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Sample records for ganglioneuromas implicates hedgehog

  1. [Giant retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma].

    PubMed

    Sarf, Ismail; el Mejjad, Amine; Badre, Latifa; Mani, Ahmed; Aboutaieb, Rachid; Meziane, Fethi

    2003-06-01

    The authors report a new case of retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma in an 18-year-old girl presenting with abdominal mass and lumbosciatica. The diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumour was based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment consisted of complete resection of the tumour. The postoperative course was favourable with no recurrence after one year of follow-up. The authors discuss the diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic aspects of this disease. PMID:12940207

  2. Lipomatous ganglioneuroma of the retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-Da; Ma, Xiao-Ning; Wei, Hong; Pan, Rong-Hui; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Fang-Shu

    2016-04-01

    Lipomatous ganglioneuroma (LG) is a rare variant of ganglioneuroma that is histologically characterized by a mature adipocytic component admixed with a conventional ganglioneuroma. We report the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of an LG in a 44-year-old Chinese male; additionally, we review the literature regarding this type of tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a left paravertebral soft-tissue mass at the T11-L3 levels. Grossly, the encapsulated neoplasm had a white to yellowish cut surface and rubbery consistency. Microscopic evaluation revealed an encapsulated lesion that consisted of areas of ganglioneuroma admixed with areas of mature fat. By immunohistochemistry, the ganglion cells were positive for chromogranin and synaptophysin, whereas the Schwann cells were positive for vimentin, S-100 protein, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). This is the second known report of a retroperitoneal LG. The patient was well and without evidence of disease at 2 years' follow-up. PMID:23978430

  3. DS-03SONIC HEDGEHOG ANTAGONISTS POTENTLY INDUCE APOPTOSIS IN THE CEREBELLAR EXTERNAL GRANULE LAYER: IMPLICATIONS FOR MEDULLOBLASTOMA TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kevin; Cabrera, Omar; Swiney, Brant; Smith, Julie; Farber, Nuri

    2014-01-01

    There is a great interest in Hedgehog signaling both for its role in cerebellar development and medulloblastoma (MB) treatment. The cerebellum maintains its own proliferative layer called the external granule layer (EGL) that produces over 90% of its neurons. During development, the established dogma views Hedgehog signaling as a robust mitogenic stimulator of EGL proliferation. However, in other regions of the body, Hedgehog stimulation acts as a survival signal by potently inducing NPC apoptosis when signaling is lost. In this manner, the sonic hedgehog ligand's concentration gradient determines NPC survival or death thereby morphologically sculpting the developing nervous system. Therefore, we tested whether Hedgehog signaling also acts as a survival signal in the EGL by administering several Hedgehog antagonists (vismodegib, cyclopamine, and jervine). Remarkably, we found all Hedgehog antagonists (HAs) potently induced EGL apoptosis within a few hours of administration. This suggests a large portion of the HAs' anti-proliferative effects are due to the apoptotic loss of a large number of EGL NPCs. This research may also have important implications for MB formation and treatment. There is convincing evidence that EGL neural progenitor cells (NPCs) can be the tumor initiating cells for MBs (the most common malignant brain tumor in children). Therefore, we examined if HAs can also produce apoptosis in Patched mice which exhibit constitutive Hedgehog stimulation and are prone to MB formation. We found HA administration also potently increased apoptosis in both EGL NPCs and preneoplasms. This may have important implications for the treatment of MBs with HAs. For example, apoptosis involves signaling mechanisms distinct from proliferation that may need to be disabled for malignant transformation. In addition, the requirement for Hedgehog signaling may prevent metastasis by killing tumor cells as they spread to regions where such signaling is absent.

  4. Ganglioneuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... may come back after it is removed. Possible Complications If the tumor has been present for a long time and has pressed on the spinal cord or caused other symptoms, surgery to remove the tumor may not reverse the ...

  5. The Hedgehog gene family of the cnidarian, Nematostella vectensis, and implications for understanding metazoan Hedgehog pathway evolution

    PubMed Central

    Matus, David Q.; Magie, Craig; Pang, Kevin; Martindale, Mark Q; Thomsen, Gerald H.

    2008-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is an important component of cell-cell communication during bilaterian development, and abnormal Hedgehog signaling contributes to disease and birth defects. Hedgehog genes are composed of a ligand (“hedge”) domain and an autocatalytic intein (“hog”) domain. Hedgehog (hh) ligands bind to a conserved set of receptors and activate downstream signal transduction pathways terminating with Gli/Ci transcription factors. We have identified five intein-containing genes in the anthozoan cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, two of which (NvHh1 and NvHh2) contain definitive hedgehog ligand domains, suggesting that to date, cnidarians are the earliest branching metazoan phylum to possess definitive Hh orthologs. Expression analysis of NvHh1 and NvHh2, the receptor NvPatched and a downstream transcription factor NvGli (a Gli3/Ci ortholog) indicate that these genes may have conserved roles in planar and trans-epithelial signaling during gut and germline development, while the three remaining intein-containing genes (NvHint1,2,3) are expressed in a cell-type specific manner in putative neural precursors. Metazoan intein-containing genes that lack a ligand domain have previously only been identified within nematodes. However, phylogenetic analyses suggest that these nematode inteins may be derived from an ancestral nematode true hedgehog gene, and that the non-bilaterian intein-containing genes identified here may represent an ancestral state prior to the domain swapping events that resulted in the formation of true hedgehog genes in the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor. Genomic surveys of N. vectensis suggest that most of the components of both protostome and deuterostome Hh signaling pathways are present in anthozoans and that some appear to have been lost in ecdysozoan lineages. Cnidarians possess many bilaterian cell-cell signaling pathways (Wnt, TGFß, FGF and Hh) that appear to act in concert to pattern tissues along the oral-aboral axis of the polyp

  6. Cardiac ganglioneuroma in a juvenile pig.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryoko; Joma, Ikumi; Otsubo, Koji; Matsutake, Hiroshi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki

    2016-02-01

    A cardiac mass (3 × 5 × 3 cm) was detected at the base between the right auricular wall and right vena cava of a slaughtered 6-month-old female mixed-breed pig during a meat inspection. The tumor comprised infiltrative prominent interweaving fascicles of Schwann cells with Verocay bodies. Moreover, the ganglion cells were scattered or aggregated throughout the neoplastic tissue. The ganglion and Schwann cells had neither cellular atypism nor mitosis. On the basis of the bearing site as well as the morphological and immunohistochemical features, this is the first case of a cardiac ganglioneuroma in a pig. PMID:26256406

  7. Cardiac ganglioneuroma in a juvenile pig

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Ryoko; JOMA, Ikumi; OTSUBO, Koji; MATSUTAKE, Hiroshi; YANAI, Tokuma; SAKAI, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A cardiac mass (3 × 5 × 3 cm) was detected at the base between the right auricular wall and right vena cava of a slaughtered 6-month-old female mixed-breed pig during a meat inspection. The tumor comprised infiltrative prominent interweaving fascicles of Schwann cells with Verocay bodies. Moreover, the ganglion cells were scattered or aggregated throughout the neoplastic tissue. The ganglion and Schwann cells had neither cellular atypism nor mitosis. On the basis of the bearing site as well as the morphological and immunohistochemical features, this is the first case of a cardiac ganglioneuroma in a pig. PMID:26256406

  8. Hedgehog Zoonoses

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Patricia Y.

    2005-01-01

    Exotic pets, including hedgehogs, have become popular in recent years among pet owners, especially in North America. Such animals can carry and introduce zoonotic agents, a fact well illustrated by the recent outbreak of monkeypox in pet prairie dogs. We reviewed known and potential zoonotic diseases that could be carried and transmitted by pet hedgehogs or when rescuing and caring for wild-caught hedgehogs. PMID:15705314

  9. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.; Sheehy, Daniel E.

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang's SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to ``escape'' into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined.

  10. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbart, P.M.; Sheehy, D.E.

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang{close_quote}s SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Sonic hedgehog functions upstream of disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (disc1): implications for mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Penelope J.; Cunliffe, Vincent T.; Roy, Sudipto; Wood, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT DISRUPTED-IN-SCHIZOPHRENIA (DISC1) has been one of the most intensively studied genetic risk factors for mental illness since it was discovered through positional mapping of a translocation breakpoint in a large Scottish family where a balanced chromosomal translocation was found to segregate with schizophrenia and affective disorders. While the evidence for it being central to disease pathogenesis in the original Scottish family is compelling, recent genome-wide association studies have not found evidence for common variants at the DISC1 locus being associated with schizophrenia in the wider population. It may therefore be the case that DISC1 provides an indication of biological pathways that are central to mental health issues and functional studies have shown that it functions in multiple signalling pathways. However, there is little information regarding factors that function upstream of DISC1 to regulate its expression and function. We herein demonstrate that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling promotes expression of disc1 in the zebrafish brain. Expression of disc1 is lost in smoothened mutants that have a complete loss of Shh signal transduction, and elevated in patched mutants which have constitutive activation of Shh signalling. We previously demonstrated that disc1 knockdown has a dramatic effect on the specification of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) in the hindbrain and Shh signalling is known to be essential for the specification of these cells. We show that disc1 is prominently expressed in olig2-positive midline progenitor cells that are absent in smo mutants, while cyclopamine treatment blocks disc1 expression in these cells and mimics the effect of disc1 knock down on OPC specification. Various features of a number of psychiatric conditions could potentially arise through aberrant Hedgehog signalling. We therefore suggest that altered Shh signalling may be an important neurodevelopmental factor in the pathobiology of mental illness. PMID

  12. Sonic hedgehog functions upstream of disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (disc1): implications for mental illness.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Penelope J; Cunliffe, Vincent T; Roy, Sudipto; Wood, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    DISRUPTED-IN-SCHIZOPHRENIA (DISC1) has been one of the most intensively studied genetic risk factors for mental illness since it was discovered through positional mapping of a translocation breakpoint in a large Scottish family where a balanced chromosomal translocation was found to segregate with schizophrenia and affective disorders. While the evidence for it being central to disease pathogenesis in the original Scottish family is compelling, recent genome-wide association studies have not found evidence for common variants at the DISC1 locus being associated with schizophrenia in the wider population. It may therefore be the case that DISC1 provides an indication of biological pathways that are central to mental health issues and functional studies have shown that it functions in multiple signalling pathways. However, there is little information regarding factors that function upstream of DISC1 to regulate its expression and function. We herein demonstrate that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling promotes expression of disc1 in the zebrafish brain. Expression of disc1 is lost in smoothened mutants that have a complete loss of Shh signal transduction, and elevated in patched mutants which have constitutive activation of Shh signalling. We previously demonstrated that disc1 knockdown has a dramatic effect on the specification of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) in the hindbrain and Shh signalling is known to be essential for the specification of these cells. We show that disc1 is prominently expressed in olig2-positive midline progenitor cells that are absent in smo mutants, while cyclopamine treatment blocks disc1 expression in these cells and mimics the effect of disc1 knock down on OPC specification. Various features of a number of psychiatric conditions could potentially arise through aberrant Hedgehog signalling. We therefore suggest that altered Shh signalling may be an important neurodevelopmental factor in the pathobiology of mental illness. PMID:26405049

  13. Transcriptome Changes Affecting Hedgehog and Cytokine Signalling in the Umbilical Cord: Implications for Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Stünkel, Walter; Tng, Emilia; Tan, Jun Hao; Chen, Li; Joseph, Roy; Cheong, Clara Y.; Ong, Mei-Lyn; Lee, Yung Seng; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang Mei; Meaney, Michael J.; Kwek, Kenneth; Sheppard, Allan M.; Gluckman, Peter D.; Holbrook, Joanna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Babies born at lower gestational ages or smaller birthweights have a greater risk of poorer health in later life. Both the causes of these sub-optimal birth outcomes and the mechanism by which the effects are transmitted over decades are the subject of extensive study. We investigated whether a transcriptomic signature of either birthweight or gestational age could be detected in umbilical cord RNA. Methods The gene expression patterns of 32 umbilical cords from Singaporean babies of Chinese ethnicity across a range of birthweights (1698–4151 g) and gestational ages (35–41 weeks) were determined. We confirmed the differential expression pattern by gestational age for 12 genes in a series of 127 umbilical cords of Chinese, Malay and Indian ethnicity. Results We found that the transcriptome is substantially influenced by gestational age; but less so by birthweight. We show that some of the expression changes dependent on gestational age are enriched in signal transduction pathways, such as Hedgehog and in genes with roles in cytokine signalling and angiogenesis. We show that some of the gene expression changes we report are reflected in the epigenome. Conclusions We studied the umbilical cord which is peripheral to disease susceptible tissues. The results suggest that soma-wide transcriptome changes, preserved at the epigenetic level, may be a mechanism whereby birth outcomes are linked to the risk of adult metabolic and arthritic disease and suggest that greater attention be given to the association between premature birth and later disease risk. PMID:22808055

  14. Unsuspected Ganglioneuroma of the Choroid Diagnosed after Enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Mbagwu, Michael; Rahmani, Bahram; Srivastava, Arth; Burrowes, Delilah; Bryar, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an unsuspected ganglioneuroma of the choroid in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. A 5-year-old girl presented from an outside institution with right proptosis and glaucoma since birth. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained and showed a cavernous sinus mass extending into the right orbit and multiple orbital lesions. Additionally, increased signal in the posterior globe of the right eye was noted, but its etiology was unclear at the time. She was lost to follow-up for 3 years and later returned with a blind painful eye. Enucleation was performed, and histopathology was significant for diffuse choroidal ganglioneuroma and advanced glaucoma. We report the atypical history, examination findings, and histopathology to support the diagnosis. PMID:27171204

  15. [Mature cystic teratoma of the ovary with a small ganglioneuroma].

    PubMed

    Marucci, G; Collina, G

    2006-02-01

    A case of ganglioneuroma arising within a cystic mature teratoma of the ovary in a 34-year-old woman is reported. Patient underwent right adnexectomy. The ovary was completely replaced by a bilocular cystic lesion, measuring 8 cm in diameter and filled with adipose tissue and pilosebaceous material. Microscopically the cyst was composed by a mature cystic teratoma containing skin with dermal appendages, fatty tissue and bronchial epithelium. Furthermore a nodule (0.5 cm in size) composed of mature ganglion cells, axons and Schwann cells, was identified. Ganglion cells were positive for NSE and synaptophysin, while Schwann cells stained positively with S100 protein and GFAP. To the best of our knowledgment this is the first reported cases of ganglioneuroma arisen within a cystic mature teratoma of the ovary. PMID:16789685

  16. Paracrine Hedgehog signaling in stomach and intestine: new roles for Hedgehog in gastrointestinal patterning

    PubMed Central

    Kolterud, Åsa; Grosse, Ann S.; Zacharias, William J.; Walton, Katherine D.; Kretovich, Katherine E.; Madison, Blair; Waghray, Meghna; Ferris, Jennifer E.; Hu, Chunbo; Merchant, Juanita L.; Dlugosz, Andrzej; Kottmann, Andreas H.; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Hedgehog signaling is critical in gastrointestinal patterning. Mice deficient in Hedgehog signaling exhibit abnormalities that mirror deformities seen in the human VACTERL (vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheal, esophageal, renal, limb) association. However, the direction of Hedgehog signal flow is controversial and the cellular targets of Hedgehog signaling change with time during development. We profiled cellular Hedgehog response patterns from embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) to adult in murine antrum, pyloric region, small intestine and colon. Methods Hedgehog signaling was profiled using Hedgehog pathway reporter mice and in situ hybridization. Cellular targets were identified by immunostaining. Ihh-overexpressing transgenic animals were generated and analyzed. Results Hedgehog signaling is strictly paracrine from antrum to colon throughout embryonic and adult life. Novel findings include: mesothelial cells of the serosa transduce Hedgehog signals in fetal life; the hindgut epithelium expresses Ptch but not Gli1 at E10.5; the two layers of the muscularis externa respond differently to Hedgehog signals; organogenesis of the pyloric sphincter is associated with robust Hedgehog signaling; dramatically different Hedgehog responses characterize stomach and intestine at E16; after birth, the muscularis mucosa and villus smooth muscle (SM) consist primarily of Hedgehog responsive cells and Hh levels actively modulate villus core SM. Conclusions These studies reveal a previously unrecognized association of paracrine Hedgehog signaling with several gastrointestinal patterning events involving the serosa, pylorus and villus smooth muscle. The results may have implications for several human anomalies and could potentially expand the spectrum of the human VACTERL association. PMID:19445942

  17. Hedgehog signalling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Zhao, Zhonghua; Ingham, Philip W

    2016-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway is one of the key regulators of metazoan development. Hh proteins have been shown to play roles in many developmental processes and have become paradigms for classical morphogens. Dysfunction of the Hh pathway underlies a number of human developmental abnormalities and diseases, making it an important therapeutic target. Interest in Hh signalling thus extends across many fields, from evo-devo to cancer research and regenerative medicine. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an outline of the current understanding of Hh signalling mechanisms, highlighting the similarities and differences between species. PMID:26839340

  18. Non-Functional Adrenal Gland Ganglioneuroma Masquerading as Chronic Calculus Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmi D; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, H L

    2015-09-01

    Adrenal ganglioneuromas in young adults are rare and ill-understood. We report an incidentally detected adrenal gland tumor diagnosed as ganglioneuroma (mature type) in 33 years old man who presented with vomiting and epigastric pain for 2 months. Histopathology examination revealed a well-encapsulated benign tumor of mature ganglion cells and Schwann-like cells arranged in fascicles, staining strongly with NSE and s-100 proteins, with adjacent unremarkable adrenal cortex and medulla. PMID:27608876

  19. Conus medullaris ganglioneuroma with syringomyelia radiologically mimicking ependymoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, KAI; DAI, JIANPING

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas are rare, benign, well-differentiated tumors of the conus medullaris. Approximately 20 cases of spinal cord ganglioneuroma, and only 1 case of mixed chemodectoma-ganglioneuroma of the conus medullaris have been previously reported. The present study presents the case of a 38-year-old man with a histopathological diagnosis of conus medullaris ganglioneuroma. The patient presented with hypoesthesia in the lower limbs, muscle atrophy of the right lower limb and dysuria. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis led to a diagnosis of ependymoma. Histopathological analysis of the excised mass revealed typical, well-differentiated ganglion cells, consistent with a ganglioneuroma. The mass was associated with a neighboring syringomyelia. At an 18 month follow-up the patient had recovered, although some remaining difficulty in walking and urinating remained. The aim of the present report was to raise awareness that when ganglioneuromas present in unusual locations, analogous radiological findings may mislead investigators to consider more common pathologies and thus result in misdiagnosis. The present case demonstrates the importance of considering the potential differential diagnoses for neural tissue neoplasms. PMID:26788212

  20. Intermittent Fever, Progressive Weight Gain, and Personality Changes in a Five-Year-Old Girl: Unusual Paraneoplastic Syndrome due to Presacral Ganglioneuroma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Li, Chang-chun; Zhang, Jun; Kong, Xiang-ru; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Deng, Xiao-bin; Peng, Liang; Wang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas are rare tumors in the neuroblastoma group. Paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) due to presacral ganglioneuromas was hardly reported in previous literature. Here, we reported that a case of a 5-year-old girl with a presacral ganglioneuroma presented with PNS, who presented with intermittent fever, progressive weight gain, and personality changes. Our report revealed intermittent fever, progressive weight gain, and personality changes may represent rare paraneoplastic syndromes in ganglioneuromas. PMID:27413558

  1. Ganglioneuroma of the Internal Auditory Canal Presenting as a Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Bekelis, Kimon; Meiklejohn, Duncan A.; Missios, Symeon; Harris, Brent; Saunders, James E.; Erkmen, Kadir

    2011-01-01

    In most series, 90% of cerebellopontine angle tumors are vestibular schwannomas. Meningiomas and epidermoid tumors follow with decreased frequency. Ganglioneuroma is a benign tumor usually found in the retroperitoneum and posterior mediastinum. We report a case of a 21-year-old man with gradual sensorineural hearing loss and a minimally enhancing lesion of the internal auditory canal, which was excised through a middle fossa approach and found histologically to be a ganglioneuroma. Like vestibular schwannomas, these lesions are benign in nature and may be managed in a similar fashion, although the possibility of malignant transformation may support surgical resection over conservative management or radiosurgery. Ganglioneuromas should be considered in patients with atypical radiographic findings for vestibular schwannomas. PMID:23984208

