prompt emission with Fermi sharpen the debates in these areas, which stimulated intense theoretical investigations invoking very different ideas. I will review these debates, and argue that the current data suggest the following picture: A quasi-thermal spectral component originating from the photosphere of the relativistic ejecta has been detected in some GRBs. Even though in some cases (e.g. GRB 090902B) this component dominates the spectrum, in most GRBs, this component either forms a sub-dominant "shoulder" spectral component in the low energy spectral regime of the more dominant "Band" component, or is not detectable at all. The main "Band" spectral component likely originates from the optically thin region due to synchrotron radiation. The diverse magnetization in the GRB central engine is likely the origin of the observed diverse prompt emission properties among bursts.

  11. Gamma Ray Bursts and Their Links With Supernovae and Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Peter; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, whose origin and mechanism is the focus of intense interest. They appear connected to supernova remnants from massive stars or the merger of their remnants, and their brightness makes them temporarily detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. After pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with observations from the recently launched Fermi satellite, as well as the prospect of detections or limits from large neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. The interplay between such observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts is reviewed, as well as their connections to supernovae and cosmology.

  12. Central Engine Memory of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs.

  13. Improved Limits on Gamma-Ray Burst Repetition from BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegmark, Max; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Briggs, Michael S.; Hakkila, Jon; Meegan, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    We tighten previous upper limits on gamma-ray burst repetition by analyzing the angular power spectrum of the BATSE 3B catalog of 1122 bursts. At 95% confidence, we find that no more than 2% of all observed bursts can be labeled as repeaters, even if no sources are observed to repeat more than once. If a fraction f of all observed bursts can be labeled as repeaters that are observed to burst upsilon times each, then all models with (upsilon - 1)f greater than or equal to 0.05 are ruled out at 99% confidence, as compared to the best previous 99% limit (upsilon - 1)f greater than or equal to 0.27. At 95% confidence, our new limit is (upsilon - 1)f greater than or equal to 0.02. Thus, even a cluster of six events from a single source would have caused excess power above that present in the 3B catalog. We conclude that the current BATSE data are consistent with no repetition of classical gamma-ray bursts and that any repeater model is severely constrained by the near-perfect isotropy of their angular distribution.

  14. Improved Limits on Gamma-Ray Burst Repetition from BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegmark, Max; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Briggs, Michael S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Hakkila, Jon

    1996-01-01

    We tighten previous upper limits on gamma-ray burst repetition by analyzing the angular power spectrum of the BATSE 3B catalog of 1122 bursts. At 95% confidence, we find that no more than 2% of all observed bursts can be labeled as repeaters, even if no sources are observed to repeat more than once. If a fraction f of all observed bursts can be labeled as repeaters that are observed to burst nu times each, then all models with (nu - 1)f greater than or equal to 0.05 are ruled out at 99% confidence, as compared to the best previous 99% limit (nu - 1)f greater than or equal to 0.27. At 95% confidence, our new limit is (nu - 1)f greater than or equal to 0.02. Thus, even a cluster of six events from a single source would have caused excess power above that present in the 3B catalog. We conclude that the current BATSE data are consistent with no repetition of classical gamma-ray bursts and that any repeater model is severely constrained by the near-perfect isotropy of their angular dis- tribution.

  15. Gamma Ray Bursts: an Enigma Being Unraveled

    SciTech Connect

    De Rujula, Alvaro

    2003-05-14

    The best astrophysical accelerators are quasars and the 'progenitors' of GRBs which, after decades of observations and scores of theories, we still do not understand. But, I shall argue, we now know quite well where GRBs come from, and we understand how their 'beams' behave, as they make short pulses of gamma rays and long-duration X-ray, optical and radio 'afterglows'. I shall argue that our understanding of these phenomena, based on the 'Cannonball Model', is unusually simple, precise and successful. The 'sociology' of GRBs is interesting per se and, in this sense, the avatars of the Cannonball Model in confronting the generally accepted 'fireball models' are also quite revealing.

  16. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    5 August 2004 A gamma-ray burst detected by ESA's Integral gamma-ray observatory on 3 December 2003 has been thoroughly studied for months by an armada of space and ground-based observatories. Astronomers have now concluded that this event, called GRB 031203, is the closest cosmic gamma-ray burst on record, but also the faintest. This also suggests that an entire population of sub-energetic gamma-ray bursts has so far gone unnoticed... Gamma ray burst model hi-res Size hi-res: 22 KB Credits: CXC/M. Weiss Artist impression of a low-energy gamma-ray burst This illustration describes a model for a gamma-ray burst, like the one detected by Integral on 3 December 2003 (GRB 031203). A jet of high-energy particles from a rapidly rotating black hole interacts with surrounding matter. Observations with Integral on 3 December 2003 and data on its afterglow, collected afterwards with XMM-Newton, Chandra and the Very Large Array telescope, show that GRB 031203 radiated only a fraction of the energy of normal gamma-ray bursts. Like supernovae, gamma-ray bursts are thought to be produced by the collapse of the core of a massive star. However, while the process leading to supernovae is relatively well understood, astronomers still do not know what happens when a core collapses to form a black hole. The discovery of 'under-energetic' gamma-ray bursts, like GRB 031203, should provide valuable clues as to links between supernovae, black holes and gamma-ray bursts. Lo-res JPG (22 Kb) Hi-res TIFF (5800 Kb) Cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are flashes of gamma rays that can last from less than a second to a few minutes and occur at random positions in the sky. A large fraction of them is thought to result when a black hole is created from a dying star in a distant galaxy. Astronomers believe that a hot disc surrounding the black hole, made of gas and matter falling onto it, somehow emits an energetic beam parallel to the axis of rotation. According to the simplest picture, all GRBs

  17. MAXI observations of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serino, Motoko; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Ohno, Masanori; Ogawa, Yuji; Nishimura, Yasunori; Fukushima, Kosuke; Higa, Masaya; Ishikawa, Kazuto; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kawamuro, Taiki; Kimura, Masashi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Morii, Mikio; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakahira, Satoshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Nakano, Yuki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Onodera, Takuya; Sasaki, Masayuki; Shidatsu, Megumi; Sugimoto, Juri; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Suwa, Fumitoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Tachibana, Yutaro; Takagi, Toshihiro; Toizumi, Takahiro; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Usui, Ryuichi; Yamada, Hisaki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yoshidome, Koshiro; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-10-01

    The Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) Gas Slit Camera (GSC) detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including bursts with soft spectra, such as X-ray flashes (XRFs). MAXI/GSC is sensitive to the energy range from 2 to 30 keV. This energy range is lower than other currently operating instruments which are capable of detecting GRBs. Since the beginning of the MAXI operation on 2009 August 15, GSC observed 35 GRBs up to the middle of 2013. One third of them were also observed by other satellites. The rest of them show a trend to have soft spectra and low fluxes. Because of the contribution of those XRFs, the MAXI GRB rate is about three times higher than those expected from the BATSE log N-log P distribution. When we compare it to the observational results of the Wide-field X-ray Monitor on the High Energy Transient Explorer 2, which covers the the same energy range as that of MAXI/GSC, we find the possibility that many of the MAXI bursts are XRFs with Epeak lower than 20 keV. We discuss the source of soft GRBs observed only by MAXI. The MAXI log N-log S distribution suggests that the MAXI XRFs are distributed over a closer distance than hard GRBs. Since the distributions of the hardness of galactic stellar flares and X-ray bursts overlap with those of MAXI GRBs, we discuss the possibility of confusion of such galactic transients with the MAXI GRB samples.

  18. High-energy spectral breaks in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Model fits are presented for 18 gamma-ray burst spectra from 100 keV to 27 MeV made with the BATSE spectroscopy detectors on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Most of the bursts are well fitted as power laws with spectral indices between -1.36 and -2.29; however, five bursts show definite departures from a simple power-law fit at high energies. Three of these bursts are well fitted with broken power-law spectra and break energies of from 400 to 690 keV, such as might arise from photon-photon interactions. If so, then the source compactness and hence distance will be sharply constrained. Two of the bursts have spectra with sharply confined slope changes and are well fitted with broken power-law spectra with break energies of 1.2 and 1.6 MeV at peak, such as might arise from photon-magnetic field interactions. If so, then these spectral breaks provide strong evidence for the existence of high magnetic fields in the burst emission region.

  19. Probing the Expansion History of the Universe by Model-independent Reconstruction from Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Burst Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    To probe the late evolution history of the universe, we adopt two kinds of optimal basis systems. One of them is constructed by performing the principle component analysis, and the other is built by taking the multidimensional scaling approach. Cosmological observables such as the luminosity distance can be decomposed into these basis systems. These basis systems are optimized for different kinds of cosmological models that are based on different physical assumptions, even for a mixture model of them. Therefore, the so-called feature space that is projected from the basis systems is cosmological model independent, and it provides a parameterization for studying and reconstructing the Hubble expansion rate from the supernova luminosity distance and even gamma-ray burst (GRB) data with self-calibration. The circular problem when using GRBs as cosmological candles is naturally eliminated in this procedure. By using the Levenberg–Marquardt technique and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform an observational constraint on this kind of parameterization. The data we used include the “joint light-curve analysis” data set that consists of 740 Type Ia supernovae and 109 long GRBs with the well-known Amati relation.

  20. Probing the Expansion History of the Universe by Model-independent Reconstruction from Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Burst Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    To probe the late evolution history of the universe, we adopt two kinds of optimal basis systems. One of them is constructed by performing the principle component analysis, and the other is built by taking the multidimensional scaling approach. Cosmological observables such as the luminosity distance can be decomposed into these basis systems. These basis systems are optimized for different kinds of cosmological models that are based on different physical assumptions, even for a mixture model of them. Therefore, the so-called feature space that is projected from the basis systems is cosmological model independent, and it provides a parameterization for studying and reconstructing the Hubble expansion rate from the supernova luminosity distance and even gamma-ray burst (GRB) data with self-calibration. The circular problem when using GRBs as cosmological candles is naturally eliminated in this procedure. By using the Levenberg-Marquardt technique and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform an observational constraint on this kind of parameterization. The data we used include the “joint light-curve analysis” data set that consists of 740 Type Ia supernovae and 109 long GRBs with the well-known Amati relation.

  1. LINKING SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, James E.

    2010-02-01

    The luminosities of short-duration gamma-ray burst (SGRB) host galaxies appear to be anticorrelated with both the isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and the gamma-ray luminosity of the explosions, based on a sample of 12 bursts with host galaxy redshifts and photometry. The correlation does depend on the correct identification of the GRB 050509b host, but is otherwise robust. In particular, simple observational selection effects only strengthen the statistical significance of this correlation, from approx95% to approx99%. The correlation may indicate that there are two physically distinct groups of SGRBs. If so, it requires that the more luminous class of explosions be associated with the younger class of progenitors. Alternatively, it could be due to a continuous distribution of burst and host properties, in which case it could be used as a crude SGRB distance indicator. As one possible explanation, we find that the effect of binary neutron star masses on inspiral time and energy reservoir produces a correlation of the appropriate sign, but does not automatically reproduce the correlation slope or the full range of SGRB energy scales. If confirmed by larger samples, this correlation will provide a valuable new constraint on SGRB progenitor models.

  2. The history of gamma-ray burst observations

    SciTech Connect

    Klebesadel, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts have been observed for 1-1/2 decades since their fortuitous discovery by nuclear test detection instruments flown on the Vela satellites. Although the volume and detail of data available through these observations has considerably refined our knowledge of the characteristics of these events, there is no confident identification of source objects or reliable model of the processes involved. The observations do suggest, however, that the bursts originate at neutron stars (probably highly-magnetized neutron stars). 17 refs., 16 figs.

  3. Ep-Eiso Correlation in a Multiple Subjet Model of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Yamazaki, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations to study the Ep-Eiso correlation in the context of a multiple-subjet model (or inhomogeneous jet model) for γ-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray-rich GRBs (XRRs), and X-ray flashes (XRFs). For a single subjet, we find that Ep~E0.4iso for large viewing angles. For the multiple-subjet model in which all the subjets have the same intrinsic properties, off-axis events show Ep~Eaiso with 0.4

  4. OFF-AXIS GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW MODELING BASED ON A TWO-DIMENSIONAL AXISYMMETRIC HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eerten, Hendrik; Zhang Weiqun; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2010-10-10

    Starting as highly relativistic collimated jets, gamma-ray burst outflows gradually slow down and become nonrelativistic spherical blast waves. Although detailed analytical solutions describing the afterglow emission received by an on-axis observer during both the early and late phases of the outflow evolution exist, a calculation of the received flux during the intermediate phase and for an off-axis observer requires either a more simplified analytical model or direct numerical simulations of the outflow dynamics. In this paper, we present light curves for off-axis observers covering the long-term evolution of the blast wave, calculated from a high-resolution two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics simulation using a synchrotron radiation model. We compare our results to earlier analytical work and calculate the consequence of the observer angle with respect to the jet axis both for the detection of orphan afterglows and for jet break fits to the observational data. We confirm earlier results in the literature finding that only a very small number of local type Ibc supernovae can harbor an orphan afterglow. For off-axis observers, the observable jet break can be delayed up to several weeks, potentially leading to overestimation of the beaming-corrected total energy. In addition we find that, when using our off-axis light curves to create synthetic Swift X-ray data, jet breaks are likely to remain hidden in the data.

  5. Blue supergiant model for ultra-long gamma-ray burst with superluminous-supernova-like bump

    SciTech Connect

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Suwa, Yudai

    2013-11-20

    Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) have a typical duration of ∼30 s, and some of them are associated with hypernovae, such as Type Ic SN 1998bw. Wolf-Rayet stars are the most plausible LGRB progenitors, since the free fall time of the envelope is consistent with the duration, and the natural outcome of the progenitor is a Type Ic SN. While a new population of ultra-long GRBs (ULGRBs), GRB 111209A, GRB 101225A, and GRB 121027A, has a duration of ∼10{sup 4} s, two of them are accompanied by superluminous-supernova-like (SLSN-like) bumps, which are ≲ 10 times brighter than typical hypernovae. Wolf-Rayet progenitors cannot explain ULGRBs because of durations that are too long and SN-like bumps that are too bright. A blue supergiant (BSG) progenitor model, however, can explain the duration of ULGRBs. Moreover, SLSN-like bumps can be attributed to the so-called cocoon fireball photospheric emissions (CFPEs). Since a large cocoon is inevitably produced during the relativistic jet piercing though the BSG envelope, this component can be smoking gun evidence of the BSG model for ULGRBs. In this paper, we examine u-, g-, r-, i-, and J-band light curves of three ULGRBs and demonstrate that they can be fitted quite well by our BSG model with the appropriate choices of the jet opening angle and the number density of the ambient gas. In addition, we predict that for 121027A, SLSN-like bump could have been observed for ∼20-80 days after the burst. We also propose that some SLSNe might be CFPEs of off-axis ULGRBs without visible prompt emissions.

  6. High energy neutrino emission and neutrino background from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2006-03-15

    High energy neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is discussed. In this paper, by using the simulation kit GEANT4, we calculate proton cooling efficiency including pion-multiplicity and proton-inelasticity in photomeson production. First, we estimate the maximum energy of accelerated protons in GRBs. Using the obtained results, neutrino flux from one burst and a diffuse neutrino background are evaluated quantitatively. We also take account of cooling processes of pion and muon, which are crucial for resulting neutrino spectra. We confirm the validity of analytic approximate treatments on GRB fiducial parameter sets, but also find that the effects of multiplicity and high-inelasticity can be important on both proton cooling and resulting spectra in some cases. Finally, assuming that the GRB rate traces the star formation rate, we obtain a diffuse neutrino background spectrum from GRBs for specific parameter sets. We introduce the nonthermal baryon-loading factor, rather than assume that GRBs are main sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). We find that the obtained neutrino background can be comparable with the prediction of Waxman and Bahcall, although our ground in estimation is different from theirs. In this paper, we study on various parameters since there are many parameters in the model. The detection of high energy neutrinos from GRBs will be one of the strong evidences that protons are accelerated to very high energy in GRBs. Furthermore, the observations of a neutrino background has a possibility not only to test the internal shock model of GRBs but also to give us information about parameters in the model and whether GRBs are sources of UHECRs or not.

  7. Gamma ray bursts: Current status of observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts display a wide range of temporal and spectral characteristics, but typically last several seconds and emit most of their energy in the low-energy gamma-ray region. The burst sources appear to be isotropically distributed on the sky. Several lines of evidence suggest magnetic neutron stars as sources for bursts. A variety of energy sources and emission mechanisms were proposed.

  8. Gamma-Ray Bursts 2012 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    It is a pleasure to announce the next combined Fermi/Swift GRB conference covering recent advances in all aspects of gamma-ray burst observations and theory. This conference will be held in Munich, Germany, on 7-11 May 2012, and follows similar previous combined Fermi/Swift meetings in Huntsville (Oct. 2008) and Annapolis (Nov. 2010). Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe and are thought to be the birth signatures of black holes. This is an exciting time in the GRB field as various missions provide a wealth of new data on this still puzzling phenomenon. The Fermi misson provides unprecedented spectral coverage over 7 decades in energy, and among others discovered new spectral components which challenge our standard picture of the prompt emission. The Swift mission continuous to swiftly monitor and locate GRBs in multiple wavebands, providing the basis for all ground-based follow-up observations towards redshift measurements and afterglow and host property investigations. AGILE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Konus continue to provide crucial information on GRB properties, and the MAXI mission provides an all sky X-ray monitoring of transients. There is also growing capability for follow-up observations by ground-based telescopes at basically all wavelengths. Besides the classical optical/infrared/radio observations, searches are underway for TeV emission, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Moreover, new experiments are expected to have returned first data, among others POGO on the prompt polarization properties, UFFO on very early optical emission, or ALMA on sub-millimeter properties. And last but not least, the unexpected is bringing us child-like astonishments at least once per year with a "GRB-trigger" which turns out to be not related to GRBs. Complementing all these new observational results, a huge theoretical effort is underway to understand the GRB phenomenon and keep up with the constant new puzzles coming from the data. This conference

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Fox, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    With its rapid-response capability and multiwavelength complement of instruments, the Swift satellite has transformed our physical understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Providing high-quality observations of hundreds of bursts, and facilitating a wide range of follow-up observations within seconds of each event, Swift has revealed an unforeseen richness in observed burst properties, shed light on the nature of short-duration bursts, and helped realize the promise of gamma-ray bursts as probes of the processes and environments of star formation out to the earliest cosmic epochs. These advances have opened new perspectives on the nature and properties of burst central engines, interactions with the burst environment from microparsec to gigaparsec scales, and the possibilities for non-photonic signatures. Our understanding of these extreme cosmic sources has thus advanced substantially; yet more than forty years after their discovery, gamma-ray bursts continue to present major challenges on both observational and theoretical fronts.

  10. Gamma-ray burst variability above 4 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Ling, J. C.; Wheaton, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.; Mahoney, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the hard X-ray and gamma ray emissions during four bursts using the anti-coincidence shields of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 3 (HEAO 3) Gamma Ray Spectrometer is explored. Recent observations of gamma ray bursts by the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) have shown that high energy emission above 1 MeV is a common and energetically important feature (Matz et al. 1985). Time histories of four gamma ray bursts in 3 energy bands ( keV, around 511 keV, and 4 MeV) with 10.24 a resolution show that the 4 MeV flux is only weakly coupled to the spectrum below approximately 600 keV.

  11. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  12. Neutrino, Neutron, and Cosmic-Ray Production in the External Shock Model of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2002-07-01

    The hypothesis that ultrahigh-energy (>~1019 eV) cosmic rays (UHECRs) are accelerated by gamma-ray burst (GRB) blast waves is assumed to be correct. Implications of this assumption are then derived for the external shock model of GRBs. The evolving synchrotron radiation spectrum in GRB blast waves provides target photons for the photomeson production of neutrinos and neutrons. Decay characteristics and radiative efficiencies of the neutral particles that escape from the blast wave are calculated. The diffuse high-energy GRB neutrino background and the distribution of high-energy GRB neutrino events are calculated for specific parameter sets, and a scaling relation for the photomeson production efficiency in surroundings with different densities is derived. GRBs provide an intense flux of high-energy neutrons, with neutron production efficiencies exceeding ~1% of the total energy release. The radiative characteristics of the neutron β-decay electrons from the GRB ``neutron bomb'' are solved in a special case. Galaxies with GRB activity should be surrounded by radiation halos of ~100 kpc extent from the outflowing neutrons, consisting of a nonthermal optical/X-ray synchrotron component and a high-energy gamma-ray component from Compton-scattered microwave background radiation. The peak luminosity emitted by the diffuse β electron halo from a single GRB with >~2×1053 ergs isotropic energy release is ~1035 ergs s-1, with a potentially much brighter signal from the neutron decay protons. The decay halo from a single GRB can persist for >~0.1-1 Myr. Stronger neutrino fluxes and neutron decay halos can be produced by external shocks in clumpy external media and in scenarios involving internal shock scenarios, so detection of neutrinos associated with smooth profile GRBs could rule out an impulsive GRB central engine and an external shock model for the prompt phase. The luminosity of sources of GRBs and relativistic outflows in L* galaxies such as the Milky Way is at

  13. Measuring dark energy with the Eiso - Ep correlation of gamma-ray bursts using model-independent methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Wang, F. Y.; Cheng, K. S.; Dai, Z. G.

    2016-01-01

    We use two model-independent methods to standardize long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using the Eiso - Ep correlation (log Eiso = a + blog Ep), where Eiso is the isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray energy and Ep is the spectral peak energy. We update 42 long GRBs and attempt to constrain the cosmological parameters. The full sample contains 151 long GRBs with redshifts from 0.0331 to 8.2. The first method is the simultaneous fitting method. We take the extrinsic scatter σext into account and assign it to the parameter Eiso. The best-fitting values are a = 49.15 ± 0.26, b = 1.42 ± 0.11, σext = 0.34 ± 0.03 and Ωm = 0.79 in the flat ΛCDM model. The constraint on Ωm is 0.55 < Ωm< 1 at the 1σ confidence level. If reduced χ2 method is used, the best-fit results are a = 48.96 ± 0.18, b = 1.52 ± 0.08, and Ωm = 0.50 ± 0.12. The second method uses type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to calibrate the Eiso - Ep correlation. We calibrate 90 high-redshift GRBs in the redshift range from 1.44 to 8.1. The cosmological constraints from these 90 GRBs are Ωm = 0.23+0.06-0.04 for flat ΛCDM and Ωm = 0.18 ± 0.11 and ΩΛ = 0.46 ± 0.51 for non-flat ΛCDM. For the combination of GRB and SNe Ia sample, we obtain Ωm = 0.271 ± 0.019 and h = 0.701 ± 0.002 for the flat ΛCDM and the non-flat ΛCDM, and the results are Ωm = 0.225 ± 0.044, ΩΛ = 0.640 ± 0.082, and h = 0.698 ± 0.004. These results from calibrated GRBs are consistent with that of SNe Ia. Meanwhile, the combined data can improve cosmological constraints significantly, compared to SNe Ia alone. Our results show that the Eiso - Ep correlation is promising to probe the high-redshift Universe.

  14. Modeling Photodisintegration-induced TeV Photon Emission from Low-luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Wen; Wu, Xue-Feng; Lu, Tan

    2012-05-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray heavy nuclei have recently been considered as originating from nearby low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts that are associated with Type Ibc supernovae. Unlike the power-law decay in long duration gamma-ray bursts, the light curve of these bursts exhibits complex UV/optical behavior: shock breakout dominated thermal radiation peaks at about 1 day, and, after that, nearly constant emission sustained by radioactive materials for tens of days. We show that the highly boosted heavy nuclei at PeV energy interacting with the UV/optical photon field will produce considerable TeV photons via the photodisintegration/photo-de-excitation process. It was later predicted that a thermal-like γ-ray spectrum peaks at about a few TeV, which may serve as evidence of nucleus acceleration. The future observations by the space telescope Fermi and by the ground atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S., VERITAS, and MAGIC will shed light on this prediction.

  15. Gamma Ray Bursts and recent Swift Results .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chincarini, G.

    Due to the large activity we had during these last months with the Swift satellite I started the writing of the presentation I gave at the SAIt Catania meeting only in the middle of September. The Swift satellite, however, never rested. Since then and in addition to the results I showed at the meeting in relation to the early and steep light curves observed with the XRT telescope in the 0.2 - 10 keV band, we had fundamental discoveries among which the detection and localization of short bursts and the detection of the largest redshift ever. It obviously would be improper to discuss here the most recent results but it would also be silly in such a fast evolving topics where the day by day observations show excellent results and the observer is far ahead of the theoretician, to write an article that, from the observational point of view, would be completely obsolete. The best approach here seems to be a brief description of what was presented during the meeting briefly mentioning also some of the most recent results. We remind the reader, however, that a copious literature written, and in preparation, exists so that we urge the reader to refer to the specialized articles. This brief article will touch on the basic characteristics of the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the Introduction (section 1) and illustrate the basic characteristics of the Swift mission in section 2. Preliminary science results will be discussed in section 3 and finally we will mention one, among many, of the main goal we plan to achieve in Cosmology via the observations of very distant GRBs.

  16. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bouvier, A. E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu; and others

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  17. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tierney, D.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Xiong, S.; Yang, Z.

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ~20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  18. A Strange Supernova with a Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-10-01

    1998bw is obviously an unusual supernova. It is therefore of particular significance that a Gamma-Ray Burst was observed from the same sky region just before it was discovered in optical light. It is very unlikely that these two very rare events would happen in the same region of the sky without being somehow related. Most astronomers therefore tend to believe that the gamma-rays do indeed originate in the supernova explosion. But can a single supernova be sufficiently energetic to produce a powerful Gamma-Ray Burst? New theoretical calculations, also published today in Nature, indicate that this may be so. Moreover, if the Gamma-Ray Burst observed on April 25 did originate in this supernova that is located in a relatively nearby galaxy, it was intrinsically much fainter than some of the other Gamma-Ray Bursts that are known to have taken place in extremely distant galaxies. The main idea is that while the centres of most other supernovae collapse into neutron stars at the moment of explosion, a black hole was created in a very massive star consisting mostly of carbon and oxygen. If so, a very strong shockwave may be produced that is capable of generating the observed gamma rays. A comparison of synthetic spectra from such a supernova model, based on a new spectrum-modelling technique developed by Leon Lucy at the ESA/ESO Space Telescope/European Coordinating Facility (ST/ECF), with the spectra of SN 1998bw observed at La Silla, show good agreement, thus lending credibility to the new models. Future work Much data has already been collected at ESO on the strange supernova SN 1998bw . More observations will be obtained by the astronomers at the ESO observatories in the future during a long-term monitoring programme of SN 1998bw . There is a good chance that this effort will ultimately provide fundamental information on the explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor star of this exceptional object. This supernova's connection with a Gamma-Ray Burst will

  19. Collapsed White Dwarfs as Gamma-Ray Burst Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Qadir, A.

    1995-09-01

    It has been suggested by Usov (1992) that accreting white dwarfs, collapsing to neutron stars may be the sources of the gamma-ray bursts observed at cosmological distances, provided they rotate very fast and have enormously high magnetic fields. In this model the burst's durationτ is given by the ratio of pulsar kinetic energy and magneticdipole luminosity, so that in order to account for the shortest (τ ˜ 0.1 s) bursts, the pulsars must rotate very fast (with periodP ˜ 0.5 ms) and have magnetic fields of 1016 - 1017 G. Though the high pulsar frequency was anticipated (Qadir and Rafique, 1986) and has been shown to be plausible (Abramowicz, 1990), the extremely high magnetic fields seem anomalous as observed neutron stars have fields below ˜ 1013 G. The problem with Usov's proposal is reduced by incorporating the relativistic corrections for fast rotating magnetic dipoles (Belinskyet al., 1994) or magnetic stars (De Paolis and Qadir, 1994). These corrections substantially enhance the radiation efficiency due to the existence of a magnetic synchrotron effect so that the magnetic field required for the explanation of the shortest gamma-ray bursts is strongly reduced. As such the model becomes much more plausible.

  20. Testing the Gamma-Ray Burst Energy Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Preece, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    Building on Nakar & Piran's analysis of the Amati relation relating gamma-ray burst peak energies E(sub p) and isotropic energies E(sub iso ) we test the consistency of a large sample of BATSE bursts with the Amati and Ghirlanda (which relates peak energies and actual gamma-ray energies E(sub gamma)) relations. Each of these relations can be exp ressed as a ratio of the different energies that is a function of red shift (for both the Amati and Ghirlanda relations) and beaming fraction f(sub B) (for the Ghirlanda relation). The most rigorous test, whic h allows bursts to be at any redshift, corroborates Nakar & Piran's r esult - 88% of the BATSE bursts are inconsistent with the Amati relat ion - while only l.6% of the bursts are inconsistent with the Ghirlan da relation if f(sub B) = 1. Modelling the redshift distribution resu lts in an energy ratio distribution for the Amati relation that is sh ifted by an order of magnitude relative to the observed distributions; any sub-population satisfying the Amati relation can comprise at mos t approx. 18% of our burst sample. A similar analysis of the Ghirland a relation depends sensitively on the beaming fraction distribution f or small values of f(sub B); for reasonable estimates of this distrib ution about a third of the burst sample is inconsistent with the Ghir landa relation. Our results indicate that these relations are an artifact of the selection effects of the burst sample in which they were f ound; these selection effects may favor sub-populations for which the se relations are valid.

  1. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  2. Searches for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoak, Daniel; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are expected to be bright sources of gravitational waves. Over the past decade, coherent analysis techniques have been applied to search for gravitational-wave signals associated with GRBs, using data from the first generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors. In these searches, no detection candidates were found, but upper limits were placed on the emission of gravitational waves from the GRB progenitors. The advanced LIGO and Virgo instruments are expected to begin operation in the next few years, and an extrapolation of upper limits from the first generation indicates that joint observations between gamma-ray satellites and gravitational-wave detectors is possible for certain progenitor models and event rates.

  3. Cosmic Forensics Confirms Gamma-Ray Burst And Supernova Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Scientists announced today that they have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to confirm that a gamma-ray burst was connected to the death of a massive star. This result is an important step in understanding the origin of gamma-ray bursts, the most violent events in the present-day universe. "If a gamma-ray burst were a crime, then we now have strong circumstantial evidence that a supernova explosion was at the scene," said Nathaniel Butler of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, lead author of a paper presented today at the meeting of the High Energy Division of the American Astronomical Society. Chandra was able to obtain an unusually long observation (approximately 21 hours) of the afterglow of GRB 020813 (so named because the High-Energy Transient Explorer, HETE, discovered it on August 13, 2002.) A grating spectrometer aboard Chandra revealed an overabundance of elements characteristically dispersed in a supernova explosion. Narrow lines, or bumps, due to silicon and sulfur ions (atoms stripped of most of their electrons) were clearly identified in the X-ray spectrum of GRB 020813. "Our observation of GRB 020813 supports two of the most important features of the popular supra-nova model for gamma-ray bursts," said Butler. "An extremely massive star likely exploded less than two months prior to the gamma-ray burst, and the radiation from the gamma-ray burst was beamed into a narrow cone." An analysis of the data showed that the ions were moving away from the site of the gamma-ray burst at a tenth the speed of light, probably as part of a shell of matter ejected in the supernova explosion. The line features were observed to be sharply peaked, indicating that they were coming from a narrow region of the expanding shell. This implies that only a small fraction of the shell was illuminated by the gamma-ray burst, as would be expected if the burst was beamed into a narrow cone. The observed duration of the afterglow suggests a delay of about 60 days

  4. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the current understanding of Gamma Ray Bursts. It covers the Long GRBs, our current understanding of Collapsar, Short GRBs, afterglows, and reduced trigger threshold. It also discusses the Hard X-ray Sky Survey.

  5. Gamma Ray Burst Observations with Swift and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The Swift and GLAST missions promise a great increase in our understanding of the gamma-ray universe. Swift was launched in November 2004 with a primary objective to study gamma-ray bursts. All instruments are performing well and more than 200 GRBs have been studied in detail. Major advances have already been made in the areas of short bursts, high redshift events and afterglow physics. The GLAST mission is scheduled for launch in fall 2007. It features a large newtechnology instrument for high energy gamma-ray observations. Hundreds of gamma-ray bursts will be detected by the LAT and GBM instruments. The talk will discuss the GRB science available with GLAST and the opportunities for joint Swift and GLAST observations of bursts.

  6. AI gamma-ray burst classification: Methodology/preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    1998-05-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) classifiers can be used to classify unknowns, refine existing classification parameters, and identify/screen-out ineffectual parameters. We present an AI methodology for classifying gamma-ray bursts, along with some preliminary results.

  7. The dependence of gamma-ray burst X-ray column densities on the model for Galactic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcodia, R.; Campana, S.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-05-01

    We study the X-ray absorption of a complete sample of 99 bright Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In recent years, a strong correlation has been found between the intrinsic X-ray absorbing column density (NH(z)) and the redshift. This absorption excess in high-z GRBs is now thought to be due to the overlooked contribution of the absorption along the intergalactic medium (IGM), by means of both intervening objects and the diffuse warm-hot intergalactic medium along the line of sight. In this work we neglect the absorption along the IGM, because our purpose is to study the eventual effect of a radical change in the Galactic absorption model on the NH(z) distribution. Therefore, we derive the intrinsic absorbing column densities using two different Galactic absorption models: the Leiden Argentine Bonn HI survey and the more recent model that includes molecular hydrogen. We find that if, on the one hand, the new Galactic model considerably affects the single column density values, on the other hand, there is no drastic change in the distribution as a whole. It becomes clear that the contribution of Galactic column densities alone, no matter how improved, is not sufficient to change the observed general trend and it has to be considered as a second order correction. The cosmological increase of NH(z) as a function of redshift persists and, to explain the observed distribution, it is necessary to include the contribution of both the diffuse intergalactic medium and the intervening systems along the line of sight of the GRBs.

