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1

Influence of hyperthermia on gamma-ray-induced mutation in V79 cells  

SciTech Connect

Asynchronously growing V79 cells were assayed for mutation induction following exposure to hyperthermia either immediately before or after being irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays. Hyperthermia exposures consisted of either 43.5{degree}C for 30 min or 45{degree}C for 10 min. Each of these heat treatments resulted in a survival level of 42%. For all sequences of combined treatment with hyperthermia and radiation, cell killing by gamma rays was enhanced. Mutation induction by gamma rays was enhanced when heat preceded gamma irradiation, but no increase was observed when heat was given after gamma exposures. Treatment at 45{degree}C for 10 min gave a higher yield in mutants at all gamma doses studied compared to treatment at 43.5{degree}C for 30 min. When heat-treated cells were incubated for different periods before being exposed to gamma rays, thermal enhancement of radiation killing was lost after 24 h. In contrast, only 5-6 h incubation was needed for loss of mutation induction enhancement.

Banerjee, S.; Bhaumik, G.; Bhattacharjee, S.B. (Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India))

1989-08-01

2

Gamma-rays-induced death of human cells carrying mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is now evidence to suggest that BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in the response of cells to DNA damage and cell cycle checkpoint control. This report examines the death pathways of human cells with various BRCA1 and BRCA2 genotypes after exposure to gamma-rays. A lack of functional BRCA1 and BRCA2 led to defective repair of DNA double-strand breaks in

Nicolas Foray; Voahangy Randrianarison; Didier Marot; Michel Perricaudet; Gilbert Lenoir; Jean Feunteun

1999-01-01

3

Neutron induced gamma-ray emission tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radioactivity induced in a neutron irradiated material may be considered as a distributed radioactive source suitable for imaging using computerized gamma-ray emission tomography. The resulting image reveals the distribution of an element of interest in a given plane of the imaged object. Therefore the technique, neutron induced gamma-ray emission tomography, provides information about the elemental composition and distribution. This is demonstrated by imaging the distribution of sodium in a pellet of freeze-dried sea water and a section of human bone using the gamma-ray emitted by Na-24 produced in the presence of a number of other gamma-ray emitting nuclides. Application of a dual energy scattering correction algorithm developed for this purpose resulted in a 44% increase in contrast for the lower energy gamma-rays (1.36 MeV), where the effect of scattering was pronounced and only 14% for the higher energy line (2.75 MeV) emitted by the same nuclide.

Balogun, F. A.; Spyrou, N. M.; Adesanmi, C. A.

1996-07-01

4

Prompt gamma-ray coincidences from U-235 induced fission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experiment to measure gamma-ray emission from the prompt fission fragments of U-235 was recently performed at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Ten HPGE detectors were used to observe coincident gamma-rays from the fission fragments. Unlike previous fission studies which focused on the fission fragments populated by beta decay, we have measured the prompt fission yields by inducing fission in the U-235 target. Coincidence information between light and heavy fission fragments permits the assignment of observed gamma-rays to a particular isotope. Preliminary analysis indicates new spectroscopic information for dozens of nuclei, as well as the observation of isotopes for which gamma-ray decays were previously unreported. We will report on the prompt fission yields of the major fission fragments, as well as the new spectroscopic information for select nuclei.

Jewell, J. Keith; Cole, Jerald; Drigert, Mark; Reber, Edward; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat

1999-10-01

5

Induced Background in the Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-Ray Spectrometers in space must necessarily work in an environment of a background of lines due to natural and cosmic-ray induced radioactivity and lines due to prompt emission following nuclear reactions caused by primary and secondary cosmic rays. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mar Observer mission has provided important data allowing one to estimate for future missions the extent of the background due to cosmic rays. These data will help in the design of instruments and in calculation of realistic background intensities that may effect the sensitivity of determining the intensity of lines of interest.

Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Starr, Richard; Bruekner, Johnnes; Bailey, S. H.; Trombka, Jacob I.

1997-01-01

6

The measurement of gamma ray induced heating in a mixed neutron and gamma ray environment  

SciTech Connect

The problem of measuring the gamma heating in a mixed DT neutron and gamma ray environment was explored. A new detector technique was developed to make this measurement. Gamma heating measurements were made in a low-Z assembly irradiated with 14-Mev neutrons and (n, n{prime}) gammas produced by a Texas Nuclear Model 9400 neutron generator. Heating measurements were made in the mid-line of the lattice using a proportional counter operating in the Continuously-varied Bias-voltage Acquisition mode. The neutron-induced signal was separated from the gamma-induced signal by exploiting the signal rise-time differences inherent to radiations of different linear energy transfer coefficient, which are observable in a proportional counter. The operating limits of this measurement technique were explored by varying the counter position in the low-Z lattice, hence changing the irradiation spectrum observed. The experiment was modelled numerically to help interpret the measured results. The transport of neutrons and gamma rays in the assembly was modelled using the one- dimensional radiation transport code ANISN/PC. The cross-section set used for these calculations was derived from the ENDF/B-V library using the code MC{sup 2}-2 for the case of DT neutrons slowing down in a low-Z material. The calculated neutron and gamma spectra in the slab and the relevant mass-stopping powers were used to construct weighting factors which relate the energy deposition in the counter fill-gas to that in the counter wall and in the surrounding material. The gamma energy deposition at various positions in the lattice is estimated by applying these weighting factors to the measured gamma energy deposition in the counter at those locations.

Chiu, H.K.

1991-10-01

7

Molecular analysis of point mutations in a barley genome exposed to MNU and gamma rays.  

PubMed

We present studies aimed at determining the types and frequencies of mutations induced in the barley genome after treatment with chemical (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, MNU) and physical (gamma rays) mutagens. We created M(2) populations of a doubled haploid line and used them for the analysis of mutations in targeted DNA sequences and over an entire barley genome using TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) and AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) technique, respectively. Based on the TILLING analysis of the total DNA sequence of 4,537,117bp in the MNU population, the average mutation density was estimated as 1/504kb. Only one nucleotide change was found after an analysis of 3,207,444bp derived from the highest dose of gamma rays applied. MNU was clearly a more efficient mutagen than gamma rays in inducing point mutations in barley. The majority (63.6%) of the MNU-induced nucleotide changes were transitions, with a similar number of G>A and C>T substitutions. The similar share of G>A and C>T transitions indicates a lack of bias in the repair of O(6)-methylguanine lesions between DNA strands. There was, however, a strong specificity of the nucleotide surrounding the O(6)-meG at the -1 position. Purines formed 81% of nucleotides observed at the -1 site. Scanning the barley genome with AFLP markers revealed ca. a three times higher level of AFLP polymorphism in MNU-treated as compared to the gamma-irradiated population. In order to check whether AFLP markers can really scan the whole barley genome for mutagen-induced polymorphism, 114 different AFLP products, were cloned and sequenced. 94% of bands were heterogenic, with some bands containing up to 8 different amplicons. The polymorphic AFLP products were characterised in terms of their similarity to the records deposited in a GenBank database. The types of sequences present in the polymorphic bands reflected the organisation of the barley genome. PMID:23085094

Kurowska, Marzena; Labocha-Paw?owska, Anna; Gnizda, Dominika; Maluszynski, Miroslaw; Szarejko, Iwona

2012-01-01

8

Detection of Neutrons Liberated from Beryllium by Gamma Rays: a New Technique for Inducing Radioactivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have observed that a radiation emitted from beryllium under the influence of radium gamma rays excites induced radioactivity in iodine, and we conclude that neutrons are liberated from beryllium by gamma rays.

Leo Szilard; T. A. Chalmers

1934-01-01

9

Time correlation of cosmic-ray-induced neutrons and gamma rays at sea level  

E-print Network

Time correlation of cosmic-ray-induced neutrons and gamma rays at sea level G. Miloshevsky n , A November 2013 Keywords: Cosmic rays Multiplicity Coincidence Correlation Poisson distribution Feynman-Y statistic a b s t r a c t The neutrons and gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions in spallation

Harilal, S. S.

10

Changes in DNA Base Sequence Induced by Gamma-Ray Mutagenesis of Lambda Phage and Prophage  

PubMed Central

Mutations in the cI (repressor) gene were induced by gamma-ray irradiation of lambda phage and of prophage, and 121 mutations were sequenced. Two-thirds of the mutations in irradiated phage assayed in recA host cells (no induction of the SOS response) were G:C to A:T transitions; it is hypothesized that these may arise during DNA replication from adenine mispairing with a cytosine product deaminated by irradiation. For irradiated phage assayed in host cells in which the SOS response had been induced, 85% of the mutations were base substitutions, and in 40 of the 41 base changes, a preexisting base pair had been replaced by an A:T pair; these might come from damaged bases acting as AP (apurinic or apyrimidinic) sites. The remaining mutations were 1 and 2 base deletions. In irradiated prophage, base change mutations involved the substitution of both A:T and of G:C pairs for the preexisting pairs; the substitution of G:C pairs shows that some base substitution mechanism acts on the cell genome but not on the phage. In the irradiated prophage, frameshifts and a significant number of gross rearrangements were also found. PMID:2966755

Tindall, K. R.; Stein, J.; Hutchinson, F.

1988-01-01

11

Lymphocytes from wasted mice express enhanced spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis  

SciTech Connect

Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wasted (wst/wst) display a disease pattern including faulty repair of DNA damage in lymphocytes after radiation exposure, neurologic abnormalities, and immunodeficiency. Many of the features of this mouse model have suggested a premature or increased spontaneous frequency of apoptosis in thymocytes; past work has shown an inability to establish cultured T cell lines, an abnormally high death rate of stimulated T cells in culture, and an increased sensitivity of T cells to the killing effects of ionizing radiations in wst/wst mice relative to controls. The experiments reported here were designed to examine splenic and thymic lymphocytes from wasted and control mice for signs of early apoptosis. Our results revealed enhanced expression of Rp-8 mRNA (associated with apoptosis) in thymic lymphocytes and reduced expression in splenic lymphocytes of wst/wst mice relative to controls; expression of Rp-2 and Td-30 mRNA (induced during apoptosis) were not detectable in spleen or thymus. Higher spontaneous DNA fragmentation was observed in wasted mice than in controls; however, {gamma}-ray-induced DNA fragmentation peaked at a lower dose and occurred to a greater extent in wasted mice relative to controls. These results provide evidence for high spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis in T cells of wasted mice as a mechanism underlying the observed lymphocyte and DNA repair abnormalities.

Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Chung, Jen; Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

1993-09-01

12

Neutron induced background in the COMPTEL detector on the Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Interactions of neutrons in a prototype of the Compton imaging telescope (COMPTEL) gamma ray detector for the Gamma Ray Observatory were studied to determine COMPTEL's sensitivity as a neutron telescope and to estimate the gamma ray background resulting from neutron interactions. The IUCF provided a pulsed neutron beam at five different energies between 18 and 120 MeV. These measurements showed that the gamma ray background from neutron interactions is greater than previously expected. It was thought that most such events would be due to interactions in the upper detector modules of COMPTEL and could be distinguished by pulse shape discrimination. Rather, the bulk of the gamma ray background appears to be due to interactions in passive material, primarily aluminum, surrounding the D1 modules. In a considerable fraction of these interactions, two or more gamma rays are produced simultaneously, with one interacting in the D1 module and the other interacting in the module of the lower (D2) detector. If the neutron interacts near the D1 module, the D1 D2 time of flight cannot distinguish such an event from a true gamma ray event. In order to assess the significance of this background, the flux of neutrons in orbit has been estimated based on observed events with neutron pulse shape signature in D1. The strength of this neutron induced background is estimated. This is compared with the rate expected from the isotropic cosmic gamma ray flux.

Morris, D. J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Byrd, R.; Collmar, W.; Connors, A.; Diehl, R.; Eymann, G.; Foster, C.

1992-01-01

13

Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

1986-01-01

14

Detection of SNM by delayed gamma rays from induced fission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly (PUNITA) is an experimental device for research in NDA methods and field applicable instrumentation for nuclear safeguards and security applications. PUNITA incorporates a standard 14-MeV (D-T) pulsed neutron generator inside a large graphite mantle. The generator target is surrounded by a thick tungsten filter with the purpose to increase the neutron output and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum. In this configuration a sample may be exposed to a relatively high average thermal neutron flux of about (2.2±0.1)×10 3 s -1 cm -2 at only 10% of the maximum target neutron emission. The sample cavity is large enough to allow variation of the experimental setup including the fissile sample, neutron and gamma detectors, and shielding materials. The response from SNM samples of different fissile material content was investigated with various field-applicable scintillation gamma detectors such as the 3×2 in. LaBr 3 detector. Shielding in the form of tungsten and cadmium was applied to the detector to improve the signal to background ratio. Gamma and neutron shields surrounding the samples were also tested for the purpose of simulating clandestine conduct. The energy spectra of delayed gamma rays were recorded in the range 100 keV-9 MeV. In addition time spectra of delayed gamma rays in the range 3.3-8 MeV were recorded in the time period of 10 ms-120 s after the 14-MeV neutron burst. The goal of the experiment was to optimize the sample/detector configuration including the energy range and time period for SNM detection. The results show, for example, that a 170 g sample of depleted uranium can be detected with the given setup in less than 3 min of investigation. Samples of higher enrichment or higher mass are detected in much shorter time.

Rennhofer, H.; Crochemore, J.-M.; Roesgen, E.; Pedersen, B.

2011-10-01

15

Neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts as a tool to explore quantum-gravity-induced  

E-print Network

LETTERS Neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts as a tool to explore quantum-gravity-induced Lorentz-energy neutrinos12,13 . At these energies, the background level in neutrino detectors such as IceCube (currently under construction in Antarctica) is extremely low. We show that the detection of even a single neutrino

Loss, Daniel

16

Oscillation Induced Gamma Ray Emission from Dead Pulsars: A Model for Delayed GeV Emission in Gamma Ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The oscillation of a crustal platelet of a neutron star will result in a high potential drop between the magnetic field lines. This potential drop can result in the emission of high energy curvature radiation photons with energy up to a few tens GeV. We consider the radiation processes that take place in the stellar magnetosphere and compute the energy spectrum escaping the magnetosphere. The strain energy available decreases as the star radiates. Thus, the resultant potential drop decreases with time and results in a time delay in the emission of GeV photons. The delay time and the duration of the gamma ray emission process are consistent with the observed behaviour of the high energy gamma ray photons ( ~ 26 GeV) in GRB 940217. These two time scales depend on the stored strain energy, the magnetic field and the period of the star. Our modelling spectrum also provides a good fit to the observed spectrum of the high energy GRB 930131. The radiation processes result in the production of enormous amount of e(+/-) . Line features are expected to be found in some of the gamma ray bursts in our model. In conclusion, if some of the gamma ray bursts do come from the galactic neutron stars, our model provides a good explanation to the time scales and spectral features observed.

Ding, K. Y. Winnis; Cheng, K. S.

1995-03-01

17

a Model-Independent Method to Study Dark Matter Induced Leptons and Gamma Rays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By using recent data, we directly determine the dark matter (DM)-induced e± spectrum at the source from experimental measurements at the earth, without reference to specific particle physics models. The DM-induced gamma rays emitted via inverse Compton scattering are then obtained in a model-independent way. However, the results depend on the choice of the astrophysical e± background, which is not reliably known. Nevertheless, we calculate, as an illustration, the fluxes of gamma rays from the Fornax cluster in the decaying DM scenario with various astrophysical e± backgrounds. Without any assumptions on details of the DM model, the predictions turn out to be either in disagreement with or only marginally below the upper limits measured recently by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration. In addition, these DM-induced ICS gamma rays in the GeV range are shown to be almost independent of choices of cosmic ray propagation model and of DM density profile, when a given astrophysical e± background is assumed. This provides a strong constraint on decaying DM scenario as the gamma rays may be produced in other processes besides inverse Compton scattering, such as the bremsstrahlung and neutral pion decays.

Luo, Mingxing; Wang, Liucheng; Zhu, Guohuai

2012-11-01

18

FISH in analysis of gamma ray-induced micronuclei formation in barley.  

PubMed

A micronucleus test in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using telomere-, centromere-specific probes and 5S and 25S rDNA was used for a detailed analysis of the effects of gamma ray irradiation on the root tip meristem cells of barley, Hordeum vulgare (2n=14). FISH with four DNA probes was used to examine the involvement of specific chromosomes or chromosome fragments in gamma ray-induced micronuclei formation and then to explain their origin. Additionally, a comparison of the possible origin of the micronuclei induced by physical and chemical treatment: maleic hydrazide (MH) and N-nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) was done. The micronuclei induced by gamma ray could originate from acentric fragments after chromosome breakage or from whole lagging chromosomes as a result of a dysfunction of the mitotic apparatus. No micronuclei containing only centromeric signals were found. An application of rDNA as probes allowed it to be stated that 5S rDNA-bearing chromosomes are involved in micronuclei formation more often than NOR chromosomes. This work allowed the origin of physically- and chemically-induced micronuclei in barley cells to be compared: the origin of micronuclei was most often from terminal fragments. FISH confirmed its usefulness in the characterization of micronuclei content, as well as in understanding and comparing the mechanisms of the actions of mutagens applied in plant genotoxicity. PMID:21136232

Juchimiuk-Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Brodziak, Lidia; Maluszynska, Jolanta

2011-02-01

19

Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes.

Lee, Y.-K.; Chang, H.-H.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, K.-S.

2000-02-01

20

Induced Radioactivity in Recovered Skylab Materials. [gamma ray spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four radioactive isotopes found in aluminum and stainless steel samples from Skylab debris were recovered in Australia. The low-level activity was induced by high-energy protons and neutrons in the space environment. Measurements of the specific activities are given.

Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

1980-01-01

21

Proton and gamma ray induced gain degradation in bipolar transistor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the results of the effect of 24 MeV proton and (CO)-C-60 gamma-irradiation on the collector characteristic., and forward current gain of commercial bipolar transistor (npn 2N2219A). The transistor has been exposed to these radiations in the biased condition and the collector characteristics and forward current gain have been measured as a function of proton fluence and gamma-dose. The observation is that both the proton and gamma-irradiation induce significant gain degradation in the transistor. The results are discussed in terms of displacement damage produced by energetic protons and gamma-radiation in the bulk of the semiconductor.

Kulkarni, S. R.; Sarma, A.; Joshi, G. R.; Ravindra, M.; Damle, R.

2003-09-01

22

The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements  

SciTech Connect

The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements has been measured in the energy range 5.6 MeV {le} E{sub {alpha}} {le} 10 MeV. The {gamma}-ray yield for > 2.1 MeV from thick targets of beryllium, boron nitride, sodium fluoride, magnesium, aluminum and silicon were measured using the {alpha}-particle beam from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories 88 in. cyclotron. The elemental yields from this experiment were used to construct the {alpha}-induced direct production {gamma}-ray spectrum from materials in the SNO detector, a large volume ultra-low background neutrino detector located in the Creighton mine near Sudbury, Canada. This background source was an order of magnitude lower than predicted by previous calculations. These measurements are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this spectrum based on a statistical nuclear model of the reaction, with the gross high energy spectrum structure being reproduced to within a factor of two. Detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical excitation population distribution of several residual nuclei indicate the same level of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

Heaton, R.K. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-10-01

23

Chromosomal mutations and chromosome loss measured in a new human-hamster hybrid cell line, ALC: studies with colcemid, ultraviolet irradiation, and 137Cs gamma-rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Small mutations, megabase deletions, and aneuploidy are involved in carcinogenesis and genetic defects, so it is important to be able to quantify these mutations and understand mechanisms of their creation. We have previously quantified a spectrum of mutations, including megabase deletions, in human chromosome 11, the sole human chromosome in a hamster-human hybrid cell line AL. S1- mutants have lost expression of a human cell surface antigen, S1, which is encoded by the M1C1 gene at 11p13 so that mutants can be detected via a complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay in which S1+ cells are killed and S1- cells survive. But loss of genes located on the tip of the short arm of 11 (11p15.5) is lethal to the AL hybrid, so that mutants that have lost the entire chromosome 11 die and escape detection. To circumvent this, we fused AL with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a new hybrid, ALC, in which the requirement for maintaining 11p15.5 is relieved, allowing us to detect mutations events involving loss of 11p15.5. We evaluated the usefulness of this hybrid by conducting mutagenesis studies with colcemid, 137Cs gamma-radiation and UV 254 nm light. Colcemid induced 1000 more S1- mutants per unit dose in ALC than in AL; the increase for UV 254 nm light was only two-fold; and the increase for 137Cs gamma-rays was 12-fold. The increase in S1- mutant fraction in ALC cells treated with colcemid and 137Cs gamma-rays were largely due to chromosome loss and 11p deletions often containing a breakpoint within the centromeric region.

Kraemer, S. M.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

1997-01-01

24

Measurements of activation induced by environmental neutrons using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.  

PubMed

The flux of environmental neutrons is being studied by activation of metal discs of selected elements. Near the earth's surface the total neutron flux is in the order of 10(-2) cm(-2)s(-1), which gives induced activities of a few mBq in the discs. Initial results from this technique, involving activation at ground level for several materials (W, Au, Ta, In, Re, Sm, Dy and Mn) and ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in an underground laboratory located at 500 m.w.e., are presented. Diffusion of environmental neutrons in water is also measured by activation of gold at different depths. PMID:10724430

Martínez Canet, M J; Hult, M; Köhler, M; Johnston, P N

2000-03-01

25

Induced mutations in foxtail millet ( Setaria italica Beauv.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Viable mutations for ear characters in two cultures of foxtail millet (Setaria italica Beauv.) were induced by individual and combined treatments of gamma rays, EMS (ethyl methanesulphonate), and dES (diethylsulphate). Four doses of gamma rays (10Kr to 40Kr), and four durations (6hrs to 24hrs) each of EMS (0.1 %) and dES (0.1 %) were used. In the combined treatments, only

P. K. Gupta; Yashvir

1976-01-01

26

Induced mutations in foxtail millet ( Setaria italica Beauv.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chlorophyll mutations induced by gamma rays, EMS and DES were studied in foxtail millet (Setaria italica), using two cultures, MU-1 (bristled) and MU-2 (non-bristled). No major differences in the mutagenic response of the two cultures were observed. The treatments included four doses of gamma rays (10Kr, 20Kr, 30Kr, 40Kr) and four durations (6 hrs, 12 hrs, 18 hrs, 24 hrs)

P. K. Gupta; Yashvir

1975-01-01

27

THE INTERNAL-COLLISION-INDUCED MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND TURBULENCE (ICMART) MODEL OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

The recent Fermi observation of GRB 080916C shows that the bright photosphere emission associated with a putative fireball is missing, which suggests that the central engine likely launches a Poynting-flux-dominated (PFD) outflow. We propose a model of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission in the PFD regime, namely, the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. It is envisaged that the GRB central engine launches an intermittent, magnetically dominated wind, and that in the GRB emission region, the ejecta is still moderately magnetized (e.g., 1 {approx}< {sigma} {approx}< 100). Similar to the internal shock (IS) model, the mini-shells interact internally at the radius R{sub IS} {approx} {Gamma}{sup 2} c{Delta}t. Most of these early collisions, however, have little energy dissipation, but serve to distort the ordered magnetic field lines entrained in the ejecta. At a certain point, the distortion of magnetic field configuration reaches the critical condition to allow fast reconnection seeds to occur, which induce relativistic MHD turbulence in the interaction regions. The turbulence further distorts field lines easing additional magnetic reconnections, resulting in a runway release of the stored magnetic field energy (an ICMART event). Particles are accelerated either directly in the reconnection zone, or stochastically in the turbulent regions, which radiate synchrotron photons that power the observed gamma rays. Each ICMART event corresponds to a broad pulse in the GRB light curve, and a GRB is composed of multiple ICMART events. This model retains the merits of IS and other models, but may overcome several difficulties/issues faced by the IS model (e.g., low efficiency, fast cooling, electron number excess, Amati/Yonetoku relation inconsistency, and missing bright photosphere). Within this model, the observed GRB variability timescales could have two components, one slow component associated with the central engine time history, and another fast component associated with relativistic magnetic turbulence in the emission region. The model predicts a decrease of gamma-ray polarization degree and E{sub p} in each ICMART event (broad pulse) during the prompt GRB phase, as well as a moderately magnetized external reverse shock. The model may be applied to the GRBs that have time-resolved, featureless Band-function spectra, such as GRB 080916C and most GRBs detected by Fermi LAT.

Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Yan Huirong [Kavli Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-01-10

28

Accretion induced collapse of white dwarfs and the origin of Long Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stellar origin of gamma-ray bursts can be explained by the rapid release of energy in a highly collimated, extremely relativistic jet. This in turn appears to require a rapidly spinning highly magnetised stellar core that collapses into a magnetic neutron star or a black hole within a relatively massive envelope. We hypothesize a binary star model that ends with the merging of an oxygen neon white dwarf with the carbon-oxygen core of a naked helium star during a common envelope phase of evolution, and subsequent accretion induced collapse into a neutron star. The rapid spin and high magnetic field are natural consequences of such a merging. These progenitors, being of intermediate mass, differ radically from the usually postulated high-mass stars. Thus we can reconcile observations that the bursts occur close to but not within massive star associations.

Tout, C. A.; Wickramasinghe, D. T.; Lau, H. H.-B.; Pringle, J. E.; Ferrario, L.

2010-11-01

29

Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of EMS, DES and gamma-rays in rice.  

PubMed

Data on chlorophyll mutation frequency after treatment with EMS, DES and gamma-rays and sequential administration of gamma-rays and the two alkylating agents in three varieties of rice have been used to work out quantitatively the effectiveness and efficiency of each mutagen and combination treatment. For effectiveness, the order is EMS > DES and for efficiency it is EMS > DES > gamma-rays. In some sequential treatments (Gamma-rays + DES in 'IR8' and 'Basmati'; DES + gamma-rays in 'IR8' and 'Jhona'; Gamma-rays + EMS in 'IR8' and 'Basmati'; and EMS + gamma-rays in 'IR8', 'Jhona' and 'Basmati') mutation frequency is more than additive (synergistic) but these treatments are decisively less efficient because of their relatively high injurious effects in the M1. generation. EMS induces more albinas than gamma-rays do. The mutational spectrum patterns induced by gamma-rays and DES are alike. In general, combination treatments tend to increase the frequency of albinas over other types of chlorophyll mutants. PMID:24407841

Kaul, M L; Bhan, A K

1977-09-01

30

Comparison of the biological effectiveness of 45 MeV C-ions and {gamma}-rays in inducing early and late effects in normal human primary fibroblasts  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of the mechanisms underlying the biological effects induced by densely ionizing radiation has relevant implications in both radiation protection and therapy. In particular, the possible advantages of hadrontherapy with respect to conventional radiotherapy in terms of high conformal tumor treatment and sparing of healthy tissues are well known. Further improvements are limited by lack of radiobiological knowledge, particularly about the specific cellular response to the damage induced by particles of potential interest for tumor treatment. This study compares early and late effects induced in AG01522 normal human primary fibroblasts by {gamma}-rays and C-ions having E {approx} 45 MeV/u at the cell entrance, corresponding to LET (in water) {approx} 49 keV/{mu}m. Different end points have been investigated, namely: cell killing and lethal mutation, evaluated as early and delayed reproductive cell death, respectively; chromosome damage, as measured by micronuclei induction (MN); DNA damage, in terms of DSB induction and repair, as measured by the H2AX phosphorylation/dephosphorylation kinetics. Linear dose-response relationships were found for cell killing and induction of lethal mutations, with RBEs of about 1.3 and 1.6 respectively, indicating that the presence of genomic instability is greater in the progeny of C-ions irradiated cells. H2AX phosphorylation/dephosphorylation kinetics have shown a maximum foci number at 30 min after irradiation, higher for {gamma}-rays than for C-ions. However, in the first 12 h the fraction of residual {gamma}-H2AX foci was higher for C-ions irradiated cells, indicating a lower removal rate, possibly related to multiple/more complex damage along the particle track, with respect to the sparse lesions produced by {gamma}-rays. MN induction, observed after 72 h from irradiation, was also greater for C-ions. Overall, these data indicate a more severe DNA damage induced by 45 MeV/u C-ions with respect to {gamma}-rays, likely responsible of an increased cellular misrepair, leading to the greater observed levels of chromosome damage and, eventually, of genomic instability. They give strong support to the idea that higher damage severity at molecular level, determined by the typical deposition pattern of densely ionizing radiation, is the earliest relevant factor for the more severe late effects at cellular level.

Fratini, E. [Centro studi e ricerche e museo storico della fisica E. Fermi, Roma (Italy); Balduzzi, M. [ENEA, Roma, Italy and INFN, Sezione Roma1-Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Roma (Italy); Antonelli, F.; Sorrentino, E.; Esposito, G. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Roma, Italy and INFN, Sezione Roma1-Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Roma (Italy); Cuttone, G.; Romano, F. [INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Dini, V.; Simone, G.; Campa, A.; Tabocchini, M. A. [stituto Superiore di Sanita, Roma, Italy and INFN, Sezione Roma1-Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Roma (Italy); Belli, M. [INFN, Sezione Roma1-Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Roma (Italy)

2013-07-18

31

Charged Particle Induced Radiation damage of Germanium Detectors in Space: Two Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (MO GRS) was designed to measure gamma-rays emitted by the Martian surface. This gamma-ray emission is induced by energetic cosmic-ray particles penetrating the Martian surface and producing many secondary particles and gamma rays. The MO GRS consisted of an high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a passive cooler. Since radiation damage due to permanent bombardment of energetic cosmic ray particles (with energies up to several GeV) was expected for the MO GRS HPGe crystal, studies on radiation damage effects of HPGe crystals were carried on earth. One of the HPGe crystals (paradoxically called FLIGHT) was similar to the MO GRS crystal. Both detectors, MO GRS and FLIGHT, contained closed-end coaxial n-type HPGe crystals and had the same geometrical dimensions (5.6 x 5.6 cm). Many other parameters, such as HV and operation temperature, differed in space and on earth, which made it somewhat difficult to directly compare the performance of both detector systems. But among other detectors, detector FLIGHT provided many useful data to better understand radiation damage effects.

Bruekner, J.; Koenen, M.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Bailey, S. H.; Boynton W. V.

1997-01-01

32

Microscopic observations of X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate crystals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was studied by optical, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. This material is a commonly used oxidizer in solid propellents which could be employed in deep-space probes, and where they will be subjected to a variety of radiations for as long as ten years. In some respects the radiation-induced damage closely resembles the effects produced by thermal decomposition, but in other respects the results differ markedly. Similar radiation and thermal effects include the following: (1) irregular or ill-defined circular etch pits are formed in both cases; (2) approximately the same size pits are produced; (3) the pit density is similar; (4) the c face is considerably more reactive than the m face; and (5) most importantly, many of the etch pits are aligned in crystallographic directions which are the same for thermal or radiolytic decomposition. Thus, dislocations play an important role in the radiolytic decomposition process.

Herley, P. J.; Levy, P. W.

1972-01-01

33

Mirrors for gamma ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The atmosperic Cherenkov technique is widely used for the detection of high energy gamma rays (Egamma > 1011 eV) from space [L.K. Resvanis et al., Astrophys. J. Lett. 328 (1988) L9]. Most current detectors use large arrays of optical mirrors to collect and focus the Cherenkov light from gamma ray induced showers onto photomultipliers. We describe herein a simple and

F. J. Loeffler

1993-01-01

34

First evidence of a gravitational lensing-induced echo in gamma rays with Fermi LAT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: This article shows the first evidence ever of gravitational lensing phenomena in high energy gamma-rays. This evidence comes from the observation of an echo in the light curve of the distant blazar PKS 1830-211 induced by a gravitational lens system. Methods: Traditional methods for estimating time delays in gravitational lensing systems rely on the cross-correlation of the light curves from individual images. We used the 300 MeV-30 GeV photons detected by the Fermi-LAT instrument. It cannot separate the images of known lenses, so the observed light curve is the superposition of individual image light curves. The Fermi-LAT instrument has the advantage of providing long, evenly spaced, time series with very low photon noise. This allows us to use Fourier transform methods directly. Results: A time delay between the two compact images of PKS 1830-211 has been searched for by both the autocorrelation method and the "double power spectrum" method. The double power spectrum shows a 4.2? proof of a time delay of 27.1 ± 0.6 days, consistent with others' results.

Barnacka, A.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Moudden, Y.

2011-04-01

35

Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of gamma-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after gamma-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRbeta locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as gammaH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi [Department of Molecular Genetics, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Department of 3rd Internal Medicine, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari [Department of Molecular Genetics, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke [Center for Bioresource-Based Researches, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan); Aoyagi, Yutaka [Department of 3rd Internal Medicine, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Ichikawa, Hitoshi [Genetics Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Mishima, Yukio [Department of Molecular Genetics, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Kominami, Ryo, E-mail: rykomina@med.niigata-u.ac.j [Department of Molecular Genetics, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan)

2010-05-01

36

Gamma-ray-induced damage and recovery behavior in an erbium-doped fiber laser  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFLs) may soon find applications in space as high bit rate optical communication systems and photonic analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The rapid advancement in digital signal processing systems has led to an increased interest in the direct digitization of high- frequency analog signals. The potential high bandwidth, reduced weight, and reduced power requirements makes photonics an attractive technology for wide-band signal conversion as well as for use in space-based platforms. It is anticipated that photonic ADCs will be able to operate at sampling rates and resolutions far greater than current electronic ADCs. The high repetition rates and narrow pulse widths produced by EDFLs allow for high-speed impulse sampling of analog signals thus making it a vital component of a photonic ADC. In this paper we report on the in situ gamma-ray irradiation of an actively mode-locked EDFL operating at 1530 nm. The onset, growth and extent of ionization induced damage under time-resolved operational conditions is presented. The laser consisted of approximately 3 meters of erbium-doped fiber pumped by a laser diode operating at 980 nm. The picosecond pulses produced by the laser were initiated and controlled by a Mach-Zehnder lithium niobate electro-optic modulator. The active mode-locking element allowed for the precise timing control of the laser repetition rate which is critical in high-speed optical networking systems as well as in photonic ADCs.

Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Johns, Steven T.; Taylor, Linda R.; Taylor, Edward W.

2002-01-01

37

Early and Late Chromosome Damages in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

2014-01-01

38

EMISSION PATTERNS AND LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA RAYS IN THE PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH A CURRENT-INDUCED MAGNETIC FIELD  

SciTech Connect

We study the emission patterns and light curves of gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere with a current-induced magnetic field perturbation. Based on the solution of a static dipole with the magnetic field induced by some currents (perturbation field), we derive the solutions of a static as well as a retarded dipole with the perturbation field in the Cartesian coordinates. The static (retarded) magnetic field can be expressed as the sum of the pure static (retarded) dipolar magnetic field and the static (retarded) perturbation field. We use the solution of the retarded magnetic field to investigate the influence of the perturbation field on the emission patterns and light curves, and apply the perturbed solutions to calculate the gamma-ray light curves for the case of the Vela pulsar. We find that the perturbation field induced by the currents will change the emission patterns and then the light curves of gamma rays, especially for a larger perturbation field. Our results indicate that the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) electrons (positrons) can decrease the rotation effect on the magnetosphere and makes emission pattern appear to be smoother relative to that of the pure retarded dipole, but the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) positrons (electrons) can make the emission pattern less smooth.

Li, X.; Zhang, L., E-mail: lizhang@ynu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming (China)

2011-12-20

39

Multiple fractions of gamma rays induced resistance to cis-dichloro-diammineplatinum (II) and methotrexate in human HeLa cells  

SciTech Connect

Previous irradiation could induce changes in the cell-sensitivity to additional cytotoxic agents. In this study we examined whether the sensitivity to additional cytotoxic agents was affected in cells irradiated with multiple fractions of gamma rays if these agents were given at the time when the lesions induced in DNA by radiation have already been repaired. Human cervix carcinoma HeLa cells were irradiated daily with 0.5 Gy of gamma rays five times a week for 6 weeks. When the fractionation regimen was completed, that is when the cells had accumulated the total dose of 15 Gy of gamma rays, the sensitivity of these cells to gamma rays, UV light, cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (II) (cis-DDP), methotrexate (MTX), and hydroxyurea (HU) was examined and compared to control cells. Results revealed that preirradiated cells did not change sensitivity to gamma rays and UV light, but that they increased the resistance to cis-DDP, and MTX (especially for higher concentrations of MTX), and increased sensitivity to HU (for lower concentrations of HU). The increased resistance to cis-DDP was also measurable up to 30 days after the last dose of gamma rays. The results indicate that preirradiation of HeLa cells with multiple fractions of gamma rays could change their sensitivity to additional cytotoxic agents, and that this is a relatively long-lasting effect. Our results suggest that caution is needed in medical application of radiation combined with chemical treatment.

Osmak, M.; Perovic, S. (Ruder Boskovic Institute, Croatia (Yugoslavia))

1989-06-01

40

Possible effects on avionics induced by Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the issue of the possible susceptibility of typical aircraft electronics exposed to particle, gamma-ray and neutron irradiation coming from Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGF). We consider possible scenarios regarding the intensity, the duration, and geometry of TGFs influencing a nearby aircraft, and study their effects on electronic equipment. We calculate, for different assumptions, the total dose and the dose-rate, and estimate single-event effects. We find that in addition to the electromagnetic component (electrons/positrons, gamma-rays) also secondary neutrons produced by gamma-ray photoproduction in the aircraft structure substantially contribute to single-event effects in critical semiconductors components. Depending on the physical characteristics and geometry, TGFs may deliver a large flux of neutrons within a few milliseconds on an aircraft. This flux is calculated to be orders of magnitude larger than the natural cosmic-ray background, and may constitute a serious hazard to aircraft electronic equipment. We present a series of numerical simulations supporting our conclusions. Our results suggest the necessity of dedicated measurement campaigns addressing the radiative and particle environment of aircraft near or within thunderstorms.

Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Paccagnella, Alessandro; Pesoli, Alessandro; Palma, Francesco; Gerardin, Simone; Bagatin, Marta; Trois, Alessio; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Benvenuti, Piero; Flamini, Enrico; Marisaldi, Martino; Pittori, Carlotta; Giommi, Paolo

2013-04-01

41

Possible effects on avionics induced by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are impulsive (intrinsically sub-millisecond) events associated with lightning in powerful thunderstorms. TGFs turn out to be very powerful natural accelerators known to accelerate particles and generate radiation up to hundreds of MeV energies. The number ratio of TGFs over normal lightning has been measured in tropical regions to be near 10-4. We address in this Article the issue of the possible susceptibility of typical aircraft electronics exposed to TGF particle, gamma ray and neutron irradiation. We consider possible scenarios regarding the intensity, the duration, and geometry of TGFs influencing nearby aircraft, and study their effects on electronic equipment. We calculate, for different assumptions, the total dose and the dose-rate, and estimate single-event-effects. We find that in addition to the electromagnetic component (electrons/positrons, gamma rays) also secondary neutrons produced by gamma-ray photo production in the aircraft structure substantially contribute to single-event effects in critical semiconductors components. Depending on the physical characteristics and geometry, TGFs may deliver a large flux of neutrons within a few milliseconds in an aircraft. This flux is calculated to be orders of magnitude larger than the natural cosmic-ray background, and may constitute a serious hazard to aircraft electronic equipment. We present a series of numerical simulations supporting our conclusions. Our results suggest the necessity of dedicated measurement campaigns addressing the radiative and particle environment of aircraft near or within thunderstorms.

Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Pesoli, A.; Palma, F.; Gerardin, S.; Bagatin, M.; Trois, A.; Picozza, P.; Benvenuti, P.; Flamini, E.; Marisaldi, M.; Pittori, C.; Giommi, P.

2013-04-01

42

PROTON INDUCED GAMMA-RAY ANALYSIS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS FOR CARBON, NITROGEN, AND SULFUR COMPOSITION  

EPA Science Inventory

A technique for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur using in-beam gamma-ray spectrometry has been developed for use with atmospheric aerosol samples. Samples are collected on quartz filters, and the aerosol composition is determined by analyzing...