  2. Adrenal ganglioneuroma in a patient with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD): a rare association.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Vishwajeet; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan; Babu, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal ganglioneuromas are rare, benign incidentalomas of a neural crest origin. A majority of these tumours are clinically silent and discovered on imaging for unrelated reasons. Polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) is an endocrine disorder characterised by bilateral polycystic ovaries, anovulation leading to infertility, irregular menstrual cycles and features of androgen hormone excess. Herein we report a rare case of adrenal ganglioneuroma in a 14-year-old girl with PCOD. She was referred to us by the gynaecologist after incidental detection of adrenal mass on ultrasonography. Except for raised 24 h urinary metanephrines, rest of the hormones measured were in normal range. Transperitoneal adrenalectomy was performed and histopathology was suggestive of ganglioneuroma. Postoperative recovery was excellent and she is doing well. To our knowledge it is the first such type of case to be reported. PMID:24145507

  3. Scoliosis secondary to ganglioneuroma: a case report and up to date literature review.

    PubMed

    D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Properzi, Enrico; Palombaro, Marta; Lodato, Valentina; Mellino, Loretta; Tetti, Martina; Martini, Lorena; Persiani, Pietro

    2014-07-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is the most common form of spinal deformity in children. However, secondary causes of scoliosis, such as ganglioneuroma, should be always considered to avoid wrong diagnosis, and further investigations are required when there are atypical signs. We report a case of ganglioneuroma misdiagnosed as idiopathic scoliosis and review the literature to identify the red flags useful for physicians during the evaluation of a child with scoliosis. On the basis of both clinical and radiographic criteria that emerged from this study, we propose an algorithm that could help in the differential diagnosis, suggesting when to perform an MRI. PMID:24681491

  4. Hedgehog signaling update.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M Michael

    2010-08-01

    In vertebrate hedgehog signaling, hedgehog ligands are processed to become bilipidated and then multimerize, which allows them to leave the signaling cell via Dispatched 1 and become transported via glypicans and megalin to the responding cells. Hedgehog then interacts with a complex of Patched 1 and Cdo/Boc, which activates endocytic Smoothened to the cilium. Patched 1 regulates the activity of Smoothened (1) via Vitamin D3, which inhibits Smoothened in the absence of hedgehog ligand or (2) via oxysterols, which activate Smoothened in the presence of hedgehog ligand. Hedgehog ligands also interact with Hip1, Patched 2, and Gas1, which regulate the range as well as the level of hedgehog signaling. In vertebrates, Smoothened is shortened at its C-terminal end and lacks most of the phosphorylation sites of importance in Drosophila. Cos2, also of importance in Drosophila, plays no role in mammalian transduction, nor do its homologs Kif7 and Kif27. The cilium may provide a function analogous to that of Cos2 by linking Smoothened to the modulation of Gli transcription factors. Disorders associated with the hedgehog signaling network follow, including nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, holoprosencephaly, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, Pallister-Hall syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. PMID:20635334

  5. Outfoxing the Hedgehog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbieri, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Jim Collins's "Good to Great" has attained near-scriptural status in organizations, including nonprofits, which Collins says constitute a third of his readers. The pivot point in "Good to Great" is the Hedgehog Concept. The "Hedgehog Concept" (HC), this author claims, is dangerous for schools because it distorts the nature of education. As Collins…

  6. A Comparison of Raman Spectral Features of Frozen and Deparaffinized Tissues in Neuroblastoma and Ganglioneuroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, Suneetha; Thakur, Jagdish S.; Poulik, Janet M.; Rabah, Raja; Naik, Vaman M.; Naik, Ratna

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the cellular regions in neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma using Raman spectroscopy and compared their spectral characteristics with those of normal adrenal gland. Thin sections from both frozen and deparaffinized tissues, obtained from the same tissue specimen, were studied in conjunction with the pathological examination of the tissues. We found a significant difference in the spectral features of frozen sections of normal adrenal gland, neuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma when compared to deparaffinized tissues. The quantitative analysis of the Raman data using chemometric methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis obtained from the frozen tissues show a sensitivity and specificity of 100% each. The biochemical identification based on the spectral differences shows that the normal adrenal gland tissues have higher levels of carotenoids, lipids, and cholesterol compared to the neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma frozen tissues. However, deparaffinized tissues show complete removal of these biochemicals in adrenal tissues. This study demonstrates that Raman spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods can successfully distinguish neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma at cellular level.

  7. Metastable nematic hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Riccardo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    1996-07-01

    For nematic liquid crystals, we study the local stability of a radial hedgehog against biaxial perturbations. Our analysis employs the Landau - de Gennes functional to describe the free energy stored in a ball, whose radius is a parameter of the model. We find that a radial hedgehog may be either unstable or metastable, depending on the values of the elastic constants. For unstable hedgehogs, we give an explicit expression for the radius of the ball within which the instability manifests itself: it can be interpreted as the size of the biaxial core of the defect; it is of the same order of magnitude as the radius of the disclination ring predicted by Penzenstadler and Trebin's model. The metastable hedgehogs predicted by our model are the major novelty of the paper. They tell us that we may also expect truly uniaxial point defects, whose core contains no biaxial structure.

  8. Paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma.

    PubMed

    Fancellu, Roberto; Corsini, Elena; Bernardi, Giorgio; Buzzo, Paolo; Ferrari, Maria Luisa; Lamantea, Eleonora; Garaventa, Alberto; Truini, Mauro; Salvarani, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-Hu antibodies and benign ganglioneuroma. A 28-year-old woman developed progressive ataxia with hyporeflexia at the age of 19. Brain MRI showed progressive cerebellar atrophy. Neurophysiological studies, screening of immune-mediated ataxias, oncological markers, vitamin E and genetic tests for spinocerebellar ataxia types 1,2,3, Friedreich ataxia and POLG1 were negative. Anti-Hu antibodies were positive in Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (1:640). Total-body computed tomography revealed a mediastinum mass; the histological diagnosis was maturing ganglioneuroma. Immunohistochemistry showed a mild reaction between the tumor and the patient's serum, and no reaction between the tumor and control serum. After surgery, serum anti-Hu titer decreased, while ataxic symptoms initially worsened and then stabilized. Ganglioneuroma is a benign tumor, usually derived from the maturation of a neuroblastoma. The benign histology and the presence of anti-Hu antibodies could be related to the positive oncological prognosis and to the slow clinical course mimicking a degenerative ataxia. PMID:25764259

  9. Hedgehog signaling in skin cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengxin; Chi, Sumin; Xie, Jingwu

    2011-01-01

    An increasing progress on the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling for carcinogenesis has been achieved since the link of Hh pathway to human cancer was firstly established. In particular, the critical role of Hh signaling in the development of Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been convincingly demonstrated by genetic mutation analyses, mouse models of BCCs, and successful clinical trials of BCCs using Hh signaling inhibitors. In addition, the Hh pathway activity is also reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), melanoma and Merkel Cell Carcinoma. These findings have significant new paradigm on Hh signaling transduction, its mechanisms in skin cancer and even therapeutic approaches for BCC. In this review, we will summarize the major advances in the understanding of Hh signaling transduction, the roles of Hh signaling in skin cancer development, and the current implications of “mechanism-based” therapeutic strategies. PMID:21397013

  10. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Aleksandar; Von Hoff, Daniel

    2016-02-25

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in a majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCC). Vismodegib and sonidegib are targeted inhibitors of Smoothened (SMO). Both drugs are approved for use in locally advanced BCC (laBCC), with vismodegib also approved for metastatic BCC (mBCC). PMID:26919418

  11. Functionally active ganglioneuroma with increased plasma and urinary catecholamines and positive iodine 131-meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Clerico, A.; Jenkner, A.; Castello, M.A.; Ciofetta, G.; Lucarelli, C.; Codini, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas are usually considered not to be functionally active. Studies of their catecholamine excretory pattern and of their imaging by means of the adrenergic tracing agent 131-I-MIBG have been therefore sparse. We report on a case of secretory ganglioneuroma, as demonstrated by the increased urinary excretion of the catecholamine metabolites HVA and VMA, increased plasma dopamine and epinephrine levels, and positive 131-I-MIBG scintigraphy. We must therefore be aware that a functionally active tumor is not necessarily a neuroblastoma, and that the diagnosis should be biopsy proven.

  12. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling and VACTERL Association

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, E.S.-W.; Kim, K.-H.; Hui, C.-c.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is vital for the patterning and organogenesis of almost every system. The specificity of these developmental processes is achieved through a tight spatio-temporal regulation of Hh signaling. Mice with defective Hh signal exhibit a wide spectrum of anomalies, including Vertebral defects, Anal atresia, Cardiovascular anomalies, Tracheoesophageal fistula, Renal dysplasia, and Limb defects, that resemble strikingly the phenotypes observed in VACTERL association in humans. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of mammalian Hh signaling and highlight the relevance of various mouse models for studying the etiology and pathogenesis of VACTERL association. In addition, recent advances in genetic study for unraveling the complexity of genetic inheritance of VACTERL and the implication of the Sonic hedgehog pathway in disease pathogenesis are also discussed. PMID:23653575

  13. Dopamine-secreting giant adrenal ganglioneuroma: clinical and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Polat, A V; Polat, A Kamali; Aslan, K; Atmaca, H; Karagoz, F

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a dopamine-secreting giant primary adrenal ganglioneuroma (GN) in a 29-year-old male patient. Although the patient was clinically silent, the 24-hour urine levels of dopamine, normetanephrine, homovanillic acid and vanillyl mandelic acid were elevated. Abdominal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a large solid tumor with calcifications and a slightly lobular edge on the left adrenal gland. A tumor, 13 x 23 x 25 cm in size, was completely resected without morbidity. A 2-year follow-up with computed tomography showed that the postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. PMID:25073244

  14. Hedgehog Excitations and their Superconducting Cores in the Antiferromagnetic State of SO(5) Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    1998-03-01

    Zhang's SO(5) approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials(S.-C. Zhang, Science 275), 1089 (1997). contains the possibility that the antiferromagnetic state should support novel excitations that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region(P. M. Goldbart, Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores); cond- mat/9711088 (UIUC Preprint P-97-10-030-iii).. Neither singular nor topologically stable, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these excitations are what hedgehogs become when antiferromagnetic order is permitted to `` escape'' toward superconductivity---a central element in Zhang's approach. We describe the structure of antiferromagnetic hedgehog excitations with superconducting cores within the context of Zhang's approach to high-temperature superconducting materials, and touch upon a number of the experimental implications that these excitations engender.

  15. Crossed thalamocortical connections in the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec: dissimilarities to erinaceous hedgehog, similarities to mammals with more differentiated brains.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1995-04-14

    The adult erinaceous hedgehog, unlike other mammals, has recently been shown to have prominent crossed projections from the thalamus to the motor cortex. There are suggestions relating this unique pattern of connectivity to the overall degree of brain differentiation and/or the poorly developed corpus callosum. The present tracing study demonstrates that the Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec, with its tiny corpus callosum and one of the lowest neocorticalization indices among insectivores, has extensive crossed cortico-thalamic projections, but essentially the same sparse thalamic projections to the contralateral cortex as have placental mammals with more differentiated brains. The implications of the findings and the relevance of extracallosal pathways are discussed. PMID:7541906

  16. Hedgehog signaling and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Finco, Isabella; LaPensee, Christopher R; Krill, Kenneth T; Hammer, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery nearly 30 years ago, the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been shown to be pivotal in many developmental and pathophysiological processes in several steroidogenic tissues, including the testis, ovary, adrenal cortex, and placenta. New evidence links the evolutionarily conserved Hh pathway to the steroidogenic organs, demonstrating how Hh signaling can influence their development and homeostasis and can act in concert with steroids to mediate physiological functions. In this review, we highlight the role of the components of the Hh signaling pathway in steroidogenesis of endocrine tissues. PMID:25668018

  17. Palmitoylation of Hedgehog proteins.

    PubMed

    Buglino, John A; Resh, Marilyn D

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are secreted signaling proteins that contain amide-linked palmitate at the N-terminus and cholesterol at the C-terminus. Palmitoylation of Hh proteins is critical for effective long- and short-range signaling. The palmitoylation reaction occurs during transit of Hh through the secretory pathway, most likely in the lumen of the ER. Attachment of palmitate to Hh proteins is independent of cholesterol modification and autoprocessing and is catalyzed by Hhat (Hedgehog acyltransferase). Hhat is a member of the membrane bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, a subgroup of multipass membrane proteins that catalyze transfer of fatty acyl groups to lipids and proteins. Several classes of secreted proteins have recently been shown to be substrates for MBOAT acyltransferases, including Hh proteins and Spitz (palmitoylated by Hhat), Wg/Wnt proteins (modified with palmitate and/or palmitoleate by Porcupine) and ghrelin (octanoylated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase). These findings highlight protein fatty acylation as a mechanism that not only influences membrane binding of intracellular proteins but also regulates the signaling range and efficacy of secreted proteins. PMID:22391306

  18. Inhibitors of Hedgehog acyltransferase block Sonic Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Elissaveta; Rios-Esteves, Jessica; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Glickman, J Fraser; Resh, Marilyn D

    2013-04-01

    Inhibition of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is of great clinical interest. Here we exploit Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat)-mediated Shh palmitoylation, a modification critical for Shh signaling, as a new target for Shh pathway inhibition. A target-oriented high-throughput screen was used to identify small-molecule inhibitors of Hhat. In cells, these Hhat inhibitors specifically block Shh palmitoylation and inhibit autocrine and paracrine Shh signaling. PMID:23416332

  19. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of KrasG12D-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radio-sensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:23182391

  20. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  1. Homeodomains, Hedgehogs, and Happiness.

    PubMed

    Scott, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Developmental biologists have had a spectacular quarter century of discoveries, building on many decades of work earlier, discovering molecular, cellular, and genetic mechanisms that underlie the magical process by which an egg becomes a plant or animal. Among the discoveries were homeodomains, DNA-binding domains that allow transcription factors to recognize their target genes, and the Hedgehog signaling pathway, which is used in many organs and tissues for communication among cells. The experience of unveiling the mechanisms and molecules connected to both of these findings has been remarkable, joyful, difficult, and a time of great teamwork and collaboration within and between laboratory groups. More than ever it is possible to discern the evolutionary processes, and their mechanisms, that led to the diversity of life on earth. A huge amount of work remains to be done to obtain a broad understanding of what happened and how development works. PMID:26969987

  2. Canonical and non-canonical Hedgehog signalling and the control of metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Teperino, Raffaele; Aberger, Fritz; Esterbauer, Harald; Riobo, Natalia; Pospisilik, John Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes represent key healthcare challenges of our day, affecting upwards of one billion people worldwide. These individuals are at higher risk for cancer, stroke, blindness, heart and cardiovascular disease, and to date, have no effective long-term treatment options available. Recent and accumulating evidence has implicated the developmental morphogen Hedgehog and its downstream signalling in metabolic control. Generally thought to be quiescent in adults, Hedgehog is associated with several human cancers, and as such, has already emerged as a therapeutic target in oncology. Here, we attempt to give a comprehensive overview of the key signalling events associated with both canonical and non-canonical Hedgehog signalling, and highlight the increasingly complex regulatory modalities that appear to link Hedgehog and control metabolism. We highlight these key findings and discuss their impact for therapeutic development, cancer and metabolic disease. PMID:24862854

  3. Non-canonical Hedgehog/AMPK-Mediated Control of Polyamine Metabolism Supports Neuronal and Medulloblastoma Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Davide; Antonucci, Laura; Di Magno, Laura; Coni, Sonia; Sdruscia, Giulia; Macone, Alberto; Miele, Evelina; Infante, Paola; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; De Smaele, Enrico; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Ciapponi, Laura; Giangaspero, Felice; Yates, John R; Agostinelli, Enzo; Cardinali, Beatrice; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2015-10-12

    Developmental Hedgehog signaling controls proliferation of cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs), and its aberrant activation is a leading cause of medulloblastoma. We show here that Hedgehog promotes polyamine biosynthesis in GCPs by engaging a non-canonical axis leading to the translation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). This process is governed by AMPK, which phosphorylates threonine 173 of the zinc finger protein CNBP in response to Hedgehog activation. Phosphorylated CNBP increases its association with Sufu, followed by CNBP stabilization, ODC translation, and polyamine biosynthesis. Notably, CNBP, ODC, and polyamines are elevated in Hedgehog-dependent medulloblastoma, and genetic or pharmacological inhibition of this axis efficiently blocks Hedgehog-dependent proliferation of medulloblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data illustrate an auxiliary mechanism of metabolic control by a morphogenic pathway with relevant implications in development and cancer. PMID:26460945

  4. Zinc Inhibits Hedgehog Autoprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Owen, Timothy; Xia, Ke; Singh, Ajay Vikram; Tou, Emiley; Li, Lingyun; Arduini, Brigitte; Li, Hongmin; Wan, Leo Q.; Callahan, Brian; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element with wide-ranging biological functions, whereas the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in both development and disease. Here we show that there is a mechanistic link between zinc and Hh signaling. The upstream activator of Hh signaling, the Hh ligand, originates from Hh autoprocessing, which converts the Hh precursor protein to the Hh ligand. In an in vitro Hh autoprocessing assay we show that zinc inhibits Hh autoprocessing with a Ki of 2 μm. We then demonstrate that zinc inhibits Hh autoprocessing in a cellular environment with experiments in primary rat astrocyte culture. Solution NMR reveals that zinc binds the active site residues of the Hh autoprocessing domain to inhibit autoprocessing, and isothermal titration calorimetry provided the thermodynamics of the binding. In normal physiology, zinc likely acts as a negative regulator of Hh autoprocessing and inhibits the generation of Hh ligand and Hh signaling. In many diseases, zinc deficiency and elevated level of Hh ligand co-exist, including prostate cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, and autism. Our data suggest a causal relationship between zinc deficiency and the overproduction of Hh ligand. PMID:25787080

  5. Hedgehog Signaling in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Omenetti, Alessia; Choi, Steve; Michelotti, Gregory; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2010-01-01

    Reactivation of Hedgehog (Hh), a morphogenic signaling pathway that controls progenitor cell fate and tissue construction during embryogenesis occurs during many types of liver injury in adult. The net effects of activating the Hedgehog pathway include expansion of liver progenitor populations to promote liver regeneration, but also hepatic accumulation of inflammatory cells, liver fibrogenesis, and vascular remodeling. All of these latter responses are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of cirrhosis. In addition, Hh signaling may play a role in primary liver cancers, such as cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Study of Hedgehog signaling in liver cells is in its infancy. Additional research in this area is justified given growing experimental and clinical data supporting a role for the pathway in regulating outcomes of liver injury. PMID:21093090

  6. Intestinal lymphosarcoma in captive African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Clarke, K A; Schafer, K A

    1998-10-01

    Two captive adult female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) had inappetance and bloody diarrhea for several days prior to death. Both hedgehogs had ulceration of the small intestine and hepatic lipidosis. Histopathology revealed small intestinal lymphosarcoma with metastasis to the liver. Extracellular particles that had characteristics of retroviruses were observed associated with the surface of some neoplastic lymphoid cells by transmission electron microscopy. These are the first reported cases of intestinal lymphosarcoma in African hedgehogs. PMID:9813852

  7. Mammary gland tumors in captive African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Gerner, M

    2000-04-01

    From December 1995 to July 1999, eight mammary gland tumors were diagnosed in eight adult captive female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris). The tumors presented as single or multiple subcutaneous masses along the cranial or caudal abdomen that varied in size for each hedgehog. Histologically, seven of eight (88%) mammary gland tumors were malignant. Tumors were classified as solid (4 cases), tubular (2 cases), and papillary (2 cases). Seven tumors had infiltrated into the surrounding stroma and three tumors had histologic evidence of neoplastic vascular invasion. Three hedgehogs had concurrent neoplasms. These are believed to be the first reported cases of mammary gland tumors in African hedgehogs. PMID:10813628

  8. Hedgehog Cholesterolysis: Specialized Gatekeeper to Oncogenic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Brian P; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Discussions of therapeutic suppression of hedgehog (Hh) signaling almost exclusively focus on receptor antagonism; however, hedgehog's biosynthesis represents a unique and potentially targetable aspect of this oncogenic signaling pathway. Here, we review a key biosynthetic step called cholesterolysis from the perspectives of structure/function and small molecule inhibition. Cholesterolysis, also called cholesteroylation, generates cholesterol-modified Hh ligand via autoprocessing of a hedgehog precursor protein. Post-translational modification by cholesterol appears to be restricted to proteins in the hedgehog family. The transformation is essential for Hh biological activity and upstream of signaling events. Despite its decisive role in generating ligand, cholesterolysis remains conspicuously unexplored as a therapeutic target. PMID:26473928

  9. Cytologic diagnosis of diseases of hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Garner, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on neoplastic diseases because they may be the most frequent disease processes in captive hedgehogs according to the literature and authors' case files and the most common cases submitted for cytologic diagnosis in these species, particularly the African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). PMID:17198959

  10. A Polyamine Twist on Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-10-12

    The Hedgehog pathway plays important roles in embryonic development and oncogenesis, but how it affects metabolism is less clear. D'Amico et al. (2015) now demonstrate that the Hedgehog pathway regulates translation of ornithine decarboxylase, thereby enhancing polyamine biosynthesis and cell proliferation in neural precursor cells and in brain tumors. PMID:26460938

  11. Cardiac assessment of African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Black, Peter A; Marshall, Cecilia; Seyfried, Alice W; Bartin, Anne M

    2011-03-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) at postmortem exam. To date, treatment attempts have been mostly empirical and unrewarding. The objective of this study was to determine reference cardiac values for captive African hedgehogs based on echocardiogram, electrocardiogram (ECG), and radiographs. Adult African hedgehogs with no clinical signs of cardiac disease (n = 13) were selected. Each animal was anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask and an echocardiogram, ECG, and radiographs were performed. Standard measurements were taken and the descriptive statistics performed. Values were comparable to limited data available in other hedgehog species and other similar-sized exotic species. Two animals were removed from consideration of reference values due to valvular defects that were considered significant. These data are the first establishing cardiac parameters in normal African hedgehogs using radiographic cardiac measurement, echocardiogram, and ECG. Evaluating animals with possible cardiomyopathy may allow for earlier diagnosis and more successful treatment. PMID:22946370

  12. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  13. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  14. Inhibition of hedgehog signaling reduces the side population in human malignant mesothelioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H-A; Kim, M-C; Kim, N-Y; Kim, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of crucial embryonic pathways, including hedgehog signaling, has been frequently implicated in a variety of human cancers and is emerging as an important target for anticancer therapy. This study evaluated the potential anticancer effects of cyclopamine, a chemical inhibitor of hedgehog signaling, in human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell lines. Cyclopamine treatment significantly decreased the proliferation of HMM cells by promoting apoptosis and shifting the cell cycle toward dormant phase. The clonogenicity and mobility of HMM cells were significantly decreased by cyclopamine treatment. Treatment of HMM cells with cyclopamine significantly reduced the abundance of side population cells, which were measured using an assay composed of Hoechst 33342 dye staining and subsequent flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression levels of stemness-related genes were significantly affected by cyclopamine treatment. Taken together, the present study showed that targeting hedgehog signaling could reduce a more aggressive subpopulation of the cancer cells, suggesting an alternative approach for HMM therapy. PMID:26206198

  15. Cholesterol and its derivatives in Sonic Hedgehog signaling and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riobo, Natalia A.