  8. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie; Ritz, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) is a satellite-based observatory to study the high energy gamma-ray sky. The main instrument on GLAST, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-conversion telescope that will survey the sky from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. With the GLAST launch in 2007, the LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high energy phenomena, including supermassive black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and cosmic ray acceleration and dark matter. A second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), greatly enhances GLAST s capability to study GRB by providing important spectral and timing information in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We describe how the instruments, spacecraft and ground system work together to provide observations of gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV - 300 GeV and to provide rapid notification of bursts to the wider gamma-ray burst community.

  9. Search for Short Bursts of Gamma Rays with SGARFACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroedter, M.; Manseri, H.; LeBohec, S.; Krennrich, F.; Downdall, C.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Horan, D.; Smith, A.; Toner, J.; Weekes, T.

    The Short GAmma Ray Front Air Cherenkov Experiment is designed to search for bursts of gamma rays above 200 MeV lasting from 60 nanoseconds to longer than 20 microseconds. The custom-designed trigger and data-acquisition system of SGARFACE piggy-backs on the existing Whipple 10m telescope. The experiment has operated for more than 3 years during which time about 1.2 million events were recorded. The majority of events originate from cosmic-ray showers from which we see, both, Cherenkov emission and fluorescence light. Rejection of background events is achieved through timing and imaging information available for each event. Potential sources of bursts of gamma rays are evaporation of primordial black holes within about 240 pc and gamma-ray emission accompanying giant radio pulses. Results are presented on the search for evaporation of primordial black holes and gamma-ray emission coincident with giant pulses from the Crab Nebula.

  10. First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV–PeV neutrinos that are predicted from gamma-ray bursts. No events were found in correlation with the prompt photon emission of the gamma-ray bursts and upper limits have been placed on the flux and fluence of neutrinos for different models.

  11. High-entropy fireballs and jets in gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Two mechanisms whereby compact coalescing binaries can produce relatively 'clean' fireballs via neutrino-antineutrino annihilation are proposed. Preejected mass due to tidal heating will collimate the fireball into jets. The resulting anisotropic gamma-ray emission can be efficient and intense enough to provide an acceptable model for gamma-ray bursts, if these originate at cosmological distances.

  12. BATSE spectroscopy catalog of bright gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Fantasia, Stephan F.; Palmer, David; Cline, Thomas L.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegar, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive results on the spectra of 30 bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs) as observed by the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The data selection was strict in including only spectra that are of high reliability for continuum shape studies. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog presents fluences, model fits (for five spectral models for three energy ranges), and photon spectra in a standard manner for each burst. Complete information is provided to describe the data selection and analysis procedures. The catalog results are also presented in electronic format (from the Compton Observatory Science Support Center) and CD-ROM format (AAS CD-ROM series, Vol. 2). These electronic formats also present the count spectra and detector response matrices so as to allow for independent study and fitting by researchers outside the BATSE Team. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog complements the catalog from BATSE Large Area Detector (LAD) data by Fishman et al. (1994).

  13. Gamma-ray bursts from massive Population-III stars: clues from the radio band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, D.; Murphy, T.; Ghirlanda, G.; Hancock, P. J.; Parry, R.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-07-01

    Current models suggest gamma-ray bursts could be used as a way of probing Population-III stars - the first stars in the early Universe. In this paper, we use numerical simulations to demonstrate that late-time radio observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows could provide a means of identifying bursts that originate from Population-III stars, if these were highly massive, independently from their redshift. We then present the results from a pilot study using the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 17 GHz, designed to test the hypothesis that there may be Population-III gamma-ray bursts amongst the current sample of known events. We observed three candidates plus a control gamma-ray burst, and make no detections with upper limits of 20-40 μJy at 500-1300 d post-explosion.

  14. KINEMATIC ORIGIN OF CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY BURST OBSERVABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.il

    2012-04-20

    Recently, several new correlations between gamma-ray burst (GRB) observables have been discovered. Like previously well-established correlations, they challenge GRB models. Here, we show that in the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, the newly discovered correlations have the same simple kinematic origin as those discovered earlier. They all result from the strong dependence of the observed radiations on the Lorentz and Doppler factors of the jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) that produces the observed radiations by interaction with the medium through which it propagates.

  15. Search for neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts with ANTARES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Julia; Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    ANTARES is the largest high-energy neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. A search for neutrinos in coincidence with gamma-ray bursts using ANTARES data from late 2007 to 2011 is presented here. An extended maximum likelihood ratio search was employed to optimise the discovery potential for a neutrino signal as predicted by a second-generation numerical model. No significant excess was found, so 90% confidence upper limits on the fluences as expected from analytically approximated neutrino-emission models as well as on up-to-date numerical predictions were placed.

  16. A test of the millisecond magnetar central engine model of gamma-ray bursts with swift data

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, Hou-Jun; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-04-10

    A rapidly spinning, strongly magnetized neutron star (magnetar) has been proposed as one possible candidate of the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We systematically analyze the Swift/XRT light curves of long GRBs detected before 2013 August, and characterize them into four categories based on how likely they may harbor a magnetar central engine: Gold, Silver, Aluminum, and Non-magnetar. We also independently analyze the data of short GRBs with a putative magnetar central engine. We then perform a statistical study of various properties of the magnetar samples and the non-magnetar sample, and investigate whether the data are consistent with the hypothesis that there exist two types of central engines. By deriving the physical parameters of the putative magnetars, we find that the observations of the Gold and Silver samples are generally consistent with the predictions of the magnetar model. For a reasonable beaming factor for long GRBs, the derived magnetar surface magnetic field B{sub p} and initial spin period P {sub 0} fall into the reasonable range. Magnetar winds in short GRBs, on the other hand, are consistent with being isotropic. No GRB in the magnetar sample has a beam-corrected total energy exceeding the maximum energy budget defined by the initial spin energy of the magnetar, while some non-magnetar GRBs do violate such a limit. With beaming correction, on average the non-magnetar sample is more energetic and luminous than the magnetar samples. Our analysis hints that millisecond magnetars are likely operating in a good fraction, but probably not all, GRBs.

  17. Long gamma-ray bursts trace the star formation history

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2014-04-10

    We show that if the broad-line supernova explosions of Type Ic (SNeIc) produce the bulk of the observed long duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), including high- and low-luminosity LGRBs and X-ray flashes, and if the LGRBs have the geometry assumed in the cannonball model of LGRBs, then their rate, measured by Swift, and their redshift distribution are consistent with the star formation rate (SFR) over the entire range of redshifts where the SFR has been measured with sufficient accuracy.

  18. Gamma Ray Bursts in the Swift-Fermi Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Razzaque, Soebur

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most violent occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole birth. They are highly luminous events and provide excellent probes of the distant universe. GRB research has greatly advanced over the past 10 years with the results from Swift, Fermi and an active follow-up community. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  19. Gamma Ray Burst with a delayed Supernovae explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The Gamma Ray Burst models didn't find yet an explanation of a few percent well known GRB-SN events. The puzzle is based on the difficulties to make twice an explosion in the same place by a single collapsing star.The possible presence of a persistent and precessing jet from a neutron star or a Black hole whose blazing to us is observed as a GRB cannot naturally explain the additional late Supernova explosion. We Show that there is a new simple and well based astrophysical configuration able to make both the GRB and the late Supernova-like explosion, solving the main puzzle of GRB-SN signature.

  20. First Results from the Swift Gamma Ray Burst Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehreis, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Swift is now in orbit after a beautiful launch on November 20, 2004. It is a multiwavelength observatory designed specifically to study the fascinating gamma-ray bursts. The goals are to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera detects more than a hundred bursts per year. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes are pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. First results from the mission will be presented, including observations of bright GRBs, faint GRBs, short GRBs and a super-giant flare from the soft gamma repeater SGRl806-20.

  1. Modeling the Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts for Arbitrary Viewing Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Dominic; Morsony, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present models of GRB afterglow light curves for simulated GRBs. We describe a method by which the energy distribution of the system can be determined for an arbitrary viewing angle relative to the jet axis. From this distribution, we calculate the time-evolution of the expanding shockwave from the stellar explosion. With relativistic considerations, we can model the synchrotron radiation emitted in this shockwave and construct the time-evolution of the afterglows seen by an observer at an arbitrary angle. We will present results of the calculated afterglow spectra as functions of time for energy distributions from numerical simulations as well as for simple jet models. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  2. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS ARE OBSERVED OFF-AXIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Geoffrey; Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew; Zhang, Bin-Bin

    2015-01-20

    We constrain the jet opening angle and, for the first time, the off-axis observer angle for gamma-ray bursts in the Swift-XRT catalog by using the ScaleFit package to fit afterglow light curves directly to hydrodynamic simulations. The ScaleFit model uses scaling relations in the hydrodynamic and radiation equations to compute synthetic light curves directly from a set of high-resolution two-dimensional relativistic blast wave simulations. The data sample consists of all Swift-XRT afterglows from 2005 to 2012 with sufficient coverage and a known redshift, 226 bursts in total. We find that the jet half-opening angle varies widely but is commonly less than 0.1 rad. The distribution of the electron spectral index is also broad, with a median at 2.30. We find the observer angle to have a median value of 0.57 of the jet opening angle over our sample, which has profound consequences for the predicted rate of observed jet breaks and affects the beaming-corrected total energies of gamma-ray bursts.

  3. Observation of gamma-ray bursts with the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Share, G. H.; Strickman, M. S.; Kinzer, R. L.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Ryan, J. M.; Rieger, E.; Reppin, C.; Kanbach, G.

    1982-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrometer on SMM is sensitive to bursts within its field of view with intensities greater than 0.000005 erg/sq cm above 100 keV. It has detected 17 events between February 1980 and March 1981 with the characteristics of cosmic gamma-ray bursts. The most intense burst, on 19 April 1980, had a photon spectrum consistent with a power law with spectral index - 2.5 from 300 keV to approximately 7 MeV. It is not possible at present to exclude the sun as the source of this burst. Spectra of 11 of the bursts have been studied for line features with no clear evidence for line emission greater than 300 keV. The continuum radiation from about half of these events have hard emission extending to approximately equal to or greater than 2 MeV.

  4. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M.; Bruel, P.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Granot, J.; Longo, F.; Razzaque, S.; Zimmer, S. E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  5. Gamma-ray bursts from colliding strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haensel, P.; Paczynski, B.; Amsterdamski, P.

    1991-01-01

    The rate of collisions between the neutron stars is about 0.0001/yr in the galaxy and about 0.00001/yr within the Hubble distance. The collisions are the final phases of binary orbit decay driven by gravitational radiation and may produce gamma-ray bursts detectable at extragalactic distances. If strange stars exist then their collisions must release about 10 to the 50th ergs in gamma rays over 0.2 s. Such events should be detectable out to 1 Gpc with the current instruments. The distance to the majority of gamma-ray bursts is not known at this time. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on Gamma Ray Observatory should determine the distance scale by determining the angular distribution of very weak bursts. If the majority of gamma-ray bursts turn out to be extragalactic, and if their distances are about 1 Gpc, then the collisions between strange stars may be the least speculative events that might account for so energetic bursts.

  6. The Prompt and High Energy Emission of Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.

    2009-05-25

    I discuss some recent developments concerning the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts, in particular the jet properties and radiation mechanisms, as exemplified by the naked-eye burst GRB 080319b, and the prompt X-ray emission of XRB080109/SN2008d, where the progenitor has, for the first time, been shown to contribute to the prompt emission. I discuss then some recent theoretical calculations of the GeV/TeV spectrum of GRB in the context of both leptonic SSC models and hadronic models. The recent observations by the Fermi satellite of GRB 080916C are then reviewed, and their implications for such models are discussed, together with its interesting determination of a bulk Lorentz factor, and the highest lower limit on the quantum gravity energy scale so far.

  7. Theoretical Aspects of Magnetic Fields for Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanami, Hitoshi

    We propose magnetic cannon ball mechanism in which the collapse of a magnetosphere onto a black hole can generate strong outward Poynting flux which drives a baryon-free fireball called the magnetic cannon ball. In the early stage, the magnetic fields in the cannon ball can prepare the explanation for the cycrotoron absorptions observed by GINGA. The magnetic cannon ball can drive, in general, a relativistic outflow which interacts with the interstellar matter and forms a shock. The magnetic field in the shock approximately equal to 104 G can induce the synchrotron radiations with peaks at approximately equal to 10^2 keV observed. This magnetic field in the cannon ball can also confine the high energy protons (gamma_p > 30) which are required for delayed photons (>25 GeV) following a burst on 1994 February 17. Accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf of > 109 G, merger of a close binary and failed type Ib supernovae are possible scenarios even without the rotation of the central object. This mechanism works at the final phase of gravitational collapse even after a neutrino driven fireball proposed in most scenarios for gamma ray bursts. Twice bursts, which consist of primary neutrino driven fireball and secondary magnetic cannon ball can be induced sometime, can be explained in this model. It suggests that the magnetic cannon ball works some parts in multiple populations and delayed or multiple burst events. The final remnant in the model should be a black hole. It implies that any gamma ray bursts can have no optical counter part if they do not have a companion in a binary.

  8. Sensitivity of HAWC to gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taboada, Ignacio; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    HAWC is a ground based very high-energy gamma ray detector under construction in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. Higher altitude, improved design and a larger physical size used to reject CR background, make HAWC 10-20 times more sensitive than its predecessor Milagro. HAWC's large field of view, ~2sr, and over 90% duty cycle make it ideal to search for GRBs. We review the sensitivity of HAWC to GRBs with two independent data acquisition systems. We show that some of the brightest GRBs observed by Fermi LAT (e.g. GRB 090510) could result in >5 σ observation by HAWC. The observations (or limits) of GRBs by HAWC will provide information on the high-energy spectra of GRBs. The high-energy spectra will teach us about extra galactic background light, the Lorentz boost factor of the jets tha power GRBs and/or particle acceleration models of GRBs. Finally we present limits on > 10 GeV emission from GRB 111016B, recently studied with HAWC's engineering array VAMOS.

  9. REDSHIFT CATALOG FOR SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Limin; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2011-04-20

    We present a catalog of the redshifts for most long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by Swift from 2004 December 20 to 2008 July 23 (258 bursts in total). All available information is collected, including spectroscopic redshifts, photometric redshift limits, and redshifts calculated from various luminosity relations. Error bars for the redshifts derived from the luminosity relations are asymmetric, with tails extended to the high-redshift end, and this effect is evaluated by looking at the 30% of Swift bursts with spectroscopic redshifts. A simulation is performed to eliminate this asymmetric effect, and the resultant redshift distribution is deconvolved. We test and confirm this simulation on the sample of bursts with known spectroscopic redshifts and then apply it to the 70% of Swift bursts that do not have spectroscopic measures. A final intrinsic redshift distribution is then made for almost all Swift bursts, and the efficiency of the spectroscopic detections is evaluated. The efficiency of spectroscopic redshifts varies from near unity at low redshift to 0.5 at z = 1, to near 0.3 at z = 4, and to 0.1 at z = 6. We also find that the fraction of GRBs with z>5 is {approx}10%, and this fraction is compared with simulations from a cosmological model.

  10. The study of gamma-ray bursts on Prognoz spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estulin, I. V.

    A joint French-Soviet experiment to identify the sources of gamma-ray bursts in space is described. The main instrument used in the experiment was a SNEG-2MP gamma-ray detector array consisting of two scintillation proportional counters and a collimator with an aperture angle of 18 degrees. The position of the SNEG-2MP array on the Prognoz-6 spacecraft is illustrated. A total of 15 gama-ray bursts was observed in the energy range 30-50 keV. The positions of the burst sources were localized on a standard star map, and the results are presented in photographic form.

  11. Effects of Goldstone bosons on gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Huitzu; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic explosion events in the universe. An amount of gravitational energy of the order of the rest-mass energy of the Sun is released from a small region within a short time. This should lead to the formation of a fireball of temperature in the MeV range, consisting of electrons/positrons, photons, and a small fraction of baryons. We exploit the potential of GRB fireballs for being a laboratory for testing particle physics beyond the Standard Model, where we find that Weinberg's Higgs portal model serves as a good candidate for this purpose. Due to the resonance effects, the Goldstone bosons can be rapidly produced by electron-positron annihilation process in the initial fireballs of the gamma-ray bursts. On the other hand, the mean free path of the Goldstone bosons is larger than the size of the GRB initial fireballs, so they are not coupled to the GRB's relativistic flow and can lead to significant energy loss. Using generic values for the GRB initial fireball energy, temperature, radius, expansion rate, and baryon number density, we find that the GRB bounds on the parameters of Weinberg's Higgs portal model are indeed competitive to current laboratory constraints.

  12. Neutrino emission from gamma-ray burst fireballs, revised.

    PubMed

    Hümmer, Svenja; Baerwald, Philipp; Winter, Walter

    2012-06-01

    We review the neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts, which is estimated from gamma-ray observations and used for the interpretation of recent IceCube data, from a particle physics perspective. We numerically calculate the neutrino flux for the same astrophysical assumptions as the analytical fireball neutrino model, including the dominant pion and kaon production modes, flavor mixing, and magnetic field effects on the secondary muons, pions, and kaons. We demonstrate that taking into account the full energy dependencies of all spectra, the normalization of the expected neutrino flux reduces by about one order of magnitude and the spectrum shifts to higher energies, where we can pin down the exact origin of the discrepancies by the recomputation of the analytical models. We also reproduce the IceCube-40 analysis for exactly the same bursts and same assumptions and illustrate the impact of uncertainties. We conclude that the baryonic loading of the fireballs, which is an important control parameter for the emission of cosmic rays, can be constrained significantly with the full-scale experiment after about ten years. PMID:23003939

  13. FLARES IN LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-04-01

    The many similarities between the prompt emission pulses in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flares during the fast decay and afterglow (AG) phases of GRBs suggest a common origin. In the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, this common origin is mass accretion episodes of fall-back matter on a newly born compact object. The prompt emission pulses are produced by a bipolar jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) ejected in the early, major episodes of mass accretion. As the accretion material is consumed, one may expect the engine's activity to weaken. X-ray flares ending the prompt emission and during the AG phase are produced in such delayed episodes of mass accretion. The common engine, environment, and radiation mechanisms (inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation) produce their observed similarities. Flares in both long GRBs and short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) can also be produced by bipolar ejections of CBs following a phase transition in compact objects due to loss of angular momentum and/or cooling. Optical flares, however, are mostly produced in collisions of CBs with massive stellar winds/ejecta or with density bumps along their path. In this paper, we show that the master formulae of the CB model of GRBs and SHBs, which reproduce very well their prompt emission pulses and their smooth AGs, seem to reproduce also very well the light curves and spectral evolution of the prominent X-ray and optical flares that are well sampled.

  14. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB. PMID:24237502

  15. Gamma-ray burst locations from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, M. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) consists of eight anisotropic gamma-ray spectrometers at the corners of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. BATSE monitors the full sky from a fixed orientation and determines the direction of gamma-ray bursts with an accuracy appropriate for studying the bursts' celestial distribution. We describe the calculation of gamma-ray burst directions from measurements made by BATSE. We present a sample of calculated directions from BATSE's measurement of solar flaxes and compare the calculated directions with the solar direction. We describe the systematic errors apparent in these data and discuss ongoing efforts to correct them.

  16. Detection of gamma-ray bursts from Andromeda

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, Tomasz; Coppi, Paolo S.; Lamb, Donald Q.

    1996-08-01

    If gamma-ray bursts originate in a corona around the Milky Way, it should also be possible to detect them from a similar corona around Andromeda. Adopting a simple model of high velocity neutron star corona, we evaluate the ability of instruments on existing missions to detect an excess of bursts toward Andromeda. We also calculate the optimal properties of an instrument designed to detect such an excess. We find that if the bursts radiate isotropically, an experiment with a sampling distance d{sub max} > or approx. 500 kpc could detect a significant excess of bursts in the direction of Andromeda in a few years of observation. If the radiation is beamed along the neutron star's direction of motion, an experiment with d{sub max} > or approx. 800 kpc would detect such an excess in a similar amount of time, provided that the width of the beam is greater than 10 deg. Lack of an excess toward Andromeda would therefore be compelling evidence that the bursts are cosmological in origin if made by an instrument at least 50 times more sensitive than BATSE, given current constraints on Galactic corona models. Comparisons with detailed dynamical calculations of the spatial distribution of high velocity neutron stars in the coronae around the Milky Way and Andromeda confirm these conclusions.

  17. VHE-UHE Properties of Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Measzaros, P.

    2008-12-24

    Gamma-ray bursts are observed to emit at least up to GeV energies, and their photon spectrum at the source is expected to extend up to TeV, due to either or both leptonic and hadronic mechanisms. I review some recent developments in GRB phenomenology in the light of Swift and other sub-MeV measurement, as well as recent theoretical work. I discuss then the acceleration of cosmic rays in GRB, which can extend to GZK energies, and the possibility of acceleration in GRB-related or other hypernovae. In both, synchrotron and inverse Compton, as well as hadronic processes, can lead to GeV-TeV gamma-rays measurable by GLAST, AGILE, or ACTs, providing useful probes of the burst physics and model parameters. Photo-meson and pp interactions also produce neutrinos at energies ranging from sub-TeV to EeV, which are targets for experiments such as IceCube, ANITA and KM3NeT.

  18. Turbulence induced additional deceleration in relativistic shock wave propagation: implications for gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Wen

    2012-11-01

    The late afterglow of gamma-ray burst is believed to be due to progressive deceleration of the forward shock wave driven by the gamma-ray burst ejecta propagating in the interstellar medium. We study the dynamic effect of interstellar turbulence on shock wave propagation. It is shown that the shock wave decelerates more quickly than previously assumed without the turbulence. As an observational consequence, an earlier jet break will appear in the light curve of the forward shock wave. The scatter of the jet-corrected energy release for gamma-ray burst, inferred from the jet-break, may be partly due to the physical uncertainties in the turbulence/shock wave interaction. This uncertainties also exist in two shell collisions in the well-known internal shock model proposed for gamma-ray burst prompt emission. The large scatters of known luminosity relations of gamma-ray burst may be intrinsic and thus gamma-ray burst is not a good standard candle. We also discuss the other implications.

  19. Swift and Fermi Observations of the Early Afterglow of the Short Gamma-Ray Burst 090510

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pasquale, M.; Schady, P.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Page, M. J.; Curran, P. A.; Zane, S.; Oates, S. R.; Holland, S. T.; Breeveld, A. A.; Hoversten, E. A.; Chincarini, G.; Grupe, D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Fishman, G.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Starck, J.-L.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-02-01

    We present the observations of GRB090510 performed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and the Swift observatory. This is a bright, short burst that shows an extended emission detected in the GeV range. Furthermore, its optical emission initially rises, a feature so far observed only in long bursts, while the X-ray flux shows an initial shallow decrease, followed by a steeper decay. This exceptional behavior enables us to investigate the physical properties of the gamma-ray burst outflow, poorly known in short bursts. We discuss internal and external shock models for the broadband energy emission of this object.

  20. The First Swift BAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Barbier, L.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Zhang, B.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), which contains bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2007 June 16. This catalog (hereafter BAT1 catalog) contains burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, and time averaged spectral parameters for each of 237 GRBs, as measured by the BAT. The BAT-determined position reported here is within 1.75' of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)-determined position for 90% of these GRBs. The BAT T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) durations peak at 80 and 20 seconds, respectively. From the fluence-fluence correlation, we conclude that about 60% of the observed peak energies, E(sup obs)(sub peak) of BAT GRBs could be less than 100 keV. We confirm that GRB fluence to hardness and GRB peak flux to hardness are correlated for BAT bursts in analogous ways to previous missions' results. The correlation between the photon index in a simple power-law model and E(sup obs)(sub peak) is also confirmed. We also report the current status for the on-orbit BAT calibrations based on observations of the Crab Nebula.

  1. An internally consistent gamma ray burst time history phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenology for gamma ray burst time histories is outlined. Order of their generally chaotic appearance is attempted, based on the speculation that any one burst event can be represented above 150 keV as a superposition of similarly shaped increases of varying intensity. The increases can generally overlap, however, confusing the picture, but a given event must at least exhibit its own limiting characteristic rise and decay times if the measurements are made with instruments having adequate temporal resolution. Most catalogued observations may be of doubtful or marginal utility to test this hypothesis, but some time histories from Helios-2, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and other instruments having one-to several-millisecond capabilities appear to provide consistency. Also, recent studies of temporally resolved Solar Maximum Mission burst energy spectra are entirely compatible with this picture. The phenomenology suggested here, if correct, may assist as an analytic tool for modelling of burst processes and possibly in the definition of burst source populations.

  2. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin

  3. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Meegan, C. A.; Lichti, G. G.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Kienlin, A. von; Fishman, G. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kippen, R. M.

    2009-05-25

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope launched on June 11, 2008 carries two experiments onboard--the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The primary mission of the GBM instrument is to support the LAT in observing {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs) by providing low-energy measurements with high temporal and spectral resolution as well as rapid burst locations over a large field-of-view ({>=}8 sr). The GBM will complement the LAT measurements by observing GRBs in the energy range 8 keV to 40 MeV, the region of the spectral turnover in most GRBs. The GBM detector signals are processed by the onboard digital processing unit (DPU). We describe some of the hardware features of the DPU and its expected limitations during intense triggers.

  4. The Error Distribution of BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Michael S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kippen, R. Marc; Brainerd, J. J.; Hurley, Kevin; Connaughton, Valerie; Meegan, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Empirical probability models for BATSE gamma-ray burst (GRB) location errors are developed via a Bayesian analysis of the separations between BATSE GRB locations and locations obtained with the Interplanetary Network (IPN). Models are compared and their parameters estimated using 392 GRBs with single IPN annuli and 19 GRBs with intersecting IPN annuli. Most of the analysis is for the 4Br BATSE catalog; earlier catalogs are also analyzed. The simplest model that provides a good representation of the error distribution has 78% of the probability in a "core" term with a systematic error of 1.85 deg and the remainder in an extended tail with a systematic error of 5.1 deg, which implies a 68% confidence radius for bursts with negligible statistical uncertainties of 2.2 deg. There is evidence for a more complicated model in which the error distribution depends on the BATSE data type that was used to obtain the location. Bright bursts are typically located using the CONT data type, and according to the more complicated model, the 68% confidence radius for CONT-located bursts with negligible statistical uncertainties is 2.0 deg.

  5. Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts and Hypernovae Conclusively Linked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    radiation. The team concludes that it is likely to be due to the nearly instantaneous, non-symmetrical collapse of the inner region of a highly developed star (known as the "collapsar" model) . The March 29 gamma-ray burst will pass into the annals of astrophysics as a rare "type-defining event", providing conclusive evidence of a direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars . PR Photo 17a/03 : Image of the optical afterglow of GRB 030329 (VLT FORS1+2). PR Photo 17b/03 : A series of VLT spectra of the optical afterglow of GRB 030329. What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the dramatic events known as "gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by sensitive instruments on-board orbiting military satellites, launched for the surveillance and detection of nuclear tests. Originating, not on the Earth, but far out in space, these short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite major observational efforts, it is only within the last six years that it has become possible to pinpoint with some accuracy the sites of some of these events. With the invaluable help of comparatively accurate positional observations of the associated X-ray emission by various X-ray satellite observatories since early 1997, astronomers have until now identified about fifty short-lived sources of optical light associated with GRBs (the "optical afterglows"). Most GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00 . During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of massive

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts as seen by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola

    2009-04-08

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi mission is revealing the rich spectral and temporal gamma-ray burst phenomena in the >100 MeV band. The synergy with Fermi's GBM detectors links these observations to those in the well-explored 10-1000 keV range; the addition of the >100 MeV band observations brings new hint and new information about burst emission in both the prompt and afterglow phases. In this contribution we describe the prospects for the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in observing Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), and some preliminary results. Here we focus our attention on the importance of multi frequencies approach to GRB science during the just began Fermi era.

  7. Systematic Effects on Duration Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshut, Thomas M.; Paciesas, William S.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    The parameters T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) have recently been introduced as a measurement of the duration of gamma-ray bursts. We present here a description of the method of measuring T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) and its application to gamma-ray bursts observed with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). We use simulated as well as observed time profiles to address some of the possible systematic effects affecting individual T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) measurements. We show that these systematic effects do not mimic those effects that would result from time dilation if the burst sources are at distances of several Gpc. We discuss the impact of these systematic effects on the T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) distributions for the gamma-ray bursts observed with BATSE. We distinguish between various types of T(sub 90) (T(sub 50)) distributions, and discuss the ways in which distributions observed with different experiments can vary, even though the measurements for commonly observed bursts may be the same. We then discuss the distributions observed with BATSE and compare them to those observed with other experiments.

  8. LAT Automated Science Processing for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James

    2007-05-01

    The LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) will perform various tasks to support coordination of multiwavelength observations for transient sources. In this paper, we describe the prototype implementation of the Automated Science Processing (ASP) for the detection and analysis of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in LAT and GBM data. The GRB-related tasks include: position refinement using LAT data given initial GBM or GCN locations, spectral analysis using LAT data alone, joint spectral fitting with GBM data, gamma-ray afterglow detection and characterization, and blind searches for prompt burst emission in LAT data.

  9. On the bimodal distribution of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shude; Narayan, Ramesh; Piran, Tsvi

    1994-01-01

    Kouveliotou et al. recently confirmed that gamma-ray bursts are bimodal in duration. In this paper we compute the statistical properties of the short (less than or = 2 s) and long (greater than 2 s) bursts using a method of analysis that makes no assumption regarding the location of the bursts, whether in the Galaxy or at a cosmological distance. We find the 64 ms channel on Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) to be more sensitive to short bursts and the 1024 ms channel to be more sensitive to long bursts. We show that all the currently available data are consistent with the simple hypothesis that both short and long bursts have the same spatial distribution and that within each population the sources are standard candles. The rate of short bursts per unit volume is about 40% of the rate of long bursts. Although the durations of short and long gamma-ray bursts span several orders of magnitude and the total energy of a typical short burst is smaller than that of a typical long burst by a factor of about 20, surprisingly the peak luminosities of the two kinds of bursts are equal to within a factor of about 2.

  10. AGILE DETECTION OF DELAYED GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 090510

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, A.; Vianello, G.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A. W.; Contessi, T.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Moretti, E.; Cattaneo, P. W.

    2010-01-10

    Short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), typically lasting less than 2 s, are a special class of GRBs of great interest. We report the detection by the AGILE satellite of the short GRB 090510 which shows two clearly distinct emission phases: a prompt phase lasting {approx}200 ms and a second phase lasting tens of seconds. The prompt phase is relatively intense in the 0.3-10 MeV range with a spectrum characterized by a large peak/cutoff energy near 3 MeV; in this phase, no significant high-energy gamma-ray emission is detected. At the end of the prompt phase, intense gamma-ray emission above 30 MeV is detected showing a power-law time decay of the flux of the type t {sup -1.3} and a broadband spectrum remarkably different from that of the prompt phase. It extends from sub-MeV to hundreds of MeV energies with a photon index {alpha} {approx_equal} 1.5. GRB 090510 provides the first case of a short GRB with delayed gamma-ray emission. We present the timing and spectral data of GRB 090510 and briefly discuss its remarkable properties within the current models of gamma-ray emission of short GRBs.

  11. DMSP satellites as gamma-ray burst detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, J.; Lee, P.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Griffee, J.W.

    1993-12-31

    Gamma-ray burst detectors are aboard three US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, in orbit at 800 km altitude, with corresponding fields of view to 117{degree} from the zenith. A large number of bursts have been detected by DMSP, usually confirming and supplementing data from GRO and other spacecraft. The location of a gamma-ray burst source detected by several DMSP spacecraft is considerably restricted by knowledge of the several fields of view. Often non-detection of a strong burst by one or more DMSP spacecraft is even more informative in narrowing the possible area of the burst. The DMSP data in conjunction with observations by other spacecraft can lead to reasonable positional information when more accurate positions are not available from GRO or other data.

  12. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pal'shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V.; Hurley, K.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  13. The INTEGRAL view of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, Pietro; Corsi, A.; Foley, S.; McGlynn, S.; De Cesare, G.; Bazzano, A.

    2011-04-01

    After more than six and half years in orbit, the ESA space observatory INTEGRAL has provided new, exciting results in the soft gamma-ray energy range (from a few keV to a few MeV). With the discovery of about 700 hard X-Ray sources, it has changed our previous view of a sky composed of peculiar and “monster” sources. The new high energy sky is in fact full of a large variety of normal, very energetic emitters, characterized by new accretion and acceleration processes (see also IBIS cat4 (Bird et al., 2010). At the same time, about one GRB/month is detected and imaged by the two main gamma-ray instruments on board: IBIS and SPI. In this paper, we review the major achievements of the INTEGRAL observatory in the field of Gamma-Ray Bursts. We summarize the global properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts detected by INTEGRAL, with respect to their duration, spectral index, and peak flux distributions. We recall INTEGRAL results on the spectral lag analysis, showing how long-lag GRBs appear to form a separate population at low peak fluxes. We review the outcome of polarisation studies performed by using INTEGRAL data. Finally, concerning single GRB studies, we highlight the properties of particularly interesting Gamma-Ray Bursts in the INTEGRAL sample.