43

Chemical warfare agent and high explosive identification by spectroscopy of neutron-induced gamma rays  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nondestructive assay method to identify chemical warfare (CW) agents and high explosive (HE) munitions was tested with actual chemical agents and explosives. The assay method exploits the gamma radiation produced by neutron interactions inside a container or munition to identify the elemental composition of its contents. The characteristic gamma-ray signature of the chemical elements chlorine, phosphorus, and sulfur were

A. J. Caffrey; J. D. Cole; R. J. Gehrke; R. C. Greenwood

1992-01-01

44

Prediction of cellular radiosensitivity from DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and carbon ion irradiation in canine tumor cells.  

PubMed

Diseases of companion animals are shifting from infectious diseases to neoplasms (cancer), and since radiation therapy is one of the effective choices available for cancer treatment, the application of radiotherapy in veterinary medicine is likely to increase. However tumor tissues have different radiosensitivities, and therefore it is important to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumors in individual patients in advance of radiotherapy. We have studied the relationship between the surviving cell fraction measured by a clonogenic assay and DNA double strand breaks detected by a comet assay under neutral conditions in three canine tumor cell lines, after gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation. In all the cell lines, cell death assessed by the clonogenic assay was much higher following irradiation with carbon ions than with gamma-rays. The initial and residual (4 hr) DNA damage due to gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation were higher in a radiosensitive cell line than in a radioresistant cell line. The surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) showed a tendency for correlation with both the initial and residual DNA damage. In particular, the residual damage per Gy was significantly correlated with SF2, regardless of the type of radiation. This indicates that cellular radiosensitivity can be predicted by detection of radiation-induced residual DNA damage. PMID:16327218

Wada, Seiichi; Van Khoa, Tran; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ueno, Shunji; Ito, Nobuhiko

2005-11-01

45

Limits on thunderstorm-induced radioactive chlorine from gamma ray observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present analysis of thunderstorm data collected with a liquid nitrogen-cooled germanium spectrometer with energies between 13 keV-2.6 MeV that was deployed at Langmuir Lab on South Baldy Peak in New Mexico for June through August 2005. The motivation was to search for gamma ray emissions from radioactive chlorine-39 and chlorine-38, as suggested by Greenfield et al. (2003). Based on the observations, we place an upper limit on the rate of chlorine production through such a process (6.8 × 10-17 chlorine atoms per argon atom). This rate is sufficiently low to suggest that the anomalous gamma ray count increases observed by Greenfield et al. (2003) were not caused by radioactive chlorine.

Lundberg, J. L.; Millan, R. M.; Eack, K.

2011-11-01

46

High energy irradiations simulating cosmic-ray-induced planetary gamma ray production. I - Fe target  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two thick Fe targets were bombarded by a series of 6 GeV proton irradiations for the purpose of simulating the cosmic ray bombardment of planetary objects in space. Gamma ray energy spectra were obtained with a germanium solid state detector during the bombardment, and 46 of the gamma ray lines were ascribed to the Fe targets. A comparison between observed and predicted values showed good agreement for Fe lines from neutron inelastic scattering and spallation reactions, and less satisfactory agreement for neutron capture reactions, the latter attributed to the difference in composition between the Fe target and the mean lunar abundance used in the modeling. Through an analysis of the irradiation results together with continuum data obtained in lunar orbit, it was found that 100 hours of measurement with a current instrument should generate a spectrum containing approximately 20 lines due to Fe alone, with a 2-sigma sensitivity for detection of about 0.2 percent.

Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Yellin, J.

1986-01-01

47

Search for cosmic-ray induced $\\gamma$-ray emission in Galaxy Clusters  

E-print Network

Current theories predict relativistic hadronic particle populations in clusters of galaxies in addition to the already observed relativistic leptons. In these scenarios hadronic interactions give rise to neutral pions which decay into $\\gamma$ rays, that are potentially observable with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi space telescope. We present a joint likelihood analysis searching for spatially extended $\\gamma$-ray emission at the locations of 50 galaxy clusters in 4 years of Fermi-LAT data under the assumption of the universal cosmic-ray model proposed by Pinzke & Pfrommer (2010). We find an excess at a significance of $2.7\\,\\sigma$, which upon closer inspection is however correlated to individual excess emission towards three galaxy clusters: Abell 400, Abell 1367 and Abell 3112. We discuss these cases in detail and conservatively attribute the emission to unmodeled background (for example, radio galaxies within the clusters). Through the combined analysis of 50 clusters we exclude h...

:,; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Allafort, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Chaves, R C G; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Franckowiak, A; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hewitt, J; Hughes, R E; Jeltema, T E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Garde, M Llena; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ruan, J; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Storm, E; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Zimmer, S; Pfrommer, C; Pinzke, A

2013-01-01

48

Rapid, non-destructive carbon analysis of forest soils using neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Forest soils are pivotal to understanding global carbon (C) cycling and evaluating policies for mitigating global change. However, they are very difficult to monitor because of the heterogeneity of soil characteristics, the difficulty of representative sampling, and the slow time scale of response to environmental change. Here we demonstrate that use of gamma-ray spectroscopy facilitates in situ non-destructive analysis of C and other elements in forest soils. In this approach the element-specific gamma-rays are induced by fast and thermal neutrons interacting with the nuclei of the elements present in the soil. Background gamma-rays emanating from naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest are recorded as well. We applied this approach in a mature northern hardwood forest on glacial till soils at the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system yielded strong signals in gamma-ray counts/h, from C and other elements present in the soil matrix that included silicon, oxygen, hydrogen, iron, aluminum, manganese and potassium. The INS sensitivity for carbon was 20.656 counts h{sup -1} kg{sup -1} C m{sup -2} based on current net C gamma-ray counts and the data for the O horizon and mineral soil to a depth of 30 cm obtained from a nearby quantitative soil pit (7.35 kg C m{sup -2}). We estimate the minimum detectable change to be {approx}0.34 kg C m{sup -2}, which is {approx}5% of the current soil C content, and the minimum detectable limit to be {approx}0.23 kg C m{sup -1}. Eight % reproducibility from 11 measurements was limited, in part, by the large variability in the system counting geometry due to the uneven forest microtopography. The INS approach has the potential to revolutionize belowground monitoring of C and other elements, because the possibility of detecting a 5% change in forest soils has not been possible with destructive sampling methods.

Wielopolski, L.; Mitra, S.; Yanai, R. D.; Levine, C. R.; Vadeboncoeur, M. A.

2010-08-01

49

Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism??{sup 0}???. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2014-05-09

50

Comparison of protein expression profile changes in human fibroblasts induced by low doses of gamma rays and energetic protons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extrapolation of known radiation risks to the risks from low dose and low dose-rate exposures of human population, especially prolonged exposure of astronauts in the space radiation environment, relies in part on the mechanistic understanding of radiation induced biological consequences at the molecular level. While some genomic data at the mRNA level are available for cells or animals exposed to radiation, the data at the protein level are still lacking. Here, we studied protein expression profile changes using Panorama antibody microarray chips that contain antibodies to more than 200 proteins (or modified proteins) involved in cell signaling that included mostly apoptosis, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and signal transduction. Normal human fibroblasts were cultured till fully confluent and then exposed to 2 cGy of gamma rays at either low (1 cGy/hr) or high (0.2 Gy/min) dose-rate, or to 2 cGy of 150 MeV protons at high dose-rate. The proteins were isolated at 2 and 6 hours after exposure and labeled with Cy3 for the irradiated cells and with Cy5 for the control samples before loaded onto the protein microarray chips. The intensities of the protein spots were analyzed using ScanAlyze software and normalized by the summed fluorescence intensities and the housekeeping proteins. Comparison of the overall protein expression profiles in gamma-irradiated cells showed significantly higher inductions at the high dose-rate than at the low dose-rate. The protein profile in cells after the proton exposure showed a much earlier induction pattern in comparison to both the high and low dose-rate gamma exposures. The same expression patterns were also found in individual cell signaling cascades. At 6 hours post irradiation, high dose-rate gamma rays induced cellular protein level changes (ratio to control ˜2) mostly in apoptosis, cell cycle and cytoskeleton, while low dose-rate gamma rays induced similar changes with smaller fold-change values. In comparison, protons induced protein changes mainly in the cell cycle category. Thus, at the total dose of 2 cGy, high dose-rate gamma rays may generate more cellular responses through protein level and modification changes to regulate cell signaling and cell-cell communication. Protons presented the less effect, possibly due to the different track distribution compared with gamma radiation.

Zhang, Ye; Clement, Jade; Gridley, Diala; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

51

Gamma ray generator  

DOEpatents

An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

2014-05-27

52

Investigations on neutron-induced prompt gamma ray analysis of bulk samples.  

PubMed

A systematic investigation was carried out for the improvement of the prompt gamma interrogation method used for contraband detection by the pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis (PFTNA) technique. Optimizations of source detector shielding and geometry, role of the type and dimension of the gamma detector, attenuation of neutrons and gamma rays in bulky samples were also studied. Results obtained for both the shielding materials and elemental content of cocaine simulants have been compared with the values calculated by the MCNP-4A code. PMID:11300412

Dokhale, P A; Csikai, J; Oláh, L

2001-06-01

53

Coincidence measurements between alpha particles and gamma rays in reactions induced by 85 and 155 MeV ¹²C on ¹??Sm  

E-print Network

COINCIDENCE MEASUREMENTS BETWEEN ALPHA PARTICLES AND GAMMA RAYS 12 154 IN REACTIONS INDUCED BY 85 AND 155 MEV C ON Sm A Thesis by STEVEN EDWARD CALA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subject: Chemistry COINCIDENCE MEASUREMENTS BETWEEN ALPHA PARTICLES AND GAMMA RAYS 12 154 IN REACTIONS INDUCED BY 85 AND 155 MEV C ON Sm A Thesis by STEVEN EDWARD CALA Approved...

Cala, Steven Edward

2012-06-07

54

Sex-dependent Differences in Intestinal Tumorigenesis Induced in Apc1638N/+ Mice by Exposure to {gamma} Rays  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of 1 and 5 Gy radiation doses and to investigate the interplay of gender and radiation with regard to intestinal tumorigenesis in an adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mouse model. Methods and Materials: Apc1638N/+ female and male mice were exposed whole body to either 1 Gy or 5 Gy of {gamma} rays and euthanized when most of the treated mice became moribund. Small and large intestines were processed to determine tumor burden, distribution, and grade. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor (ER)-{alpha} were also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: We observed that, with both 1 Gy and 5 Gy of {gamma} rays, females displayed reduced susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis compared with males. As for radiation effect on small intestinal tumor progression, although no substantial differences were found in the relative frequency and degree of dysplasia of adenomas in irradiated animals compared with controls, invasive carcinomas were found in 1-Gy- and 5-Gy-irradiated animals. Radiation exposure was also shown to induce an increase in protein levels of proliferation marker Ki-67 and sex-hormone receptor ER-{alpha} in both non tumor mucosa and intestinal tumors from irradiated male mice. Conclusions: We observed important sex-dependent differences in susceptibility to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc1638N/+ mutants. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that exposure to radiation doses as low as 1 Gy can induce a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity as well as enhance tumor progression in vivo.

Trani, Daniela [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Maastricht Radiation Oncology (MaastRO) Lab, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University of Maastricht (Netherlands); Moon, Bo-Hyun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hartmann, Dan P. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)] [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Datta, Kamal [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Fornace, Albert J., E-mail: af294@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

2013-01-01

55

Induced Mutations for Improving Production on Bread and Durum Wheat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wheat is a very important crop and has been bred for food and its improvement is continuous from cross-breeding. Radiation and chemically induced mutations have provided variability in selection for novel varieties. Four bread and one durum wheat cultivars were exposed to gamma rays, Cs 137 with doses 10, 15 and 20 krad (2000 seeds of each dose and cultivars). We have isolated mutant plants with height reduced and on cv Progress spike without chaff.

Stamo, Ilirjana; Ylli, Ariana; Dodbiba, Andon

2007-04-01

56

Quantitative comparison between experimental and simulated gamma-ray spectra induced by 14 MeV tagged neutrons.  

PubMed

Fast neutron interrogation with the associated particle technique can be used to identify explosives in cargo containers (EURITRACK FP6 project) and unexploded ordnance on the seabed (UNCOSS FP7 project), by detecting gamma radiations induced by 14 MeV neutrons produced in the 2H(3H,?)n reaction. The origin of the gamma rays can be determined in 3D by the detection of the alpha particle, which provides the direction of the opposite neutron and its time-of-flight. Gamma spectroscopy provides the relative counts of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are converted to chemical fractions to differentiate explosives from other organic substances. To this aim, Monte Carlo calculations are used to take into account neutron moderation and gamma attenuation in cargo materials or seawater. This paper presents an experimental verification that C, N, and O counts are correctly reproduced by numerical simulation. A quantitative comparison is also reported for silicon, iron, lead, and aluminium. PMID:21782459

Perot, B; El Kanawati, W; Carasco, C; Eleon, C; Valkovic, V; Sudac, D; Obhodas, J; Sannie, G

2012-07-01

57

Body composition to climate change studies - the many facets of neutron induced prompt gamma-ray analysis  

SciTech Connect

In-vivo body composition analysis of humans and animals and in-situ analysis of soil using fast neutron inelastic scattering and thermal neutron capture induced prompt-gamma rays have been described. By measuring carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O), protein, fat and water are determined. C determination in soil has become important for understanding below ground carbon sequestration process in the light of climate change studies. Various neutron sources ranging from radio isotopic to compact 14 MeV neutron generators employing the associated particle neutron time-of-flight technique or micro-second pulsing were implemented. Gamma spectroscopy using recently developed digital multi-channel analyzers has also been described.

Mitra,S.

2008-11-17

58

Assessment of gamma ray-induced DNA damage in Lasioderma serricorne using the comet assay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We attempted a DNA comet assay under alkaline conditions to verify the irradiation treatment of pests. Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius) were chosen as test insects and irradiated with gamma rays from a 60Co source at 1 kGy. We conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over time for 7 day. Severe DNA fragmentation in L. serricorne cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. The parameters of the comet image analysis were calculated, and the degree of DNA damage and repair were evaluated. Values for the Ratio (a percentage determined by fluorescence in the damaged area to overall luminance, including intact DNA and the damaged area of a comet image) of individual cells showed that no cells in the irradiated group were included in the Ratio<0.1 category, the lowest grade. This finding was observed consistently throughout the 7-day post-irradiation period. We suggest that the Ratio values of individual cells can be used as an index of irradiation history and conclude that the DNA comet assay under alkaline conditions, combined with comet image analysis, can be used to identify irradiation history.

Kameya, Hiromi; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Imamura, Taro; Todoriki, Setsuko

2012-03-01

59

Molecular characterization of mutations induced by gamma irradiation in rice.  

PubMed

In order to analyze mutations induced by gamma irradiation in higher plants, we irradiated rice with gamma rays and screened for mutations expressing phenotypes of glutinous endosperm (wx), chlorophyll b deficiency, endosperm protein deficiency, gibberellin-related dwarfism, and shortened plastochron-in order to clarify types of mutations. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the most frequent mutation induced by gamma rays was deletion, particularly small deletion. Of the 24 mutations, 15 were small deletions (1-16 bp), four were large deletions (9.4-129.7 kbp), three were single-base substitutions, and two were inversions. Deletions 100 bp-8 kbp in length were not found, suggesting that gamma irradiation is unlikely to induce deletions of 100 bp to 8 kbp but is more likely to induce deletions between 1 and several ten bp or those of around 10 kbp or more. Based on the results, reverse genetics applications may be possible for gamma irradiation-induced deletions in rice by mismatch cleavage analysis used in Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING) to detect small deletions and base substitutions or by using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to detect large deletions. PMID:20154423

Morita, Ryouhei; Kusaba, Makoto; Iida, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Nishio, Takeshi; Nishimura, Minoru

2009-10-01

60

Gamma ray-induced synthesis of hyaluronic acid/chondroitin sulfate-based hydrogels for biomedical applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyaluronic acid (HA)/chondroitin sulfate (CS)/poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel systems were synthesized by gamma-ray irradiation without the use of additional initiators or crosslinking agents to achieve a biocompatible hydrogel system for skin tissue engineering. HA and CS derivatives with polymerizable residues were synthesized. Then, the hydrogels composed of glycosaminoglycans, HA, CS, and a synthetic ionic polymer, PAAc, were prepared using gamma-ray irradiation through simultaneous free radical copolymerization and crosslinking. The physicochemical properties of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels having various compositions were investigated to evaluate their feasibility as artificial skin substitutes. The gel fractions of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels increased in absorbed doses up to 15 kGy, and they exhibited 91-93% gel fractions under 15 kGy radiation. All of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels exhibited relatively high water contents of over 90% and reached an equilibrium swelling state within 24 h. The enzymatic degradation kinetics of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels depended on both the concentration of the hyaluronidase solution and the ratio of HA/CS/PAAc. The in vitro drug release profiles of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels were significantly influenced by the interaction between the ionic groups in the hydrogels and the ionic drug molecules as well as the swelling of the hydrogels. From the cytotoxicity results of human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells cultured with extracts of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogels, all of the HA/CS/PAAc hydrogel samples tested showed relatively high cell viabilities of more than 82%, and did not induce any significant adverse effects on cell viability.

Zhao, Linlin; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Lim, Youn-Mook; Nho, Young-Chang; Kim, So Yeon

2015-01-01

61

Gamma ray transients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

Cline, Thomas L.

1987-01-01

62

Gamma rays induce DNA damage and oxidative stress associated with impaired growth and reproduction in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus.  

PubMed

Nuclear radioisotope accidents are potentially ecologically devastating due to their impact on marine organisms. To examine the effects of exposure of a marine organism to radioisotopes, we irradiated the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus with several doses of gamma radiation and analyzed the effects on mortality, fecundity, and molting by assessing antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression patterns. No mortality was observed at 96h, even in response to exposure to a high dose (800Gy) of radiation, but mortality rate was significantly increased 120h (5 days) after exposure to 600 or 800Gy gamma ray radiation. We observed a dose-dependent reduction in fecundity of ovigerous females; even the group irradiated with 50Gy showed a significant reduction in fecundity, suggesting that gamma rays are likely to have a population level effect. In addition, we observed growth retardation, particularly at the nauplius stage, in individuals after gamma irradiation. In fact, nauplii irradiated with more than 200Gy, though able to molt to copepodite stage 1, did not develop into adults. Upon gamma radiation, T. japonicus showed a dose-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, the activities of several antioxidant enzymes, and expression of double-stranded DNA break damage genes (e.g. DNA-PK, Ku70, Ku80). At a low level (sub-lethal dose) of gamma irradiation, we found dose-dependent upregulation of p53, implying cellular damage in T. japonicus in response to sub-lethal doses of gamma irradiation, suggesting that T. japonicus is not susceptible to sub-lethal doses of gamma irradiation. Additionally, antioxidant genes, phase II enzyme (e.g. GSTs), and cellular chaperone genes (e.g. Hsps) that are involved in cellular defense mechanisms also showed the same expression patterns for sublethal doses of gamma irradiation (50-200Gy). These findings indicate that sublethal doses of gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage and increase the expression of antioxidant enzymes and proteins with chaperone-related functions, thereby significantly affecting life history parameters such as fecundity and molting in the copepod T. japonicus. PMID:24800869

Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Lee, Bo-Young; Hwang, Un-Ki; Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee; Lee, Yong Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

2014-07-01

63

Gamma-ray astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

Stecker, F. W. (editor); Trombka, J. I. (editor)

1973-01-01

64

Gamma-ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prologue C. Kouveliotou, R. A . M. J. Wijers and S. E. Woosley; 1. The discovery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon R. W. Klebesadel; 2. Instrumental principles E. E. Fenimore; 3. The BATSE era G. J. Fishman and C. A. Meegan; 4. The cosmological era L. Piro and K. Hurley; 5. The Swift era N. Gehrels and D. N. Burrows; 6. Discoveries enabled by multi-wavelength afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts J. Greiner; 7. Prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts T. Piran, R. Sari and R. Mochkovitch; 8. Basic gamma-ray burst afterglows P. Mészáros and R. A. M. J. Wijers; 9. The GRB-supernova connection J. Hjorth and J. S. Bloom; 10. Models for gamma-ray burst progenitors and central engines S. E. Woosley; 11. Jets and gamma-ray burst unification schemes J. Granot and E. Ramirez-Ruiz; 12. High-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos E. Waxman; 13. Long gamma-ray burst host galaxies and their environments J. P. U. Fynbo, D. Malesani and P. Jakobsson; 14. Gamma-ray burst cosmology V. Bromm and A. Loeb; 15. Epilogue R. D. Blandford; Index.

Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woosley, Stan

2012-11-01

65

Double strand breaks induced by low doses of {gamma} rays or heavy ions: Quantitation in nonradioactive human DNA  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a method of quantitating low frequencies (0-30 sites/10{sup 9} base pairs) of double strand breaks in {approximately}1 {mu}g of nonradioactive human DNA. Unirradiated or irradiated DNA is digested with the restriction endonuclease NotI, producing cleavage fragments that include a major group centered at {approximately}1.2-1.3 Mbp. The DNA molecules are separated as a function of size by transverse alternating field electrophoresis. The frequency of double strand breaks is computed directly from the decrease in number average molecular length induced in the 1.2 to 1.3-Mbp cleavage fragment group by {sup 137}Cs {gamma} or Fe{sup 26+} (1.1 GeV/nucleon) irradiation vs the corresponding unirradiated DNA samples. The double strand break frequency can be quantitated easily in the dose range of 0-10 cGy of {gamma} rays. The frequency of breaks per unit dose calculated for {gamma} irradiation of DNA in human cells ({approximately}4.6 double strand breaks/10{sup 9} bp/Gy) who used methods requiring higher doses. 55 refs., 4 figs.

Sutherland, B.M.; Bennett, P.V.; Sutherland, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-07-15

66

Hyperthermia increases gamma-ray and fission neutron-induced translocations in Drosophila  

SciTech Connect

Hyperthermia has been reported in Drosophila melanogaster to increase radiation-induced chromosome rearrangements, chromosome loss, recessive and dominant lethals. To determine whether hyperthermia would also affect high linear energy transfer (LET)-induced genetic damage such as translocations, which involve breakage and reunion of chromosomes, a genetic system was employed not only allowing detection of ordinary 2;3 translocations, but also permitting a more accurate measure of Y-autosome translocations.

Mittler, S.

1984-01-01

67

mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

2014-01-01

68

Does merger-induced core-collapse produce gamma-ray bursts in type Ib & Ic supernovae?  

E-print Network

Gamma-ray bursts, discovered over three decades ago, can appear to be a hundred times as luminous as the brightest supernovae. However, there has been evidence for some time now of an association of gamma-ray bursts with supernovae of type Ib and Ic. Here we interpret the overabundance of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and the details of supernova 1987A to reveal the energy source, which powers at least some long-duration gamma-ray bursts, as core-collapse following the merger of two white dwarfs, either as stars or stellar cores. In order for the beams/jets associated with gamma-ray bursts to form in mergers within massive common envelopes (as with SN1987A), much of the intervening stellar material in the polar directions must be cleared out by the time of core-collapse, or the beams/jets themselves must clear their own path. The core-collapse produces supernovae of type Ib, Ic, or II (as with SN1987A, a SNa IIp), leaving a weakly magnetized neutron star remnant with a spin period near 2 milliseconds. There is no compelling reason to invoke any other model for gamma-ray bursts.

John Middleditch

2003-10-23

69

Estrogens decrease {gamma}-ray-induced senescence and maintain cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells independently of p53  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Sequential administration of radiotherapy and endocrine therapy is considered to be a standard adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Recent clinical reports suggest that radiotherapy could be more efficient in association with endocrine therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the estrogen effects on irradiated breast cancer cells (IR-cells). Methods and Materials: Using functional genomic analysis, we examined the effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen) on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Results: Our results showed that E{sub 2} sustained the growth of IR-cells. Specifically, estrogens prevented cell cycle blockade induced by {gamma}-rays, and no modification of apoptotic rate was detected. In IR-cells we observed the induction of genes involved in premature senescence and cell cycle progression and investigated the effects of E{sub 2} on the p53/p21{sup waf1/cip1}/Rb pathways. We found that E{sub 2} did not affect p53 activation but it decreased cyclin E binding to p21{sup waf1/cip1} and sustained downstream Rb hyperphosphorylation by functional inactivation of p21{sup waf1/cip1}. We suggest that Rb inactivation could decrease senescence and allow cell cycle progression in IR-cells. Conclusion: These results may help to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the maintenance of breast cancer cell growth by E{sub 2} after irradiation-induced damage. They also offer clinicians a rational basis for the sequential administration of ionizing radiation and endocrine therapies.

Toillon, Robert-Alain [Laboratoire Jean-Claude Heuson de Cancerologie Mammaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: robert.toillon@univ-lille1.fr; Magne, Nicolas [Radiotherapy Unit, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Laios, Ioanna [Laboratoire Jean-Claude Heuson de Cancerologie Mammaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium); Castadot, Pierre [Radiotherapy Unit, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Kinnaert, Eric [Radiotherapy Unit, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Van Houtte, Paul [Radiotherapy Unit, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Desmedt, Christine B.Sc. [Microarray Unit, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Leclercq, Guy [Laboratoire Jean-Claude Heuson de Cancerologie Mammaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium); Lacroix, Marc [Laboratoire Jean-Claude Heuson de Cancerologie Mammaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

2007-03-15

70

Prompt gamma rays from triton-induced reactions on oxygen and their use for analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Triton-induced reactions on oxygen were studied with a view to using the prompt ?-rays for analytical purposes. Five ?-rays\\u000a were found to be potentially useful, of which three had a high intensity, the n(1, 0), n(2, 0) and p(1, 0) ?-rays, the other\\u000a two being the n(3, 0) and the unresolved pair ?(1, 0)–?(2, 0). The ?-rays are labelled according

M. Peisach

1972-01-01

71

Gamma-ray Astronomy  

E-print Network

The relevance of gamma-ray astronomy to the search for the origin of the galactic and, to a lesser extent, the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays has long been recognised. The current renaissance in the TeV gamma-ray field has resulted in a wealth of new data on galactic and extragalactic particle accelerators, and almost all the new results in this field were presented at the recent International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC). Here I summarise the 175 papers submitted on the topic of gamma-ray astronomy to the 30th ICRC in Merida, Mexico in July 2007.

Jim Hinton

2007-12-20

72

Study of gamma-ray radiation-induced polymerization of butadiene in ethanol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Co 60 ?-ray radiation induced polymerization of butadiene in bulk and in ethanol at temperatures ranging from 15 to 45°C was studied. Hydrogen peroxide was used as initiator on some occasions. The mechanism of the polymerization in ethanol seems to be fitted to the no energy transfer kinetics as described by Chapiro (1962). The ratio of relative rate of free radical production of solvent/monomer ? rel is 19. When hydrogen peroxide was added, the polymerization rate increased and hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene was obtained. The microstructure of polybutadiene was studied by i.r. and NMR spectra.

Jian, Zhang; Zhiping, Zhang; Shengkang, Ying

73

Study of gamma-ray radiation induced polymerization of butadiene in ethanol  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 60Co ?-ray radiation induced polymerization of butadiene in bulk and in ethanol at temperature ranging from 15 to 45°C has been studied. Hydrogen peroxide was used as initiator in some occasions. The mechanisms of polymerization in ethanol seems to fit the no-energy transfer kinetics described by Chapiro (1962) and the ratio of relative rate of free radical production of solvent/monomer ? rel is 19. When hydrogen peroxide was added to the butadiene-ethanol system the polymerization rate increased and hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene was obtained. The microstructure of polybutadiene was studied by IR and NMR spectra.

Jian, Zhang; Zhi-Ping, Zhang; Shang-Kang, Ying

74

Effects of Luminosity Functions Induced by Relativistic Beaming on Statistics of Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

We study the effects of the beaming-induced luminosity function on statistics of observed GRBs, assuming the cosmological scenario. We select and divide the BATSE 4B data into 588 long bursts (T$_{90}>2.5$ sec) and 149 short bursts (T$_{90}$ of the long bursts is $ 0.2901\\pm 0.0113$, and that of the short bursts is $0.4178\\pm 0.0239$, which is a Euclidean value. For luminosity function models, we consider a cylindrical-beam and a conic-beam. We take into account the spatial distribution of GRB sources as well. A broad luminosity function is naturally produced when one introduces beaming of GRBs. We calculate the maximum detectable redshift of GRBs, $z_{\\rm max}$. The estimated $z_{\\rm max}$ for the cylindrical-beam case is as high as $\\sim 14$ for the long bursts and $\\sim 3$ for the short bursts. The large $z_{\\rm max}$ value for the short bursts is rather surprising in that the $$ for this subgroup is close to the so-called Euclidean value, 0.5. We calculate the fraction of bursts whose redshifts are larger than a certain redshift $z'$, i.e. $f_{\\rm > z'}$. When we take $z'=3.42$ and apply the luminosity function derived for the cylindrical-beam, the expected $f_{\\rm > z'}$ is $\\sim 75 %$ for long bursts. When we increase the opening angle of the conic beam to $\\Delta \\theta =3^\\circ.0$, $f_{\\rm > z'}$ decreases to $\\sim 20 %$ at $ {\\rm z'=3.42}$. We conclude that the beaming-induced luminosity functions are compatible with the redshift distribution of observed GRBs and that the apparent Euclidean value of $$ may not be due to the Euclidean space distribution but to the luminosity distribution.

Chunglee Kim; Heon-Young Chang; Insu Yi

2000-05-29

75

An imaging neutron/gamma-ray spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the test results of a neutron/gamma-ray imaging spectrometer for the identification and location of radioactive and special nuclear materials. Radioactive materials that could be fashioned into a radiation dispersal device typically emit gamma rays, while fissile materials such as uranium and plutonium emit both neutrons and gamma rays via spontaneous or induced fission. The simultaneous detection of neutrons and gamma rays is a clear indication of the presence of fissile material. The instrument works as a double-scatter telescope, requiring a neutron or gamma ray to undergo an interaction in two detectors to be considered a valid event. While this requirement reduces the detector efficiency, it yields information about the direction and energy of the incident particle, which is then used to reconstruct an image of the emitting source. Because of this imaging capability background events can be rejected, decreasing the number of events required for high confidence detection and thereby greatly improving its sensitivity. The instrument is optimized for the detection of neutrons with energies from 1-20 MeV and gamma rays from 0.4 to 10 MeV. Images and energy spectra for neutron and gamma rays are reported for several sources including depleted uranium and plutonium. In addition, the effect of neutron source shielding is investigated.

Madden, Amanda C.; Bloser, Peter F.; Fourguette, Dominique; Larocque, Liane; Legere, Jason S.; Lewis, Matt; McConnell, Mark L.; Rousseau, Marissa; Ryan, James M.

2013-05-01

76

High Energy Gamma Rays  

E-print Network

This article reviews the present status of high energy gamma-ray astronomy at energies above 30 MeV. Observations in the past decade using both space- and ground-based experiments have been primarily responsible for giving a tremendous boost to our knowledge of the high energy Universe. High energy gamma-rays have been detected from a wide range of Galactic and extragalactic astrophysical sources, such as gamma-ray bursters, pulsars, and active galaxies. These observations have established high energy gamma-ray astronomy as a vital and exciting field, that has a bright future. This review summarizes the experimental techniques, observations and results obtained with recent experiments, and concludes with a short description of future prospects.

R. Mukherjee

2000-09-22

77

A study of Venus surface elemental composition from 14 MeV neutron induced gamma ray spectroscopy: Activation analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The surface elemental composition of Venus can be determined using an artificially pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator (PNG) combined with a gamma ray spectrometer (GRS). The 14 MeV neutrons will interact with the surface materials and generate gamma rays, characteristic of specific elements, whose energy spectrum will be measured by GRS. These characteristic gamma rays are produced mainly through 3 different neutron interaction mechanisms: capture, inelastic, and activation reactions. Each reaction type has a different neutron energy dependency and different time scale for gamma ray production and transport. Certain elements are more easily identified through one reaction type over the others. Thus, careful analysis of the gamma ray spectra during and after the neutron pulse provides a comprehensive understanding of the surface elemental composition. In this paper, we use a well-tested neutron/gamma transport code, called Monte Carlo N-Particles (MCNP), to investigate the measurement capability of a PNG-GRS detection system through the neutron activation reactions. An activation analysis was performed for a representative soil composition of Venus with a notional operational scenario of PNG and GRS. The analysis shows that the proposed instrument concept can identify most of the modeled surface elements at Venus with sufficient accuracy through the activation mode. Specifically, U, Th, K, Si can be measured to within 1%, Fe within 2%, Al within 10%, Ca within 5%, Mg with 15%, Mn with 20%, and Cl within 6%. Although modeled in the analysis, it is shown that the activation mode alone cannot distinguish the S and Ti peaks.

Jun, I.; Kim, W.; Smith, M.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M.

2011-02-01

78

A Study of Venus Surface Elemental Composition From 14-MeV Neutron Induced Gamma Ray Spectroscopy: Activation Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The surface elemental composition of Venus can be determined by using an artificially pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator (PNG) combined with a gamma ray spectrometer (GRS). The 14 MeV neutrons will interact with the surface materials and generate gamma rays, characteristic of specific elements, whose energy spectrum will be measured by GRS. These characteristic gamma rays are produced mainly through 3 different neutron interaction mechanisms: capture, inelastic, and activation reactions. Each reaction type has a different neutron energy dependency and different time scale for gamma ray production and transport. Certain elements are more easily identified through one reaction type over the others. Thus, careful analysis of the gamma ray spectra during and after the neutron pulse provides a comprehensive understanding of the surface elemental composition. In this paper, we use a well-tested neutron/gamma transport code, called Monte Carlo N-Particles (MCNP), to investigate the measurement capability of a PNG-GRS detection system through the neutron activation reactions. An activation analysis was performed for a representative soil composition of Venus with a notional operational scenario of PNG and GRS. The analysis shows that the proposed instrument concept can identify most of the modeled surface elements at Venus with sufficient accuracy through the activation mode. Specifically, U, Th, K, Si can be measured to within 1%, Fe within 2%, Al within 10%, Ca within 5%, Mg with 15%, Mn with 20%, and Cl within 6%. Although modeled in the analysis, it is shown that the activation mode alone cannot distinguish the S and Ti peaks.

Jun, I.; Kim, W.; Smith, M.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M. L.

2010-12-01

79

Gamma ray camera  

DOEpatents

A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01

80

Variation in sensitivity to. gamma. -ray-induced chromosomal aberrations during the mitotic cycle of the sea urchin egg  

SciTech Connect

Sea urchin eggs were irradiated with /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays at various stages of the mitotic cycle, and chromosomal aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis and embryonic abnormalities at later developmental stages were examined. The radiosensitivity of the eggs to both endpoints varied in parallel with the mitotic stage at the time of irradiation, suggesting a possible relationship between chromosomal damage and embryonic abnormalities.

Ejima, Y. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Nakamura, I.; Shiroya, T.

1982-11-01

81

Measurement of Cerenkov Radiation Induced by the Gamma-Rays of Co-60 Therapy Units Using Wavelength Shifting Fiber  

PubMed Central

In this study, a wavelength shifting fiber that shifts ultra-violet and blue light to green light was employed as a sensor probe of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor. In order to characterize Cerenkov radiation generated in the developed wavelength shifting fiber and a plastic optical fiber, spectra and intensities of Cerenkov radiation were measured with a spectrometer. The spectral peaks of light outputs from the wavelength shifting fiber and the plastic optical fiber were measured at wavelengths of 500 and 510 nm, respectively, and the intensity of transmitted light output of the wavelength shifting fiber was 22.2 times higher than that of the plastic optical fiber. Also, electron fluxes and total energy depositions of gamma-ray beams generated from a Co-60 therapy unit were calculated according to water depths using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons over the Cerenkov threshold energy and the energy depositions of gamma-ray beams from the Co-60 unit is a near-identity function. Finally, percentage depth doses for the gamma-ray beams were obtained using the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor, and the results were compared with those obtained by an ionization chamber. The average dose difference between the results of the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor and those of the ionization chamber was about 2.09%. PMID:24755521

Jang, Kyoung Won; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Seon Geun; Kim, Jae Seok; Yoo, Wook Jae; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Bongsoo

2014-01-01

82

Measurement of Cerenkov radiation induced by the gamma-rays of Co-60 therapy units using wavelength shifting fiber.  

PubMed

In this study, a wavelength shifting fiber that shifts ultra-violet and blue light to green light was employed as a sensor probe of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor. In order to characterize Cerenkov radiation generated in the developed wavelength shifting fiber and a plastic optical fiber, spectra and intensities of Cerenkov radiation were measured with a spectrometer. The spectral peaks of light outputs from the wavelength shifting fiber and the plastic optical fiber were measured at wavelengths of 500 and 510 nm, respectively, and the intensity of transmitted light output of the wavelength shifting fiber was 22.2 times higher than that of the plastic optical fiber. Also, electron fluxes and total energy depositions of gamma-ray beams generated from a Co-60 therapy unit were calculated according to water depths using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons over the Cerenkov threshold energy and the energy depositions of gamma-ray beams from the Co-60 unit is a near-identity function. Finally, percentage depth doses for the gamma-ray beams were obtained using the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor, and the results were compared with those obtained by an ionization chamber. The average dose difference between the results of the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor and those of the ionization chamber was about 2.09%. PMID:24755521

Jang, Kyoung Won; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Seon Geun; Kim, Jae Seok; Yoo, Wook Jae; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Bongsoo

2014-01-01

83

Inelastic cross sections from gamma-ray measurements  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of gamma rays following neutron induced reactions have been studied with the Germanium Array for Neutron-induced Excitations (GEANIE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for many years. Gamma-ray excitation functions and coincidence studies provide insight into nuclear reaction mechanisms as well as expanding our knowledge of energy levels and gamma-rays. Samples studied with Ge detectors at LANSCE range from Be to Pu. Fe, Cr and Ti have been considered for use as reference cross sections. An overview of the measurements and efforts to create a reliable neutron-induced gamma-ray reference cross section will be presented.

Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-06

84

Hypernuclear gamma rays  

SciTech Connect

The observation of hypernuclear ..gamma.. rays pprovides a method of determining the spin dependence of the ..lambda..-nucleon interaction with a sensitivity not approachable by other means in the forseeable future. The transitions of primary interest are those between states that differ only in the orientation of the spin of the ..lambda.. particle with respect to the angular momentum of the nuclear core. The effective ..lambda..-nucleon interaction can be specified by a small number of ..gamma..-ray measurements. A program of experiments directed at this goal is in progress at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This paper reviews the status of the subject with emphasis on the recent experiment to measure ground state doublet splittings using germanium ..gamma..-ray detectors.

May, M.

1985-01-01

85

Gamma Ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

Wu, S. T.

2000-01-01

86

Celestial gamma ray study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report documents the research activities performed by Stanford University investigators as part of the data reduction effort and overall support of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. This report is arranged chronologically, with each subsection detailing activities during roughly a one year period of time, beginning in June 1991.

Michelson, Peter F.

1995-01-01

87

Gamma rays from Galactic pulsars  

E-print Network

Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray emission measured by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we show that they explain only a small fraction of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background.

Calore, Francesca; Donato, Fiorenza

2014-01-01

88

Topics in gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of gamma rays from solar flares, gamma ray bursts, the Galactic center, galactic nucleosynthesis, SS433, and Cygnus X-3, and their effects on astrophysical problems are discussed. It is observed that gamma ray spectra from solar flares are applicable to the study of particle acceleration and confinement and the determination of chemical abundances in the solar atmosphere. The gamma ray lines from the compact galactic object SS433 are utilized to examine the acceleration of jets, and analysis of the gamma ray lines of Cygnus X-3 reveal that particles can be accelerated in compact sources to ultrahigh energies.

Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1986-01-01

89

Evaluation of a pragmatic approach for the prediction of radiation-induced losses in optical fibers exposed to a gamma-ray environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The many advantages of optical fibers for their use in various nuclear environments ushered the respective communities to extensive studies over the last decades. Forecasting the behavior of fiber-optic links exposed to ionizing radiation still remains an important issue. We have developed an industry-aimed pragmatic method based on a simple model for the prediction of radiation induced losses in commercially available optical fibers exposed to 60Co gamma rays. When environmental and measurement conditions are well defined, long-term losses could be predicted with a precision of about 15%, for dose rates ranging between 100 Gy/h and 3 kGy/h and total doses up to MGy levels. Thermally induced effects were also considered, between ambient temperature and 80 degree(s)C. From an interpretation of these results, we discuss its applicability and potential further improvements.