    2012-01-01

    The connection between the Hedgehog pathway and cholesterol has been recognized since the early days that shaped our current understanding of this unique pathway. Cholesterol and related lipids are intricately linked to HH signaling: from the role of cholesterol in HH biosynthesis to the modulation of HH signal reception and transduction by other sterols, passing by the phylogenetic relationships among many components of the HH pathway that resemble or contain lipid-binding domains. Here I review the connections between HH signaling, cholesterol and its derivatives and analyze the potential implications for HH-dependent cancers. PMID:22832232

  16. Sonic Hedgehog Signalling Pathway and Ameloblastoma - A Review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pallavi; Panda, Abikshyeet; Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath; Kumar, Harish; Mohiddin, Gouse

    2015-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but aggressive odontogenic neoplasm arising from odontogenic epithelium. Many theories have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of ameloblatoma. Numerous signalling pathways have been implicated to be associated in the development and progression of this neoplasm. Studies have found association of various signalling molecules of Sonic Hedgehog Pathway, namely SHH, PTCH1, SMO, Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3, with ameloblastoma. Knowledge about this pathway will help us to understand the nature and behaviour of this neoplasm. This will open the door towards new treatment modalities. PMID:26674664

  17. Sonic Hedgehog Signalling Pathway and Ameloblastoma – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pallavi; Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath; Kumar, Harish; Mohiddin, Gouse

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but aggressive odontogenic neoplasm arising from odontogenic epithelium. Many theories have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of ameloblatoma. Numerous signalling pathways have been implicated to be associated in the development and progression of this neoplasm. Studies have found association of various signalling molecules of Sonic Hedgehog Pathway, namely SHH, PTCH1, SMO, Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3, with ameloblastoma. Knowledge about this pathway will help us to understand the nature and behaviour of this neoplasm. This will open the door towards new treatment modalities. PMID:26674664

  18. Hedgehog Signaling Components Are Expressed in Choroidal Neovascularization in Laser-induced Retinal Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nochioka, Katsunori; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Morita, Shoko; Ogata, Nahoko; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization is one of the major pathological changes in age-related macular degeneration, which causes devastating blindness in the elderly population. The molecular mechanism of choroidal neovascularization has been under extensive investigation, but is still an open question. We focused on sonic hedgehog signaling, which is implicated in angiogenesis in various organs. Laser-induced injuries to the mouse retina were made to cause choroidal neovascularization. We examined gene expression of sonic hedgehog, its receptors (patched1, smoothened, cell adhesion molecule down-regulated by oncogenes (Cdon) and biregional Cdon-binding protein (Boc)) and downstream transcription factors (Gli1-3) using real-time RT-PCR. At seven days after injury, mRNAs for Patched1 and Gli1 were upregulated in response to injury, but displayed no upregulation in control retinas. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Patched1 and Gli1 proteins were localized to CD31-positive endothelial cells that cluster between the wounded retina and the pigment epithelium layer. Treatment with the hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine did not significantly decrease the size of the neovascularization areas, but the hedgehog agonist purmorphamine made the areas significantly larger than those in untreated retina. These results suggest that the hedgehog-signaling cascade may be a therapeutic target for age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27239075

  19. Functional Interaction between HEXIM and Hedgehog Signaling during Drosophila Wing Development

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy; Fayol, Olivier; Buisine, Nicolas; Lecorre, Pierrette; Uguen, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Studying the dynamic of gene regulatory networks is essential in order to understand the specific signals and factors that govern cell proliferation and differentiation during development. This also has direct implication in human health and cancer biology. The general transcriptional elongation regulator P-TEFb regulates the transcriptional status of many developmental genes. Its biological activity is controlled by an inhibitory complex composed of HEXIM and the 7SK snRNA. Here, we examine the function of HEXIM during Drosophila development. Our key finding is that HEXIM affects the Hedgehog signaling pathway. HEXIM knockdown flies display strong phenotypes and organ failures. In the wing imaginal disc, HEXIM knockdown initially induces ectopic expression of Hedgehog (Hh) and its transcriptional effector Cubitus interuptus (Ci). In turn, deregulated Hedgehog signaling provokes apoptosis, which is continuously compensated by apoptosis-induced cell proliferation. Thus, the HEXIM knockdown mutant phenotype does not result from the apoptotic ablation of imaginal disc; but rather from the failure of dividing cells to commit to a proper developmental program due to Hedgehog signaling defects. Furthermore, we show that ci is a genetic suppressor of hexim. Thus, HEXIM ensures the integrity of Hedgehog signaling in wing imaginal disc, by a yet unknown mechanism. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the physiological function of HEXIM has been addressed in such details in vivo. PMID:27176767

  20. Hedgehog Signaling Components Are Expressed in Choroidal Neovascularization in Laser-induced Retinal Lesion.

    PubMed

    Nochioka, Katsunori; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Morita, Shoko; Ogata, Nahoko; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-04-28

    Choroidal neovascularization is one of the major pathological changes in age-related macular degeneration, which causes devastating blindness in the elderly population. The molecular mechanism of choroidal neovascularization has been under extensive investigation, but is still an open question. We focused on sonic hedgehog signaling, which is implicated in angiogenesis in various organs. Laser-induced injuries to the mouse retina were made to cause choroidal neovascularization. We examined gene expression of sonic hedgehog, its receptors (patched1, smoothened, cell adhesion molecule down-regulated by oncogenes (Cdon) and biregional Cdon-binding protein (Boc)) and downstream transcription factors (Gli1-3) using real-time RT-PCR. At seven days after injury, mRNAs for Patched1 and Gli1 were upregulated in response to injury, but displayed no upregulation in control retinas. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Patched1 and Gli1 proteins were localized to CD31-positive endothelial cells that cluster between the wounded retina and the pigment epithelium layer. Treatment with the hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine did not significantly decrease the size of the neovascularization areas, but the hedgehog agonist purmorphamine made the areas significantly larger than those in untreated retina. These results suggest that the hedgehog-signaling cascade may be a therapeutic target for age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27239075

  1. Thyroid, Renal, and Breast Carcinomas, Chondrosarcoma, Colon Adenomas, and Ganglioneuroma: A New Cancer Syndrome, FAP, or Just Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Ihab Shafek; AlQahtani, Fahd Nasser

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a case associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, invasive mammary carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, benign ganglioneuroma, and numerous colon adenomas. The patient had a family history of colon cancer, kidney and bladder cancers, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia, and throat and mouth cancers. She was diagnosed with colonic villous adenoma at the age of 41 followed by thyroid, renal, and breast cancers and chondrosarcoma at the ages of 48, 64, 71, and 74, respectively. Additionally, we included a table with the most common familial cancer syndromes with one or more benign or malignant tumors diagnosed in our case, namely, FAP, HNPCC, Cowden, Peutz-Jeghers, renal cancer, tuberous sclerosis, VHL, breast/other, breast/ovarian, Carney, Werner's, Bloom, Li-Fraumeni, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia-telangiectasia, osteochondromatosis, retinoblastoma, and MEN2A. PMID:27087812

  2. Thyroid, Renal, and Breast Carcinomas, Chondrosarcoma, Colon Adenomas, and Ganglioneuroma: A New Cancer Syndrome, FAP, or Just Coincidence.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ihab Shafek; AlQahtani, Fahd Nasser

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a case associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, invasive mammary carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, benign ganglioneuroma, and numerous colon adenomas. The patient had a family history of colon cancer, kidney and bladder cancers, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, leukemia, and throat and mouth cancers. She was diagnosed with colonic villous adenoma at the age of 41 followed by thyroid, renal, and breast cancers and chondrosarcoma at the ages of 48, 64, 71, and 74, respectively. Additionally, we included a table with the most common familial cancer syndromes with one or more benign or malignant tumors diagnosed in our case, namely, FAP, HNPCC, Cowden, Peutz-Jeghers, renal cancer, tuberous sclerosis, VHL, breast/other, breast/ovarian, Carney, Werner's, Bloom, Li-Fraumeni, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia-telangiectasia, osteochondromatosis, retinoblastoma, and MEN2A. PMID:27087812

  3. Cardiomyopathy in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2000-09-01

    From 1994 to 1999, 16 captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), from among 42 necropsy cases, were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy in this study population was 38%. Fourteen of 16 hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy were males and all hedgehogs were adult (>1 year old). Nine hedgehogs exhibited 1 or more of the following clinical signs before death: heart murmur, lethargy, icterus, moist rales, anorexia, dyspnea, dehydration, and weight loss. The remaining 7 hedgehogs died without premonitory clinical signs. Gross findings were cardiomegaly (6 cases), hepatomegaly (5 cases), pulmonary edema (5 cases), pulmonary congestion (4 cases), hydrothorax (3 cases), pulmonary infarct (1 case), renal infarcts (1 case), ascites (1 case), and 5 cases showed no changes. Histologic lesions were found mainly within the left ventricular myocardium and consisted primarily of myodegeneration, myonecrosis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and disarray of myofibers. All hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy had myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema, or both. Other common histopathologic findings were acute and chronic passive congestion of the lungs, acute passive congestion of the liver, renal tubular necrosis, vascular thrombosis, splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic lipidosis. This is the first report of cardiomyopathy in African hedgehogs. PMID:11021439

  4. [Hedgehog signaling pathway and human disorders].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and cancer formation. This pathway in mammals consists of multiple molecules such as Sonic Hedgehog, PTCH, SMO, and GLI. Mutations of these components result in various human malformations or tumors, i.e., holoprosencephaly, Gorlin syndrome, Greig encephalopolysyndactyly, Pallister-Hall syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, basal cell carcinomas, and medulloblastomas. Recently, small molecules that inhibit this signaling pathway were developed, and clinically applied to cancer therapy. Thus, understanding of these molecular relationships may facilitate the development of new therapies and treatments for diseases caused by hedgehog signaling disorders. PMID:19618878

  5. Astrocytoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) suspected wobbly hedgehog syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Makoto; Miwa, Yasutsugu; Itou, Takuya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takeo

    2011-10-01

    A 28-month-old African hedgehog was referred to our hospital with progressive tetraparesis. On the first presentation, the hedgehog was suspected as having wobbly hedgehog syndrome (WHS) and the animal was treated with medication and rehabilitation. The animal died 22 days after onset. Pathological examination revealed that the animal was involved in astrocytoma between the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord (C1). This report indicates that a primary central nervous system tumor should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses for hedgehogs presenting with progressive paresis, together with WHS. PMID:21628867

  6. Anomalous dispersions of `hedgehog' particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Joong Hwan; Yeom, Bongjun; Wang, Yichun; Tung, Siu On; Hoff, J. Damon; Kotov, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic particles in water and hydrophilic particles in oil aggregate, but can form colloidal dispersions if their surfaces are chemically camouflaged with surfactants, organic tethers, adsorbed polymers or other particles that impart affinity for the solvent and increase interparticle repulsion. A different strategy for modulating the interaction between a solid and a liquid uses surface corrugation, which gives rise to unique wetting behaviour. Here we show that this topographical effect can also be used to disperse particles in a wide range of solvents without recourse to chemicals to camouflage the particles' surfaces: we produce micrometre-sized particles that are coated with stiff, nanoscale spikes and exhibit long-term colloidal stability in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic media. We find that these `hedgehog' particles do not interpenetrate each other with their spikes, which markedly decreases the contact area between the particles and, therefore, the attractive forces between them. The trapping of air in aqueous dispersions, solvent autoionization at highly developed interfaces, and long-range electrostatic repulsion in organic media also contribute to the colloidal stability of our particles. The unusual dispersion behaviour of our hedgehog particles, overturning the notion that like dissolves like, might help to mitigate adverse environmental effects of the use of surfactants and volatile organic solvents, and deepens our understanding of interparticle interactions and nanoscale colloidal chemistry.

  7. Regulation of Thalamic Development by Sonic Hedgehog

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Douglas J.

    2012-01-01

    The thalamus is strategically positioned within the caudal diencephalic area of the forebrain, between the mesencephalon and telencephalon. This location is important for unique aspects of thalamic function, to process and relay sensory and motor information to and from the cerebral cortex. How the thalamus comes to reside within this region of the central nervous system has been the subject of much investigation. Extracellular signals secreted from key locations both extrinsic and intrinsic to the thalamic primordium have recently been identified and shown to play important roles in the growth, regionalization, and specification of thalamic progenitors. One factor in particular, the secreted morphogen Sonic hedgehog (Shh), has been implicated in spatiotemporal and threshold models of thalamic development that differ from other areas of the CNS due, in large part, to its expression within two signaling centers, the basal plate and the zona limitans intrathalamica, a dorsally projecting spike that separates the thalamus from the subthalamic region. Shh signaling from these dual sources exhibit unique and overlapping functions in the control of thalamic progenitor identity and nuclei specification. This review will highlight recent advances in our understanding of Shh function during thalamic development, revealing similarities, and differences that exist between species. PMID:22529771

  8. Twist transition of nematic hyperbolic hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    James, Richard; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-01

    Stability of an idealized hyperbolic hedgehog in a nematic liquid crystal against a twist transition is investigated by extending the methodology of Rüdinger and Stark [Liq. Cryst. 26, 753 (1999)], where the hedgehog is confined between two concentric spheres. In the ideal hyperbolic-hedgehog the molecular orientation is assumed to rotate proportionally with respect to the inclination angle, θ (and in the opposite sense). However, when splay, k11, and bend, k33, moduli differ this proportionality is lost and the liquid crystal deforms relative to the ideal with bend and splay. Although slight, these deformations are shown to significantly shift the transition if k11/k33 is small. By increasing the degree of confinement the twist transition can be inhibited, a characteristic both hyperbolic and radial hedgehogs have in common. The twist transition of a hyperbolic defect that accompanies a particle is found to be well predicted by the earlier stability analysis of a thick shell. PMID:24827263

  9. Corynebacterial pneumonia in an African hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Williams, C; Wu, C C

    1998-04-01

    A 3-mo-old, male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was anorectic and lethargic for a period of 3 days prior to death. Necropys revealed lungs that were diffusely firm, dark red, and dorsally adhered by fibrinous tags to the pericardial sac. Histopathology revealed necrosuppurative bronchopneumonia with pulmonary abscesses and suppurative pericarditis and myocarditis. A Corynebacterium sp. was isolated from the lungs. We believe this is the first reported case of corynebacterial pneumonia in an African hedgehog. PMID:9577794

  10. Intestinal plasmacytoma in an African hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Vara, J A; Miller, M A; Craft, D

    1998-04-01

    A 3-yr-old male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) had anorexia and weight loss for 1 wk before its death. The colon and mesocolon were diffusely infiltrated by a neoplastic proliferation of round cells with plasmacytoid features. A diagnosis of intestinal plasmacytoma was made and confirmed by electron microscopy. No other organs appeared to be affected. This is the first description of intestinal plasmacytoma in a hedgehog. PMID:9577789

  11. Foxf Genes Integrate Tbx5 and Hedgehog Pathways in the Second Heart Field for Cardiac Septation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Andrew D.; Yang, Xinan Holly; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Bosman, Joshua D.; Ren, Xiaomeng; Steimle, Jeffrey D.; Vokes, Steven A.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2014-01-01

    The Second Heart Field (SHF) has been implicated in several forms of congenital heart disease (CHD), including atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs). Identifying the SHF gene regulatory networks required for atrioventricular septation is therefore an essential goal for understanding the molecular basis of AVSDs. We defined a SHF Hedgehog-dependent gene regulatory network using whole genome transcriptional profiling and GLI-chromatin interaction studies. The Forkhead box transcription factors Foxf1a and Foxf2 were identified as SHF Hedgehog targets. Compound haploinsufficiency for Foxf1a and Foxf2 caused atrioventricular septal defects, demonstrating the biological relevance of this regulatory network. We identified a Foxf1a cis-regulatory element that bound the Hedgehog transcriptional regulators GLI1 and GLI3 and the T-box transcription factor TBX5 in vivo. GLI1 and TBX5 synergistically activated transcription from this cis-regulatory element in vitro. This enhancer drove reproducible expression in vivo in the posterior SHF, the only region where Gli1 and Tbx5 expression overlaps. Our findings implicate Foxf genes in atrioventricular septation, describe the molecular underpinnings of the genetic interaction between Hedgehog signaling and Tbx5, and establish a molecular model for the selection of the SHF gene regulatory network for cardiac septation. PMID:25356765

  12. Hedgehog inhibitors from Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Tatsuro; Arai, Midori A; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Ishibashi, Masami

    2015-09-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway performs an important role in embryonic development and in cellular proliferation and differentiation. However, aberrant activation of the Hh signaling pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. Hh signal inhibition was evaluated using a cell-based assay system that targets GLI1-mediated transcription. Activity-guided isolation of the Withania somnifera MeOH extract led to the isolation of six compounds: withaferin A (1) and its derivatives (2-6). Compounds 1 and 2 showed strong inhibition of Hh/GLI1-mediated transcriptional activity with IC50 values of 0.5 and 0.6 μM, respectively. Compounds 1, 2, 3, and 6 were cytotoxic toward human pancreatic (PANC-1), prostate (DU145) and breast (MCF7) cancer cells. Furthermore, 1 also inhibited GLI1-DNA complex formation in EMSA. PMID:26169123

  13. Magnetic hedgehog-like nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brombacher, C.; Falke, M.; Springer, F.; Rohrmann, H.; Goncharov, A.; Schrefl, T.; Bleloch, A.; Albrecht, M.

    2010-09-01

    Granular CoCrPt-SiO2 films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were deposited onto arrays of SiO2 nanoparticles with diameters down to 10 nm. Columnar CoCrPt grains with their c-axis pointing perpendicular to the particle surface were formed, creating a unique hedgehog-like cap structure. This peculiar structure induced by the curvature of the particles substantially modifies the magnetic properties. Underneath the CoCrPt pillars a continuous Co-rich layer was observed, which gives rise to enhanced intergranular exchange coupling resulting in single domain states. The temperature dependence of the coercivity and the angular dependence of the switching field were extracted and correlated with the microstructure.