  14. Short Gamma-ray Bursts: Observations and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H.-Thomas

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the workshop, which will be held at the scenic Ringberg castle, is supposed to bring together astrophysicists, physicists, and astronomers from different fields in order to discuss recent observational and theoretical discoveries and developments on short gamma-ray bursts. In particular, we plan to address the following topics: * recent short GRB observations * environments and host galaxies of short GRBs * is there a 3rd class of GRBs? * modeling GRB engines and jet outflows * rate and redshift predictions for short GRBs * the fireball model and short GRBs * gravitational-wave signals from short GRBs * neutrino signals from short GRBs * microphysics needed for modeling short GRBs and their engines Scientific and Local organizing committee members: H.-Thomas Janka (Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Garching), Miguel Aloy (University of Valencia), Jochen Greiner (Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics), Sandra Savaglio (Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics), Shri Kulkarni (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena)

  15. ON THE RECENTLY DISCOVERED CORRELATIONS BETWEEN GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY PROPERTIES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2013-09-20

    Recently, many correlations between the prompt {gamma}-ray emission properties and the X-ray afterglow properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been inferred from a comprehensive analysis of the X-ray light curves of more than 650 GRBs measured with the Swift X-Ray Telescope (Swift/XRT) during the years 2004-2010. We show that these correlations are predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs. They result from the dependence of GRB observables on the bulk motion Lorentz factor and viewing angle of the jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) that produces the observed radiations by interaction with the medium through which it propagates. Moreover, despite their different physical origins, long GRBs (LGRBs) and short-hard bursts (SHBs) in the CB model share similar kinematic correlations, which can be combined into triple correlations satisfied by both LGRBs and SHBs.

  16. The Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog Obtained with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor Aboard BeppoSAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.; Montanari, E.; Rossi, F.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Calura, F.; Rapisarda, M.; Amati, L.; Carturan, D.; Cinti, M. R.; Fiume, D. Dal; Nicastro, L.; Orlandini, M.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor aboard the BeppoSAX satellite. It includes 1082 GRBs with 40-700 keV fluences in the range from 1.3 × 10-7 to 4.5 × 10-4 erg cm-2, and 40-700 keV peak fluxes from 3.7 × 10-8 to 7.0 × 10-5 erg cm-2 s-1. We report in the catalog some relevant parameters of each GRB and discuss the derived statistical properties.

  17. Search for simultaneous optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H S; Porrata, R A; Bionta, R M; Williams, G G

    2000-09-05

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations made possible by the instantaneous distribution of reliable GRB coordinate information over the internet provided by NASA's GCN (GRB Coordinates Network). The 3-year LDRD project described here, done in collaboration with the workers responsible for the GCN, was the very first serious system to actively utilize the GCN and thus played a major role in the development of the GCN and the dramatic increase in our understanding of GRBs. The scientific objective of this project was to measure the intensity of any prompt visible radiation accompanying the gamma-ray emission utilizing a small but sensitive robotic telescope that responded to GCN triggers by rapidly taking images of the GCN error box. The instrument developed for this project, LOTIS, was the first of its kind, and the longest running, collecting data on over 75 GRBs during its 3 year running period. The results of LOTIS and the other follow-up programs have now shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the ''fireball model.'' Visible, prompt, optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. This places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the GRB environment. A much more sensitive instrument, Super-LOTIS, has been developed for operation at Kitt-Peak.

  18. The Fermi view of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Fermi/LAT Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Fermi mission has brought great advances in the study of GRBs. Over 1500 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and more than 100 of these are also detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) above 30 MeV. These high-energy detections have revealed previously unknown features in GRB spectra, including additional components and spectral cut-offs, as well as delayed and long-lived GeV emission. Interpretation of these new features has proven to be a source of vigorous debate within the GRB community. I will review recent Fermi-LAT observations of GRBs, ranging from the detection of the long-lived GRB 130427A to the broad-band fits of simultaneous X-ray and gamma-ray data, and what they reveal about the origin of the high-energy emission from GRBs.

  19. Implications of a PeV neutrino spectral cut-off in gamma-ray burst models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, M.; Giannios, D.; Dimitrakoudis, S.

    2014-11-01

    The recent discovery of extragalactic PeV neutrinos opens a new window to the exploration of cosmic ray accelerators. The observed PeV neutrino flux is close to the Waxman-Bahcall upper bound implying that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). Starting with the assumption of the GRB-UHECR connection, we show using both analytical estimates and numerical simulations that the observed neutrinos can originate at the jet as a result of photopion interactions with the following implications: the neutrino spectra are predicted to have a cut-off at energy ≲10 PeV; the dissipation responsible for the GRB emission and cosmic ray acceleration takes place at distances rdiss ≃ 3 × 1011-3 × 1013 cm from the central engine; the Thomson optical depth at the dissipation region is τT ˜ 1; the jet carries a substantial fraction of its energy in the form of Poynting flux at the dissipation region, and has a Lorentz factor Γ ≃ 100-500. The non-detection of PeV neutrinos coincident with GRBs will indicate that GRBs are either poor cosmic accelerators or the dissipation takes place at small optical depths in the jet.

  20. Gamma-ray bursts and collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, E.

    2006-12-01

    Particle acceleration in collisionless shocks is believed to be responsible for the production of cosmic-rays over a wide range of energies, from a few GeV to > 1020 eV, as well as for the non-thermal emission of radiation from a wide variety of high energy astrophysical sources. A theory of collisionless shocks based on first principles does not, however, exist. Observations of γ-ray burst (GRB) 'afterglows' provide a unique opportunity for diagnosing the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks. Most GRBs are believed to be associated with explosions of massive stars. Their 'afterglows', delayed low energy emission following the prompt burst of γ-rays, are well accounted for by a model in which afterglow radiation is due to synchrotron emission of electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shock waves driven by the explosion into the surrounding plasma. Within the framework of this model, some striking characteristics of collisionless relativistic shocks are implied. These include the generation of downstream magnetic fields with energy density exceeding that of the upstream field by ~8 orders of magnitude, the survival of this strong field at distances ~1010 skin-depths downstream of the shock and the acceleration of particles to a power-law energy spectrum, d log n/d logɛ ap -2, possibly extending to 1020 eV. I review in this talk the phenomenological considerations, based on which these characteristics are inferred, and the challenges posed to our current models of particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in collisionless shocks. Some recent theoretical results derived based on the assumption of a self-similar shock structure are briefly discussed. Invited review presented at the 33rd annual European Physical Society Conference, Rome, 2006.

  1. Gamma Ray Bursts and the Birth of Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Black holes have been predicted since the 1940's from solutions of Einstein's general relativity field equation. There is strong evidence of their existence from astronomical observations, but their origin has remained an open question of great interest. Gamma-ray bursts may the clue. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and appear to be the birth cries of black holes. The Swift and Fermi missions are two powerful NASA observatories currently in orbit that are discovering how gamma-ray bursts work. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are tremendously luminous and are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. One Swift burst at z=8.3 is the most distant object known in the universe. The talk will present the latest gamma-ray burst results from Swift and Fermi and will highlight what they are teaching us about black holes and jet outflows.

  2. Correlation Analysis of Prompt Emission from Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothapragada, Sriharsha

    Prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibits very rapid, complicated temporal and spectral evolution. This diverse variability in the light-curves reflects the complicated nature of the underlying physics, in which inter-penetrating relativistic shells in the outflow are believed to generate strong magnetic fields that vary over very small scales. We use the theory of jitter radiation to model the emission from such regions and the resulting overall prompt gamma ray emission from a series of relativistic collisionless shocks. We present simulated GRB light-curves developed as a series of "pulses" corresponding to instantaneously illuminated "thin-shell" regions emitting via the jitter radiation mechanism. The effects of various geometries, viewing angles, and bulk Lorentz factor profiles of the radiating outflow jets on the spectral features and evolution of these light-curves are explored. Our results demonstrate how an anisotropic jitter radiation pattern, in conjunction with relativistic shock kinematics, can produce certain features observed in the GRB prompt emission spectra, such as the occurrence of hard, synchrotron violating spectra, the "tracking" of observed flux with spectral parameters, and spectral softening below peak energy within individual episodes of the light curve. We highlight predictions in the light of recent advances in the observational sphere of GRBs.

  3. UNCOVERING THE INTRINSIC VARIABILITY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkhou, V. Zach; Butler, Nathaniel R

    2014-08-01

    We develop a robust technique to determine the minimum variability timescale for gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves, utilizing Haar wavelets. Our approach averages over the data for a given GRB, providing an aggregate measure of signal variation while also retaining sensitivity to narrow pulses within complicated time series. In contrast to previous studies using wavelets, which simply define the minimum timescale in reference to the measurement noise floor, our approach identifies the signature of temporally smooth features in the wavelet scaleogram and then additionally identifies a break in the scaleogram on longer timescales as a signature of a true, temporally unsmooth light curve feature or features. We apply our technique to the large sample of Swift GRB gamma-ray light curves and for the first time—due to the presence of a large number of GRBs with measured redshift—determine the distribution of minimum variability timescales in the source frame. We find a median minimum timescale for long-duration GRBs in the source frame of Δtmin = 0.5 s, with the shortest timescale found being on the order of 10 ms. This short timescale suggests a compact central engine (3000 km). We discuss further implications for the GRB fireball model and present a tantalizing correlation between the minimum timescale and redshift, which may in part be due to cosmological time dilation.

  4. Uncovering the intrinsic variability of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Golkhou, Vahid Z.; Butler, Nathaniel R. E-mail: natbutler@asu.edu

    2014-05-20

    We develop a robust technique to determine the minimum variability timescale for gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves, utilizing Haar wavelets. Our approach averages over the data for a given GRB, providing an aggregate measure of signal variation while also retaining sensitivity to narrow pulses within complicated time series. In contrast to previous studies using wavelets, which simply define the minimum timescale in reference to the measurement noise floor, our approach identifies the signature of temporally smooth features in the wavelet scaleogram and then additionally identifies a break in the scaleogram on longer timescales as a signature of a true, temporally unsmooth light curve feature or features. We apply our technique to the large sample of Swift GRB gamma-ray light curves and for the first time—due to the presence of a large number of GRBs with measured redshift—determine the distribution of minimum variability timescales in the source frame. We find a median minimum timescale for long-duration GRBs in the source frame of Δt {sub min} = 0.5 s, with the shortest timescale found being on the order of 10 ms. This short timescale suggests a compact central engine (3 × 10{sup 3} km). We discuss further implications for the GRB fireball model and present a tantalizing correlation between the minimum timescale and redshift, which may in part be due to cosmological time dilation.

  5. The NuSTAR View of Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission was launched June 13, 2012. During the next two pears NuSTAR observed two Gamma Ray Bursts, GRBs 130427A and 130925A. I will describe here the NuSTAR GRB results and discuss their implications on the GRB field.

  6. On the extragalactic origin of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Teller, E.

    1984-11-02

    A theory to explain the origin of extragalactic gamma ray bursts is presented. Collisions of black dwarf and neutron stars with a subsequent fragmentation of the dwarf producing relativistic particle accelerations toward the neutron star and a resulting turbulent flow of material at the neutron star surface is postulated. (DWL)

  7. Constraints on relativity violations from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Kostelecký, V Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2013-05-17

    Tiny violations of the Lorentz symmetry of relativity and the associated discrete CPT symmetry could emerge in a consistent theory of quantum gravity such as string theory. Recent evidence for linear polarization in gamma-ray bursts improves existing sensitivities to Lorentz and CPT violation involving photons by factors ranging from ten to a million. PMID:25167393

  8. Rossi Prize Lecture: Gamma Ray Bursts: Origins and Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meszaros, P.

    2000-12-01

    Some of the major stepping stones towards uncovering the mystery of gamma ray bursts will be discussed. This is an unfinished process, new observations being expected in the near future. I will review the current observational status, and discuss the present theoretical understanding of GRB, as well as the possible impact of future missions and experiments.

  9. Properties of multiple event gamma ray bursts. [GB 820301

    SciTech Connect

    Lochner, J.C. )

    1991-09-01

    We present results from a study of 37 multiple event gamma ray bursts found in the monitoring data of the PVO gamma ray burst detector. We define these bursts as those which have two or more distinct emission events separated by a return to the background intensity. Significant correlation exists between the duration of the first event and the duration of the second event, while some correlation exists between the hardness of the events and only weak correlation exists in the intensity of the events. Although the time profiles of events in a burst may be similar, as measured in the phase portrait, there is no general rule about the degree of similarity of the time profiles. Subdividing the data according to the recurrence time, we find a tendency for the strength of the correlation in the hardness to increase with decreasing separation between the events.

  10. Gamma-ray burst observations by Pioneer Venus Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. D.; Glore, J. P.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Tech, E. R.; Spalding, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus Orbiter gamma burst detector is an astrophysics experiment for monitoring cosmic gamma-ray bursts. It is included in this planetary mission to provide a long baseline for accurately locating the sources of these bursts in order to identify them with specific astronomical objects. Responses to 14 gamma-ray burst events were examined; these events were verified from data acquired by other systems. Preliminary locations are proposed for three events, based on data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, ISEE C, and Vela spacecraft. These locations will be improved, and additional locations will be determined by including in the analyses data from Helios B and the Russian Venera 11, Venera 12, and Prognoz 7 spacecraft.

  11. Spectral evolution of pulse structures in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Dennis, B. R.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data from the Solar Maximum Mission satellite have been searched for gamma-ray bursts with sufficient intensities and relatively simple time profiles such that their spectral behavior may be studied on a time scale of about 1 s. Ten such events were observed with the GRS experiment, and four of these were also detected within the HXRBS field of view. Details are presented for two moderately intense bursts with relatively simple structure. The spectral evolutions of the remaining events are summarized briefly. Results suggest a pattern in the spectral evolution within burst pulses: a tendency for the high-energy emission to lead the low-energy emission, in contrast to the correlation of intensity and spectral hardness reported by Golenetskii et al. (1983).

  12. Search for gamma ray bursts with coincident balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A search was conducted for cosmic gamma ray bursts of small size and of sufficient frequency of occurrence to be detected during a one day observation program. Two similar detectors, successfully balloon-borne from launch sites in South Dakota and Texas, achieved about 20 hours of simultaneous operation at several millibars atmospheric depth, with continuous separation of over 1,500 km. Fluctuations of the counting rates of less than 150 keV photons with temporal structures from microseconds to several minutes were compared in order to detect coincident or associated responses from the two instruments. No coincident gamma-ray burst events were detected. The resulting integral size spectrum of small bursts, from this and from all other searches, remains a spectrum of upper limits, consistent with an extrapolation of the size spectrum of the largest known bursts, fitting a power low of index -1.5.

  13. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Frederick; Bonnell, Jerry; Hughes, Richard; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; /Ohio State U.

    2007-10-15

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the onground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  14. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Frederick; Hughes, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; Bonnell, Jerry; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James

    2007-07-12

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the on-ground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  15. The progenitors of extended emission gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gompertz, B. P.

    2015-06-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous transient events in the Universe, and as such are associated with some of the most extreme processes in nature. They come in two types: long and short, nominally separated either side of a two second divide in gamma-ray emission duration. The short class (those with durations of less than two seconds) are believed to be due to the merger of two compact objects, most likely neutron stars. Within this population, a small subsection exhibit an apparent extra high-energy emission feature, which rises to prominence several seconds after the initial emission event. These are the extended emission (EE) bursts. This thesis investigates the progenitors of the EE sample, including what drives them, and where they fit in the broader context of short GRBs. The science chapters outline a rigorous test of the magnetar model, in which the compact object merger results in a massive, rapidly-rotating neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field. The motivation for this central engine is the late-time plateaux seen in some short and EE GRBs, which can be interpreted as energy injection from a long-lived central engine, in this case from the magnetar as it loses angular momentum along open field lines. Chapter 2 addresses the energy budget of such a system, including whether the EE component is consistent with the rotational energy reservoir of a millisecond neutron star, and the implications the model has for the physical properties of the underlying magnetar. Chapter 3 proposes a potential mechanism by which EE may arise, and how both classes may be born within the framework of a single central engine. Chapter 4 addresses the broadband signature of both short and EE GRBs, and provides some observational tests that can be used to either support or contradict the model.

  16. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES OF JET PRECESSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Mouyuan; Liu Tong; Gu Weimin; Lu Jufu

    2012-06-10

    The physical nature of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is believed to involve an ultra-relativistic jet. The observed complex structure of light curves motivates the idea of jet precession. In this work, we study the gravitational waves of jet precession based on neutrino-dominated accretion disks around black holes, which may account for the central engine of GRBs. In our model, the jet and the inner part of the disk may precess along with the black hole, which is driven by the outer part of the disk. Gravitational waves are therefore expected to be significant from this black-hole-inner-disk precession system. By comparing our numerical results with the sensitivity of some detectors, we find that it is possible for DECIGO and BBO to detect such gravitational waves, particularly for GRBs in the Local Group.

  17. Gamma-ray bursts: huge explosion in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, G; Mangano, V; Chincarini, G; Panaitescu, A; Burrows, D N; La Parola, V; Sakamoto, T; Campana, S; Mineo, T; Tagliaferri, G; Angelini, L; Barthelemy, S D; Beardmore, A P; Boyd, P T; Cominsky, L R; Gronwall, C; Fenimore, E E; Gehrels, N; Giommi, P; Goad, M; Hurley, K; Kennea, J A; Mason, K O; Marshall, F; Mészáros, P; Nousek, J A; Osborne, J P; Palmer, D M; Roming, P W A; Wells, A; White, N E; Zhang, B

    2006-03-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of high-energy photons that can last for tens of minutes; they are generally associated with galaxies that have a high rate of star formation and probably arise from the collapsing cores of massive stars, which produce highly relativistic jets (collapsar model). Here we describe gamma- and X-ray observations of the most distant GRB ever observed (GRB 050904): its redshift (z) of 6.29 means that this explosion happened 12.8 billion years ago, corresponding to a time when the Universe was just 890 million years old, close to the reionization era. This means that not only did stars form in this short period of time after the Big Bang, but also that enough time had elapsed for them to evolve and collapse into black holes. PMID:16525462

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts Shower the Universe with Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-13

    According to the results from a Livermore computer model, some of the small change jingling in your pocket contains zinc and copper created in massive gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that rank as the most impressive light shows in the universe. Livermore astrophysicist Jason Pruet and his colleagues Rebecca Surman and Gail McLaughlin from North Carolina State University (NCSU) reported on their calculations in the February 20, 2004, issue of ''Astrophysical Journal Letters''. They found that GRBs from black holes surrounded by a disk of dense, hot plasma may have contributed heavily to the galactic inventory of elements such as calcium, scandium, titanium, zinc, and copper. ''A typical GRB of this kind briefly outshines all the stars in millions of galaxies combined'', says Pruet. ''Plus it makes about 100 times as much of some common elements as an ordinary supernova''.

  19. SCIENCE Magazine: BATSE 1000 gamma-ray burst perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horack, John M.

    1995-01-01

    A historical highlight and analysis of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), which has been in operation for more than three years and has detected more than 1,000 cosmic gamma-ray bursts is presented. The questions BATSE has answered and those it has not are assessed, along with the problems and data correlation and processing that has occured from the BATSE operation.

  20. Gamma-ray burst of November 19, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Zenchenko, V.M.; Kuznetsov, A.V.; Mersov, G.A.; Estulin, I.V.; Vedrenne, G.; Niel, M.; Hurley, K.

    1980-03-01

    The ..gamma..-ray burst recorded on November 19, 1978, by the Venera 11 and Venera 12 space probes and the Prognoz 7 satellite is described. The source of this burst is confined to an ellipse measuring 0'.84 x 15'.4, centered at ..cap alpha..=19/sup 0/.064, delta=-28/sup 0/.858 (1950.0). No identification can yet be made between the source and any stellar object.

  1. Cosmology and the subclasses of the gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, Attila; Horváth, István; Řípa, Jakub; Bagoly, Zsolt; Balázs, Lajos G.; Veres, Péter

    2011-02-01

    Several statistical studies - done also by the authors of this contribution - show that there are three subclasses of gamma-ray bursts. They can be called as short, intermediate and long ones, because they can be separated with respect to their durations. The short and intermediate bursts are distributed anisotropically on the sky. This behavior is highly remarkable, and can have a cardinal impact on the cosmology. The subject of this contribution is a survey of this topic.

  2. Structure in gamma ray burst time profiles: Statistical Analysis 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1992-01-01

    Since its launch on April 5, 1991, the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) has observed and recorded over 500 gamma-ray bursts (GRB). The analysis of the time profiles of these bursts has proven to be difficult. Attempts to find periodicities through Fourier analysis have been fruitless except one celebrated case. Our goal is to be able to qualify the observed time-profiles structure. Before applying this formation to bursts, we have tested it on profiles composed of random Poissonian noise. This paper is a report of those preliminary results.

  3. Constraints on the hadronic content of gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Yacobi, Lee; Guetta, Dafne; Behar, Ehud

    2014-09-20

    The IceCube High-energy Neutrino Telescope has been collecting data since 2006. Conversely, hundreds of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected by the GRB Monitor on board Fermi since its launch in 2008. So far no neutrino event has been associated with a GRB, despite many models predicting the generation of high-energy neutrinos through GRB photon interaction with PeV protons in the GRB jet. We use the non-detection of neutrinos to constrain the hadronic content of GRB jets independent of jet model parameters. Assuming a generic particle spectrum of E {sup –α} with α = 2, we find that the ratio of the energy carried by pions to that in electrons has to be small f {sub π}/f{sub e} ≲ 0.24 at 95% confidence level. A distribution of spectral slopes can lower f {sub π}/f{sub e} by orders of magnitude. Another limit, independent of neutrinos, is obtained if one ascribes the measured Fermi/Large Area Telescope GeV gamma-ray emission to pair-photon cascades of high-energy photons resulting from (the same photon-hadronic interactions and subsequent) neutral pion decays. Based on the generally observed MeV-to-GeV GRB fluence ratio of ≈10, we show that f {sub π}/f{sub e} ≲ 0.3. In some bursts, this ratio is as low as unity, f {sub π}/f{sub e} ≲ 0.03. These findings add to mounting doubts regarding the presence of PeV protons in GRB jets.

  4. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA Swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit after a beautiful launch on November 20, 2004. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera detects more than a hundred bursts per year. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners and calibrated in Germany, are pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. Early results from the mission will be presented. The long-standing mystery of short GRBs has been solved, and the answer is the most interesting possible scenario. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow. Observations of magnetars, galactic transients, supernovae, AGN and many other types of sources are also being performed

  5. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit since November 20, 2004 and all hardware is performing well. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera is detecting a hundred bursts per year. sensitive narrow-field X-ray and uv/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 50-100 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year of findings from the mission will be presented. There has been a break-through in the longstanding mystery of short GRBs; they appear to be caused by merging neutron stars. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow.

  6. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of gamma-ray bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit since November 20, 2004 and all hardware is performing well. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera is detecting a hundred bursts per year. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 50-100 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year and a half of findings from the mission will be presented. There has been a break-through in the long-standing mystery of short GRBs; they appear to be caused by merging neutron stars. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. A fascinating nearby burst triggered Swift and enabled the best early-time observations of an emerging coincident Type lb/c supernova. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow.

  7. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Swift Team

    2006-09-01

    The NASA Swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of gamma-ray bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit since November 20, 2004 and all hardware is performing well. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera is detecting a hundred bursts per year. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 50-100 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year and a half of findings from the mission will be presented. There has been a break-through in the long-standing mystery of short GRBs; they appear to be caused by merging neutron stars. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. A fascinating nearby burst triggered Swift and enabled the best early-time observations of an emerging coincident Type Ib/c supernova. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow.

  8. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA Swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit since November 20, 2004 and all hardware is performing well. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera is detecting a hundred bursts per year. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 50-100 sec by an autonomously controlled ``swift'' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year of findings from the mission will be presented. There has been a break-through in the long-standing mystery of short GRBs; they appear to be caused by merging neutron stars. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow.

  9. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA Swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit after a beautiful launch on November 20, 2004. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera detects more than a hundred bursts per year. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year of findings from the mission will be presented. The long-standing mystery of short GRBs has been solved, and the answer is the most interesting possible scenario. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow. These, and other topics, will be discussed.

  10. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Gehrels, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest gamma-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  11. Repeating sources of classical gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, V. C.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    From an analysis of the first catalog of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment (Fishman et al. 1993, 1994a) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), we find an excessive number of pairs of gamma-ray bursts which are clustered in both a space and time . The angular separation between the two bursts in each pair is less than their positional uncertainties, and the interval between their occurrence times is within several days. Optimizing the signal, we find that the probability of observing such a clustered excess froma Poisson ensemble is approximately 2 x 10(exp -5). We suggest that these bursts arise from repeating sources. A detailed study of the most prolific source, GBS 0855-00, is presented in a separate paper (Wang & Lingenfelter 1993a, b). Unlike most of the 'soft' gamma-ray repeaters, these repeating bursts have relatively hard spectra, complex light curves, and widely varying durations, that are indistinguishable from classical gamma-ray bursts. Although the significance of the clustered excess was optimized a posteriori, because it depends on temporal and spatial bin sized that could not be defined a priori, we can use the optimizations from the first catalog to test subsequent BATSE data sets. Unfortunately, the failure of the on-board tape recorders during the second catalog period seriously reduced the number of accurately positioned bursts (Fishman et al. 1994b), so that we can neither confirm, nor refute, the predicted repitition in that sample, and we must await the results of the third catalog.

  12. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF GAMMA-RAY BURST POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, Kenji; Sakamoto, Takanori; Hill, Joanne E.; Zhang, Bing; McConnell, Mark L.; Bloser, Peter F.; Yamazaki, Ryo; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-06-20

    The emission mechanism and the origin and structure of magnetic fields in gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets are among the most important open questions concerning the nature of the central engine of GRBs. In spite of extensive observational efforts, these questions remain to be answered and are difficult or even impossible to infer with the spectral and light-curve information currently collected. Polarization measurements will lead to unambiguous answers to several of these questions. Recent developments in X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarimetry techniques have demonstrated a significant increase in sensitivity, enabling several new mission concepts, e.g., Polarimeters for Energetic Transients (POET), providing wide field of view and broadband polarimetry measurements. If launched, missions of this kind would finally provide definitive measurements of GRB polarizations. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to derive the distribution of GRB polarizations in three emission models; the synchrotron model with a globally ordered magnetic field (SO model), the synchrotron model with a small-scale random magnetic field (SR model), and the Compton drag model (CD model). The results show that POET, or other polarimeters with similar capabilities, can constrain the GRB emission models by using the statistical properties of GRB polarizations. In particular, the ratio of the number of GRBs for which the polarization degrees can be measured to the number of GRBs that are detected (N{sub m} /N{sub d} ) and the distributions of the polarization degrees ({pi}) can be used as the criteria. If N{sub m} /N{sub d} > 30% and {pi} is clustered between 0.2 and 0.7, the SO model will be favored. If, instead, N{sub m} /N{sub d} < 15%, then the SR or CD model will be favored. If several events with {pi}>0.8 are observed, then the CD model will be favored.

  13. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Sari, R.; Bloom, J. S.; Galama, T. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Price, P. A.; Fox, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Yost, S.; Berger, E.; Diercks, A.; Goodrich, R.; Chaffee, F.

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic γ-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean γ-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 1051 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ( ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host galaxies span a range of luminosities and morphologies, but appear to be broadly typical for the normal, actively star-forming galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes. Some of the challenges for the future include: the nature of the short bursts and possibly other types of bursts and transients; use of GRBs to probe the obscured star formation in the universe, and possibly as probes of the very early universe; and their detection as sources of high-energy particles and gravitational waves.

  14. The First Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesler, R. A.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph; Fryer, Chris L.; Lloyd-Ronning, N. M.; Pihlström, Y. M.

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the ultimate cosmic lighthouses, capable of illuminating the universe at its earliest epochs. Could such events probe the properties of the first stars at z ~ 20, the end of the cosmic Dark Ages? Previous studies of Population III (Pop III) GRBs only considered explosions in the diffuse relic H II regions of their progenitors or bursts that are far more energetic than those observed to date. However, the processes that produce GRBs at the highest redshifts likely reset their local environments, creating much more complicated structures than those in which relativistic jets have been modeled so far. These structures can greatly affect the luminosity of the afterglow and hence the redshift at which it can be detected. We have now simulated Pop III GRB afterglows in H II regions, winds, and dense shells ejected by the star during the processes that produce the burst. We find that GRBs with E iso, γ = 1051-1053 erg will be visible at z >~ 20 to the next generation of near infrared and radio observatories. In many cases, the environment of the burst, and hence progenitor type, can be inferred from the afterglow light curve. Although some Pop III GRBs are visible to Swift and the Very Large Array now, the optimal strategy for their detection will be future missions like the proposed EXIST and JANUS missions with large survey areas and onboard X-ray and infrared telescopes that can track their near-infrared flux from the moment of the burst, thereby identifying their redshifts.

  15. The first gamma-ray bursts in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, R. A.; Pihlström, Y. M.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph; Fryer, Chris L.; Lloyd-Ronning, N. M.

    2014-05-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the ultimate cosmic lighthouses, capable of illuminating the universe at its earliest epochs. Could such events probe the properties of the first stars at z ∼ 20, the end of the cosmic Dark Ages? Previous studies of Population III (Pop III) GRBs only considered explosions in the diffuse relic H II regions of their progenitors or bursts that are far more energetic than those observed to date. However, the processes that produce GRBs at the highest redshifts likely reset their local environments, creating much more complicated structures than those in which relativistic jets have been modeled so far. These structures can greatly affect the luminosity of the afterglow and hence the redshift at which it can be detected. We have now simulated Pop III GRB afterglows in H II regions, winds, and dense shells ejected by the star during the processes that produce the burst. We find that GRBs with E {sub iso,γ} = 10{sup 51}-10{sup 53} erg will be visible at z ≳ 20 to the next generation of near infrared and radio observatories. In many cases, the environment of the burst, and hence progenitor type, can be inferred from the afterglow light curve. Although some Pop III GRBs are visible to Swift and the Very Large Array now, the optimal strategy for their detection will be future missions like the proposed EXIST and JANUS missions with large survey areas and onboard X-ray and infrared telescopes that can track their near-infrared flux from the moment of the burst, thereby identifying their redshifts.

  16. Pulse properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, S.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Tierney, D.; McBreen, S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Chaplin, V. L.; Bhat, P. N.; Byrne, D.; Cramer, E.; Fishman, G. J.; Xiong, S.; Greiner, J.; Kippen, R. M.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2014-07-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has triggered on over 300 terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) since its launch in June 2008. With 14 detectors, GBM collects on average ˜100 counts per triggered TGF, enabling unprecedented studies of the time profiles of TGFs. Here we present the first rigorous analysis of the temporal properties of a large sample of TGFs (278), including the distributions of the rise and fall times of the individual pulses and their durations. A variety of time profiles are observed with 19% of TGFs having multiple pulses separated in time and 31 clear cases of partially overlapping pulses. The effect of instrumental dead time and pulse pileup on the temporal properties are also presented. As the observed gamma ray pulse structure is representative of the electron flux at the source, TGF pulse parameters are critical to distinguish between relativistic feedback discharge and lightning leader models. We show that at least 67% of TGFs at satellite altitudes are significantly asymmetric. For the asymmetric pulses, the rise times are almost always shorter than the fall times. Those which are not are consistent with statistical fluctuations. The median rise time for asymmetric pulses is ˜3 times shorter than for symmetric pulses while their fall times are comparable. The asymmetric shapes observed are consistent with the relativistic feedback discharge model when Compton scattering of photons between the source and Fermi is included, and instrumental effects are taken into account.

  17. Analysis of the Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts duration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Veres, P.; Balazs, L. G.; Kelemen, J.; Bagoly, Z.

    2008-10-22

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts have been identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by durations shorter and longer than about 2 seconds. There are, however, some indications for the existence of a third type of burst. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for gamma-ray bursts. Therefore it is worth to reanalyze the durations and their distribution and also the classification of GRBs. Using The First BAT Catalog the maximum likelihood estimation was used to analyzed the duration distribution of GRBs. The three log-normal fit is significantly (99.54% probability) better than the two for the duration distribution. Monte-Carlo simulations also confirm this probability (99.2%)

  18. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts are the largest explosions in the Universe, and the recently launched Swift mission is a multi-wavelength observatory that has greatly expanded our ability to study them. Swift's wide-field gamma-ray camera is detecting about 100 bursts per year that are quickly viewed with sensitive X-ray and UV/optical telescopes on the observatory. Positions are rapidly released to the world to enable ground-based observations. Results from the first year of observations will be presented. The mystery of short GRBs has been solved, very high redshift bursts discovered, and enormous X-ray flares found in afterglows. These and other results will be discussed.

  19. Search for ultrashort gamma-ray bursts from evaporating primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshkov, G. M.; Petkov, V. B.

    2015-02-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts from evaporating primordial black holes for the evaporation model with relativistic phase transitions have been sought in the data from the Andyrchy extensive air shower (EAS) array. This model predicts ultrashort (≃10-13 s) gamma-ray bursts with the spectrum with the maximum intensities simultaneously at the photon energies of 100 MeV and 100 GeV. Such ultrashort gamma-ray bursts can be detected by EAS arrays located on mountains as EASs with a uniform lateral distribution. A limit on the concentration of evaporating primordial black holes in a local region of the Galaxy for this evaporation model has been obtained from information accumulated during a live time of 4.23 yr.

  20. MAGIC Telescope Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Garczarczyk, M.; Becerra-Gonzalez, J.; Gaug, M.; Antonelli, A.; Carosi, A.; La Barbera, A.; Spiro, S.; Bastieri, D.; Covino, S.; Dominguez, A.; Longo, F.; Scapin, V.