Van Uffelen, Marco; Berghmans, Francis; Decreton, Marc C.; Nowodzinski, Antoine; Lecompte, Jean-Claude

2000-10-01

90

Shape of the 4.438 MeV gamma-ray line of ^12C from proton and alpha-particle induced reactions on ^12C and ^16O  

E-print Network

We calculated in detail the angular distribution of gamma-rays and the resulting shape of the gamma-ray line produced by the nuclear deexcitation of the 4.439 MeV state of ^12C following proton and alpha-particle interactions with ^12C and ^16O in the energy range from threshold to 100 MeV per nucleon, making use of available experimental data. In the proton energy range from 8.6 to 20 MeV, the extensive data set of a recent accelerator experiment on gamma-ray line shapes and angular distributions was used to deduce parameterizations for the gamma-ray emission of the 2^+, 4.439 MeV state of ^12C following inelastic proton scattering off ^12C and proton induced spallation of ^16O. At higher proton energies and for alpha-particle induced reactions, optical model calculations were the main source to obtain the needed reaction parameters for the calculation of gamma-ray line shapes and angular distributions. Line shapes are predicted for various interaction scenarios of accelerated protons and alpha-particles in solar flares.

J. Kiener; N. de Sereville; V. Tatischeff

2001-05-16

91

Gamma-Ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high-energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter. We detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with an accuracy of {approx}5-10 deg. at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the subsatellite point than 400 km. Considering that our gamma rays reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, our measurements provide the first precise direct localization of TGFs from space.

Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Gianotti, F. [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Argan, A.; De Paris, G. [INAF, Viale del Parco Mellini 84, Roma (Italy); Trois, A.; Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Rubini, A.; Sabatini, S. [INAF-IASF Roma, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

2010-09-17

92

Intrinsic and dust-induced polarization in gamma-ray burst afterglows: the case of GRB 021004  

E-print Network

Polarization measurements for the optical counterpart to GRB 021004 are presented and discussed. Our observations were performed with the TNG and the VLT-UT3 (Melipal) during the first and fourth night after the gamma-ray burst discovery. We find robust evidence of temporal evolution of the polarization, which is therefore, at least partially, intrinsic to the optical transient. We do not find convincing evidence of wavelength dependence for the intrinsic polarization of the transient, in agreement with current polarization models for optical afterglows. We discuss the role of dust, both in our galaxy and in the host, in modifying the transmitted polarization vector, showing how a sizable fraction of the observed polarized flux is due to Galactic selective extinction, while it is not possible to single out any clear contribution from dust in the host galaxy. We discuss how our data compare to those obtained by different groups showing that a two-component model is required to describe the complete dataset. This is not surprising given the complex lightcurve of GRB 021004.

D. Lazzati; S. Covino; S. di Serego Alighieri; G. Ghisellini; J. Vernet; E. Le Floc'h; D. Fugazza; S. Di Tomaso; D. Malesani; N. Masetti; E. Pian; E. Oliva; L. Stella

2003-08-29

93

Observing terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flash Workshop; Huntsville, Alabama, 13-14 July 2011 Terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) were the focus of a workshop held at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), with observation and theory well represented by the 38 attendees. Discovered in 1991 as brief (submillisecond), bright flashes of gamma rays detected over regions of thunderstorm activity by the spaceborne Burst And Transient Source Experiment, TGFs may be entering an observational golden era. Three space-based gamma ray telescopes currently make TGFs a scientific priority.

Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.

2011-12-01

94

Digital Pulse Processing and Gamma Ray Tracking  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Two of the big changes in new generations of Nuclear Physics instrumentation will be the incorporation of digital processing and the use of gamma ray tracking. The Nuclear Physics Group at Daresbury has set up a project to investigate digital pulse processing for gamma ray detectors and how best to implement gamma ray tracking in large Germanium gamma ray detectors. Topics on this site include but are not limited to: gamma ray tracking, overview of the Gamma Ray Tracking Project, pictures of one of the tracking gamma ray detectors (TIGRE), pictures of test experiment, gamma ray tracking project publications, and links to other gamma ray tracking pages.

2010-09-21

95

Gamma Ray Bursts and CETI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma ray burst sources are isotropically distributed. They could be located at distances 1000 AU. (Katz (4)) GRB signals have many narrow peaks that are unresolved at the millisecond time resolution of existing observations. (1) CETI could use stars as gravitational lenses for interstellar gamma ray laser beam communication. Much better time resolution of GRB signals could rule out (or

96

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments,

N. Gehrels; E. Chipman; D. Kniffen

1994-01-01

97

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and the observing program of the first 2 years of the mission. Examples of early discoveries by Compton are enumerated, including the discovery that gamma-ray bursts are isotropic but spatially inhomogeneous in their distribution; the discovery of a new class of high-energy extragalacatic gamma-ray sources, the gamma-ray AGNs; the discovery of emission from SN 1987A in the nuclear line of Co-57; and the mapping of emission from Al-26 in the interstellar medium (ISM) near the Galactic center. Future observations will include deep surveys of selected regions of the sky, long-tem studies of individual objects, correlative studies of objects at gamma-ray and other energies, a Galactic plane survey at intermediate gamma-ray energies, and improved statistics on gamma-ray bursts to search for small anisotropies. After completion of the all-sky survey, a Guest Investigator program is in progress with guest observers' time share increasing from 30% upward for the late mission phases.

Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D.

1994-01-01

98

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and the observing program of the first 2 years of the mission. Examples of early discoveries by Compton are enumerated, including the discovery that gamma-ray bursts are isotropic but spatially inhomogeneous in their distribution; the discovery of a new class of high-energy extragalacatic gamma-ray sources, the gamma-ray AGNs; the discovery of emission from SN 1987A in the nuclear line of Co-57; and the mapping of emission from Al-26 in the interstellar medium (ISM) near the Galactic center. Future observations will include deep surveys of selected regions of the sky, long-tem studies of individual objects, correlative studies of objects at gamma-ray and other energies, a Galactic plane survey at intermediate gamma-ray energies, and improved statistics on gamma-ray bursts to search for small anisotropies. After completion of the all-sky survey, a Guest Investigator program is in progress with guest observers' time share increasing from 30% upward for the late mission phases.

Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D.

1994-06-01

99

Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

2010-01-01

100

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Revolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Isolated neutron stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. In the 1970s, only two sources had been identified, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space in both the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led to breakthrough developments in understanding the structure and physics of neutron star (NS) magnetospheres. In parallel, the 20-year-long chase to understand the nature of Geminga unveiled the existence of a radio-quiet, gamma-ray-emitting INS, adding a new dimension to the INS family. We are living through an extraordinary time of discovery. The current generation of gamma-ray detectors has vastly increased the population of known gamma-ray-emitting NSs. The 100 mark was crossed in 2011, and we are now over 150. The gamma-ray-emitting NS population exhibits roughly equal numbers of radio-loud and radio-quiet young INSs, plus an astonishing, and unexpected, group of isolated and binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). The number of MSPs is growing so rapidly that they are on their way to becoming the most numerous members of the family of gamma-ray-emitting NSs. Even as these findings have set the stage for a revolution in our understanding of gamma-ray-emitting NSs, long-term monitoring of the gamma-ray sky has revealed evidence of flux variability in the Crab Nebula as well as in the pulsed emission from PSR J2021+4026, challenging a four-decades-old, constant-emission paradigm. Now we know that both pulsars and their nebulae can, indeed, display variable emission.

Caraveo, Patrizia A.

2014-08-01

101

High energy gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

Fichtel, Carl E.

1987-01-01

102

Gamma-Ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high-energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by

M. Marisaldi; A. Argan; A. Trois; A. Giuliani; M. Tavani; C. Labanti; F. Fuschino; A. Bulgarelli; F. Longo; G. Barbiellini; E. Del Monte; E. Moretti; M. Trifoglio; E. Costa; P. Caraveo; P. W. Cattaneo; A. Chen; F. D'Ammando; G. de Paris; G. Di Cocco; G. di Persio; I. Donnarumma; Y. Evangelista; M. Feroci; A. Ferrari; M. Fiorini; T. Froysland; M. Galli; F. Gianotti; I. Lapshov; F. Lazzarotto; P. Lipari; S. Mereghetti; A. Morselli; L. Pacciani; A. Pellizzoni; F. Perotti; P. Picozza; G. Piano; M. Pilia; M. Prest; G. Pucella; M. Rapisarda; A. Rappoldi; A. Rubini; S. Sabatini; P. Soffitta; E. Striani; E. Vallazza; S. Vercellone; V. Vittorini; A. Zambra; D. Zanello; L. A. Antonelli; S. Colafrancesco; S. Cutini; P. Giommi; F. Lucarelli; C. Pittori; P. Santolamazza; F. Verrecchia; L. Salotti

2010-01-01

103

Cloaked Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

It is suggested that many $\\gamma$-ray bursts (GRBs) are cloaked by an ultra-relativistic baryonic shell that has high optical depth when the photons are manufactured. Such a shell would not fully block photons reflected or emitted from its inner surface, because the radial velocity of the photons can be less than that of the shell. This avoids the standard problem associated with GRBs that the thermal component should be produced where the flow is still obscured by high optical depth. The radiation that escapes high optical depth obeys the Amati relation. Observational implications may include a) anomalously high ratios of afterglow to prompt emission, such as may have been the case in the recently discovered PTF 11agg, and b) ultrahigh-energy neutrino pulses that are non-coincident with detectable GRB. It is suggested that GRB 090510, a short, very hard GRB with very little afterglow, was an {\\it exposed} GRB, in contrast to those cloaked by baryonic shells. \\end{abstract}

Eichler, David

2014-01-01

104

Study of asymmetries of Cd(Zn)Te devices investigated using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, and gamma ray spectroscopies  

SciTech Connect

Despite these recent advancements in preparing the surface of Cd(Zn)Te devices for detector applications, large asymmetries in the electronic properties of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors are common. Furthermore, for the development of patterned electrode geometries, selection of each electrode surface is crucial for minimizing dark current in the device. This investigation presented here has been carried out with three objectives. Each objective is oriented towards establishing reliable methods for the selection of the anode and cathode surfaces independent of the crystallographic orientation. The objectives of this study are (i) investigate how the asymmetry in I-V characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te devices may be associated with the TeO2 interfacial layer using Rutherford backscattering to study the structure at the Au-Cd(Zn)Te interface, (ii) develop an understanding of how the concentration of the active traps in Cd(Zn)Te varies with the external bias, and (iii) propose non-destructive methods for selection of the anode and cathode which are independent of crystallographic orientation. The spectroscopic methods employed in this investigation include Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, and surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, as well as gamma ray spectroscopy to demonstrate the influence on detector properties.

Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Dieguez, E. [Crystal Growth Laboratory, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid Spain (Spain); Corregidor, V.; Avles, E. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear UFA, Sacavem (Portugal); Castaldini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A. [PHoS Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Vela, O. [Centro de Investigacion Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)

2012-10-01

105

Gamma-Ray Burst Lines  

E-print Network

The evidence for spectral features in gamma-ray bursts is summarized. As a guide for evaluating the evidence, the properties of gamma-ray detectors and the methods of analyzing gamma-ray spectra are reviewed. In the 1980's, observations indicated that absorption features below 100 keV were present in a large fraction of bright gamma-ray bursts. There were also reports of emission features around 400 keV. During the 1990's the situation has become much less clear. A small fraction of bursts observed with BATSE have statistically significant low-energy features, but the reality of the features is suspect because in several cases the data of the BATSE detectors appear to be inconsistent. Furthermore, most of the possible features appear in emission rather than the expected absorption. Analysis of data from other instruments has either not been finalized or has not detected lines.

Michael S. Briggs

1999-10-20

106

Multiwavelength Astronomy: Gamma Ray Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dieter Hartmann, a high-energy physicist, presents a story-based lesson on the science of Gamma-Ray astronomy. The lesson focuses on gamma-ray bursts; examining their sources, types, and links to the origin and evolution of the Universe. The story-based format of the lesson also provides insights into the nature of science. Students answer questions based on the reading guide. A list of supplemental websites is also included.

107

Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory  

SciTech Connect

The symposium represents the topics on varied aspects ofgamma-ray astronomy. The Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory representsa dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions.A large number of reports were presented on the topic of gamma-raybursts. A total of two hundred and ten papers were presented at thesymposium, out of which twenty four have been abstracted for thedatabase. (AIP)

Friedlander, M. (ed.) (Washington University, St. Louis,Missouri (United States)); Gehrels, N.; Macomb, D.J. (eds.) (Laboratory forHigh Energy Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center,Greenbelt, Maryland (United States))

1993-01-01

108

Gamma-ray Pulsar Revolution  

E-print Network

Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. At first, in the 70s, there were only two identified sources, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space both in the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led to breakthrough developments in understanding the structure and physics of neutron star magnetospheres. In parallel, the 20-year-long chase to understand the nature of Geminga unveiled the existence of a radio-quiet, gamma-ray-emitting, INS, adding a new dimension to the INS family. Today we are living through an extraordinary time of discovery. The current generation of gamma-ray detectors has vastly increased the population of known of gamma-ray-emitting neutron stars. The 100 mark was crossed in 2011 and we are now appr...

Caraveo, Patrizia A

2013-01-01

109

Ultra-high energy gamma rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The production of ultrahigh energy gamma rays by proton interactions with relicit radiation, propagation of gamma rays through the universe, and proton cascading in the presence and absence of galactic magnetic fields is discussed. Detailed data are given on proton spectrum link, gamma ray intensity, and energy spectra of gamma rays on production.

Strong, A. W.; Wdowczyk, J.; Wolfendale, A. W.

1973-01-01

110

[gamma]-ray bursts from ordinary cosmic strings  

SciTech Connect

We give an upper estimate for the number of [gamma]-ray bursts from ordinary (nonsuperconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic-string-induced flux of [gamma]-ray bursts.

Brandenberger, R.H.; Sornborger, A.T.; Trodden, M. (Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States))

1993-07-15

111

Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory being released from the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-35 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered the Earth's atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, GRO's Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientist to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of star, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in BATSE's science program.

1991-01-01

112

Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

1991-01-01

113

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than that of previous observations. The 16,000 kilogram observatory contains four instruments on a stabilized platform. The mission began normal operations on 16 May 1991 and is now over half-way through a full-sky survey. The mission duration is expected to be from six to ten years. A Science Support Center has been established at Goddard Space Flight Center for the purpose of supporting a vigorous Guest Investigator Program. New scientific results to date include: (1) the establishment of the isotropy, combined with spatial inhomogeneity, of the distribution of gamma-ray bursts in the sky; (2) the discovery of intense high energy (100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 3C 279 and other quasars and BL Lac objects, making these the most distant and luminous gamma-ray sources ever detected; (3) one of the first images of a gamma-ray burst; (4) the observation of intense nuclear and position-annihilation gamma-ray lines and neutrons from several large solar flares; and (5) the detection of a third gamma-ray pulsar, plus several other transient and pulsing hard X-ray sources.

Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

1993-01-01

114

The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From these results, we conclude that the cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting the ubiquitin-proteasome dependent degradation of XRCC1 in an Epac-dependent pathway in lung cancer cells.

Cho, Eun-Ah [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Juhnn, Yong-Sung, E-mail: juhnn@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-06-01

115

[Contribution of 210Bi beta-ray induced bremsstrahlung to the emission of Pb-KX-rays observed in the lead shielded gamma-ray background spectrum (author's transl)].  

PubMed

Observation of gamma-ray background has been done by using a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector when it was placed inside the lead shielding material. With the aid of a very simple model calculation, the concentration of 210Pb radioisotope embedded in the lead material has been estimated to be 0.1-0.4 (Bq/Pb-g) (3-12 (pCi/Pb-g). The origin of Pb-KX-ray emission, the highest peak in the background spectrum, has been investigated by comparing the 210Pb-47 keV gamma-ray and Pb-KX-ray peak counts. As the results, about 50 +/- 30% of Pb-KX-ray production is estimated to be due to the Pb-K shell photoionization which is induced by the bremsstrahlung of 210Bi beta-ray. PMID:7208990

Shima, K; Mihara, T; Umetani, K; Mikumo, T

1980-08-01

116

Experimental simulations of planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy using thick targets irradiated by protons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To simulate planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy, gamma rays were measured during a series of five irradiations of up to 30-ton thick targets with protons beams of 1.5 and 2.5 GeV. The targets were steel (iron), basalt with structural steel, basalt with added S and Cl, and basalt with added H, S, and Cl. The pulsed proton beam was carefully monitored and counted. Spectra were collected with both proton beam on and beam off and with a lead shield both between the target and the germanium detector and with the lead shield removed. This set of four spectra was used to determine the fluxes of prompt gamma rays emitted from the target. Over 200 discrete gamma-ray lines per irradiation were observed and identified. Counting results for the more intense gamma rays were compiled, and gamma-ray fluxes determined for about 25 gamma rays of interest to planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy. The ratios of thermal and fast neutron induced gamma-ray fluxes between irradiations were similar. Thus the relative gamma-ray fluxes can be used in testing model calculations and interpreting planetary gamma-ray spectra.

Brückner, J.; Reedy, R. C.; Englert, P. A. J.; Drake, D. M.

2011-11-01

117

Study of radiation dose induced by cosmic-ray origin low-energy gamma rays and electrons near sea level  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For a long time, it has been known that low-energy continuous gamma radiation is present in open air at the Earth's surface. In previous investigations it was assumed that this radiation is produced almost exclusively by gamma photons emitted due to the natural radioactivity, which are backscattered by air above ground. We show that significant amount of this radiation (related to energy region 30-300 keV) that peaks at about 90 keV, is produced by cosmic-rays, with the photon flux of about 3000 m-2 s-1. We find that the contribution of this omnipresent low-energy gamma radiation of cosmic-ray origin, including the corresponding low-energy electron flux, to the doses of general population are non-negligible components of overall doses induced by cosmic rays near sea level.

Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Bikit, K.; Slivka, J.; Anicin, I.

2015-02-01

118

The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

Thompson, David

2012-01-01

119

Gamma rays from molecular clouds  

E-print Network

It is believed that the observed diffuse gamma ray emission from the galactic plane is the result of interactions between cosmic rays and the interstellar gas. Such emission can be amplified if cosmic rays penetrate into dense molecular clouds. The propagation of cosmic rays inside a molecular cloud has been studied assuming an arbitrary energy and space dependent diffusion coefficient. If the diffusion coefficient inside the cloud is significantly smaller compared to the average one derived for the galactic disk, the observed gamma ray spectrum appears harder than the cosmic ray spectrum, mainly due to the slower penetration of the low energy particles towards the core of the cloud. This may produce a great variety of gamma ray spectra.

Stefano Gabici; Felix Aharonian; Pasquale Blasi

2006-10-02

120

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models.

Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Tavani, Marco; Argan, Andrea; Del Monte, Ettore; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Trois, Alessio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo

2013-08-01

121

Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

For more than 50 years, the measurement of radioactivity has been used for onshore geological surveys and in laboratories. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has extended the use of this type of equipment to the marine environment with the development of seabed gamma ray spectrometer systems. The present seabed gamma ray spectrometer, known as the Eel, has been successfully used for sediment and solid rock mapping, mineral exploration, and radioactive pollution studies. The range of applications for the system continues to expand. This paper examines the technological aspects of the Eel and some of the applications for which it has been used.

Jones, D.G. (British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom))

1994-08-01

122

Cosmography by gamma ray bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aims: Relations connecting gamma ray burst quantities can be used to constrain cosmographic parameters of the Hubble law at medium-high redshifts. Methods: We consider a sample of 27 gamma ray bursts to construct the luminosity distance to redshift relation and derive the values of the parameters q_0, j_0, and s_0. The analysis is compared with other methods in the literature. Results: Gamma gay bursts, if calibrated by SNeIa, seem reliable as distance indicators and give cosmographic parameters in agreement with the ?CDM model.

Capozziello, S.; Izzo, L.

2008-10-01

123

Cosmological gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The distribution in angle and flux of gamma-ray bursts indicates that the majority of gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, i.e., at z of about 1. The rate is then about 10 exp -8/yr in a galaxy like the Milky Way, i.e., orders of magnitude lower than the estimated rate for collisions between neutron stars in close binary systems. The energy per burst is about 10 exp 51 ergs, assuming isotropic emission. The events appear to be less energetic and more frequent if their emission is strongly beamed. Some tests for the distance scale are discussed: a correlation between the burst's strength and its spectrum; the absorption by the Galactic gas below about 2 keV; the X-ray tails caused by forward scattering by the Galactic dust; about 1 month recurrence of some bursts caused by gravitational lensing by foreground galaxies; and a search for gamma-ray bursts in M31. The bursts appear to be a manifestation of something exotic, but conventional compact objects can provide an explanation. The best possibility is offered by a decay of a bindary composed of a spinning-stellar-mass black-hole primary and a neutron or a strange-quark star secondary. In the final phase the secondary is tidally disrupted, forms an accretion disk, and up to 10 exp 54 ergs are released. A very small fraction of this energy powers the gamma-ray burst.

Paczynski, Bohdan

1991-01-01

124

Cosmological gamma-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Gamma-ray bursts are brief events that dominate the emission from all other gamma-ray objects in the sky, flicker for tens of seconds, and then turn off. Their nature remains uncertain despite years of efforts to understand them. One hypothesis is that the bursts arise within our galaxy albeit in an extended halo of neutron stars. Another hypothesis uses the isotropic distribution of gamma-ray bursts to argue that they come from nearly the edge of the universe. If gamma-ray bursts originate from cosmological distances, then the expansion of the universe should cause the dimmer (and presumably further) bursts to last longer. The authors have developed methods for measuring this time stretching, related the time stretching to the distance to the bursts, determined how the detailed physics causes temporal variations, and found the amount of total energy and peak luminosity that the events must be producing.

Fenimore, E.; Epstein, R.; Ho, C.; Intzand, J.

1996-04-01

125

Gamma-ray camera flyby  

SciTech Connect

Animation based on an actual classroom demonstration of the prototype CCI-2 gamma-ray camera's ability to image a hidden radioactive source, a cesium-137 line source, in three dimensions. For more information see http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/06/02/applied-nuclear-physics/.

None

2010-01-01

126

Swift: Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video segment adapted from Penn State Public Broadcasting's Swift: Eyes Through Time, learn about the Swift satellite — a NASA mission with international participation — and how it is collecting data about gamma-ray bursts that may yield important discoveries about the Universe.

2005-12-17

127

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than

N. Gehrels; E. Chipman; D. A. Kniffen

1993-01-01

128

Cosmic Rays: What Gamma Rays Can Say  

E-print Network

We will review the main channels of gamma ray emission due to the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, discussing the cases of both galactic and extra-galactic cosmic rays and their connection with gamma rays observations.

Aloisio, Roberto

2014-01-01

129

Cosmic Gamma-ray Background Radiation  

E-print Network

The cosmic gamma-ray background radiation is one of the most fundamental observables in the gamma-ray band. Although the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation has been a mystery for a long time, the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has recently measured it at 0.1-820 GeV and revealed that the cosmic GeV gamma-ray background is composed of blazars, radio galaxies, and star-forming galaxies. However, Fermi still leaves the following questions. Those are dark matter contribution, origins of the cosmic MeV gamma-ray background, and the connection to the IceCube TeV-PeV neutrino events. In this proceeding, I will review the current understandings of the cosmic gamma-ray background and discuss future prospects of cosmic gamma-ray background radiation studies. I also briefly review the current status of cosmic infrared/optical background radiation studies.

Inoue, Yoshiyuki

2014-01-01

130

Portable compton gamma-ray detection system  

DOEpatents

A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Oldaker, Mark E. (Pleasanton, CA)

2008-03-04

131

Accurate determination of lithium, boron, fluorine and sodium in some matrices using low energy alpha-particles induced gamma-rays  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described for analyzing some light elements with high accuracy. Prompt gamma-ray spectrometry with 3.5 MeV alpha-particles\\u000a from a Van de Graaff accelerator was used: this technique is non-destructive, rapid and experimentally simple. Sensitivities\\u000a are indicated and factors affecting the accuracy of analysis are considered. A range of different materials has been analyzed\\u000a and analytical results are presented.

B. Borderie; M. Basutcu; J. N. Barrandon; J. L. Pinault

1980-01-01

132

Multifrequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst  

E-print Network

Neither a flaring nor a quiescent counterpart to a gamma-ray burst has yet been convincingly identified at any wavelength region. The present status of the search for counterparts of classical gamma-ray bursts is given. Particular emphasis is put on the search for flaring counterparts, i.e. emission during or shortly after the gamma-ray emission.

J. Greiner

1995-10-04

133

Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

Cline, T. L. (editor); Ramaty, R. (editor)

1978-01-01

134

Gamma ray astrophysics. [emphasizing processes and absorption  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray production processes are reviewed, including Compton scattering, synchrotron radiation, bremsstrahlung interactions, meson decay, nucleon-antinucleon annihilations, and pion production. Gamma ray absorption mechanisms through interactions with radiation and with matter are discussed, along with redshifts and gamma ray fluxes.

Stecker, F. W.

1974-01-01

135

Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1978-01-01

136

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Concept of new gamma ray detector  

E-print Network

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Concept of new gamma ray detector Satoko Osone Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa City,Chiba 277-8582, Japan Abstract We present a concept of a new gamma ray detector in order to observe undetected TeV gamma ray

Enomoto, Ryoji

137

Differential radiosensitivity phenotypes of DNA-PKcs mutations affecting NHEJ and HRR systems following irradiation with gamma-rays or very low fluences of alpha particles.  

PubMed

We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate ? irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of ?-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by ?-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of ?-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by ?-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component. PMID:24714417

Lin, Yu-Fen; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B; Kato, Takamitsu A; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson, Paul F; Brogan, John R; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C

2014-01-01

138

Differential Radiosensitivity Phenotypes of DNA-PKcs Mutations Affecting NHEJ and HRR Systems following Irradiation with Gamma-Rays or Very Low Fluences of Alpha Particles  

PubMed Central

We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate ? irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of ?-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by ?-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of ?-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by ?-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component. PMID:24714417

Little, John B.; Kato, Takamitsu A.; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson Jr., Paul F.; Brogan, John R.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J.; Bedford, Joel S.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.

2014-01-01

139

900-MHz microwave radiation enhances gamma-ray adverse effects on SHG44 cells.  

PubMed

Mobile phones are widely used globally. However, the biological effects due to exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) produced by mobile phones are largely unknown. Environmental and occupational exposure of humans to gamma-rays is a biologically relevant phenomenon. Consequently studies were undertaken to examine the interactions between gamma-rays and EMF on human health. In this study, exposure to 900-MHz EMF expanded gamma-ray damage to SHG44 cells. Preexposure EMF enhanced the decrease in cell proliferation induced by gamma-ray irradiation and the rate of apoptosis. The combination of EMF and gamma-ray exposure resulted in a synergistic effect by triggering stress response, which increased reactive oxygen species, but the expression of hsp70 at both mRNA and protein levels remained unaltered. Data indicate that the adverse effects of gamma-rays on cellular functions are strengthened by EMF. PMID:19492235

Cao, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Min-Xia; Xu, Qian; Meng, Qian-Qian; Nie, Ji-Hua; Tong, Jian

2009-01-01

140

High-energy gamma rays from the intense 1993 January 31 gamma-ray burst  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intense gamma-ray burst of 1993 January 31 was detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. Sixteen gamma rays above 30 MeV were imaged in the telescope when only 0.04 gamma rays were expected by chance. Two of these gamma rays have energies of approximately 1 GeV, and the five bin spectrum of the

M. Sommer; D. L. Bertsch; B. L. Dingus; C. E. Fichtel; G. J. Fishman; A. K. Harding; R. C. Hartman; S. D. Hunter; K. Hurley; G. Kanbach; D. A. Kniffen; C. Kouveliotou; Y. C. Lin; J. R. Mattox; H. A. Mayer-Hasselwander; P. F. Michelson; C. von Montigny; P. L. Nolan; E. Schneid; P. Sreekumar; D. J. Thompson

1994-01-01

141

Analysis of noise power spectrum of gamma rays camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gamma rays camera is widely used in many studies, including the image diagnostics of the radiation sources, flash photography, and nondestructive assessment (NDA), etc. As a major component of the high sensitivity gamma rays camera, the MCP image intensifier is characterized in the intensified image, tunable shutter time and gain. The gamma rays camera is consisting with rays-fluorescence convertor, the optical imaging system, the MCP image intensifier, CCD and other devices. The performance of the gamma rays camera is mainly dependent on such parameters as the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), etc. All of the parameters are somewhat limited by the noise characteristics of the system. Compared with the standard derivative noise distribution, the NPS, which can reflect the evolution characteristics of the noise of the imaging system with the change of the spatial frequency, could convey more information on the noise distribution in the system. In this paper, theoretical analysis is presented on the major sources of the noise in the gamma rays camera. Based on the analysis, the noise power spectra of the gamma rays camera were calibrated under various radiation dosages respectively with the visible light and gamma rays radiation sources (0.2MeV and 1.25MeV in energy, respectively). As indicated by the experimental results, the noise is majorly induced by the fluctuations of the gain of the MCP image intensifier. And the remarkable noise peak occurs nearby the spatial frequency of about 0.633 Hz/mm. And almost the same phenomena were found with both the 0.2MeV and 1.25MeV radiation energy. Besides, the noise power spectra are in circular symmetrical distribution, whose intensities are rapidly decreased with the increasing spatial frequencies.

Xie, Hongwei; Zhang, Faqiang; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Jinchuan; Chen, Dingyang; Li, Linbo

2014-01-01

142

Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the observation of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes (TGFs) by Gamma-Ray Telescopes. These were: (1) BATSE /Compton Observatory, (2) Solar Spectroscopic Imager, (3) AGILE Gamma-ray Telescope, and (4) Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It contains charts which display the counts over time, a map or the TGFs observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). and a map showing the latitude and longitude of 85 of the TGFs observed by the Fermi GBM.

Fishman, Gerald J.

2010-01-01

143

Solar gamma-ray lines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite has observed emissions produced by nuclear reactions in over 20 separate solar flares. The observed intensity from different flares ranges over a factor of 100, and the time scale for their production ranges from 10-s pulses to complete events lasting over 1000 s. The emissions include narrow and broadened prompt gamma-ray lines from numerous isotopes from Li-7 to Fe-56 and cover the energy range from 0.431 MeV (Be-7) to 7.12 MeV (O-16). The instrument has also observed emissions at energies greater than 10 MeV from the decay of pi0 mesons, from electron bremsstrahlung, and from the direct observation of greater-than-100-MeV solar neutrons. The intensity, temporal and spectral properties of these emissions are reviewed from the point of view that solar flares represent an astrophysical particle-acceleration site.

Forrest, D. J.

1983-01-01

144

A Model of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a model that reproduces the basic spectral properties of classical gammaray bursts with essentially no free parameters. It is an elaboration of the scenario for cosmological gamma-ray bursts outlined by Duncan & Thompson. The starting point is a Poynting-flux-dominated, relativistic, MHD wind of extremely high luminosity, L 1050 erg s- . The compactness parameter measured at the base of the wind exceeds that of the Crab pulsar, or that of a luminous AGN, by a factor of 1012. The wind emanates from a rapidly rotating neutron star, or neutron disc, in which a poloidal field > 1014 G has been generated by a helical dynamo. Scenarios that could produce such an object include a failed Type Ib supernova, accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf, or perhaps a binary neutron star merger. The wind is safely in the MHD limit as the result of neutrino-driven and centrifugally driven mass loss. Mildly relativistic Alfven turbulence is excited in the wind by reconnection, or by hydrodynamical instabilities triggered by magnetic tension. Gamma-rays are generated via Comptonization at moderate to high scattering depth. The amplitude of the turbulence is itself limited by Compton drag, and the y-parameter of the Alfven motions is regulated to a value near 114, with a weak dependence on parameters such as radius, luminosity and the amount of baryon loading. The resulting spectrum is a power law with spectral index close to = -2 (VFv = constant), extending from an energy Ebreak - 1 (Ly/1050 erg S - 1)1/4 MeV (close to the spectral peak of a thermal fireball carrying the same flux) up to an energy as high as - 10 meG2. This power law steepens when the amplitude of the turbulence declines, or when the turbulence is generated outside the scattering photosphere. The spectrum below energy Ebreak is also a power law, with index a = - 1, which is cut off from below by stimulated scattering terms. Heavy baryon loading causes much less adiabatic softening of the spectrum than in thermal fireballs, so long as the Alfve'n turbulence is generated out to the scattering photo sphere. We show explicitly that the broken power law spectrum is an attractor, and that neither power law is altered by relativistic corrections to the Kompane'ets equation (except near the high-energy cut-off). The emergent gamma-ray spectrum is generated at a distance as small as - 1 0 cm from the source, without the need for any interaction with an external medium. Key words: MHD - radiation mechanisms: non-thermal - radiative transfer - turbulence - stars: neutron - gamma-rays: bursts.

Thompson, C.

1994-10-01

145

Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of 131I Radiation Relative to 60Co Gamma Rays  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 131I radiation relative to 60Co gamma rays in glioblastoma spheroid cells. Materials and Methods: : In this experimental study, glioblastoma spheroid cells were exposed to 131I radiation and 60Co gamma rays. Radiation induced DNA damage was evaluated by alkaline comet assay. Samples of spheroid cells were treated by radiation from 131I for four different periods of time to find the dose-response equation. Spheroid cells were also exposed by 200 cGy of 60Co gamma rays as reference radiation to induce DNA damage as endpoint. Results: Resulted RBE of 131I radiation relative to 60Co gamma rays in 100 µm giloblastoma spheroid cells was equal to 1.16. Conclusion: The finding of this study suggests that 131I photons and electrons can be more effective than 60Co gamma rays to produce DNA damage in glioblastoma spheroid cells. PMID:24027663

Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie

2013-01-01

146

Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

2012-01-01

147

Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a review of the current status of very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. The development of the atmospheric Cerenkov imaging technique for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has led to a rapid growth in the number of observatories. The detection of TeV gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei was unexpected and is providing new insights into the emission mechanisms in the jets.

Michael Catanese; Trevor C. Weekes

1999-01-01

148

Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies with GLAST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the prospects of extending the understanding of gamma ray pulsars, and answering the open questions left from the limited observations that are available from current observatories. There are 2 new gamma ray observatories that are either on orbit or will be shortly launched: (1) Astro-rivelatore Gamma a Immagini LEggero (AGILE), and Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). On board GLAST there will be two instruments Large Area Telescope (LAT), and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM).

Thompson, David J.

2007-01-01

149

Gamma rays from star-forming regions  

E-print Network

Star-forming regions have been tentatively associated with gamma-ray sources since the early days of the COS B satellite. After the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, the statistical evidence for such an association has became overwhelming. Recent results from Cherenkov telescopes indicate that some high-energy sources are produced in regions of active star formation like Cygnus OB2 and Westerlund 2. In this paper I will briefly review what kind of stellar objects can produce gamma-ray emission in star-forming regions and I will suggest that the formation process of massive stars could in principle result in the production of observable gamma rays.

Gustavo E. Romero

2008-10-15

150

Gamma rays from compact binary system  

E-print Network

Some of the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray sources detected with the modern generation of Cherenkov telescopes have been identified with previously known X-ray binary systems. These detections demonstrate the richness of non-thermal phenomena in compact galactic objects containing relativistic outflows or winds produced near black holes and neutron stars. Recently, the well-known microquasar Cygnus X-3 seems to be associated with a gamma-ray source detected with AGILE. Here I summarise the main observational results on gamma-ray emission from X-ray binaries, as well as some of the proposed scenarios to explain the production of VHE gamma-rays.

Josep M. Paredes

2008-10-24

151

Cosmic gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of the cosmic gamma-ray burst phenomenon is presented. Both the light curves and the energy spectra of these short transient events display a great diversity. However, rapid rise times and periodicities sometimes observed in the light curves suggest a compact object origin. Similarly, absorption and emission features in the energy spectra argue strongly in favor of this interpretation. Counterparts to gamma-bursters in other energy ranges, such as optical and sort x-ray, have still not been identified, however, leading to a large uncertainty in the distances to bursters. Although gamma-ray burst sources have not yet been observed to repeat, numerous bursts from three objects which may be related to the gamma-bursters, called Soft Gamma Repeaters, have been recorded; there is weak evidence that they may be relatively distant on a galactic scale. Future missions, particularly those emphasizing high energy, time, and/or spatial resolution, as well as a multiwavelength approach, are likely to advance our understanding of this enigmatic phenomenon.

Hurley, K.

1991-01-01

152

Gravitational Waves versus X and Gamma Ray Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst  

E-print Network

The recent progress in the understanding the physical nature of neutron star equilibrium configurations and the first observational evidence of a genuinely short gamma-ray burst, GRB 090227B, allows to give an estimate of the gravitational waves versus the X and Gamma-ray emission in a short gamma-ray burst.

F. G. Oliveira; Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini

2012-05-31

153

117Fermi Detects Gamma-Rays from Messier 82 The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space  

E-print Network

117Fermi Detects Gamma-Rays from Messier 82 The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has recently to the left shows the gamma-ray energy spectrum measured by Fermi. The data points are presented as crosses telescope is red; Hubble space telescope observations of hydrogen line emission is orange, and the bluest

154

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Gamma-ray Signatures of Dark Matter Particles  

E-print Network

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Gamma-ray Signatures of Dark Matter Particles Lars Bergstr@physto.se Abstract Indirect detection methods of dark matter particles are discussed. In particular, detection of supersymmetric dark matter through annihilation into gamma-rays is described. Aspects of the density structure

Enomoto, Ryoji

155

Sequence specificity of streptozotocin-induced mutations.  

PubMed Central

The isolation and characterization of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced mutations in the phage P22 mnt repressor gene is described. Cells carrying the plasmid-borne mnt gene were exposed to STZ to give 10-20 percent survival and at least an eleven-fold increase in mutation frequency. DNA sequence analysis showed that 50 of 51 STZ-induced mutations were GC to AT transitions, and one was an AT to GC transition. We have also compared the STZ mutational spectrum to that for N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG). There are sites in the mnt gene which are mutated only by STZ; only by MNNG, or by both agents. Sites at which only STZ induced GC to AT transition mutations occur were in sequences that are pyrimidine rich 5' to the mutated site and purine rich 3' to the mutated site. Induction of mutations by both STZ and MNNG should be considered to maximize the number of mutable sites. PMID:2972994

Mack, S L; Fram, R J; Marinus, M G

1988-01-01

156

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: mission status  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) is the second in NASA's series of Great Observatories. Compton has now been operating for over two and a half years, and has given a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made and

N. Gehrels; E. Chipman; D. A. Kniffen

1994-01-01

157

Gamma ray lines from dark matter annihilation  

SciTech Connect

If direct annihilation of dark matter particles into a pair of photons occurs in the galactic halo, a narrow {gamma}-ray line can be discovered at future {gamma}-ray detectors sensitive to the GeV region. The signals predicted by different dark matter candidates are analyzed. 16 refs., 3 figs.

Giudice, G.F.

1989-08-01

158

Concept of new gamma ray detector  

E-print Network

We present a concept of a new gamma ray detector in order to observe undetected TeV gamma ray background. We measure a track of an electron-positron pair made by a pair creation in a magnet. By using Si as a tracker in a magnetic field 3 T, an energy range is up to 10 TeV.

S. Osone

2002-11-29

159

Automation system for measurement of gamma-ray spectra of induced activity for multi-element high volume neutron activation analysis at the reactor IBR-2 of Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics at the joint institute for nuclear research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The automation system for measurement of induced activity of gamma-ray spectra for multi-element high volume neutron activation analysis (NAA) was designed, developed and implemented at the reactor IBR-2 at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics. The system consists of three devices of automatic sample changers for three Canberra HPGe detector-based gamma spectrometry systems. Each sample changer consists of two-axis of linear positioning module M202A by DriveSet company and disk with 45 slots for containers with samples. Control of automatic sample changer is performed by the Xemo S360U controller by Systec company. Positioning accuracy can reach 0.1 mm. Special software performs automatic changing of samples and measurement of gamma spectra at constant interaction with the NAA database.