  14. Membrane topology of hedgehog acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Matevossian, Armine; Resh, Marilyn D

    2015-01-23

    Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat) is a multipass transmembrane enzyme that mediates the covalent attachment of the 16-carbon fatty acid palmitate to the N-terminal cysteine of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). Palmitoylation of Shh by Hhat is critical for short and long range signaling. Knowledge of the topological organization of Hhat transmembrane helices would enhance our understanding of Hhat-mediated Shh palmitoylation. Bioinformatics analysis of transmembrane domains within human Hhat using 10 different algorithms resulted in highly consistent predictions in the C-terminal, but not in the N-terminal, region of Hhat. To empirically determine the topology of Hhat, we designed and exploited Hhat constructs containing either terminal or 12 different internal epitope tags. We used selective permeabilization coupled with immunofluorescence as well as a protease protection assay to demonstrate that Hhat contains 10 transmembrane domains and 2 re-entrant loops. The invariant His and highly conserved Asp residues within the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) homology domain are segregated on opposite sides of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The localization of His-379 on the lumenal membrane surface is consistent with a role for this invariant residue in catalysis. Analysis of the activity and stability of the Hhat constructs revealed that the C-terminal MBOAT domain is especially sensitive to manipulation. Moreover, there was remarkable similarity in the overall topological organization of Hhat and ghrelin O-acyltransferase, another MBOAT family member. Knowledge of the topological organization of Hhat could serve as an important tool for further design of selective Hhat inhibitors. PMID:25488661

  15. Hedgehog Signaling in the Maintenance of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Catherine R.; Szczepny, Anette; Watkins, D. Neil; Cain, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a rare population of cells with the capacity to self-renew and give rise to heterogeneous cell lineages within a tumour. Whilst the mechanisms underlying the regulation of CSCs are poorly defined, key developmental signaling pathways required for normal stem and progenitor functions have been strongly implicated. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is an evolutionarily-conserved pathway essential for self-renewal and cell fate determination. Aberrant Hh signaling is associated with the development and progression of various types of cancer and is implicated in multiple aspects of tumourigenesis, including the maintenance of CSCs. Here, we discuss the mounting evidence suggestive of Hh-driven CSCs in the context of haematological malignancies and solid tumours and the novel strategies that hold the potential to block many aspects of the transformation attributed to the CSC phenotype, including chemotherapeutic resistance, relapse and metastasis. PMID:26270676

  16. Characterization of two patched receptors for the vertebrate hedgehog protein family

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, David; Stone, Donna M.; Brush, Jennifer; Ryan, Anne; Armanini, Mark; Frantz, Gretchen; Rosenthal, Arnon; de Sauvage, Frederic J.

    1998-01-01

    The multitransmembrane protein Patched (PTCH) is the receptor for Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a secreted molecule implicated in the formation of embryonic structures and in tumorigenesis. Current models suggest that binding of Shh to PTCH prevents the normal inhibition of the seven-transmembrane-protein Smoothened (SMO) by PTCH. According to this model, the inhibition of SMO signaling is relieved after mutational inactivation of PTCH in the basal cell nevus syndrome. Recently, PTCH2, a molecule with sequence homology to PTCH, has been identified. To characterize both PTCH molecules with respect to the various Hedgehog proteins, we have isolated the human PTCH2 gene. Biochemical analysis of PTCH and PTCH2 shows that they both bind to all hedgehog family members with similar affinity and that they can form a complex with SMO. However, the expression patterns of PTCH and PTCH2 do not fully overlap. While PTCH is expressed throughout the mouse embryo, PTCH2 is found at high levels in the skin and in spermatocytes. Because Desert Hedgehog (Dhh) is expressed specifically in the testis and is required for germ cell development, it is likely that PTCH2 mediates its activity in vivo. Chromosomal localization of PTCH2 places it on chromosome 1p33–34, a region deleted in some germ cell tumors, raising the possibility that PTCH2 may be a tumor suppressor in Dhh target cells. PMID:9811851

  17. Hedgehog Cholesterolysis: Specialized Gatekeeper to Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Brian P.; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Discussions of therapeutic suppression of hedgehog (Hh) signaling almost exclusively focus on receptor antagonism; however, hedgehog’s biosynthesis represents a unique and potentially targetable aspect of this oncogenic signaling pathway. Here, we review a key biosynthetic step called cholesterolysis from the perspectives of structure/function and small molecule inhibition. Cholesterolysis, also called cholesteroylation, generates cholesterol-modified Hh ligand via autoprocessing of a hedgehog precursor protein. Post-translational modification by cholesterol appears to be restricted to proteins in the hedgehog family. The transformation is essential for Hh biological activity and upstream of signaling events. Despite its decisive role in generating ligand, cholesterolysis remains conspicuously unexplored as a therapeutic target. PMID:26473928

  18. Chylous ascites in a hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Roh, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Eun-Ju; Cho, Ara; Kim, Min-Su; Cho, Ho-Seong; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2014-12-01

    An African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was diagnosed as chylous ascites with biliary cirrhosis. Abdomenocentesis revealed a milky fluid with a 324 mg/dl triglyceride level. On serum biochemical examination, the hedgehog had hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, and high blood urea nitrogen. There was no cytologic or genomic evidence of infection, and a blood culture was negative. Histopathologic examination revealed a liver with proliferative bile ducts that were often surrounded by prominent septa of fibrous connective tissue. In the area of ductular reaction, proliferative cells positive for CD66, an embryogenic antigen of epithelial cells, were revealed. The potential association between chylous ascites and liver cirrhosis is undetermined but could be an aspect of future study. This is the first description of chylous ascites in a hedgehog. PMID:25632690

  19. The role of ciliary trafficking in Hedgehog receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jynho; Hsia, Elaine Y. C.; Brigui, Amira; Plessis, Anne; Beachy, Philip A.; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Defects in the biogenesis of or transport through primary cilia affect Hedgehog protein signaling, and many Hedgehog pathway components traffic through or accumulate in cilia. The Hedgehog receptor, Patched, negatively regulates the activity and ciliary accumulation of Smoothened, a seven transmembrane protein that is essential for transducing the Hedgehog signal. We found that this negative regulation of Smoothened required the ciliary localization of Patched, as specified either by its own cytoplasmic tail or by provision of heterologous ciliary localization signals. Surprisingly, given that Hedgehog binding promotes the exit of Patched from the cilium, we observed that an altered form of Patched that is retained in the cilium nevertheless responded to Hedgehog, resulting in Smoothened activation. Our results indicate that, whereas ciliary localization of Patched is essential for suppression of Smoothened activation, the primary event enabling Smoothened activation is binding of Hedgehog to Patched, and Patched ciliary removal is secondary. PMID:26038600

  20. Detection of a pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) in an African hedgehog (Atelerix arbiventris) with suspected wobbly hedgehog syndrome (WHS).

    PubMed

    Madarame, Hiroo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Kimura, Moe; Nagai, Makoto; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Ochiai, Hideharu; Mizutani, Tetsyuya

    2014-09-17

    A pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) from an African hedgehog (Atelerix arbiventris) with suspected wobbly hedgehog syndrome (WHS) was detected and genetically characterized. The affected hedgehog had a nonsuppurative encephalitis with vacuolization of the white matter, and the brain samples yielded RNA reads highly homogeneous to PVM strain 15 (96.5% of full genomic sequence homology by analysis of next generation sequencing). PVM antigen was also detected in the brain and the lungs immunohistochemically. A PVM was strongly suggested as a causative agent of encephalitis of a hedgehog with suspected WHS. This is a first report of PVM infection in hedgehogs. PMID:25129384

  1. Endometrial polyps in 2 African pygmy hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Reports of spontaneously occurring endometrial polyps in animals are rare and have only involved a few species. This report is intended to advise veterinarians that older African pygmy hedgehogs may develop endometrial polyps and that these lesions can be a cause of bloody vaginal discharge, sometimes interpreted as hematuria. PMID:16048013

  2. Ectoparasites of hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor) from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Girisgin, Ahmet Onur; Senlik, Bayram; Aydin, Levent; Cirak, Veli Y

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehogs are small, nocturnal, spiny-coated animals that have been growing in popularity as exotic pets. However, these animals are host to a wide variety of viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites, some of which are of zoonotic character. Thus, because hedgehogs have a potential role to transmit zoonoses including arthropod-borne diseases, we examined them for their ectoparasites. The study was carried out on hedgehogs found dead mainly due to road casualties in the Bursa province of Turkey. The ectoparasites were collected by both insecticide spraying of the body and inspection on a white paper carefully. Totally three species of ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Hyalomma aegyptium, Haemophysalis parvo) and one flea species (Archeopsylla erinacei) were detected. The prevalence of mixed infestation with both ticks and fleas was 45.5%. Haemaphysalis parva was reported for the first time from hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor) in Turkey. The occurrence of ectoparasites and their potential role as vectors of certain zoonotic diseases are briefly discussed. PMID:26281445

  3. Twist transition of nematic hyperbolic hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Richard; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-01

    Stability of an idealized hyperbolic hedgehog in a nematic liquid crystal against a twist transition is investigated by extending the methodology of Rüdinger and Stark [Liq. Cryst. 26, 753 (1999), 10.1080/026782999204840], where the hedgehog is confined between two concentric spheres. In the ideal hyperbolic-hedgehog the molecular orientation is assumed to rotate proportionally with respect to the inclination angle, θ (and in the opposite sense). However, when splay, k11, and bend, k33, moduli differ this proportionality is lost and the liquid crystal deforms relative to the ideal with bend and splay. Although slight, these deformations are shown to significantly shift the transition if k11/k33 is small. By increasing the degree of confinement the twist transition can be inhibited, a characteristic both hyperbolic and radial hedgehogs have in common. The twist transition of a hyperbolic defect that accompanies a particle is found to be well predicted by the earlier stability analysis of a thick shell.

  4. Protein kinase A activity and Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a well-known kinase that plays fundamental roles in a variety of biological processes. In Hedgehog-responsive cells, PKA plays key roles in proliferation and fate specification by modulating the transduction of Hedgehog signaling. In the absence of Hedgehog, a basal level of PKA activity represses the transcription of Hedgehog target genes. The main substrates of PKA in this process are the Ci/Gli family of bipotential transcription factors, which activate and repress Hedgehog target gene expression. PKA phosphorylates Ci/Gli, promoting the production of the repressor forms of Ci/Gli and thus repressing Hedgehog target gene expression. In contrast, the activation of Hedgehog signaling in response to Hedgehog increases the active forms of Ci/Gli, resulting in Hedgehog target gene expression. Because both decreased and increased levels of PKA activity cause abnormal cell proliferation and alter cell fate specification, the basal level of PKA activity in Hedgehog-responsive cells should be precisely regulated. However, the mechanism by which PKA activity is regulated remains obscure and appears to vary between cell types, tissues, and organisms. To date, two mechanisms have been proposed. One is a classical mechanism in which PKA activity is regulated by a small second messenger, cAMP; the other is a novel mechanism in which PKA activity is regulated by a protein, Misty somites. PMID:22391308

  5. The hedgehog/Gli signaling paradigm in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengqian; Carkner, Richard; Buttyan, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog is a ligand-activated signaling pathway that regulates Gli-mediated transcription. Although most noted for its role as an embryonic morphogen, hyperactive hedgehog also causes human skin and brain malignancies. The hedgehog-related gene anomalies found in these tumors are rarely found in prostate cancer. Yet surveys of human prostate tumors show concordance of high expression of hedgehog ligands and Gli2 that correlate with the potential for metastasis and therapy-resistant behavior. Likewise, prostate cancer cell lines express hedgehog target genes, and their growth and survival is affected by hedgehog/Gli inhibitors. To date, the preponderance of data supports the idea that prostate tumors benefit from a paracrine hedgehog microenvironment similar to the developing prostate. Uncertainty remains as to whether hedgehog’s influence in prostate cancer also includes aspects of tumor cell autocrine-like signaling. The recent findings that Gli proteins interact with the androgen receptor and affect its transcriptional output have helped to identify a novel pathway through which hedgehog/Gli might affect prostate tumor behavior and raises questions as to whether hedgehog signaling in prostate cancer cells is suitably measured by the expression of Gli target genes alone. PMID:21776292

  6. Hedgehog signaling: networking to nurture a promalignant tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lillianne G; Samant, Rajeev S; Shevde, Lalita A

    2011-09-01

    In addition to its role in embryonic development, the Hedgehog pathway has been shown to be an active participant in cancer development, progression, and metastasis. Although this pathway is activated by autocrine signaling by Hedgehog ligands, it can also initiate paracrine signaling with cells in the microenvironment. This creates a network of Hedgehog signaling that determines the malignant behavior of the tumor cells. As a result of paracrine signal transmission, the effects of Hedgehog signaling most profoundly influence the stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. The stromal cells in turn produce factors that nurture the tumor. Thus, such a resonating cross-talk can amplify Hedgehog signaling, resulting in molecular chatter that overall promotes tumor progression. Inhibitors of Hedgehog signaling have been the subject of intense research. Several of these inhibitors are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Here, we review the role of the Hedgehog pathway in the signature characteristics of cancer cells that determine tumor development, progression, and metastasis. This review condenses the latest findings on the signaling pathways that are activated and/or regulated by molecules generated from Hedgehog signaling in cancer and cites promising clinical interventions. Finally, we discuss future directions for identifying the appropriate patients for therapy, developing reliable markers of efficacy of treatment, and combating resistance to Hedgehog pathway inhibitors. PMID:21775419

  7. Hedgehog signaling in development and homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Gijs R

    2007-10-01

    The Hedgehog family of secreted morphogenetic proteins acts through a complex evolutionary conserved signaling pathway to regulate patterning events during development and in the adult organism. In this review I discuss the role of Hedgehog signaling in the development, postnatal maintenance, and carcinogenesis of the gastrointestinal tract. Three mammalian hedgehog genes, sonic hedgehog (Shh), indian hedgehog (Ihh), and desert hedgehog (Dhh) have been identified. Shh and Ihh are important endodermal signals in the endodermal-mesodermal cross-talk that patterns the developing gut tube along different axes. Mutations in Shh, Ihh, and downstream signaling molecules lead to a variety of gross malformations of the murine gastrointestinal tract including esophageal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula, annular pancreas, midgut malrotation, and duodenal and anal atresia. These congenital malformations are also found in varying constellations in humans, suggesting a possible role for defective Hedgehog signaling in these patients. In the adult, Hedgehog signaling regulates homeostasis in several endoderm-derived epithelia, for example, the stomach, intestine, and pancreas. Finally, growth of carcinomas of the proximal gastrointestinal tract such as esophageal, gastric, biliary duct, and pancreatic cancers may depend on Hedgehog signaling offering a potential avenue for novel therapy for these aggressive cancers. PMID:17928586

  8. RAS and Hedgehog--partners in crime.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Both RAS and Hedgehog (HH) pathway activation can be found in approximately one third of all cancers. In many cases, this activation occurs in the same tumor types, suggesting a positive impact of a simultaneous activation of RAS and HH on tumor development. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge about the molecular and functional crosstalk of RAS and HH signaling in the development of hyperproliferative disease. PMID:21622175

  9. Hedgehog Signalling in the Embryonic Mouse Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    T cells develop in the thymus, which provides an essential environment for T cell fate specification, and for the differentiation of multipotent progenitor cells into major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, non-autoreactive T cells. Here we review the role of the Hedgehog signalling pathway in T cell development, thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development, and thymocyte–TEC cross-talk in the embryonic mouse thymus during the last week of gestation. PMID:27504268

  10. [Endoparasitic infestation of wild hedgehogs and hedgehogs in human care with a contribution to therapy].

    PubMed

    Barutzki, D; Laubmeier, E; Forstner, M J

    1987-01-01

    In order to confirm the prevalence of endoparasites fecal samples from 127 hedgehogs living outdoors as well as from 85 in an animal home and from 542 hedgehogs hibernating in private homes were examined. 52.0%-72.3% of the animals from natural surroundings proved to be infested with the lung worm and 72.3%-74.0% with Capillaria species of the intestine, respectively. Capillaria aerophila were found in 15.1%-40.7%, whereas coccidia (1.4%-12.9%) were less frequent. In animal homes and private care hibernating hedgehogs excreted larvae of Crenosoma striatum (23.5% and 21.0%, respectively), eggs of Capillaria species of the intestine (47.1% and 37.1%), and eggs of Capillaria aerophila (7.1% and 19.4%), but oocysts of Isospora rastegaievae were found to be predominant (44.7% and 32.3%). Proglottides of Hymenolepis erinacei and eggs of Brachylaemus erinacei appeared only in the faeces of 3 and 2 hedgehogs, respectively. Helminths of the lung and gut were already found in May, therefore it must be concluded that these parasites are able to survive the winter in the host during the hibernation period. Even young hedgehogs (400-500 g) were infected with Crenosoma and/or Capillaria spp. of the intestine, however, compared with the adults the excretion of eggs and larvae was rather low. The antiparasitic agent Ivermectin (0.3 mg/100 g body-weight) was effective against Crenosoma striatum (efficacy: 95.9%) and Capillaria spp. (100%); therefore it can be recommended as a new, well tolerated anthelmintic against nematodes of the hedgehog. PMID:3424361

  11. Role of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in NASH.

    PubMed

    Verdelho Machado, Mariana; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the number one cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Although only a minority of patients will ultimately develop end-stage liver disease, it is not yet possible to efficiently predict who will progress and, most importantly, effective treatments are still unavailable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is necessary to improve the clinical management of NAFLD patients. Epidemiological data indicate that NAFLD prognosis is determined by an individual's response to lipotoxic injury, rather than either the severity of exposure to lipotoxins, or the intensity of liver injury. The liver responds to injury with a synchronized wound-healing response. When this response is abnormal, it leads to pathological scarring, resulting in progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis, rather than repair. The hedgehog pathway is a crucial player in the wound-healing response. In this review, we summarize the pre-clinical and clinical evidence, which demonstrate the role of hedgehog pathway dysregulation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and the preliminary data that place the hedgehog pathway as a potential target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:27258259

  12. Role of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway in NASH

    PubMed Central

    Verdelho Machado, Mariana; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the number one cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world. Although only a minority of patients will ultimately develop end-stage liver disease, it is not yet possible to efficiently predict who will progress and, most importantly, effective treatments are still unavailable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease is necessary to improve the clinical management of NAFLD patients. Epidemiological data indicate that NAFLD prognosis is determined by an individual’s response to lipotoxic injury, rather than either the severity of exposure to lipotoxins, or the intensity of liver injury. The liver responds to injury with a synchronized wound-healing response. When this response is abnormal, it leads to pathological scarring, resulting in progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis, rather than repair. The hedgehog pathway is a crucial player in the wound-healing response. In this review, we summarize the pre-clinical and clinical evidence, which demonstrate the role of hedgehog pathway dysregulation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and the preliminary data that place the hedgehog pathway as a potential target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:27258259

  13. The Hedgehog signalling pathway in bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Andre, Philipp; Ye, Ling; Yang, Ying-Zi

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway plays many important roles in development, homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The critical function of Hh signalling in bone formation has been identified in the past two decades. Here, we review the evolutionarily conserved Hh signalling mechanisms with an emphasis on the functions of the Hh signalling pathway in bone development, homeostasis and diseases. In the early stages of embryonic limb development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) acts as a major morphogen in patterning the limb buds. Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) has an essential function in endochondral ossification and induces osteoblast differentiation in the perichondrium. Hh signalling is also involved intramembrane ossification. Interactions between Hh and Wnt signalling regulate cartilage development, endochondral bone formation and synovial joint formation. Hh also plays an important role in bone homeostasis, and reducing Hh signalling protects against age-related bone loss. Disruption of Hh signalling regulation leads to multiple bone diseases, such as progressive osseous heteroplasia. Therefore, understanding the signalling mechanisms and functions of Hh signalling in bone development, homeostasis and diseases will provide important insights into bone disease prevention, diagnoses and therapeutics. PMID:26023726

  14. Hedgehog receptor function during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Guilherme M; Seppala, Maisa; Barrell, William; Birjandi, Anahid A; Geoghegan, Finn; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2016-07-15

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway plays a fundamental role in orchestrating normal craniofacial development in vertebrates. In particular, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is produced in three key domains during the early formation of the head; neuroectoderm of the ventral forebrain, facial ectoderm and the pharyngeal endoderm; with signal transduction evident in both ectodermal and mesenchymal tissue compartments. Shh signalling from the prechordal plate and ventral midline of the diencephalon is required for appropriate division of the eyefield and forebrain, with mutation in a number of pathway components associated with Holoprosencephaly, a clinically heterogeneous developmental defect characterized by a failure of the early forebrain vesicle to divide into distinct halves. In addition, signalling from the pharyngeal endoderm and facial ectoderm plays an essential role during development of the face, influencing cranial neural crest cells that migrate into the early facial processes. In recent years, the complexity of Shh signalling has been highlighted by the identification of multiple novel proteins that are involved in regulating both the release and reception of this protein. Here, we review the contributions of Shh signalling during early craniofacial development, focusing on Hedgehog receptor function and describing the consequences of disruption for inherited anomalies of this region in both mouse models and human populations. PMID:26875496

  15. Hedgehogs in a three-dimensional anisotropic spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Thordur

    1983-06-01

    We study a continuum version of a classical anisotropic spin model in three dimensions with three component spins. We prove the existence of topological defects, called hedgehogs, which are analogous to the vortices in the two-dimensional xy-model and have a logarithmically divergent action. Bounds for the interaction energy of a hedgehog and an antihedgehog are derived.