    2010-10-15

    MAGIC is built to perform observations of prompt and early afterglow emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) above 25 GeV. The instrument is designed to have the lowest possible energy threshold among the ground based {gamma}-ray detectors and the fastest reaction time to alerts distributed over the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN). The MAGIC-I telescope observed 57 GRBs during the first six years. In no cases Very High Energy (VHE){gamma}-ray emission above the threshold energy could be detected. The telescope has undergone several major improvements in sensitivity and repositioning performance. The biggest improvement in sensitivity was achieved with the installation of the second MAGIC-II telescope. Since more than one year both telescopes are observing in stereo mode. MAGIC are the only telescopes fast and sensitive enough to extend the observational energy range of satellite detectors, while GRB prompt and early afterglow emission is still ongoing.

  1. Swift: The Next-Generation Gamma-Ray Burst Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Thomas; Gehrels, Neil; Norris, Jay

    2006-02-01

    Swift is a next-generation, multi-wavelength observatory for transient gamma-ray astromomy. A NASA mission with an international collaboration, Swift is in development for launch in 2004. It is designed to make breakthroughs in determining the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and in using GRBs to probe the early Universe. This mission features a wide-field, 15-150 keV, gamma ray imager that will detect over 100 GRBs per year of all durations and spectral types, including X-ray rich, and localize them with better than 4 arc-minute accuracy. Autonomous, on-board source localization will enable rapid reorientation of two narrow-field optical/UV and X-ray telescopes to determine arc-second source localizations and to perform optical, UV, and x-ray spectrophotometry. A strong outreach program and the afterglow campaigns should make possible great advances in the understanding of the early Universe.

  2. The Locations of Gamma-Ray Bursts Measured by Comptel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kippen, R. Marc; Ryan, James M.; Connors, Alanna; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Winkler, Christoph; Kuiper, Lucien; Varendorff, Martin; McConnell, Mark L.; Hurley, Kevin; Hermsen, Wim; Schoenfelder, Volker

    1998-01-01

    The COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is used to measure the locations of gamma-ray bursts through direct imaging of MeV photons. In a comprehensive search, we have detected and localized 29 bursts observed between 1991 April 19 and 1995 May 31. The average location accuracy of these events is 1.25 deg (1 sigma), including a systematic error of approx. 0.5 deg, which is verified through comparison with Interplanetary Network (IPN) timing annuli. The combination of COMPTEL and IPN measurements results in locations for 26 of the bursts with an average "error box" area of only approx. 0.3 deg (1 sigma). We find that the angular distribution of COMPTEL burst locations is consistent with large-scale isotropy and that there is no statistically significant evidence of small-angle autocorrelations. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence for burst repetition since no more than two of the events (or approx. 7% of the 29 bursts) could possibly have come from the same source. We also find that there is no significant correlation between the burst locations and either Abell clusters of galaxies or radio-quiet quasars. Agreement between individual COMPTEL locations and IPN annuli places a lower limit of approx. 100 AU (95% confidence) on the distance to the stronger bursts.

  3. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Cramer, Eric; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S.; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L.; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J.; Roberts, Oliver J.; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the data. Based on these results, we propose that the source electron distributions of TGFs observed by GBM vary on time scales of at least tens of microseconds, with an upper limit of ˜100 μs.

  4. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Zhang, Binbin; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald; Roberts, Oliver; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Shelia; Grove, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog reports parameters for over 2700 TGFs. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  5. Ulysses/BATSE observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Boer, M.; Sommer, M.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W.; Wilson, R.; Kouveliotou, C.; Cline, T.

    1992-01-01

    The gamma ray burst detector aboard the ESA-NASA Ulysses spacecraft, in operation since Nov. 1990, has detected numerous gamma bursts in conjunction with the BATSE experiment aboard the Compton Observatory. Initial results are presented on burst locations for three events (21 April, 2 May, and 3 May, 1991) obtained by arrival time analysis, and they are compared with the BATSE locations. The arrival time analysis annuli have typical widths of 5'. The preliminary analysis indicates that both experiments are likely to have unresolved systematic errors, but that further work will improve the location accuracy substantially.

  6. SVOM: a new mission for Gamma-Ray Bursts studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Diego; SVOM Collaboration

    The French Space Agency (CNES) in collaboration with the Chinese National Space Administration (CNSA) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) are developing a new mission aiming at studying Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) called SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor). The mission will consist of a set of space borne instruments and a set of ground based ones. The space borne instruments include two wide field of view gamma-ray instruments, and two narrow field ones operating in the X-ray and visible domains. The two gamma-ray instruments are a coded mask soft-gamma ray imager (4-250 keV), ECLAIRs, with a 2 sr field of view, which detects and localizes in real time GRB candidates, and a gamma-ray spectrometer (50 keV-5 MeV), GRM, with the same field of view as ECLAIRs, but without imaging capabilities. The narrow field instruments, used after an autonomous satellite slew for fine localization and afterglow studies, are MXT (0.2-10 keV) and VT (400-950 nm). The space borne instruments are complemented on ground by two dedicated robotic telescopes (GFTs), designed for position refinement and early afterglow studies, and a set of ground wide angle cameras (GWACs) that aim at monitoring the field of view of ECLAIRs with the goal of detecting the prompt optical emission of GRBs.

  7. On the binary nature of cosmic gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S. A.; Joss, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    The binary model of gamma ray burst sources wherein the bursts are emitted by a collapsed object in a close-binary stellar system and a small fraction of the gamma radiation is reprocessed into optical radiation in the surface layers of a companion star is considered, and it is concluded that the model is viable. In particular, under the assumption that the optical flashes discovered by Schaefer (1981) and Schaefer et al. (1984) were produced by gamma-ray bursts of about the same intensity as those observed, it is found that nearby binary systems with secondaries whose masses are less than about 0.06 solar mass can fit all the observational constraints for the three optical/gamma-ray pair events.

  8. FERMI AND SWIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW POPULATION STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Racusin, J. L.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; Sakamoto, T.; Troja, E.; Vasileiou, V.; Oates, S. R.; De Pasquale, M.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; Koch, S.; Roming, P.; Swenson, C.; Piran, T.; Wanderman, D.; Virgili, F.; Zhang, B.

    2011-09-10

    The new and extreme population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) shows several new features in high-energy gamma rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last six years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT-detected GRBs and the well-studied, fainter, and less energetic GRBs detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  9. Gamma Ray Burst 150518a measured at different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apala, Ellizabeth Ann; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita; West, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Ray Burst (GRB's), extremely energetic flashes of Gamma Rays, are caused by either deaths of massive unstable stars or colliding binary neutron stars. A unique burst, GRB 150518a, had two recorded bursts fifteen minutes apart which is very rare and is considered to be ultra-long, lasting around thirty minutes total and is associated with a Supernova explosion. GBR 150518a is also extremely close compared to the average burst being measured to have a redshift of .2, this is important to note because GRB's measuring less than a redshift of .3 only are seen every ten years. Gamma rays are emitted by supernovae, neutron stars, black holes, and quasars and by studying GRB's it allows us to see more deeply into how these objects function. The first few days of GRB 150518as' detected afterglow was plotted in different wavelengths, including optical, x-ray, radio, and infrared, in flux verses time. Data is continuously being added as time goes on. This research is funded by the NSF, grant number 1358990.

  10. Gravitational waves versus X-ray and gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2014-06-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 090227B, allows us to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X-ray and gamma-ray emission in a short GRB.

  11. Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer: Mission Design for Rapid, Accurate Location of Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundas, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer is a NASA Mid-sized Explorer (MIDEX) with the primary mission of determining the origins of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). It will be the first mission to autonomously respond to newly-discovered GRBs and provide immediate follow-up with narrow field instruments capable of multi-wavelength (UT, Optical, X-ray) observations. The characteristics of GRBs that are the key mission design drivers, are their non-repeating and brief duration bursts of multi-wavelength photons. In addition, rapid notification of the location and characteristics of the GRBs to ground-and-space-based observatories drive the end-to-end data analysis and distribution requirements.

  12. Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer: Mission Design for Rapid, Accurate Location of Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundas, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer is a NASA Mid-sized Explorer (MIDEX) with the primary mission of determining the origins of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). It will be the first mission to autonomously respond to newly-discovered GRBs and provide immediate follow-up with narrow field instruments capable of multi-wavelength (UV, Optical, X-ray) observations. The characteristics of GRBs that are the key mission design drivers, are their non-repeating and brief duration bursts of multi-wavelength photons. In addition, rapid notification of the location and characteristics of the GRBs to ground-and-space-based observatories drive the end-to-end data analysis and distribution requirements.

  13. A search for the radio counterpart to the 1994 March 1 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Hurley, K. C.; Fishman, G. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C. A.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Cline, T.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the results of a search for the radio counterpart to the bright gamma-ray burst of 1994 March 1. Using the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory Synthesis Telescope sensitive, wide-field radio images at 1.4 GHz and 0.4 GHz were made of a region around GRB 940301. A total of 15 separate radio images were obtained at each frequency, sampling a near-continuous range of post-burst timescales between 3 and 15 days, as well as 26, 47, and 99 days. We place an upper limit of 3.5 mJy on a fading/flaring radio counterpart at 1.4 GHz and 55 mJy at 0.4 GHz. Unlike past efforts our counterpart search maintains high sensitivity over two decades of post-burst time durations. Time-variable radio emission after the initial gamma-ray burst is a prediction of all fireball models, currently the most popular model for gamma-ray bursts. Our observations allow us to put significant constraints on the fireball parameters for cosmological models of gamma-ray bursts.

  14. Toward a Unified Model for the Broadband Prompt Emission of Gamma Ray Bursts & a New Luminosity-Hardness Relation for Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiriec, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    We suggest here to replace the historical spectral model (Band function) for the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) prompt emission (keV-MeV energy regime) with a new one. We show that the complex GRB spectral shapes are well described with a combination of three separate components: (i) a thermal-like component that we interpret as emission from a non-dissipative GRB jet photosphere, (ii) a non-thermal component that we interpret either as synchrotron radiation from charged particles propagating and accelerated within the GRB jet or as a dissipative photosphere, and (iii) a second non-thermal component that is not always present or detectable and which extends from optical up to hard gamma-rays. The smooth evolution of all three components during the burst duration reinforces the validity of this new model. Detailed studies of the evolution of these components provide insights on the nature and composition of GRB jets as well as on their magnetic fields. Moreover, this new model enables a new luminosity-hardness relation based on the first non-thermal component that may establish GRBs as standard candles. If statistically confirmed, this relation will be used to (i) constrain the mechanisms powering GRB jets, (ii) estimate GRB distances, (iii) probe the early Universe, and (iv) constrain the cosmological parameters in complement to the Type Ia SNe sample. I will present this new model using analysis of GRBs detected with various observatories and instruments such as Fermi, CGRO/BATSE and more recently Swift. I will discuss here the striking similarities of GRB spectral shapes as well as the possible universality of the proposed luminosity-hardness relation in the context of the new model.

  15. Precursors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troja, E.; Rosswog, S.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out a systematic search of precursors on the sample of short GRBs observed by Swift. We found that approx. 8-10% of short GRBs display such early episode of emission. One burst (GRB 090510) shows two precursor events, the former approx.13 s and the latter approx. 0.5 s before the GRB. We did not find any substantial difference between the precursor and the main GRB emission, and between short GRBs with and without precursors. We discuss possible mechanisms to reproduce the observed precursor emission within the scenario of compact object mergers. The implications of our results on quantum gravity constraints are also discussed.

  16. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most energetic events in the Universe, but some appear curiously faint in visible light. The biggest study to date of these so-called dark gamma-ray bursts, using the GROND instrument on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla in Chile, has found that these gigantic explosions don't require exotic explanations. Their faintness is now fully explained by a combination of causes, the most important of which is the presence of dust between the Earth and the explosion. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), fleeting events that last from less than a second to several minutes, are detected by orbiting observatories that can pick up their high energy radiation. Thirteen years ago, however, astronomers discovered a longer-lasting stream of less energetic radiation coming from these violent outbursts, which can last for weeks or even years after the initial explosion. Astronomers call this the burst's afterglow. While all gamma-ray bursts [1] have afterglows that give off X-rays, only about half of them were found to give off visible light, with the rest remaining mysteriously dark. Some astronomers suspected that these dark afterglows could be examples of a whole new class of gamma-ray bursts, while others thought that they might all be at very great distances. Previous studies had suggested that obscuring dust between the burst and us might also explain why they were so dim. "Studying afterglows is vital to further our understanding of the objects that become gamma-ray bursts and what they tell us about star formation in the early Universe," says the study's lead author Jochen Greiner from the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching bei München, Germany. NASA launched the Swift satellite at the end of 2004. From its orbit above the Earth's atmosphere it can detect gamma-ray bursts and immediately relay their positions to other observatories so that the afterglows could be studied. In the new study, astronomers combined Swift

  17. Implications of the BATSE data for a helocentric origin of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horack, J. M.; Koshut, T. M.; Mallozzi, R. S.; Storey, S. D.; Emslie, A. G.

    1994-01-01

    Several possible models have been suggested to explain the observed distribution of gamma-ray bursts: heliocentric distributions such as the Oort cloud, large galactic halos, and cosmological models. We report here on an investigation into the implications of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) gamma-ray burst distribution (Meegan et al. 1992a) data on the possible helocentric origin of gamma-ray bursts. We find no statistically significant anisotropy in the angular distribution of the bursts in a Sun-referenced coordinate system; there is no dipole moment in the direction of the Sun, and no quardrupole moment associated with the ecliptic plane. We have employed direct analytic calculations and Monte Carlo simulations of sources in the Oort cloud to constrain possible helicentric burst distributions. These can produce distributions consistent with the observed angular isotropy, the meal value of V/V(sub max), and the observed C/C(sub min) distribution of BATSE, and provide limits to burst energy of a few times approximately 10(exp 27) ergs. However, the agreement of the heliocentric C/C(sub min) distributions with the BATSE data is attributable to the relatively limited sampling of strong, nearby bursts. These bursts are known from observation to be homogeneously distributed, yet the density of sources in the Oort cloud is not constant in this region. Integral number-intensity distributions from the Oort cloud for larger numbers of bursts cannot reproduce the known homogeneity of the strong bursts without modification to the computed cometary number density and are therefore unlikely explanations of the gamma-ray burst distribution.

  18. Soft-spectrum gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laros, J. G.; Fenimore, E. E.; Fikani, M. M.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Kane, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    A typical gamma to ray burst (GRB), when observed over the approximately 30 keV to 1 MeV range, has a 1 to 10 s duration and a spectrum describable in terms of a several-hundred-keV exponential function. However, KONUS data indicate that some GRBs may belong to a separate class of short (approximately 0.1 s), soft (kT 50 keV) events. This result has been questioned because the KONUS experiments, with only 4 s spectral time resolution and a lack of information approximately 30 keV, are not particularly well suited for the detection and study of these bursts. The UC Berkely/Los Alamos Solar X-Ray Spectrometer/GRB experiment on the International Cometry Explorer (ICE), with nearly continuous coverage of approxiomately one-sixth of the sky down to 5 keV at 0.5 s resolution, is better designed for such a task. Using ICE data, it was confirmed that soft-spectrum events do indeed exist, apparently with properties that set them apart from the general GRB population. Results from the ICE experiment are presented.

  19. The ISEE-C gamma ray burst spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Porreca, G.; Stilwell, D.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.; Hovestadt, D.

    1978-01-01

    The technical properties, operation, and expected sensitivity are discussed for an experiment intended to search for narrow lines in the spectra of gamma ray bursts during the ISEE-C mission. At the heart of the experiment is a radiatively cooled germanium solid state photon detector. The instrumentation is capable of storing the entire spectrum of all but the largest bursts in the energy range 0.05-6.5 MeV. In addition, it analyzes the signals from two CsI detectors in two other experiments on the spacecraft and records event time histories from these to a few millisecond accuracy. A background mode permits spectral analysis during quiet times and will allow the determination of physically interesting upper limits for narrow lines in the diffuse gamma ray background radiation.

  20. A revised analysis of gamma-ray bursts' prompt efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Nava, Lara; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-09-01

    The prompt gamma-ray bursts' (GRBs) efficiency is an important clue on the emission mechanism producing the γ-rays. Previous estimates of the kinetic energy of the blast waves, based on the X-ray afterglow luminosity LX, suggested that this efficiency is large, with values above 90 per cent in some cases. This poses a problem to emission mechanisms and in particular to the internal shocks model. These estimates are based, however, on the assumption that the X-ray emitting electrons are fast cooling and that their Inverse Compton (IC) losses are negligible. The observed correlations between LX (and hence the blast wave energy) and Eγ, iso, the isotropic equivalent energy in the prompt emission, has been considered as observational evidence supporting this analysis. It is reasonable that the prompt gamma-ray energy and the blast wave kinetic energy are correlated and the observed correlation corroborates, therefore, the notion LX is indeed a valid proxy for the latter. Recent findings suggest that the magnetic field in the afterglow shocks is significantly weaker than was earlier thought and its equipartition fraction, ɛB, could be as low as 10-4 or even lower. Motivated by these findings we reconsider the problem, taking now IC cooling into account. We find that the observed LX - Eγ, iso correlation is recovered also when IC losses are significant. For small ɛB values the blast wave must be more energetic and we find that the corresponding prompt efficiency is significantly smaller than previously thought. For example, for ɛB ˜ 10-4 we infer a typical prompt efficiency of ˜15 per cent.

  1. A Revised Analysis of Gamma Ray Bursts' prompt efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Nava, Lara; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-06-01

    The prompt Gamma-Ray Bursts' (GRBs) efficiency is an important clue on the emission mechanism producing the γ-rays. Previous estimates of the kinetic energy of the blast waves, based on the X-ray afterglow luminosity LX, suggested that this efficiency is large, with values above 90% in some cases. This poses a problem to emission mechanisms and in particular to the internal shocks model. These estimates are based, however, on the assumption that the X-ray emitting electrons are fast cooling and that their Inverse Compton (IC) losses are negligible. The observed correlations between LX (and hence the blast wave energy) and E_{γ ,iso}, the isotropic equivalent energy in the prompt emission, has been considered as observational evidence supporting this analysis. It is reasonable that the prompt gamma-ray energy and the blast wave kinetic energy are correlated and the observed correlation corroborates, therefore, the notion LX is indeed a valid proxy for the latter. Recent findings suggest that the magnetic field in the afterglow shocks is significantly weaker than was earlier thought and its equipartition fraction, ɛB, could be as low as 10-4 or even lower. Motivated by these findings we reconsider the problem, taking now IC cooling into account. We find that the observed L_X-E_{γ ,iso} correlation is recovered also when IC losses are significant. For small ɛB values the blast wave must be more energetic and we find that the corresponding prompt efficiency is significantly smaller than previously thought. For example, for ɛB ˜ 10-4 we infer a typical prompt efficiency of ˜15%.

  2. OPTICAL CLASSIFICATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Racusin, J.; Burrows, D. N.

    2009-07-10

    We propose a new method for the classification of optically dark gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on the X-ray and optical-to-X-ray spectral indices of GRB afterglows, and utilizing the spectral capabilities of Swift. This method depends less on model assumptions than previous methods, and can be used as a quick diagnostic tool to identify optically sub-luminous bursts. With this method we can also find GRBs that are extremely bright at optical wavelengths. We show that the previously suggested correlation between the optical darkness and the X-ray/gamma-ray brightness is merely an observational selection effect.

  3. The Agile Gamma-Ray Mission and Gamma-Ray Burst Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Francesco; Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Caraveo, Patrizia; Chen, Andrew; Fiorini, Mauro; Giuliani, Andrea; Mereghetti, Sandro; Perotti, Francesco; Vercellone, Stefano; Barbiellini, Guido; Fedel, Giulio; Pontoni, Cristian; Prest, Michela; Vallazza, Erik; Costa, Enrico; Feroci, Marco; Lapshov, Igor; Rapisarda, Massimo; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Cocco, Veronica; Morselli, Aldo; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Pittori, Carlotta; Auricchio, Natalia; Di Cocco, Guido; Galli, Marcello; Labanti, Claudio; Morelli, Ennio; Rossi, Elio; Trifoglio, Massimo; Lipari, Paolo; Zanello, Dino

    2002-12-01

    The AGILE satellite (the first of ASI Small Scientific Missions) is planned to be operational in 2003 and will be the only space mission entirely dedicated to gamma-ray astrophysics in the energy range 30 MeV - 50 GeV. AGILE is based on innovative solid state detector technology and will have two imaging detectors: a Silicon tracker (30 MeV-50 GeV), and a coded mask system with Si detectors (Super-AGILE, 10-40 keV). In addition, a CsI Mini-Calorimeter will be able to detect gamma-rays in the range 250 keV - 200 MeV. The instrument large field of view (~1/4 of the whole sky), excellent spatial resolution (a few arcminutes for Super-AGILE, 10-20 arcminutes for the Si-tracker), and unprecedented timing resolution and short deadtimes (~5-100 microseconds) improving EGRET capabilities by three orders of magnitude make of AGILE an ideal instrument to detect gamma-ray bursts

  4. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbro, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Roberts, O.; McBreen, S.; Bhat, N.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from the catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first release, in January 2015, provided data on 2700 TGFs. Updates are extending the catalog at a rate of ~800 TGFs per year. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and other Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs). In January 2016 additional data will be released online from correlating these TGFs with sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). Maps of sferics in the vicinity of each TGF will be provided, as will the locations and times of sferics found to be associated with TGFs.

  5. THE ENGINES BEHIND SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    FRYER, CHRISTOPHER LEE

    2007-01-23

    The authors review the different engines behind supernova (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), focusing on those engines driving explosions in massive stars: core-collapse SNe and long-duration GRBs. Convection and rotation play important roles in the engines of both these explosions. They outline the basic physics and discuss the wide variety of ways scientists have proposed that this physics can affect the supernova explosion mechanism, concluding with a review of the current status in these fields.

  6. Observations of short-duration gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozanenko, Alexei; Volnova, Alina; Tungalag, Namkhai; Elenin, Leonid; Molotov, Igor; Voropaev, Victor; Schmalz, Sergey

    2014-09-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are the most powerful cosmological catastrophes in the Universe, with energy releases of 1048 - 1053 erg within a few tens of seconds. It is widely believed that progenitors of the short-duration class of GRB can be merging relativistic binary systems such as a neutron star (NS) and a black hole (BH) or NS-NS. We review the physics of GRBs, their phenomenological properties and observational evidence of GRBs, emphasizing optical observations of GRBs from Mongolia.

  7. Fast Fourier transformation results from gamma-ray burst profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Norris, Jay P.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    Several gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE data have sufficiently long durations and complex temporal structures with pulses that appear to be spaced quasi-periodically. In order to test and quantify these periods we have applied fast Fourier transformations (FFT) to all these events. We have also performed cross spectral analyses of the FFT of the two extreme (high-low) energy bands in each case to determine the lead/lag of the pulses in different energies.

  8. The RHESSI Satellite and Classes of Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Ripa, Jakub; Meszaros, Attila; Hudec, Rene; Wigger, Claudia; Hajdas, Wojtek

    2008-05-22

    Some articles based on the BATSE gamma-ray burst (GRB) catalog claim the existence of a third population of GRBs, besides long and short. In this contribution we wanted to verify these claims with an independent data source, namely the RHESSI GRB catalog. Our verification is based on the statistical analysis of duration and hardness ratio of GRBs. The result is that there is no significant third group of GRBs in our RHESSI GRB data-set.

  9. The Third BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Koshut, Thomas M.; Lestrade, John Patrick; Paciesas, William S.; McCollough, Michael L.; Brainerd, Jerome J.; Horack, John M.; Hakkila, Jon; Henze, William; Preece, Robert D.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has triggered on 1122 cosmic gamma-ray bursts between 1991 April 19 and 1994 September 19. These events constitute the Third BATSE (3B) burst catalog. This catalog includes the events previously reported in the 2B catalog, which covered the time interval 1991 April 19 to 1993 March 9. We present tables of the burst occurrence times, locations, peak fluxes, fluences, and durations. In general, results from previous BATSE catalogs are confirmed here with greater statistical significance. The angular distribution is consistent with isotropy. The mean galactic dipole and quadrupole moments are within 0.6 a and 0.3 a, respectively, of the values expected for isotropy. The intensity distribution is not consistent with a homogeneous distribution of burst sources, with V/V(sub max) = 0.33 +/- 0.01. The duration distribution (T(sub 90)) exhibits bimodality, with peaks at approx. 0.5 and approx. 30 s. There is no compelling evidence for burst repetition, but only weak limits can be placed on the repetition rate.

  10. The width of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Borgonovo, Luis

    2015-03-01

    The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper, we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the EFE spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability <10-6). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes - synchrotron and blackbody radiation - the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78 per cent of long GRBs and 85 per cent of short GRBs are incompatible with the minimum width of standard slow cooling synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, with fast cooling spectra predicting even wider spectra. Photospheric emission can explain the spectra if mechanisms are invoked to give a spectrum much broader than a blackbody.

  11. Gamma ray burst optical counterpart search experiment (GROCSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye-Sook; Ables, Elden; Bionta, Richard M.; Ott, Linda; Parker, Eric; Akerlof, Carl; Lee, Brian; Wallace, Scott; Barthelmy, Scott; Butterworth, Paul; Cline, Thomas; Gehrels, Neil; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Meegan, Charles; Ferguson, Donald

    1996-08-01

    GROCSE (Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiment) is a system of automated telescopes that search for simultaneous optical activity associated with gamma ray bursts in response to real-time burst notifications provided by the BATSE/BACODINE network. The first generation system, GROCSE I, is sensitive down to M{sub V}{approx}8.5 and requires an average of 12 seconds to obtain the first images of the gamma ray burst error box defined by the BACODINE trigger. The collaboration is now constructing a second generation system which has a 4 second slewing time and can reach M{sub V}{approx}14 with a 5 second exposure. GROCSE II consists of 4 cameras on a single mount. Each camera views the night sky through a commercial Canon lens (f/1.8, focal length 200 mm) and utilizes a 2Kx2K Loral CCD. Light weight and low noise custom readout electronics were designed and fabricated for these CCDs. The total field of view of the 4 cameras is 17.6x17.6 deg. GROCSE II will be operating by the end of 1995. In this paper, we present an overview of the GROCSE system and the results of measurements with a GROCSE II prototype unit.

  12. Gamma Ray Burst Optical Counterpart Search Experiment (GROCSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.S.; Ables, E.; Bionta, R.M.

    1995-10-27

    GROCSE (Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiments) is a system of automated telescopes that search for simultaneous optical activity associated with gamma ray bursts in response to real-time burst notifications provided by the BATSE/BACODINE network. The first generation system, GROCSE 1, is sensitive down to Mv {approximately} 8.5 and requires an average of 12 seconds to obtain the first images of the gamma ray burst error box defined by the BACODINE trigger. The collaboration is now constructing a second generation system which has a 4 second slewing time and can reach Mv {approximately} 14 with a 5 second exposure. GROCSE 2 consists of 4 cameras on a single mount. Each camera views the night sky through a commercial Canon lens (f/1.8, focal length 200 mm) and utilizes a 2K x 2K Loral CCD. Light weight and low noise custom readout electronics were designed and fabricated for these CCDs. The total field of view of the 4 cameras is 17.6 x 17.6 {degree}. GROCSE II will be operated by the end of 1995. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the GROCSE system and the results of measurements with a GROCSE 2 prototype unit.

  13. The SWIFT Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Wells, A.; Chincarini, G.; Abbey, A. F.; Angelini, L.; Beardmore, A.; Brauninger, H. W.; Chang, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer is designed to make prompt multi-wavelength observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts and GRB afterglows. The X-ray Telescope enables Swift to determine GRB positions with a few arcseconds accuracy within 100 seconds of the burst onset. The XRT utilizes a mirror set built for JET-X and an XMM-Newton/ EPIC MOS CCD detector to provide a sensitive broad-band (0.2-10 keV) X-ray imager with an effective area of more than 120 sq cm at 1.5 keV, a field of view of 23.6 x 23.6 arcminutes, and an angular resolution of 18 arcseconds (HPD). The detection sensitivity is 2x10(exp 14) erg/sq cm/s in 10(exp 4) seconds. The instrument provides automated source detection and position reporting within 5 seconds of target acquisition. It can also measure the redshifts of GRBs with Iron line emission or other spectral features. The XRT operates in an auto-exposure mode, adjusting the CCD readout mode automatically to optimize the science return as the source intensity fades. The XRT measures spectra and lightcurves of the GRB afterglow beginning about a minute after the burst and follows each burst for days or weeks. We provide an overview of the X-ray Telescope scientific background from which the systems engineering requirements were derived, with specific emphasis on the design and qualification aspects from conception through to launch. We describe the impact on cleanliness and vacuum requirements for the instrument low energy response and to maintain the high sensitivity to the fading signal of the Gamma-ray Bursts.

  14. How Special Are Dark Gamma-Ray Burst: A Diagnostic Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rod, Evert; Wiers, Ralph A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaper, Lex; Kaneko, Yuki; Kaper, Lex

    2005-01-01

    We present here a comprehensive study of the optical/near-infrared (IR) upper limits for gamma-ray bursts that have an X-ray afterglow. We have extrapolated the X-ray afterglows to optical wavelengths based on the physics of the fireball blast wave model and compared these results with optical upper limits for a large sample of bursts. We find a small set of only three bursts out of a sample of 20 for which the upper limits are not compatible with their X-ray afterglow properties within the context of any blast wave model. This sparse sample does not allow us to conclusively determine the cause of this optical/near-IR deficit. Extinction in the host galaxy is a likely cause, but high redshifts and different afterglow mechanisms might also explain the deficit in some cases. We note that the three bursts appear to have higher than average gamma-my peak fluxes. In a magnitude versus time diagram the bursts are separated from the majority of bursts with a detected optical/near-IR afterglow. However, two gamma- ray bursts with an optical afterglow (one of which is highly reddened) also fall in this region with dark bursts, making it likely that dark bursts are at the faint end of the set of optically detected bursts, and therefore the dark bursts likely form a continuum with the bursts with a detected optical afterglow. Our work provides a useful diagnostic tool for follow-up observations for potentially dark bursts; applied to the events detected with the Swift satellite, it will significantly increase our sample of truly dark bursts and shed light upon their nature. Subject headings: dust, extinction - gamma rays: bursts Online material: machine-readable tables

  15. Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor Observations of SGR J0501+4516 Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Woods, Peter M.; Göǧüş, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas; Chaplin, Vandiver; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Bhat, Narayan; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels, Neil; Harding, Alice; Kaper, Lex; Kaspi, Victoria; Mcenery, Julie; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Pe'er, Asaf; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; van der Klis, Michiel; Wachter, Stefanie; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-10-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T 90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T 90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E peak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ~30 keV at F = 8.7 × 10-6 erg cm-2 s-1, increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, L iso, corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 × 1040 erg s-1).

  16. The Hurst Exponent of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, Eda; MacLachlan, Glen A.; Dhuga, Kalvir S.; Landay, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Using a wavelet decomposition technique, we have extracted the Hurst exponent for a sample of long and short Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard the Swift satellite. The Hurst exponent is a scaling parameter that can be used to gauge the long-range behavior in a time series. The mean Hurst exponent for the short GRB sample is significantly smaller than that for the long GRB sample, suggesting that this index may serve as an unbiased criterion for distinguishing short and long GRBs. In addition, a K-S test for the two samples suggest that the null hypothesis can be rejected.

  17. Three precise gamma-ray burst source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The precise source regions of three moderately intense gamma ray bursts are derived. These events were observed with the first interplanetary burst sensor network. The optimum locations of the detectors, widely separated throughout the inner solar system, allowed for high accuracy, over-determined source fields of size 0.7 to 7.0 arc-min(2). All three locations are at fairly high galactic latitude in regions of low source confusion; none can be identified with a steady source object. Archived photographs were searched for optical transients that are able to be associated with these source fields; one such association was made.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Population III Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Bromm, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are ideal probes of the epoch of the first stars and galaxies. We review the recent theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of the first (so-called Population III) stars, in light of their viability of providing GRB progenitors. We proceed to discuss possible unique observational signatures of such bursts, based on the current formation scenario of long GRBs. These include signatures related to the prompt emission mechanism, as well as to the afterglow radiation, where the surrounding intergalactic medium might imprint a telltale absorption spectrum. We emphasize important remaining uncertainties in our emerging theoretical framework.

  19. Recent DMSP satellite detections of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, J.; Lee, P.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Griffee, J. W.

    1998-05-16

    Gamma-ray burst detectors are aboard seven U.S. Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, two of which are currently in use. Their 800 km altitude orbits give a field of view to 117 degrees from the zenith. A great many bursts have been detected, usually in coincidence with detections by GRO or other satellites such as PVO or Ulysses. The directions of the sources can be determined with considerable accuracy from such correlated observations, even when neither GRO nor BeppoSAX is involved. Results obtained from the most recently launched satellites (DMSP 13 and DMSP 14) are given in this paper.

  20. Are Abell Clusters Correlated with Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Hartmann, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Laros, J.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A recent study has presented marginal statistical evidence that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources are correlated with Abell clusters, based on analyses of bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog. Using precise localization information from the Third Interplanetary Network, we have reanalyzed this possible correlation. We find that most of the Abell clusters that are in the relatively large 3B error circles are not in the much smaller IPN/BATSE error regions. We believe that this argues strongly against an Abell cluster-GRB correlation.

  1. Features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Paczynski, Bohdan; Goodman, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Gravitational lensing of cosmological gamma-ray bursts by objects in the mass range about 10 exp 17 to 10 exp 20 g (femtolensing) may introduce complicated interference patterns that might be interpreted as absorption or emission lines in the bursts' spectra. This phenomenon, if detected, may be used as a unique probe of dark matter in the universe. The BATSE spectral data should allow one to detect such spectral features or to put significant upper limits on the cosmic density of a dark matter component that may be in the femtolensing range. Software to generate theoretical spectra has been developed, and it is accessible over the computer network with anonymous ftp.