Pavlov, S. S.; Dmitriev, A. Yu.; Chepurchenko, I. A.; Frontasyeva, M. V.

2014-11-01

160

Atmospheric gamma-ray and neutron flashes  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray pulses are calculated from 2D numerical simulations of an upward atmospheric discharge in a self-consistent electric field using the multigroup approach to the kinetics of relativistic runaway electrons (REs). Computed {gamma}-ray numbers and spectra are consistent with those of terrestrial {gamma}-ray flashes (TGFs) observed aboard spacecrafts. The RE flux is concentrated mainly within the domain of the Blue Jet fluorescence. This confirms that exactly the domain adjacent to a thundercloud is the source of the observed {gamma}-ray flashes. The yield of photonuclear neutrons is calculated. One {gamma}-ray pulse generates {approx}10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} neutrons. The possibility of the direct deposition of REs to the detector readings and the origin of the lightning-advanced TGFs are discussed.

Babich, L. P., E-mail: babich@elph.vniief.ru; Kudryavtsev, A. Yu., E-mail: kay@sar.ru; Kudryavtseva, M. L., E-mail: kay@sar.ru; Kutsyk, I. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

2008-01-15

161

Gamma-Ray Bursts: An Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A history and overview of the observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are presented. The phenomenon of gamma-ray bursts is without precedent in astronomy, having no observed property that would be a direct indicator of their distance and no counterpart object in another wavelength region. Their brief, random appearance only in the gamma-ray region has made their study difficult. The observed time profiles, spectral properties, and durations of gamma-ray bursts cover a wide range. All proposed models for their origin must be considered speculative. It is humbling to think that even after 25 years since their discovery, the distance scale of gamma-ray bursts is still very much debatable.

Fishman, Gerald J.

1995-01-01

162

Abnormal pattern of post-gamma-ray DNA replication in radioresistant fibroblast strains from affected members of a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.  

PubMed Central

Non-malignant dermal fibroblast strains, cultured from affected members of a Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) family with diverse neoplasms associated with radiation exposure, display a unique increased resistance to the lethal effects of gamma-radiation. In the studies reported here, this radioresistance (RR) trait has been found to correlate strongly with an abnormal pattern of post-gamma-ray DNA replicative synthesis, as monitored by radiolabelled thymidine incorporation and S-phase cell autoradiography. In particular, the time interval between the gamma-ray-induced shutdown of DNA synthesis and its subsequent recovery was greater in all four RR strains examined and the post-recovery replication rate was much higher and was maintained longer than in normal and spousal controls. Alkaline sucrose sedimentation profiles of pulse-labelled cellular DNA indicated that the unusual pattern of DNA replication in irradiated RR strains may be ascribed to anomalies in both replicon initiation and DNA chain elongation processes. Moreover, the RR strain which had previously displayed the highest post-gamma-ray clonogenic survival was found to harbour a somatic (codon 234) mutation (presumably acquired during culture in vitro) in the same conserved region of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene as the germline (codon 245) mutation in the remaining three RR strains from other family members, thus coupling the RR phenotype and abnormal post-gamma-ray DNA synthesis pattern with faulty p53 expression. Significantly, these two aberrant radioresponse end points, along with documented anomalies in c-myc and c-raf-1 proto-oncogenes, are unprecedented among other LFS families carrying p53 germline mutations. We thus speculate that this peculiar cancer-prone family may possess in its germ line a second, as yet unidentified, genetic defect in addition to the p53 mutation. Images Figure 8 PMID:7779715

Mirzayans, R.; Aubin, R. A.; Bosnich, W.; Blattner, W. A.; Paterson, M. C.

1995-01-01

163

A digital spectrometer approach to obtaining multiple time-resolved gamma-ray spectra for pulsed spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Neutron-induced gamma-ray emission and its detection using a pulsed neutron generator system is an established analytical technique for quantitative multi-element analysis. Traditional gamma-ray spectrometers used for this type of analysis are normally operated either in coincidence mode - for counting prompt gamma-rays following inelastic neutron scattering (INS) events when the neutron generator is ON, or in anti-coincidence mode - for counting prompt gamma-rays from thermal neutron capture (TNC) processes when the neutron generator is OFF. We have developed a digital gamma-ray spectrometer for concurrently measuring both the INS and TNC gamma-rays using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator. The spectrometer separates the gamma-ray counts into two independent spectra together with two separate sets of counting statistics based on the external gate level. Because the TNC gamma-ray yields are time dependent, additional accuracy in analyzing the data can be obtained by acquiring multiple time-resolved gamma-ray spectra at finer time intervals than simply ON or OFF. For that purpose we are developing a multi-gating system that will allow gamma-ray spectra to be acquired concurrently in real time with up to 16 time slots. The conceptual system design is presented, especially focusing on considerations for tracking counting statistics in multiple time slots and on the placement of pulse heights into multiple spectra in real time.

Tan, H.; Mitra, S.; Fallu-Labruyere, A.; Hennig, W.; Chu, Y. X.; Wielopolski, L.; Warburton, W. K.

2007-10-01

164

Gamma-ray Astronomy and GLAST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high energy gamma-ray (30 MeV to 100 GeV) sky has been relatively poorly studied. Most of our current knowledge comes from observations made by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which revealed that the GeV gamma-ray sky is rich and vibrant. Studies of astrophysical objects at GeV energies are interesting for several reasons: The high energy gamma-rays are often produced by a different physical process than the better studied X-ray and optical emission, thus providing a unique information for understanding these sources. Production of such high-energy photons requires that charged particles are accelerated to equally high energies, or much greater. Thus gamma-ray astronomy is the study of extreme environments, with natural and fundamental connections to cosmic-ray and neutrino astrophysics. The launch of GLAST in 2008 will herald a watershed in our understanding of the high energy gamma-ray sky, providing dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. GLAST will open a new avenue to study our Universe as well as to answer scientific questions EGRET observations have raised. In this talk, I will describe the GLAST instruments and capabilities and highlight some of the science we expect to address.

McEnery, Julie

2007-01-01

165

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some basic observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Although some properties were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the Compton Observatory in the past three years. The new observation with the greatest impact has been the observed isotropic distribution of bursts along with a deficiency of weak bursts which would be expected from a homogeneous burst distribution. This is not compatible with any known Galactic population of objects. Gamma-ray bursts show an enormous variety of burst morphologies and a wide spread in burst durations. The spectra of gamma-ray bursts are characterized by rapid variations and peak power which is almost entirely in the gamma-ray energy range. Delayed gamma-ray burst photons extending to GeV energies have been detected for the first time. A time dilation effect has also been reported to be observed in gamma-ray, bursts. The observation of a gamma-ray burst counterpart in another wavelength region has yet to be made.

Fishman, G. J.

1995-01-01

166

Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an observatory designed to survey the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The primary instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), provides observations from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. A second instrument, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), provides observations of transients from less than 10 keV to 40 MeV. We describe the design and performance of the instruments and their subsystems, the spacecraft and the ground system.

McEnery, Julie E.; Michelson, Peter F.; Paclesas, William S.; Ritz, Steven

2012-01-01

167

Cosmic gamma-ray lines - Theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The various processes that lead to gamma-ray line emission and the possible astrophysical sources of such emission are reviewed. The processes of nuclear excitation, radiative capture, positron annihilation, and cyclotron radiation, which may produce gamma-ray line emission from such diverse sources as the interstellar medium, novas, supernovas, pulsars, accreting compact objects, the galactic nucleus and the nuclei of active galaxies are considered. The significance of the relative intensities, widths, and frequency shifts of the lines are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding those gamma-ray lines that have already been observed from astrophysical sources.

Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

1980-01-01

168

NEAR Gamma Ray Spectrometer Characterization and Repair  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report covers the work completed in the third year of the contract. The principle activities during this period were (1) the characterization of the NEAR 2 Gamma Ray Spectrometer using a neutron generator to generate complex gamma ray spectra and a large Ge Detecter to identify all the major peaks in the spectra; (2) the evaluation and repair of the Engineering Model Unit of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer for the NEAR mission; (3) the investigation of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray detection; and (4) technology transfer from NASA to forensic science.

Groves, Joel Lee; Vajda, Stefan

1998-01-01

169

Detecting axionlike particles with gamma ray telescopes.  

PubMed

We propose that axionlike particles (ALPs) with a two-photon vertex, consistent with all astrophysical and laboratory bounds, may lead to a detectable signature in the spectra of high-energy gamma-ray sources. This occurs as a result of gamma rays being converted into ALPs in the magnetic fields of efficient astrophysical accelerators according to the "Hillas criterion", such as jets of active galactic nuclei or hot spots of radio galaxies. The discovery of such an effect is possible by GLAST in the 1-100 GeV range and by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes in the TeV range. PMID:18233353

Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D

2007-12-01

170

First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope  

SciTech Connect

A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV–PeV neutrinos that are predicted from gamma-ray bursts. No events were found in correlation with the prompt photon emission of the gamma-ray bursts and upper limits have been placed on the flux and fluence of neutrinos for different models.

NONE

2013-03-01

171

First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope  

E-print Network

A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV--PeV neutrinos that are predicted from gamma-ray bursts. No events were found in correlation with the prompt photon emission of the gamma-ray bursts and upper limits have been placed on the flux and fluence of neutrinos for different models.

Adrián-Martínez, S; Albert, A; André, M; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Jesus, A C Assis; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J-J; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigongiari, C; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouhou, B; Bouwhuis, M; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Carloganu, C; Carr, J; Cecchini, S; Charif, Z; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Core, L; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; De Bonis, G; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Enzenhöfer, A; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S; Fehn, K; Fermani, P; Ferri, M; Ferry, S; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J-L; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geyer, K; Giacomelli, G; Giordano, V; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Hallewell, G; Hamal, M; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; Hsu, C C; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, G; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Lefèvre, D; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Motz, H; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; Pavalas, G E; Payet, K; Petrovic, J; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Reed, C; Riccobene, G; Richardt, C; Richter, R; Rivière, C; Robert, A; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Ruiz-Rivas, J; Rujoiu, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sapienza, P; Schnabel, J; Schöck, F; Schuller, J-P; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Visser, E; Wagner, S; Wijnker, G; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúniga, J

2013-01-01

172

Extreme energy gamma rays and neutrinos and their observation in JEM-EUSO Mission  

SciTech Connect

The origin of the extreme energy cosmic rays (EECRs) is a mystery in the contemporary astrophysics. The JEM-EUSO Mission that mainly aims establishing astronomy using such EECRs with very high statistics will also have realistic capability of detecting gamma rays and neutrinos with approx10{sup 20} eV energies. Aboard the International Space Station, the JEM-EUSO mission also provides a unique platform to detect and study the air showers from extreme energy gamma rays and neutrinos. In the present paper, we discuss a part of results from our study on properties of gamma ray and neutrino induced air showers and the advantage for space-based observation.

Shinozaki, K. [RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

2010-06-01

173

High-energy gamma rays from the intense 1993 January 31 gamma-ray burst  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The intense gamma-ray burst of 1993 January 31 was detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. Sixteen gamma rays above 30 MeV were imaged in the telescope when only 0.04 gamma rays were expected by chance. Two of these gamma rays have energies of approximately 1 GeV, and the five bin spectrum of the 16 events is fitted by a power law of photon spectral index -2.0 +/- 0.4. The high-energy emission extends for at least 25 s. The most probable direction for this burst is determined from the directions of the 16 gamma rays observed by Egret and also by requiring the position to lie on annulus derived by the Interplanetary Network.

Sommer, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Hurley, K.; Kanbach, G.

1994-01-01

174

The EGRET high energy gamma ray telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is sensitive in the energy range from about 20 MeV to about 30,000 MeV. Electron-positron pair production by incident gamma photons is utilized as the detection mechanism. The pair production occurs in tantalum foils interleaved with the layers of a digital spark chamber system; the spark chamber records the tracks of the electron and positron, allowing the reconstruction of the arrival direction of the gamma ray. If there is no signal from the charged particle anticoincidence detector which surrounds the upper part of the detector, the spark chamber array is triggered by two hodoscopes of plastic scintillators. A time of flight requirement is included to reject events moving backward through the telescope. The energy of the gamma ray is primarily determined by absorption of the energies of the electron and positron in a 20 cm deep NaI(Tl) scintillator.

Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

1992-01-01

175

Thermal neutron capture gamma-rays  

SciTech Connect

The energy and intensity of gamma rays as seen in thermal neutron capture are presented. Only those (n,..cap alpha..), E = thermal, reactions for which the residual nucleus mass number is greater than or equal to 45 are included. These correspond to evaluations published in Nuclear Data Sheets. The publication source data are contained in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The data presented here do not involve any additional evaluation. Appendix I lists all the residual nuclides for which the data are included here. Appendix II gives a cumulated index to A-chain evaluations including the year of publication. The capture gamma ray data are given in two tables - the Table 1 is the list of all gamma rays seen in (n,..gamma..) reaction given in the order of increasing energy; the Table II lists the gamma rays according to the nuclide.

Tuli, J.K.

1983-01-01

176

Gamma rays from giant molecular clouds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) are massive, bounded, cool, dense regions containing mostly H2, but also H I, CO, and other molecules. These clouds occupy less than 1 percent of the galactic volume, but are a substantial part of the interstellar mass. They are irradiated by the high energy cosmic rays which are possibly modulated by the matter and magnetic fields within the clouds. The product of cosmic-ray flux and matter density is traced by the emission of high energy gamma-rays. A spherical cloud model is considered and the gamma ray flux from several GMCs within 1 kpc of the sun which should be detectable by the EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) instrument on GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory).

Hunter, Stanley D.; Kanbach, Gottfried

1990-01-01

177

Gamma Rays in a Spectrum from the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gamma-ray spectrum from a long sum over the middle latitudes of Mars measured by the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer was analyzed. About 250 peaks and features were observed, including many seen during the cruise to Mars. The sources of about 85% of these gamma rays were identified. Most were background lines from the Ge detector or from Ti, Mg, and Zn near the detector.

Reedy, R. C.; Evans, L. G.; Brueckner, J.; Kim, K. J.; Boynton, W. V.

2003-01-01

178

Gamma-Ray Bursts and Particle Acceleration  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are possible sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHE-CRs). To test the GRB origin of UHECRs, it is essential to search for characteristic, proton-induced signatures of secondary radiation. In this paper we present our recent results of Monte Carlo simulations that model the broadband prompt emission of GRBs including various processes associated with electrons and protons accelerated to high energies. The most notable effect of accelerated protons on the high-energy spectra is the synchrotron emission from secondary electron-positron pairs injected by photomeson interactions. Secondary photons tend to make the spectra flat, so a spectral flattening in the GeV-TeV bands may serve as a signature of UHECR acceleration. In some cases, the proton-induced photons overwhelm the photon field, resulting in a spectral peak due to inverse Compton emission from secondary pairs located around 10{sup 7} eV. We can expect to detect synchrotron photons from protons or muons. Observations with GLAST or with atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes can provide useful estimates of the bulk Lorents factor and can constrain the proton acceleration efficiency.

Asano, Katsuaki [Interactive Research Center for Science, Graduate School of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2008-08-28

179

GRI: The Gamma-Ray Imager mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood and nuclear

Jürgen Knödlseder

2006-01-01

180

The Gamma-Ray Imager GRI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear

Cornelia B. Wunderer

2006-01-01

181

Gamma-ray constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual supernova explosions via short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring current global Galactic supernova nucleosynthesis with longer-lived radioactivity. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both Co-56 and Co-57 were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions and nucleosynthesis. Live Al-26 in the Galaxy might come from Type II supernovae, and if it is eventually shown to be so, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, and the Galactic Type II supernova rate. Type Ia supernovae, thought to be thermonuclear explosions, have not yet been detected in gamma-rays. This is somewhat surprising given current models and recent Co-56 detection attempts. Ultimately, gamma-ray measurements can confirm their thermonuclear nature, probe the nuclear burning conditions, and help evaluate their contributions to Galactic nucleosynthesis. Type Ib/c supernovae are poorly understood. Whether they are core collapse or thermonuclear events might be ultimately settled by gamma-ray observations. Depending on details of the nuclear processing, any of these supernova types might contribute to a detectable diffuse glow of Fe-60 gamma-ray lines. Previous attempts at detection have come very close to expected emission levels. Remnants of any type of age less that a few centuries might be detectable as individual spots of Ti-44 gamma-ray line emission. It is in fact quite surprising that previous surveys have not discovered such spots, and the constraints on the combination of nucleosynthesis yields and supernova rates are very interesting. All of these interesting limits and possibilities mean that the next mission, International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), if it has sufficient sensitivity, is very likely to lead to the realization of much of the great potential of gamma-ray spectroscopy for understanding supernovae.

Leising, Mark D.

1994-01-01

182

Neutrinos and Gamma Rays from Galaxy Clusters  

E-print Network

The next generation of neutrino and gamma-ray detectors should provide new insights into the creation and propagation of high-energy protons within galaxy clusters, probing both the particle physics of cosmic rays interacting with the background medium and the mechanisms for high-energy particle production within the cluster. In this paper we examine the possible detection of gamma-rays (via the GLAST satellite) and neutrinos (via the ICECUBE and Auger experiments) from the Coma cluster of galaxies, as well as for the gamma-ray bright clusters Abell 85, 1758, and 1914. These three were selected from their possible association with unidentified EGRET sources, so it is not yet entirely certain that their gamma-rays are indeed produced diffusively within the intracluster medium, as opposed to AGNs. It is not obvious why these inconspicuous Abell-clusters should be the first to be seen in gamma-rays, but a possible reason is that all of them show direct evidence of recent or ongoing mergers. Their identification with the EGRET gamma-ray sources is also supported by the close correlation between their radio and (purported) gamma-ray fluxes. Under favorable conditions (including a proton spectral index of 2.5 in the case of Abell 85, and sim 2.3 for Coma, and Abell 1758 and 1914), we expect ICECUBE to make as many as 0.3 neutrino detections per year from the Coma cluster of galaxies, and as many as a few per year from the Abell clusters 85, 1758, and 1914. Also, Auger may detect as many as 2 events per decade at ~ EeV energies from these gamma-ray bright clusters.

Brandon Wolfe; Fulvio Melia; Roland M. Crocker; Raymond R. Volkas

2008-07-04

183

Simulating The Gamma-Ray Observatory Spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) spacecraft constitutes major advance in gamma-ray astronomy by offering first opportunity for comprehensive observations in range of 0.1 to 30,000 MeV. GRO Attitude Dynamics Simulator (GROSS) computer program designed to simulate mission. Consists of three separate programs: stand-alone profile program; simulator program, containing simulation control input/output (SCIO) subsystem, truth model (TM) subsystem, and on-board computer (OBC) subsystem; and postprocessor program. Written in FORTRAN 77.

Garrick, J.

1989-01-01

184

High altitude balloons and gamma ray astronomy  

SciTech Connect

The author's experience with scientific high altitude ballooning will be presented. Usefulness of satellite versus balloon platforms will be contrasted in the context of gamma ray astronomy. General principles of gamma ray astronomy instrumentation will be discussed and illustrated in terms of our current instrument, GRIS. Some words about the supernova phenomenon and its necessity for the existence of life in the universe will be followed by a brief glimpse of our preliminary data from Supernova 1987a.

MacCallum, C.J.

1988-01-01

185

The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays  

E-print Network

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

2013-01-01

186

The blazar gamma-ray luminosity function and the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have used the data from the new EGRET catalog on 'grazars' (blazers which are observed to be high-energy gamma-ray sources), together with radio data, to construct a new relation between radio and gamma-ray luminosity for these sources. Using this relation to construct a grazar gamma-ray luminosity function, we then calculate the contribution of unresolved grazars to the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation. We derive the energy spectrum of this background component above 100 MeV and the angular fluctuations in this background implied by our model.

Salamon, M. H.; Stecker, F. W.

1994-01-01

187

Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon  

SciTech Connect

We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

2007-06-14

188

Gamma-ray albedo of the moon  

E-print Network

We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalisation; this makes it a useful "standard candle" for gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo gamma rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

Igor V. Moskalenko; Troy A. Porter

2007-08-15

189

Gamma-ray spectroscopy: An historical perspective  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of MeV-range gamma-rays from extraterrestrial sources had been speculated on by cosmic-ray physicists since the late 1940's. The first definitive detection occurred with balloon-borne cosmic-ray instrumentation during a class 2 solar flare in March 1958, apparently associated with the acceleration of a nonthermal particle population. Following this detection, physicists were motivated to develop instrumentation specific for observation of astronomical gamma-ray sources. Gamma-ray lines were also first observed during the flares of August 1972, apparently associated with accelerated particles undergoing nuclear interactions in the solar atmosphere. The development of low background, high resolution Ge counters has permitted construction of gamma-ray telescopes with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. Even modest versions of these devices have measured discrete gamma-ray lines from sources as diverse as cosmic gamma-ray bursts, the galactic center and the galactic plane. Many other predictions are within the range of modern detectors.

Peterson, L.E.

1988-09-25

190

Distinguishing fissions of 232Th, 237Np and 238U with beta-delayed gamma rays  

E-print Network

Measurements of beta-delayed gamma-ray spectra following 14-MeV neutron-induced fissions of 232Th, 237Np, and 238U were conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Spectra were collected for times ranging from 1 minute to 14 hours after irradiation. Intensity ratios of gamma-ray lines were extracted from the data that allow identification of the fissioning isotope.

A. Iyengar; E. B. Norman; C. Howard; C. Angell; A. Kaplan; J. J. Ressler; P. Chodash; E. Swanberg; A. Czeszumska; B. Wang; R. Yee; H. A. Shugart

2012-12-29

191

Relativistic Conic Beams and Spatial Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

We study the statistics of gamma-ray bursts, assuming that gamma-ray bursts are cosmological and they are beamed in the form of a conical jet with a large bulk Lorentz factor $\\sim 100$. In such a conic beam, the relativistic ejecta may have a spatial variation in the bulk Lorentz factor and the density distribution of gamma-ray emitting jet material. An apparent luminosity function arises because the axis of the cone is randomly oriented with respect to the observer's line of sight. The width and the shape of the luminosity function are determined by the ratio of the beam opening angle of the conical jet to the inverse of the bulk Lorentz factor, when the bulk Lorentz factor and the jet material density is uniform on the photon emitting jet surface. We calculate effects of spatial variation of the Lorentz factor and the spatial density fluctuations within the cone on the luminosity function and the statistics of gamma-ray bursts. In particular, we focus on the redshift distribution of the observed gamma-ray bursts. The maximum distance to and the average redshift of the gamma-ray bursts are strongly affected by the beaming-induced luminosity function. The bursts with the angle-dependent Lorentz factor which peaks at the center of the cone have substantially higher average gamma-ray burst redshifts. When both the jet material density and the Lorentz factor are inhomogeneous in the conical beam, the average redshift of the bursts could be 5 times higher than that of the case in which relativistic jet is completely homogeneous and structureless. Even the simplest models for the gamma-ray burst jets and their apparent luminosity distributions have a significant effect on the redshift distribution of the gamma-ray bursts.

Heon-Young Chang; Insu Yi

2000-05-15

192

Understanding hadronic gamma-ray emission from supernova remnants  

E-print Network

We aim to test the plausibility of a theoretical framework in which the gamma-ray emission detected from supernova remnants may be of hadronic origin, i.e., due to the decay of neutral pions produced in nuclear collisions involving relativistic nuclei. In particular, we investigate the effects induced by magnetic field amplification on the expected particle spectra, outlining a phenomenological scenario consistent with both the underlying Physics and the larger and larger amount of observational data provided by the present generation of gamma experiments, which seem to indicate rather steep spectra for the accelerated particles. In addition, in order to study to study how pre-supernova winds might affect the expected emission in this class of sources, the time-dependent gamma-ray luminosity of a remnant with a massive progenitor is worked out. Solid points and limitations of the proposed scenario are finally discussed in a critical way.

Damiano Caprioli

2011-05-06

193

Measurement of radionuclide activities induced in target components of an IBA CYCLONE 18/9 by gamma-ray spectrometry with HPGe and LaBr3: Ce detectors.  

PubMed

Cyclotrons are used worldwide to produce radiopharmaceuticals by proton irradiation of a suitable target. The intense secondary neutron beam generated by proton interactions with the target induce high radionuclide activities in the target assembly parts that may result in an exposure to high dose levels of the operators during maintenance. The main goal of this work is to evaluate gamma-emitting radionuclide activities induced in Havar foils and titanium windows of a target assembly and carousel stripper forks of an IBA CYCLONE 18/9 cyclotron. The knowledge of radionuclide inventory for each component is required by many companies to assess risk for operators before waste handling and disposal. Gamma-ray spectrometric analyses were carried out with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillation detectors. HPGe is the most used detector for its high energy resolution although it is more suitable for use in a laboratory. The use of LaBr3:Ce can be considered a viable option, particularly in realizing a portable spectrometric system to perform "on-site" measurements and a fast dose rate evaluation before the disposal of activated parts. Due to a high activity of target assembly components replaced after a typical irradiation cycle (about 5000 ?Ah integrated beam current), gamma-ray spectrometric measurements were performed at a large distance from the detector, even more than 100 cm, or by using a purposely realized Lead-walled collimator. The identification of some key-radionuclides allows to evaluate through simple formulations the dose rate behavior for each component as function of decay time from the last irradiation. The knowledge of the dose rate behavior is a significant piece of information to health physicists for waste handling with safety at work. For an Havar™ foil, the dose rate will be reduced to about 1/1,000 of the starting value after a decay period of approximately 4 y (about 1,500 d), with a relatively safety at product disposal work. For a longer time, only long-lived radionuclides (57)Co, (60)Co, and (54)Mn contribute to dose rate. PMID:24949919

Tomarchio, Elio

2014-08-01

194

Gamma ray astrophysics to the year 2000. Report of the NASA Gamma Ray Program Working Group  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Important developments in gamma-ray astrophysics up to energies of 100 GeV during the last decade are reviewed. Also, the report seeks to define the major current scientific goals of the field and proposes a vigorous program to pursue them, extending to the year 2000. The goals of gamma-ray astronomy include the study of gamma rays which provide the most direct means of studying many important problems in high energy astrophysics including explosive nucleosynthesis, accelerated particle interactions and sources, and high-energy processes around compact objects. The current research program in gamma-ray astronomy in the U.S. including the space program, balloon program and foreign programs in gamma-ray astronomy is described. The high priority recommendations for future study include an Explorer-class high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy mission and a Get Away Special cannister (GAS-can) or Scout class multiwavelength experiment for the study of gamma-ray bursts. Continuing programs include an extended Gamma Ray Observatory mission, continuation of the vigorous program of balloon observations of the nearby Supernova 1987A, augmentation of the balloon program to provide for new instruments and rapid scientific results, and continuation of support for theoretical research. Long term recommendations include new space missions using advanced detectors to better study gamma-ray sources, the development of these detectors, continued study for the assembly of large detectors in space, collaboration with the gamma-ray astronomy missions initiated by other countries, and consideration of the Space Station attached payloads for gamma-ray experiments.

1988-01-01

195

Gamma ray astrophysics to the year 2000. Report of the NASA Gamma Ray Program Working Group  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Important developments in gamma-ray astrophysics up to energies of 100 GeV during the last decade are reviewed. Also, the report seeks to define the major current scientific goals of the field and proposes a vigorous program to pursue them, extending to the year 2000. The goals of gamma-ray astronomy include the study of gamma rays which provide the most direct means of studying many important problems in high energy astrophysics including explosive nucleosynthesis, accelerated particle interactions and sources, and high-energy processes around compact objects. The current research program in gamma-ray astronomy in the U.S. including the space program, balloon program and foreign programs in gamma-ray astronomy is described. The high priority recommendations for future study include an Explorer-class high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy mission and a Get Away Special cannister (GAS-can) or Scout class multiwavelength experiment for the study of gamma-ray bursts. Continuing programs include an extended Gamma Ray Observatory mission, continuation of the vigorous program of balloon observations of the nearby Supernova 1987A, augmentation of the balloon program to provide for new instruments and rapid scientific results, and continuation of support for theoretical research. Long term recommendations include new space missions using advanced detectors to better study gamma-ray sources, the development of these detectors, continued study for the assembly of large detectors in space, collaboration with the gamma-ray astronomy missions initiated by other countries, and consideration of the Space Station attached payloads for gamma-ray experiments.

1988-10-01

196

Fireball/Blastwave Model and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters  

E-print Network

Soft gamma-ray repeaters are at determined distances and their positions are known accurately. If observed, afterglows from their soft gamma-ray bursts will provide important clues to the study of the so called "classical gamma-ray bursts". On applying the popular fireball/blastwave model of classical gamma-ray bursts to soft gamma-ray repeaters, it is found that their X-ray and optical afterglows are detectable. Monitoring of the three repeaters is solicited.

Y. F. Huang; Z. G. Dai; T. Lu

2005-02-24

197

Coincidence Techniques in Gamma-ray Spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In many different gamma-ray detection systems, the events are registered in coincidence, i.e. within short time interval, by two or more detectors. Depending on purpose of an experiment, these events can be rejected (anticoincidence counting) or acquired (coincidence counting). The construction, setup and application of several coincidence systems in Laboratory for nuclear physics of Department of Physics in Novi sad are presented. The anti-Compton shield for HPGe detector based on big annular NaI(Tl) detector and corresponding measurement which proved existing of 283 keV level in Ba-137 populating by beta decay of Cs-137, is described. The application of this system (in addition with NaI(Tl) plug detector) where HPGe detector is actively shielded by NaI(Tl) detector for investigation of double beta decay of positron emitters (Cr-50, Zn-64,) is also shown. The improving of detection limit of HPGe detector by the active shield consisting of five plastic scintillation detectors is presented, as well as the measurements of cross sections for X-ray production, induced by interaction of cosmic-ray muons with massive lead shield. We found that the prompt and delayed coincidence events between plastic veto detector and Ge detector can be sharply divided in two groups. Also, the bremsstrahlung and annihilation events can be time resolved from (n,n') events, although all these events belong to the group of delayed events.

Bikit, Istvan; Mrdja, Dusan; Veskovic, Miroslav; Krmar, Miodrag; Slivka, Jaroslav; Todorovic, Natasa; Bikit, Kristina

198

Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

Xie, Xufei; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Xi; Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Fan, Tieshuan; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

2012-09-01

199

Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis.  

PubMed

Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described. PMID:23020376

Xie, Xufei; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Xi; Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Fan, Tieshuan; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

2012-09-01

200

Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis  

SciTech Connect

Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

Xie Xufei; Zhang Xing; Yuan Xi; Chen Jinxiang; Li Xiangqing; Zhang Guohui; Fan Tieshuan [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing (China); Yuan Guoliang; Yang Jinwei; Yang Qingwei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

2012-09-15

201

Gamma-ray Emission from Nova Outbursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of gamma-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from 7Be and 22Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission, with the 511 keV line and a continuum. Gamma-ray spectra and light curves are potential unique tools to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope. Another possible origin of gamma-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce gamma-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected with the Fermi satellite in V407 Cyg, a nova in a symbiotic binary, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main sequence star as in the cataclysmic variables hosting classical novae. Two more novae have been detected recently (summer 2012) by Fermi, apparently in non symbiotic binaries, thus challenging our understanding of the emission mechanism. Both scenarios (radioactivities and acceleration) of gamma-ray production in novae are discussed.

Hernanz, M.

2014-12-01

202

Inverse compton scattering gamma ray source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) (e.g. U-235, Pu-239) can be detected by active interrogation with gamma rays (>6 MeV) through photofission. For long-range detection (˜1 km), an intense beam of gamma rays (˜10 14 per second) is required in order to produce measurable number of neutrons. The production of such fluxes of gamma rays, and in the pulse formats useful for detection, presents many technical challenges, and requires novel approaches to the accelerator and laser technology. RadiaBeam is currently designing a gamma ray source based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high-energy electron beam. To achieve this, improvements in photoinjector, linac, final focus, and laser system are planned. These enhanced sub-systems build on parallel work being performed at RadiaBeam, UCLA, and elsewhere. A high-repetition rate photoinjector, a high-gradient S-band linac, and a laser pulse recirculator will be used. The proposed system will be a transportable source of high-flux, high-energy quasi-monochromatic gamma rays for active interrogation of special nuclear materials.

Boucher, S.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Ruelas, M.; Jovanovic, I.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.

2009-09-01

203

Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

Stecker, Floyd W.

2009-01-01

204

Solar gamma rays and neutron observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present status of knowledge concerning the impulsive and the continuous emission of solar gamma rays and neutrons is reviewed in the light of the recent solar activity in early August 1972. The gamma ray spectrometer on OSO-7 has observed the sun continuously for most of the activity period except for occultation by the earth. In association with the 2B flare on 4 August 1972 and the 3B flare on 7 August 1972, the monitor provides evidence for solar gamma ray line emission in the energy range from 300 keV to 10 MeV. A summary of all the results available from preliminary analysis of the data will be given. Significant improvements in future experiments can be made with more sensitive instruments and more extensive time coverage of the sun.

Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.

1972-01-01

205

Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

Gehrels, Neil

2011-01-01

206

Gamma-Ray Imaging for Explosives Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe a gamma-ray imaging camera (GIC) for active interrogation of explosives being developed by NASA/GSFC and NSWCICarderock. The GIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approx.0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of gamma rays, E, > 6 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the electron-positron pair resulting from interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The optimization of the 3-DTI technology for this specific application and the performance of the GIC from laboratory tests is presented.

deNolfo, G. A.; Hunter, S. D.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

2008-01-01

207

Gamma-ray bursters at cosmological distances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is proposed that some, perhaps most, gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances, like quasars, with a redshift of about 1 or 2. This proposition requires a release of supernova-like energy of about 10 to the 51st ergs within less than 1 s, making gamma-ray bursters the brightest objects known in the universe, many orders of magnitude brighter than any quasars. This power must drive a highly relativistic outflow of electron-positron plasma and radiation from the source. It is proposed that three gamma-ray bursts, all with identical spectra, detected from B1900 + 14 by Mazets, Golenetskii, and Gur'yan and reported in 1979, were all due to a single event multiply imaged by a gravitational lens. The time intervals between the successive bursts, 10 hr to 3 days, were due to differences in the light travel time for different images.

Paczynski, B.

1986-09-01

208

Gamma-ray spectroscopy - Status and prospects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contemporary gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments and their results are reviewed. Sensitivities of 10 to the -4th to 10 to the -3rd ph/sq cm-sec have been achieved for steady sources and 10 to the -2nd to 1 ph/sq cm-sec for transient sources. This has led to the detection of gamma-ray lines from more than 40 objects representing 6 classes of astrophysical phenomena. The lines carry model-independent information and are of fundamental importance to theoretical modeling and our understanding of the objects. The objectives and anticipated results of future instruments are discussed. Several instruments in development will have a factor of 10 sensitivity improvement to certain phenomena over contemporary instruments. A factor of 100 improvement in sensitivity will allow the full potential of gamma-ray spectroscopy to be realized. Instrument concepts which would achieve this with both present and advanced techniques are discussed.

Matteson, J. L.

209

Gamma rays from pulsar wind shock acceleration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A shock forming in the wind of relativistic electron-positron pairs from a pulsar, as a result of confinement by surrounding material, could convert part of the pulsar spin-down luminosity to high energy particles through first order Fermi acceleration. High energy protons could be produced by this mechanism both in supernova remnants and in binary systems containing pulsars. The pion-decay gamma-rays resulting from interaction of accelerated protons with surrounding target material in such sources might be observable above 70 MeV with EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) and above 100 GeV with ground-based detectors. Acceleration of protons and expected gamma-ray fluxes from SN1987A, Cyg X-3 type sources and binary pulsars are discussed.

Harding, Alice K.

1990-01-01

210

The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data sets exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations onboard to allow re-orienting the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of 12 sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from ~8 keV to ~40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The onboard trigger threshold is ~0.7 photons cm-2 s-1 (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates onboard triggers for ~250 GRBs per year.

Meegan, Charles; Lichti, Giselher; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Hoover, Andrew S.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wallace, Mark S.; Wilson, Robert B.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

2009-09-01

211

The Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A gamma-ray spectrometer has been flown on the Apollo 15 and 16 spacecraft to determine the lunar-surface composition and measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux. The instrument included a NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal coupled to a 7.6-cm photomultiplier tube, a plastic mantle for anti-coincidence rejection of charged particles, and 511 channels of analysis. Boom-mounted operation permitted a significant reduction in the background. The data were transmitted on an event-by-event basis. About 22% of the lunar surface was mapped and spectra of the cosmic gamma-ray flux over an energy range of 0.065-27.5 MeV have been obtained.

Harrington, T. M.; Marshall, J. H.; Arnold, J. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Trombka, J. I.; Metzger, A. E.

1974-01-01

212

Gamma Ray Astronomy With IceCube  

E-print Network

We demonstrate that the South Pole kilometer-scale neutrino observatory IceCube can detect multi-TeV gamma rays continuously over a large fraction of the southern sky. While not as sensitive as pointing atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, IceCube can roughly match the sensitivity of Milagro. Also, IceCube is complementary to Milagro because it will observe, without interruption, a relatively poorly studied fraction of the southern sky. The information which IceCube must record to function as a gamma ray observatory is only the directions and possibly energies of down-going muons.

Francis Halzen; Dan Hooper

2003-05-13

213

Nucleosynthesis in gamma-ray bursts outflows  

E-print Network

It is shown that fusion of neutrons and protons to He-4 nuclei occurs in gamma-ray burst outflows in a process similar to big-bang nucleosynthesis in the early Universe. Only the surviving free neutrons can then decouple kinematically from the charged fluid so that the multi-GeV neutrino signal predicted from inelastic nuclear n-p collisions is significantly reduced. It is also argued that a sizeable fraction of ultra-high energy cosmic rays accelerated in gamma-ray bursts should be He-4 nuclei.

M. Lemoine

2002-05-07

214

Radioactivities and gamma-rays from supernovae  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An account is given of the implications of several calculations relevant to the estimation of gamma-ray signals from various explosive astronomical phenomena. After discussing efforts to constrain the amounts of Ni-57 and Ti-44 produced in SN 1987A, attention is given to the production of Al-27 in massive stars and SNs. A 'delayed detonation' model of type Ia SNs is proposed, and the gamma-ray signal which may be expected when a bare white dwarf collapses directly into a neutron star is discussed.

Woosley, S. E.

1991-01-01

215

VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants  

SciTech Connect

Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2007-01-22

216

Gamma ray line observations with OSSE  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations from the oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment of the gamma ray lines originating from a variety of Galactic center sources are reviewed. Extensive observations were acquired of the Galactic center region, including the 0.511 MeV positron annihilation line and associated positronium continuum and Al-26 emission. The results reviewed include: Co-57 from SN 1987A; limits on Co-56 from SN 1991T; gamma ray lines from solar flares; searches for Ti-44 emission from Cas A, and searches for C-12 and O-16 lines from the Orion region.

Kurfess, J. D.; Grove, J. E.; Johnson, W. N.; Murphy, R. J.; Share, G. H.; Purcell, W. R.; Leising, M. D.; Harris, M. J.

1997-01-01

217

Gamma-ray Burst Skymap Website  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Gamma-ray Burst Skymap website automatically updates for each gamma-ray burst as it occurs, whether detected by Swift or other orbiting satellites. For each burst, the location on the sky, star map, constellation and detecting mission are generated automatically. It is then quickly updated by hand to include a written description of the burst properties and scientific significance, as observations continue. Note: In order to view the content of the website, users need to download and install Silverlight on their computers.

218

Gamma rays and interstellar gas in the Cepheus region - A new gamma-ray source?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recent CO survey of the Cep Flare region has allowed a detailed study of the diffuse gamma-ray emission and the gas content. The comparison of the H I and CO observations with the COS-B gamma-ray data yields estimates of the N(H2)/WCO ratio in this molecular complex and of the emissivity spectrum of the gas between 70 MeV and 5 GeV. A significant (3.9sigma) pointlike excess above the diffuse emission has been found and can be interpreted as a new gamma-ray source.

Grenier, I. A.; Lebrun, F.

219

Gamma-ray Pulsars: Models and Predictions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is, dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10(exp 12) - 10(exp 13) G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers of the primary curvature emission around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. Next-generation gamma-ray telescopes sensitive to GeV-TeV emission will provide critical tests of pulsar acceleration and emission mechanisms.