  16. Hedgehog signaling pathway in small bovine ovarian follicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hedgehog signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and turnover in a variety of mammalian embryonic and adult tissues including bovine ovarian granulosa and theca cells. Binding of hedgehog to the patch receptor derepresses smoothened resulting in t...

  17. Downregulating Hedgehog Signaling Reduces Renal Cystogenic Potential of Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Talbott, George C.; Turbe-Doan, Annick; Jacobs, Damon T.; Schonfeld, Michael P.; Silva, Luciane M.; Chatterjee, Anindita; Prysak, Mary; Allard, Bailey A.; Beier, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Renal cystic diseases are a leading cause of renal failure. Mutations associated with renal cystic diseases reside in genes encoding proteins that localize to primary cilia. These cystoproteins can disrupt ciliary structure or cilia-mediated signaling, although molecular mechanisms connecting cilia function to renal cystogenesis remain unclear. The ciliary gene, Thm1(Ttc21b), negatively regulates Hedgehog signaling and is most commonly mutated in ciliopathies. We report that loss of murine Thm1 causes cystic kidney disease, with persistent proliferation of renal cells, elevated cAMP levels, and enhanced expression of Hedgehog signaling genes. Notably, the cAMP-mediated cystogenic potential of Thm1-null kidney explants was reduced by genetically deleting Gli2, a major transcriptional activator of the Hedgehog pathway, or by culturing with small molecule Hedgehog inhibitors. These Hedgehog inhibitors acted independently of protein kinase A and Wnt inhibitors. Furthermore, simultaneous deletion of Gli2 attenuated the renal cystic disease associated with deletion of Thm1. Finally, transcripts of Hedgehog target genes increased in cystic kidneys of two other orthologous mouse mutants, jck and Pkd1, and Hedgehog inhibitors reduced cystogenesis in jck and Pkd1 cultured kidneys. Thus, enhanced Hedgehog activity may have a general role in renal cystogenesis and thereby present a novel therapeutic target. PMID:24700869

  18. Hedgehog signaling in prostate epithelial-mesenchymal growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Ching; Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction, and is also an organ prone to diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. The prostate consists of ducts with an inner layer of epithelium surrounded by stroma. Reciprocal signaling between these two cell compartments is instrumental to normal prostatic development, homeostasis, regeneration, as well as tumor formation. Hedgehog (HH) signaling is a master regulator in numerous developmental processes. In many organs, HH plays a key role in epithelial-mesenchymal signaling that regulates organ growth and tissue differentiation, and abnormal HH signaling has been implicated in the progression of various epithelial carcinomas. In this review, we focus on recent studies exploring the multipotency of endogenous postnatal and adult epithelial and stromal stem cells and studies addressing the role of HH in prostate development and cancer. We discuss the implications of the results for a new understanding of prostate development and disease. Insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial-mesenchymal growth regulation should provide a basis for devising innovative therapies to combat diseases of the prostate. PMID:25641695

  19. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L.; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  20. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of Graded Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Falkenstein, Kristin N.; Vokes, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays conserved roles in regulating a diverse spectrum of developmental processes. In some developmental contexts, a gradient of Hh protein specifies multiple cell types in a dose-dependent fashion, thereby acting as a morphogen. Hh signaling ultimately acts on the transcriptional level through GLI proteins. In the presence of Hh signaling full length GLI proteins act as transcriptional activators of target genes. Conversely, in the absence of Hh, GLI proteins act as transcriptional repressors. This review will highlight mechanisms contributing to how graded Hh signaling might translate to differential GLI activity and be interpreted into distinct transcriptional responses. PMID:24862856

  2. Regulation of Hedgehog signaling by ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Elaine Y. C.; Gui, Yirui; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles both in embryonic development and in adult stem cell function. The timing, duration and location of Hh signaling activity need to be tightly controlled. Abnormalities of Hh signal transduction lead to birth defects or malignant tumors. Recent data point to ubiquitination-related posttranslational modifications of several key Hh pathway components as an important mechanism of regulation of the Hh pathway. Here we review how ubiquitination regulates the localization, stability and activity of the key Hh signaling components. PMID:26366162

  3. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26499980

  4. Localizing global hedgehogs on the brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inyong

    2004-10-01

    We investigate the localization of 4D topological global defects on the brane embedded in 5D. The defects are induced by 5D scalar fields with a symmetry-breaking potential. Taking an Ansatz which separates the scalar field into the 4D and the extra-D part, we find that the static-hedgehog configuration is accomplished and the defects are formed only in the AdS4/AdS5 background. In the extra dimension, the localization amplitude for the 4D defects is high where the warp factor is high.

  5. Where Are the Hedgehogs in Quenched Nematics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark

    1995-09-01

    In experiments which take a liquid crystal rapidly from the isotropic to the nematic phase, a dense tangle of defects is formed. In nematics, there are, in principle, both line and point defects (``hedgehogs''), but no point defects are observed until the defect network has coarsened appreciably. In this Letter the expected density of point defects is shown to be extremely low, approximately 10-8 per initially correlated domain, as a result of the topology (specifically, the homology) of the order-parameter space.

  6. Localizing global hedgehogs on the brane

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Inyong

    2004-10-15

    We investigate the localization of 4D topological global defects on the brane embedded in 5D. The defects are induced by 5D scalar fields with a symmetry-breaking potential. Taking an Ansatz which separates the scalar field into the 4D and the extra-D part, we find that the static-hedgehog configuration is accomplished and the defects are formed only in the AdS{sub 4}/AdS{sub 5} background. In the extra dimension, the localization amplitude for the 4D defects is high where the warp factor is high.

  7. Acinic cell carcinoma in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Fukuzawa, Kazuhiro; Abe, Hitoshi; Nagai, Toshihiro; Kameyama, Kaori

    2004-01-01

    A male African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris), estimated to be 3 years old, presented with exophthalmos and fixed abduction of the right eye. Radiographic examination revealed a retrobulbar tumor in the right orbital cavity. The mass was surgically resected but recurred 3 months later and the hedgehog died. There was no gross or microscopic evidence of salivary or lacrimal gland involvement of the tumor at surgery or at necropsy. The histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings were those of acinic cell carcinoma, the origin of which was unknown. This is the first known case of acinic cell carcinoma in an African hedgehog. PMID:15048626

  8. Perturbations to the hedgehog pathway in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob F; McClay, David R

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway has been shown to be an important developmental signaling pathway in many organisms (Ingham and McMahon. Genes Dev 15:3059-3087, 2001). Recently that work has been extended to developing echinoderm embryos (Walton et al. Dev Biol 331(1):26-37, 2009). Here we describe several methods to perturb the Hedgehog signaling pathway in the sea urchin. These include microinjection of Morpholinos and mRNA constructs as well as treatments with small molecule inhibitors. Finally we provide simple methods for assaying Hedgehog phenotypes in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:24567217

  9. Endocannabinoids are conserved inhibitors of the Hedgehog pathway

    PubMed Central

    Khaliullina, Helena; Bilgin, Mesut; Sampaio, Julio L.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Eaton, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog ligands control tissue development and homeostasis by alleviating repression of Smoothened, a seven-pass transmembrane protein. The Hedgehog receptor, Patched, is thought to regulate the availability of small lipophilic Smoothened repressors whose identity is unknown. Lipoproteins contain lipids required to repress Smoothened signaling in vivo. Here, using biochemical fractionation and lipid mass spectrometry, we identify these repressors as endocannabinoids. Endocannabinoids circulate in human and Drosophila lipoproteins and act directly on Smoothened at physiological concentrations to repress signaling in Drosophila and mammalian assays. Phytocannabinoids are also potent Smo inhibitors. These findings link organismal metabolism to local Hedgehog signaling and suggest previously unsuspected mechanisms for the physiological activities of cannabinoids. PMID:25733905

  10. Targeting the Hedgehog Pathway in Pediatric Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sherri Y.; Yang, Jer-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB), a primitive neuroectomal tumor of the cerebellum, is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. The cause of MB is largely unknown, but aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is responsible for ~30% of MB. Despite aggressive treatment with surgical resection, radiation and chemotherapy, 70%–80% of pediatric medulloblastoma cases can be controlled, but most treated patients suffer devastating side effects. Therefore, developing a new effective treatment strategy is urgently needed. Hh signaling controls transcription of target genes by regulating activities of the three Glioma-associated oncogene (Gli1-3) transcription factors. In this review, we will focus on current clinical treatment options of MB and discuss mechanisms of drug resistance. In addition, we will describe current known molecular pathways which crosstalk with the Hedgehog pathway both in the context of medulloblastoma and non-medulloblastoma cancer development. Finally, we will introduce post-translational modifications that modulate Gli1 activity and summarize the positive and negative regulations of the Hh/Gli1 pathway. Towards developing novel combination therapies for medulloblastoma treatment, current information on interacting pathways and direct regulation of Hh signaling should prove critical. PMID:26512695

  11. Hedgehog Signaling during Appendage Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhairab N.; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Donaldson, Andrew; Weaver, Cyprian V.; Garry, Mary G.; Garry, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory networks that govern embryonic development have been well defined. While a common hypothesis supports the notion that the embryonic regulatory cascades are reexpressed following injury and tissue regeneration, the mechanistic regulatory pathways that mediate the regenerative response in higher organisms remain undefined. Relative to mammals, lower vertebrates, including zebrafish and newts, have a tremendous regenerative capacity to repair and regenerate a number of organs including: appendages, retina, heart, jaw and nervous system. Elucidation of the pathways that govern regeneration in these lower organisms may provide cues that will enhance the capacity for the regeneration of mammalian organs. Signaling pathways, such as the hedgehog pathway, have been shown to play critical functions during development and during regeneration in lower organisms. These signaling pathways have been shown to modulate multiple processes including cellular origin, positional identity and cellular maturation. The present review will focus on the cellular and molecular regulation of the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway and its interaction with other signaling factors during appendage development and regeneration. PMID:26110318

  12. Hedgehog Signaling during Appendage Development and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhairab N; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Donaldson, Andrew; Weaver, Cyprian V; Garry, Mary G; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory networks that govern embryonic development have been well defined. While a common hypothesis supports the notion that the embryonic regulatory cascades are reexpressed following injury and tissue regeneration, the mechanistic regulatory pathways that mediate the regenerative response in higher organisms remain undefined. Relative to mammals, lower vertebrates, including zebrafish and newts, have a tremendous regenerative capacity to repair and regenerate a number of organs including: appendages, retina, heart, jaw and nervous system. Elucidation of the pathways that govern regeneration in these lower organisms may provide cues that will enhance the capacity for the regeneration of mammalian organs. Signaling pathways, such as the hedgehog pathway, have been shown to play critical functions during development and during regeneration in lower organisms. These signaling pathways have been shown to modulate multiple processes including cellular origin, positional identity and cellular maturation. The present review will focus on the cellular and molecular regulation of the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway and its interaction with other signaling factors during appendage development and regeneration. PMID:26110318

  13. Semiclassical projection of hedgehog models with quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, T.D.; Broniowski, W.

    1986-12-01

    A simple semiclassical method is presented for calculating physical observables in states with good angular momentum and isospin for models whose mean-field solutions are hedgehogs. The method is applicable for theories which have both quark and meson degrees of freedom. The basic approach is to find slowly rotating solutions to the time-dependent mean-field equations. A nontrivial set of differential equations must be solved to find the quark configuration for these rotating hedgehogs. The parameters which specify the rotating solutions are treated as the collective degrees of freedom. They are requantized by imposing a set of commutation relations which ensures the correct algebra for the SU(2) x SU(2) group of angular momentum and isospin. Collective wave functions can then be found and with these wave functions all matrix elements can be calculated. The method is applied to a simple version of the chiral quark-meson model. A number of physical quantities such as magnetic moments, charge distributions, g/sub A/, g/sub ..pi..//sub N//sub N/, N-..delta.. mass splitting, properties of the N-..delta.. transition, etc., are calculated.

  14. Semiclassical projection of hedgehog models with quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Thomas D.; Broniowski, Wojciech

    1986-12-01

    A simple semiclassical method is presented for calculating physical observables in states with good angular momentum and isospin for models whose mean-field solutions are hedgehogs. The method is applicable for theories which have both quark and meson degrees of freedom. The basic approach is to find slowly rotating solutions to the time-dependent mean-field equations. A nontrivial set of differential equations must be solved to find the quark configuration for these rotating hedgehogs. The parameters which specify the rotating solutions are treated as the collective degrees of freedom. They are requantized by imposing a set of commutation relations which ensures the correct algebra for the SU(2)×SU(2) group of angular momentum and isospin. Collective wave functions can then be found and with these wave functions all matrix elements can be calculated. The method is applied to a simple version of the chiral quark-meson model. A number of physical quantities such as magnetic moments, charge distributions, gA, gπNN, N-Δ mass splitting, properties of the N-Δ transition, etc., are calculated.

  15. Ontogenetic Expression of Sonic Hedgehog in the Chicken Subpallium

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Sylvia M.; Ferran, José L. E.; Sanchez-Arrones, Luisa; Puelles, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is a secreted signaling factor that is implicated in the molecular patterning of the central nervous system (CNS), somites, and limbs in vertebrates. SHH has a crucial role in the generation of ventral cell types along the entire rostrocaudal axis of the neural tube. It is secreted early in development by the axial mesoderm (prechordal plate and notochord) and the overlying ventral neural tube. Recent studies clarified the impact of SHH signaling mechanisms on dorsoventral patterning of the spinal cord, but the corresponding phenomena in the rostral forebrain are slightly different and more complex. This notably involves separate Shh expression in the preoptic part of the forebrain alar plate, as well as in the hypothalamic floor and basal plates. The present work includes a detailed spatiotemporal description of the singular alar Shh expression pattern in the rostral preoptic forebrain of chick embryos, comparing it with FoxG1, Dlx5, Nkx2.1, and Nkx2.2 mRNA expression at diverse stages of development. As a result of this mapping, we report a subdivision of the preoptic region in dorsal and ventral zones; only the dorsal part shows Shh expression. The positive area impinges as well upon a median septocommissural preoptic domain. Our study strongly suggests tangential migration of Shh-positive cells from the preoptic region into other subpallial domains, particularly into the pallidal mantle and the intermediate septum. PMID:20700498

  16. Structural insights into hedgehog ligand sequestration by the human hedgehog-interacting protein HIP

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Benjamin; Aricescu, A. Radu; Harlos, Karl; O’Callaghan, Chris A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Siebold, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) morphogens play fundamental roles in development whilst dysregulation of Hh signaling leads to disease. Multiple cell surface receptors are responsible for transducing and/or regulating Hh signals. Among these, the hedgehog-interacting protein (HIP) is a highly conserved, vertebrate-specific, inhibitor of Hh signaling. We have solved a series of crystal structures for the human HIP ectodomain and Desert Hh in isolation, as well as Sonic and Desert Hh-HIP complexes, with and without calcium. The interaction determinants, confirmed by biophysical studies and mutagenesis, reveal novel and distinct functions for Hh zinc- and calcium-binding sites; functions which appear common to all vertebrate Hhs. Zinc makes a key contribution to the Hh-HIP interface while calcium prevents electrostatic repulsion between the two proteins, thus playing a major modulatory role. This interplay of several metal-binding sites suggests a tuneable mechanism for regulation of Hh signaling. PMID:19561611

  17. Sweet on Hedgehogs: regulatory roles of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in Hedgehog-dependent cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bandari, Shyam; Exner, Sebastian; Ortmann, Corinna; Bachvarova, Velina; Vortkamp, Andrea; Grobe, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Morphogens exert their effects over long distances, typically by spreading from cell to cell to activate signal transduction in surrounding tissues in concentration-dependent manner. One example of a morphogen is the signaling molecule Hedgehog (Hh), which controls growth and patterning during development and has also been implicated in the progression of numerous cancers. To this end, accessory mechanisms that release, transport, and receive Hhs are required to elicit temporally and spatially specific responses in cells and tissues. The Hh spreading mechanism is especially intriguing, because all Hhs are released from the producing cells despite being synthesized as dually lipidated, membrane-tethered molecules. In addition to this cellular association, Hhs bind strongly to extracellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which is expected to further reduce their spreading. Paradoxically, several lines of evidence suggest that Hh gradient formation actually requires HSPG expression, and that HSPGs act as both positive and negative regulators of Hh function. This article reviews the multiple roles that HSPGs play in Hh morphogen function, and discusses their congruity with proposed mechanisms of Hh solubilization, transport, and signal reception in vertebrate and invertebrate tissues. PMID:25692848

  18. Spontaneous neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs (Setifer setosus).

    PubMed

    Khoii, Mina K; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Burns, Roy B; Carmichael, K Paige; Gyimesi, Zoltan S

    2008-09-01

    Little information is available about diseases and pathology of species within the family Tenrecidae, including the greater hedgehog tenrec (Setifer setosus), a Madagascan insectivore. This report summarizes necropsy and histopathologic findings of neoplasia in four captive greater hedgehog tenrecs. Although only four animals are included in this report, neoplasia seems to be a common and significant source of morbidity and mortality in greater hedgehog tenrecs. Types of neoplasia identified include a thyroid follicular-solid carcinoma, two urinary bladder transitional cell carcinomas, uterine endometrial polyps, and multicentric B-cell lymphoma. Due to small sample size, no etiology could be determined, but genetics, viral infection, pesticide treatment, nutrition, or other environmental factors might contribute to the development of neoplasia in this species. This is the first report of neoplasia in greater hedgehog tenrecs. PMID:18817002

  19. Impacts of removing badgers on localised counts of hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Trewby, Iain D; Young, Richard; McDonald, Robbie A; Wilson, Gavin J; Davison, John; Walker, Neil; Robertson, Andrew; Doncaster, C Patrick; Delahay, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the interactions among mammalian predators that eat or compete with one another is rare, due to the ethical and logistical challenges of managing wild populations in a controlled and replicated way. Here, we report on the opportunistic use of a replicated and controlled culling experiment (the Randomised Badger Culling Trial) to investigate the relationship between two sympatric predators: European badgers Meles meles and western European hedgehogs Erinaceus europaeus. In areas of preferred habitat (amenity grassland), counts of hedgehogs more than doubled over a 5-year period from the start of badger culling (from 0.9 ha-1 pre-cull to 2.4 ha-1 post-cull), whereas hedgehog counts did not change where there was no badger culling (0.3-0.3 hedgehogs ha-1). This trial provides experimental evidence for mesopredator release as an outcome of management of a top predator. PMID:24736454

  20. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-25

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol. PMID:27545348

  1. Non-canonical Hedgehog signaling contributes to chemotaxis in cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Razumilava, Nataliya; Gradilone, Sergio A.; Smoot, Rory L.; Mertens, Joachim C.; Bronk, Steven F.; Sirica, Alphonse E.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims: The Hedgehog signaling pathway contributes to cholangiocarcinoma biology. However, canonical Hedgehog signaling requires cilia, and cholangiocarcinoma cells often do not express cilia. To resolve this paradox, we examined non-canonical (G-protein coupled, pertussis toxin sensitive) Hedgehog signaling in cholangiocarcinoma cells. Methods: Human [non-malignant (H69), malignant (HuCC-T1 and Mz-ChA-1)] and rat [non-malignant (BDE1 and NRC), and malignant (BDEneu)] cell lines were employed for this study. A BDEΔLoop2 cell line with the dominant-negative receptor Patched-1 was generated with the Sleeping Beauty transposon transfection system. Results: Cilia expression was readily identified in non-malignant, but not in malignant cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. Although the canonical Hh signaling pathway was markedly attenuated in cholangiocarcinoma cells, they were chemotactic to purmorphamine, a small-molecule direct Smoothened agonist. Purmorphamine also induced remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton with formation of filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions. All these biological features of cell migration were pertussis toxin sensitive, a feature of G-protein coupled (Gis) receptors. To further test the role of Hedgehog signaling in vivo, we employed a syngeneic orthotopic rat model of cholangiocarcinoma. In vivo, genetic inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling pathway employing BDEΔLoop2 cells or pharmacological inhibition with a small-molecule antagonist of Smoothened, vismodegib, was tumor and metastasis suppressive. Conclusions: Cholangiocarcinoma cells exhibit non-canonical Hedgehog signaling with chemotaxis despite impaired cilia expression. This non-canonical Hedgehog signaling pathway appears to contribute to cholangiocarcinoma progression, thereby, supporting a role for Hedgehog pathway inhibition in human cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:24239776