  2. The effects of pure density evolution on the brightness distribution of cosmological gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horack, J. M.; Emslie, A. G.; Hartmann, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    In this work, we explore the effects of burst rate density evolution on the observed brightness distribution of cosmological gamma-ray bursts. Although the brightness distribution of gamma-ray bursts observed by the BATSE experiment has been shown to be consistent with a nonevolving source population observed to redshifts of order unity, evolution of some form is likely to be present in the gamma-ray bursts. Additionally, nonevolving models place significant constraints on the range of observed burst luminosities, which are relaxed if evolution of the burst population is present. In this paper, three analytic forms of density evolution are examined. In general, forms of evolution with densities that increase monotonically with redshift require that the BATSE data correspond to bursts at larger redshifts, or to incorporate a wider range of burst luminosities, or both. Independent estimates of the maximum observed redshift in the BATSE data and/or the range of luminosity from which a large fraction of the observed bursts are drawn therefore allow for constraints to be placed on the amount of evolution that may be present in the burst population. Specifically, if recent measurements obtained from analysis of the BATSE duration distribution of the actual limiting redshift in the BATSE data at z(sub lim) = 2 are correct, the BATSE N(P) distribution in a Lambda = 0 universe is inconsistent at a level of approximately 3 alpha with nonevolving gamma-ray bursts and some form of evolution in the population is required. The sense of this required source evolution is to provide a higher density, larger luminosities, or both with increasing redshift.

  3. Persistent X-ray emission from a gamma-ray burst source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Cline, T.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Pizzichini, G.; Evans, W. D.; Laros, J. G.; Hurley, K. C.; Niel, M.; Klebesadel, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    A quiescent X-ray source detected with the Einstein X-ray Observatory in a location consistent with that of an intense gamma ray burst is shown to be also consistent with the location of the 1928 optical transient, the likely optical counterpart of the gamma ray burst source GBS0117-29. The system appears to be underluminous in X-rays by a factor of 10; possible reasons for this are discussed. The observed X-ray flux would require an accretion rate of about 10 to the -14th (d/1 kpc/)-squared solar masses per year, which is probably too low to be consistent with published nuclear flash models for gamma bursts, unless the distance is substantially greater than about 1 kpc or the burst recurrence time is greater than about 50 yrs, or the accretion rate is highly variable. Such a long recurrence time appears to be inconsistent with the detection of the optical burst.

  4. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  5. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew D.

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high-energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  6. Background Information: Deciphering Gamma Ray Burst Physics With Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For 30 years, Gamma Ray Bursts, now known to be the most energetic explosions in the sky, have intrigued scientists and constituted one of the greatest mysteries in astrophysics. Such basic details as their exact locations in the sky and their distances from Earth remained unknown or subject to intense debate until just last year. With the discovery of "afterglows" at X-ray, visible, infrared and radio wavelengths, scientists have been able to study the physics of these explosive fireballs for the first time. Radio telescopes, the NSF's VLA in particular, are vitally important in this quest for the answers about Gamma Ray Bursts. Planned improvements to the VLA will make it an even more valuable tool in this field. Since their first identification in 1967 by satellites orbited to monitor compliance with the atmospheric nuclear test ban, more than 2,000 Gamma Ray Bursts have been detected. The celestial positions of the bursts have only been well-localized since early 1997, when the Italian- Dutch satellite Beppo-SAX went into operation. Since Beppo-SAX began providing improved information on burst positions, other instruments, both orbiting and ground-based, have been able to study the afterglows. So far, X-ray afterglows have been seen in about a dozen bursts, visible-light afterglows in six and radio afterglows in three. The search for radio emission from Gamma Ray Bursts has been an ongoing, target-of-opportunity program at the VLA for more than four years, led by NRAO scientist Dale Frail. The detection of afterglows "opens up a new era in the studies of Gamma Ray Bursts," Princeton University theorist Bohdan Paczynski wrote in a recent scientific paper. Optical studies of GRB 970508 indicated a distance of at least seven billion light-years, the first distance measured for a Gamma Ray Burst. VLA studies of the same burst showed that the fireball was about a tenth of a light-year in diameter a few days after the explosion and that it was expanding at very

  7. On gamma-ray bursts spectra: A possible theoretical understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardonnet, Pascal; Filina, Anastasia; Popov, Mikhail; Chechetkin, Valery; Baranov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    The study of spectra of gamma-ray burst is certainly a very promising part of the GRB studies. More and more data are available for GRBs and with time-sequence analysis it is possible also to propose a link with the other set of data represented by the light curves. Consequently, the explanation of the spectra requires both the local physical condition of the engine as well as the dynamic of the explosion process. In this view, we have analysed the GRB spectra with a specific model: black-body + thermal Bremsstrahlung. Our results show that this model is consistent with the observed GRB spectra. We can derive the temperature of the hot plasma needed to reproduce this spectrum consistent with the core of a very hot star ˜109 K. We have also found a correlation between the variation in time of this temperature and the variation of the spikes in luminosity of the light curves. This time profile each spike could be the correct fingerprint of the GRB physical process.Each spike, as a fingerprint, could keep the memory of the GRB physical process. If this model find a confirmation for other GRBs, this idea will ask us to open a new paradigm in GRB physics.

  8. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. There has been tremendous recent progress in our understanding of bursts with the new data from the Swift mission. Swift was launched in November 2004 and is an international multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. The two years of findings fiom the mission will be presented. A huge step forward has been made in our understanding of the mysterious short GRBs. High redshift bursts have been detected from enormous explosions early in the universe. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow. These, and other topics, will be discussed.

  9. Alternative temporal classification of long Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Vasquez, Nicolas; Baquero, Andres; Andrade, David

    2015-08-01

    In order to increase the understanding on Gamma Ray Bursts, many attempts of classification have been proposed. Starting with the canonical classification into long and short GRBs, alternative classifications taking into account the cosmological origin of GRBs have been analyzed. In the present work we propose an alternative classification based on two temporal estimators, the Auto Correlation Function (ACF) of the light curves and the emission time which considered the time where the bursts engine is active. The time estimators chosen reflects the internal evolution of the GRB and the internal structure. Using a sample of 61 bright GRBs detected by SWIFT satellite with known redshift, we proposed a bimodal distribution of long bursts. The two types of bursts have different internal structure suggesting different progenitors.

  10. A complete sample of long bright Swift gamma ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Salvaterra, Ruben; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fugazza, Dino; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Melandri, Andrea; Nava, Lara; Sbarufatti, Boris; Vergani, Susanna

    2013-06-13

    Complete samples are the basis of any population study. To this end, we selected a complete subsample of Swift long bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The sample, made up of 58 bursts, was selected by considering bursts with favourable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up observations and with the 15-150 keV 1 s peak flux above a flux threshold of 2.6 photons cm(-2) s(-1). This sample has a redshift completeness level higher than 90 per cent. Using this complete sample, we investigate the properties of long GRBs and their evolution with cosmic time, focusing in particular on the GRB luminosity function, the prompt emission spectral-energy correlations and the nature of dark bursts. PMID:23630371

  11. Gamma-ray burst and spectroscopy instrumentation development at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities that are specifically related to the development of instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy. Three programs are described: (1) the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS), a balloon-borne array of seven germanium detectors for high-resolution spectrographic studies of persistent gamma-ray sources; (2) the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS), a single radiatively-cooled germanium detector for the spectrographic study of gamma-ray bursts, and (3) the Rapidly Moving Telescope (RMT), a ground-based optical telescope for the detection and study of short-lived optical transients, particularly those that occur in coincidence with gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Nucleosynthesis, neutrino bursts and gamma-rays from coalescing neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, David; Livio, Mario; Piran, Tsvi; Schramm, David N.

    1989-01-01

    It is pointed out here that neutron-star collisions should synthesize neutron-rich heavy elements, thought to be formed by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). Furthermore, these collisions should produce neutrino bursts and resultant bursts of gamma rays; the latter should comprise a subclass of observable gamma-ray bursts. It is argued that observed r-process abundances and gamma-ray burst rates predict rates for these collisions that are both significant and consistent with other estimates.

  13. Do the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Swift Burst Alert Telescope see the Same Short Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Eric; Connaughton, Valerie; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lien, Amy; Briggs, Michael S.; Goldstein, Adam; Pelassa, Veronique; Troja, Eleonora

    2016-02-01

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field of view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field of view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and GBM are detecting significantly different populations of SGRBs. Both instruments can detect untriggered SGRBs using ground searches seeded with time and position. The detection of SGRBs below the on-board triggering sensitivities of Swift BAT and Fermi GBM increases the possibility of detecting and localizing the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) events seen by the new generation of GW detectors.

  14. On the magnetization of gamma-ray burst blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Li, Zhuo; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2013-11-01

    The origin of magnetic fields that permeate the blast waves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is a long-standing problem. The present paper argues that in four GRBs revealing extended emission at >100 MeV, with follow-up in the radio, optical and X-ray domains at later times, this magnetization can be described as the partial decay of the micro-turbulence that is generated in the shock precursor. Assuming that the bulk of the extended emission >100 MeV can be interpreted as synchrotron emission of shock-accelerated electrons, we model the multi-wavelength light curves of GRB 090902B, GRB 090323, GRB 090328 and GRB 110731A, using a simplified then a full synchrotron calculation with power-law-decaying micro-turbulence ɛB ≈ tαt (t denotes the time since injection through the shock, in the comoving blast frame). We find that these models point to a consistent value of the decay exponent -0.5 ≲ αt ≲ -0.4.

  15. The Diversity and Versatility of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Tanmoy

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, thus providing a unique laboratory for the study of extreme astrophysical processes. In parallel, their large luminosity makes GRBs a premier probe of the early Universe. My thesis has explored and exploited both aspects of GRB science by addressing the following fundamental open questions: 1) what is the nature of the GRB ejecta?, 2) how does the GRB progenitor population evolve with redshift, and 3) how can GRBs be used to probe the high-redshift Universe? To answer these questions, I present the first multi-wavelength detection and modeling of a GRB reverse shock, a comprehensive analysis of the plateau phase of GRB light curves, studies of the evolution of the progenitor population to redshifts, z~9, and demonstrate the use of GRBs as probes of galaxy formation and evolution through the first galaxy mass-metallicity relation at z~3-5. I find support for baryonic ejecta in GRB 130427A, evidence that GRB jets contain a large amount of energy in slow-moving ejecta, and proof that the GRB progenitor population does not evolve to the highest redshifts at which it has yet been observed. Building on the decade of observations by the Swift GRB mission, future observations and modeling of GRBs and their host galaxies will provide clues to these and other open questions in GRB science, allowing for the first statistical studies of their progenitors and host environments to the epoch of reionization and beyond.

  16. The Spectral Sharpness Angle of Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Bhat, P. Narayana; Kienlin, Andreas von; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2016-06-01

    We explain the results of Yu et al. (2015b) of the novel sharpness angle measurement to a large number of spectra obtained from the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor. The sharpness angle is compared to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. It is found that more than 91% of the high temporally and spectrally resolved spectra are inconsistent with any kind of optically thin synchrotron emission model alone. It is also found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to 58+23 -18% of the peak flux. These results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed spectra. Since any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin synchrotron radiation are likely required in a full explanation of the spectral peaks or breaks of the GRB prompt emission phase.

  17. Gamma-ray bursts from neutron star detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F.C.

    1988-09-25

    A phenomenological gamma-ray burst model postulating the injection of 10/sup 51/--10/sup 53/ ergs into a neutron star by Paczyn-acute-accentski and by Goodman is closely reminiscent of what a relativistic version of a type I supernova might look like. Burning to tightly bound quark complexes (i.e., particles) could go explosively, just as the final burning of helium to iron disrupts a white darf in some models of type I supernovae. Particle theorists have for some years entertained the possibility that compressing nuclear matter may lead irreversibly to an exothermic formation of ''quark'' matter. From stellar evolution, we know that nuclear burning does not proceed directly to the known endpoint (iron) but is halted at various intermediate stages (e.g., at helium). Thus when the central densities of a neutron star begin to rise to that at which a transition to quark matter would be expected (10--20 times nuclear) owing to accretion or fusion with a companion neutron star, explosive burning may take place. Active galactic nuclei could be powered by such events and are therefore possible source regions. The particles themselves would be massive tightly bound bosons having zero spin, zero charge, and zero magnetic moment, hence could possible evidence themselves in the form of ''dark'' ( = nonluminous) matter or ''WIMPs'' (weakly interacting massive particles). The relativistic shocks from such events should accelerate cosmic rays more efficiently than the usual supernova shocks.

  18. The Complex Evolution of Gamma-Ray Burst Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Lien, Amy; Sakamoto, Takanori; Morris, David; Neff, James; Giblin, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Isolated Swift and BATSE gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB pulses exhibit two distinct yet linked components. The bulk of pulsed emission comes in the form of a hard-to-soft component that can be fitted by the Norris et al. (2005) empirical pulse model. The second is a fainter, three-peaked signal overlaying the hard-to-soft component that can be fitted by an empirical wave-like function (Hakkila & Preece 2014). The two fits combine to produce GRB pulses with distinctive three-peaked shapes. The precursor peak appears on or before the pulse rise and is typically the hardest component of a pulse. The central peak is the brightest and most pronounced peak of a pulse. The decay peak occurs during the decay portion of the pulse, and converts an exponential decay into a long, soft, power-law decay. GRB pulses are dominated by hard-to-soft evolution. However, they also exhibit weaker intensity tracking behaviors that are tied to the three peaks found to varying degrees within each pulse. Hard pulses soften rapidly, but re-harden during the pulse's decay peak. Soft pulses soften slowly and re-harden during the central peak; additional hardening may occur during the decay peak. These results argue that theoretical GRB pulse models should have more than one temporally evolving spectral component in order to explain the complex observed pulse characteristics.

  19. Luminosity function and jet structure of Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Nappo, F.; Salvaterra, R.

    2015-02-01

    The structure of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets impacts on their prompt and afterglow emission properties. The jet of GRBs could be uniform, with constant energy per unit solid angle within the jet aperture, or it could be structured, namely with energy and velocity that depend on the angular distance from the axis of the jet. We try to get some insight about the still unknown structure of GRBs by studying their luminosity function. We show that low (1046-48 erg s-1) and high (i.e. with L ≥ 1050 erg s-1) luminosity GRBs can be described by a unique luminosity function, which is also consistent with current lower limits in the intermediate luminosity range (1048-50 erg s-1). We derive analytical expressions for the luminosity function of GRBs in uniform and structured jet models and compare them with the data. Uniform jets can reproduce the entire luminosity function with reasonable values of the free parameters. A structured jet can also fit adequately the current data, provided that the energy within the jet is relatively strongly structured, i.e. E ∝ θ-k with k ≥ 4. The classical E ∝ θ-2 structured jet model is excluded by the current data.

  20. BATSE Observations of the Large-Scale Isotropy of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Horack, John M.; Brock, Martin N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Hakkila, Jon

    1996-01-01

    We use dipole and quadrupole statistics to test the large-scale isotropy of the first 1005 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). In addition to the entire sample of 1005 gamma-ray bursts, many subsets are examined. We use a variety of dipole and quadrupole statistics to search for Galactic and other predicted anisotropies and for anisotropies in a coordinate-system independent manner. We find the gamma-ray burst locations to be consistent with isotropy, e.g., for the total sample the observed Galactic dipole moment (cos theta) differs from the value predicted for isotropy by 0.9 sigma and the observed Galactic quadrupole moment (sin(exp 2) b - 1/3) by 0.3 sigma. We estimate for various models the anisotropies that could have been detected. If one-half of the locations were within 86 deg of the Galactic center, or within 28 deg of the Galactic plane, the ensuing dipole or quadrupole moment would have typically been detected at the 99% confidence level. We compare the observations with the dipole and quadrupole moments of various Galactic models. Several Galactic gamma-ray bursts models have moments within 2 sigma of the observations; most of the Galactic models proposed to date are no longer in acceptable agreement with the data. Although a spherical dark matter halo distribution could be consistent with the data, the required core radius is larger than the core radius of the dark matter halo used to explain the Galaxy's rotation curve. Gamma-ray bursts are much more isotropic than any observed Galactic population, strongly favoring but not requiring an origin at cosmological distances.

  1. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Tueller, Jack

    2007-01-01

    There is a great synergy between the Swift and INTEGRAL missions. Swift provides wide-field hard x-ray monitoring and sensitive x-ray and UV/optical observations. INTEGRAL provides optical through gamma-ray coverage with emphasis on hard xray imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. For hard x-ray survey studies, the BAT and IBIS instruments are complementary with BAT covering the full sky every day and IBIS scanning the galactic plane. For GRBs, Swift follows up bursts detected by INTEGRAL. X-ray and optical observations give arcsecond positions and afterglow lightcurves. For IGR sources, X-ray observations identify counterparts. The joint BAT and IBIS survey data are giving the most complete picture of the hard x-ray sky ever obtained. This talk will review Swift capabilities and discuss joint observations that are taking place and planned

  2. Strategies for Studying the Sources of Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Norris, J. P.; Hurley, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) has rapidly evolved in recent years with the discovery of their cosmological nature and with BATSE, BeppoSAX, HETE and the IPN enabling a wide variety of associated . afterglow measurements. Multiwavelength observations ranging through the radio, optical, soft and hard x-ray, and gamma-ray regimes have exploded the field of GRB interpretation. Also, the Amanda, Milagro and LIGO experiments can search for related neutrino, cosmic-ray photon, and gravitational radiation events, even with the delayed alerts, such as from the IPN. The infrared region, where the optical emissions from sources at the extreme distances may be shifted, will become important but is undersubscribed. The soon-to-be launched Swift mission will greatly broaden the GRB discipline, and a strategy for associated ground-based measurements is outlined. The need for the improved global distribution of all instruments, in particular, robotic infrared detectors, is cited.

  3. Search for optical bursts from gamma-ray bursters. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudec, R.; Borovicka, J.; Wenzel, W.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Cline, T.; Desai, U.; Teegarden, B.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary results of an examination of the Ondrejov and Sonneberg plate collections for possible optical counterparts to gamma-ray bursters are presented. The investigation proceeds in three different directions: (1) time-correlated searches for gamma-ray bursts (GRB) with known positions, (2) time-correlated searches for GRB without know positions, and (3) archival searches. 3 GRB with known positions and 28 GRB without known positions were studied in this way; archival searches representing a total exposure of 2.75 yr were done for 10 GRB positions, with limiting magnitudes for a 1 s flash between 3 and 8. No evidence for true optical images associated with GRB was found. Some statistical conclusions are drawn and the results obtained are discussed.

  4. Light speed variation from gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haowei; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    The effect of quantum gravity can bring a tiny light speed variation which is detectable through energetic photons propagating from gamma ray bursts (GRBs) to an observer such as the space observatory. Through an analysis of the energetic photon data of the GRBs observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST), we reveal a surprising regularity of the observed time lags between photons of different energies with respect to the Lorentz violation factor due to the light speed energy dependence. Such regularity suggests a linear form correction of the light speed v(E) = c(1 - E /ELV) , where E is the photon energy and ELV =(3.60 ± 0.26) ×1017 GeV is the Lorentz violation scale measured by the energetic photon data of GRBs. The results support an energy dependence of the light speed in cosmological space.

  5. Of narrow lines and beaming in the strong-field SSC emission model. [synchrotron self-Compton for gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    The synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission model for gamma-ray bursts is capable of producing narrow line features for a variety of modelled field strengths, primary electron injection distributions and burst luminosities. Multiple resonant scattering with synchrotron continuum photons efficiently traps and cools pairs in the ground state to an average energy where the Compton energy loss rate is zero. Annihilation between pairs in these cooled distributions can be very efficient. For isotropic injection of primary electrons, there is an anti-correlation of the intensity of the angular-binned emission between the portions of the continuum spectrum below the cyclotron peak and above the annihilation line feature. Small-angle emission dominates the continuum above the annihilation line feature and is smooth through the line up to the pair production cut-off, which can be above several MeV for small enough angles. The angle-averaged annihilation line is made of components which can have peak emission centered at energies away from 511 keV, due to Doppler shifting. For beamed injection,the annihilation line breaks up into relatively narrow components in the angular emission, which sum into a broad feature in the angle-averaged emission.

  6. BATSE software for the analysis of the gamma ray burst spatial distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkila, Jon

    1990-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is designed to study astronomical gamma ray sources and to provide better positional, spectral, and time resolution about these objects than has previously been possible from one experiment. The procedure to be used in the analysis of the gamma ray burst spatial distribution is presented. Data is input from BATSE via the Gamma Ray Burst Catalog (listing individual burst positions, flux values, and associated errors) and the Sky Sensitivity Map (which summarizes observational selection effects in table format). A FORTRAN program generates Monte Carlo burst catalogs, which are models to be compared to the actual distribution. The Monte Carlo models are then filtered through the Sky Sensitivity Map so that they suffer from the same selection effects as the actual catalog data. Additionally, each burst position is converted into a probability distribution to mimic BATSE positional sensitivity. The Burst Catalog, Monte Carlo burst catalog, and Sky Sensitivity Map are then passed onto an IDL program that compares the catalogs for statistical significance. The Sky Sensitivity Map is used to estimate how often each sky area is observed above the minimum flux level in question. Each burst found in this sky area is then weighted according to the frequency with which this sky area is observed. The catalogs are then compared via tests of homogeneity (based on their radial distributions) and isotropy (based upon their angular distributions). The results of the statistical comparisons along with graphs and charts of the summaries, are output from the IDL program for study.

  7. Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter aboard IKAROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, T.; Yonetoku, D.; Sakashita, T.; Morihara, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Gunji, S.; Tokairin, N.; Mihara, T.

    2010-10-01

    A GRB polarimeter was launched by H-IIA on 21 May in 2010 at JAXA Tanegashima Space Center. A GRB polarization is the best key to understand mechanism of GRB prompt emissions and also to understand the geometry of magnetic fields. The standard GRB fireball models predict the synchrotron radiation of them, thus a high degree of polarization is expected, if the magnetic field-lines are coaligned. Previously, a few of the GRB polarization detections were reported. Although they used the Compton scattering method, but their measurements were non-coincidence mode. This made their reports were somewhat unclear. This time, our detector works fully in the coincidence mode to avoid the confusion. On 21 June, GAP is switched on and the first GRB was detected on 7 July but not yet well calibrated.

  8. Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter aboard IKAROS

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, T.; Yonetoku, D.; Sakashita, T.; Morihara, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Gunji, S.; Tokairin, N.; Mihara, T.

    2010-10-15

    A GRB polarimeter was launched by H-IIA on 21 May in 2010 at JAXA Tanegashima Space Center. A GRB polarization is the best key to understand mechanism of GRB prompt emissions and also to understand the geometry of magnetic fields. The standard GRB fireball models predict the synchrotron radiation of them, thus a high degree of polarization is expected, if the magnetic field-lines are coaligned. Previously, a few of the GRB polarization detections were reported. Although they used the Compton scattering method, but their measurements were non-coincidence mode. This made their reports were somewhat unclear. This time, our detector works fully in the coincidence mode to avoid the confusion. On 21 June, GAP is switched on and the first GRB was detected on 7 July but not yet well calibrated.

  9. APPLICATION OF JITTER RADIATION: GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng

    2013-10-10

    A high degree of polarization of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission has been confirmed in recent years. In this paper, we apply jitter radiation to study the polarization feature of GRB prompt emission. In our framework, relativistic electrons are accelerated by turbulent acceleration. Random and small-scale magnetic fields are generated by turbulence. We further determine that the polarization property of GRB prompt emission is governed by the configuration of the random and small-scale magnetic fields. A two-dimensional compressed slab, which contains a stochastic magnetic field, is applied in our model. If the jitter condition is satisfied, the electron deflection angle in the magnetic field is very small and the electron trajectory can be treated as a straight line. A high degree of polarization can be achieved when the angle between the line of sight and the slab plane is small. Moreover, micro-emitters with mini-jet structures are considered to be within a bulk GRB jet. The jet 'off-axis' effect is intensely sensitive to the observed polarization degree. We discuss the depolarization effect on GRB prompt emission and afterglow. We also speculate that the rapid variability of GRB prompt polarization may be correlated with the stochastic variability of the turbulent dynamo or the magnetic reconnection of plasmas.

  10. Host Galaxies of Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, Megan; Kewley, L. J.; Levesque, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive, short-lived stars, and thus may be useful in tracking star formation in the universe. However, GRB progenitor models suggest that they might occur only in low-metallicity environments, introducing a bias into star formation studies. Presented here are the high-resolution spectra of two GRB host galaxies, one at z 0.03 and the other at z 0.7. The nearby galaxy, the host of GRB 060218, has a low metallicity, but one that is comparable to local galaxies of similar luminosity. It has little to no extinction and a star formation rate of 2x10-2 M⊙yr-1. The metallicity of the more distant galaxy, the host of GRB 991208, is not well constrained because the Hα and [N II] lines are redshifted into the near infrared and were not observed. It has a star formation rate of 1-9 M⊙yr-1 and, unlike the majority of GRB hosts, is dusty. These two galaxies will eventually be a part of a larger sample of GRB hosts. This work was conducted by a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position at the University of Hawai'i's Institute for Astronomy and funded by the NSF.

  11. Are long gamma-ray bursts standard candles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Li, Xin; Wang, Sai; Chang, Zhe

    2015-10-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely proposed as an effective probe to trace the Hubble diagram of the Universe in high-redshift range. However, the calibration of GRBs is not as easy as that of Type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Most calibrating methods at present make use one or some of the empirical luminosity correlations, e.g. Amati relation. One of the underlying assumptions of these calibrating methods is that the empirical correlation is universal over all redshifts. In this paper, we check to what extent this assumption holds. Assuming that SNe Ia exactly trace the Hubble diagram of the Universe, we re-investigate the Amati relation for low-redshift (z < 1.4) and high-redshift (z > 1.4) GRBs, respectively. It is found that the Amati relation of low-z GRBs differs from that of high-z GRBs at more than 3σ confidence level. This result is insensitive to cosmological models. We should be cautious when using Amati relation to reconstruct the Hubble diagram of the Universe.

  12. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ≲ 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Marine Primary Producers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through long-term depletion of stratospheric ozone, leading to greatly increased solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at the surface. It has been suggested that a GRB may have initiated the late Ordovician mass extinction - one of the "big five" known extinctions. Past efforts by our group to estimate the biological impact of a GRB have used a simplified Beer-Lambert calculation with an ozone column density to estimate surface UV irradiance. Biological damage was then computed by combining the irradiance with a biological weighting function (BWF) for DNA damage. We are currently engaged in a project to greatly increase the accuracy of these estimates, with a focus on the impact on primary producers in the Earth's oceans. These organisms make up the base of the marine food web and produce half the world's oxygen. Our approach features full radiative transfer modeling to determine surface UV irradiance, combined with newly measured biological weighting functions for some of the most abundant marine primary producers. Here, we report on preliminary results of this study, including computed spectral irradiance at the surface and in ocean water under conditions following a GRB, along with the impact on primary productivity as computed using preliminary BWF results. This work is supported by NASA's Astrobiology: Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology program, grant #NNX09AM85G.

  14. Relativistic Jet Dynamics and Calorimetry of Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygoda, N.; Waxman, E.; Frail, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    We present numerical solutions of the two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics equations describing the deceleration and expansion of highly relativistic conical jets, of opening angles 0.05 <= θ0 <= 0.2, propagating into a medium of uniform density. Jet evolution is followed from a collimated relativistic outflow to the quasi-spherical non-relativistic phase. We show that relativistic sideways expansion becomes significant beyond the radius r θ at which the expansion Lorentz factor drops to θ-1 0. This is consistent with simple analytic estimates, which predict faster sideways expansion than has been claimed based on earlier numerical modeling. For t > ts = r θ/c the emission of radiation from the jet blast wave is similar to that of a spherical blast wave carrying the same energy (significant deviations at t ~ ts occur only for well off-axis observers, θobs ~ 1 Gt θ0). Thus, the total (calorimetric) energy of gamma-ray burst blast waves may be estimated with only a small fractional error based on t > ts observations.

  15. RELATIVISTIC JET DYNAMICS AND CALORIMETRY OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wygoda, N.; Waxman, E.; Frail, D. A.

    2011-09-10

    We present numerical solutions of the two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics equations describing the deceleration and expansion of highly relativistic conical jets, of opening angles 0.05 {<=} {theta}{sub 0} {<=} 0.2, propagating into a medium of uniform density. Jet evolution is followed from a collimated relativistic outflow to the quasi-spherical non-relativistic phase. We show that relativistic sideways expansion becomes significant beyond the radius r{sub {theta}} at which the expansion Lorentz factor drops to {theta}{sup -1}{sub 0}. This is consistent with simple analytic estimates, which predict faster sideways expansion than has been claimed based on earlier numerical modeling. For t > t{sub s} = r{sub {theta}}/c the emission of radiation from the jet blast wave is similar to that of a spherical blast wave carrying the same energy (significant deviations at t {approx} t{sub s} occur only for well off-axis observers, {theta}{sub obs} {approx} 1 >> {theta}{sub 0}). Thus, the total (calorimetric) energy of gamma-ray burst blast waves may be estimated with only a small fractional error based on t > t{sub s} observations.

  16. Spectral Properties of Relativistic Shocks in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, Hariklia

    1998-12-01

    The origin of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) is still embedded in mystery. There is, however, good evidence that, irrespective of the trigger mechanism and the progenitor's identity, GRBs involve ultra-relativistic flows. It has been suggested that such outflows develop shocks due to their deceleration by the surrounding medium (external shocks) and, possibly, due to variability within the flow (internal shocks). Such shocks are believed to act as particle accelerators and magnetic field amplifiers. In this thesis, we study the spectral properties of external and internal shocks. We employ an extensive parameterization of the uncertain physical processes (electron injection and acceleration, magnetic field amplification) in the shocks and calculate the time averaged spectra that result from synchrotron emission and its inverse Compton scattered counterpart. Overall, the resulting spectra share the defining properties of the observed ones: they are non-thermal, they show a break (whose value is not fixed by the model), and spectral slopes in the range that was revealed by fitting BATSE spectra. The hardness-duration anti-correlation and the brightness-hardness correlation are properties inherent to the model spectra (both in external and internal shocks). The spectra are, in general, very broad and counterparts in higher and lower frequencies are predicted. Behaviors such as X-ray deficiency and occasional X-ray excess are common. We discuss the broad-band properties of the spectra and the spectral differences between internal and external shocks bursts. We also examine the spectral properties arising from the deceleration of an unsteady wind that results in hard and delayed emission from external shocks following the main burst from internal ones. We conduct a parameter search in order to identify the environments external shock bursts take place in, as well as the radiative properties of the shocks. Internal shocks are semi-relativistic (v≃0.6c), but one of the external

  17. Accessing the population of high-redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Ghisellini, G.; Mereghetti, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P.; Tanvir, N.; Willingale, D.; Amati, L.; Basa, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Burlon, D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Frontera, F.; Götz, D.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Piro, L.; Vergani, S. D.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high-redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and γ-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Epeak-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence, of ˜10-8 erg cm-2 is expected to detect ≈40 GRBs yr-1 sr-1 at z ≥ 5 (≈3 GRBs yr-1 sr-1 at z ≥ 10). Once high-z GRBs are detected the principal issue is to secure their redshift. To this aim we estimate their NIR afterglow flux at relatively early times and evaluate the effectiveness of following them up and construct usable samples of events with any forthcoming GRB mission dedicated to explore the high-z Universe.

  18. Supernova Shocks and the Gamma-Ray Burst Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Roger

    We propose projects on the nature of low luminosity gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the X-ray emission from strongly interacting supernovae. The class of nearby, low luminosity GRBs with associated supernovae can be studied in detail and probably share physical processes with cosmological bursts. The particular view of low luminosity events to be explored here attributes the X-ray thermal emission to a mildly relativistic flow from a central engine, the early thermal optical emission to the shocked ejecta from a star that has undergone an eruptive event, and the radio emission to the interaction of the mildly relativistic flow with the surrounding medium. We will develop models for this scenario, including the propagation of the collimated flow through the progenitor star and the eventual transition to spherical, nonrelativistic flow in the surrounding medium. The transient event associated with SN 2008D shows similarities to the low luminosity GRBs and will be considered as an especially low energy event. The topic of X- ray supernovae builds on the growing evidence for the interaction of supernovae with very dense circumstellar matter lost within years of the supernova event. A viscous shock is expected even when the shock wave is at moderate optical depth, but the escape of X-ray emission from hot gas is complicated by a number of factors, including changes in absorption by photoionization and Comptonization of energetic photons. There may be circumstances where no emission escapes below 10 keV, but does at 10's of keV. The complex physical situation gives diagnostics on the progenitor star and its dense wind can be obtained. This research is especially relevant to the Swift, Chandra, and XMM missions, as well as the future NuSTAR mission.

  19. PROBING EXTRAGALACTIC DUST THROUGH NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, S. L.; Li Aigen E-mail: lia@missouri.ed

    2010-02-10

    The quantities and wavelength dependencies of the dust extinction along the lines of sight toward 33 nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with redshifts z < 2 are derived from fitting their afterglow spectral energy distributions. Unlike previous studies which often assume a specific extinction law like that of the Milky Way (MW) and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC), our approach-we call it the 'Drude' approach-is more flexible in determining the true wavelength dependence of the extinction (while the shape of the extinction curve inferred from that relying on a priori assumption of a template extinction law is, of course, fixed). The extinction curves deduced from the Drude approach display a wide diversity of shapes, ranging from relatively flat curves to curves which are featureless and steeply rise toward the far-ultraviolet, and from curves just like that of the MW, LMC, and SMC to curves resembling that of the MW and LMC but lacking the 2175 A bump. The visual extinction A{sub V} derived from the Drude approach is generally larger by a factor of {approx}2-5 than that inferred by assuming a SMC-type template extinction law. Consistent with previous studies, the extinction-to-gas ratio is mostly smaller than that of the MW, and does not seem to correlate with the shape of the extinction curve. It is shown that the standard silicate-graphite interstellar grain model closely reproduces the extinction curves of all 33 GRBs host galaxies. For these 33 bursts at z < 2, we find no evidence for the evolution of the dust extinction, dust sizes, and relative abundances of silicate to graphite on redshifts.