Harding Alice K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

220

New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

1969-01-01

221

Study of gamma-ray strength functions  

SciTech Connect

The use of gamma-ray strength function systematics to calculate neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra is discussed. The ratio of the average capture width, GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar, to the average level spacing, D/sub obs/, both at the neutron separation energy, can be derived from such systematics with much less uncertainty than from separate systematics for values of GAMMA/sub ..gamma../-bar and D/sub obs/. In particular, the E1 gamma-ray strength function is defined in terms of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR line shape is modeled with the usual Lorentzian function and also with a new energy-dependent, Breit-Wigner (EDBW) function. This latter form is further parameterized in terms of two overlapping resonances, even for nuclei where photonuclear measurements do not resolve two peaks. In the mass ranges studied, such modeling is successful for all nuclei away from the N = 50 closed neutron shell. Near the N = 50 shell, a one-peak EDBW appears to be more appropriate. Examples of calculated neutron capture excitation functions and capture gamma-ray spectra using the EDBW form are given for target nuclei in the mass-90 region and also in the Ta-Au mass region. 20 figures.

Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Dietrich, F.S.

1980-08-07

222

Gamma-ray Burst Science with GLAST  

SciTech Connect

The recent observations of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with Swift have provided unprecedented information about nature of GRBs. The launch of GLAST in late 2007 will unveil the final spectral regime of GRB prompt emission and afterglows. Here we briefly review various theoretical suggestions of producing high energy photons from GRB fireballs, and discuss what observatons are expected from the GLAST observatory.

Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

2007-07-12

223

Gamma-ray bursts: Restarting the Engine  

E-print Network

Recent gamma-ray burst observations have revealed late-time, highly energetic events which deviate from the simplest expectations of the standard fireball picture. Instead they may indicate that the central engine is active or restarted at late times. We suggest that fragmentation and subsequent accretion during the collapse of a rapidly rotating stellar core offers a natural mechanism for this.

Andrew King; Paul T. O'Brien; Michael R. Goad; Julian Osborne; Emma Olsson; Kim Page

2005-08-04

224

GAMMA RAY IMAGING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The research is a three year development program to apply high resolution gamma-ray imaging technologies to environmental remediation of radioactive hazards. High resolution, position-sensitive germanium detectors are being developed at the Naval Research Laboratory for space app...

225

Gamma-ray Astrophysics with AGILE  

SciTech Connect

AGILE will explore the gamma-ray Universe with a very innovative instrument combining for the first time a gamma-ray imager and a hard X-ray imager. AGILE will be operational in spring 2007 and it will provide crucial data for the study of Active Galactic Nuclei, Gamma-Ray Bursts, unidentified gamma-ray sources. Galactic compact objects, supernova remnants, TeV sources, and fundamental physics by microsecond timing. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV AGILE is now (March 2007) undergoing launcher integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in spring 2007. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2007.

Longo, Francesco [Department of Physics, University of Trieste (Italy)]|[INFN, Section of Trieste (Italy); Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M. (and others)

2007-07-12

226

The Supernova Gamma-Ray Burst Connection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chief distinction between ordinary supernovae and long-soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the degree of differential rotation in the inner several solar masses when a massive star dies, and GRBs are rare mainly because of the difficulty achieving the necessary high rotation rate. Models that do provide the necessary angular momentum are discussed, with emphasis on a new single star

Stan Woosley; A. Heger

2006-01-01

227

Gamma Ray Burst Detectives (Elementary School)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive resource invites students to join NASA to find the source of gamma ray bursts, the single biggest explosions in the Universe since the Big Bang. The web site features an animation, information on three possible star sources, and a check yes or no for each star with feedback.

WPSU

2010-04-29

228

Gamma Ray Telescope Senses High-Energy Radiation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from NASA describes the GLAST satellite, which is equipped with a gamma-ray telescope, and shares some background about the kinds of extreme universal phenomena indicated by the presence of gamma rays.

WNET

2011-11-02

229

Investigation of gamma rays from the galactic center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data from Argentine balloon flights made to investigate gamma ray emission from the galactic center are summarized. Data are also summarized from a Palestine, Texas balloon flight to measure gamma rays from NP 0532 and Crab Nebulae.

Helmken, H. F.

1973-01-01

230

Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst - Duration: 1:04.  

NASA Video Gallery

On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

231

Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

1998-01-01

232

Photon-photon refraction for TeV gamma rays  

E-print Network

The propagation of TeV gamma rays can be strongly modified by B-field induced conversion to axion-like particles. The conversion rate depends on the photon dispersion relation which, at such high energies, is dominated by the B-field itself through the QED photon-photon interaction. However, ambient photons also contribute and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) dominates when B electron+positron it is the extra-galactic background light. Local radiation fields, e.g., the galactic star light, can be more important for dispersion than the CMB.

Alexandra Dobrynina; Alexander Kartavtsev; Georg Raffelt

2014-12-15

233

Cygnus X-3 and EGRET Gamma-Ray Observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

0!rQ1The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory observed the Cygnus region in 14 different viewing periods during 1991 May to 1994 July. We present here our results on unpulsed and pulsed emissions of gamma rays at E > 50 MeV from Cyg X-3. While we detect a gamma-ray source consistent with the position of

M. Mori; D. L. Bertsch; B. L. Dingus; J. A. Esposito; C. E. Fichtel; S. D. Hunter; G. Kanbach; D. A. Kniffen; Y. C. Lin; J. R. Mattox; H. A. Mayer-Hasselwander; P. F. Michelson; C. von Montigny; R. Mukherjee; P. L. Nolan; P. V. Ramanamurthy; E. Schneid; P. Sreekumar; D. J. Thompson

1997-01-01

234

Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations

M. S. Briggs; D. L. Band; R. M. Kippen; R. D. Preece; C. Kouveliotou; J. van Paradijs; G. H. Share; R. J. Murphy; S. M. Matz; A. Connors; C. Winkler; M. L. McConnell; J. M. Ryan; O. R. Williams; C. A. Young; B. Dingus; J. R. Catelli; R. A. M. J. Wijers

1999-01-01

235

Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRBs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Details on the project to search for serendipitous time correlated optical photographic observations of Gamma Ray Bursters (GRB's) are presented. The ongoing photographic observations at nine observatories are used to look for plates which were exposed simultaneously with a gamma ray burst detected by the gamma ray instrument team (BATSE) and contain the burst position. The results for the first two years of the gamma ray instrument team operation are presented.

Greiner, J.; Wenzel, W.; Hudec, R.; Moskalenko, E. I.; Metlov, V.; Chernych, N. S.; Getman, V. S.; Ziener, Rainer; Birkle, K.; Bade, N.

1994-01-01

236

Lunar Elemental Abundances from Gamma-Ray and Neutron Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The determination of elemental abundances is one of the highest science objectives of most lunar missions. Such multi-element abundances, ratios, or maps should include results for elements that are diagnostic or important in lunar processes, including heat-producing elements (such as K and Th), important incompatible elements (Th and rare earth elements), H (for polar deposits and regolith maturity), and key variable elements in major lunar provinces (such as Fe and Ti in the maria). Both neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy can be used to infer elemental abundances; the two complement each other. These elemental abundances need to be determined with high accuracy and precision from measurements such as those made by the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) and neutron spectrometers (NS) on Lunar Prospector. As presented here, a series of steps, computer codes, and nuclear databases are needed to properly convert the raw gamma-ray and neutron measurements into good elemental abundances, ratios, and/or maps. Lunar Prospector (LP) is the first planetary mission that has measured neutrons escaping from a planet other than the Earth. The neutron spectrometers on Lunar Prospector measured a wide range of neutron energies. The ability to measure neutrons with thermal (E < 0.1 eV), epithermal (E about equal 0.1 - 1000 eV), and fast (E about 0.1-10 MeV) energies maximizes the scientific return, being especially sensitive to both H (using epithermal neutrons) and thermal-neutron-absorbing elements. Neutrons are made in the lunar surface by the interaction of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with the atomic nuclei in the surface. Most neutrons are produced with energies above about 0.1 MeV. The flux of fast neutrons in and escaping from the Moon depends on es the intensity of the cosmic rays (which vary with solar activity) and the elemental composition of the surface. Variations in the elemental composition of the lunar surface can affect the flux of fast neutrons by about 25% , with Ti and Fe emitting more fast neutrons than light elements like O and Si. Most elements moderate neutrons to thermal energies at similar rates. The main exception is when neutrons scatter from H, in which case neutrons can be rapidly thermalized. The cross sections for the absorption of thermal neutrons can vary widely among elements, with major elements like Ti and Fe having high-capture cross sections. Some trace elements, such as Sm and Gd, have such large neutron-absorption cross sections that, despite their low abundances, can absorb significant amounts of thermal neutrons in the Moon. Because the processes affecting neutrons are complicated, good modeling is needed to properly extract elemental information from measured neutron fluxes. The LAHET Code System (LCS) can be use to calculate neutron fluxes from GCR interactions in the Moon. Lunar Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy: The main sources of planetary gamma-rays are the decay of the naturally occurring radioactive isotopes of K, Th, and U and the interactions of GCRs with atomic nuclei in the planet's surface. Most "cosmogenic" gamma-rays are produced by fast and thermal neutrons made in the planet's surface by GCRs, and their production rates can vary with time. Over 300 gamma-ray lines have been identified that can be emitted from planetary surfaces by a variety of production mechanisms. There exist nuclear databases that can be used to identify and quantify other gamma-ray lines. Use will be made of gamma-rays from major elements, particularly those from Si and O, that have not been routinely used in the past. The fluxes of gamma-rays from a given element can vary depending on many factors besides the concentration of that element. For example, the fluxes of neutron-capture gamma-rays in the planetary region of interest depend on (1) the total cross section for elements to absorb thermalized neutrons and (2) the H content of the top meter of the surface. The fluxes of the fast neutrons that induce inelastic-scattering and other nonelastic-scattering reactions can vary with the composition of

Reedy, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.

1999-01-01

237

Gamma-ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes by AGILE  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the first direct localization of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) in space by the AGILE gamma-ray imager above 20 MeV. AGILE is one of the three currently active space missions detecting TGFs. AGILE is detecting about 10 TGFs/month by the mini-calorimeter (MCAL) instrument sensitive in the energy range 0.35-100 MeV and was the first to clearly show the extension of the TGFs energy spectrum up to at least 40 MeV. Motivated by this initial discovery, we searched for detections in the AGILE Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) data correlated with TGFs detected in MCAL. Among the 119 TGFs detected by MCAL at MeV energies during the period June, 2008 - December, 2009, we detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with a relatively good accuracy of 5-10 deg at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma-rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the sub-satellite point than 400km, independently confirming the results obtained by combining space and ground measurements (sferics). Considering that our photons reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, these results have deep implications for the study of TGFs.

Marisaldi, M.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Giuliani, A.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Longo, F.; Barbiellini, G.

2010-12-01

238

Gamma-Ray Telescopes: 400 Years of Astronomical Telescopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The last half-century has seen dramatic developments in gamma-ray telescopes, from their initial conception and development through to their blossoming into full maturity as a potent research tool in astronomy. Gamma-ray telescopes are leading research in diverse areas such as gamma-ray bursts, blazars, Galactic transients, and the Galactic distribution of Al-26.

Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

2010-01-01

239

Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

Weekes, Trevor C.

1986-01-01

240

Simulation of prompt gamma-ray emission during proton radiotherapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The measurement of prompt gamma rays emitted from proton-induced nuclear reactions has been proposed as a method to verify in vivo the range of a clinical proton radiotherapy beam. A good understanding of the prompt gamma-ray emission during proton therapy is key to develop a clinically feasible technique, as it can facilitate accurate simulations and uncertainty analysis of gamma detector designs. Also, the gamma production cross-sections may be incorporated as prior knowledge in the reconstruction of the proton range from the measurements. In this work, we performed simulations of proton-induced nuclear reactions with the main elements of human tissue, carbon-12, oxygen-16 and nitrogen-14, using the nuclear reaction models of the GEANT4 and MCNP6 Monte Carlo codes and the dedicated nuclear reaction codes TALYS and EMPIRE. For each code, we made an effort to optimize the input parameters and model selection. The results of the models were compared to available experimental data of discrete gamma line cross-sections. Overall, the dedicated nuclear reaction codes reproduced the experimental data more consistently, while the Monte Carlo codes showed larger discrepancies for a number of gamma lines. The model differences lead to a variation of the total gamma production near the end of the proton range by a factor of about 2. These results indicate a need for additional theoretical and experimental study of proton-induced gamma emission in human tissue.

Verburg, Joost M.; Shih, Helen A.; Seco, Joao

2012-09-01

241

Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Mystery Story  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the success of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer currently in orbit, this is quite an exciting time in the history of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The study of GRBs is a modern astronomical mystery story that began over 30 years ago with the serendipitous discovery of these astronomical events by military satellites in the late 1960's. Until the launch of BATSE on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, astronomers had no clue whether GRBs originated at the edge of our solar system, in our own Milky Way Galaxy or incredibly far away near the edge of the observable Universe. Data from BATSE proved that GRBs are distributed isotropically on the sky and thus could not be the related to objects in the disk of our Galaxy. Given the intensity of the gamma-ray emission, an extragalactic origin would require an astounding amount of energy. Without sufficient data to decide the issue, a great debate continued about whether GRBs were located in the halo of our own galaxy or were at extragalactic - even cosmological distances. This debate continued until 1997 when the BeppoSAX mission discovered a fading X-ray afterglow signal in the same location as a GRB. This discovery enabled other telescopes, to observe afterglow emission at optical and radio wavelengths and prove that GRBs were at cosmological distances by measuring large redshifts in the optical spectra. Like BeppoSAX Swift, slews to new GRB locations to measure afterglow emission. In addition to improved GRB sensitivity, a significant advantage of Swift over BeppoSAX and other missions is its ability to slew very quickly, allowing x-ray and optical follow-up measurements to be made as early as a minute after the gamma-ray burst trigger rather than the previous 6-8 hour delay. Swift afterglow measurements along with follow-up ground-based observations, and theoretical work have allowed astronomers to identify two plausible scenarios for the creation of a GRB: either through core collapse of super massive stars or colliding compact objects in distant galaxies. The pieces of the puzzle are beginning to fall into place and yet the story isn't quite finished. I will frame the history of gamma-ray bursts as a mystery story and will end with a description of what we still don't know and what we'll have to do to get the next clues.

Parsons, Ann

2007-01-01

242

Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

2011-01-01

243

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Galactic Diffuse Gamma-ray Spectrum from Cosmic-ray In-  

E-print Network

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Galactic Diffuse Gamma-ray Spectrum from Cosmic-ray In- teractions with Gas Clouds Michiko OHISHI and Masaki MORI Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University, Australia Abstract Gamma-ray spectra from cosmic-ray proton and electron interactions with gas clouds have

Mori, Masaki

244

A Proposed Student Built and Operated Satellite: The Gamma Ray Burst Polarization Observer (PolOSat)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Polarization Observer (PolOSat) is small satellite mission whose goal is to measure the polarization of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A precise measurement of the polarization of GRBs will constrain the models of radiative mechanisms associated with GRBs as supermassive stars undergo collapse into black holes. The primary goal of PolOSat is the detection of strongly linearly polarized GRBs (?20; %) and/or to set upper limits on polarization for a few GRBs (?30; %). PolOSat is designed to have a sensitivity to polarization that exceeds all prior experiments. The primary scientific instrument, the Gamma-ray Polarization Monitor (GPM) is based on a CMOS hybrid array that is optimized for performance in the low energy gamma-ray band (20-200 keV). The GPM has two passive Beryllium (Be) scattering elements which provide signal gamma-rays within a large field of view (two 45 degree radius cones). Gamma-rays impinge on the Be scatterers and are then Compton scattered into the CZT arrays and detected. A bright GRB (occurring 5 times a year) will produce 100,000s of direct gamma-rays and 1000s of Compton scattered gamma-rays detected by the CZT array. The PolOSat satellite with the GPM is rotated ( 1 Hz) inducing a strong temporal component at twice the spin frequency that is proportional to the linear polarization in the GRB signal. The team includes the University of California, Berkeley, the Kentucky Space Program including the Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation, the University of Kentucky, Morehead State University, Sonoma State University, the Rochester Institute of Technology, the University of Rochester and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. PolOSat features significant participation by undergraduate and graduate students in all phases of development and operation of the spacecraft and instruments and in data analysis. PolOSat was initially proposed as a small complete NASA Mission of Opportunity and is currently seeking funding.

Malphrus, Benjamin K.; Jernigan, J. G.; Bloom, J. S.; Boggs, S.; Butler, N. R.; Cominsky, L. R.; Doering, T. J.; Doty, J. P.; Erb, D. M.; Figer, D. F.; Hurley, K. C.; Kimel, K. W.; Lumpp, J. E.; Labov, S.

2009-01-01

245

Gamma ray irradiated silicon nanowires: An effective model to investigate defects at the interface of Si/SiOx  

SciTech Connect

The effect of gamma ray irradiation on silicon nanowires was investigated. Here, an additional defect emerged in the gamma-ray-irradiated silicon nanowires and was confirmed with electron spin resonance spectra. {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that irradiation doses had influence on the Q{sup 4} unit structure. This phenomenon indicated that the unique core/shell structure of silicon nanowires might contribute to induce metastable defects under gamma ray irradiation, which served as a satisfactory model to investigate defects at the interface of Si/SiOx.

Yin, Kui; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Liangbin; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Shao, Mingwang, E-mail: wxlthefirst@gmail.com, E-mail: xuegi@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: mwshao@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices and Collaborative Innovation, Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang, Xiaoliang, E-mail: wxlthefirst@gmail.com, E-mail: xuegi@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: mwshao@suda.edu.cn; Xue, Gi, E-mail: wxlthefirst@gmail.com, E-mail: xuegi@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: mwshao@suda.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Co-ordination Chemistry, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, No. 20, Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2014-01-20

246

Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system  

DOEpatents

A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

2013-02-12

247

Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo  

E-print Network

Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility ...

Kiraly, Orsolya

248

Gamma-ray imaging with germanium detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. By combining existing position-sensitive detectors with an appropriate code aperture, two-dimensional imaging with 0.2-deg angular resolution becomes practical for a typical balloon experiment. Much finer resolutions are possible with larger separations between detectors and the coded aperture as would be applicable for space-based or lunar-based observatories. Two coaxial germanium detectors divided into five external segments have been fabricated and have undergone extensive performance evaluation and imaging testing in our laboratory. These tests together with detailed Monte Carlo modeling calculations have demonstrated the great promise of this sensor technology for future gamma-ray missions.

Mahoney, W. A.; Callas, J. L.; Ling, J. C.; Radocinski, R. G.; Skelton, R. T.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

1993-01-01

249

The diffuse galactic gamma ray emission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope) detector will provide a much more detailed view of the diffuse galactic gamma ray intensity in terms of higher resolution, greater statistical significance, and broader energy range than earlier missions. These observations will furnish insight into a number of very important questions related to the dynamics and structure of the Galaxy. A diffuse emission model is being developed that incorporates the latest information on matter distribution and source functions. In addition, it is tailored to the EGRET instrument response functions. The analysis code of the model maintains flexibility to accommodate the quality of the data that is anticipated. The discussion here focuses on the issues of the distributions of matter, cosmic rays, and radiation fields, and on the important source functions that enter into the model calculation of diffuse emission.

Bertsch, David L.

1990-01-01

250

Gamma ray bursts: a 1983 overview  

SciTech Connect

Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect. Energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all. Burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective. Finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

Cline, T.L.

1983-10-01

251

Gamma Ray Bursts: a 1983 Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray burst observations are reviewed with mention of new gamma-ray and optical transient measurements and with discussions of the controversial, contradictory and unresolved issues that have recently emerged: burst spectra appear to fluctuate in time as rapidly as they are measured, implying that any one spectrum may be incorrect; energy spectra can be obligingly fitted to practically any desired shape, implying, in effect, that no objective spectral resolution exists at all; burst fluxes and temporal quantities, including the total event energy, are characterized very differently with differing instruments, implying that even elementary knowledge of their properties is instrumentally subjective; finally, the log N-log S determinations are deficient in the weak bursts, while there is no detection of a source direction anisotropy, implying that Ptolemy was right or that burst source distance estimates are basically guesswork. These issues may remain unsolved until vastly improved instruments are flown.

Cline, T. L.

1983-01-01

252

Nuclear isomer suitable for gamma ray laser  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The operation of gamma ray lasers (gasers) are studied. It is assumed that the nuclear isomers mentioned in previously published papers have inherent limitations. It is further assumed that the judicious use of Bormann effect or the application of the total external reflection of low energy gamma radiation at grazing angle of incidence may permit the use of a gaser crystal sufficiently long to achieve observable stimulated emission. It is suggested that a long lived 0(+) isomer decaying by low energy gamma ray emission to a short lived 2(+) excited nuclear state would be an attractive gaser candidate. It is also suggested that the nuclear isomer be incorporated in a matrix of refractory material having an electrostatic field gradient whose principal axis lies along the length of the medium. This results in the preferential transmission of electric quadrupole radiation along the length of the medium.

Jha, S.

1979-01-01

253

Nucleosynthesis and astrophysical gamma ray spectroscopy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The HEAO-3 gamma ray spectrometer has provided evidence in the quest for the understanding of complex element formation in the universe with the discovery of Al-26 in the interstellar medium. It has demonstrated that the synthesis of intermediate mass nuclei is currently going on in the galaxy. This discovery was confirmed by the Solar Maximum Mission. The flux is peaked near the galactic center and indicates about 3 solar masses of Al-26 in the interstellar medium, with an implied ratio of Al-26/Al-27 = .00001. Several possible distributions were studied but the data gathered thus far do not allow discrimination between them. It is felt that only the spaceflight of a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer with adequate sensitivity will ultimately resolve the issue of the source of this material.

Jacobson, Allan S.

1987-01-01

254

Phenomenology of Gamma-Ray Jets  

E-print Network

We discuss some phenomenological aspects of $\\gamma$-ray emitting jets. In particular, we present calculations of the $\\gamma$-sphere and $\\pi$-sphere for various target photon fields, and employ them to demonstrate how $\\gamma$-ray observations at very high energies can be used to constraint the Doppler factor of the emitting plasma and the production of VHE neutrinos. We also consider the implications of the rapid TeV variability observed in M87 and the TeV blazars, and propose a model for the very rapid TeV flares observed with HESS and MAGIC in some blazars,that accommodates the relatively small Doppler factors inferred from radio observations. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for detecting VHE neutrinos from relativistic jets.

Amir Levinson

2007-09-10

255

Spectral evolution in gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) and the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite have independently monitored cosmic gamma-ray bursts since launch in February 1980. Several bursts with relatively simple pulse structure and sufficient intensity have been analyzed for evidence of spectral variability on time scales shorter than the pulse durations. In many of these bursts pulse structures are found, ranging in duration from 1 to 10 seconds, which exhibit a trend of hard-to-soft spectral evolution. No significant evidence for soft-to-hard evolution has been found. The HXRBS data above 100 keV and the GRS data above 1 MeV indicate that the spectral evolution generally is not due to time-varying absorption features at energies below 100 keV.

Norris, J. P.; Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Matz, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.

1986-01-01

256

Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

E-print Network

Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has become an active astrophysical discipline with four confirmed sources of TeV gamma rays, two plerionic supernova remnants (SNRs) and two BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). An additional nine objects (one plerion, three shell-type SNRs, one X-ray binary, and four BL Lacs) have been detected but have not been confirmed by independent detections. None of the galactic sources require the presence of hadronic cosmic rays, so definitive evidence of their origin remains elusive. Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 are weak EGRET sources but they exhibit extremely variable TeV emission with spectra that extend beyond 10 TeV. They also exhibit correlations with lower energy photons during multi-wavelength campaigns, providing tests of emission models. Next generation telescopes like VERITAS hold the promise of moving this field dramatically forward.

Michael Catanese

1999-11-09

257

Lorentz violation from gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The constancy of light speed is a basic assumption in Einstein’s special relativity, and consequently the Lorentz invariance is a fundamental symmetry of space-time in modern physics. However, it is speculated that the speed of light becomes energy-dependent due to the Lorentz invariance violation (LV) in various new physics theories. We analyse the data of the energetic photons from the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, and find more events to support the energy dependence in the light speed with both linear and quadratic form corrections. We provide two scenarios to understand all the new-released Pass 8 data of bright GRBs by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, with predictions from such scenarios being testable by future detected GRBs.

Zhang, Shu; Ma, Bo-Qiang

2015-02-01

258

SuperAGILE and Gamma Ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect

The solid-state hard X-ray imager of AGILE gamma-ray mission -- SuperAGILE -- has a six arcmin on-axis angular resolution in the 15-45 keV range, a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. The instrument is very light: 5 kg only. It is equipped with an on-board self triggering logic, image deconvolution, and it is able to transmit the coordinates of a GRB to the ground in real-time through the ORBCOMM constellation of satellites. Photon by photon Scientific Data are sent to the Malindi ground station at every contact. In this paper we review the performance of the SuperAGILE experiment (scheduled for a launch in the middle of 2006), after its first onground calibrations, and show the perspectives for Gamma Ray Bursts.

Pacciani, Luigi; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Frutti, Massimo; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Lapshov, Igor; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Tavani, Marco [IASF-INAF Rome (Italy); Barbiellini, Guido [INFN Trieste (Italy); Mastropietro, Marcello [CNR Montelibretti (Italy); Morelli, Ennio [IASF-INAF-Bologna (Italy); Rapisarda, Massimo [ENEA Frascati (Italy)

2006-05-19

259

Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser  

DOEpatents

A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01

260

The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: mission status.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) is the second in NASA's series of Great Observatories. Compton has now been operating for over two and a half years, and has given a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made and continue to be made. The authors describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments and the observing programs for the first three years of the mission. During Phases 2 and 3 of the mission a Guest Investigator program has been in progress with the Guest Observers' time share increasing from 30% to over 50% for the later mission phases.

Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

261

Intergalactic thermonuclear gamma-ray line  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The possibility of thermonculear reactions occurring in dilute space is briefly considered. X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies demonstrates that perhaps as much as 10 to the 14th solar masses of hot gas (T of about 100 million K) may often surround galaxies in clusters with a density of perhaps 0.004/cu cm. If the ion temperature is 100 million K, the thermonuclear reaction p + d to He-3 + gamma ray should emit gamma rays at a rate of roughly 4 x 10 to the 41st/sec with energy 5.516 + or -0.016 MeV. Such a source in teh virgo cluster at 15.7 Mpc would present a line flux of 1 x 10 to the -11th/sq cm/sec.

Clayton, D. D.

1985-01-01

262

Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO): Emergency support  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is an Earth orbiting satellite that studies sources of localized, galactic, and extragalactic gamma rays. It will be carried into a near-circular orbit by the Space Shuttle, following which it will be placed in its operational orbit by its on-board hydrazine propulsion system. Formal orbit parameters are 350 km x 450 km x 28.5 degrees with a period of 93 minutes. Deep Space Network coverage will be provided during emergencies that would prevent communications via the normal Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)-White Sands data link. Emergency support will be provided by the DSN's 26-meter antenna subnetwork. Information is given in tabular form for DSN support, frequency assignments, telemetry, and command.

Schauer, K.; Madden, J.

1991-01-01

263

Prospects for Nuclear-gamma-ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis was made of prospects for gamma rays coming from two sources outside the solar system: (1) radioactive decay of fresh nuclear products to explosive nucleosynthesis, and (2) scattering of low energy cosmic rays. The former should be detectable and will provide a factual base for many suppositions about the site and history of nucleosynthesis. The latter may be detectable and, if so, will probably provide factual information about high-flux regions of cosmic radiation.

Clayton, D. D.

1973-01-01

264

Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in the mountains of northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between 250 GeV and 50 TeV. With ± a high duty-cycle, large detector area, and wide field-of-view

Joseph McCullough; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M.-L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-01-01

265

Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Microsoft Academic Search

I review the observational status of the Supernova\\/Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) connection. Available data suggest that Supernovae (SNe) associated with GRBs form an heterogeneous class of objects including bright and faint hypernovae (Hyp) and perhaps also `standard' Ib\\/c events. Current estimates of SN and GRB rates and beaming angles yield ratios GRB\\/SNe-Ibc ?2% and GRB\\/Hyp ?25%. In the few SN\\/GRB associations

Massimo Della Valle

2006-01-01

266

Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI  

E-print Network

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

David M. Smith

2004-04-30

267

Are Gamma-Ray Bursts Standard Candles?  

E-print Network

By dividing a sample of 48 long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into four groups with redshift from low to high and fitting each group with the Amati relation log Eiso = a + b log Epeak, I find that parameters a and b vary with the mean redshift of the GRBs in each group systematically and significantly. The results suggest that GRBs evolve strongly with the cosmic redshift and hence are not standard candles.

Li-Xin Li

2007-05-30

268

THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data sets exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations onboard to allow re-orienting the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of 12 sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from {approx}8 keV to {approx}40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The onboard trigger threshold is {approx}0.7 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates onboard triggers for {approx}250 GRBs per year.

Meegan, Charles [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Lichti, Giselher; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Steinle, Helmut [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse Postfach 1312, Garching 85748 (Germany); Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, Robert; Wilson, Robert B. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Hoover, Andrew S.; Kippen, R. Marc; Wallace, Mark S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J. [NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); McBreen, Sheila [University College, Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland)] (and others)

2009-09-01

269

Gravitational Waves and gamma-ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

If the gamma-ray burst sources detected by GRO are coalescing binaries at cosmological distances there should be a coincident gravitational radiation signal. Using the GRBs rate we predict the gravitational radiation detection rate as a function of the gravitational wave strain at Earth. This method of predicting the rate avoids the large statistical uncertainties in the current estimates that are based on the three neutron star binaries containing pulsars found, so far, in the Galaxy. The brightest gamma-ray bursts should be accompanied by a gravitational pulse detectable by LIGO or VIRGO, and by using the bursts as triggers for LIGO/VIRGO their sensitivity can be improved by 50% and the detection rate increases by a factor of 3. LIGO/VIRGO must reach a strain sensitivity of 10(sup-20.7)h(sub 0) to detect one burst per decade, and a failure to find coincidences at a rate of one per year with a strain sensitivity of 10(sup -20.6)h(sub 0) will rule out the binary hypothesis. If they are detected as gravitational wave sources, the time delay between the gamma-rays and the gravitational waves will help to determine the burst mechanism, and the polarization of the gravitational waves will help to determine the burst geometry.

Kochanek, Christopher S.; Piran, Tsvi

1993-01-01

270

Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 10(exp 12) Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

Harding, Alice K.

1990-01-01

271

Neutrino bursts from gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

If gamma-ray bursts originate at cosmological distances, as strongly indicated by the results from Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), then ultrarelativistic ejecta are the likely consequence of the highly super-Eddington luminosity of the sources. If the energy injection rate varies with time, then the Lorentz factor of the wind also varies, and the shells of ejected matter collide with each other. The collisions between baryons produce pions which decay into high-energy photons, electrons, electron positron pairs, and neutrino pairs. The bulk Lorentz factor of approximately 300 is required if our model is to be compatible with the observed millisecond variability. The strongest gamma-ray bursts are observed to deliver approximately 10(exp -4) ergs/sq cm in 100-200 keV photons. In our scenario more energy may be delivered in a neutrino burst. Typical neutrinos may be approximately 30 GeV if the protons have a Maxwellian energy distribution, and up to approximately TeV if the protons have a power-law distribution. Such neutrino bursts are close to the detection limit of the DUMAND II experiment.

Paczynski, Bohdan; Xu, Guohong

1994-01-01

272

The solar gamma ray and neutron capabilities of COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The imaging Compton telescope COMPTEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has unusual spectroscopic capabilities for measuring solar gamma-ray and neutron emission. The launch of the GRO is scheduled for June 1990 near the peak of the sunspot cycle. With a 30 to 40 percent probability for the Sun being in the COMPTEL field-of-view during the sunlit part of an orbit, a large number of flares will be observed above the 800 keV gamma-ray threshold of the telescope. The telescope energy range extends to 30 MeV with high time resolution burst spectra available from 0.1 to 10 MeV. Strong Compton tail suppression of instrumental gamma-ray interactions will facilitate improved spectral analysis of solar flare emissions. In addition, the high signal to noise ratio for neutron detection and measurement will provide new neutron spectroscopic capabilities. Specifically, a flare similar to that of 3 June 1982 will provide spectroscopic data on greater than 1500 individual neutrons, enough to construct an unambiguous spectrum in the energy range of 20 to 200 MeV. Details of the instrument and its response to solar gamma-rays and neutrons will be presented.

Ryan, James M.; Lockwood, John A.

1989-01-01

273

The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect

The Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) is a satellite-based observatory to study the high energy gamma-ray sky. The main instrument on GLAST, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-conversion telescope that will survey the sky from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV With the GLAST launch in 2007, the LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high energy phenomena, including supermassive black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and cosmic ray acceleration and dark matter. A second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), greatly enhances GLAST's capability to study GRB by providing important spectral and timing information in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We describe how the instruments, spacecraft and ground system work together to provide observations of gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV - 300 GeV and to provide rapid notification of bursts to the wider gamma-ray burst community.

McEnery, Julie; Ritz, Steve [NASA/GSFC, Lab for Astroparticle Physics, MailCode 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2006-05-19

274

Tobacco Induced Mutations: A Fun, Visually Impressive Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A modified version "Tobacco Induced Mutations" of Ames assay experiment provides a meaningful context for students to learn about the concept of mutations by using a known carcinogen that is tobacco. This experiment shows toxicological concept of the dose/response relationship and visually demonstrates when a mutation have occurred in bacteria…

Milholland, Rebecca B. R.; Hines, Stefani D.

2004-01-01

275

Solar gamma ray and neutron observations. [analysis of gamma ray spectrometer data obtained on OSO-7  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present status of knowledge concerning the impulsive and the continuous emission of solar gamma rays and neutrons is reviewed in the light of the recent solar activity in early August 1972. The gamma ray spectrometer on Orbiting Solar Observatory-7 (OSO-7) has observed the sun continuously for most of the activity period except for occultation by the earth. In association with the 2B flare on August 4, 1972, and the 3B flare on August 7, 1972, the monitor provides evidence for solar gamma ray line emission in the energy range from 300 keV to 10 MeV. A summary of all the results available from preliminary analysis of the data will be given.

Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.

1973-01-01

276

Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the angular anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thereby inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that current Fermi data already seem to prefer nonnegligible IGMF values. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

2013-01-01

277

Neutron and gamma-ray dose-rates from the Little Boy replica  

SciTech Connect

We report dose-rate information obtained at many locations in the near vicinity of, and at distances out to 0.64 km from, the Little Boy replica while it was operated as a critical assembly. The measurements were made with modified conventional dosimetry instruments that used an Anderson-Braun detector for neutrons and a Geiger-Mueller tube for gamma rays with suitable electronic modules to count particle-induced pulses. Thermoluminescent dosimetry methods provide corroborative data. Our analysis gives estimates of both neutron and gamma-ray relaxation lengths in air for comparison with earlier calculations. We also show the neutron-to-gamma-ray dose ratio as a function of distance from the replica. Current experiments and further data analysis will refine these results. 7 references, 8 figures.

Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

1984-01-01

278

Rapid increase in prescission GDR {gamma}-ray emission with energy  

SciTech Connect

A rapid increase in the emission of prescission giant dipole resonance (GDR) {gamma}-rays with bombarding energy is observed in excited Th and Cf nuclei formed in the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 20B}Pb and {sup 32}S+{sup nat}W,{sup 208}Pb. This increase begins around E{sub exc} = 40 MeV for the {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb reaction and E{sub exc} = 70 MeV for the {sup 32}S-induced reactions. The excess {gamma}-ray yield above these thresholds cannot be described within the standard statistical model. Statistical model calculations which include a temperature dependent nuclear dissipation are able to reproduce simultaneously the observed GDR {gamma}-ray spectra and recently measured evaporation residue across sections.

Hofman, D.J.; Back, B.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Paul, P. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

1995-12-31

279

Energy response and dose-rate calibration of a Geiger-Mueller gamma-ray detector  

SciTech Connect

To obtain more precise dose-rate measurements, we have taken a commercial gamma-ray dosimeter that uses a Geiger-Mueller (GM) tube as its detector and, by supplying it with an externally regulated high voltage, counted the gamma-ray-induced pulses with suitable scaling and timing circuits. We have now improved the method of calibration by measuring detector response to 13 different sources, each with an independently verified strength, in the energy range from 60 keV to 2.6 MeV. With the use of computer codes, the resulting response curve can be folded into the spectrum of the source to be measured.

Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.; Moss, C.E.

1984-01-01

280

SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND DARK MATTER SEEDING IN NEUTRON STARS  

SciTech Connect

We present a mechanism based on internal self-annihilation of dark matter accreted from the galactic halo in the inner regions of neutron stars that may trigger full or partial conversion into a quark star. We explain how this effect may induce a gamma-ray burst (GRB) that could be classified as short, according to the usual definition based on time duration of the prompt gamma-ray emission. This mechanism differs in many aspects from the most discussed scenario associating short GRBs with compact object binary mergers. We list possible observational signatures that should help distinguish between these two possible classes of progenitors.

Perez-Garcia, M. Angeles [Department of Fundamental Physics and IUFFyM, University of Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Daigne, F.; Silk, J., E-mail: mperezga@usal.es, E-mail: daigne@iap.fr, E-mail: j.silk1@physics.ox.ac.uk [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

2013-05-10

281

Thermoluminescence of Simulated Interstellar Matter after Gamma-ray Irradiation  

E-print Network

Interstellar matter is known to be strongly irradiated by radiation and several types of cosmic ray particles. Simulated interstellar matter, such as forsterite $\\rm Mg_{2}SiO_{4}$, enstatite $\\rm MgSiO_{3}$ and magnesite $\\rm MgCO_{3}$ has been irradiated with the $\\rm ^{60}Co$ gamma-rays in liquid nitrogen, and also irradiated with fast neutrons at 10 K and 70 K by making use of the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL. Maximum fast neutron dose is $10^{17}n_f{\\rm /cm^{2}}$). After irradiation, samples are stored in liquid nitrogen for several months to allow the decay of induced radioactivity. We measured the luminescence spectra of the gamma ray irradiated samples during warming to 370K using a spectrophotometer. For the forsterite and magnesite, the spectra exhibit a rather intense peak at about 645 -- 655 nm and 660 nm respectively, whereas luminescence scarcely appeared in olivine sample. The spectra of forsterite is very similar to the ERE of the Red Rectangle.

K. Koike; M. Nakagawa; C. Koike; M. Okada; H. Chihara

2002-02-01

282

GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-08-20

283

Comparison of activation effects in {gamma}-ray detector materials  

SciTech Connect

Activation induced by cosmic and trapped radiation in {gamma}-ray detector materials represents a significant source of background for space-based detector systems. Selection of detector materials should therefore include consideration of this background source. Results are presented from measurements of induced radioactivity in different scintillators activated either as a result of irradiation by mono-energetic protons at accelerator facilities, or flight on board the Space Shuttle. Radiation transport computer codes are used to help compare the effects observed from the scintillators, by identifying and quantifying the influence on the background spectra from more than one hundred of the radionuclides produced by spallation. For the space experiment data, the simulation results also permit determination of the contributions to detector activation from the different sources of radiation in the Shuttle cabin.