  2. Hedgehog-Gli pathway activation during kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Steven L; Penchev, Radostin R; St-Jacques, Benoit; Rao, Anjali N; Sipilä, Petra; West, Kip A; McMahon, Andrew P; Humphreys, Benjamin D

    2012-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway regulates tissue patterning during development, including patterning and growth of limbs and face, but whether Hh signaling plays a role in adult kidney remains undefined. In this study, using a panel of hedgehog-reporter mice, we show that the two Hh ligands (Indian hedgehog and sonic hedgehog ligands) are expressed in tubular epithelial cells. We report that the Hh effectors (Gli1 and Gli2) are expressed exclusively in adjacent platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β-positive interstitial pericytes and perivascular fibroblasts, suggesting a paracrine signaling loop. In two models of renal fibrosis, Indian Hh ligand was upregulated with a dramatic activation of downstream Gli effector expression. Hh-responsive Gli1-positive interstitial cells underwent 11-fold proliferative expansion during fibrosis, and both Gli1- and Gli2-positive cells differentiated into α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts. In the pericyte-like cell line 10T1/2, hedgehog ligand triggered cell proliferation, suggesting a possible role for this pathway in the regulation of cell cycle progression of myofibroblast progenitors during the development of renal fibrosis. The hedgehog antagonist IPI-926 abolished Gli1 induction in vivo but did not decrease kidney fibrosis. However, the transcriptional induction of Gli2 was unaffected by IPI-926, suggesting the existence of smoothened-independent Gli activation in this model. This study is the first detailed description of paracrine hedgehog signaling in adult kidney, which indicates a possible role for hedgehog-Gli signaling in fibrotic chronic kidney disease. PMID:22342522

  3. Hedgehog-Gli Pathway Activation during Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Steven L.; Penchev, Radostin R.; St-Jacques, Benoit; Rao, Anjali N.; Sipilä, Petra; West, Kip A.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway regulates tissue patterning during development, including patterning and growth of limbs and face, but whether Hh signaling plays a role in adult kidney remains undefined. In this study, using a panel of hedgehog-reporter mice, we show that the two Hh ligands (Indian hedgehog and sonic hedgehog ligands) are expressed in tubular epithelial cells. We report that the Hh effectors (Gli1 and Gli2) are expressed exclusively in adjacent platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β-positive interstitial pericytes and perivascular fibroblasts, suggesting a paracrine signaling loop. In two models of renal fibrosis, Indian Hh ligand was upregulated with a dramatic activation of downstream Gli effector expression. Hh-responsive Gli1-positive interstitial cells underwent 11-fold proliferative expansion during fibrosis, and both Gli1- and Gli2-positive cells differentiated into α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts. In the pericyte-like cell line 10T1/2, hedgehog ligand triggered cell proliferation, suggesting a possible role for this pathway in the regulation of cell cycle progression of myofibroblast progenitors during the development of renal fibrosis. The hedgehog antagonist IPI-926 abolished Gli1 induction in vivo but did not decrease kidney fibrosis. However, the transcriptional induction of Gli2 was unaffected by IPI-926, suggesting the existence of smoothened-independent Gli activation in this model. This study is the first detailed description of paracrine hedgehog signaling in adult kidney, which indicates a possible role for hedgehog-Gli signaling in fibrotic chronic kidney disease. PMID:22342522

  4. Targeting hedgehog signaling reduces self-renewal in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Satheesha, S; Manzella, G; Bovay, A; Casanova, E A; Bode, P K; Belle, R; Feuchtgruber, S; Jaaks, P; Dogan, N; Koscielniak, E; Schäfer, B W

    2016-04-21

    Current treatment regimens for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most common pediatric soft tissue cancer, rely on conventional chemotherapy, and although they show clinical benefit, there is a significant risk of adverse side effects and secondary tumors later in life. Therefore, identifying and targeting sub-populations with higher tumorigenic potential and self-renewing capacity would offer improved patient management strategies. Hedgehog signaling has been linked to the development of embryonal RMS (ERMS) through mouse genetics and rare human syndromes. However, activating mutations in this pathway in sporadic RMS are rare and therefore the contribution of hedgehog signaling to oncogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show by genetic loss- and gain-of-function experiments and the use of clinically relevant small molecule modulators that hedgehog signaling is important for controlling self-renewal of a subpopulation of RMS cells in vitro and tumor initiation in vivo. In addition, hedgehog activity altered chemoresistance, motility and differentiation status. The core stem cell gene NANOG was determined to be important for ERMS self-renewal, possibly acting downstream of hedgehog signaling. Crucially, evaluating the presence of a subpopulation of tumor-propagating cells in patient biopsies identified by GLI1 and NANOG expression had prognostic significance. Hence, this work identifies novel functional aspects of hedgehog signaling in ERMS, redefines the rationale for its targeting as means to control ERMS self-renewal and underscores the importance of studying functional tumor heterogeneity in pediatric cancers. PMID:26189795

  5. Rickettsiae in arthropods collected from the North African Hedgehog (Atelerix algirus) and the desert hedgehog (Paraechinus aethiopicus) in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, Mourad; Socolovschi, Cristina; Benyettou, Meryam; Barech, Ghania; Biche, Mohamed; Kernif, Tahar; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    Hedgehogs have become a popular pet despite their potential role in zoonotic disease transmission. We conducted an entomological study in a mountainous region of northeast Algeria in which we collected 387 fleas (Archeopsylla erinacei) and 342 ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Haemaphysalis erinacei) from Paraechinus aethiopicus and Atelerix algirus hedgehogs. Of the hedgehogs sampled, 77.7% and 91% were infested with fleas and ticks, respectively. Significantly more ticks and fleas were collected from A. algirus than from P. aethiopicus. Rickettsia felis was detected in 95.5% of fleas and R. massiliae was detected in 6.25% of Rh. sanguineus ticks by molecular tools. A new Rickettsia species of the spotted fever group was detected in 11.25% of Rh. sanguineus and in 77% of H. erinacei ticks. Overall, we show that hedgehogs can act as hosts for ectoparasites infected with several rickettsial agents. These data justify a more detailed investigation of animal reservoirs for Rickettsiae. PMID:22222114

  6. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Ciaran J.; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Fitzpatrick, Emma; Kennedy, Eimear; Walls, Dermot; Morrow, David; Redmond, Eileen M.; Cahill, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall. PMID:26064136

  7. Smoothened regulation in response to Hedgehog stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kai; Jia, Jianhang

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway play critical roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. A critical step in Hh signal transduction is how Hh receptor Patched (Ptc) inhibits the atypical G protein-coupled receptor Smoothened (Smo) in the absence of Hh and how this inhibition is release by Hh stimulation. It is unlikely that Ptc inhibits Smo by direct interaction. Here we discuss how Hh regulates the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Smo, leading to cell surface and ciliary accumulation of Smo in Drosophila and vertebrate cells, respectively. In addition, we discuss how PI(4)P phospholipid acts in between Ptc and Smo to regulate Smo phosphorylation and activation in response to Hh stimulation. PMID:26973699

  8. Developmental pathways: Sonic hedgehog-Patched-GLI.

    PubMed Central

    Walterhouse, D O; Yoon, J W; Iannaccone, P M

    1999-01-01

    Developmental pathways are networks of genes that act coordinately to establish the body plan. Disruptions of genes in one pathway can have effects in related pathways and may result in serious dysmorphogenesis or cancer. Environmental exposures can be associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, including dysmorphic offspring or children with a variety of diseases. An important goal of environmental science should be reduction of these poor outcomes. This will require an understanding of the genes affected by specific exposures and the consequence of alterations in these genes or their products, which in turn will require an understanding of the pathways critical in development. The ligand Sonic hedgehog, the receptors Patched and Smoothened, and the GLI family of transcription factors represent one such pathway. This pathway illustrates several operating principles important in the consideration of developmental consequences of environmental exposures to toxins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10064544

  9. The role of glypicans in Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Filmus, Jorge; Capurro, Mariana

    2014-04-01

    Glypicans (GPCs) are a family of proteoglycans that are bound to the cell surface by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Six glypicans have been found in the mammalian genome (GPC1 to GPC6). GPCs regulate several signaling pathways, including the pathway triggered by Hedgehogs (Hhs). This regulation, which could be stimulatory or inhibitory, occurs at the signal reception level. In addition, GPCs have been shown to be involved in the formation of Hh gradients in the imaginal wing disks in Drosophila. In this review we will discuss the role of various glypicans in specific developmental events in the embryo that are regulated by Hh signaling. In addition, we will discuss the mechanism by which loss-of-function GPC3 mutations alter Hh signaling in the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel overgrowth syndrome, and the molecular basis of the GPC5-induced stimulation of Hh signaling and tumor progression in rhabdomyosarcomas. PMID:24412155

  10. Serotonin Regulates Calcium Homeostasis in Lactation by Epigenetic Activation of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P.; Weaver, Samantha R.; Cronick, Callyssa M.; Prichard, Austin P.; Crenshaw, Thomas D.; Heyne, Galen W.; Vezina, Chad M.; Lipinski, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. We previously showed that nonneuronal/peripheral serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] causes the lactating mammary gland to synthesize and secrete PTHrP in an acute fashion. Here, using a mouse model, we found that genetic inactivation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in peripheral 5-HT synthesis, reduced circulating and mammary PTHrP expression, osteoclast activity, and maternal circulating calcium concentrations during the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Tph1 inactivation also reduced sonic hedgehog signaling in the mammary gland during lactation. Each of these deficiencies was rescued by daily injections of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (an immediate precursor of 5-HT) to Tph1-deficient dams. We used immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts to demonstrate that 5-HT induces PTHrP through a sonic hedgehog-dependent signal transduction mechanism. We also found that 5-HT altered DNA methylation of the Shh gene locus, leading to transcriptional initiation at an alternate start site and formation of a variant transcript in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in mammary tissue in vivo. These results support a new paradigm of 5-HT-mediated Shh regulation involving DNA methylation remodeling and promoter switching. In addition to having immediate implications for lactation biology, identification and characterization of a novel functional regulatory relationship between nonneuronal 5-HT, hedgehog signaling, and PTHrP offers new avenues for the study of these important factors in development and disease. PMID:25192038

  11. Catecholaminergic and serotoninergic fibres innervate the ventricular system of the hedgehog CNS.

    PubMed Central

    Michaloudi, H C; Papadopoulos, G C

    1996-01-01

    Immunocytochemistry with antisera against serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) was used to detect monoaminergic (MA) fibres in the ventricular system of the hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus. Light microscopic examination of immunocytochemically stained sections revealed that the ventricular system of the hedgehog is unique among mammals in that the choroid plexuses receive CA axons and that the supraependyma and subependyma of the cerebral ventricles and the spinal central canal are innervated both by serotoninergic and catecholaminergic (CA) fibres. Supraependymal 5-HT axons were generally more abundant and created at places a large number of interconnected basket-like structures, whereas CA fibres were usually directed towards the ventricular lumen. In the lateral ventricles, CA fibres were more numerous in the ependyma lining grey matter, whereas a higher 5-HT innervation density was observed in the area between the corpus callosum and the caudate nucleus or the septum. In the 3rd ventricle, the ependyma of its dorsal part exhibited a higher 5-HT and NA innervation density, whereas DA fibres were preferentially distributed in the ventral half of the basal region. The ependyma lining the cerebral aqueduct displayed a higher MA innervation density in its ventral part. The ependymal wall of the 4th ventricle exhibited an extremely dense 5-HT innervation, mainly in the floor of the ventricle, relatively fewer NA fibres and only sparse DA ones. Few NA and relatively more 5-HT fibres were detected in the ependyma of the central canal. Finally, the circumventricular organs were unevenly innervated by the 3 types of MA fibres. The extensive monoaminergic innervation of the hedgehog ventricular system described here probably reflects a transitory evolutionary stage in the phylogeny of the MA systems with presently unknown functional implications. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Figs 3-8 Figs 9-14 Figs 15-20 PMID:8886949

  12. Expression pattern of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yavropoulou, Maria P; Maladaki, Anna; Topouridou, Konstantina; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Poulios, Chris; Daskalaki, Emily; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Karkavelas, George; Yovos, John G

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of Wnt and Notch signaling in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas, but data are scarce regarding the role of Hedgehog signaling. In this study we investigated the differential expression of gene targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from adult patients who underwent transphenoidal resection and normal human pituitary tissues that were obtained from autopsies were used. Clinical information and data from pre-operative MRI scan (extracellular tumor extension, tumor size, displacement of the optic chiasm) were retrieved from the Hospital's database. We used a customized RT(2) Profiler PCR Array, to investigate the expression of genes related to Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways (PTCH1, PTCH2, GLI1, GLI3, NOTCH3, JAG1, HES1, and HIP). A total of 52 pituitary adenomas (32 non-functioning adenomas, 15 somatotropinomas and 5 prolactinomas) were used in the final analysis. In non-functioning pituitary adenomas there was a significant decrease (approximately 75%) in expression of all Hedgehog related genes that were tested, while Notch3 and Jagged-1 expression was found significantly increased, compared with normal pituitary tissue controls. In contrast, somatotropinomas demonstrated a significant increase in expression of all Hedgehog related genes and a decrease in the expression of Notch3 and Jagged-1. There was no significant difference in the expression of Hedgehog and Notch related genes between prolactinomas and healthy pituitary tissues. Hedgehog signalling appears to be activated in somatotropinomas but not in non-functioning pituitary adenomas in contrast to the expression pattern of Notch signalling pathway. PMID:26620835

  13. Ectoparasite loads in sympatric urban populations of the northern white-breasted and the European hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Dziemian, Sylwia; Sikora, Bożena; Piłacińska, Barbara; Michalik, Jerzy; Zwolak, Rafał

    2015-06-01

    We investigated abundance and prevalence of ticks and fleas infesting urban populations of two species of hedgehogs: the northern white-breasted hedgehog (Erinaceus roumanicus) and the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus). The hedgehogs were captured in the city of Poznań (western Poland) over the period of 4 years. Both species of hedgehogs were infested with the castor bean tick (Ixodes ricinus), the hedgehog tick (Ixodes hexagonus), and the hedgehog flea (Archeopsylla erinacei). The northern white-breasted hedgehog had higher loads of I. ricinus and A. erinacei than the European hedgehog. The abundance and prevalence of I. hexagonus were similar on both species of hosts. Co-infestation with the two species of ticks was more frequent on the northern white-breasted hedgehog than on the European hedgehog. Therefore, these two closely related species of hedgehogs differ in their importance as hosts of arthropod vectors of pathogens in urban areas and might play a different role in the dynamics of zoonotic diseases. PMID:25820646

  14. Gastroenteritis caused by the Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype in an immunocompetent man.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Saková, Kamila; Kvĕtoňová, Dana; Kicia, Marta; Wesołowska, Maria; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    The Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype, which has been reported previously in hedgehogs and horses, was identified as the cause of the diarrheal disease cryptosporidiosis in an immunocompetent man in the Czech Republic. This is the first report of human illness caused by the Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype. PMID:24131692

  15. Regulation of Patched by Sonic Hedgehog in the Developing Neural Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, Valeria; Tabin, Clifford J.

    1996-09-01

    Ventral cell fates in the central nervous system are induced by Sonic hedgehog, a homolog of hedgehog, a secreted Drosophila protein. In the central nervous system, Sonic hedgehog has been identified as the signal inducing floor plate, motor neurons, and dopaminergic neurons. Sonic hedgehog is also involved in the induction of ventral cell type in the developing somites. ptc is a key gene in the Drosophila hedgehog signaling pathway where it is involved in transducing the hedgehog signal and is also a transcriptional target of the signal. PTC, a vertebrate homolog of this Drosophila gene, is genetically downstream of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the limb bud. We analyze PTC expression during chicken neural and somite development and find it expressed in all regions of these tissues known to be responsive to Sonic hedgehog signal. As in the limb bud, ectopic expression of Sonic hedgehog leads to ectopic induction of PTC in the neural tube and paraxial mesoderm. This conservation of regulation allows us to use PTC as a marker for Sonic hedgehog response. The pattern of PTC expression suggests that Sonic hedgehog may play an inductive role in more dorsal regions of the neural tube than have been previously demonstrated. Examination of the pattern of PTC expression also suggests that PTC may act in a negative feedback loop to attenuate hedgehog signaling.

  16. Gas1 is a modifier for holoprosencephaly and genetically interacts with sonic hedgehog

    PubMed Central

    Seppala, Maisa; Depew, Michael J.; Martinelli, David C.; Fan, Chen-Ming; Sharpe, Paul T.; Cobourne, Martyn T.

    2007-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a clinically heterogeneous developmental anomaly affecting the CNS and face, in which the embryonic forebrain fails to divide into distinct halves. Numerous genetic loci and environmental factors are implicated in HPE, but mutation in the sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene is an established cause in both humans and mice. As growth arrest–specific 1 (Gas1) encodes a membrane glycoprotein previously identified as a Shh antagonist in the somite, we analyzed the craniofacial phenotype of mice harboring a targeted Gas1 deletion. Gas1–/– mice exhibited microform HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, premaxillary incisor fusion, and cleft palate, in addition to severe ear defects; however, gross integrity of the forebrain remained intact. These defects were associated with partial loss of Shh signaling in cells at a distance from the source of transcription, suggesting that Gas1 can potentiate hedgehog signaling in the early face. Loss of a single Shh allele in a Gas1–/– background significantly exacerbated the midline craniofacial phenotype, providing genetic evidence that Shh and Gas1 interact. As human GAS1 maps to chromosome 9q21.3–q22, a region previously associated with nonsyndromic cleft palate and congenital deafness, our results establish GAS1 as a potential locus for several human craniofacial malformations. PMID:17525797

  17. Habenular Neurogenesis in Zebrafish Is Regulated by a Hedgehog, Pax6 Proneural Gene Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Naye, François; Peers, Bernard; Roussigné, Myriam; Blader, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are highly conserved nuclei in the dorsal diencephalon that connect the forebrain to the midbrain and hindbrain. These nuclei have been implicated in a broad variety of behaviours in humans, primates, rodents and zebrafish. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms that control the genesis and differentiation of neural progenitors in the habenulae remain relatively unknown. We have previously shown that, in zebrafish, the timing of habenular neurogenesis is left-right asymmetric and that in the absence of Nodal signalling this asymmetry is lost. Here, we show that habenular neurogenesis requires the homeobox transcription factor Pax6a and the redundant action of two proneural bHLH factors, Neurog1 and Neurod4. We present evidence that Hedgehog signalling is required for the expression of pax6a, which is in turn necessary for the expression of neurog1 and neurod4. Finally, we demonstrate by pharmacological inhibition that Hedgehog signalling is required continuously during habenular neurogenesis and by cell transplantation experiments that pathway activation is required cell autonomously. Our data sheds light on the mechanism underlying habenular development that may provide insights into how Nodal signalling imposes asymmetry on the timing of habenular neurogenesis. PMID:27387288

  18. An essential role for Grk2 in Hedgehog signalling downstream of Smoothened.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhonghua; Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Pusapati, Ganesh V; Iyu, Audrey; Rohatgi, Rajat; Ingham, Philip W

    2016-05-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (adrbk2/GRK2) has been implicated in vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signalling based on the effects of its transient knock-down in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos. Here, we show that the response to Hh signalling is effectively abolished in the absence of Grk2 activity. Zebrafish embryos lacking all Grk2 activity are refractory to both Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and oncogenic Smoothened (Smo) activity, but remain responsive to inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. Mutation of the kinase domain abrogates the rescuing activity of grk2 mRNA, suggesting that Grk2 acts in a kinase-dependent manner to regulate the response to Hh. Previous studies have suggested that Grk2 potentiates Smo activity by phosphorylating its C-terminal tail (CTT). In the zebrafish embryo, however, phosphomimetic Smo does not display constitutive activity, whereas phospho-null mutants retain activity, implying phosphorylation is neither sufficient nor necessary for Smo function. Since Grk2 rescuing activity requires the integrity of domains essential for its interaction with GPCRs, we speculate that Grk2 may regulate Hh pathway activity by downregulation of a GPCR. PMID:27113758

  19. The dawn of hedgehog inhibitors: Vismodegib.

    PubMed

    Sandhiya, Selvarajan; Melvin, George; Kumar, Srinivasamurthy Suresh; Dkhar, Steven Aibor