  20. Search of the energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope (EGRET) data for high-energy gamma-ray microsecond bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Esposito, J. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Hawking (1974) and Page & Hawking (1976) investigated theoretically the possibility of detecting high-energy gamma rays produced by the quantum-mechanical decay of a small black hole created in the early universe. They concluded that, at the very end of the life of the small black hole, it would radiate a burst of gamma rays peaked near 250 MeV with a total energy of about 10(exp 34) ergs in the order of a microsecond or less. The characteristics of a black hole are determined by laws of physics beyond the range of current particle accelerators; hence, the search for these short bursts of high-energy gamma rays provides at least the possibility of being the first test of this region of physics. The Compton Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) has the capability of detecting directly the gamma rays from such bursts at a much fainter level than SAS 2, and a search of the EGRET data has led to an upper limit of 5 x 10(exp -2) black hole decays per cu pc per yr, placing constraints on this and other theories predicting microsecond high-energy gamma-ray bursts.

  1. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2007-07-12

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict emission at > 100 GeV. Milagro is a wide field (2 sr) high duty cycle (> 90%) ground based water Cherenkov detector that records extensive air showers in the energy range 100 GeV to 100 TeV. We have searched for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift or the IPN. No evidence for emission from any of the bursts has been found and we present upper limits from these bursts.

  2. HYPERACCRETING BLACK HOLE AS GAMMA-RAY BURST CENTRAL ENGINE. I. BARYON LOADING IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Weihua; Zhang Bing; Liang Enwei E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-03-10

    A hyperaccreting stellar-mass black hole has been long speculated as the best candidate for the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent rich observations of GRBs by space missions such as Swift and Fermi pose new constraints on GRB central engine models. In this paper, we study the baryon-loading processes of a GRB jet launched from a black hole central engine. We consider a relativistic jet powered by {nu} {nu}-bar -annihilation or by the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism. We consider baryon loading from a neutrino-driven wind launched from a neutrino-cooling-dominated accretion flow. For a magnetically dominated BZ jet, we consider neutron drifting from the magnetic wall surrounding the jet and subsequent positron capture and proton-neutron inelastic collisions. The minimum baryon loads in both types of jet are calculated. We find that in both cases a more luminous jet tends to be more baryon poor. A neutrino-driven ''fireball'' is typically ''dirtier'' than a magnetically dominated jet, while a magnetically dominated jet can be much cleaner. Both models have the right scaling to interpret the empirical {Gamma}-L{sub iso} relation discovered recently. Since some neutrino-driven jets have too much baryon loading as compared with the data, we suggest that at least a good fraction of GRBs should have a magnetically dominated central engine.

  3. Properties of gamma-ray burst progenitor stars.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Narayan, Ramesh; Johnson, Jarrett L

    2008-07-18

    We determined some basic properties of stars that produce spectacular gamma-ray bursts at the end of their lives. We assumed that accretion of the outer portion of the stellar core by a central black hole fuels the prompt emission and that fall-back and accretion of the stellar envelope later produce the plateau in the x-ray light curve seen in some bursts. Using x-ray data for three bursts, we estimated the radius of the stellar core to be approximately (1 - 3) x 10(10) cm and that of the stellar envelope to be approximately (1 - 2) x 10(11) cm. The density profile in the envelope is fairly shallow, with rho approximately r(-2) (where rho is density and r is distance from the center of the explosion). The rotation speeds of the core and envelope are approximately 0.05 and approximately 0.2 of the local Keplerian speed, respectively. PMID:18583579

  4. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the SWIFT Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA SWIFT mission, in orbit since November 2004, is an innovative multiwavelenth observaroty designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Recent results from the mission will be presented. The long-standing mstery of short GRBs is beginning to be solved in a most interesting direction. High redshift bursts have been detected to redshift z=6.3 leading to a better understanding of star formation rates at early times. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow.The very nearby GRB 060218 triggered obsevations within minutes of the full light curve of an odd suupernova Type Ic.

  5. Climatic and biogeochemical effects of a galactic gamma ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C.; Hogan, Daniel P.; Ejzak, Larissa M.; Jackman, Charles H.

    2005-07-01

    It is likely that one or more gamma ray bursts within our galaxy have strongly irradiated the Earth in the last Gy. This produces significant atmospheric ionization and dissociation, resulting in ozone depletion and DNA-damaging ultraviolet solar flux reaching the surface for up to a decade. Here we show the first detailed computation of two other significant effects. Visible opacity of NO2 is sufficient to reduce solar energy at the surface up to a few percent, with the greatest effect at the poles, which may be sufficient to initiate glaciation. Rainout of dilute nitric acid could have been important for a burst nearer than our conservative ``nearest burst''. These results support the hypothesis that the characteristics of the Late Ordovician mass extinction are consistent with GRB initiation.

  6. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Stanbro, M.; Zhang, B.; Bhat, N.; Fishman, G. J.; Roberts, O.; Fitzpatrick, G.; McBreen, S.; Grove, J. E.; Chekhtman, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog is expected to contain about 2600 TGFs and will be released both online, to conveniently provide the community with TGF parameters, and as a publication. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage -- in the first year of this data mode 841 TGFs were detected. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog will include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and other parameters (e.g., see the Bayesian Block analysis by O. Roberts). There will be separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  7. Statistical and Time Analyses of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marani, Gabriela Fabiana

    1998-10-01

    If Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are cosmological in origin, different signatures are expected to be found in the available \\batse catalog and time series. Cross-correlation with extragalactic objects and gravitational lensing by intervening objects are some examples of these particular features. A new statistical method to perform 2-D angular cross-correlations between GRB positions and different catalogs of extragalactic objects has been implemented. For the best located 74 3B GRBs, a 2.5-σ level association with rich, nearby Abell clusters is found. If all the cluster are taken into account, a 3.5-σ association is found for the best located 27 3B bursts. Another 2.5-σ excess is found between soft GRBs and the whole Abell catalog. On the other hand, excesses of the order of ~ 3.5-4-σ are found between the best located 10 to 380 bursts and the nearest, intrinsically brightest radio quiet quasars. However, the correlations appears to be due to statistical fluctuations and the excesses are only suggestive of a physical association. A fully automated search among 1,235 4B bursts has been carried out to look for statistical similarities in the GRB time series. No two GRBs are found to be identical to within the statistical limits of the data, regardless of their position on the sky. GRBs that appear statistically similar in one energy channel are either dissimilar in other energy channels or too dim for a significant statistical comparison. One consequence of the search for statistical similarities is that no gravitational lensing of GRBs by foreground galaxies have been found. Given this null result, and assuming no GRB rate density or luminosity evolution, and that QSO images are distorted by the same galaxy field, a conservative upper limit to the redshift is derived, zmax ~ 4.22 at a 2-σ confidence level, for an Einstein-de Sitter universe and bursts with P > 1 photon cm-2 s-1. The gravitational lensing rates have been computed for different Friedmann

  8. Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer: Mission Design for Rapid, Accurate Location of Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundas, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer is a NASA Mid-sized Explorer (MIDEX) with the primary mission of determining the origins of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). It will be the first mission to autonomously respond to newly-discovered GRBs and provide immediate follow-up narrow field instruments capable of multi-wavelength (UV, Optical, X-ray) observations. The characteristics of GRBs that are the key mission design drivers, are their non-repeating and brief duration bursts of multi-wavelength photons. In addition, rapid notification of the location and characteristics of the GRBs to ground-and-space- based observatories drive the end-to-end data analysis and distribution requirements. The Swift mission is managed by the GSFC, and includes an international team of contributors that each bring their unique perspective that have proven invaluable to the mission. The spacecraft bus, provided by Spectrum Astro, Inc. was procured through a Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) contract by the GSFC. There are three instruments: the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) provided by the GSFC; the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) provided by a team led by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU); and the Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope (UVOT), again managed by PSU. The Mission Operations Center (MOC) was developed by and is located at PSU. Science archiving and data analysis centers are located at the GSFC, in the UK and in Italy.

  9. Observations of optical counterparts of Gamma-Ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Frederick K.

    1992-01-01

    This is a final report for a contract begun in Dec. 1987 and ended in Mar. 1989 to use the existing Lincoln Laboratory Experimental Test Site in Socorro, NM to search for optical counterparts to gamma-ray bursts. The objective was to develop an autonomous staring system to search for stationary, transient optical flashes. The search was to use an existing 31-inch telescope equipped with a sensitive video detector. The approach for the search was to develop real-time processing software to monitor the video signal from the detector and to record any transient, point-like flashes that occurred in the field of view. The system would have been able to detect fainter flashes (B is approximately 15(sup m) in 1/30 s, delta(m(sub v)) = 0.25(sup m)) than other systems but lacked a large field of view (only 1.2 deg diameter) necessary to give a high probability of detecting a random flash on the sky. As such, the plan was to monitor known gamma-ray burst error boxes and wait for a repetition of an earlier event. The high payoff of good sensitivity with high angular resolution (1 pixel = 10sec) and good time resolution (30 s) to allow post-burst searches warranted funding if the cost was not prohibitive. The contract began in the middle of the three-year cycle for High Energy Astrophysics Gamma-Ray Astronomy Research and Analysis Program. This final report briefly describes the portion of the plan completed under the original contract.

  10. GRB 090727 AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH EARLY-TIME OPTICAL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kopac, D.; Gomboc, A.; Japelj, J.; Kobayashi, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Bersier, D.; Cano, Z.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Virgili, F. J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2013-07-20

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 090727, for which optical emission was detected during the prompt gamma-ray emission by the 2 m autonomous robotic Liverpool Telescope and subsequently monitored for a further two days with the Liverpool and Faulkes Telescopes. Within the context of the standard fireball model, we rule out a reverse shock origin for the early-time optical emission in GRB 090727 and instead conclude that the early-time optical flash likely corresponds to emission from an internal dissipation process. Putting GRB 090727 into a broader observational and theoretical context, we build a sample of 36 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early-time optical and gamma-ray detections. From these GRBs, we extract a sub-sample of 18 GRBs, which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, and perform detailed temporal and spectral analysis in gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical bands. We find that in most cases early-time optical emission shows sharp and steep behavior, and notice a rich diversity of spectral properties. Using a simple internal shock dissipation model, we show that the emission during prompt GRB phase can occur at very different frequencies via synchrotron radiation. Based on the results obtained from observations and simulation, we conclude that the standard external shock interpretation for early-time optical emission is disfavored in most cases due to sharp peaks ({Delta}t/t < 1) and steep rise/decay indices, and that internal dissipation can explain the properties of GRBs with optical peaks during gamma-ray emission.

  11. GRB 090727 and Gamma-Ray Bursts with Early-time Optical Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopač, D.; Kobayashi, S.; Gomboc, A.; Japelj, J.; Mundell, C. G.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Bersier, D.; Cano, Z.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Virgili, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 090727, for which optical emission was detected during the prompt gamma-ray emission by the 2 m autonomous robotic Liverpool Telescope and subsequently monitored for a further two days with the Liverpool and Faulkes Telescopes. Within the context of the standard fireball model, we rule out a reverse shock origin for the early-time optical emission in GRB 090727 and instead conclude that the early-time optical flash likely corresponds to emission from an internal dissipation process. Putting GRB 090727 into a broader observational and theoretical context, we build a sample of 36 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early-time optical and gamma-ray detections. From these GRBs, we extract a sub-sample of 18 GRBs, which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, and perform detailed temporal and spectral analysis in gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical bands. We find that in most cases early-time optical emission shows sharp and steep behavior, and notice a rich diversity of spectral properties. Using a simple internal shock dissipation model, we show that the emission during prompt GRB phase can occur at very different frequencies via synchrotron radiation. Based on the results obtained from observations and simulation, we conclude that the standard external shock interpretation for early-time optical emission is disfavored in most cases due to sharp peaks (Δt/t < 1) and steep rise/decay indices, and that internal dissipation can explain the properties of GRBs with optical peaks during gamma-ray emission.

  12. Classification and Energetics of Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Nemiroff, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative phenomenological classification method for cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) into two known subgroups of Short & Long GRBs based on the prompt gamma-ray emission properties. The classification is intended to be universal, independently of the gamma-ray detector specifications and can be used to classify a given GRB based on its observer- or rest-frame prompt variables. We show that the joint population distribution of the four main prompt emission parameters in both classes of GRBs: the isotropic luminosity (Liso), the isotropic total emission (Eiso), the rest-frame spectral peak energy (Epz) and the rest-frame duration of the prompt emission (T90z), and the interrelations among them can be well represented by a multivariate log-normal distribution, once corrected for the detector triggering threshold. The population properties of the two classes of Long & Short GRBs bear striking similarities in the 4-dimensional space of Liso, Eiso, Epz & T90z, possibly indicating a common origin and similar mechanisms responsible for the observed correlations among the prompt emission parameters.

  13. TWO POPULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST RADIO AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, P. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murphy, T.

    2013-10-20

    The detection rate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows is ∼30% at radio wavelengths, much lower than in the X-ray (∼95%) or optical (∼70%) bands. The cause of this low radio detection rate has previously been attributed to limited observing sensitivity. We use visibility stacking to test this idea, and conclude that the low detection rate is instead due to two intrinsically different populations of GRBs: radio-bright and radio-faint. We calculate that no more than 70% of GRB afterglows are truly radio-bright, leaving a significant population of GRBs that lack a radio afterglow. These radio-bright GRBs have higher gamma-ray fluence, isotropic energies, X-ray fluxes, and optical fluxes than the radio-faint GRBs, thus confirming the existence of two physically distinct populations. We suggest that the gamma-ray efficiency of the prompt emission is responsible for the difference between the two populations. We also discuss the implications for future radio and optical surveys.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts as Sources of Strong Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Jonathan; Piran, Tsvi; Bromberg, Omer; Racusin, Judith L.; Daigne, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the strongest explosions in the Universe, which due to their extreme character likely involve some of the strongest magnetic fields in nature. This review discusses the possible roles of magnetic fields in GRBs, from their central engines, through the launching, acceleration and collimation of their ultra-relativistic jets, to the dissipation and particle acceleration that power their γ-ray emission, and the powerful blast wave they drive into the surrounding medium that generates their long-lived afterglow emission. An emphasis is put on particular areas in which there have been interesting developments in recent years.

  15. Gravitational waves and neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are not only strong sources of gammaray emission, but also of neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Observat.ions of these particles can provide a good deal of insight into the progenitor and engine behind these outbursts. But to do so, these particles must be detected . Here we review the different phases of GW and neutrino emission from a range of GRB progenitors, outlining the features and detectability of these phases. Unfortunately, except for a few cases, the detection of non-photon emission is very difficult. But the potential gain from any detection make understanding these sources critically important.

  16. Cyclotron scattering lines in gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Preece, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    If cyclotron scattering, rather than absorption, is responsible for the line features observed recently in two gamma-ray burst spectra (Murakami et al., 1988), then the second and higher harmonics are due to resonant scattering events that excite the electron to Landau levels above the ground state. Here, relativistic Compton scattering cross sections are used to estimate the expected ratio of third to second harmonics in the presence of Doppler broadening. At the field strength (1.7 TG) required to give first and second harmonics at 19 keV and 38 keV, there should be no detectable third harmonic in the spectrum.

  17. Light speed variation from gamma ray burst GRB 160509A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haowei; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    It is postulated in Einstein's relativity that the speed of light in vacuum is a constant for all observers. However, the effect of quantum gravity could bring an energy dependence of light speed. Even a tiny speed variation, when amplified by the cosmological distance, may be revealed by the observed time lags between photons with different energies from astrophysical sources. From the newly detected long gamma ray burst GRB 160509A, we find evidence to support the prediction for a linear form modification of light speed in cosmological space.

  18. Delayed hard photons from gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1994-01-01

    The delayed hard (up to 25 GeV) photons observed more than an hour following a gamma-ray burst on 1994 February 17 may result from the collisions of relativistic nucleons with a dense cloud, producing pi(0). The required cloud density is approx. 2 x 10(exp 11)/cu cm. This cloud may be the remains of the disrupted envelope of a neutron star, and may survive as an excretion disk of approx. 10(exp 14) - 10 (exp 15) cm radius around the coalescing binary.

  19. Cosmological blueshifting may explain the gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasiński, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that the basic observed properties of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are accounted for if one assumes that the GRBs arise by blueshifting the emission radiation of hydrogen and helium generated during the last scattering epoch. The blueshift generator for a single GRB is a region with a nonconstant bang-time function tB(r ) (described by a Lemaître-Tolman (L-T) exact solution of Einstein's equations) matched into a homogeneous and isotropic (Friedmann) background. Blueshift visible to the present observer arises only on those rays that are emitted radially in an L-T region. The paper presents three L-T models with different Big Bang profiles, adapted for the highest and the lowest end of the GRB frequency range. The models account for (1) the observed frequency range of the GRBs; (2) their limited duration; (3) the afterglows; (4) their hypothetical collimation into narrow jets; (5) the large distances to their sources; (6) the multitude of the observed GRBs. Properties (2), (3) and (6) are accounted for only qualitatively. With a small correction of the parameters of the model, the implied perturbations of the CMB radiation will be consistent with those actually caused by the GRBs. A complete model of the Universe would consist of many L-T regions with different tB(r ) profiles, matched into the same Friedmann background. This paper is meant to be an initial exploration of the possibilities offered by models of this kind; the actual fitting of all parameters to observational results requires fine-tuning of several interconnected variables and is left for a separate study.

  20. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Extended Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    The recent association of several short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with early type galaxies with low star formation rate demonstrates that short bursts arise from a different progenitor mechanism than long bursts. However, since the duration distributions of the two classes overlap, membership is not always easily established. The picture is complicated by the occasional presence of softer, extended emission lasting tens of seconds after the initial spike- like emission comprising an otherwise short burst. Using the large BATSE sample with time-tagged event (TTE) data, we show that the fundamental defining characteristic of the short burst class is that the initial spike exhibits negligible spectral evolution at energies above approx. 25 keV. This is behavior is nearly ubiquitous for the 260 bursts with T(sub 90) less than 2s where the BATSE TTE data type completely included the initial spike: Their spectral lags measured between the 25-50 keV and 100-300 energy ranges are consistent with zero in 90-95% of the cases, with most outliers probably representing the tail of the long burst class. We also analyze a small sample of "short" BATSE bursts - those with the most fluent, intense extended emission. The same lack of evolution on the pulse timescale obtains for the extended emission in the brighter bursts where significant measurements can be made. One possible inference is that both emission components may arise in the same region. We also show that the dynamic range in the ratio of peak intensities, spike : extended, is at least approx. l0(exp 3), and that for some bursts, the extended emission is only a factor of 2-5 lower. However, for our whole sample the total counts fluence of the extended component equals or exceeds that in the spike by a factor of several.

  1. Fermi-LAT observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bonamente, E; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Burgess, J Michael; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Chaplin, V; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cleveland, W; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Collazzi, A; Cominsky, L R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; DeKlotz, M; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Desiante, R; Diekmann, A; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Finke, J; Fitzpatrick, G; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Gibby, M; Giglietto, N; Giles, M; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Granot, J; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Gruber, D; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Inoue, Y; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, W N; Kawano, T; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Paneque, D; Pelassa, V; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Racusin, J L; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sartori, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Scargle, J D; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Sonbas, E; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yamazaki, R; Younes, G; Yu, H-F; Zhu, S J; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Byrne, D; Foley, S; Goldstein, A; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; McBreen, S; Meegan, C; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R; Rau, A; Tierney, D; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Xiong, S; Cusumano, G; La Parola, V; Cummings, J R

    2014-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock. PMID:24263133

  2. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chaplin, V.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cleveland, W.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Collazzi, A.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeKlotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Diekmann, A.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Gibby, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giles, M.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Paneque, D.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sartori, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yamazaki, R.; Younes, G.; Yu, H.-F.; Zhu, S. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Byrne, D.; Foley, S.; Goldstein, A.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; Tierney, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Xiong, S.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Cummings, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  3. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most fascinating occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole formation. The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 bursts per year for 4 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from approximately 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=6.7 giving metallicity measurements and other data on galaxies at previously inaccessible distances. The talk will present the latest results from Swift in GRB astronomy.

  4. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most fascinating occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole formation. The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 bursts per year for 3 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from approximately 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z greater than 5 and one at z=6.3 giving metallicity measurements and other data on galaxies at previously inaccessible distances. The talk will present the latest results from Swift in GRB astronomy.

  5. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most fascinating occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole formation. The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 bursts per year for 3 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from - 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type I1 and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=6.3 giving metallicity measurements and other data on galaxies at previously inaccessible distances. The talk will present the latest results from Swift in GRB astronomy.

  6. A search for pre- and post-burst emission from well-localized gamma-ray burst locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1994-01-01

    We present the results from the first long-term search for nonburst gamma-ray emission from the positions of 70 intense, well-localized bursts. Using the BATSE occultation technique, designed for monitoring of discrete sources, these burst positions were measured in the energy range of approximately 15 keV to 1.8 MeV over a 112 day interval during 1991. None of these 70 locations exhibited detectable emission at or above the level of approximately 5 x 10(exp -9) ergs cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) during the 112 day interval. This level is approximately 1000 times less than the typical intensity of the burst associated with the given location. In addition, 35 intense gamma-ray bursts detected by BATSE were examined in a five day interval centered on the time of detection. We find no compelling evidence that these bursts emit preburst emission or display prompt postburst emission at a level of approximately 5 x 10(exp -9) ergs cm(exp 2) s(exp -1) on timescales of approximately 1 hr or longer. The lack of detectable long-term emission or preburst and postburst emission from the positions of gamma-ray bursts has important consequences for a variety of burst production models.

  7. Gamma ray bursts: A review of recent high-precision measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent measurements and discoveries in gamma ray bursts and transients are reviewed including observations of the red shifted annihilation line in two kinds of slow transients (in 'classical' gamma ray bursts and in the unique 1979 March 5th event); of red shifted nuclear lines in a slow transient and in one gamma ray burst; and of the positions of precise source locations of gamma ray bursts and of the March 5th event, within the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  8. On the Prompt Signals of Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.

    2013-07-01

    We introduce a new model of gamma ray burst (GRB) that explains its observed prompt signals, namely, its primary quasi-thermal spectrum and high energy tail. This mechanism can be applied to either assumption of GRB progenitor: coalescence of compact objects or hypernova explosion. The key ingredients of our model are: (1) The initial stage of a GRB is in the form of a relativistic quark-gluon plasma lava; (2) The expansion and cooling of this lava results in a QCD phase transition that induces a sudden gravitational stoppage of the condensed non-relativistic baryons and form a hadrosphere; (3) Acoustic shocks and Alfven waves (magnetoquakes) that erupt in episodes from the epicenter efficiently transport the thermal energy to the hadrospheric surface and induce a rapid detachment of leptons and photons from the hadrons; (4) The detached e + e - and γ form an opaque, relativistically hot leptosphere, which expands and cools to T ~ mc2, or 0.5 MeV, where e + e - → 2γ and its reverse process becomes unbalanced, and the GRB photons are finally released; (5) The mode-conversion of Alfven waves into electromagnetic waves in the leptosphere provides a snowplow acceleration and deceleration that gives rise to both the high energy spectrum of GRB and the erosion of its thermal spectrum down to a quasi-thermal distribution. According to this model, the observed GRB photons should have a redshifted peak frequency at Ep ~ Γ(1 + β/2)mc2/(1 + z), where Γ ~ O(1) is the Lorentz factor of the bulk flow of the lava, which may be determined from the existing GRB data.

  9. The Decay of Optical Emission from the gamma-Ray Burst GRB970228

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T.; Groot, P. J.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Robinson, C. R.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Petro, L.; Macchetto, F. D.; Heise, J.; Int Zand, J.; Strom, R. G.; Telting, J.; Rutten, R. G. M.; Pettini, M.; Tanvir, N.; Bloom, J.

    1997-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the great unsolved mysteries in high-energy astrophysics for almost 30 years. The recent discovery of fading sources at X-ray and optical wavelengths coincident with the location of the gamma-ray burst GRB970228 therefore provides an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nature of these high-energy events. The optical counterpart appears to be a transient point source embedded in a region of extended nebulosity, the latter having been tentatively identified as a high-redshift galaxy. This would seem to favour models that place gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distances, although a range of mechanisms for producing the bursts is still allowed. A crucial piece of information for distinguishing between such models is how the brightness of the optical counterpart evolves with time. Here we re-evaluate the existing photometry of the optical counterpart of GRB970228 to construct an optical light curve for the transient event. We find that between 21 hours and six days after the burst, the R-band brightness decreased by a factor of approximately 40, with any subsequent decrease in brightness occurring at a much slower rate. As the point source faded, it also became redder. The initial behaviour of the source appears to be consistent with the 'fireball' model, but the subsequent decrease in the rate of fading may prove harder to explain.

  10. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray; Page, Mathew J.; Cole, Richard; Walton, David M.; Winter, Berend; Pedersen, Kristian; Hjorth, Jens; Andersen, Michael; Hornstrup, Allan; den Herder, Jan-Willem A.; Piro, Luigi

    2012-09-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope is a 0.7-m F/1 with a very small instrument box containing 3 instruments: a slitless spectrograph with a resolution of 20, a multi-imager giving images of a field in 4 bands simultaneously, and a cross-dispersed Échelle spectrograph giving a resolution of 1000. The wavelength range is 0.5 μm to 1.7 μm. All instruments fit together in a box of 80 mm x 80 mm x 200 mm. The low resolution spectrograph uses a very compact design including a special triplet. It contains only spherical surfaces except for one tilted cylindrical surface to disperse the light. To reduce the need for a high precision pointing, an Advanced Image Slicer was added in front of the high resolution spectrograph. This spectrograph uses a simple design with only one mirror for the collimator and another for the camera. The Imager contains dichroics to separate the bandwidths and glass thicknesses to compensate the differences in path length. All 3 instruments use the same 2k x 2k detector simultaneously so that telescope pointing and tip-tilt control of a fold mirror permit to place the gamma ray burst on the desired instrument without any other mechanism.

  11. Gamma-ray burst high energy emission from internal shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Guetta, D.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:In this paper we study synchrotron and synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission from internal shocks (IS) during the prompt and X-ray flare phases of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The aim is to test the IS model for the flare emission and for whether GRBs can be GeV sources. Methods: We determine the parameters for which the IS model can account for the observed prompt and X-ray flares emission, and study the detectability of the high energy SSC emission by the AGILE and GLAST satellites. Results: We find that the detectability of the SSC emission during the prompt phase of GRBs improves for higher values of the fireball Lorentz factor Γ and of the temporal variability t_v. If IS is the mechanism responsible for the flare emission, and the Lorentz factor of the shells producing the flare is Γ 100, the flare light curves are expected to present some substructures with temporal variability tv = 10-100 ms which are much smaller than the average duration of flares, and similar to those observed during the prompt phase of GRBs. If one assumes lower Lorentz factors, such as Γ 10 div 25, then a larger temporal variability tv 40 s can also account for the observed flare properties. However in this case we predict that X-ray flares do not have a counterpart at very high energies (MeV-GeV). Conclusions: An investigation on the substructures of the X-ray flare light curves, and simultaneous X-ray and high energy observations, will allow us to corroborate the hypothesis that late IS are responsible for the X-ray flares.

  12. The ionosphere as a gamma ray burst detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgruder, Charles H., III

    1992-01-01

    Unlike all man made detectors, which are only sensitive to relative narrow regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, the ionosphere is practically a perfect detector for high energy radiation because it absorbs all radiation from the far-ultraviolet to the higher energy gamma-rays. Therefore, it may be possible to employ the terrestrial atmosphere as a detector of high energy celestial photons. As early as the 1940's solar flares were detected by the disturbance they caused to the ionosphere. The VLF (3 - 30 kHz) approach for detecting ionospheric disturbances is based on the following physical circumstance: celestial high energy radiation ionizes the atoms of the earth's ionosphere leading to the production of free electrons. These free electrons influence the propagation of electromagnetic waves. By studying the phase and amplitude changes of VLF radio wave propagating in the earth-ionosphere waveguide, it was hoped to ascertain the electron density in these regions and draw conclusions about the celestial radiation which caused them. To detect gamma-ray bursts, two conditions for the optimal detection are: (1) large zenith angle; and (2) alignment of burst and propagation path.

  13. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) emit in a few dozen of seconds up to ~1054 erg, in terms of isotropic equivalent radiated energy Eiso, therefore they can be observed up to z ~ 10 and appear very promising tools to describe the expansion rate history of the Universe. In this paper we review the use of the Ep,i-Eiso correlation of Gamma-Ray Bursts to measure ΩM. We show that the present data set of GRBs, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide indipendent evidence, from other probes, that ΩM~0.3. We show that current (e.g., Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and next GRB experiments (e.g., CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO, LOFT/WFM) will allow us, within a few years, to constrain ΩM and the evolution of dark energy with time, with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by SNe-Ia.

  14. Predicting supernova associated to gamma-ray burst 130427a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Ruffini, R.; Kovacevic, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Enderli, M.; Muccino, M.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Binary systems constituted by a neutron star and a massive star are not rare in the universe. The Induced Gravitational Gamma-ray Burst (IGC) paradigm interprets Gamma-ray bursts as the outcome of a neutron star that collapses into a black hole due to the accretion of the ejecta coming from its companion massive star that underwent a supernova event. GRB 130427A is one of the most luminous GRBs ever observed, of which isotropic energy exceeds 1054 erg. And it is within one of the few GRBs obtained optical, X-ray and GeV spectra simultaneously for hundreds of seconds, which provides an unique opportunity so far to understand the multi-wavelength observation within the IGC paradigm, our data analysis found low Lorentz factor blackbody emission in the Episode 3 and its X-ray light curve overlaps typical IGC Golden Sample, which comply to the IGC mechanisms. We consider these findings as clues of GRB 130427A belonging to the IGC GRBs. We predicted on GCN the emergence of a supernova on May 2, 2013, which was later successfully detected on May 13, 2013.

  15. On the future of gamma-ray burst cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörtsell, E.; Sollerman, J.

    2005-06-01

    With the understanding that the enigmatic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are beamed explosions, and with the recently discovered 'Ghirlanda relation', the dream of using GRBs as cosmological yardsticks may have come a few steps closer to reality. Assuming that the Ghirlanda relation is real, we have investigated possible constraints on cosmological parameters using a simulated future sample of a large number of GRBs inspired by the ongoing SWIFT mission. Comparing with constraints from a future sample of Type Ia supernovae, we find that GRBs are not efficient in constraining the amount of dark energy or its equation of state. The main reason for this is that very few bursts are available at low redshifts.

  16. Location of the 1979 April 6 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laros, J. G.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Estulin, I. V.; Zenchenko, V. M.

    1981-04-01

    A gamma-ray burst was recorded on 1979 April 6 at 1140 UT by instruments on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), Venera 11 (V11), Venera 12 (V12), Prognoz 7 (P7), and International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) spacecraft. The event consisted of a single spike of 0.2 s duration and had a spectral feature near 400 keV, thus resembling the 1979 March 5 event in two respects. However, important differences in rise time and spectral hardness make it impossible to conclude positively that the two events shared the same mechanism or had comparable energetics. Constraints placed by these findings on the energetics and types of objects that could be responsible for the April 6 and possibly the March 5 bursts are discussed.

  17. Location of the 1979 April 6 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laros, J. G.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Estulin, I. V.; Zenchenko, V. M.

    1981-01-01

    A gamma-ray burst was recorded on 1979 April 6 at 1140 UT by instruments on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), Venera 11 (V11), Venera 12 (V12), Prognoz 7 (P7), and International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) spacecraft. The event consisted of a single spike of 0.2 s duration and had a spectral feature near 400 keV, thus resembling the 1979 March 5 event in two respects. However, important differences in rise time and spectral hardness make it impossible to conclude positively that the two events shared the same mechanism or had comparable energetics. Constraints placed by these findings on the energetics and types of objects that could be responsible for the April 6 and possibly the March 5 bursts are discussed.

  18. Recent DMSP satellite detections of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, J.; Lee, P.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Griffee, J.W.

    1998-05-01

    Gamma-ray burst detectors are aboard seven U.S. Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft, two of which are currently in use. Their 800 km altitude orbits give a field of view to 117 degrees from the zenith. A great many bursts have been detected, usually in coincidence with detections by GRO or other satellites such as PVO or Ulysses. The directions of the sources can be determined with considerable accuracy from such correlated observations, even when neither GRO nor BeppoSAX is involved. Results obtained from the most recently launched satellites (DMSP 13 and DMSP 14) are given in this paper. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Interpretation of gamma-ray burst source count statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    1993-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of gamma-ray bursts, the so-called log N-log S relation has been used for determination of their distances and distribution. This task has not been straightforward because of varying thresholds for the detection of bursts. Most of the current analyses of these data are couched in terms of ambiguous distributions, such as the distribution of Cp/Clim, the ratio of peak to threshold photon count rates, or the distribution of V/Vmax = (Cp/Clim) exp -3/2. It is shown that these distributions are not always a true reflection of the log N-log S relation. Some kind of deconvolution is required for obtaining the true log N-log S. Therefore, care is required in the interpretation of results of such analyses. A new method of analysis of these data is described, whereby the bivariate distribution of Cp and Clim is obtained directly from the data.

  20. Broad-band modelling of short gamma-ray bursts with energy injection from magnetar spin-down and its implications for radio detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gompertz, B. P.; van der Horst, A. J.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wynn, G. A.; Wiersema, K.