Truscott, P.R.; Evans, H.E.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L.; Flatman, J.C.; Cosby, M.; Knight, P. [Defence Research Agency, Farnborough (United Kingdom). Space Dept.] [Defence Research Agency, Farnborough (United Kingdom). Space Dept.; Moss, C.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-06-01

284

ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT INDUCED MUTATION AND DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID REPLICATION IN BACTERIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through a concurrent investigation of the nonlinearity of the UV-induced ; mutation curve in strain WP2 and the recovery of DNA synthesis in E. coli ; following various ievels of exposure to UV, evidence has been obtained to ; support. the hypothesis that two basic radiation effects are involved in UV-; induced mutation. These effects are blockage. of DNA synthesis

C. O. Doudney; C. S. Young

1962-01-01

285

Common Gamma-ray Glows above Thunderclouds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gamma-ray glows are continuous, long duration gamma- and x-ray emission seen coming from thunderclouds. The Airborne for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) observed 12 gamma-ray glows during its summer 2009 flight campaign over the areas of Colorado and Florida in the United States. For these glows we shall present their spectra, relationship to lightning activity and how their duration and size changes as a function of distance. Gamma-ray glows follow the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) spectrum and have been previously measured from the ground and inside the cloud. ADELE measured most glows as it flew above the screening layer of the cloud. During the brightest glow on August 21, 2009, we can show that we are flying directly into a downward facing relativistic runaway avalanche, indicative of flying between the upper positive and negative screening layer of the cloud. In order to explain the brightness of this glow, RREA with an electric field approaching the limit for relativistic feedback must be occurring. Using all 12 glows, we show that lightning activity diminishes during the onset of the glow. Using this along with the fact that glows occur as the field approaches the level necessary for feedback, we attempt to distinguish between two possibilities: that glows are evidence that RREA with feedback, rather than lightning, is sometimes the primary channel for discharging the cloud, or else that the overall discharging is still controlled by lightning, with glows simply appearing during times when a subsidence of lightning allows the field to rise above the threshold for RREA.

Kelley, Nicole; Smith, David; Dwyer, Joseph; Hazelton, Bryna; Grefenstette, Brian; Lowell, Alex; Splitt, Michael; Lazarus, Steven; Rassoul, Hamid

2013-04-01

286

Gamma-ray bursts with ROSAT  

E-print Network

I review the use of ROSAT over the last years for the investigation of well localized gamma-ray burst (GRB) error boxes. In particular, I cover (i) the systematic study of several dozens of IPN locations using the ROSAT All-Sky-Survey data, (ii) results of deep ROSAT pointings of selected small GRB error boxes, (iii) the attempts for and results of quick follow-up observations after GRB events including the three GRBs localized with BeppoSAX, (iv) the correlation of GRB locations with serendipitous ROSAT pointings and (v) the search for X-ray flashes in the database of pointed ROSAT observations.

J. Greiner

1997-04-01

287

Gamma Ray Bursts: an Enigma Being Unraveled  

SciTech Connect

The best astrophysical accelerators are quasars and the 'progenitors' of GRBs which, after decades of observations and scores of theories, we still do not understand. But, I shall argue, we now know quite well where GRBs come from, and we understand how their 'beams' behave, as they make short pulses of gamma rays and long-duration X-ray, optical and radio 'afterglows'. I shall argue that our understanding of these phenomena, based on the 'Cannonball Model', is unusually simple, precise and successful. The 'sociology' of GRBs is interesting per se and, in this sense, the avatars of the Cannonball Model in confronting the generally accepted 'fireball models' are also quite revealing.

De Rujula, Alvaro (Boston University and CERN) [Boston University and CERN

2003-05-14

288

Gamma ray bursts from extragalactic sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The properties of gamma ray bursts of classical type are found to be explicable in terms of high speed collisions between stars. A model is proposed in which the frequency of such collisions can be calculated. The model is then applied to the nuclei of galaxies in general on the basis that galaxies, or at least some fraction of them, originate in the expulsion of stars from creation centers. Evidence that low level activity of this kind is also taking place at the center of our own Galaxy is discussed. The implications for galactic evolution are discussed and a negative view of black holes is taken.

Hoyle, Fred; Burbidge, Geoffrey

1992-01-01

289

Comptonization of gamma rays by cold electrons  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytic method is developed for calculating the emergent spectrum of gamma-rays and X-rays scattered in a homogeneous medium with low-temperature electrons. The Klein-Nishina corrections of the scattering cross section and absorption processes are taken in account. The wavelength relaxation and the spatial diffusion problems are solved separately, and the emergent spectrum is calculated by convolving the evolution function of the spectrum in an infinite medium with the photon luminosity resulting from the spatial diffusion in a finite sphere. The analytic results are compared with that of Monte Carlo calculations and it is concluded that the analytic result is quite accurate.

Xu, Yueming; Ross, Randy R.; Mccray, Richard

1991-01-01

290

Gamma-Ray Bursts observed by INTEGRAL  

E-print Network

During the first six months of operations, six Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected in the field of view of the INTEGRAL instruments and localized by the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS): a software for the automatic search of GRBs and the rapid distribution of their coordinates. I describe the current performances of IBAS and review the main results obtained so far. The coordinates of the latest burst localized by IBAS, GRB 031203, have been distributed within 20 s from the burst onset and with an uncertainty radius of only 2.7 arcmin.

S. Mereghetti

2003-12-12

291

Gamma-ray burster counterparts - Radio  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many observers and theorists have suggested that gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) are related to highly magnetized rotating, neutron stars, in which case an analogy with pulsars implies that GRBs would be prodigious emitters of polarized radio emission during quiescence. The paper reports on a survey conducted with the Very Large Array radio telescope of 10 small GRB error regions for quiescent radio emission at wavelengths of 2, 6, and 20 cm. The sensitivity of the survey varied from 0.1 to 0.8 mJy. The observations did indeed reveal four radio sources inside the GRB error regions.

Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cline, Thomas L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barat, C.; Estulin, I. V.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Hurley, K.

1989-01-01

292

Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

Thompson, David J.

2010-01-01

293

The gamma-ray light curves of SN 1987A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observations of the SN 1987A ejecta in four Co-56-decay gamma-ray lines, obtained using the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer between February 1987 and May 1989, are reported and analyzed. The instrument characteristics and data-reduction procedures are described, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and discussed with reference to theoretical models. Gamma-ray fluxes significantly above possible instrumental levels (as determined from analysis of pre-1987 data) were detected in the second half of 1987 and the first half of 1988. The data are found to favor a model with some Co-56 in regions of low gamma-ray optical depth by 200 d after the SN outburst over models with all Co-56 at one depth within a uniform expanding envelope. Also investigated are the gamma-ray contribution to the total bolometric luminosity and the escape (and potential observability) of Co-57 gamma rays.

Leising, Mark D.; Share, Gerald H.

1990-01-01

294

Theoretical fluxes of gamma rays from the Martian surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theoretical fluxes of gamma rays escaping the surface of Mars were calculated. These and other calculated fluxes are needed to model the counting rates in the Mars Odyssey gamma ray spectrometer that are used to determine elemental compositions and other results using these measurements. Cross sections for the formation of gamma rays by both thermal and fast neutrons were compiled and evaluated. These evaluated cross sections were used with neutron fluxes calculated with the Monte Carlo N Particle Extended (MCNPX) code to get gamma ray production rates as a function of depth in the Martian surface. The fluxes of these gamma rays as a function of angle at the Martian surface were then calculated using gamma ray attenuation coefficients.

Kim, Kyeong J.; Drake, Darrell M.; Reedy, Robert C.; Williams, Remo M. S.; Boynton, William V.

2006-12-01

295

Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.  

PubMed

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields. PMID:20360067

Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, ?; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

2010-05-01

296

Global Characteristics of Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with INTEGRAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gamma-ray instruments on board INTEGRAL have detected and localized 62 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to date. The peak flux distribution of these bursts shows that INTEGRAL detects proportionally more weak GRBs than Swift because of its higher sensitivity in a smaller field of view. Spectral lags, i.e., the time delay in the arrival of low-energy gamma rays with respect to

S. Foley; S. McGlynn; L. Hanlon; S. McBreen; A. Martin-Carrillo; B. McBreen; M. Topinka; S. Meehan

2009-01-01

297

Gamma Ray Bursts: Explaining the Universe's Biggest Bangs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This radio broadcast discusses research into gamma ray bursts, the largest explosions in the universe. Topics include the SWIFT satellite mission and discoveries; the immense energy output of a gamma ray burst, and the causes of long and short gamma ray bursts (long bursts caused by core collapse into a black hole, and the short bursts from binary stellar system mergers, such as a neutron star colliding with a black hole). The broadcast is 28 minutes and 50 seconds in length.

298

EGRET Observations of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The all-sky survey in high-energy gamma rays (E > 30 MeV) carried out by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the diffuse gamma-ray emission. The observed diffuse emission has a Galactic component arising from cosmic-ray interactions with the local interstellar gas and radiation, as well as an almost uniformly distributed component

P. Sreekumar; D. L. Bertsch; B. L. Dingus; J. A. Esposito; C. E. Fichtel; R. C. Hartman; S. D. Hunter; G. Kanbach; D. A. Kniffen; Y. C. Lin; H. A. Mayer-Hasselwander; P. F. Michelson; C. von Montigny; A. Muecke; R. Mukherjee; P. L. Nolan; M. Pohl; O. Reimer; E. Schneid; J. G. Stacy; F. W. Stecker; D. J. Thompson; T. D. Willis

1998-01-01

299

Gamma Ray/neutron Spectrometers for Planetary Elemental Mapping  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Los Alamos has designed gamma ray and neutron spectrometers for Lunar Scout, two robotic missions to map the Moon from 100 km polar orbits. Knowledge of the elemental composition is desirable in identifying resources and for geochemical studies and can be obtained using gamma ray and neutron spectrometers. Measurements with gamma ray and neutron spectrometers complement each other in determining elemental abundances in a planet's surface. Various aspects of the instruments are discussed.

Reedy, R. C.; Auchampaugh, G. F.; Barraclough, B. L.; Burt, W. W.; Byrd, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Edwards, B. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Martin, R. A.; Moss, C. E.

1993-01-01

300

Gamma-ray measurements for simultaneous calorimetric assay  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray measurements obtained in the course of developing a simultaneous calorimetric assay system are described. Gamma-ray measurements of the isotopic composition of six, well-characterized plutonium oxide samples were obtained while the samples were in the calorimeter. These samples represent a range of plutonium masses from 19 to 231 g and two isotopic compositions. The values of effective specific power determined from the gamma-ray measurements agree with the values determined from destructive assay.

Rakel, D.A.

1982-03-02

301

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation explores the relationship between Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and lightning. Using data from the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), and the gamma ray observations from Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), the study reviews any causal relationship between TGFs and lightning. The conclusion of the study is that the TGF and lightning are simultaneous with out a causal relationship.

Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

2010-01-01

302

The Gamma-Ray Background from Blazars: A New Look  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of a new model calculation of the gamma-ray background\\u000aproduced by unresolved blazars, using the second EGRET catalogue and taking\\u000aaccount of flaring. These results are compared to the preliminary gamma-ray\\u000abackground spectrum reported recently by the EGRET team. We find that blazars\\u000acan account for the entire extragalactic gamma-ray background observed by\\u000aEGRET. In addition,

F. W. Stecker; M. H. Salamon

1996-01-01

303

The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope  

ScienceCinema

The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

Isabelle Grenier

2010-01-08

304

Measurement of Disintegration Rates and Absolute {gamma}-ray Intensities  

SciTech Connect

The majority of practical radioactive materials decay by modes that include {gamma}-ray emission. For questions of 'how much' or 'how pure', one must know the absolute intensities of the major radiations. We are using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) to measurements of disintegration rates, coupled with {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to measure absolute {gamma}-ray emission probabilities. Described is a study of the 227Th chain yielding absolute {gamma}-ray intensities with {approx}0.5% accuracy and information on LSC efficiencies.

DeVries, Daniel J.; Griffin, Henry C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2006-03-13

305

GAMMA-RAY BURST PREDICTIONS FOR THE FERMI GAMMA RAY SPACE TELESCOPE  

SciTech Connect

Results of a phenomenological model to estimate the gamma-ray burst (GRB) detection rate by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope are reported. This estimate is based on the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) 4B GRB fluence distribution, the mean ratio of fluences measured at 100 MeV-5 GeV with Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and at 20 keV-2 MeV with BATSE, and the mean EGRET GRB spectrum for the five EGRET spark-chamber GRBs. For a 10% fluence ratio and a number spectral index {alpha}{sub 1} = -2 at 100 MeV- 5 GeV energies, we estimate a rate of {approx}20 and 4 GRBs yr{sup -1} in the Fermi Large Area Telescope field of view (FOV) with at least five photons with energy E>100 MeV and E>1 GeV, respectively. We also estimate {approx}1.5 GRBs yr{sup -1} in the Fermi FOV where at least one photon with energy E>10 GeV is detected. For these parameters, we estimate {approx}1-2 GRBs yr{sup -1} detected with the Fermi telescope with more than 100 {gamma}-rays with E {approx}> 100 MeV. Comparison predictions for {alpha}{sub 1} = -2.2, different fluence ratios, and the AGILE {gamma}-ray satellite are made. Searches for different classes of GRBs using a diagram plotting 100 MeV-10 GeV fluence versus 20 keV- 20 MeV fluence is considered as a way to search for separate classes of GRBs and, specifically, spectral differences between the short-hard and long-duration GRB classes, and for hard components in GRBs.

Le, Truong; Dermer, Charles D. [Space Science Division, Code 7653, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)], E-mail: tle@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: charles.dermer@nrl.navy.mil

2009-08-01

306

Physics of Gamma Ray Burst Sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During this grant period, the physics of gamma-ray bursts was investigated. A number of new results have emerged. The importance of pair formation in high compactness burst spectra may help explain x-ray flashes; a universal jet shape is a likely explanation for the distribution of jet break times; gravitational waves may be copiously produced both in short bursts from compact mergers and in long bursts arising from collapsars; x-ray iron lines are likely to be due to interaction with the stellar atmosphere of the progenitor; prompt optical flashes from reverse shocks will give diagnostics on the Lorentz factor and the environment; GeV and TeV emission from bursts may be expected in the external shock; etc. The group working with the PI included postdocs Dr. Bing Zhang (now assistant professor at University of Nevada); Dr. Shiho Kobayashi; graduate student Lijun Gou; collaborators Drs. Tim Kallman and Martin Rees. Meszaros shared with Rees and Dr. Bohan Paczynsky the AAS Rossi Prize in 2000 for their work on the theory of gamma ray bursts. The refereed publications and conference proceedings resulting from this research are summarized below. The PI gave a number of invited talks at major conferences, also listed.

Meszaros, Peter

2004-01-01

307

Iron K Lines from Gamma Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present models for reprocessing of an intense flux of X-rays and gamma rays expected in the vicinity of gamma ray burst sources. We consider the transfer and reprocessing of the energetic photons into observable features in the X-ray band, notably the K lines of iron. Our models are based on the assumption that the gas is sufficiently dense to allow the microphysical processes to be in a steady state, thus allowing efficient line emission with modest reprocessing mass and elemental abundances ranging from solar to moderately enriched. We show that the reprocessing is enhanced by down-Comptonization of photons whose energy would otherwise be too high to absorb on iron, and that pair production can have an effect on enhancing the line production. Both "distant" reprocessors such as supernova or wind remnants and "nearby" reprocessors such as outer stellar envelopes can reproduce the observed line fluxes with Fe abundances 30-100 times above solar, depending on the incidence angle. The high incidence angles required arise naturally only in nearby models, which for plausible values can reach Fe line to continuum ratios close to the reported values.

Kallman, T. R.; Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

2003-01-01

308

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Study of the TeV gamma-ray emission mechanism of  

E-print Network

The Universe Viewed in Gamma-Rays 1 Study of the TeV gamma-ray emission mechanism of PSR 1706 spectrum of gamma rays between 0.5 to 4 TeV is obtained and is found to be consistent with previous results. In addition, we analyzed Chandra archive data, to derive the X-ray spectra of both the pulsar and the nebula

Enomoto, Ryoji

309

The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer: A New High Resolution Detector for Gamma-Ray Burst Spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic [gamma]-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E\\/[delta]E = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm[sup 3] high

H. Seifert; R. Baker; T. L. Cline; N. Gehrels; J. Jermakian; T. Nolan; R. Ramaty; D. A. Sheppard; G. Smith; D. E. Stilwell; B. J. Teegarden; J. Trombka; A. Owens; C. P. Cork; D. A. Landis; P. N. Luke; N. W. Madden; D. Malone; R. H. Pehl; H. Yaver; K. Hurley; S. Mathias; A. H. Post Jr.

1992-01-01

310

Near-infrared and gamma-ray monitoring of TANAMI gamma-ray bright sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Spectral energy distribution and its variability are basic tools for understanding the physical processes operating in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Aims: In this paper we report the results of a one-year near-infrared (NIR) and optical monitoring of a sample of 22 AGN known to be gamma-ray emitters, aimed at discovering correlations between optical and gamma-ray emission. Methods: We observed our objects with the Rapid Eye Mount (REM) telescope in J,H,K, and R bands nearly twice every month during their visibility window and derived light curves and spectral indexes. We also analyzed the gamma-ray data from the Fermi gamma-ray Space Telescope, making weekly averages. Results: Six sources were never detected during our monitoring, proving to be fainter than their historical Two micron all sky survey (2MASS) level. All of the sixteen detected sources showed marked flux density variability, while the spectral indexes remained unchanged within our sensitivity limits. Steeper sources showed, on average, a larger variability. From the NIR light curves we also computed a variability speed index for each detected source. Only one source (PKS 0208-512) underwent an NIR flare during our monitoring. Half of the sources showed a regular flux density trend on a one-year time scale, but do not show any other peculiar characteristic. The broadband spectral index ?ro appears to be a good proxy of the NIR spectral index only for BL Lac objects. No clear correlation between NIR and gamma-ray data is evident in our data, save for PKS 0537-441, PKS 0521-360, PKS 2155-304, and PKS 1424-418. The gamma-ray/NIR flux ratio showed a large spread, QSO being generally gamma-louder than BL Lac, with a marked correlation with the estimated peak frequency (?peak) of the synchrotron emission. A table of the photometry is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/555/A2

Nesci, R.; Tosti, G.; Pursimo, T.; Ojha, R.; Kadler, M.

2013-07-01

311

GROSS- GAMMA RAY OBSERVATORY ATTITUDE DYNAMICS SIMULATOR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) spacecraft will constitute a major advance in gamma ray astronomy by offering the first opportunity for comprehensive observations in the range of 0.1 to 30,000 megaelectronvolts (MeV). The Gamma Ray Observatory Attitude Dynamics Simulator, GROSS, is designed to simulate this mission. The GRO Dynamics Simulator consists of three separate programs: the Standalone Profile Program; the Simulator Program, which contains the Simulation Control Input/Output (SCIO) Subsystem, the Truth Model (TM) Subsystem, and the Onboard Computer (OBC) Subsystem; and the Postprocessor Program. The Standalone Profile Program models the environment of the spacecraft and generates a profile data set for use by the simulator. This data set contains items such as individual external torques; GRO spacecraft, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS), and solar and lunar ephemerides; and star data. The Standalone Profile Program is run before a simulation. The SCIO subsystem is the executive driver for the simulator. It accepts user input, initializes parameters, controls simulation, and generates output data files and simulation status display. The TM subsystem models the spacecraft dynamics, sensors, and actuators. It accepts ephemerides, star data, and environmental torques from the Standalone Profile Program. With these and actuator commands from the OBC subsystem, the TM subsystem propagates the current state of the spacecraft and generates sensor data for use by the OBC and SCIO subsystems. The OBC subsystem uses sensor data from the TM subsystem, a Kalman filter (for attitude determination), and control laws to compute actuator commands to the TM subsystem. The OBC subsystem also provides output data to the SCIO subsystem for output to the analysts. The Postprocessor Program is run after simulation is completed. It generates printer and CRT plots and tabular reports of the simulated data at the direction of the user. GROSS is written in FORTRAN 77 and ASSEMBLER and has been implemented on a VAX 11/780 under VMS 4.5. It has a virtual memory requirement of 255k. GROSS was developed in 1986.

Garrick, J.

1994-01-01

312

Effect of fast neutron, gamma-ray and combined radiations on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate single crystals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The thermal decomposition kinetics have been determined for ammonium perchlorate crystals subjected to a fast neutron irradiation or to a fast neutron irradiation followed by a gamma-ray irradiation. Qualitatively, the radiation induced changes are similar to those obtained in this and in previous studies, with samples exposed only to gamma rays. The induction period is shortened and the rate constants, obtained from an Avrami-Erofeyev kinetic analysis, are modified. The acceleratory period constant increases and the decay period constant decreases. When compared on an equal deposited energy basis, the fast neutron induced changes are appreciably larger than the gamma-ray induced changes. Some, or all, of the fast neutron induced effects might be attributable to the introduction of localized regions of concentrated radiation damage ('spikes') by lattice atom recoils which become thermal decomposition sites when the crystals are heated.

Herley, P. J.; Wang, C. S.; Varsi, G.; Levy, P. W.

1974-01-01

313

Diagram of the Apollo 15 & 16 Gamma-ray Detector  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a diagram of the Apollo 15 & 16 Gamma-ray Detector from the NASA website. Primarily intended to study the Moon's radioactivity, it made measurements of the cosmic gamma-ray background during its trip. It shows measurements in millimeters.

314

Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large

M. Alvarez; D. D'Armiento; G. Agnetta; A. Alberdi; A. Antonelli; A. Argan; P. Assis; E. A. Baltz; C. Bambi; G. Barbiellini; H. Bartko; M. Basset; D. Bastieri; P. Belli; G. Benford; L. Bergstrom; R. Bernabei; G. Bertone; A. Biland; B. Biondo; F. Bocchino; E. Branchini; M. Brigida; T. Bringmann; P. Brogueira; A. Bulgarelli; J. A. Caballero; G. A. Caliandro; P. Camarri; F. Cappella; P. Caraveo; R. Carbone; M. Carvajal; S. Casanova; A. J. Castro-Tirado; O. Catalano; R. Catena; F. Celi; A. Celotti; R. Cerulli; A. Chen; R. Clay; V. Cocco; J. Conrad; E. Costa; A. Cuoco; G. Cusumano; C. J. Dai; B. Dawson; B. De Lotto; G. De Paris; A. de Ugarte Postigo; E. Del Monte; C. Delgado; A. Di Ciaccio; G. Di Cocco; S. Di Falco; G. Di Persio; B. L. Dingus; A. Dominguez; F. Donato; I. Donnarumma; M. Doro; J. Edsjo; J. M. Espino Navas; M. C. Espirito Santo; Y. Evangelista; C. Evoli; D. Fargion; C. Favuzzi; M. Feroci; M. Fiorini; L. Foggetta; N. Fornengo; T. Froysland; M. Frutti; F. Fuschino; J. L. Gomez; M. Gomez; D. Gaggero; N. Galante; M. I. Gallardo; M. Galli; J. E. Garcia; M. Garczarczyk; F. Gargano; M. Gaug; F. Gianotti; S. Giarrusso; B. Giebels; N. Giglietto; P. Giommi; F. Giordano; A. Giuliani; J. Glicenstein; P. Goncalves; D. Grasso; M. Guerriero; H. L. He; A. Incicchitti; J. Kirk; H. H. Kuang; A. La Barbera; G. La Rosa; C. Labanti; G. Lamanna; I. Lapshov; F. Lazzarotto; S. Liberati; F. Liello; P. Lipari; F. Longo; F. Loparco; M. Lozano; P. G. Lucentini De Sanctis; J. M. Ma; M. C. Maccarone; L. Maccione; V. Malvezzi; A. Mangano; M. Mariotti; M. Marisaldi; I. Martel; A. Masiero; E. Massaro; M. Mastropietro; E. Mattaini; F. Mauri; M. N. Mazziotta; S. Mereghetti; T. Mineo; S. Mizobuchi; A. Moiseev; M. Moles; C. Monte; F. Montecchia; E. Morelli; A. Morselli; I. Moskalenko; F. Nozzoli; J. F. Ormes; M. A. Peres-Torres; L. Pacciani; A. Pellizzoni; F. Perez-Bernal; F. Perotti; P. Picozza; L. Pieri; M. Pietroni; M. Pimenta; A. Pina; C. Pittori; C. Pontoni; G. Porrovecchio; F. Prada; M. Prest; D. Prosperi; R. Protheroe; G. Pucella; J. M. Quesada; J. M. Quintana; J. R. Quintero; S. Raino; M. Rapisarda; M. Rissi; J. Rodriguez; E. Rossi; G. Rowell; A. Rubini; F. Russo; M. Sanchez-Conde; B. Sacco; V. Scapin; M. Schelke; A. Segreto; A. Sellerholm; X. D. Sheng; A. Smith; P. Soffitta; R. Sparvoli; P. Spinelli; V. Stamatescu; L. S. Stark; M. Tavani; G. Thornton; L. G. Titarchuk; B. Tome; A. Traci; M. Trifoglio; A. Trois; P. Vallania; E. Vallazza; S. Vercellone; S. Vernetto; V. Vitale; N. Wild; Z. P. Ye; A. Zambra; F. Zandanel; D. Zanello

2007-01-01

315

A high resolution scintillating fiber gamma-ray telescope  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scintillating fibers coupled to position sensitive photomultipliers have good angular precision and good energy resolution in detecting gamma-rays. Scintillating fibers stacked up into scintillating fiber planes U, V and W that are rotated by 60° angle relative to each other and coupled to position sensitive photomultipliers can be used as high resolution imaging gamma-ray detectors. With this arrangement the Compton

M. Atac; D. B. Cline; E. J. Fenyves; R. C. Chaney; H. Hammack

1989-01-01

316

Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

Weekes, Trevor C.

1994-01-01

317

QUALITY CONTROL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS USING GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes the quality control procedures, calibration, collection, analysis, and interpretation of data in measuring the activity of gamma ray-emitting radionuclides in environmental samples. Included in the appendices are basic data for selected gamma ray-emitting ra...

318

GAMMA-RAY IMAGING AND POLARIZATION MEASUREMENT USING 3-D  

E-print Network

GAMMA-RAY IMAGING AND POLARIZATION MEASUREMENT USING 3-D POSITION-SENSITIVE CdZnTe DETECTORS by Dan a solid foundation for the gamma-ray Compton imaging using a single 3-D CdZnTe detector. It was her-Ramo Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.2 Single Polarity Charge Sensing

He, Zhong

319

Gamma ray bursts: Current status of observations and theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray bursts display a wide range of temporal and spectral characteristics, but typically last several seconds and emit most of their energy in a low energy, gamma ray region. The burst sources appear to be isotropically distributed on the sky. Several lines of evidence suggest magnetic neutron stars as sources for bursts. A variety of energy sources and emission mechanisms are proposed.

Meegan, Charles A.

1990-01-01

320

Images of Simultaneous Gamma-Ray Burst Optical Counterpart  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Astronomers have observed a visible light emitted at the same time as a gamma-ray burst for the first time on January 27, 1999. Six images of this gamma-ray burst are provided at the University of Michigan site.

1999-01-01

321

Gamma Ray Astrophysics: New insight into the universe  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma ray observations of the solar system, the galaxy and extragalactic radiation are reported. Topics include: planets, comets, and asteroids; solar observations; interstellar medium and galactic structure; compact objects; cosmology; and diffuse radiation. The instrumentation used in gamma ray astronomy in covered along with techniques for the analysis of observational spectra.

Fichtel, C. E.; Trombka, J. I.

1981-01-01

322

Gamma rays from accretion onto rotating black holes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ionized matter falling onto an isolated rotating black hole will be heated sufficiently that proton-proton collisions will produce mesons, including neutral pions, which decay into gamma rays. For massive (1000-solar mass) black holes, the resulting gamma-ray luminosity may exceed 10 to the 36th erg/s with a spectrum peaked near 20 MeV.

Collins, M. S.

1979-01-01

323

Discoveries by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fermi is a large space gamma-ray mission developed by NASA and the DOE with major contributions from France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Sweden. It was launched in June 2008 and has been performing flawlessly since then. The main instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT) operating in the 20 MeV to 300 GeV range and a smaller monitor instrument is the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) operating in the 8 keV to 40 MeV range. New findings are occurring every week. Some of the key discoveries are: 1) Discovery of many new gamma-ray pulsars, including gamma-ray only and millisecond pulsars. 2) Detection of high energy gamma-ray emission from globular clusters, most likely due to summed emission from msec pulsars. 3) Discovery of delayed and extended high energy gamma-ray emission from short and long gamma-ray busts. 4) Detection of approximately 250 gamma-ray bursts per year with the GBM instrument. 5) Most accurate measurement of the cosmic ray electron spectrum between 30 GeV and 1 TeV, showing some excess above the conventional diffusion model. The talk will present the new discoveries and their implications.

Gehrels, Neil

2011-01-01

324

The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Swift mission: scheduled for launch in early 2004: is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy. It is the first-of-its-kind autonomous rapid-slewing satellite for transient astronomy and pioneers the way for future rapid-reaction and multiwavelength missions. It will be far more powerful than any previous GRB mission, observing more than 100 bursts per year and performing detailed X-ray and UV/optical afterglow observations spanning timescales from 1 minute to several days after the burst. The objectives are to: 1) determine the origin of GFU3s; 2) classify GRBs and search for new types; 3) study the interaction of the ultra-relativistic outflows of GRBs with their surrounding medium; and 4) use GRBs to study the early universe out to z greater than 10. The mission is being developed by a NASA-led international collaboration. It will carry three instruments: a new-generation wide-field gamma-ray (15-150 keV) detector that will detect bursts, calculate 1-4 arcmin positions: and trigger autonomous spacecraft slews; a narrow-field X-ray telescope that will give 5 arcsec positions and perform spectroscopy in the 0.2 to 10 keV band; and a narrow-field UV/optical telescope that will operate in the 170-600 nm band and provide 0.3 arcsec positions and optical finding charts. Redshift determinations will be made for most bursts. In addition to the primary GRB science, the mission will perform a hard X-ray survey to a sensitivity of approx. 1 mCrab (approx. 2 x l0(exp -11) erg/sq cm s in the 15-150 keV band), more than an order of magnitude better than HEAO A-4. A flexible data and operations system will allow rapid follow-up observations of all types of high-energy transients. with rapid data downlink and uplink available through the NASA TDRSS system. Swift transient data will be rapidly distributed to the astronomical community and all interested observers are encouraged to participate in follow-up measurements. A Guest Investigator program for the mission will provide funding for community involvement. Innovations from the Swift program applicable to the future include: 1) a large-area gamma-ray detector us- ing the new CdZnTe detectors; 2) an autonomous rapid slewing spacecraft; 3) a multiwavelength payload combining optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray instruments; 4) an observing program coordinated with other ground-based and space-based observatories; and 5) immediate multiwavelength data flow to the community. The mission is currently funded for 2 years of operations and the spacecraft will have a lifetime to orbital decay of approx. 8 years.

Gehrels, N.; Chincarini, G.; Giommi, P.; Mason, K. O.; Nousek, J. A.; Wells, A. A.; White, N. E.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Cominsky, L. R.

2004-01-01

325

Very high energy gamma ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent results in ground based very high energy gamma ray astronomy are reviewed. The various modes of the atmospheric Cerenkov technique are described, and the importance of cosmic ray rejection methods is stressed. The positive detections of the Crab pulsar that suggest a very flat spectrum and time-variable pulse phase are discussed. Observations of other pulsars (particularly Vela) suggest these features may be general. Evidence that a 4.8 hr modulated effect was detected from Cyg X-3 is strengthened in that the exact period originally proposed agrees well with a recent determination of the X-ray period. The southern sky observations are reviewed, and the significance of the detection of an active galaxy (NGC 5128) is considered for source models and future observations.

Grindlay, J. E.

1976-01-01

326

Neutrino oscillations and gamma-ray bursts  

E-print Network

If the ordinary neutrinos oscillate into a sterile flavor in a manner consistent with the Super-Kamiokande data on the zenith-angle dependence of atmospheric mu-neutrino flux, an energy sufficient to power a typical cosmic gamma-ray burst (GRB) (about 10^{52} erg) can be carried by sterile neutrinos away from the source and deposited in a region relatively free of baryons. Hence, ultra-relativistic bulk motion (required by the theory of and observations of GRBs and their afterglows) can easily be achieved in the vicinity of plausible sources of GRBs. Oscillations between sterile and ordinary neutrinos would thus provide a solution to the ``baryon-loading problem'' in the theory of GRBs.

W. Kluzniak

1998-07-22

327

Fireballs and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

The sudden release of copious $\\g$-ray photons into a compact region creates an opaque photon--lepton fireball due to the prolific production of electron--positron pairs. The photons that we observe in the bursts emerge only at the end of the fireball phase after it expanded sufficiently to become optically thin or after it converted its energy to the kinetic energy of relativistic baryons which convert it, in turn, to electromagnetic pulse via the interaction with interstellar matter. It is essential, therefore, to analyze the evolution of a fireball in order to comprehend the observed features of $\\gamma$-ray bursts. We discuss various aspects of fireball hydrodynamics and the resulting emitted spectra.

Tsvi Piran

1994-01-17

328

Lorentz invariance violation with gamma rays  

E-print Network

The assumption of Lorentz invariance is one of the founding principles of Modern Physics and violation of it would have profound implications to our understanding of the universe. For instance, certain theories attempting a unified theory of quantum gravity predict there could be an effective refractive index of the vacuum; the introduction of an energy dependent dispersion to photons could in turn lead to an observable Lorentz invariance violation signature. Whilst a very small effect on local scales the effect will be cumulative, and so for very high energy particles that travel very large distances the difference in arrival times could become sufficiently large to be detectable. This proceedings will look at testing for such Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) signatures in the astronomical lightcurves of gamma-ray emitting objects, with particular notice being given to the prospects for LIV testing with, the next generation observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

Daniel, Michael

2015-01-01

329

Gamma Ray Lines from the Orion Complex  

E-print Network

We show that the 4.44 and 6.13 MeV line emission observed with COMPTEL from Orion is consistent with gamma ray spectra consisting of a mixture of narrow and broad lines or spectra containing only broad lines. We employed several accelerated particle compositions and showed that the current COMPTEL data in the 3--7 MeV region alone cannot distinguish between the various possibilities. However, the COMPTEL upper limits in the 1--3 MeV band favor a composition similar to that of the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars of spectral type WC. The power dissipated by the accelerated particles at Orion is about 4 $\\times$ 10$^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. These particles are not expected to produce significant amounts of $^{26}$Al.

Reuven Ramaty; Benzion Kozlovsky; Richard E. Lingenfelter

1994-11-10

330

The High Altitude Gamma Ray Observatory, HAWC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Volcano Sierra Negra in Puebla, Mexico was selected to host HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov), a unique obervatory of wide field of view (2? sr) capable of observing the sky continously at energies from 0.5 TeV to 100 TeV. HAWC is an array of 300 large water tanks (7.3 m diameter × 5 m depth) at an altitude of 4100 m. a. s. l. Each tank is instrumented with three upward-looking photomultipliers tubes. The full array will be capable of observing the most energetic gamma rays from the most violent events in the universe. HAWC will be 15 times more sensitive than its predecesor, Milagro. We present HAWC, the scientific case and capabilities.

González, M. M.

2011-10-01

331

Lambda Hypernuclei via gamma-Ray Spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High precision gamma-ray spectroscopy of Lambda hypernuclei with a germanium detector array, Hyperball, has revealed fine structure of various p-shell Lambda hypernuclei. From accumulated data the strengths of all the spin-dependent components in the LambdaN interaction have been extracted, which play essential roles to improve baryon-baryon interaction models. The hypernuclear shrinking effect was confirmed from measurement of a B(E2) value in (7_Lambda) Li. In the J-PARC facility, intense kaon beams and a new generation Ge detector array will allow us to investigate baryon properties in nuclei and impurity effects, as well as to further study the hyperon-nucleon interactions.

Tamura, H.

332

The Supernova Gamma-Ray Burst Connection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations show that at least some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) happen simultaneously with core-collapse supernovae (SNe), thus linking by a common thread nature's two grandest explosions. We review here the growing evidence for and theoretical implications of this association, and conclude that most long-duration soft-spectrum GRBs are accompanied by massive stellar explosions (GRB-SNe). The kinetic energy and luminosity of well-studied GRB-SNe appear to be greater than those of ordinary SNe, but evidence exists, even in a limited sample, for considerable diversity. The existing sample also suggests that most of the energy in the explosion is contained in nonrelativistic ejecta (producing the supernova) rather than in the relativistic jets responsible for making the burst and its afterglow. Neither all SNe, nor even all SNe of Type Ibc produce GRBs. The degree of differential rotation in the collapsing iron core of massive stars when they die may be what makes the difference.

Woosley, S. E.; Bloom, J. S.

2006-09-01

333

The HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

HAWC, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov gamma-ray observatory, will be a prime instrument for surveying and monitoring the 100 GeV - 100 TeV sky during the next decade. HAWC is conceived as a 150m x 150m water Cherenkov detector divided in 900 optically isolated cells. Its optimized design and 4100m location will allow it to survey two thirds of the sky in the TeV range down to 40 mCrab, with emphasis on extended sources. HAWC will permanently monitor 2sr above its zenith with capability to detect a 5 Crab flare from GRBs and blazars within 10 minutes. HAWC, a major scientific collaboration between Mexico and United Statues, will begin construction in 2008 at its 19º latitude Sierra Negra site, in Central Mexico.

Carraminana, Alberto; Dingus, B.; Goodman, J.; Gonzalez, M.; HAWC Collaboration

2008-03-01

334

The Chase to Capture Gamma Ray Bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in the universe, thought to be the birth cries of black holes. It has taken 40 years of international cooperation and competition to begin to unravel the mystery of their origin. The most recent chapter in this field is being written by the SWIFT mission, a fast-response satellite with 3 power telescopes. An international team from countries all over the world participates in the chase to capture the fading light of bursts detected by SWIFT. This talk will discuss the challenges and excitement of building this space observatory. New results will be presented on our growing understanding of exploding stars and fiery mergers of orbiting stars.

Gehrels, Neil

2008-01-01

335

Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with SWIFT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. There has been tremendous recent progress in our understanding of bursts with the new data from the SWIFT mission. SWIFT was launched in November 2004 and is an international multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Findings from the mission will be presented with emphasis on the relativistic outflows from GRBs. A huge step forward has been made in our understanding of the mysterious short GRBs. High redshift bursts have been detected from enormous explosions early in the universe. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow, challenging predictions of the fireball model. These, and other topics, will be discussed.

Gehrels, Neil

2007-01-01

336

LONG GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM COLLAPSARS  

SciTech Connect

In the collapsar model for common gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the formation of a centrifugally supported disk occurs during the first {approx}10 s following the collapse of the iron core in a massive star. This only occurs in a small fraction of massive stellar deaths, however, and requires unusual conditions. A much more frequent occurrence could be the death of a star that makes a black hole and a weak or absent outgoing shock, but in a progenitor that only has enough angular momentum in its outermost layers to make a disk. We consider several cases where this is likely to occur-blue supergiants with low mass-loss rates, tidally interacting binaries involving either helium stars or giant stars, and the collapse to a black hole of very massive pair-instability supernovae. These events have in common the accretion of a solar mass or so of material through a disk over a period much longer than the duration of a common GRB. A broad range of powers is possible, 10{sup 47}-10{sup 50} erg s{sup -1}, and this brightness could be enhanced by beaming. Such events were probably more frequent in the early universe where mass-loss rates were lower. Indeed, this could be one of the most common forms of gamma-ray transients in the universe and could be used to study first generation stars. Several events could be active in the sky at any one time. Recent examples of this sort of event may have been the Swift transients Sw-1644+57, Sw-2058+0516, and GRB 101225A.

Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Heger, Alexander, E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: alex@physics.umn.edu [Minnesota Institute of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2012-06-10

337

AGILE and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect

AGILE is a Scientific Mission dedicated to high-energy astrophysics supported by ASI with scientific participation of INAF and INFN. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV. The broadband detection of GRBs and the study of implications for particle acceleration and high energy emission are primary goals of th emission. AGILE can image GRBs with 2-3 arcminutes error boxes in the hard X-ray range, and provide broadband photon-by photon detection in the 15-45 keV, 03-50 MeV, and 30 MeV-30 GeV energy ranges. Microsecond on-board photon tagging and a {approx} 100 microsecond gamma-ray detection deadtime will be crucial for fast GRB timing. On-board calculated GRB coordinates and energy fluxes will be quickly transmitted to the ground by an ORBCOMM transceiver. AGILE have recently (December 2005) completed its gamma-ray calibration. It is now (January 2006) undergoing satellite integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in early 2006. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2006. It will be the only mission entirely dedicated to high-energy astrophysics above 30 MeV during the period mid-2006/mid-2007.