    2013-01-01

    Cancer, one of the leading causes of death worldwide is estimated to increase to approximately 13.1 million by 2030. This has amplified the research in oncology towards the exploration of novel targets. Recently there has been lots of interest regarding the hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which plays a significant role in the development of organs and tissues during embryonic and postnatal periods. In a normal person, the Hh signaling pathway is under inhibition and gets activated upon the binding of Hh ligand to a transmembrane receptor called Patched (PTCH1) thus allowing the transmembrane protein, smoothened (SMO) to transfer signals through various proteins. One of the newer drugs namely vismodegib involves the inhibition of Hh pathway and has shown promising results in the treatment of advanced basal-cell carcinoma as well as medulloblastoma. It has been granted approval by US Food and Drug Administration's (US FDA) priority review program on January 30, 2012 for the treatment of advanced basal-cell carcinoma. The drug is also being evaluated in malignancies like medulloblastoma, pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, chondrosarcoma and prostate cancer. Moreover various Hh inhibitors namely LDE 225, saridegib, BMS 833923, LEQ 506, PF- 04449913 and TAK-441 are also undergoing phase I and II trials for different neoplasms. Hence this review will describe briefly the Hh pathway and the novel drug vismodegib. PMID:23662017

  20. Probing extracellular Sonic hedgehog in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Erez; Petralia, Ronald S.; Wang, Ya-Xian; Indig, Fred E.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bioactivity of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) depends on specific lipid modifications; a palmitate at its N-terminus and a cholesterol at its C-terminus. This dual-lipid modification makes Shh molecules lipophilic, which prevents them from diffusing freely in extracellular space. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Shh proteins are carried by various forms of extracellular vesicles (EVs). It also has been shown, for instance, that in some tissues Shh proteins are transported to neighboring cells directly via filopodia. We have previously reported that Shh proteins are expressed in hippocampal neurons. In this study we show that, in the hippocampus and cerebellum of postnatal day (P)2 rats, Shh is mostly found near or on the membrane surface of small neurites or filopodia. We also examined cultured hippocampal neurons where we observed noticeable and widespread Shh-immunolabeled vesicles located outside neurons. Through immunoelectron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we find Shh-containing EVs with a wide range of sizes. Unlike robust Shh activity in EVs isolated from cells overexpressing an N-terminal Shh fragment construct, we did not detect measurable Shh activity in EVs purified from the medium of cultured hippocampal neurons. These results suggest the complexity of the transcellular Shh signaling mechanisms in neurons. PMID:27387534

  1. dachshund Potentiates Hedgehog Signaling during Drosophila Retinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Stein; Casares, Fernando; Janody, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Proper organ patterning depends on a tight coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation. The patterning of Drosophila retina occurs both very fast and with high precision. This process is driven by the dynamic changes in signaling activity of the conserved Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which coordinates cell fate determination, cell cycle and tissue morphogenesis. Here we show that during Drosophila retinogenesis, the retinal determination gene dachshund (dac) is not only a target of the Hh signaling pathway, but is also a modulator of its activity. Using developmental genetics techniques, we demonstrate that dac enhances Hh signaling by promoting the accumulation of the Gli transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci) parallel to or downstream of fused. In the absence of dac, all Hh-mediated events associated to the morphogenetic furrow are delayed. One of the consequences is that, posterior to the furrow, dac- cells cannot activate a Roadkill-Cullin3 negative feedback loop that attenuates Hh signaling and which is necessary for retinal cells to continue normal differentiation. Therefore, dac is part of an essential positive feedback loop in the Hh pathway, guaranteeing the speed and the accuracy of Drosophila retinogenesis. PMID:27442438

  2. Evolution of the Hedgehog Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.; Balczarek, K. A.; Lai, Z. C.

    1996-01-01

    Effective intercellular communication is an important feature in the development of multicellular organisms. Secreted hedgehog (hh) protein is essential for both long- and short-range cellular signaling required for body pattern formation in animals. In a molecular evolutionary study, we find that the vertebrate homologs of the Drosophila hh gene arose by two gene duplications: the first gave rise to Desert hh, whereas the second produced the Indian and Sonic hh genes. Both duplications occurred before the emergence of vertebrates and probably before the evolution of chordates. The amino-terminal fragment of the hh precursor, crucial in long- and short-range intercellular communication, evolves two to four times slower than the carboxyl-terminal fragment in both Drosophila hh and its vertebrate homologues, suggesting conservation of mechanism of hh action in animals. A majority of amino acid substitutions in the amino- and carboxyl-terminal fragments are conservative, but the carboxyl-terminal domain has undergone extensive insertion-deletion events while maintaining its autocleavage protease activity. Our results point to similarity of evolutionary constraints among sites of Drosophila and vertebrate hh homologs and suggest some future directions for understanding the role of hh genes in the evolution of developmental complexity in animals. PMID:8849902

  3. Probing extracellular Sonic hedgehog in neurons.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Erez; Petralia, Ronald S; Wang, Ya-Xian; Indig, Fred E; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    The bioactivity of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) depends on specific lipid modifications; a palmitate at its N-terminus and a cholesterol at its C-terminus. This dual-lipid modification makes Shh molecules lipophilic, which prevents them from diffusing freely in extracellular space. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Shh proteins are carried by various forms of extracellular vesicles (EVs). It also has been shown, for instance, that in some tissues Shh proteins are transported to neighboring cells directly via filopodia. We have previously reported that Shh proteins are expressed in hippocampal neurons. In this study we show that, in the hippocampus and cerebellum of postnatal day (P)2 rats, Shh is mostly found near or on the membrane surface of small neurites or filopodia. We also examined cultured hippocampal neurons where we observed noticeable and widespread Shh-immunolabeled vesicles located outside neurons. Through immunoelectron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we find Shh-containing EVs with a wide range of sizes. Unlike robust Shh activity in EVs isolated from cells overexpressing an N-terminal Shh fragment construct, we did not detect measurable Shh activity in EVs purified from the medium of cultured hippocampal neurons. These results suggest the complexity of the transcellular Shh signaling mechanisms in neurons. PMID:27387534

  4. Aberrant Hedgehog Signaling and Clinical Outcome in Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Winnie W.; Pinnaduwage, Dushanthi; Gokgoz, Nalan; Wunder, Jay S.; Andrulis, Irene L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of Hedgehog signaling in bone development, the relationship between Hedgehog pathway expression and osteosarcoma clinical characteristics and outcome has not been investigated. In this study of 43 high-grade human osteosarcoma samples, we detected high expression levels of the Hedgehog ligand gene, IHH, and target genes, PTCH1 and GLI1, in most samples. Further analysis in tumors of patients with localized disease at diagnosis identified coexpression of IHH and PTCH1 exclusively in large tumors. Higher levels of IHH were observed more frequently in males and patients with higher levels of GLI1 were more responsive to chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis by tumor size and IHH expression indicated that the well-known association between survival and tumor size was further refined when IHH levels were taken into consideration. PMID:24799831

  5. Novel Hedgehog pathway targets against basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jean Y. So, P.-L.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2007-11-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a key role in directing growth and patterning during embryonic development and is required in vertebrates for the normal development of many structures, including the neural tube, axial skeleton, skin, and hair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in adult tissue is associated with the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), medulloblastoma, and a subset of pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and other cancers. This review will provide an overview of what is known about the mechanisms by which activation of Hedgehog signaling leads to the development of BCCs and will review two recent papers suggesting that agents that modulate sterol levels might influence the Hh pathway. Thus, sterols may be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of BCCs, and readily available agents such as statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) or vitamin D might be helpful in reducing BCC incidence.

  6. Hedgehog ansatz and its generalization for self-gravitating Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Maeda, Hideki

    2013-04-01

    The hedgehog ansatz for spherically symmetric spacetimes in self-gravitating nonlinear sigma models and Skyrme models is revisited and its generalization for nonspherically symmetric spacetimes is proposed. The key idea behind our construction is that, even if the matter fields depend on the Killing coordinates in a nontrivial way, the corresponding energy-momentum tensor can still be compatible with spacetime symmetries. Our generalized hedgehog ansatz reduces the Skyrme equations to coupled differential equations for two scalar fields together with several constraint equations between them. Some particular field configurations satisfying those constraints are presented in several physically important spacetimes, including stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. Incidentally, new exact solutions are obtained under the standard hedgehog ansatz, one of which represents a global monopole inside a black hole with the Skyrme effect.

  7. Piperazic acid derivatives inhibit Gli1 in Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Khatra, Harleen; Kundu, Jayanta; Khan, Pragya Paramita; Duttagupta, Indranil; Pattanayak, Sankha; Sinha, Surajit

    2016-09-15

    Piperazic acid, a non-proteinogenic amino acid, found in complex secondary metabolites and peptide natural substances, has shown down regulation of Gli1 expression in Hedgehog signaling pathway in cell based assays. Further structure activity relationship study indicated that amide derivatives of piperazic acid are more potent than piperazic acid itself, with little to no toxicity. However, other cellular components involved in the pathway were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the inhibitory property of piperazic acid in this pathway. Hence, this molecule could serve as a useful tool for studying Hedgehog signaling. PMID:27528433

  8. A different kind of hedgehog pathway: tinea manus due to Trichophyton erinacei transmitted by an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, Julia; Kolb-Mäurer, Annette; Lempert, Sigrid; Nenoff, Pietro; Uhrlaß, Silke; Hamm, Henning; Goebeler, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    The unusual case of a 29-year-old woman with tinea manus caused by infection due to Trichophyton erinacei is described. The patient presented with marked erosive inflammation of the entire fifth finger of her right hand. Mycological and genomic diagnostics resulted in identification of T. erinacei as the responsible pathogen, which had been transmitted by a domestic African pygmy hedgehog, Atelerix albiventris. Upon prolonged treatment with topical and systemic antifungal agents skin lesions slowly resolved. This case illustrates that the increasingly popular keeping of extraordinary pets such as hedgehogs may bear the risk of infections with uncommon dermatophytes. PMID:23889168

  9. Amygdalar connections in the lesser hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyses the overall extrinsic connectivity of the non-olfactory amygdala (Ay) in the lesser hedgehog tenrec. The data were obtained from tracer injections into the lateral and intermediate portions of the Ay as well as several non-amygdalar brain regions. Both the solitary and the parabrachial nucleus receive descending projections from the central nucleus of the Ay, but only the parabrachial nucleus appears to project to the Ay. There is one prominent region in the ventromedial hypothalamus connected reciprocally with the medial and central Ay. Amygdalar afferents clearly arise from the dorsomedial thalamus, the subparafascicular nuclei and the medial geniculate complex (GM). Similar to other subprimate species, the latter projections originate in the dorsal and most caudal geniculate portions and terminate in the dorsolateral Ay. Unusual is the presence of amygdalo-projecting cells in the marginal geniculate zone and their virtual absence in the medial GM. As in other species, amygdalo-striatal projections mainly originate in the basolateral Ay and terminate predominantly in the ventral striatum. Given the poor differentiation of the tenrec's neocortex, there is a remarkable similarity with regard to the amygdalo-cortical connectivity between tenrec and rat, particularly as to prefrontal, limbic and somatosensorimotor areas as well as the rhinal cortex throughout its length. The tenrec's isocortex dorsomedial to the caudal rhinal cortex, on the other hand, may not be connected with the Ay. An absence of such connections is expected for primary auditory and visual fields, but it is unusual for their secondary fields. PMID:21638204

  10. Pyrvinium attenuates Hedgehog signaling downstream of smoothened.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Fei, Dennis Liang; Flaveny, Colin A; Dahmane, Nadia; Baubet, Valérie; Wang, Zhiqiang; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Hang, Brian; Orton, Darren; Han, Lu; Wang, Baolin; Capobianco, Anthony J; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J

    2014-09-01

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway represents an important class of emerging developmental signaling pathways that play critical roles in the genesis of a large number of human cancers. The pharmaceutical industry is currently focused on developing small molecules targeting Smoothened (Smo), a key signaling effector of the HH pathway that regulates the levels and activity of the Gli family of transcription factors. Although one of these compounds, vismodegib, is now FDA-approved for patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma, acquired mutations in Smo can result in rapid relapse. Furthermore, many cancers also exhibit a Smo-independent activation of Gli proteins, an observation that may underlie the limited efficacy of Smo inhibitors in clinical trials against other types of cancer. Thus, there remains a critical need for HH inhibitors with different mechanisms of action, particularly those that act downstream of Smo. Recently, we identified the FDA-approved anti-pinworm compound pyrvinium as a novel, potent (IC50, 10 nmol/L) casein kinase-1α (CK1α) agonist. We show here that pyrvinium is a potent inhibitor of HH signaling, which acts by reducing the stability of the Gli family of transcription factors. Consistent with CK1α agonists acting on these most distal components of the HH signaling pathway, pyrvinium is able to inhibit the activity of a clinically relevant, vismodegib -resistant Smo mutant, as well as the Gli activity resulting from loss of the negative regulator suppressor of fused. We go on to demonstrate the utility of this small molecule in vivo, against the HH-dependent cancer medulloblastoma, attenuating its growth and reducing the expression of HH biomarkers. PMID:24994715

  11. Hedgehog and extramacrochaetae in the Drosophila eye

    PubMed Central

    Spratford, Carrie M; Kumar, Justin P

    2014-01-01

    During the third and final larval instar stage, thousands of pluripotent cells within the Drosophila eye imaginal disc are transformed into a near perfect neurocrystalline lattice of 800 unit eyes called ommatidia. This transformation begins with the initiation of the morphogenetic furrow at the posterior margin of the eye field. The furrow, which marks the leading edge of a wave of differentiation, passes across the epithelium transforming unpatterned and undifferentiated cells into rows of periodically spaced clusters of photoreceptor neurons. As cells enter and exit the furrow they undergo dramatic alterations in cellular architecture and gene expression, many of which are required to propel the furrow forward and for proper cell fate specification. The Decapentaplegic (Dpp) and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways are required for the initiation and progression of the furrow, respectively. Consistent with a role in furrow progression, the loss of Hh pathway activity results in a “furrow stop” phenotype. In contrast, reductions in levels of the helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Extramacrochaetae (Emc), lead to the polar opposite phenotype—the furrow accelerates. Recently, we demonstrated that the furrow stop and furrow acceleration phenotypes are molecularly connected. Emc appears to serve as a brake on the furrow by dampening the activity of the Hh pathway. Loss of Emc leads to an upsurge in Hh pathway activity and a faster moving furrow. The acceleration of the furrow appears to be due to an increase in levels of the full-length isoform of Cubitus Interruptus (Ci155) and Suppressor of Fused [Su(fu)]. Here we will briefly review the mechanisms by which Hh drives and Emc impedes the progression of the furrow across the developing retina. PMID:24406336

  12. Sonic hedgehog: restricted expression and limb dysmorphologies.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert E; Heaney, Simon J H; Lettice, Laura A

    2003-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog, SHH, is required for patterning the limb. The array of skeletal elements that compose the hands and feet, and the ordered arrangement of these bones to form the pattern of fingers and toes are dependent on SHH. The mechanism of action of SHH in the limb is not fully understood; however, an aspect that appears to be important is the localized, asymmetric expression of Shh. Shh is expressed in the posterior margin of the limb bud in a region defined as the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA). Analysis of mouse mutants which have polydactyly (extra toes) shows that asymmetric expression of Shh is lost due to the appearance of an ectopic domain of expression in the anterior limb margin. One such polydactylous mouse mutant, sasquatch (Ssq), maps to the corresponding chromosomal region of the human condition pre-axial polydactyly (PPD) and thus represents a model for this condition. The mutation responsible for Ssq is located 1 Mb away from the Shh gene; however, the mutation disrupts a long-range cis-acting regulator of Shh expression. By inference, human pre-axial polydactyly results from a similar disruption of Shh expression. Other human congenital abnormalities also map near the pre-axial polydactyly locus, suggesting a major chromosomal region for limb dysmorphologies. The distinct phenotypes range from loss of all bones of the hands and feet to syndactyly of the soft tissue and fusion of the digits. We discuss the role played by Shh expression in mouse mutant phenotypes and the human limb dysmorphologies. PMID:12587915

  13. Sonic hedgehog: restricted expression and limb dysmorphologies

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert E; Heaney, Simon JH; Lettice, Laura A

    2003-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog, SHH, is required for patterning the limb. The array of skeletal elements that compose the hands and feet, and the ordered arrangement of these bones to form the pattern of fingers and toes are dependent on SHH. The mechanism of action of SHH in the limb is not fully understood; however, an aspect that appears to be important is the localized, asymmetric expression of Shh. Shh is expressed in the posterior margin of the limb bud in a region defined as the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA). Analysis of mouse mutants which have polydactyly (extra toes) shows that asymmetric expression of Shh is lost due to the appearance of an ectopic domain of expression in the anterior limb margin. One such polydactylous mouse mutant, sasquatch (Ssq), maps to the corresponding chromosomal region of the human condition pre-axial polydactyly (PPD) and thus represents a model for this condition. The mutation responsible for Ssq is located 1 Mb away from the Shh gene; however, the mutation disrupts a long-range cis-acting regulator of Shh expression. By inference, human pre-axial polydactyly results from a similar disruption of Shh expression. Other human congenital abnormalities also map near the pre-axial polydactyly locus, suggesting a major chromosomal region for limb dysmorphologies. The distinct phenotypes range from loss of all bones of the hands and feet to syndactyly of the soft tissue and fusion of the digits. We discuss the role played by Shh expression in mouse mutant phenotypes and the human limb dysmorphologies. PMID:12587915

  14. Structural insights into human Kif7, a kinesin involved in Hedgehog signalling

    PubMed Central

    Klejnot, Marta; Kozielski, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Kif7, a member of the kinesin 4 superfamily, is implicated in a variety of diseases including Joubert, hydrolethalus and acrocallosal syndromes. It is also involved in primary cilium formation and the Hedgehog signalling pathway and may play a role in cancer. Its activity is crucial for embryonic development. Kif7 and Kif27, a closely related kinesin in the same subfamily, are orthologues of the Drosophila melano­gaster kinesin-like protein Costal-2 (Cos2). In vertebrates, they work together to fulfil the role of the single Cos2 gene in Drosophila. Here, the high-resolution structure of the human Kif7 motor domain is reported and is compared with that of conventional kinesin, the founding member of the kinesin superfamily. These data are a first step towards structural characterization of a kinesin-4 family member and of this interesting molecular motor of medical significance. PMID:22281744

  15. The Hedgehog Signalling Pathway in Cell Migration and Guidance: What We Have Learned from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sofia J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration and guidance are complex processes required for morphogenesis, the formation of tumor metastases, and the progression of human cancer. During migration, guidance molecules induce cell directionality and movement through complex intracellular mechanisms. Expression of these molecules has to be tightly regulated and their signals properly interpreted by the receiving cells so as to ensure correct navigation. This molecular control is fundamental for both normal morphogenesis and human disease. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved and known to be crucial for normal cellular growth and differentiation throughout the animal kingdom. The relevance of Hh signaling for human disease is emphasized by its activation in many cancers. Here, I review the current knowledge regarding the involvement of the Hh pathway in cell migration and guidance during Drosophila development and discuss its implications for human cancer origin and progression. PMID:26445062

  16. Stage-specific effects of sonic hedgehog expression in the epidermis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, B A; Orkin, R W; Noramly, S; Perez, A

    1998-09-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the ectoderm of the forming hair follicle and feather bud during normal development. However, inappropriate activation of the Shh signal transduction cascade in human epidermis can cause basal cell carcinoma. Here we show that during normal development of avian skin, Shh is first expressed only after the responsiveness to this protein has been suppressed in most of the surrounding ectodermal cells. Forced expression of Shh in avian skin prior to this time causes a disorganized ectodermal proliferation. However, as skin begins to differentiate, the forced expression of Shh causes feather bud formation. Subsequently, expression of Shh in interfollicular epidermis has little or no morphological effect. Restricted responsiveness to Shh in developing skin has functional consequences for morphogenesis and may have important implications for cutaneous pathologies as well. PMID:9733569

  17. Sonic Hedgehog functions by localizing the region of proliferation in early developing feather buds.

    PubMed

    McKinnell, Iain W; Turmaine, Mark; Patel, Ketan

    2004-08-01

    Feathers are formed following a series of reciprocal signals between the epithelium and the mesenchyme. Initially, the formation of a dense dermis leads to the induction of a placode in the overlying ectoderm. The ectoderm subsequently signals back to the dermis to promote cell division. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted protein expressed in the ectoderm that has previously been implicated in mitogenic and morphogenetic processes throughout feather bud development. We therefore interfered with Shh signaling during early feather bud development and observed a dramatic change in feather form and prominence. Surprisingly, outgrowth did occur and was manifest as irregular, fused, and ectopic feather domains at both molecular and morphological levels. Experiments with Di-I and BrdU indicated that this effect was at least in part caused by the dispersal of previously aggregated proliferating dermal cells. We propose that Shh maintains bud development by localizing the dermal feather progenitors. PMID:15242792