    2015-03-01

    The magnetar model has been proposed to explain the apparent energy injection in the X-ray light curves of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), but its implications across the full broad-band spectrum are not well explored. We investigate the broad-band modelling of four SGRBs with evidence for energy injection in their X-ray light curves, applying a physically motivated model in which a newly formed magnetar injects energy into a forward shock as it loses angular momentum along open field lines. By performing an order of magnitude search for the underlying physical parameters in the blast wave, we constrain the characteristic break frequencies of the synchrotron spectrum against their manifestations in the available multiwavelength observations for each burst. The application of the magnetar energy injection profile restricts the successful matches to a limited family of models that are self-consistent within the magnetic dipole spin-down framework. We produce synthetic light curves that describe how the radio signatures of these SGRBs ought to have looked given the restrictions imposed by the available data, and discuss the detectability of these signatures with present-day and near-future radio telescopes. Our results show that both the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the upgraded Very Large Array are now sensitive enough to detect the radio signature within two weeks of trigger in most SGRBs, assuming our sample is representative of the population as a whole. We also find that the upcoming Square Kilometre Array will be sensitive to depths greater than those of our lower limit predictions.

  1. Mimicking within Euclidean space a cosmological time dilation of gamma-ray burst durations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    If gamma-ray burst sources are cosmological in origin, then the time dilation at large z can correlate a burst's duration with its peak flux. Detection of this effect is thought by many to be strong evidence for a cosmological burst origin. In this Letter I show that an apparent time distortion--either a dilation or contraction--is generally expected for an ensemble of bursts that is spatially limited within Euclidean space. The appearance of this effect is correlated with the falling away of the log N-log P curve from a -3/2 slope line. An example of this effect is provided by the relativistic bulk motion model, which produces a strong time dilation when spatially limited in Euclidean space. As a consequence, envidence that weak bursts have longer durations than strong bursts is not evidence of a cosmological burst origin.

  2. Unraveling the Origin of Short Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Chincarini, G.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Covino, S.; Moretti, A.; Romano, P.; OBrien, P. T.; Sarazin, C. L.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2005-01-01

    The origin of the short (<2 s) class of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is finally becoming clear after decades of search. The first one localized to a few arcseconds accuracy, GRB 050509B, was found to have a highly probable association with a nearby (z = 0.225) elliptical galaxy. A second one with arcsecond localization, GRB 050709, was also associated with a low redshift (z = 0.16) galaxy. We report here the detection of short GRB 050724 with remarkable properties; in particular, it has low energy gamma-ray emission that lasts for 100 s after the main short pulse, strong early X-ray afterglow, and an unusual lightcurve that rebrightens at 3x10(exp 4) s. A position on the sky accurate to 9 arcsec was determined and provided as a GCN alert to ground-based telescopes within 80 s. A subsequent high-resolution X-ray image provided a sub-arcsec position coincident with ground-based optical and radio observations of the afterglow. Like GRB 050509B, this burst is located off-center in an elliptical galaxy. The energy output of the GRB at the host distance of z = 0.258 is 2-3 orders of magnitude less than for long bursts. The low level of star formation in such galaxies is strong evidence against a collapsar or hypernova origin like that associated with long GRBs. Based on these new data, it is highly probable that short GRBs are produced by the coalescence of orbiting neutron stars (NSs) or black holes (BHs), with some evidence for a NS-BH merger in this burst.

  3. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extrasolar Oort Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1995-01-01

    With the strong Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (CGRO/BATSE) evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approx. equals 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NSs penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequence stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on time scales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating, events. Comparing these estimates to the 3-4 soft gamma-ray repeater sources

  4. Why galactic gamma-ray bursts might depend on environment: Blast waves around neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, Martin J.; Meszaros, Peter; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1994-01-01

    Although galactic models for gamma-ray bursts are hard to reconcile with the isotropy data, the issue is still sufficiently open that both options should be explored. The most likely 'triggers' for bursts in our Galaxy would be violent disturbances in the magnetospheres of neutron stars. Any event of this kind is likely to expel magnetic flux and plasma at relativistic speed. Such ejecta would be braked by the interstellar medium (ISM), and a gamma-ray flash may result from this interaction. The radiative efficiency, of this mechanism would depend on the density of the circumstellar ISM. Therefore, even if neutron stars were uniformly distributed in space (at least within 1-2 kpc of the Sun), the observed locations of bursts would correlate with regions of above-average ISM density.

  5. ARE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DIFFERENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Boër, M.; Gendre, B.; Stratta, G.

    2015-02-10

    The discovery of a number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with duration exceeding 1000 s has opened the debate on whether these bursts form a new class of sources, the so-called ultra-long GRBs, or if they are rather the tail of the distribution of the standard long GRB duration. Using the long GRB sample detected by Swift, we investigate the statistical properties of long GRBs and compare them with the ultra-long burst properties. We compute the burst duration of long GRBs using the start epoch of the so-called ''steep decay'' phase detected with Swift/XRT. We discuss also the differences observed in their spectral properties. We find that ultra-long GRBs are statistically different from the standard long GRBs with typical burst duration less than 100-500 s, for which a Wolf-Rayet star progenitor is usually invoked. Together with the presence of a thermal emission component we interpret this result as indication that the usual long GRB progenitor scenario cannot explain the extreme duration of ultra-long GRBs, their energetics, as well as the mass reservoir and size that can feed the central engine for such a long time.

  6. Are Ultra-long Gamma-Ray Bursts Different?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boër, M.; Gendre, B.; Stratta, G.

    2015-02-01

    The discovery of a number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with duration exceeding 1000 s has opened the debate on whether these bursts form a new class of sources, the so-called ultra-long GRBs, or if they are rather the tail of the distribution of the standard long GRB duration. Using the long GRB sample detected by Swift, we investigate the statistical properties of long GRBs and compare them with the ultra-long burst properties. We compute the burst duration of long GRBs using the start epoch of the so-called "steep decay" phase detected with Swift/XRT. We discuss also the differences observed in their spectral properties. We find that ultra-long GRBs are statistically different from the standard long GRBs with typical burst duration less than 100-500 s, for which a Wolf-Rayet star progenitor is usually invoked. Together with the presence of a thermal emission component we interpret this result as indication that the usual long GRB progenitor scenario cannot explain the extreme duration of ultra-long GRBs, their energetics, as well as the mass reservoir and size that can feed the central engine for such a long time.

  7. THERMAL RADIATION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Aoi, Junichi

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the light curves and spectrum of the photospheric thermal radiation from ultrarelativistic gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets are calculated using two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of jets from a collapsar. As the jet advances, the density around the head of the jet decreases, and its Lorentz factor reaches as high as 200 at the photosphere and 400 inside the photosphere. For an on-axis observer, the photosphere appears concave due to the low density and high beaming factor of the jet. The luminosity varies because of the abrupt change in the position of the photosphere due to the internal structure of the jet. Comparing our results with GRB 090902B, the flux level of the thermal-like component is similar to our model, although the peak energy appears slightly higher (but still within a factor of two). From the comparison, we estimate that the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB 090902B is {Gamma} {approx} 2.4 x 10{sup 2}(r/10{sup 12} cm), where r is the radius of the photosphere. The spectrum for an on-axis observer is harder than that for an off-axis observer. There is a time lag of a few seconds for high energy bands in the light curve. This may be the reason for the delayed onset of GeV emission seen in GRB 080916C. The spectrum below the peak energy is a power law and the index is 2.3-2.6, which is softer than that of a single temperature Planck distribution but still harder than that of the typical value of the observed spectrum.

  8. Cosmic Evolution of Long Gamma-Ray Burst Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Can-Min; Wang, Xiang-Gao; Guo, Bei-Bei; Lu, Rui-Jing; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity is essential for revealing the GRB physics and for using GRBs as cosmological probes. We investigate the luminosity evolution of long GRBs with a large sample of 258 Swift/BAT GRBs. By describing the peak luminosity evolution of individual GRBs as {L}{{p}}\\propto \\text{}{(1+z)}k, we get k=1.49+/- 0.19 using the nonparametric τ statistics method without considering observational biases of GRB trigger and redshift measurement. By modeling these biases with the observed peak flux and characterizing the peak luminosity function of long GRBs as a smoothly broken power law with a break that evolves as {L}{{b}}\\propto {(1+z)}{k{{b}}}, we obtain {k}{{b}}={1.14}-0.47+0.99 through simulations based on the assumption that the long GRB rate follows the star formation rate incorporating the cosmic metallicity history. The derived k and kb values are systematically smaller than those reported in previous papers. By removing the observational biases of the GRB trigger and redshift measurement based on our simulation analysis, we generate mock complete samples of 258 and 1000 GRBs to examine how these biases affect the τ statistics method. We get k=0.94+/- 0.14 and k=0.80+/- 0.09 for the two samples, indicating that these observational biases may lead to overestimating the k value. With the large uncertainty of kb derived from our simulation analysis, one cannot even convincingly argue for a robust evolution feature of the GRB luminosity.

  9. Temporal Deconvolution Study of Long and Short Gamma-Ray Burst Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    The light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within the framework of the internal shock model for GRB prompt emission.

  10. TEMPORAL DECONVOLUTION STUDY OF LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M.; and others

    2012-01-10

    The light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within the framework of the internal shock model for GRB prompt emission.

  11. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Timing analysis can be a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and, more in general, to investigate the dominant variability timescales in astrophysical sources. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties involved, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature thus far. Aims: We aim at characterising the individual PDS of GRBs to describe their variability in terms of a stochastic process, to explore their variety, and to carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between PDS properties and other GRB observables. Methods: We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study the individual PDS of 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope in the 15-150 keV band from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Results: Two classes of GRBs emerge: with or without a unique dominant timescale. A comparison with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals similar distributions of PDS slopes. Unexpectedly, GRBs with subsecond-dominant timescales and duration longer than a few tens of seconds in the source frame appear to be either very rare or altogether absent. Three GRBs are found with possible evidence for a periodic signal at 3.0-3.2σ (Gaussian) significance, corresponding to a multi-trial chance probability of ~1%. Thus, we found no compelling evidence for periodic signal in GRBs. Conclusions: The analogy between the PDS of GRBs and of AGNs could tentatively indicate similar stochastic processes that rule BH accretion across different BH mass scales and objects

  12. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Timing analysis can be a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and, more in general, to investigate the dominant variability timescales in astrophysical sources. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties involved, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature thus far. Aims: We aim at characterising the individual PDS of GRBs to describe their variability in terms of a stochastic process, to explore their variety, and to carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between PDS properties and other GRB observables. Methods: We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study the individual PDS of 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope in the 15-150 keV band from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Results: Two classes of GRBs emerge: with or without a unique dominant timescale. A comparison with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals similar distributions of PDS slopes. Unexpectedly, GRBs with subsecond-dominant timescales and duration longer than a few tens of seconds in the source frame appear to be either very rare or altogether absent. Three GRBs are found with possible evidence for a periodic signal at 3.0-3.2σ (Gaussian) significance, corresponding to a multi-trial chance probability of ~1%. Thus, we found no compelling evidence for periodic signal in GRBs. Conclusions: The analogy between the PDS of GRBs and of AGNs could tentatively indicate similar stochastic processes that rule BH accretion across different BH mass scales and objects

  13. An Analysis of Gamma-ray Burst Time Profiles from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requested funding to measure the durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) in the 4B catalog as well as to study the structure of GRB time profiles returned by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The duration (T90) was to be measured using the same techniques and algorithms developed by the principal investigator for the 3B data. The profile structure studies fall into the two categories of variability and fractal analyses.

  14. Which Epeak? The Characteristic Energy of Gamma-ray Burst Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Robert; Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, Narayana; Stanbro, Matthew; Hakkila, Jon; Blalock, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic energy of individual gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra can in most cases be determined from the peak energy of the energy density spectra (ν {{ F }}ν ), called “{E}{{peak}}.” Distributions of {E}{{peak}} have been compiled for time-resolved spectra from bright GRBs, as well as time-averaged spectra and peak flux spectra for nearly every burst observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst And Transient Source Experiment and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Even when determined by an instrument with a broad energy band, such as GBM (8 keV to 40 MeV), the distributions themselves peak at around 240 keV in the observer’s frame, with a spread of roughly a decade in energy. {E}{{peak}} can have considerable evolution (sometimes greater than one decade) within any given burst, as amply demonstrated by single pulses in GRB 110721A and GRB 130427A. Meanwhile, several luminosity or energy relations have been proposed to correlate with either the time-integrated or peak flux {E}{{peak}}. Thus, when discussing correlations with {E}{{peak}}, the question arises, “Which {E}{{peak}}?” A single burst may be characterized by any of a number of values for {E}{{peak}} that are associated with it. Using a single-pulse simulation model with spectral evolution as a proxy for the type of spectral evolution observed in many bursts, we investigate how the time-averaged {E}{{peak}} emerges from the spectral evolution within a single pulse, how this average naturally correlates with the peak flux derived {E}{{peak}} in a burst, and how the distribution in {E}{{peak}} values from many bursts derives its surprisingly narrow width.

  15. The duration distribution of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, I.; Tóth, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    Decades ago two classes of gamma-ray bursts were identified and delineated as having durations shorter and longer than about 2 s. Subsequently indications also supported the existence of a third class. Using maximum likelihood estimation we analyze the duration distribution of 888 Swift BAT bursts observed before October 2015. Fitting three log-normal functions to the duration distribution of the bursts provides a better fit than two log-normal distributions, with 99.9999% significance. Similarly to earlier results, we found that a fourth component is not needed. The relative frequencies of the distribution of the groups are 8% for short, 35% for intermediate and 57% for long bursts which correspond to our previous results. We analyse the redshift distribution for the 269 GRBs of the 888 GRBs with known redshift. We find no evidence for the previously suggested difference between the long and intermediate GRBs' redshift distribution. The observed redshift distribution of the 20 short GRBs differs with high significance from the distributions of the other groups.

  16. GRB 070724B: the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by SuperAGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Soffitta, P.; Argan, A.; Pucella, G.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Evangelista, Y.; Rapisarda, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Basset, M.; Foggetta, L.; Vallazza, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.

    2008-05-22

    GRB070724B is the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by the SuperAGILE instrument aboard the AGILE space mission. The SuperAGILE localization has been confirmed after the after-glow observation by the XRT aboard the Swift satellite. No significant gamma ray emission above 50 MeV has been detected for this GRB. In this paper we describe the SuperAGILE capabilities in detecting Gamma Ray Burst and the AGILE observation of GRB 070724B.

  17. The Second Swift BAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Zhang, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parametert:; measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs. The time-averaged spectra of the BAT S GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the L-GRBs. Whereas, the spectra of the initial short spikes of the S-GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the S-GRBs. We show that the BAT GRB samples are significantly softer than the BATSE bright GRBs, and that the time-averaged E obs/peak of the BAT GRBs peaks at 80 keV which is significantly lower energy than those of the BATSE sample which peak at 320 keV. The time-averaged spectral properties of the BAT GRB sample are similar to those of the HETE-2 GRB samples. By time-resolved spectral analysis, we find that 10% of the BAT observed photon indices are outside the allowed region of the synchrotron shock model. The observed durations of the BAT high redshift GRBs are not systematically longer than those of the moderate

  18. Earth Occultation Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT). Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors for daily monitoring. Light curves, updated daily, are available on our website http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm. Our software is also capable of performing the Earth occultation monitoring using up to 128 energy bands, or any combination of those bands, using our 128-channel, 4-s CSPEC data. The GBM BGO detectors, sensitive from about 200 keV to 40 keV, can also be used with this technique. In our standard application of the EOT, we use a catalog of sources to drive the measurements. To ensure that our catalog is complete, our team has developed an Earth occultation imaging method. In this talk, I will describe both techniques and the current data products available. I will highlight recent and important results from the GBM EOT, including the current status of our observations of hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula.

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Afterglows and Central Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Lu, T.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most intense transient gamma-ray events in the sky; this, together with the strong evidence (the isotropic and inhomogeneous distribution of GRBs detected by BASTE) that they are located at cosmological distances, makes them the most energetic events ever known. For example, the observed radiation energies of some GRBs are equivalent to the total convertion into radiation of the mass energy of more than one solar mass. This is thousand times stronger than the energy of a supernova explosion. Some unconventional energy mechanism and extremely high conversion efficiency for these mysterious events are required. The discovery of host galaxies and association with supernovae at cosmological distances by the recently launched satellite of BeppoSAX and ground based radio and optical telescopes in GRB afterglow provides further support to the cosmological origin of GRBs and put strong constraints on their central engine. It is the aim of this article to review the possible central engines, energy mechanisms, dynamical and spectral evolution of GRBs, especially focusing on the afterglows in multi-wavebands.

  20. The Decay of Optical Emission Form the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 970228

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T.; Groot, P. J.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouvellotou, C.; Robinson, C. R.; Fishmans, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Petro, L.

    1997-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the great unsolved mysteries in high-energy astrophysics for almost 30 years. The recent discovery of fading sources at X-ray and optical wave-lengths coincident with the location of the gamma-ray burst GRB970228 therefore provides an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nature of these high-energy events. The optical counterpart appears to be a transient point source embedded in a region of extended nebulosity, the latter having been tentatively identified as a high-redshift galaxy. This would seem to favour models that place gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distances, although a range of mechanisms for producing the bursts is still allowed. A crucial piece of information for distinguishing between such models is how the brightness of the optical counterpart evolves with time. Here we re-evaluate the existing photometry of the optical counterpart of GRB970228 to construct an optical light curve for the transient event. We find that between 21 hours and six days after the burst, the R-band brightness decreased by a factor of approx. 50, with any subsequent decrease in brightness occurring at a much slower rate. As the point source faded, it also became redder. The initial behaviour of the source appears to be consistent with the 'fireball' model, in which the burst results from the merger of two neutron stars, but the subsequent decrease in the rate of fading may prove harder to explain. The gamma-ray burst of 28 February 1997, detected with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor on board the BeppoSAX satellite, and located with an approx. 3 feet radius position with the Wide Field Camera on the same satellite, was the first for which a fading X-ray and optical counterpart were discovered. The optical Counterpart was discovered from a comparison of V- and I-band images taken with the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on February 28.99 UT, and the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT; V band) and the WHT (I band) on March 8.8 uT.

  1. The duration-photon energy relation in gamma-ray bursts and its interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Titarchuk, Lev G.; Hua, Xin-Min

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between the spectral and temporal structure in gamma ray bursts was presented elsewhere, where it was discovered that the duration of the constituent subpulses of the time profile of a given gamma ray burst have a well-defined power law dependence, of approximately index 0.45, on the energy of the observed photons. Two models are presented which account for the observed correlation. These models involve: the impulsive injection of a population of relativistic electrons; their subsequent cooling by synchrotron radiation; the impulsive injection of mono-energetic high energy photons in a medium of a Thomson depth of approximately 5, and their subsequent downgrading in energy due to electron scattering. Arguments are presented for distinguishing between these two models from the existing data.

  2. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE SPECTRAL BREAK IN THE AFTERGLOW OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2012-02-20

    The temporal evolution of the spectral break in the time-resolved spectral energy density of the broadband afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 091127 and 080319B was shown recently to be inconsistent with that expected for the cooling break in the standard fireball model of GRBs. Here we show that it is, however, in good agreement with the predicted temporal evolution of the smooth injection break/bend in the cannonball model of GRBs.

  3. Gamma-ray burst spectroscopy capabilities of the BATSE/GRO experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A scintillation spectrometer is included in each of the eight BATSE/GRO detector modules, resulting in all-sky coverage for gamma-ray bursts. The scientific motivation, design and capabilities of these spectrometers for performing spectral observations over a wide range of gamma-ray energies and burst intensities are described.

  4. Evidence for Temporally-Extended, High-Energy Emission from Gamma Ray Burst 990104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, D. N.; Bertsch, D. L.; Ritz, S.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV - GeV) has been observed in several gamma ray bursts and temporally-extended emission from lower-energy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. Observations of extended, high-energy emission are, however, scarce. Here we present evidence for a gamma ray burst emission that is both high-energy and extended, coincident with lower energy emissions. For the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104, we show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) trigger and initial burst emission. Between the initial output and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a period of approx. 100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma ray bursts.

  5. GRB 081029: A Gamma-Ray Burst with a Multi-Component Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; DePasquale, Massimiliano; Mao, Jirong; Sakamoto, Taka; Shady, Patricia; Covino, Stefano; Yi-Zhong, Fan; Zhi-Ping, Jin; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Antonelli, Angelo; D'Elia, Valerio; Chincarini, Guido; Fiore, Fabrizio; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM and ROTSE telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to approx. 100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range, from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A to 16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 5000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray burst jets are complex and will require detailed modelling to fully understand them.

  6. GRB 081029: A GAMMA-RAY BURST WITH A MULTI-COMPONENT AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen T.; Sakamoto, Takanori; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Schady, Patricia; Mao, Jirong; Covino, Stefano; Jin, Zhi-Ping; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Chincarini, Guido; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Antonelli, Angelo; D'Elia, Valerio; Fiore, Fabrizio; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Cobb, Bethany E.

    2012-01-20

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM, ROTSE, and CTIO 1.3 m telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to {approx}100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A-16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 3000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray-burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray-burst jets are complex and will require detailed modeling to fully understand them.

  7. High-z Universe with Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in space and trace the cosmic star formation history back to the first generations of stars. Their bright afterglows allow us to trace the abundances of heavy elements to large distances, thereby measuring cosmic chemical evolution. To date GRBs have been detected up to distances of z=8.23 and possibly even beyond z9. This makes GRBs a unique and powerful tool to probe the high-z Universe up to the re-ionization era. We discuss the current status of the field, place it in context with other probes, and also discuss new mission concepts that have been planned to utilize GRBs as probes.

  8. Cosmological Parameters from Supernovae Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Hjorth, Jens; Wojtak, Radosław

    2014-11-01

    We report estimates of the cosmological parameters Ω m and ΩΛ obtained using supernovae (SNe) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at redshifts up to 0.606. Eight high-fidelity GRB-SNe with well-sampled light curves across the peak are used. We correct their peak magnitudes for a luminosity-decline rate relation to turn them into accurate standard candles with dispersion σ = 0.18 mag. We also estimate the peculiar velocity of the low-redshift host galaxy of SN 1998bw using constrained cosmological simulations. In a flat universe, the resulting Hubble diagram leads to best-fit cosmological parameters of (Ω _m, Ω Λ ) = (0.58+0.22-0.25,0.42 +0.25-0.22). This exploratory study suggests that GRB-SNe can potentially be used as standardizable candles to high redshifts to measure distances in the universe and constrain cosmological parameters.

  9. Distinguishing short and long Fermi gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnopolski, M.

    2015-11-01

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short and long, have been determined without any doubts, and are usually ascribed to different progenitors, yet these classes overlap for a variety of descriptive parameters. A subsample of 46 long and 22 short Fermi GRBs with estimated Hurst Exponents (HEs), complemented by minimum variability time-scales (MVTS) and durations (T90) is used to perform a supervised machine learning and Monte Carlo simulation using a support vector machine algorithm. It is found that while T90 itself performs very well in distinguishing short and long GRBs, the overall success ratio is higher when the training set is complemented by MVTS and HE. These results may allow us to introduce a new (non-linear) parameter that might provide less ambiguous classification of GRBs.

  10. Effect of Dust Extinction on Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lŭ, Gu-Jing; Shao, Lang; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming

    2011-10-01

    In order to study the effect of dust extinction on the afterglow of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we carry out numerical calculations with high precision based on the rigorous Mie theory and the latest optical properties of interstellar dust grains, and analyze the different extinction curves produced by dust grains with different physical parameters. Our results indicate that the absolute extinction quantity is substantially determined by the medium density and metallicity. However, the shape of the extinction curve is mainly determined by the size distribution of the dust grains. If the dust grains aggregate to form larger ones, they will cause a flatter or grayer extinction curve with lower extinction quantity. On the contrary, if the dust grains are disassociated to smaller ones due to some uncertain processes, they will cause a steeper extinction curve with larger amount of extinction. These results might provide an important insight into understanding the origin of the optically dark GRBs.

  11. The low energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Lamb, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of observed gamma-ray burst spectra for the physical conditions and geometries of the sources are examined. It is noted that an explanation of the continua in terms of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung requires a relatively large area but a fairly shallow depth. On the other hand, a spectrum similar to that observed could be produced by rapid flickering of sources with less extreme geometries if each flicker emits a Comptonized thermal spectrum. Either field inhomogeneities or plasma motions are required to interpret the low energy features as cyclotron extinction. An alternative explanation is photoelectric absorption by heavy atoms; this requires a field strength high enough to make one-photon electron positron annihilation possible. Observational tests of these possibilities are proposed

  12. Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Scarsi, Livio

    1998-06-15

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10{sup 20} eV arriving on Earth with very low flux ({approx}1 particle/Km{sup 2}-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas, exceeding values of 1000 km{sup 2} sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays ('Auger' with 2x3500 km{sup 2} sr) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space ('AIR WATCH' and OWL,'' with effective area reaching 1 million km{sup 2} sr). In this last case, by using as a target the 10{sup 13} tons of air viewed, also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.

  13. HOST GALAXIES AS GAMMA-RAY BURST DISTANCE INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    D. BAND; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the distributions of the total burst energy, the peak luminosity and the X-ray afterglow energy using burst observations and distances to the associated host galaxies. To expand the sample, we include redshift estimates for host galaxies without spectroscopic redshifts. The methodology requires a model of the host galaxy population; we find that in the best model the burst rate is proportional to the host galaxy luminosity at the time of the burst.

  14. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG: THE FIRST TWO YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Adam; Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, Vandiver; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; and others

    2012-03-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) during its first two years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 487 GRBs, and by fitting four different spectral models, this results in a compendium of over 3800 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedure and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the Fermi GBM Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  15. The Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog: The First Two Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Adam; Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Connaughton, Valerie; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Paciesas, William S.; Meegan, Charles A.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; McGlynn, Sinéad; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave

    2012-03-01

    We present systematic spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) during its first two years of operation. This catalog contains two types of spectra extracted from 487 GRBs, and by fitting four different spectral models, this results in a compendium of over 3800 spectra. The models were selected based on their empirical importance to the spectral shape of many GRBs, and the analysis performed was devised to be as thorough and objective as possible. We describe in detail our procedure and criteria for the analyses, and present the bulk results in the form of parameter distributions. This catalog should be considered an official product from the Fermi GBM Science Team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  16. Line and continuum spectroscopy as diagnostic tools for gamma ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, E.P.

    1990-12-01

    We review the theoretical framework of both line and continuum spectra formation in gamma ray bursts. These include the cyclotron features at 10's of keV, redshifted annihilation features at {approximately}400 keV, as well as other potentially detectable nuclear transition lines, atomic x-ray lines, proton cyclotron lines and plasma oscillation lines. By combining the parameters derived from line and continuum modeling we can try to reconstruct the location, geometry and physical conditions of the burst emission region, thereby constraining and discriminating the astrophysical models. Hence spectroscopy with current and future generations of detectors should provide powerful diagnostic tools for gamma ray bursters. 48 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Location of the 1979 April 6 gamma-ray burst

    SciTech Connect

    Laros, J.G.; Evans, W.D.; Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Estulin, I.V.; Zenchenko, V.M.; Mersov, G.A.

    1981-04-15

    A gamma-ray burst was recorded on 1979 April 6 at 1140 UT by instruments on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Venera 11 (V11), Venera12 (V12), Prognoz 7 (P7), and International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) spacecraft. The event consisted of a single spike of 0.2 s duration and had a spectral feature near 400 keV (Mazets and Golenetskii), thus resembling the 1979 March 5 events (Mazets et al .; Cline et al .; Evans et al .; Brarat et al.) in two respects. However, important differences in rise time and spectral hardness prevent one from concluding positively that the two events shared the same mechanism or had comparable energetics. Using arrival time analysis we have obtained for the April 6 burst a <1/sub '/ diameter error box centered at (..cap alpha.., delta)/sub 1950/ = (23/sup h/11/sup m/12/sup s/,-49/sup 0/55'39''). According to our searches, there is no cataloged object within or suggestively close to this error box. A UK Schmidt plate of the region likewise revealed no images within the error box to m/sub v/ = 22.5. Constraints placed by these findings on the energetics and types of objects that could be responsible for the April 6 and possibly the March 5 bursts are discussed.

  18. Impact of a gamma-ray burst on the Schumann resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickolaenko, A. P.; Kudintseva, I. G.; Pechonaya, O.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakamura, T.; Hobara, Ya.; Tanaka, Ya.

    2011-02-01

    We compare the experimental and simulated data on the impact of an extragalactic gamma-ray burst of December 27, 2004 on the global electromagnetic resonance. It is known from measurements of the signals of ultralong-wave radio stations that the ionizing radiation descended the ionosphere over the dayside hemisphere by 20 km. Such a disturbance should change the eigenfrequencies of the Earth-ionosphere cavity and affect the shape of the observed spectrum of extremely low-frequency Earth's radio noise. The results of observations and modeling of the Schumann-resonance variation under the action of a gamma-ray burst are compared. We employ two models. In the simpler one, the ionospheric disturbance is averaged over the entire globe. The second model allows for the day-night nonuniformity. It is shown that both models yield similar predictions and the effect little depends on the day-night nonuniformity. Since the ionosphere carries the positive electric charge, its vertical displacement causes a current which serves as a "parametric" impulse source of the electromagnetic field. The global size of the source results in that the pulse contains only the lower Schumann-resonance frequency. The extremely low-frequency pulse coincides in time with the gamma-ray burst arrival. The results of observations in the Moshiri observatory (Japan) at the time of a gamma-ray burst, which are compared with the calculation for this observatory are presented. It is shown that both a modification of the Schumann resonance sonogram and a parametric extremely low-frequency radio pulse have been detected in the record.

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Their Links with Supernovae and Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Peter; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, whose origin and mechanism are the focus of intense interest. They appear connected to supernova remnants from massive stars or the merger of their remnants, and their brightness makes them temporarily detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the universe. After pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with observations from the recently launched Fermi satellite, as well as the prospect of detections or limits from large neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. The interplay between such observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts is reviewed, as well as their connections to supernovae and cosmology.

  20. The Intensity Distribution of Faint Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kommers, Jefferson M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; VanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    2000-01-01

    We have recently completed a search of 6 years of archival BATSE data for gamma-ray bursts (GRBS) that were too faint to activate the real-time burst detection system running on board the spacecraft. These "nontriggered" bursts can be combined with the "triggered" bursts detected on board to produce a GRB intensity distribution that reaches peak fluxes a factor of approximately 2 lower than could be studied previously. The value of the statistic (in Euclidean space) for the bursts we detect is 0.177 plus or minus 0.006. This surprisingly low value is obtained because we detected very few bursts on the 4.096 s and 8.192 s timescales (where most bursts have their highest signal-to-noise ratio) that were not already detected on the 1.024 s timescale. If allowance is made for a power-law distribution of intrinsic peak luminosities, the extended peak flux distribution is consistent with models in which the redshift distribution of the gamma-ray burst rate approximately traces the star formation history of the universe. We argue that this class of models is preferred over those in which the burst rate is independent of redshift. We use the peak flux distribution to derive a limit of 10% (99% confidence) on the fraction of the total burst rate that could be contributed by a spatially homogeneous (in Euclidean space) subpopulation of burst sources, such as type lb/c supernovae. These results lend support to the conclusions of previous studies predicting that relatively few faint "classical" GRBs will be found below the BATSE onboard detection threshold.

  1. Gamma-ray bursts, QSOs and active galaxies.

    PubMed

    Burbidge, Geoffrey

    2007-05-15

    The similarity of the absorption spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources or afterglows with the absorption spectra of quasars (QSOs) suggests that QSOs and GRB sources are very closely related. Since most people believe that the redshifts of QSOs are of cosmological origin, it is natural to assume that GRBs or their afterglows also have cosmological redshifts. For some years a few of us have argued that there is much optical evidence suggesting a very different model for QSOs, in which their redshifts have a non-cosmological origin, and are ejected from low-redshift active galaxies. In this paper I extend these ideas to GRBs. In 2003, Burbidge (Burbidge 2003 Astrophys. J. 183, 112-120) showed that the redshift periodicity in the spectra of QSOs appears in the redshift of GRBs. This in turn means that both the QSOs and the GRB sources are similar objects ejected from comparatively low-redshift active galaxies. It is now clear that many of the GRBs of low redshift do appear in, or very near, active galaxies.A new and powerful result supporting this hypothesis has been produced by Prochter et al. (Prochter et al. 2006 Astrophys. J. Lett. 648, L93-L96). They show that in a survey for strong MgII absorption systems along the sightlines to long-duration GRBs, nearly every sightline shows at least one absorber. If the absorbers are intervening clouds or galaxies, only a small fraction should show absorption of this kind. The number found by Prochter et al. is four times higher than that normally found for the MgII absorption spectra of QSOs. They believe that this result is inconsistent with the intervening hypothesis and would require a statistical fluctuation greater than 99.1% probability. This is what we expect if the absorption is intrinsic to the GRBs and the redshifts are not associated with their distances. In this case, the absorption must be associated with gas ejected from the QSO. This in turn implies that the GRBs actually originate in comparatively low

  2. Strong gamma-ray bursts observed by COMPTEL during its second year of operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kippen, R. M.; Connors, A.; Mcconnell, M.; Ryan, J.; Collmar, W.; Greiner, J.; Schonfelder, V.; Varendorff, M.; Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.