Longo, Francesco [Department of Physics, University of Trieste (Italy); INFN, section of Trieste (Italy); Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M. (and others)

2006-05-19

338

MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS PROBED BY GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION  

SciTech Connect

We report polarization measurements in two prompt emissions of gamma-ray bursts, GRB 110301A and GRB 110721A, observed with the gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP) on borad the IKAROS solar sail mission. We detected linear polarization signals from each burst with polarization degree of {Pi} = 70 {+-} 22% with statistical significance of 3.7{sigma} for GRB 110301A, and {Pi} = 84{sup +16}{sub -28}% with 3.3{sigma} confidence level for GRB 110721A. We did not detect any significant change of polarization angle. These two events had shorter durations and dimmer brightness compared with GRB 100826A, which showed a significant change of polarization angle, as reported in Yonetoku et al. Synchrotron emission model can be consistent with the data of the three GRBs, while the photospheric quasi-thermal emission model is not favored. We suggest that magnetic field structures in the emission region are globally ordered fields advected from the central engine.

Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Morihara, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Takuya; Wakashima, Yudai; Yonemochi, Hajime; Sakashita, Tomonori; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Kodama, Yoshiki [College of Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Gunji, Shuichi; Toukairin, Noriyuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12, Koshirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Mihara, Tatehiro [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Toma, Kenji, E-mail: yonetoku@astro.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2012-10-10

339

Observation of gamma-ray bursts with the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gamma-ray spectrometer on SMM is sensitive to bursts within its field of view with intensities greater than 0.000005 erg/sq cm above 100 keV. It has detected 17 events between February 1980 and March 1981 with the characteristics of cosmic gamma-ray bursts. The most intense burst, on 19 April 1980, had a photon spectrum consistent with a power law with spectral index - 2.5 from 300 keV to approximately 7 MeV. It is not possible at present to exclude the sun as the source of this burst. Spectra of 11 of the bursts have been studied for line features with no clear evidence for line emission greater than 300 keV. The continuum radiation from about half of these events have hard emission extending to approximately equal to or greater than 2 MeV.

Share, G. H.; Strickman, M. S.; Kinzer, R. L.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Ryan, J. M.; Rieger, E.; Reppin, C.; Kanbach, G.

1982-01-01

340

Gamma-Ray Bursts as seen by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi mission is revealing the rich spectral and temporal gamma-ray burst phenomena in the >100 MeV band. The synergy with Fermi's GBM detectors links these observations to those in the well-explored 10-1000 keV range; the addition of the >100 MeV band observations brings new hint and new information about burst emission in both the prompt and afterglow phases. In this contribution we describe the prospects for the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) in observing Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), and some preliminary results. Here we focus our attention on the importance of multi frequencies approach to GRB science during the just began Fermi era.

Omodei, Nicola [INFN Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo, 3 56100 Pisa (Italy)

2009-04-08

341

Gamma ray irradiation for sludge solubilization and biological nitrogen removal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was conducted to investigate the effects of gamma ray irradiation on the solubilization of waste sewage sludge. The recovery of an organic carbon source from sewage sludge by gamma ray irradiation was also studied. The gamma ray irradiation showed effective sludge solubilization efficiencies. Both soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5) increased by gamma ray irradiation. The feasibility of the solubilized sludge carbon source for a biological nitrogen removal was also investigated. A modified continuous bioreactor (MLE process) for a denitrification was operated for 20 days by using synthetic wastewater. It can be concluded that the gamma ray irradiation was useful for the solubilization of sludge and the recovery of carbon source from the waste sewage sludge for biological nitrogen removal.

Kim, Tak-Hyun; Lee, Myunjoo; Park, Chulhwan

2011-12-01

342

A Plasma Instability Theory of Gamma-Ray Burst Emission  

E-print Network

A new theory for gamma-ray burst radiation is presented. In this theory, magnetic fields and relativistic electrons are created through plasma processes arising as a relativistic shell passes through the interstellar medium. The gamma-rays are produced through synchrotron self-Compton emission. It is found that shocks do not arise in this theory, and that efficient gamma-ray emission only occurs for a high Lorentz factor and a high-density interstellar medium. The former explains the absence of gamma-ray bursts with thermal spectra. The latter provides the Compton attenuation theory with an explanation of why the interstellar medium density is always high. The theory predicts the existence of a class of extragalactic optical transient that emit no gamma-rays.

J. J. Brainerd

1999-04-02

343

Evaluation of Potash Grade with Gamma-ray Logs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Potassium is an emitter of gamma-ray radiation, consequently deposits of potash can be detected and evaluated using gamma-ray logs. A method originally designed to evaluate uranium deposits in boreholes can also be applied to potash deposits. The method equates the depth-integral of a gamma-ray log to the grade-thickness product of a potash-bearing bed or series of beds. The average grade of a bed is then determined by dividing by the overall bed thickness, which can also be obtained from the gamma-ray log. The method was tested using gamma-ray logs and potash assays from boreholes near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

Nelson, Philip H.

2007-01-01

344

The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.  

PubMed

The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general. PMID:23630379

Hjorth, Jens

2013-06-13

345

Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

2013-01-01

346

Association between Local External Gamma Rays and Frequency of Cancer in Babol-Iran  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The effect of natural background radiation on Cancer is still challenging. The investigation of association between external gamma rays and Cancer was the main goal of study. Materials & Methods: External Gamma rays were measured using a radiation survey meter in 184 urban and rural health centers to estimate the exposure to the population in residential areas of Babol. The dose distribution map was compared to the 5 years radiation induced cancer incidence data from cancer registry center in north part of Iran. Results: Results showed that although the external gamma ray level in Babol is nearly equal to the average natural background radiation in the world, there is a relatively weak inverse association between local external gamma ray and incidence of Cancer [Correlation coefficient = ?0.43, (p<0.01)]. Conclusion: This finding might be due to the inhibition of cancer induction following exposure to the low doses of ionizing radiation and probably can be a confirmation of radiation hormesis. However, due to some uncertainties, the conclusion should be interpreted with caution. Further national and international studies are suggested. PMID:20877491

Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Hajian, Karimollah; Hosseini, Reza; Nasir, Akbar

2010-01-01

347

Energy- and time-resolved detection of prompt gamma-rays for proton range verification.  

PubMed

In this work, we present experimental results of a novel prompt gamma-ray detector for proton beam range verification. The detection system features an actively shielded cerium-doped lanthanum(III) bromide scintillator, coupled to a digital data acquisition system. The acquisition was synchronized to the cyclotron radio frequency to separate the prompt gamma-ray signals from the later-arriving neutron-induced background. We designed the detector to provide a high energy resolution and an effective reduction of background events, enabling discrete proton-induced prompt gamma lines to be resolved. Measuring discrete prompt gamma lines has several benefits for range verification. As the discrete energies correspond to specific nuclear transitions, the magnitudes of the different gamma lines have unique correlations with the proton energy and can be directly related to nuclear reaction cross sections. The quantification of discrete gamma lines also enables elemental analysis of tissue in the beam path, providing a better prediction of prompt gamma-ray yields. We present the results of experiments in which a water phantom was irradiated with proton pencil-beams in a clinical proton therapy gantry. A slit collimator was used to collimate the prompt gamma-rays, and measurements were performed at 27 positions along the path of proton beams with ranges of 9, 16 and 23 g cm(-2) in water. The magnitudes of discrete gamma lines at 4.44, 5.2 and 6.13 MeV were quantified. The prompt gamma lines were found to be clearly resolved in dimensions of energy and time, and had a reproducible correlation with the proton depth-dose curve. We conclude that the measurement of discrete prompt gamma-rays for in vivo range verification of clinical proton beams is feasible, and plan to further study methods and detector designs for clinical use. PMID:24077338

Verburg, Joost M; Riley, Kent; Bortfeld, Thomas; Seco, Joao

2013-10-21

348

Energy- and time-resolved detection of prompt gamma-rays for proton range verification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we present experimental results of a novel prompt gamma-ray detector for proton beam range verification. The detection system features an actively shielded cerium-doped lanthanum(III) bromide scintillator, coupled to a digital data acquisition system. The acquisition was synchronized to the cyclotron radio frequency to separate the prompt gamma-ray signals from the later-arriving neutron-induced background. We designed the detector to provide a high energy resolution and an effective reduction of background events, enabling discrete proton-induced prompt gamma lines to be resolved. Measuring discrete prompt gamma lines has several benefits for range verification. As the discrete energies correspond to specific nuclear transitions, the magnitudes of the different gamma lines have unique correlations with the proton energy and can be directly related to nuclear reaction cross sections. The quantification of discrete gamma lines also enables elemental analysis of tissue in the beam path, providing a better prediction of prompt gamma-ray yields. We present the results of experiments in which a water phantom was irradiated with proton pencil-beams in a clinical proton therapy gantry. A slit collimator was used to collimate the prompt gamma-rays, and measurements were performed at 27 positions along the path of proton beams with ranges of 9, 16 and 23 g?cm-2 in water. The magnitudes of discrete gamma lines at 4.44, 5.2 and 6.13 MeV were quantified. The prompt gamma lines were found to be clearly resolved in dimensions of energy and time, and had a reproducible correlation with the proton depth-dose curve. We conclude that the measurement of discrete prompt gamma-rays for in vivo range verification of clinical proton beams is feasible, and plan to further study methods and detector designs for clinical use.

Verburg, Joost M.; Riley, Kent; Bortfeld, Thomas; Seco, Joao

2013-10-01

349

WIDE RADIO BEAMS FROM {gamma}-RAY PULSARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the radio and {gamma}-ray beaming properties of normal and millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by selecting two samples from the known populations. The first, Sample G, contains pulsars which are detectable in blind searches of {gamma}-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The second, Sample R, contains pulsars detectable in blind radio searches which have spin-down luminosities E>10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1}. We analyze the fraction of the {gamma}-ray-selected Sample G which have detectable radio pulses and the fraction of the radio-selected Sample R which have detectable {gamma}-ray pulses. Twenty of our 35 Sample G pulsars have already observed radio pulses. This rules out low-altitude polar-cap beaming models if, as is currently believed, {gamma}-ray beams are generated in the outer magnetosphere and are very wide. We further find that, for the highest-E pulsars, the radio and {gamma}-ray beams have comparable beaming factors, i.e., the beams cover similar regions of the sky as the star rotates. For lower-E {gamma}-ray emitting pulsars, the radio beams have about half of the {gamma}-ray sky coverage. These results suggest that, for high-E young and MSPs, the radio emission originates in wide beams from regions high in the pulsar magnetosphere, probably close to the null-charge surface and to the {gamma}-ray emitting regions. Furthermore, it suggests that for these high-E pulsars, as in the {gamma}-ray case, features in the radio profile represent caustics in the emission beam pattern.

Ravi, V.; Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2010-06-10

350

Constraints on Very High Energy gamma-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view and high duty cycle, monitoring the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Milagro is, thus, uniquely capable of searching for very high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during the prompt emission phase. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Twenty-five satellite-triggered GRBs occurred within the field of view of Milagro between January 2000 and December 2001. We have searched for counterparts to these GRBs and found no significant emission from any of the burst positions. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light, detections are only expected to be possible for redshifts less than ~0.5. Three of the GRBs studied have measured redshifts. GRB 010921 has a redshift low enough (0.45) to allow an upper limit on the fluence to place an observational constraint on potential GRB models.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; D. G. Coyne; T. DeYoung; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; L. A. Kelley; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; D. A. Williams; M. E. Wilson; X. W. Xu; G. B. Yodh

2005-03-11

351

High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

2011-11-29

352

Characteristics of the Telescope for High Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy Selected for Definition Studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high energy gamma-ray selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Johansson, A.; Rolfe, J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

1979-01-01

353

Analysis of Data from the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The final report consists of summaries of work proposed, work accomplished, papers and presentations published and continuing work regarding the cooperative agreement. The work under the agreement is based on high energy gamma ray source data analysis collected from the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET).

Kniffen, Donald A.; Elliott, William W.

1999-01-01

354

RELATIVISTIC SHOCK BREAKOUTS-A VARIETY OF GAMMA-RAY FLARES: FROM LOW-LUMINOSITY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect

The light from a shock breakout of stellar explosions, which carries a wealth of information, strongly depends on the shock velocity at the time of the breakout. The emission from Newtonian breakouts, typical in regular core-collapse supernovae (SNe), has been explored extensively. However, a large variety of explosions result in mildly or ultrarelativistic breakouts, where the observed signature is unknown. Here we calculate the luminosity and spectrum produced by relativistic breakouts. In order to do so, we improve the analytic description of relativistic radiation-mediated shocks and follow the system from the breakout itself, through the planar phase and into the spherical phase. We limit our calculation to cases where the post-breakout acceleration of the gas ends during the planar phase (i.e., the final gas Lorentz factor {approx}< 30). We find that spherical relativistic breakouts produce a flash of gamma rays with energy, E{sub bo}, temperature, T{sub bo}, and duration, t{sup obs} b{sub o}, that provide the breakout radius ( Almost-Equal-To 5 R{sub Sun }(t{sup obs}{sub bo}/10 s)(T{sub bo}/50 keV){sup 2}) and the Lorentz factor ( Almost-Equal-To T{sub bo}/50 keV). They also always satisfy a relativistic breakout relation (t{sup obs}{sub bo}/20 s) {approx} (E{sub bo}/10{sup 46} erg){sup 1/2}(T{sub bo}/50 keV){sup -2.68}. The breakout flare is typically followed, on longer timescales, by X-rays that carry a comparable energy. We apply our model to a variety of explosions, including Type Ia and .Ia SNe, accretion-induced collapse, energetic SNe, and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We find that all these events produce detectable gamma-ray signals, some of which may have already been seen. Some particular examples are: (1) relativistic shock breakouts provide a natural explanation to the energy, temperature, and timescales of low-luminosity GRBs. Indeed, all observed low-luminosity GRBs satisfy the relativistic breakout relation. (2) Nearby broad-line Type Ib/c (like SN 2002ap) may produce a detectable {gamma}-ray signal. (3) Galactic Type Ia SNe may produce detectable {gamma}-ray flares. We conclude that relativistic shock breakouts provide a generic process for the production of gamma-ray flares.

Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sari, Re'em [Racah Institute for Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2012-03-10

355

Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

Carraminana, Alberto [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

2013-06-12

356

Rejoining of double strand breaks in normal human and ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts after exposure to 60Co gamma-rays, 241Am alpha-particles or bleomycin.  

PubMed

The rejoining of DNA double strand breaks (dsb) induced by 60Co gamma-rays, 241Am alpha-particles or bleomycin was measured by neutral filter elution. In agreement with their colony-forming ability, ataxia-telangiectasia cells (AT2BE) and normal fibroblasts exhibited similar dsb rejoining capacity following alpha-irradiation, but showed marked differences in the rejoining kinetics of dsb induced by gamma-rays or bleomycin. PMID:2435666

Coquerelle, T M; Weibezahn, K F; Lücke-Huhle, C

1987-02-01

357

Pair Production and Gamma-Ray Emission in the Outer Magnetospheres of Rapidly Spinning Young Pulsars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electron-positron pair production and acceleration in the outer magnetosphere may be crucial for a young rapidly spinning canonical pulsar to be a strong Gamma-ray emitter. Collision between curvature radiated GeV photons and soft X-ray photons seems to be the only efficient pair production mechanism. For Crib-like pulsars, the magnetic field near the light cylinder is so strong, such that the synchrotron radiation of secondary pairs will be in the needed X-ray range. However, for majority of the known Gamma-ray pulsars, surface emitted X-rays seem to work as the matches and fuels for a gamma-ray generation fireball in the outer magnetosphere. The needed X-rays could come from thermal emission of a cooling neutron star or could be the heat generated by bombardment of the polar cap by energetic particles generated in the outer magnetosphere. With detection of more Gamma-ray pulsars, it is becoming evident that the neutron star's intrisic geometry (the inclination angle between the rotation and magnetic axes) and observational geometry (the viewing angle with respect to the rotation axis) are crucial to the understanding of varieties of observational properties exhibited by these pulsars. Inclination angles for many known high energy Gamma-ray pulsars appear to be large and the distribution seems to be consistent with random orientation. However, all of them except Geminga are pre-selected from known radio pulsars. The viewing angles are thus limited to be around the respective inclination angles for beamed radio emission, which may induce strong selection effect. The viewing angles as well as the inclination angles of PSR 1509-58 and PSB 0656+14 may be small such that most of the high energy Gamma-rays produced in the outer accelerators may not reach the observer's direction. The observed Gamma-rays below 5 MeV from this pulsar may be synchrotron radiation of secondary electron-positron pairs produced outside the accelerating regions.

Ruderman, Malvin; Chen, Kaiyou

1997-01-01

358

Gamma-Ray Observatory - The next great observatory in space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) which is part of NASA's Great Observatories space program is presented. The GRO is equipped with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (which detects low-energy gamma-ray photons from 20 keV to 600 keV and locates sources of gamma-ray bursts), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (which detects celestial gamma rays from 100 keV to 10 MeV and identifies the elements producing these rays by measuring the ray's spectra and time variability), the Imaging Compton Telescope (which images gamma rays with energies from 1 to 30 MeV created when cosmic rays interact with interstellar matter), and the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (which detects high-energy photons associated with the most energetic processes occurring in nature). After the energies of photons from each source are classified, the gamma-ray mechanisms can be modelled. Nuclei, radioactive isotopes, and nuclear reactions can be identified, and the physical conditions at the radiation's source can also be modelled. From these models, theories can be developed about the creation of elements in the explosion and collapse of giant stars, the acceleration of charged particles to velocities approaching the speed of light, and the destruction of matter and antimatter.

Neal, Valerie; Fishman, Gerald; Kniffen, Donald

1990-01-01

359

Gamma-ray Astronomy: Implications for Fundamental Physics  

E-print Network

Gamma-ray Astronomy studies cosmic accelerators through their electromagnetic radiation in the energy range between ~100 MeV and ~100 TeV. The present most sensitive observations in this energy band are performed, from space, by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi satellite and, from Earth, by the Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes MAGIC, H.E.S.S. and VERITAS. These instruments have revolutionized the field of Gamma-ray Astronomy, discovering different populations of gamma-ray emitters and studying in detail the non-thermal astrophysical processes producing this high-energy radiation. The scientific objectives of these observatories include also questions of fundamental physics. With gamma-ray instruments we study the origin of Galactic cosmic rays, testing the hypothesis or whether they are mainly produced in supernova explosions. Also, we obtain the most sensitive measurement of the cosmic electron-positron spectrum between 20 GeV and 5 TeV. By observing the gamma-ray emission from sources at cosmological distances, we learn about the intensity and evolution of the extragalactic background light, and perform tests of Lorentz Invariance. Moreover, we can search for dark matter by looking for gamma-ray signals produced by its annihilation or decay in over-density sites. In this paper, we review the most recent results produced with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments in these fields of research.

Javier Rico

2011-11-28

360

Studies of Cosmic Rays with GeV Gamma Rays  

E-print Network

We describe the role of GeV gamma-ray observations with GLAST-LAT (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope - Large Area Telescope) in identifying interaction sites of cosmic-ray proton (or hadrons) with interstellar medium (ISM). We expect to detect gamma rays from neutral pion decays in high-density ISM regions in the Galaxy, Large Magellanic Cloud, and other satellite galaxies. These gamma-ray sources have been detected already with EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) as extended sources (eg. LMC and Orion clouds) and GLAST-LAT will detect many more with a higher spatial resolution and in a wider spectral range. We have developed a novel image restoration technique based on the Richardson-Lucy algorithm optimized for GLAST-LAT observation of extended sources. Our algorithm calculates PSF (point spread function) for each event. This step is very important for GLAST-LAT and EGRET image analysis since PSF varies more than one order of magnitude from one gamma ray to another depending on its energy as well as its impact point and angle in the instrument. The GLAST-LAT and EGRET image analysis has to cope with Poisson fluctuation due to low number of detected photons for most sources. Our technique incorporates wavelet filtering to minimize effects due to the fluctuation. Preliminary studies on some EGRET sources are presented, which shows potential of this novel image restoration technique for the identification and characterisation of extended gamma-ray sources.

Hiroyasu Tajima; Tuneyoshi Kamae; Stefano Finazzi; Johann Cohen-Tanugi; James Chiang

2007-05-10

361

Design Study for Direction Variable Compton Scattering Gamma Ray  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A monochromatic gamma ray beam is attractive for isotope-specific material/medical imaging or non-destructive inspection. A laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma ray source which is based on the backward Compton scattering of laser light on high-energy electrons can generate energy variable quasi-monochromatic gamma ray. Due to the principle of the LCS gamma ray, the direction of the gamma beam is limited to the direction of the high-energy electrons. Then the target object is placed on the beam axis, and is usually moved if spatial scanning is required. In this work, we proposed an electron beam transport system consisting of four bending magnets which can stick the collision point and control the electron beam direction, and a laser system consisting of a spheroidal mirror and a parabolic mirror which can also stick the collision point. Then the collision point can be placed on one focus of the spheroid. Thus gamma ray direction and collision angle between the electron beam and the laser beam can be easily controlled. As the results, travelling direction of the LCS gamma ray can be controlled under the limitation of the beam transport system, energy of the gamma ray can be controlled by controlling incident angle of the colliding beams, and energy spread can be controlled by changing the divergence of the laser beam.

Kii, T.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Choi, Y. W.; Kinjo, R.; Yoshida, K.; Konstantin, T.; Kimura, N.; Ishida, K.; Imon, H.; Shibata, M.; Shimahashi, K.; Komai, T.; Okumura, K.; Zen, H.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Ohgaki, H.

2013-03-01

362

GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

McEnery, Julie

2008-01-01

363

X-ray and gamma ray astronomy detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

X-ray and gamma ray astronomy was made possible by the advent of space flight. Discovery and early observations of celestial x-rays and gamma rays, dating back almost 40 years, were first done with high altitude rockets, followed by Earth-orbiting satellites> once it became possible to carry detectors above the Earth's atmosphere, a new view of the universe in the high-energy part of the electromagnetic spectrum evolved. Many of the detector concepts used for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy were derived from radiation measuring instruments used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other fields. However, these instruments, when used in x-ray and gamma ray astronomy, have to meet unique and demanding requirements related to their operation in space and the need to detect and measure extremely weak radiation fluxes from celestial x-ray and gamma ray sources. Their design for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy has, therefore, become a rather specialized and rapidly advancing field in which improved sensitivity, higher energy and spatial resolution, wider spectral coverage, and enhanced imaging capabilities are all sought. This text is intended as an introduction to x-ray and gamma ray astronomy instruments. It provides an overview of detector design and technology and is aimed at scientists, engineers, and technical personnel and managers associated with this field. The discussion is limited to basic principles and design concepts and provides examples of applications in past, present, and future space flight missions.

Decher, Rudolf; Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert

1994-01-01

364

Gamma-Ray Bursts from Decompressing Neutron Star Material()  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore the possibility that decompressing neutron star material may be a source for the isotropic gamma-ray bursts observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Such material might be ejected during the collision or tidal disruption of a neutron star in a binary sytem or as a result of neutron star seismic activity. Without gravitational confinement, this extremely neutron-rich material will decompress and heat up through a series of fissions, beta (-) decays, and photodissociations. It will then recombine in an r-process like environment. As the density drops and the material becomes optically thin, short-lived nuclei decay back to stability emitting a burst of gamma rays on a time scale of msec to sec. The resulting gamma-ray spectrum will be directly observable if the burst luminosity is low enough that a pair-dominated photosphere which would reprocess the gamma-ray spectrum is not formed. We report on efforts to model the resulting gamma-ray spectrum, which requires estimates of beta (-) decay, gamma emission, beta -delayed neutron emission, and photodissociation rates for many neutron rich nuclei. This work will eventually be coupled to hydrodynamic and radiation transport codes, in an effort to explain some of the observed gamma-ray bursts. () Work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 and DOE Nuclear Theory Grant SF-ENG-48.

Mathews, G. J.; Aufderheide, M. B.; Ressell, M. T.; Rogers, R. D.; Meyer, B. S.; Schramm, D. N.

1992-12-01

365

High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Blazars: EGRET Observations  

E-print Network

We will present a summary of the observations of blazars by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). EGRET has detected high energy gamma-ray emission at energies greater than 100 MeV from more that 50 blazars. These sources show inferred isotropic luminosities as large as $3\\times 10^{49}$ ergs s$^{-1}$. One of the most remarkable characteristics of the EGRET observations is that the gamma-ray luminosity often dominates the bolometric power of the blazar. A few of the blazars are seen to exhibit variability on very short time-scales of one day or less. The combination of high luminosities and time variations seen in the gamma-ray data indicate that gamma-rays are an important component of the relativistic jet thought to characterize blazars. Currently most models for blazars involve a beaming scenario. In leptonic models, where electrons are the primary accelerated particles, gamma-ray emission is believed to be due to inverse Compton scattering of low energy photons, although opinions differ as to the source of the soft photons. Hardronic models involve secondary production or photomeson production followed by pair cascades, and predict associated neutrino production.

R. Mukherjee

1999-01-17

366

The Gamma-Ray Albedo of the Moon  

SciTech Connect

We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

Moskalenko, I.V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Porter, T.A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

2008-03-25

367

The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon  

E-print Network

We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalisation; this makes it a useful "standard candle" for gamma-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo gamma rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

Igor V. Moskalenko; Troy A. Porter

2007-08-21

368

The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon  

SciTech Connect

We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

2007-09-28

369

ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reaction history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be employed to help steer the National Ignition Facility (NIF) towards ignition. Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of nuclear interaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Gas Cherenkov Detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. In particular, bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics are being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases. The first phase consists of four channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at ~6 m from target chamber center (GRH-6m) coupled to ultra-fast photo-multiplier tubes (PMT). This system is intended to operate in the 1013-1017 neutron yield range expected during the early THD campaign. It will have high enough bandwidth to provide accurate bang times and burn widths for the expected THD reaction histories (> 80 ps fwhm). Successful operation of the first GRH-6m channel has been demonstrated at OMEGA, allowing a verification of instrument sensitivity, timing and EMI/background suppression. The second phase will consist of several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from target chamber center (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs. This system is intended to operate in the 1016-1020 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign, providing higher temporal resolution for the expected burn widths of 10-20 ps associated with ignition. Multiple channels at each phase will allow for increased redundancy, reliability, accuracy and flexibility. In addition, inherent energy thresholding capability combined with this multiplicity will allow exploration of interesting gamma-ray physics well beyond the ignition campaign.

Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Batha, S.; Schmitt, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Malone, R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Cox, B. C.; Frogget, B.; Miller, E. K.; Ali, Z. A.; Tunnell, T. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.

2010-08-01

370

Gamma-Ray Bursts 2012 Conference  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is a pleasure to announce the next combined Fermi/Swift GRB conference covering recent advances in all aspects of gamma-ray burst observations and theory. This conference will be held in Munich, Germany, on 7-11 May 2012, and follows similar previous combined Fermi/Swift meetings in Huntsville (Oct. 2008) and Annapolis (Nov. 2010). Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe and are thought to be the birth signatures of black holes. This is an exciting time in the GRB field as various missions provide a wealth of new data on this still puzzling phenomenon. The Fermi misson provides unprecedented spectral coverage over 7 decades in energy, and among others discovered new spectral components which challenge our standard picture of the prompt emission. The Swift mission continuous to swiftly monitor and locate GRBs in multiple wavebands, providing the basis for all ground-based follow-up observations towards redshift measurements and afterglow and host property investigations. AGILE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Konus continue to provide crucial information on GRB properties, and the MAXI mission provides an all sky X-ray monitoring of transients. There is also growing capability for follow-up observations by ground-based telescopes at basically all wavelengths. Besides the classical optical/infrared/radio observations, searches are underway for TeV emission, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Moreover, new experiments are expected to have returned first data, among others POGO on the prompt polarization properties, UFFO on very early optical emission, or ALMA on sub-millimeter properties. And last but not least, the unexpected is bringing us child-like astonishments at least once per year with a "GRB-trigger" which turns out to be not related to GRBs. Complementing all these new observational results, a huge theoretical effort is underway to understand the GRB phenomenon and keep up with the constant new puzzles coming from the data. This conference will bring together astrophysicists, neutrino physicists and gravitational wave scientists to discuss the latest data and theories, to build synergistic collaborations between the fields and across wavelengths, and beyond better understanding the GRB phenomenon to develop GRBs as a powerful probe of a variety of fundamental questions in present-day research.

371

Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Dawn Mission will determine the surface composition of 4 Vesta and 1 Ceres, providing constraints on their formation and thermal evolution. The payload includes a Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND), which will map the surface elemental composition at regional spatial scales. Target elements include the constituents of silicate and oxide minerals, ices, and the products of volcanic exhalation and aqueous alteration. At Vesta, GRaND will map the mixing ratio of end-members of the howardite, diogenite, and eucrite (HED) meteorites, determine relative proportions of plagioclase and mafic minerals, and search for compositions not well sampled by the meteorite collection. The large south polar impact basin may provide an opportunity to determine the composition of Vesta’s mantle and lower crust. At Ceres, GRaND will provide chemical information needed to test different models of Ceres’ origin and thermal and aqueous evolution. GRaND is also sensitive to hydrogen layering and can determine the equivalent H2O/OH content of near-surface hydrous minerals as well as the depth and water abundance of an ice table, which may provide information about the state of water in the interior of Ceres. Here, we document the design and performance of GRaND with sufficient detail to interpret flight data archived in the Planetary Data System, including two new sensor designs: an array of CdZnTe semiconductors for gamma ray spectroscopy, and a loaded-plastic phosphor sandwich for neutron spectroscopy. An overview of operations and a description of data acquired from launch up to Vesta approach is provided, including annealing of the CdZnTe sensors to remove radiation damage accrued during cruise. The instrument is calibrated using data acquired on the ground and in flight during a close flyby of Mars. Results of Mars flyby show that GRaND has ample sensitivity to meet science objectives at Vesta and Ceres. Strategies for data analysis are described and prospective results for Vesta are presented for different operational scenarios and compositional models.

Prettyman, Thomas H.; Feldman, William C.; McSween, Harry Y.; Dingler, Robert D.; Enemark, Donald C.; Patrick, Douglas E.; Storms, Steven A.; Hendricks, John S.; Morgenthaler, Jeffery P.; Pitman, Karly M.; Reedy, Robert C.

2011-12-01

372

A directional low energy gamma-ray detector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The sensitivity of a directional gamma ray detector, which relies on blocking a source to determine its direction and energy spectrum, is calculated and compared to the more conventional well-shaped shielded detectors. It is shown that such an anticollimator detection system provides a basis for measuring the celestial diffuse gamma ray background, gamma ray sources and bursts with good energy, angular, and time resolution, and that additionally the system is 20 to 50 times as sensitive as conventional detectors when compared on a per unit mass basis.

Morfill, G.; Pieper, G. F.

1973-01-01

373

The LXeCAT instrument for gamma-ray astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Liquid Xenon Coded Aperture Telescope (LXeCAT) and its capability to image astrophysical gamma-ray sources in the MeV region is described. The gamma-ray detector is a Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber (LXeTPC) triggered by the primary scintillation light. Effective background rejection is a direct consequence of the intrinsic three-dimensional imaging capability of the LXeTPC. Initial results with a 10 liter prototype confirm an energy resolution of 6% FWHM, a position resolution of 1 mm RMS and a light triggering efficiency higher than 90% for 1 MeV gamma-rays.

Aprile, E.; Xu, F.; Zhou, M.; Doke, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Masuda, K.; Chupp, E. L.; Dunphy, P. P.; Fishman, G.; Pendelton, G.

1995-01-01

374

Al-26: A galactic source of gamma ray line emission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is shown that Al26 is a very good candidate for producing a detectable gamma-ray line, and that this line is not only intense but also very narrow. By examining the chart of nuclides for other radioactive isotopes which could produce hiterto unnoticed gamma-ray lines following nucleosynthesis, it is found that for mass numbers less than 60, the isotopes Na22, Al26, K40, Ar42, Ti44, Sc46, Mn54, Co56, Co57, Co58, Co60 and Fe60 are the only ones with sufficiently long half lives (70) days to produce gamma rays in optically thin regions.

Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

1976-01-01

375

Unresolved Blazar Component of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present new theoretical estimates of the relative contribution of unresolved blazars and star forming galaxies to the extragalactic gamma-ray background and discuss constraints on the contributions from other possible components. We find that the Fermi data do not rule out a scenario in which the extragalactic gamma-ray background is dominated by emission from unresolved blazars. The spectrum of unresolved FSRQs, when accounting for the energy dependent effects of source confusion, could be consistent with the combined spectrum of the low energy EGRET extragalactic gamma-ray background measurements and the Fermi-LAT measurements above 200 MeV.

Stecker, Floyd W.; Venters, T. M.

2011-01-01

376

Simulation of Gamma Rays from Proton Interaction in Local Galaxies  

SciTech Connect

The GLAST Large Area Telescope will provide unprecedented opportunities to detect cosmic GeV gamma rays, thanks to its large effective area, field of view and angular resolution compared with earlier telescopes. We present here the possibility of detecting GeV gamma rays produced by interactions of accelerated protons (or hadrons) with surrounding ambient material. Sources where such detection could be made include local galaxies, such as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), molecular clouds and other extended sources. We have calculated the expected gamma-ray spectrum for an isotropic distribution of protons in the LMC and simulated a one-year GLAST-LAT observation.

Karlsson, Niklas; /SLAC /Stockholm U.; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Tajima, Hiroyasu; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2007-06-06

377

Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-print Network

We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of ~ 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (~ 6 x 10^-10 erg/cm^2/s) is ~ 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (~ 60,000 s) is ~ 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy in...

Norris, Jay P; Scargle, Jeffrey D

2011-01-01

378

Search for Thunderstorm Associated Nuclear Gamma Rays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results from further analysis of thunderstorm data taken with a liquid nitrogen-cooled germanium spectrometer with energy range from 13 keV-2.6 MeV that was setup on South Baldy Peak at Langmuir Laboratory in New Mexico during June through August of 2005. The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the suggestion made by Greenfield et al. (2003) that delayed gamma ray emissions associated with thunderstorms may be attributed to Chlorine-39 and Chlorine-38. We improve upon results of Boggs et al. (2005) by doing a careful spectral calibration to improve sensitivity.Two methods to determine the presence of chlorine emission lines were used; we created storm length background-subtracted spectra, and also examined the change in count rates in energy bins that correspond to the Chlorine emission energies. Both these methods confirm the conclusions of Boggs et al. that chlorine emission was not detected and any signature of Chlorine production was below the detectability of the detector. These results lead to an upper limit on photon flux in chlorine line emission that can be used to place an upper limit on chlorine production during thunderstorms.

Lundberg, J. L.; Millan, R.; Boggs, S.; Eack, K.; Aulich, G.

2007-12-01

379

Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The origin of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission, bursts of ?-rays lasting from shorter than one second to thousands of seconds, remains not fully understood after more than 40 years of observations. The uncertainties lie in several open questions in the GRB physics, including jet composition, energy dissipation mechanism, particle acceleration mechanism and radiation mechanism. Recent broad-band observations of prompt emission with Fermi sharpen the debates in these areas, which stimulated intense theoretical investigations invoking very different ideas. I will review these debates, and argue that the current data suggest the following picture: A quasi-thermal spectral component originating from the photosphere of the relativistic ejecta has been detected in some GRBs. Even though in some cases (e.g. GRB 090902B) this component dominates the spectrum, in most GRBs, this component either forms a sub-dominant "shoulder" spectral component in the low energy spectral regime of the more dominant "Band" component, or is not detectable at all. The main "Band" spectral component likely originates from the optically thin region due to synchrotron radiation. The diverse magnetization in the GRB central engine is likely the origin of the observed diverse prompt emission properties among bursts.

Zhang, Bing

2014-12-01

380

Gamma-ray emission from pulsar binaries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pulsar winds, containing charged particles, waves and a net (phase-averaged) magnetic field, are thought to fuel the high-energy emission from several gamma-ray binaries. They terminate where the ram pressure matches that of the surroundings - which, in binaries, is provided by the wind of the companion. Before termination, pulsed emission can be produced by inverse Compton scattering of photons from the companion by particles in the waves. After termination, both the bulk kinetic energy of the particles and the Poynting flux in the waves are dissipated into an energetic particle population embedded in the surviving phase-averaged magnetic field. Pulsed emission is no longer possible, but a substantial flux of unpulsed high-energy photons can be produced. I will present results showing that the physical conditions at the termination shock can be divided into two regimes: a high density one, where current sheets in the wind are first compressed by an MHD shock and subsequently dissipate by reconnection, and a low density one, where the wind can first convert into an electromagnetic wave in the shock precursor, which then damps and merges into the wind nebula. The shocks surrounding isolated pulsars fall into the low-density category, but those around pulsars in binary systems, may transit from one regime to the other according to binary phase. The implications of the shock-structure dichotomy for these objects will be discussed.

Kirk, John; Mochol, Iwona

2013-03-01

381

The electromagnetic model of Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-print Network

I describe electromagnetic model of gamma ray bursts and contrast its main properties and predictions with hydrodynamic fireball model and its magnetohydrodynamical extension. The electromagnetic model assumes that rotational energy of a relativistic, stellar-mass central source (black-hole--accretion disk system or fast rotating neutron star) is converted into magnetic energy through unipolar dynamo mechanism, propagated to large distances in a form of relativistic, subsonic, Poynting flux-dominated wind and is dissipated directly into emitting particles through current-driven instabilities. Thus, there is no conversion back and forth between internal and bulk energies as in the case of fireball model. Collimating effects of magnetic hoop stresses lead to strongly non-spherical expansion and formation of jets. Long and short GRBs may develop in a qualitatively similar way, except that in case of long bursts ejecta expansion has a relatively short, non-relativistic, strongly dissipative stage inside the star. Electromagnetic and fireball models (as well as strongly and weakly magnetized fireballs) lead to different early afterglow dynamics, before deceleration time. Finally, I discuss the models in view of latest observational data in the Swift era.

Maxim Lyutikov

2005-12-13

382

Persistent Counterparts to Gamma-Ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent discovery of persistent gamma-ray burst (GRB) counterparts at lower frequencies permits several important conclusions to be drawn. The spectrum of GRB 970508 is not consistent with an external shock origin for both the prompt GRB and the persistent emission, suggesting that at least the prompt radiation is produced by internal shocks. Comparisons among three GRBs with counterparts (or upper limits on them) establishes that GRBs are not all scaled versions of similar events. The angular size inferred from the apparent observation of self-absorption in the radio spectrum of GRB 970508 a week later implies that its expansion had slowed to semirelativistic speeds. This permits a remarkably low upper bound to be placed on its residual energy, suggesting either that radiation has been more than 99.7% efficient or that the initial outflow was strongly collimated. Observations of self-absorbed radio emission from future GRBs may permit direct measurement of their expansion and determination of their parameters and energetics. We estimate initial Lorentz factors of ?0 ~ 100 for GRB 970228 and GRB 970508, and present a solution for the evolution of a blast wave with instantaneous cooling.

Katz, J. I.; Piran, T.

1997-12-01

383

Gamma-Ray Bursts - The Second Revolution  

E-print Network

Gamma-ray bursts GRBs are among the most mysterious astronomical phenomenon ever discovered. Unlike most astronomical discoveries which were explained within weeks or months after their initial discovery, GRBs remain a puzzle for more than thirty years. During the last decade our understanding of GRBs has undergone two major revolutions. First, BATSE discovered that GRBs are distributed isotropically over the sky and thereby demonstrated their cosmological origin. The second revolution tool place more recently when BeppoSAX discovered GRB afterglow. This confirmed the fireball model and led to a wealth of observational data, some of which has not been fully understood yet. The emerging picture is that GRBs are the most luminous objects and the most relativistic objects ever discovered: (i) GRBs involve relativistic motion at a velocity of 0.9999c or larger. (ii) Most current GRB models involve the formation of a black hole in one way or another. (iii) If binary neutron star mergers are the sources of GRBs then GRBs are also associated with gravitational radiation signals. Finally, (iv) as cosmological power-houses that are observed to high red-shift GRBs might be used to measure cosmological parameters and to teach us about the epoch of galaxy formation.

Tsvi Piran

1998-07-24

384

Evaluation of solarization resistant optical fibers under gamma-ray irradiation and temperature stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five types of large diameter optical fibers (600 ?m and 1000 ?m core diameter) having either an enhanced UV transmission or being solarization resistant were subjected to gamma-ray irradiation, at a dose rate of 0.3 kGy\\/h ± 5%, up to a total irradiation dose of 113 kGy, at room temperature. The radiation induced optical absorption in the UV-visible spectral range

Dan Sporea; Adelina Sporea

2005-01-01

385

A New View of the High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with the Ferrni Gamma-Ray Space Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Following its launch in June 2008, high energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have opened a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and the origin of cosmic rays, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as super symmetric dark matter annihilations. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from the first year of observations.

McEnery, Julie

2009-01-01

386

Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

Yamaguchi, H.; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y.

2003-05-01

387

Low and medium energy galactic gamma-ray observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observation of 0.2-100 MeV diffuse gamma radiation emitted from the Galaxy can provide information on the intensities of 5-50 MeV/nucleon cosmic-rays and 50 MeV electrons in interstellar space. Recent measurements of gamma-rays emitted from the galactic center region provide evidence for a diffuse continuum between 10 and 100 MeV. The intensities of the recently reported nuclear line gamma rays, also observed in the direction of the galactic center, require the presence of intense fluxes of low-energy cosmic-rays in the inner Galaxy if the gamma-rays are produced on a galactic scale. Current detection techniques for 0.1-100 MeV gamma-ray measurements are summarized and their capabilities for measuring the diffuse galactic emission are evaluated.

Share, G. H.

1976-01-01

388

Gamma-ray burst theory: Back to the drawing board  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts have always been intriguing sources to study in terms of particle acceleration, but not since their discovery two decades ago has the theory of these objects been in such turmoil. Prior to the launch of Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and observations by Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), there was strong evidence pointing to magnetized Galactic neutron stars as the sources of gamma-ray bursts. However, since BATSE the observational picture has changed dramatically, requiring much more distant and possibly cosmological sources. I review the history of gamma-ray burst theory from the era of growing consensus for nearby neutron stars to the recent explosion of halo and cosmological models and the impact of the present confusion on the particle acceleration problem.

Harding, Alice K.

1994-01-01

389

Wolf-Rayet Stars and Cosmic Gamma-ray Bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The observational properties of cosmic gamma-ray bursts and of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars and their CO cores at the end of their evolution are analyzed. WR stars do not have hydrogen envelopes, facilitating the transformation of the energy of collapse into observable gamma rays. Of the ?90 well-localized gamma-ray bursts, 21 have optical identifications, of which 16 have measured redshifts (z=0.4 4.5). The distribution of gamma-ray bursts in energy N(?E) has a large scatter, from 3×1051 to 2×1054 erg. There is some evidence that the distribution N(?E) is bimodal if we include the gamma-ray burst GRB 980425, which is associated with the peculiar type Ic supernova SN 1998bw in the nearby elliptical galaxy ESO 184-G82, for which ?E ??1048erg. These characteristics of gamma-ray bursts are reminiscent of the distribution of final masses for the CO cores of WR stars, which uniformly covers a broad range: M CO=(1 2)M ?-(20 44)M ?. The possible bimodality of the gamma-ray burst energy distribution (E 1=1048 erg; ?E 2=3×1051-2×1054erg) could be associated with the bimodal mass distribution for stellar relativistic objects (M NS=(1.35±0.15)M ?; M BH=4 15M ?). The fact that SN 1998bw is a “peculiar” type Ic supernova, not typical for the collapses of WR stars (which usually give rise to type Ib/c supernovae), could be related to the rotation of the collapsing CO core. This “drags out/rd the time for the collapse, leading to the formation of a neutron star, a decrease in the gamma-ray burst energy, and an increase in the fraction of kinetic energy transferred to the supernova envelope. The expected rate of collapse of the CO cores of WR stars in the Galaxy is ?10-3/yr. This is at least three orders of magnitude higher than the mean frequency of gamma-ray bursts per galaxy (?10-6 10-7/yr). Two models for gamma-ray bursts with WR stars as progenitors are considered: the hypernova model of Paczynski (1998) and the pulsation instability CO-core collapse model proposed by Gershte & $/set{lower0.5emhbox{smashriptscriptstylesmile}}{l} $ ; n (2000). In both models, the rate of CO-core collapses can be brought into agreement with the observed rate of gamma-ray bursts by taking into account the anisotropy of the gamma radiation, associated with either a relativistic jet or the random character of the initial CO-core collapse due to instabilities. It is concluded that WR stars could be the progenitors of gamma-ray bursts. This hypothesis predicts the existence of two types of gamma-ray bursts, corresponding to the bimodal mass distribution for stellar relativistic objects, and of three types of optical afterglow, associated with collapses of the CO cores of WR stars that are single, in WR+O binaries, and in hypothetical WR+(A-M) systems. The paper also briefly examines a model of gamma-ray bursts as transient phenomena in the early stages of the evolution of galaxies (z>1), when very massive stars (M>100M ?) weak in heavy elements could form. Such massive stars should also lose their hydrogen envelopes and be transformed into massive WR stars, whose collapses could be accompanied by gamma-ray bursts. It is suggested that WR galaxies are the most probable candidates for the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts.

Postnov, K. A.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

2001-07-01

390

Fireball and cannonball models of gamma ray bursts confront observations  

E-print Network

The two leading contenders for the theory of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows, the Fireball and Cannonball models, are compared and their predictions are confronted, within space limitations, with key GRB observations, including recent observations with SWIFT

Arnon Dar

2006-07-27

391

Low- and medium-energy galactic gamma-ray observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observation of 0.2 to 100 MeV-diffuse gamma-radiation emitted from a galaxy provides information on the intensities of 5 to 50 MeV/nucleon cosmic-rays and approximately less than 50-MeV electrons in interstellar space. Recent measurements of gamma-rays emitted from the galactic center region provide evidence for a diffuse continuum between 10 and 100 MeV, which is dominant over the pi-decay emission generated in high-energy nuclear collisions. The intensities of the recently reported nuclear line gamma-rays, also observed in the direction of the galactic center, require the presence of intense fluxes of low energy cosmic rays in the inner galaxy if the gamma-ray are produced on a galactic scale. Current detection techniques for 0.1 to 100 MeV gamma-ray measurements are summarized, and their capabilities for measuring the diffuse galactic emission are evaluated.

Share, G. H.

1977-01-01

392

Cosmic Gamma-ray Background from Star-forming Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background is a pressing cosmological mystery. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has recently measured the intensity and spectrum of this background; both are substantially different from previous measurements. We present a novel calculation of the gamma-ray background from normal star-forming galaxies. Contrary to long-standing expectations, we find that numerous but individually faint normal galaxies may comprise the bulk of the Fermi signal, rather than rare but intrinsically bright active galaxies. This result has wide-ranging implications, including: the possibility to probe the cosmic star formation history with gamma rays; the ability to infer the cosmological evolution of cosmic rays and galactic magnetic fields; and an increased likelihood of identifying subdominant components from rare sources (e.g., dark matter clumps) through their large anisotropy.

Fields, Brian D.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki; Prodanovi?, Tijana

2010-10-01

393

The Gamma-Ray Background from Star-Forming Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The process of massive star formation gives rise supernova explosions, which in turn launch strong shocks, which are the sites of cosmic-ray acceleration. Cosmic-ray interactions with interstellar matter and photons unavoidably give rise to gamma rays. Thus, star-forming galaxies are a guaranteed source of the extragalactic gamma-ray background as observed by Fermi. We present a calculation of the gamma-ray background from normal star-forming galaxies, including hadronic and leptonic emission as well as the effects of core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae. We find that the resulting signal can represent a substantial and perhaps dominant component of the Fermi background. We briefly comment on future tests of this result, and discuss its implications for using gamma rays to probe cosmic rays over cosmological history.

Fields, Brian D.

2012-05-01

394

Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background from Star-Forming Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background is a pressing cosmological mystery. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has recently measured the intensity and spectrum of this background; both are substantially different from previous measurements. We present a novel calculation of the gamma-ray background from normal star-forming galaxies. Contrary to longstanding expectations, we find that numerous but individually faint normal galaxies may comprise the bulk of the Fermi signal, rather than rare but intrinsically bright active galaxies. This result has wide-ranging implications, including: the possibility to probe the cosmic star-formation history with gamma rays; the ability to infer the cosmological evolution of cosmic rays and galactic magnetic fields; and an increased likelihood to identify subdominant components from rare sources (e.g., dark matter annihilation).

Fields, Brian D.; Pavlidou, V.; Prodanovic, T.

2011-01-01

395

Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the current understanding of Gamma Ray Bursts. It covers the Long GRBs, our current understanding of Collapsar, Short GRBs, afterglows, and reduced trigger threshold. It also discusses the Hard X-ray Sky Survey.

Gehrels, Neil

2007-01-01

396

Antimatter in the Universe: constraints from gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review gamma-ray observations that constrain antimatter - both baryonic and leptonic - in the Universe. Antimatter is probed through ordinary matter, with the resulting annihilation gamma-rays providing indirect evidence for its presence. Although it is generally accepted that equal amounts of matter and antimatter have been produced in the Big Bang, gamma-rays have so far failed to detect substantial amounts of baryonic antimatter in the Universe. Conversely, positrons are abundantly observed through their annihilation in the central regions of our Galaxy and, although a wealth of astrophysical sources are plausible, their very origin is still unknown. As both antimatter questions - the source of the Galactic positrons and the baryon asymmetry in the Universe - can be investigated through the low energy gamma-ray channel, the mission concept of a dedicated space telescope is sketched out.

von Ballmoos, Peter

2014-02-01

397

Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope- GLAST Mission Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), and the instrumentation that will be on the spacecraft: Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The presentation revierws in detail the LAT instrument.

Moiseev, Alexander A.

2007-01-01

398

Gamma-ray dosimetry measurements of the Little Boy replica  

SciTech Connect

We present the current status of our gamma-ray dosimetry results for the Little Boy replica. Both Geiger-Mueller and thermoluminescent detectors were used in the measurements. Future work is needed to test assumptions made in data analysis.

Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

1984-01-01

399

Analysis of fissionable material using delayed gamma rays from photofission  

SciTech Connect

The energetic gamma-ray spectra from the fission products of photofission have been investigated to determine whether photofission can identify heavily shielded fissionable material. Target samples of natural thorium, 93% enriched /sup 235/U, natural uranium, and 93% enriched /sup 239/Pu were irradiated with bremsstrahlung gamma rays produced by 10-MeV electrons from a small linear accelerator. The gamma-ray spectra for each of the four isotopes studied reveals a distinctive intensity distribution. For example, the intensity ratio of the pair of gamma rays at 1436 keV (/sup 138/Cs) and 1428 keV (/sup 94/Sr) is 1.9 for /sup 235/U, 2.4 for /sup 238/U, 1.7 for /sup 232/Th and 1.4 for /sup 239/Pu. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Hollas, C.L.; Close, D.A.; Moss, C.E.

1986-09-01

400

Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays - Duration: 0:20.  

NASA Video Gallery

Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

401

Very high energy gamma ray extension of GRO observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This has been an exiciting year for high energy gamma-ray astronomy, both from space and from ground-based observatories. It has been a particularly active period for the Whipple Observatory gamma-ray group. In phase 1 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), there has not been too much opportunity for overlapping observations with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and the other GRO telescopes; however, significant progress was made in the development of data analysis techniques and in improving the sensitivity of the technique which will have direct application in correlative observations in phase 2. Progress made during the period 1 Jul. 1991 - 31 Dec. 1991 is presented.

Weekes, Trevor C.

1992-01-01

402

Gamma Ray Burst Observations with Swift and GLAST  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Swift and GLAST missions promise a great increase in our understanding of the gamma-ray universe. Swift was launched in November 2004 with a primary objective to study gamma-ray bursts. All instruments are performing well and more than 200 GRBs have been studied in detail. Major advances have already been made in the areas of short bursts, high redshift events and afterglow physics. The GLAST mission is scheduled for launch in fall 2007. It features a large newtechnology instrument for high energy gamma-ray observations. Hundreds of gamma-ray bursts will be detected by the LAT and GBM instruments. The talk will discuss the GRB science available with GLAST and the opportunities for joint Swift and GLAST observations of bursts.

Gehrels, Neil

2007-01-01

403

ENU-induced phenovariance in mice: inferences from 587 mutations  

PubMed Central

Background We present a compendium of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mouse mutations, identified in our laboratory over a period of 10 years either on the basis of phenotype or whole genome and/or whole exome sequencing, and archived in the Mutagenetix database. Our purpose is threefold: 1) to formally describe many point mutations, including those that were not previously disclosed in peer-reviewed publications; 2) to assess the characteristics of these mutations; and 3) to estimate the likelihood that a missense mutation induced by ENU will create a detectable phenotype. Findings In the context of an ENU mutagenesis program for C57BL/6J mice, a total of 185 phenotypes were tracked to mutations in 129 genes. In addition, 402 incidental mutations were identified and predicted to affect 390 genes. As previously reported, ENU shows strand asymmetry in its induction of mutations, particularly favoring T to A rather than A to T in the sense strand of coding regions and splice junctions. Some amino acid substitutions are far more likely to be damaging than others, and some are far more likely to be observed. Indeed, from among a total of 494 non-synonymous coding mutations, ENU was observed to create only 114 of the 182 possible amino acid substitutions that single base changes can achieve. Based on differences in overt null allele frequencies observed in phenotypic vs. non-phenotypic mutation sets, we infer that ENU-induced missense mutations create detectable phenotype only about 1 in 4.7 times. While the remaining mutations may not be functionally neutral, they are, on average, beneath the limits of detection of the phenotypic assays we applied. Conclusions Collectively, these mutations add to our understanding of the chemical specificity of ENU, the types of amino acid substitutions it creates, and its efficiency in causing phenovariance. Our data support the validity of computational algorithms for the prediction of damage caused by amino acid substitutions, and may lead to refined predictions as to whether specific amino acid changes are responsible for observed phenotypes. These data form the basis for closer in silico estimations of the number of genes mutated to a state of phenovariance by ENU within a population of G3 mice. PMID:23095377

2012-01-01

404

Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

Baring, M. G.

1995-01-01

405

Prospects in space-based gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear

Jürgen Knödlseder

2005-01-01

406

Prospects in space-based gamma-ray astronomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower\\u000a wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on\\u000a the non-thermal Universe. Here particles are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly\\u000a understood, and nuclear

J. Knödlseder

407

The LXeCAT instrument for gamma-ray astrophysics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Liquid Xenon Coded Aperture Telescope (LXeCAT) and its capability to image astrophysical gamma-ray sources in the MeV region is described. The gamma-ray detector is a Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber (LXe-TPC) triggered by the primary scintillation light. Effective background rejection is a direct consequence of the intrinsic three-dimensional imaging capability of the LXe-TPC. Initial results with a 10 liter

E. Aprile; F. Xu; M. Zhou; T. Doke; J. Kikuchi; E. L. Chupp; P. P. Dunphy; G. Fishman; G. Pendleton; K. Masuda

1996-01-01

408

Gamma ray satellite to be launched from Africa  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The announcement is presented of the launch of NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite B (SAS-B) on 2 Nov. 1972, to study gamma rays. The launch is to be from the Italian-operated San Marco Equatorial Range in the Indian Ocean for ease in acquiring an equatorial orbit. The spacecraft systems described include: stabilization and control, communication, and spark chamber gamma ray telescope. The results of Uhuru (Explorer 42) are also presented.

Allaway, H. G.; Senstad, K.

1972-01-01

409

Multiwavelength observations of unidentified high energy gamma ray sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As was the case for COS B, the majority of high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument on GRO are not immediately identifiable with cataloged objects at other wavelengths. These persistent gamma-ray sources are, next to the gamma-ray bursts, the least understood objects in the universe. Even a rudimentary understanding of their nature awaits identifications and follow-up work at other wavelengths to tell us what they are. The as yet unidentified sources are potentially the most interesting, since they may represent unrecognized new classes of astronomical objects, such as radio-quiet pulsars or new types of active galactic nuclei (AGN's). This two-year investigation is intended to support the analysis, correlation, and theoretical interpretation of data that we are obtaining at x ray, optical, and radio wavelengths in order to render the gamma-ray data interpretable. According to plan, in the first year concentration was on the identification and study of Geminga. The second year will be devoted to studies of similar unidentified gamma-ray sources which will become available in the first EGRET catalogs. The results obtained so far are presented in the two papers which are reproduced in the Appendix. In these papers, we discuss the pulse profiles of Geminga, the geometry and efficiency of the magnetospheric accelerator, the distance to Geminga, the implications for theories of polar cap heating, the effect of the magnetic field on the surface emission and environment of the neutron star, and possible interpretations of a radio-quiet Geminga. The implications of the other gamma-ray pulsars which were discovered to have high gamma-ray efficiency are also discussed, and the remaining unidentified COS B sources are attributed to a population of efficient gamma-ray sources, some of which may be radio quiet.

Halpern, Jules P.

1993-01-01

410

Neutron and gamma-ray penetrations in thick iron  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of neutron and gamma-ray penetrations in an iron shield were performed up to a 60-cm depth in a tightly coupled source shield configuration with the fast-neutron reactor YAYOI as a source. Rates of neutron reactions and gamma-ray dose rates in the iron shield were obtained using activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Analyses of the experiments were made by using

Y. Oka; S. An; S. Kasai; K. Koyama; S. Miyasaka

1980-01-01

411

Thunderstorm ground enhancements: Gamma ray differential energy spectra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shape and evolution of the energy spectra of the thunderstorm ground enhancement (TGE) electrons and gamma rays shed light on the origin of TGEs, on the relationship of modification of the energy spectra (MOS) and relativistic runaway electron avalanche processes, on the nature of the seed particles, and on the strength and elongation of an atmospheric electric field. However, till now the measurements of energy spectra of TGE electrons and gamma rays have been rather scarce. For the first time, we present differential energy spectra of gamma rays in the wide energy range 4-100 MeV for five TGE events detected in 2012-2013 at Aragats. We use the special technique of electron/gamma ray fraction determination to select TGE events with very small contamination of electrons. The network of large NaI spectrometers located 3200 m above sea level measured energy spectra of gamma rays. The power law indices of “small” TGEs are rather close to the background cosmic gamma ray spectrum (?˜-2); thus, we may deduce that these small events are due to MOS of cosmic ray electrons in the electric field of a thundercloud. Larger TGEs measured by the NaI network and the two largest TGE events earlier recovered from energy releases in a 60-cm-thick scintillator have much steeper energy spectra typical for the avalanche process in atmosphere. The classification of TGEs according to intensity and gamma ray spectral index pointed toward two main mechanisms of the TGE gamma ray origin: the runaway process and modification of electron energy spectra in the thunderstorm atmospheres.

Chilingarian, A.; Hovsepyan, G.; Kozliner, L.

2013-10-01

412

Angular Correlation of Gamma Rays from Fe56  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gamma rays emitted in the decay of Co56 were studied by gamma-gamma angular correlation measurements. The results of these experiments permitted the discussion of the energy levels of the daughter nucleus, Fe56. The gamma-gamma coincidence experiment showed the presence of 2.03-Mev. gamma ray decaying to the second excited level. One part of the decay scheme was confirmed by positron-gamma

Mitsuo Sakai

1955-01-01

413

Al26: A galactic source of gamma ray line emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that Al26 is a very good candidate for producing a detectable gamma-ray line, and that this line is not only intense but also very narrow. By examining the chart of nuclides for other radioactive isotopes which could produce hiterto unnoticed gamma-ray lines following nucleosynthesis, it is found that for mass numbers less than 60, the isotopes Na22,

R. Ramaty; R. E. Lingenfelter

1976-01-01

414

Gamma ray bursts: Current status of observations and theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gamma-ray bursts display a wide range of temporal and spectral characteristics, but typically last several seconds and emit most of their energy in the low-energy gamma-ray region. The burst sources appear to be isotropically distributed on the sky. Several lines of evidence suggest magnetic neutron stars as sources for bursts. A variety of energy sources and emission mechanisms were proposed.

Meegan, Charles A.

1990-01-01

415

Search for spectral lines in cosmic gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Time-integrated spectra from 177 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite (SMM) have been systematically searched for evidence of emission lines in the range 300 keV and higher. The distribution of fitted line strengths is consistent with what is expected from a random sample of data, suggesting that there are no statistically significant narrow or moderately broadened line features in any of the bursts.

Messina, Daniel C.; Share, Gerald H.

1992-01-01

416

Measuring The Variability Of Gamma-Ray Sources With AGILE  

SciTech Connect

Variability in the gamma-ray flux above 100 MeV at various time scales is one of the primary characteristics of the sources detected by EGRET, both allowing the identification of individual sources and constraining the unidentified source classes. We present a detailed simulation of the capacity of AGILE to characterize the variability of gamma-ray sources, discussing the implications for source population studies.

Chen, Andrew W. [Consorzio Interuniversitario per la Fisica Spaziale, Torino, TO 10133 (Italy); Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Sezione di Milano, Milan, MI 20133 (Italy); Vercellone, Stefano; Pellizzoni, Alberto [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Sezione di Milano, Milan, MI 20133 (Italy); Tavani, Marco [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Sezione di Roma, Rome 00133 (Italy)

2005-02-21

417

Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments  

E-print Network

This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

M. Alvarez; D. D'Armiento; G. Agnetta; A. Alberdi; A. Antonelli; A. Argan; P. Assis; E. A. Baltz; C. Bambi; G. Barbiellini; H. Bartko; M. Basset; D. Bastieri; P. Belli; G. Benford; L. Bergstrom; R. Bernabei; G. Bertone; A. Biland; B. Biondo; F. Bocchino; E. Branchini; M. Brigida; T. Bringmann; P. Brogueira; A. Bulgarelli; J. A. Caballero; G. A. Caliandro; P. Camarri; F. Cappella; P. Caraveo; R. Carbone; M. Carvajal; S. Casanova; A. J. Castro-Tirado; O. Catalano; R. Catena; F. Celi; A. Celotti; R. Cerulli; A. Chen; R. Clay; V. Cocco; J. Conrad; E. Costa; A. Cuoco; G. Cusumano; C. J. Dai; B. Dawson; B. De Lotto; G. De Paris; A. de Ugarte Postigo; E. Del Monte; C. Delgado; A. Di Ciaccio; G. Di Cocco; S. Di Falco; G. Di Persio; B. L. Dingus; A. Dominguez; F. Donato; I. Donnarumma; M. Doro; J. Edsjo; J. M. Espino Navas; M. C. Espirito Santo; Y. Evangelista; C. Evoli; D. Fargion; C. Favuzzi; M. Feroci; M. Fiorini; L. Foggetta; N. Fornengo; T. Froysland; M. Frutti; F. Fuschino; J. L. Gomez; M. Gomez; D. Gaggero; N. Galante; M. I. Gallardo; M. Galli; J. E. Garcia; M. Garczarczyk; F. Gargano; M. Gaug; F. Gianotti; S. Giarrusso; B. Giebels; N. Giglietto; P. Giommi; F. Giordano; A. Giuliani; J. Glicenstein; P. Goncalves; D. Grasso; M. Guerriero; H. L. He; A. Incicchitti; J. Kirk; H. H. Kuang; A. La Barbera; G. La Rosa; C. Labanti; G. Lamanna; I. Lapshov; F. Lazzarotto; S. Liberati; F. Liello; P. Lipari; F. Longo; F. Loparco; M. Lozano; P. G. Lucentini De Sanctis; J. M. Ma; M. C. Maccarone; L. Maccione; V. Malvezzi; A. Mangano; M. Mariotti; M. Marisaldi; I. Martel; A. Masiero; E. Massaro; M. Mastropietro; E. Mattaini; F. Mauri; M. N. Mazziotta; S. Mereghetti; T. Mineo; S. Mizobuchi; A. Moiseev; M. Moles; C. Monte; F. Montecchia; E. Morelli; A. Morselli; I. Moskalenko; F. Nozzoli; J. F. Ormes; M. A. Peres-Torres; L. Pacciani; A. Pellizzoni; F. Perez-Bernal; F. Perotti; P. Picozza; L. Pieri; M. Pietroni; M. Pimenta; A. Pina; C. Pittori; C. Pontoni; G. Porrovecchio; F. Prada; M. Prest; D. Prosperi; R. Protheroe; G. Pucella; J. M. Quesada; J. M. Quintana; J. R. Quintero; S. Raino; M. Rapisarda; M. Rissi; J. Rodriguez; E. Rossi; G. Rowell; A. Rubini; F. Russo; M. Sanchez-Conde; B. Sacco; V. Scapin; M. Schelke; A. Segreto; A. Sellerholm; X. D. Sheng; A. Smith; P. Soffitta; R. Sparvoli; P. Spinelli; V. Stamatescu; L. S. Stark; M. Tavani; G. Thornton; L. G. Titarchuk; B. Tome; A. Traci; M. Trifoglio; A. Trois; P. Vallania; E. Vallazza; S. Vercellone; S. Vernetto; V. Vitale; N. Wild; Z. P. Ye; A. Zambra; F. Zandanel; D. Zanello

2007-12-04

418

STS-37 Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) grappled by RMS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Backdropped against the Earth's cloud-covered surface, the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) with its solar array (SA) panels deployed is grappled by the remote manipulator system (RMS) during STS-37 systems checkout. GRO's four complement instruments are visible: the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) (at the bottom); the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) (center); the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) (top); and Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) (on four corners).

1991-01-01

419

A study of the sensitivity of an imaging telescope (GRITS) for high energy gamma-ray astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When a gamma-ray telescope is placed in Earth orbit, it is bombarded by a flux of cosmic protons much greater than the flux of interesting gammas. These protons can interact in the telescope's thermal shielding to produce detectable gamma rays, most of which are vetoed. Since the proton flux is so high, the unvetoed gamma rays constitute a significant background relative to some weak sources. This background increases the observing time required to pinpoint some sources and entirely obscures other sources. Although recent telescopes have been designed to minimize this background, its strength and spectral characteristics were not previously calculated in detail. Monte Carlo calculations are presented which characterize the strength, spectrum and other features of the cosmic proton background using FLUKA, a hadronic cascade program. Several gamma-ray telescopes, including SAS-2, EGRET and the Gamma Ray Imaging Telescope System (GRITS), are analyzed, and their proton-induced backgrounds are characterized. In all cases, the backgrounds are either shown to be low relative to interesting signals or suggestions are made which would reduce the background sufficiently to leave the telescope unimpaired. In addition, several limiting cases are examined for comparison to previous estimates and calibration measurements.

Yearian, Mason R.

1990-01-01

420

RADIO AND GAMMA-RAY PULSED EMISSION FROM MILLISECOND PULSARS  

SciTech Connect

Pulsed {gamma}-ray emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs) has been detected by the sensitive Fermi space telescope, which sheds light on studies of the emission region and its mechanism. In particular, the specific patterns of radio and {gamma}-ray emission from PSR J0101-6422 challenge the popular pulsar models, e.g., outer gap and two-pole caustic models. Using the three-dimensional annular gap model, we have jointly simulated radio and {gamma}-ray light curves for three representative MSPs (PSR J0034-0534, PSR J0101-6422, and PSR J0437-4715) with distinct radio phase lags, and present the best simulated results for these MSPs, particularly for PSR J0101-6422 with complex radio and {gamma}-ray pulse profiles, and for PSR J0437-4715 with a radio interpulse. We have found that both the {gamma}-ray and radio emission originate from the annular gap region located in only one magnetic pole, and the radio emission region is not primarily lower than the {gamma}-ray region in most cases. In addition, the annular gap model with a small magnetic inclination angle instead of an 'orthogonal rotator' can account for the MSPs' radio interpulse with a large phase separation from the main pulse. The annular gap model is a self-consistent model not only for young pulsars but also MSPs, and multi-wavelength light curves can be fundamentally explained using this model.

Du, Y. J.; Chen, D. [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.1 Nanertiao, Zhongguancun, Haidian District, Beijing 100190 (China)] [National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.1 Nanertiao, Zhongguancun, Haidian District, Beijing 100190 (China); Qiao, G. J., E-mail: duyj@nssc.ac.cn [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-01-20

421

Milagro - A TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect

Milagro is a large field of view ({approx} 2 sr), high duty cycle ({approx}90%), ground-based observatory sensitive to gamma-rays above {approx}100 GeV. This unique detector is ideal for observing the highest energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays are attenuated by pair production with the extragalactic infrared background light, Milagro's sensitivity decreases rapidly for bursts with redshift > 0.5. While only 10 % of bursts have been measured to be within z=0.5, these bursts are very well studied at all wavelengths resulting in the most complete understanding of GRB phenomena. Milagro has sufficient sensitivity in units of E2 dN/dE to detect VHE luminosities lower than the observed luminosities at {approx} 100 keV for these nearby bursts. Therefore, the launch of SWIFT and its ability to localize and measure redshifts of many bursts points to great future possibilities.

Dingus, B.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

2004-09-28

422

Gamma-ray Albedo of Small Solar System Bodies  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and KBOs strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected, it can be used to derive the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt and to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center. For details of our calculations and references see [1].

Moskalenko, I.V.

2008-03-25

423

Absolute calibration of fusion gamma ray detector on TFTR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An in situ measurement of the absolute detection efficiency of the fusion gamma ray detector on TFTR has been completed. The efficiency was determined by measuring the yield of the 4.44 MeV gamma ray from a plutonium-berrylium source situated within the vacuum vessel. The absolute detection efficiency at 4.44 MeV is extended to higher energies using the known energy dependence of the gamma ray attenuation coefficients in the vessel port cover, the detector neutron moderator, and the scintillator. The absolute detection efficiency (full energy peak detected gamma rays per source gamma ray) varies from 8.6E-9 at 4.44 MeV to 1.1E-8 at 17 MeV and is insensitive at the few percent level to relatively large variations in the radial profile of the gamma ray source distribution in the plasma. The absolute detection efficiency is used to determine the total d-3He reaction rate during recent deuterium neutral beam heated 3He plasmas on TFTR.

Medley, S. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Cecil, F. E.

1992-10-01

424

Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

2015-02-01

425

Analysis of Data from the Energetic Gamma-ray Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work under the Grant has involved participation with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) Team in the analysis of data obtained during instrument operations and the preparation of scientific papers and proposals for future observations. The Principal Investigator (PI) has been a co-author on a total of 90 papers published in refereed professional journals since the beginning of 1991, plus many other non-refereed publications, and contributed and invited papers at professional meetings and IAU telegrams. On seven of these papers he was the lead author. The EGRET team continues to submit IAU Astronomical telegrams and present many papers at scientific meetings. The effort by the PI has involved working remotely by internet connection on the Goddard Space Flight Center Computers where the EGRET data are archived. Students have monitored instrument performance, performed Viewing Period Analyses and analyzed data remotely. The PI has completed the detailed analysis of over 20 viewing periods to search for point sources and this work has been used in developing the first and second EGRET catalog of sources, published in Supplements to the Astrophysical Journal.

Kniffen, Donald A.

1996-01-01

426

Gamma-Ray Burst Class Properties  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Guided by the supervised pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 developed by Quinlan in 1986, we examine the three gamma-ray burst classes identified by Mukherjee et al. in 1998. C4.5 provides strong statistical support for this classification. However, with C4.5 and our knowledge of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument, we demonstrate that class 3 (intermediate fluence, intermediate duration, soft) does not have to be a distinct source population: statistical/systematic errors in measuring burst attributes combined with the well-known hardness/intensity correlation can cause low peak flux class 1 (high fluence, long, intermediate hardness) bursts to take on class 3 characteristics naturally. Based on our hypothesis that the third class is not a distinct one, we provide rules so that future events can be placed in either class 1 or class 2 (low fluence, short, hard). We find that the two classes are relatively distinct on the basis of Band's work in 1993 on spectral parameters alpha, beta, and E (sub peak) alone. Although this does not indicate a better basis for classification, it does suggest that different physical conditions exist for class 1 and class 2 bursts. In the process of studying burst class characteristics, we identify a new bias affecting burst fluence and duration measurements. Using a simple model of how burst duration can be underestimated, we show how this fluence duration bias can affect BATSE measurements and demonstrate the type of effect it can have on the BATSE fluence versus peak flux diagram.

Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Roiger, Richard J.

2000-01-01

427

Gamma Ray Bursts and recent Swift Results .  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the large activity we had during these last months with the Swift satellite I started the writing of the presentation I gave at the SAIt Catania meeting only in the middle of September. The Swift satellite, however, never rested. Since then and in addition to the results I showed at the meeting in relation to the early and steep light curves observed with the XRT telescope in the 0.2 - 10 keV band, we had fundamental discoveries among which the detection and localization of short bursts and the detection of the largest redshift ever. It obviously would be improper to discuss here the most recent results but it would also be silly in such a fast evolving topics where the day by day observations show excellent results and the observer is far ahead of the theoretician, to write an article that, from the observational point of view, would be completely obsolete. The best approach here seems to be a brief description of what was presented during the meeting briefly mentioning also some of the most recent results. We remind the reader, however, that a copious literature written, and in preparation, exists so that we urge the reader to refer to the specialized articles. This brief article will touch on the basic characteristics of the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the Introduction (section 1) and illustrate the basic characteristics of the Swift mission in section 2. Preliminary science results will be discussed in section 3 and finally we will mention one, among many, of the main goal we plan to achieve in Cosmology via the observations of very distant GRBs.

Chincarini, G.

428

Thermonuclear model for. gamma. -ray bursts  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of approx. 10/sup 12/ gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of approx. /sup 13/ M/sub 0/yr/sup -1/ is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the hot CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 10/sup 20/ to 10/sup 22/ g km/sup -2/. Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into /sup 56/Ni releases from 10/sup 38/ to 10/sup 40/ erg km/sup -2/ and pushes hot plasma with ..beta.. > 1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard ..gamma..-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most ..gamma..-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for Jacobson-like transients is also offered.

Woosley, S.E.

1981-08-26

429

MAXI observations of gamma-ray bursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) Gas Slit Camera (GSC) detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including bursts with soft spectra, such as X-ray flashes (XRFs). MAXI/GSC is sensitive to the energy range from 2 to 30 keV. This energy range is lower than other currently operating instruments which are capable of detecting GRBs. Since the beginning of the MAXI operation on 2009 August 15, GSC observed 35 GRBs up to the middle of 2013. One third of them were also observed by other satellites. The rest of them show a trend to have soft spectra and low fluxes. Because of the contribution of those XRFs, the MAXI GRB rate is about three times higher than those expected from the BATSE log N-log P distribution. When we compare it to the observational results of the Wide-field X-ray Monitor on the High Energy Transient Explorer 2, which covers the the same energy range as that of MAXI/GSC, we find the possibility that many of the MAXI bursts are XRFs with Epeak lower than 20 keV. We discuss the source of soft GRBs observed only by MAXI. The MAXI log N-log S distribution suggests that the MAXI XRFs are distributed over a closer distance than hard GRBs. Since the distributions of the hardness of galactic stellar flares and X-ray bursts overlap with those of MAXI GRBs, we discuss the possibility of confusion of such galactic transients with the MAXI GRB samples.

Serino, Motoko; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Ohno, Masanori; Ogawa, Yuji; Nishimura, Yasunori; Fukushima, Kosuke; Higa, Masaya; Ishikawa, Kazuto; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kawamuro, Taiki; Kimura, Masashi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Morii, Mikio; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakahira, Satoshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Nakano, Yuki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Onodera, Takuya; Sasaki, Masayuki; Shidatsu, Megumi; Sugimoto, Juri; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Suwa, Fumitoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Tachibana, Yutaro; Takagi, Toshihiro; Toizumi, Takahiro; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Usui, Ryuichi; Yamada, Hisaki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yoshidome, Koshiro; Yoshii, Taketoshi

2014-10-01

430

A New View of the High Energy Gamma-ray Sky with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews some of the findings that have been made possible by the use of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It describes the current status of the Fermi Telescope and reviews some of the science highlights.

McEnery, Julie

2010-01-01

431

Detection of high-energy gamma rays from quasar PKS 0528 + 134 by EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The first several pointing directions of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, launched on 1991 April 5, were toward the Galactic anticenter. In addition to the known gamma-ray sources, Crab and Geminga, high-energy gamma-ray emission was observed from the quasar PKS 0528 + 134 by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). A redshift measurement, reported here, of 2.07 confirms the identification of this object as a quasar. The differential photon spectrum is well represented by a power law with an exponent of 2.56 +/- 0.09 and a photon intensity above 100 MeV of (8.4 +/- 1.0) x 10 exp -7 photons sq cm/s. There is evidence for time variability on a time scale of a few days.

Hunter, S. D.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

1993-01-01

432

Neutrons and gamma-rays spectroscopy of Mercury surface: global mapping from ESA MPO-BepiColombo spacecraft by MGNS instrument  

Microsoft Academic Search

For analyse chemistry composition of Mercury subsurface we will apply method of as-called remote sensing of neutrons. This method can be use for study celestial body of Solar system without thick atmospheres, like Moon, Mars, Phobos, Mercury etc. by the analysis of induced nuclear gamma-rays and neutron emission. These gamma-rays and neutrons are produced by energetic galactic cosmic rays colliding

A. S. Kozyrev; L. I. Gurvits; M. L. Litvak; A. A. Malakhov; M. I. Mokrousov; I. G. Mitrofanov; A. A. Rogozhin; A. B. Sanin; A. Owens; V. N. Schvetsov

2009-01-01

433

Calculated nuclide compositions and gamma-ray exposure rates for fallout from the HARRY, SMOKY, and ANNIE events  

SciTech Connect

The results of computer calculations of the nuclide composition and associated external gamma-ray exposure rates for fallout from the HARRY, SMOKY, and ANNIE events are documented. The fission product distribution is calculated for each event with the appropriate neutron spectrum and the fractions of fissions due to each fissionable material. Also calculated are the total number of microcuries per square meter and the gamma-ray exposure rates (mR/h, 1 meter above ground level) for the 152 fission products and 25 neutron-induced nuclides. The normalized data are presented in 9 Appendices. (DLS)

Hicks, H.G.

1981-03-03

434

From White Dwarf To Neutron Star To Black Hole: Accretion, Gamma-ray Bursts, And Their Aftermath  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When white dwarfs with massive companions experience accretion-induced-collapse, the newborn neutron star may continue to accrete until its mass becomes larger than the maximum neutron-star mass. The resulting black hole may have special properties that allow it to be identified post-collapse. We present a set of such evolutions, punctuated by gamma-ray bursts, and assess the expected rates. An individual system may exhibit a remarkable range of high-energy states: supersoft source, ultraluminous x-ray source, hard x-ray binary, and gamma-ray bursts.

Di Stefano, Rosanne

2010-01-01

435

FERMI LIMIT ON THE NEUTRINO FLUX FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect

If gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce high-energy cosmic rays, neutrinos are expected to be generated in GRBs via photo-pion productions. However, we stress that the same process also generates electromagnetic (EM) emission induced by the secondary electrons and photons, and that the EM emission is expected to be correlated with neutrino flux. Using Fermi/Large Area Telescope results on gamma-ray flux from GRBs, the GRB neutrino emission is limited to be <20 GeV m{sup -2} per GRB event on average, which is independent of the unknown GRB proton luminosity. This neutrino limit suggests that IceCube, operating at full scale, requires stacking of more than 130 GRBs in order to detect one GRB muon neutrino.

Li Zhuo [Department of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China)

2013-06-20

436

Improvement of flame-retardent properties of insulated wires by raidation crosslinking. [. gamma. rays of electrons  

SciTech Connect

Electric wires coated with polyethylene insulation crosslinked by a chemical method (gel fraction = 80%) and a jacket of self-extinguishing resin were produced. The jacket was crosslinked by irradiation with ..gamma.. rays or accelerated electrons. Flame-retardant properties of the wire improved by ..gamma..-ray induced crosslinking up to approx. 60% gel fraction in the jacket. Beyond this point, however, the flame resistance rapidly decreased with increasing gel fraction. The flame resistance was also improved by irradiation with electrons, but the extent of the improvement was strongly dependent on the energy of incident electrons. This fact was attributed to the difference in the distribution of energy dissipation, i.e., crosslinks formed in the jacket. By introducing a double-layer structure to the jacket, in which the inner layer adjacent to the polyethylene insulation was crosslinked more densely than the outer layer, the wires were markedly improved in resistance to flame and heat deformation. (9 figures, 1 table.)

Hagiwara, M.; Sohara, M.; Araki, K.; Kagiya, T.

1980-08-01

437

Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

1973-01-01

438

Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

Barty, C. P. J.

2015-10-01