    1995-01-01

    The imaging Compton telescope (COMPTEL) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) can localize gamma-ray bursts occurring inside its approximately 1 sr field-of-view in the energy range from 0.75 to 30 MeV with location accuracy of 1 deg. Additional time-resolved spectral measurements in the energy range 0.1 to 10 MeV are made by individual COMPTEL 'burst' detectors. During its second year of operation COMPTEL observed several gamma-ray bursts. Locations of five strong bursts (including the rapidly imaged events GRB 930131 and GRB 930309) are presented here along with the findings from preliminary spectral analysis.

  3. Gamma-ray burst high time-resolution spectral observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Norris, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The gamma-ray bursts of April 19 and 21, 1980, and March 1, 1981, are characterized on the basis of observations obtained at 25-500 keV and time resolution 128 msec using the hard-X-ray-burst spectrometer of the SMM satellite. The data are presented graphically, and the parameters determined by fitting three theoretical models to the data for each phase (rising phase, decay phase, and valleys between pulses) are given in tables. Models used are thin thermal bremsstrahlung with or without absorption lines, thermal synchrotron with or without absorption lines, and power law with exponential cutoff.

  4. The Spectral Evolution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    The proposed project was a continuation of our work on the spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts begun when the Co-I on this proposal. Lyle Ford, was my graduate student. In the proposal we discussed two projects. The first was finishing and publishing the last chapter of Professor Ford's thesis. In this research effort we looked for correlations in the energies of pairs of counts recorded by the BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors within a short time of each other. A greater correlation within a short time would indicate that the observed broadband spectrum is really composed of narrowband spectral components which last for a short time and which rapidly sum to the observed spectrum. We did not find any evidence for such narrowband emission, and are setting limits on its presence. Professor Ford is revising the last chapter of his thesis for publication with my participation. The second project was a continuation of my study of the cross-correlations between the gamma-ray burst lightcurves in different energy bands. I published a first study with this technique (1997. Ap.J., 486, 928) which showed that "hard-to-soft" spectral evolution is prevalent both within and between the bursts' intensity spikes. I proposed to continue developing this technique. However, I have been somewhat disillusioned about using this methodology quantitatively since it averages the spectral evolution on a given timescale over the entire burst. Nonetheless, I have been applying the technique to new bursts which are scientifically interesting for other reasons. Attached I include the cross-correlations for the burst GRB 990123, the burst during which ROTSE discovered an optical transient. The solid curve is the autocorrelatl'on of BATSE's channel 3 (100-300 keV), while the dashed, dot-dashed and 3 dots-dashed curves are the crosscorrelations of channel 3 with channels 1 (25-50 keV), 2 (50-100 keV), and 4 (300-2000 keV). The order of, and separation between, the curves on the positive lag side

  5. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extra-solar Oort clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1994-01-01

    With the strong CGRO/BATSE evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approximately equals to 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NS's penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequences stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on timescales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating events. Comparing these estimates to the three to four soft gamma-ray repeater sources detected by BATSE, one is forced to conclude that (1

  6. Gamma ray pulsars: Models and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    1990-01-01

    The two known gamma ray pulsars, the Crab and Vela, were used as guides for the development of models of high-energy radiation from spinning neutron stars. Two general classes of models were developed: those with the gamma radiation originating in the pulsar magnetosphere far from the neutron star surface (outer gap models) and those with the gamma radiation coming from above the polar cap (polar cap models). The goal is to indicate how EGRET can contribute to understanding gamma-ray pulsars, and especially how it can help distinguish between models for emission.

  7. BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra. Part 3; Low-Energy Behavior of Time-Averaged Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Matteson, J. L.; Band, D. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Meegan, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze time-averaged spectra from 86 bright gamma-ray bursts from the first 5 years of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to determine whether the lowest energy data are consistent with a standard spectra form fit to the data at all energies. The BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors have the capability to observe photons as low as 5 keV. Using the gamma-ray burst locations obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors, the Spectroscopy Detectors' low-energy response can be modeled accurately. This, together with a postlaunch calibration of the lowest energy Spectroscopy Detector discriminator channel, which can lie in the range 5-20 keV, allows spectral deconvolution over a broad energy range, approx. 5 keV to 2 MeV. The additional coverage allows us to search for evidence of excess emission, or for a deficit, below 20 keV. While no burst has a significant (greater than or equal to 3 sigma) deficit relative to a standard spectra model, we find that 12 bursts have excess low-energy emission, ranging between 1.2 and 5.8 times the model flux, that exceeds 5 sigma in significance. This is evidence for an additional low-energy spectral component in at least some bursts, or for deviations from the power-law spectral form typically used to model gamma-ray bursts at energies below 100 keV.

  8. The X-ray afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D.

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are renowned for being the brightest explosions since the Big Bang. They are extremely useful probes with which to study the cosmos, primarily because of their bright afterglows. While the afterglow is panchromatic, the X-ray afterglow has proved extremely useful: the first localisations of both short and long-duration GRBs were made via their X-ray afterglows, an X-ray afterglow is associated with almost every burst, and spectroscopy of the X-ray afterglow informs us of the material close to the GRB as well as providing an unobscured measurement of the afterglow flux for virtually every GRB. We now have an incredibly rich database of ten years worth of GRBs and their afterglows from the Swift satellite, where its rapid autonomous repointing has allowed its X-Ray Telescope to be on target only minutes after the GRB. Here I will review what we have learnt from the X-ray afterglows of GRBs and describe some exciting recent results.

  9. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts by HETE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, N.; Matsuoka, M.; Yoshida, A.; Shirasaki, Y.; Ricker, G.; Doty, J.; Vanderspek, R.; Crew, G.; Villasenor, J.; Atteia, J.-L.; Fenimore, E. E.; Galassi, M.; Lamb, D. Q.; Graziani, C.; Hurley, K.; Jernigan, J. G.; Woosley, S.; Martel, F.; Monnelly, G.; Prigozhin, G.; Olive, J.-F.; Dezalay, J.P.; Boer, M.; Pizzichini, G.; Cline, T.

    2004-01-01

    The High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE-2), launched in October 2000, is currently localizing gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) at a rate of approximately 20/yr, many in real time. As of August 2003, HETE-2 had localized 43 GRBs; 16 localizations had led to the detection of an X-ray, optical, or radio afterglows. The prompt position notification of HETE-2 enabled probing the nature of so-called "dark bursts" for which no optical afterglows were found despite of accurate localizations. In some cases, the optical afterglow was found to be intrinsically faint , and its flux declined rapidly. In another case, the optical emission was likely to be extinguished by the dust in the vicinity of the GRB source. The bright afterglows of GRB021004 and GRB030329 were observed in unprecedented details by telescopes around the world. Strong evidence for the association of long GRBs with the core-collapse supernovae was found. HETE-2 has localized almost as many X-ray rich GRBs as classical GRBs. The nature of the X-ray rich GRBs and X-ray flashes have been studied systematically with HETE-2, and they are found to have many properties in common with the classical GRBs, suggesting that they are a single phenomenon.

  10. GAMMA-RAY BURST FLARES: ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL FLARING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional ''breaks'' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T{sub start}, T{sub stop}, and T{sub peak}. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of {approx}2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10{sup 5} s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with {Delta}t/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  11. ON PARTICLE ACCELERATION RATE IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eran; Nakar, Ehud

    2012-04-10

    It is well known that collisionless shocks are major sites of particle acceleration in the universe, but the details of the acceleration process are still not well understood. The particle acceleration rate, which can shed light on the acceleration process, is rarely measured in astrophysical environments. Here, we use observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, which are weakly magnetized relativistic collisionless shocks in ion-electron plasma, to constrain the rate of particle acceleration in such shocks. We find, based on X-ray and GeV afterglows, an acceleration rate that is most likely very fast, approaching the Bohm limit, when the shock Lorentz factor is in the range of {Gamma} {approx} 10-100. In that case X-ray observations may be consistent with no amplification of the magnetic field in the shock upstream region. We examine the X-ray afterglow of GRB 060729, which is observed for 642 days showing a sharp decay in the flux starting about 400 days after the burst, when the shock Lorentz factor is {approx}5. We find that inability to accelerate X-ray-emitting electrons at late time provides a natural explanation for the sharp decay, and that also in that case acceleration must be rather fast, and cannot be more than a 100 times slower than the Bohm limit. We conclude that particle acceleration is most likely fast in GRB afterglows, at least as long as the blast wave is ultrarelativistic.

  12. High-redshift Gamma-Ray Burst Studies with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca

    2007-05-01

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SN) rates with the observed long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift. To do that, we assume different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological type: ellipticals, spirals and irregulars. In particular, the predicted Type Ib/c SN rate (SNRIb/c) is always higher than the GRB rate, as expected, suggesting that only a small fraction (0.1-1%) of them become GRBs. We predict a ratio between the cosmic GRB rate and the cosmic SNRIb/c in the range 10-2 - 10-3, in agreement with previous estimates. Finally, due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict more GRBs at high redshift than previous estimates, a prediction which awaits to be proven by future observations by GLAST. Based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this high-redshift burst population is finally presented.

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Flares: Ultraviolet/Optical Flaring. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional "breaks" to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T start, T stop, and T peak. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 105 s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with Δt/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  14. Radio afterglows and host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Biao; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Huang, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xue-Feng; Kong, Si-Wei; Li, Di; Chang, Heon-Young; Choi, Chul-Sung

    2015-08-01

    Considering the contribution of emission from the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to radio afterglows, we investigate the effect of host galaxies on observations statistically. For the three types of event, i.e. low-luminosity, standard and high-luminosity GRBs, it is found that a tight correlation exists between the ratio of the radio flux (RRF) of the host galaxy to the total radio peak emission and the observational frequency. Towards lower frequencies, in particular, the contribution from the host increases significantly. The correlation can be used to obtain a useful estimate for the radio brightness of those host galaxies that only have very limited radio afterglow data. Using this prediction, we reconsidered the theoretical radio afterglow light curves for four kinds of event: high-luminosity, low-luminosity, standard and failed GRBs, taking into account the contribution from host galaxies and aiming to explore the detectability of these events by the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST). Lying at a typical redshift of z = 1, most of the events can be detected easily by FAST. For the less fierce low-luminosity GRBs, their radio afterglows are not strong enough to exceed the sensitivity limit of FAST at such distances. However, since a large number of low-luminosity bursts actually happen very near to us, it is expected that FAST will still be able to detect many of them.

  15. A Non-Triggered Burst Supplement to the BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kommers, J.; Lewin, W. H.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Pendleton, G. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a real-time burst detection (or "trigger") system running onboard the spacecraft. Under some circumstances, however, a GRB may not activate the onboard burst trigger. For example, the burst may be too faint to exceed the onboard detection threshold, or it may occur while the onboard burst trigger is disabled for technical reasons. This paper is a catalog of such "non-triggered" GRBs that were detected in a search of the archival continuous data from BATSE. It lists 873 non-triggered bursts that were recorded between 1991 December 9.0 and 1997 December 17.0. For each burst, the catalog gives an estimated source direction, duration, peak flux, and fluence. Similar data are presented for 50 additional bursts of unknown origin that were detected in the 25-50 keV range; these events may represent the low-energy "tail" of the GRB spectral distribution. This catalog increases the number of GRBs detected with BATSE by 48% during the time period covered by the search.

  16. The x-/gamma-ray camera ECLAIRs for the gamma-ray burst mission SVOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godet, O.; Nasser, G.; Atteia, J.-.; Cordier, B.; Mandrou, P.; Barret, D.; Triou, H.; Pons, R.; Amoros, C.; Bordon, S.; Gevin, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Götz, D.; Gros, A.; Houret, B.; Lachaud, C.; Lacombe, K.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Schanne, S.; Waegebaert, V.

    2014-07-01

    We present ECLAIRs, the Gamma-ray burst (GRB) trigger camera to fly on-board the Chinese-French mission SVOM. ECLAIRs is a wide-field (~ 2 sr) coded mask camera with a mask transparency of 40% and a 1024 cm2 detection plane coupled to a data processing unit, so-called UGTS, which is in charge of locating GRBs in near real time thanks to image and rate triggers. We present the instrument science requirements and how the design of ECLAIRs has been optimized to increase its sensitivity to high-redshift GRBs and low-luminosity GRBs in the local Universe, by having a low-energy threshold of 4 keV. The total spectral coverage ranges from 4 to 150 keV. ECLAIRs is expected to detect ~ 200 GRBs of all types during the nominal 3 year mission lifetime. To reach a 4 keV low-energy threshold, the ECLAIRs detection plane is paved with 6400 4 × 4 mm2 and 1 mm-thick Schottky CdTe detectors. The detectors are grouped by 32, in 8×4 matrices read by a low-noise ASIC, forming elementary modules called XRDPIX. In this paper, we also present our current efforts to investigate the performance of these modules with their front-end electronics when illuminated by charged particles and/or photons using radioactive sources. All measurements are made in different instrument configurations in vacuum and with a nominal in-flight detector temperature of -20°C. This work will enable us to choose the in-flight configuration that will make the best compromise between the science performance and the in-flight operability of ECLAIRs. We will show some highlights of this work.

  17. High-precision source location of the 1978 November 19 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Pizzichini, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The celestial source location of the November 19, 1978, intense gamma ray burst has been determined from data obtained with the interplanetary gamma-ray sensor network by means of long-baseline wave front timing instruments. Each of the instruments was designed for studying events with observable spectra of approximately greater than 100 keV, and each provides accurate event profile timing in the several millisecond range. The data analysis includes the following: the triangulated region is centered at (gamma, delta) 1950 = (1h16m32s, -28 deg 53 arcmin), at -84 deg galactic latitude, where the star density is very low and the obscuration negligible. The gamma-ray burst source region, consistent with that of a highly polarized radio source described by Hjellming and Ewald (1981), may assist in the source modeling and may facilitate the understanding of the source process. A marginally identifiable X-ray source was also found by an Einstein Observatory investigation. It is concluded that the burst contains redshifted positron annihilation and nuclear first-excited iron lines, which is consistent with a neutron star origin.

  18. The SKA View of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; van der Horst, A.; Murphy, T.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Gaensler, B.; Ghisellini, G.; Prandoni, I.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are some of the most extreme events in the Universe. As well as providing a natural laboratory for investigating fundamental physical processes, they might trace the cosmic star formation rate up to extreme redshifts and probe the composition of the intergalactic medium over most of the Universe's history. Radio observations of GRBs play a key part in determining their physical properties, but currently they are largely limited to follow-up observations of $\\gamma$-ray-detected objects. The SKA will significantly increase our ability to study GRB afterglows, following up several hundred objects in the high frequency bands already in the "early science" implementation of the telescope. SKA1-MID Bands 4 (4 GHz) and 5 (9.2 GHz) will be particularly suited to the detection of these transient phenomena. The SKA will trace the peak of the emission, sampling the thick-to-thin transition of the evolving spectrum, and follow-up the afterglow down to the time the ejecta slow down to non-relativistic speeds. The full SKA will be able to observe the afterglows across the non-relativistic transition, for ~25% of the whole GRB population. This will allow us to get a significant insight into the true energy budget of GRBs, probe their surrounding density profile, and the shock microphysics. The SKA will also be able to routinely detect the elusive "orphan afterglow" emission, from the population of GRBs whose jets are not pointed towards the Earth. We expect that a deep all-sky survey such as SKA1-SUR will see around 300 orphan afterglows every week. We predict these detection to be >1000 when the full SKA telescope will be operational.

  19. Extreme Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): constraining energetics and probing central engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Aquib; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Tingay, Steven; Frail, Dale

    2009-10-01

    We propose an ATCA study of the highest energy and highest redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). There is growing evidence for a population of "hyper-energetic" GRBs with a total energy release ten or more times the canonical event which release of order 10^51 erg. The energy budget of these hyper-energetic events is a severe test of GRB progenitor models. Radio observations provide complementary and sometimes unique constraints on the total energy release. The CABB sensitivity improvements and the recent launch of the GLAST and Agile satellites (which self-select energetic bursts) make this project timely.

  20. Search for Prompt Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larsen, D. T.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Paul, L.; Penke, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Rees, I.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zoll, M.

    2015-05-01

    We present constraints derived from a search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A single low-significance neutrino, compatible with the atmospheric neutrino background, was found in coincidence with one of the 506 observed bursts. Although GRBs have been proposed as candidate sources for ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, our limits on the neutrino flux disfavor much of the parameter space for the latest models. We also find that no more than ˜1% of the recently observed astrophysical neutrino flux consists of prompt emission from GRBs that are potentially observable by existing satellites.

  1. Methodological problems with gamma-ray burst hardness/intensity correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1993-01-01

    The hardness and intensity are easily measured quantities for all gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and so, many past and current studies have sought correlations between them. This Letter presents many serious methodological problems with the practical definitions for both hardness and intensity. These difficulties are such that significant correlations can be easily introduced as artifacts of the reduction procedure. In particular, cosmological models of GRBs cannot be tested with hardness/intensity correlations with current instrumentation and the time evolution of the hardness in a given burst may be correlated with intensity for reasons that are unrelated to intrinsic change in the spectral shape.

  2. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BeppoSAX GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Guidorzi, C.; Frontera, F.; Montanari, E.; Rossi, F.; Feroci, M.; Mazets, E.; Golenetskii, S.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Starr, R.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barraud, C.; Pelangeon, A.; Boer, M.; Vanderspek, R.

    2010-11-15

    Between 1996 July and 2002 April, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network detected 786 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and/or Wide-Field X-Ray Camera experiments aboard the BeppoSAX spacecraft. During this period, the network consisted of up to six spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 475 bursts were obtained. We present the localization data for these events.

  3. Closest Gamma Ray Burst Providing Scientists With Crucial Test for Burst Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    The closest Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) yet known is providing astronomers with a rare opportunity to gain information vital to understanding these powerful cosmic explosions. Extremely precise radio-telescope observations already have ruled out one proposed mechanism for the bursts. "This is the closest and brightest GRB we've ever seen, and we can use it to decipher the physics of how these bursts work," said Greg Taylor of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Taylor worked with Dale Frail, also of the NRAO, along with Prof. Shri Kulkarni and graduate student Edo Berger of Caltech in studying a GRB detected on March 29, 2003. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Nashville, TN. VLBA image of GRB 030329 VLBA IMAGE of GRB 030329 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on Image for Larger Version) Taylor and Frail used the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and other radio telescopes to study the burst, known as GRB 030329. In a series of observations from April 1 to May 19, they determined the size of the expanding "fireball" from the burst and measured its position in the sky with great precision. At a distance of about 2.6 billion light-years, GRB 030329 is hardly next door. However, compared to other GRBs at typical distances of 8-10 billion light-years, it presents an easier target for study. "We only expect to see one burst per decade this close," said Frail. The precise measurement of the object's position allowed the scientists to show that one theoretical model for GRBs can be ruled out. This model, proposed in 2000, says that the radio-wave energy emitted by the GRB comes from "cannonballs" of material shot from the explosion at extremely high speeds. "The 'cannonball model' predicted that we should see the radio-emitting object move across the sky by a specific amount. We have not seen that motion," Taylor said. The currently standard "fireball model" of GRBs

  4. A New Variability Parameter for Gamma-Ray Burst Time Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1994-01-01

    We present a parameter that measures the structure of gamma-ray burst time profiles. This parameter is based on the statistics of runs and is a good measure of time profile variability. It is shown to be independent of burst duration and less sensitive to burst distance than algorithms that depend directly on the intensity of a burst.

  5. Are short Gamma Ray Bursts similar to long ones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Bernardini, M. G.; Calderone, G.; D'Avanzo, P.

    2015-09-01

    The apparent separation of short and long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the hardness ratio vs duration plot has been considered as a direct evidence of the difference between these two populations. The origin of this diversity, however, has been only confirmed with larger GRB samples but not fully understood. In particular, the hardness ratio is only a proxy of the shape of the spectra of GRBs and itself, together with the observed duration, does not consider the possible different redshift distribution of short and long bursts, which might arise from their different progenitors' nature. By correcting the spectral shape of short and long GRBs for the redshift effects, short GRBs are harder than long ones due to a harder low energy spectral component while the two populations have similar (rest frame) peak energy. In the rest frame, the temporal break of the long/short duration distribution is blurred away and short and long GRBs have a continuous differential duration distribution. Moreover, they show similar luminosities but their energetics differ by a factor proportional to their different average duration. The spectral evolution of long GRBs shows that the initial phase (of the order of 0.3 s rest frame) has similar spectral properties of that of short GRBs. As a consequence, the different hardness at low energies might be due to a prolonged spectral evolution of long GRBs with respect to short ones. Finally, we show that long GRBs can have a null lag similarly to short bursts. Moreover, we find that a considerable fraction of long (and most of short) GRBs are inconsistent with the lag-luminosity relation which could be a boundary in the corresponding plane, rather than a correlation.

  6. A Nontriggered Burst Supplement to the BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kommers, Jefferson M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    2001-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a real-time burst detection (or "trigger") system running onboard the spacecraft. Under some circumstances, however, a GRB may not activate the on-board burst trigger. For example, the burst may be too faint to exceed the on-board detection threshold, or it may occur while the on-board burst trigger is disabled for technical reasons. This paper describes a catalog of 873 "nontriggered" GRBs that were detected in a search of the archival continuous data from BATSE recorded between 1991 December 9.0 and 1997 December 17.0. For each burst, the catalog gives an estimated source direction, duration, peak flux, and fluence. Similar data are presented for 50 additional bursts of unknown origin that were detected in the 25-50 keV range; these events may represent the low-energy "tail" of the GRB spectral distribution. This catalog increases the number of GRBs detected with BATSE by 48% during the time period covered by the search.

  7. Gamma-Ray bursts: accumulating afterglow implications, progenitor clues, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Mészáros, P

    2001-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays that, for a few blinding seconds, light up in an otherwise fairly dark gamma-ray sky. They are detected at the rate of about once a day, and while they are on, they outshine every other gamma-ray source in the sky, including the sun. Major advances have been made in the last 3 or 4 years, including the discovery of slowly fading x-ray, optical, and radio afterglows of GRBs, the identification of host galaxies at cosmological distances, and evidence showing that many GRBs are associated with star-forming regions and possibly supernovae. Progress has been made in understanding how the GRB and afterglow radiation arises in terms of a relativistic fireball shock model. These advances have opened new vistas and questions on the nature of the central engine, the identity of their progenitors, the effects of the environment, and their possible gravitational wave, cosmic ray, and neutrino luminosity. The debates on these issues indicate that GRBs remain among the most mysterious puzzles in astrophysics. PMID:11141551

  8. BeppoSAX/Ulysses observations of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, K.; Cline, T.; Frontera, F.; Dal Fiume, D.; Orlandini, M.

    1998-05-16

    BeppoSAX has been added to the 3rd Interplanetary Network of gamma-ray burst detectors. Of the {approx_equal}8 events observed to date by Ulysses and the BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GRBM), four have been localized by triangulation, resulting in annuli whose 3 {sigma} widths are as small as 63{sup ''}. These data give error boxes whose sizes can be as much as an order of magnitude smaller than those obtained with the SAX Wide Field Camera (WFC). They can be used to confirm the association between fading X-ray and optical sources and gamma-ray bursts.

  9. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of the Three Brightest and Hardest Short Gamma-ray Bursts Observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiriec, Sylvain; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaugthon, Valerie; Kara, Erin; Daigne, Frédéric; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A.; Bhat, P. N.; Foley, Suzanne; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2010-12-01

    From 2008 July to 2009 October, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected 320 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). About 20% of these events are classified as short based on their T 90 duration below 2 s. We present here for the first time time-resolved spectroscopy at timescales as short as 2 ms for the three brightest short GRBs observed with GBM. The time-integrated spectra of the events deviate from the Band function, indicating the existence of an additional spectral component, which can be fit by a power law with index ~-1.5. The time-integrated E peak values exceed 2 MeV for two of the bursts and are well above the values observed in the brightest long GRBs. Their E peak values and their low-energy power-law indices (α) confirm that short GRBs are harder than long ones. We find that short GRBs are very similar to long ones, but with light curves contracted in time and with harder spectra stretched toward higher energies. In our time-resolved spectroscopy analysis, we find that the E peak values range from a few tens of keV up to more than 6 MeV. In general, the hardness evolutions during the bursts follow their flux/intensity variations, similar to long bursts. However, we do not always see the E peak leading the light-curve rises and confirm the zero/short average light-curve spectral lag below 1 MeV, already established for short GRBs. We also find that the time-resolved low-energy power-law indices of the Band function mostly violate the limits imposed by the synchrotron models for both slow and fast electron cooling and may require additional emission processes to explain the data. Finally, we interpreted these observations in the context of the current existing models and emission mechanisms for the prompt emission of GRBs.

  10. ARE LOW-LUMINOSITY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS GENERATED BY RELATIVISTIC JETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Omer; Piran, Tsvi; Nakar, Ehud

    2011-10-01

    Low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (ll-GRBs) constitute a subclass of GRBs that play a central role in the GRB-supernova connection. While ll-GRBs differ from typical long GRBs (LGRBs) in many aspects, they also share some common features. Therefore, the question whether the gamma-ray emission of ll-GRBs and LGRBs has a common origin is of great interest. Here we address this question by testing whether ll-GRBs, like LGRBs according to the Collapsar model, can be generated by relativistic jets that punch holes in the envelopes of their progenitor stars. The Collapsar model predicts that the durations of most observed bursts will be comparable to, or longer than, the time it takes the jets to break out of the star. We calculate the jet breakout times of ll-GRBs and compare them to the observed durations. We find that there is a significant excess of ll-GRBs with durations that are much shorter than the jet breakout time and that these are inconsistent with the Collapsar model. We conclude that the processes that dominate the gamma-ray emission of ll-GRBs and of LGRBs are most likely fundamentally different.

  11. What did we learn from gamma-ray burst 080319B?

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, Alin; Kumar, Pawan

    2008-01-01

    The optical and gamma-ray observations of GRB 080319B allow us to provide a broad-brush picture for this remarkable burst. The data indicate that the prompt optical and gamma-ray photons were possibly produced at the same location but by different radiation processes: synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton, respectively (but we note that this interpretation of the gamma-ray data faces some difficulties). We find that the burst prompt optical emission was produced at a distance of 10{sup 16.3} cm by an ultrarelativistic source moving at Lorentz factor of -500. A straightforward inference is that about 10 times more energy must have been radiated at tens of GeV than that released at 1 MeV. Assuming that the GRB outflow was baryonic and the gamma-ray source was shock-heated plasma, the collimation-corrected kinetic energy of the jet powering GRB 080319B was larger than 10{sup 52.3} erg. The decay of the early afterglow optical emission (up to 1 ks) is too fast to be attributed to the reverse-shock crossing the GRB ejecta but is consistent with the expectations for the 'large-angle' emission released during the burst. The pure power-law decay of the optical afterglow flux from 1 ks to 10 d is most naturally identified with the (synchrotron) emission from the shock propagating into a wind-like medium. However, the X-ray afterglow requires a departure from the standard blast-wave model.

  12. Limits on neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts with the 40 string IceCube detector.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Bazo Alba, J L; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülss, J-P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pérez de los Heros, C; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schoenwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, C; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-04-01

    IceCube has become the first neutrino telescope with a sensitivity below the TeV neutrino flux predicted from gamma-ray bursts if gamma-ray bursts are responsible for the observed cosmic-ray flux above 10(18)  eV. Two separate analyses using the half-complete IceCube detector, one a dedicated search for neutrinos from pγ interactions in the prompt phase of the gamma-ray burst fireball and the other a generic search for any neutrino emission from these sources over a wide range of energies and emission times, produced no evidence for neutrino emission, excluding prevailing models at 90% confidence. PMID:21561178

  13. Gamma-ray bursts as the death throes of massive binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; Paczynski, Bohdan; Piran, Tsvi

    1992-01-01

    We propose that gamma-ray bursts are created in the mergers of double neutron star binaries and black hole neutron star binaries at cosmological distances. Two different processes provide the electromagnetic energy for the bursts: neutrino-antineutrino annihilation into electron-position pairs during the merger, and magnetic flares generated by the Parker instability in a postmerger differentially rotating disk. In both cases, an optically thick fireball of size less than or approximately equal to 100 km is initially created, which expands ultrarelativistically to large radii before radiating. The scenario is only qualitative at this time, but it eliminates many previous objections to the cosmological merger model. The strongest bursts should be found close to, but not at the centers of, galaxies at redshifts of order 0.1, and should be accompanied by bursts of gravitational radiation from the spiraling-in binary which could be detected by LIGO.

  14. Terrestrial Ozone Depletion Due to a Milky Way Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Brian C.; Jackman, Charles H.; Melott, Adrian L.; Laird, Claude M.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.; Hogan, Daniel P.

    2005-01-01

    Based on cosmological rates, it is probable that at least once in the last Gy the Earth has been irradiated by a gamma-ray burst in our Galaxy from within 2 kpc. Using a two-dimensional atmospheric model we have computed the effects upon the Earth's atmosphere of one such burst. A ten second burst delivering 100 kJ/sq m to the Earth results in globally averaged ozone depletion of 35%, with depletion reaching 55% at some latitudes. Significant global depletion persists for over 5 years after the burst. This depletion would have dramatic implications for life since a 50% decrease in ozone column density results in approximately three times the normal UVB flux. Widespread extinctions are likely, based on extrapolation from UVB sensitivity of modern organisms.

  15. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays From Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Asano, Katsuaki; Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-06

    Regenerated high energy emissions from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are studied in detail. If the primary emission spectrum extends to TeV range, these very high energy photons will be absorbed by the cosmic infrared background (CIB). The created high energy electron-positron pairs up-scatter not only cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons but also CIB photons, and secondary photons are generated in the GeV-TeV range. These secondary delayed photons may be observed in the near future, and useful for a consistency check for the primary spectra and GRB physical parameters. The up-scattered CIB photons cannot be neglected for low redshift bursts and/or GRBs with a relatively low maximum photon energy. The secondary gamma-rays also give us additional information on the CIB, which is uncertain in observations so far.

  16. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center program in gamma-ray burst astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    The research program in gamma-ray burst astronomy at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center is described. Large-area scintillation detector arrays have been flown on high-altitude balloons, and an array is being developed for the Gamma-Ray Observatory. The design of these detectors is described along with results obtained from previous balloon flights.

  17. PROGRESS ON MARGIE, A GAMMA-RAY BURST ULTRA-LONG DURATION BALLOON MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    D. BAND; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    We are designing the Minute of Arc Resolution Gamma-ray Imaging Experiment (MARGIE) as a 100 day Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) mission to: (1) detect and localize gamma-ray bursts; and (2) survey the hard X-ray sky. Major advances in designing the CZT detectors increase the sensitivity to higher energy. Design of the gondola has also progressed.

  18. DIFFUSE PeV NEUTRINOS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2013-04-01

    The IceCube Collaboration recently reported the potential detection of two cascade neutrino events in the energy range 1-10 PeV. We study the possibility that these PeV neutrinos are produced by gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), paying special attention to the contribution by untriggered GRBs that elude detection due to their low photon flux. Based on the luminosity function, rate distribution with redshift and spectral properties of GRBs, we generate, using a Monte Carlo simulation, a GRB sample that reproduces the observed fluence distribution of Fermi/GBM GRBs and an accompanying sample of untriggered GRBs simultaneously. The neutrino flux of every individual GRB is calculated in the standard internal shock scenario, so that the accumulative flux of the whole samples can be obtained. We find that the neutrino flux in PeV energies produced by untriggered GRBs is about two times higher than that produced by the triggered ones. Considering the existing IceCube limit on the neutrino flux of triggered GRBs, we find that the total flux of triggered and untriggered GRBs can reach at most a level of {approx}10{sup -9} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}, which is insufficient to account for the reported two PeV neutrinos. Possible contributions to diffuse neutrinos by low-luminosity GRBs and the earliest population of GRBs are also discussed.

  19. Probing massive stars around gamma-ray burst progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenbin; Kumar, Pawan; Smoot, George F.

    2015-10-01

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced by ultra-relativistic jets launched from core collapse of massive stars. Most massive stars form in binaries and/or in star clusters, which means that there may be a significant external photon field (EPF) around the GRB progenitor. We calculate the inverse-Compton scattering of EPF by the hot electrons in the GRB jet. Three possible cases of EPF are considered: the progenitor is (I) in a massive binary system, (II) surrounded by a Wolf-Rayet-star wind and (III) in a dense star cluster. Typical luminosities of 1046-1050 erg s-1 in the 1-100 GeV band are expected, depending on the stellar luminosity, binary separation (I), wind mass-loss rate (II), stellar number density (III), etc. We calculate the light curve and spectrum in each case, taking fully into account the equal-arrival time surfaces and possible pair-production absorption with the prompt γ-rays. Observations can put constraints on the existence of such EPFs (and hence on the nature of GRB progenitors) and on the radius where the jet internal dissipation process accelerates electrons.

  20. The polarized gamma-ray burst GRB 061122

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, D.; Covino, S.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Laurent, P.; Bošnjak, Ž.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the polarization measure, obtained with IBIS on board INTEGRAL, of the prompt emission of GRB 061122. Over an 8 s interval containing the brightest part of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) we put a lower limit on its polarization fraction of 60 per cent at 68 per cent confidence level (c.l.) and of 33 per cent at 90 per cent c.l. on the 250-800 keV energy range. We performed late time optical and near-infrared imaging observations of the GRB field using the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Our multiband (ugrizYJHK) photometry allowed us to identify the host galaxy of GRB 061122 and to build its spectral energy distribution. Using a photometric redshift code we fitted these data, and derived the basic properties of the galaxy, including its type and redshift, that we could constrain to the interval [0.57, 2.10] at a 90 per cent c.l., with a best-fitting value of z = 1.33. The polarization measurement in different energy bands, together with the distance determination, allowed us to put the most stringent limit (ξ ≲ 3.4 × 10-16) to date to a possible Lorentz invariance violation based on the vacuum birefringence effect, predicted by some quantum-gravity theories.