  18. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  19. Acute upregulation of hedgehog signaling in mice causes differential effects on cranial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nandini; Dutka, Tara; Devenney, Benjamin M.; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Reeves, Roger H.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling, and particularly signaling by sonic hedgehog (SHH), is implicated in several essential activities during morphogenesis, and its misexpression causes a number of developmental disorders in humans. In particular, a reduced mitogenic response of cerebellar granule cell precursors to SHH signaling in a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS), Ts65Dn, is substantially responsible for reduced cerebellar size. A single treatment of newborn trisomic mice with an agonist of the SHH pathway (SAG) normalizes cerebellar morphology and restores some cognitive deficits, suggesting a possible therapeutic application of SAG for treating the cognitive impairments of DS. Although the beneficial effects on the cerebellum are compelling, inappropriate activation of the HH pathway causes anomalies elsewhere in the head, particularly in the formation and patterning of the craniofacial skeleton. To determine whether an acute treatment of SAG has an effect on craniofacial morphology, we quantitatively analyzed the cranial form of adult euploid and Ts65Dn mice that were injected with either SAG or vehicle at birth. We found significant deformation of adult craniofacial shape in some animals that had received SAG at birth. The most pronounced differences between the treated and untreated mice were in the midline structures of the facial skeleton. The SAG-driven craniofacial dysmorphogenesis was dose-dependent and possibly incompletely penetrant at lower concentrations. Our findings illustrate that activation of HH signaling, even with an acute postnatal stimulation, can lead to localized dysmorphology of the skull by generating modular shape changes in the facial skeleton. These observations have important implications for translating HH-agonist-based treatments for DS. PMID:25540129

  20. Acute upregulation of hedgehog signaling in mice causes differential effects on cranial morphology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nandini; Dutka, Tara; Devenney, Benjamin M; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Reeves, Roger H; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2015-03-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling, and particularly signaling by sonic hedgehog (SHH), is implicated in several essential activities during morphogenesis, and its misexpression causes a number of developmental disorders in humans. In particular, a reduced mitogenic response of cerebellar granule cell precursors to SHH signaling in a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS), Ts65Dn, is substantially responsible for reduced cerebellar size. A single treatment of newborn trisomic mice with an agonist of the SHH pathway (SAG) normalizes cerebellar morphology and restores some cognitive deficits, suggesting a possible therapeutic application of SAG for treating the cognitive impairments of DS. Although the beneficial effects on the cerebellum are compelling, inappropriate activation of the HH pathway causes anomalies elsewhere in the head, particularly in the formation and patterning of the craniofacial skeleton. To determine whether an acute treatment of SAG has an effect on craniofacial morphology, we quantitatively analyzed the cranial form of adult euploid and Ts65Dn mice that were injected with either SAG or vehicle at birth. We found significant deformation of adult craniofacial shape in some animals that had received SAG at birth. The most pronounced differences between the treated and untreated mice were in the midline structures of the facial skeleton. The SAG-driven craniofacial dysmorphogenesis was dose-dependent and possibly incompletely penetrant at lower concentrations. Our findings illustrate that activation of HH signaling, even with an acute postnatal stimulation, can lead to localized dysmorphology of the skull by generating modular shape changes in the facial skeleton. These observations have important implications for translating HH-agonist-based treatments for DS. PMID:25540129

  1. Malignant mast cell tumor in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; White, M R; Janovitz, E B

    1997-01-01

    In November 1995, a malignant mast cell tumor (mastocytoma) was diagnosed in an adult African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) from a zoological park (West Lafayette, Indiana, USA). The primary mast cell tumor presented as a firm subcutaneous mass along the ventrum of the neck. Metastasis to the right submandibular lymph node occurred. PMID:9027702

  2. Spinal osteosarcoma in a hedgehog with pedal self-mutilation.

    PubMed

    Rhody, Jeffrey L; Schiller, Chris A

    2006-09-01

    An African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was diagnosed with osteosarcoma of vertebral origin with compression of the spinal cord and spinal nerves. The only presenting sign was a self-mutilation of rear feet. Additional diagnoses included a well-differentiated splenic hemangiosarcoma, an undifferentiated sarcoma of the ascending colon, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. PMID:16931383

  3. Brown adipocyte differentiation is regulated by hedgehog signaling during development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During development, brown fat tissue arises from mesenchymal precursor cells under the control of signaling networks that are not yet well understood. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is one of the major signaling pathways that regulate mesenchymal cell fate. However, whether the Hh pathway contr...

  4. Learning to Play: A "Hedgehog Concept" for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    What is physical education and why does it exist? Despite its relatively long and storied history, consensus about the main purpose of physical education remains minimal. This article explores three questions, developed by Jim Collins in his best-selling book Good to Great, to help organizations identify a hedgehog concept, or primary reason for…

  5. Dissecting the Role of Hedgehog Pathway in Murine Gonadal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsoum, Ivraym Boshra

    2009-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is one of the universal pathways involved in animal development. This dissertation focuses on Hh role in the mammalian gonad development, which is a central part of mammalian sexual development and identity. The central dogma of mammalian sex development is that genetic sex determines the gonadal sex, which in turn…

  6. Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Hofmannová, Lada; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Vítovec, Jiří; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-03-17

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. is proposed to reflect its specificity for hedgehogs under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. erinacei are morphologically indistinguishable from Cryptosporidium parvum, measuring 4.5-5.8 μm (mean=4.9 μm) × 4.0-4.8 μm (mean=4.4 μm) with a length to width ratio of 1.13 (1.02-1.35) (n=100). Oocysts of C. erinacei obtained from a naturally infected European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) were infectious for naïve 8-week-old four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris); the prepatent period was 4-5 days post infection (DPI) and the patent period was longer than 20 days. C. erinacei was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus), Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), or golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, 60 kDa glycoprotein, actin, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, thrombospondin-related adhesive protein of Cryptosporidium-1, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. erinacei is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:24529828

  7. Common Emergencies in Small Rodents, Hedgehogs, and Sugar Gliders.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Alicia; Strunk, Anneliese

    2016-05-01

    Small exotic mammal pets such as rats, mice, hamsters, gerbils, degus, hedgehogs, and sugar gliders are becoming more popular. Because these animals are prone to a variety of health problems, and require specialized husbandry care to remain healthy, they may present to emergency hospitals in critical condition. This article provides a basic overview of common emergency presentations of these species. PMID:27131160

  8. Ectoparasitic infestations of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) in Urmia city, Iran: First report

    PubMed Central

    Gorgani-Firouzjaee, Tahmineh; Pour-Reza, Behzad; Naem, Soraya; Tavassoli, Mousa

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehogs are small, nocturnal mammals that become popular in the world and have significant role in transmission of zoonotic agents. Some of the agents are transmitted by ticks and fleas such as rickettsial agents. For these reason, a survey on ectoparasites in European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) carried out between April 2006 and December 2007 from different parts of Urmia city, west Azerbaijan, Iran. After being euthanized external surface of body of animals was precisely considered for ectoparasites, and arthropods were collected and stored in 70% ethanol solution. Out of 34 hedgehogs 23 hedgehogs (67.70%) were infested with ticks (Rhipicephalus turanicus). Fleas of the species Archaeopsylla erinacei were found on 19 hedgehogs of 34 hedgehogs (55.90%). There was no significant differences between sex of ticks (p > 0.05) but found in fleas (p < 0.05). The prevalence of infestation in sexes and the body condition of hedgehogs (small, medium and large) with ticks and fleas did not show significant differences (p > 0.05). Highest occurrence of infestation in both tick and flea was in June. Among three seasons of hedgehog collection significant differences was observed (p < 0.05). The result of our survey revealed that infestation rate in hedgehog was high. According to zoonotic importance of this ectoparasite and ability to transmission of some pathogens, more studies are needed to investigate hedgehog parasites in different parts of Iran. PMID:25653796

  9. The hedgehog system in ovarian follicles of cattle selected for twin ovulations and births: evidence of a link between the IGF and hedgehog systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hedgehog signaling is involved in regulation of ovarian function in Drosophila but its role in regulating mammalian ovarian folliculogenesis is less clear. Therefore, gene expression of Indian hedgehog (IHH) and its type 1 receptor, patched 1 (PTCH1), were quantified in bovine granulosa (GC) or the...

  10. The hedgehog system in ovarian follicles of cattle selected for twin ovulations and births: evidence of a link between the IGF and hedgehog systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hedgehog system is involved in the regulation of ovarian function in drosophila, but its role in regulating ovarian follicular function in mammals is unclear. Therefore, gene expression of Indian hedgehog ligand (Ihh), its type 1 receptor (patched 1; Patch1), and IGF type 2 receptor (IGF2R) were...

  11. Axon Targeting of Olfactory Receptor Neurons is Patterned by Coupled Hedgehog Signaling at Two Distinct Steps

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ya-Hui; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Beachy, Philip A.; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We present evidence for a novel, coupled two-step action of Hedgehog signaling in patterning axon targeting of Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). In the first step, differential Hedgehog pathway activity in peripheral sensory organ precursors creates ORN populations with different levels of the Patched receptor. Different Patched levels in ORNs then determine axonal responsiveness to target-derived Hedgehog in the brain: only ORN axons that do not express high levels of Patched are responsive to and require a second-step of Hedgehog signaling for target selection. Hedgehog signaling in the imaginal sensory organ precursors thus confers differential ORN responsiveness to Hedgehog-mediated axon targeting in the brain. This mechanism contributes to the spatial coordination of ORN cell bodies in the periphery and their glomerular targets in the brain. Such coupled two-step signaling may be more generally used to coordinate other spatially and temporally segregated developmental events. PMID:20850015

  12. Requirements for Hedgehog, a Segmental Polarity Gene, in Patterning Larval and Adult Cuticle of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, J.

    1988-01-01

    Mutations of the hedgehog gene are generally embryonic lethal, resulting in a lawn of denticles on the ventral surface. In strong alleles, no segmentation is obvious and the anteroposterior polarity of ventral denticles is lost. Temperature shift analysis of a temperature-sensitive allele indicates an embryonic activity period for hedgehog between 2.5 and 6 hr of embryonic development (at 25°) and a larval/pupal period from 4 to 7 days of development (at 25°). Mosaic analysis of hedgehog mutations in the adult cuticle indicates a series of defined defects associated with the failure of appropriate hedgehog expression. In particular, defects in the distal portions of the legs and antenna occur in association with homozygous hedgehog clones in the posterior compartment of those structures. Because the defects are associated with homozygous clones, but are not co-extensive, a type of ``domineering'' nonautonomy is proposed for the activity of the hedgehog gene. PMID:3147217

  13. Cloning and bioinformatical analysis of the N-terminus of the sonic hedgehog gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shu; Dong, Weiren; He, Suifen; Wang, Haihong; Zhang, Lihua; Tang, Yinjuan; Guo, Jiasong; Guo, Suiqun

    2013-01-25

    The sonic hedgehog protein not only plays a key role in early embryonic development, but also has essential effects on the adult nervous system, including neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and neuronal axon guidance. The N-terminal fragment of sonic hedgehog is the key functional element in this process. Therefore, this study aimed to clone and analyze the N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog gene. Total RNA was extracted from the notochord of a Sprague-Dawley rat at embryonic day 9 and the N-terminal fragment of sonic hedgehog was amplified by nested reverse transcription-PCR. The N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog gene was successfully cloned. The secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog protein were predicted using Jpred and Phyre online. PMID:25206596

  14. A directed mutagenesis screen in Drosophila melanogaster reveals new mutants that influence hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, N; van den Heuvel, M

    2000-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway has been recognized as essential for patterning processes in development of metazoan animal species. The signaling pathway is, however, not entirely understood. To start to address this problem, we set out to isolate new mutations that influence Hedgehog signaling. We performed a mutagenesis screen for mutations that dominantly suppress Hedgehog overexpression phenotypes in the Drosophila melanogaster wing. We isolated four mutations that influence Hedgehog signaling. These were analyzed in the amenable wing system using genetic and molecular techniques. One of these four mutations affects the stability of the Hedgehog expression domain boundary, also known as the organizer in the developing wing. Another mutation affects a possible Hedgehog autoregulation mechanism, which stabilizes the same boundary. PMID:11102373

  15. Hedgehog excitations in double-exchange magnetism: Energetics and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, David; Goldbart, Paul; Salamon, Myron; Abanov, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    Topological hedgehog excitations of the magnetic state are believed to play an important role in the three-dimensional ferromagnet-to-paramagnet phase transition. This is true not only in Heisenberg magnets but also in double-exchange magnets, for which the transition is accompanied by a metal-insulator transition. The energetics and electronic structure of hedgehog excitations in double-exchange systems are investigated using a model in which the electrons move through a lattice of classical spins, to which they are coupled via Hund's Rule interactions. The core energy of hedgehog excitations is determined, as is the extent to which charge is expelled from the hedgehog cores. In settings involving pairs of hedgehogs, the manner in which the electronic energetics determines the magnetic structure is explored variationally, especially in the region between the hedgehogs.

  16. Unraveling the therapeutic potential of the LncRNA-dependent noncanonical Hedgehog pathway in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zhen; Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to Hedgehog pathway inhibitors has been reported in the clinical setting and upregulation of noncanonical Hedgehog signaling is one of the major underlying mechanisms behind this resistance. As demonstrated in our recent study, greater clinical efficacy might be achieved by focusing on downstream targets of the chemokine-activated noncanonical Hedgehog signaling pathway such as BCAR4 and phospho-GLI2 (Ser149). PMID:27308519

  17. The Mode of Hedgehog Binding to Ihog Homologues is Not Conserved Across Different Phyla

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, J.; Zheng, X; Hauk, G; Ghirlando, R; Beachy, P; Leahy, D

    2008-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins specify tissue pattern in metazoan embryos by forming gradients that emanate from discrete sites of expression and elicit concentration-dependent cellular differentiation or proliferation responses1, 2. Cellular responses to Hh and the movement of Hh through tissues are both precisely regulated, and abnormal Hh signalling has been implicated in human birth defects and cancer3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Hh signalling is mediated by its amino-terminal domain (HhN), which is dually lipidated and secreted as part of a multivalent lipoprotein particle8, 9, 10. Reception of the HhN signal is modulated by several cell-surface proteins on responding cells, including Patched (Ptc), Smoothened (Smo), Ihog (known as CDO or CDON in mammals) and the vertebrate-specific proteins Hip (also known as Hhip) and Gas1 (ref. 11). Drosophila Ihog and its vertebrate homologues CDO and BOC contain multiple immunoglobulin and fibronectin type III (FNIII) repeats, and the first FNIII repeat of Ihog binds Drosophila HhN in a heparin-dependent manner12, 13. Surprisingly, pull-down experiments suggest that a mammalian Sonic hedgehog N-terminal domain (ShhN) binds a non-orthologous FNIII repeat of CDO12, 14. Here we report biochemical, biophysical and X-ray structural studies of a complex between ShhN and the third FNIII repeat of CDO. We show that the ShhN-CDO interaction is completely unlike the HhN-Ihog interaction and requires calcium, which binds at a previously undetected site on ShhN. This site is conserved in nearly all Hh proteins and is a hotspot for mediating interactions between ShhN and CDO, Ptc, Hip and Gas1. Mutations in vertebrate Hh proteins causing holoprosencephaly and brachydactyly type A1 map to this calcium-binding site and disrupt interactions with these partners.

  18. Hedgehog signal activation coordinates proliferation and differentiation of fetal liver progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Tohru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2009-09-10

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays crucial roles in development and homeostasis of various organs. In the adult liver, it regulates proliferation and/or viability of several types of cells, particularly under injured conditions, and is also implicated in stem/progenitor cell maintenance. However, the role of this signaling pathway during the normal developmental process of the liver remains elusive. Although Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the ventral foregut endoderm from which the liver derives, the expression disappears at the onset of the liver bud formation, and its possible recurrence at the later stages has not been investigated. Here we analyzed the activation and functional relevance of Hh signaling during the mouse fetal liver development. At E11.5, Shh and an activation marker gene for Hh signaling, Gli1, were expressed in Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts, the fetal liver progenitor cells, and the expression was rapidly decreased thereafter as the development proceeded. In the culture of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts isolated from the E11.5 liver, activation of Hh signaling stimulated their proliferation and this effect was cancelled by a chemical Hh signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine. In contrast, hepatocyte differentiation of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts in vitro as manifested by the marker gene expression and acquisition of ammonia clearance activity was significantly inhibited by forced activation of Hh signaling. Taken together, these results demonstrate the temporally restricted manner of Hh signal activation and its role in promoting the hepatoblast proliferation, and further suggest that the pathway needs to be shut off for the subsequent hepatic differentiation of hepatoblasts to proceed normally.

  19. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  20. WHEN AND WHY DO HEDGEHOGS AND FOXES DIFFER?

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Philip E. Tetlock’s finding that “hedgehog” experts (those with one big theory) are worse predictors than “foxes” (those with multiple, less comprehensive theories) offers fertile ground for future research. Are experts as likely to exhibit hedgehog- or fox-like tendencies in areas that call for explanatory, diagnostic, and skill-based expertise—as they did when Tetlock called on experts to make predictions? Do particular domains of expertise curtail or encourage different styles of expertise? Can we trace these different styles to childhood? Finally, can we nudge hedgehogs to be more like foxes? Current research can only grope at the answers to these questions, but they are essential to gauging the health of expert political judgment. PMID:21698070

  1. Recurrent sebaceous carcinoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Yong-Baek; Park, Jun-Won; Oh, Won-Seok; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lim, Byoung-Yong; Kim, Dae-Yong

    2010-07-01

    A 1.5-year-old intact male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was presented with a firm, non-movable subcutaneous mass on ventral chest area. Microscopically, the tumor was un-encapsulated, invasive up to the muscle layer, and composed of highly pleomorphic polygonal cells arranged in variably-sized lobules. The neoplastic cells had abundant cytoplasm with vacuolation and a large pleomorphic nucleus with prominent nucleoli. Mitotic figures were frequently observed with atypical mitoses. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin, but negative for vimentin. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of sebaceous carcinoma was made. Three months after the surgery, a recurrent mass was found at the surgical site. On necropsy, the mass has penetrated the underlying intercostal musculature, without metastasis to distant organs. This is the first report of a sebaceous carcinoma in an African hedgehog. PMID:20215722

  2. Purmorphamine induces osteogenesis by activation of the hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Walker, John; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Sheng; Schultz, Peter G

    2004-09-01

    Previously, a small molecule, purmorphamine, was identified that selectively induces osteogenesis in multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells. In order to gain insights into the mechanism of action of purmorphamine, high-density oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile gene expression in multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells treated with either purmorphamine or bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4). In contrast to BMP-4 treatment, purmorphamine activates the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, resulting in the up- and downregulation of its downstream target genes, including Gli1 and Patched. Moreover, the known Hh signaling antagonists, cyclopamine and forskolin, completely block the osteogenesis and Glimediated transcription induced by purmorphamine. These results demonstrate that purmorphamine is a small molecule agonist of Hedgehog signaling, and it may ultimately be useful in the treatment of bone-related disease and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:15380183

  3. Regulation of Hedgehog Signalling Inside and Outside the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ramsbottom, Simon A.; Pownall, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway is conserved throughout metazoans and plays an important regulatory role in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Many levels of regulation exist that control the release, reception, and interpretation of the hedgehog signal. The fatty nature of the Shh ligand means that it tends to associate tightly with the cell membrane, and yet it is known to act as a morphogen that diffuses to elicit pattern formation. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play a major role in the regulation of Hh distribution outside the cell. Inside the cell, the primary cilium provides an important hub for processing the Hh signal in vertebrates. This review will summarise the current understanding of how the Hh pathway is regulated from ligand production, release, and diffusion, through to signal reception and intracellular transduction. PMID:27547735

  4. Hedgehog signalling in gut development, physiology and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Juanita L

    2012-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is one of the most common signal transduction pathways used by mammalian cells. Most studies have focused on its role during development, primarily of the nervous system, skin, bone and pancreas. Due to the activation of this pathway during proliferation and neoplastic transformation, more recent studies have examined its role in adult tissues. Significant levels of sonic hedgehog are expressed in the gastric mucosa, which has served to direct analysis of its role during organogenesis, gastric acid secretion and neoplastic transformation. Therefore the goal of this review is to apply current knowledge of this pathway to further our understanding of gastrointestinal physiology and neoplasia, using the stomach as a prototype. PMID:22144577

  5. Equine cryptosporidial infection associated with Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Laatamna, Abd Elkarim; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Aissi, Miriem; Rost, Michael; Kváč, Martin

    2013-10-18

    Faecal samples from two horse farms in Algeria keeping Arabian, Thoroughbred, and Barb horses were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium in 2010-2011. A total of 138 faecal samples (16 from a farm keeping 50 animals and 122 from a farm with 267 horses) were screened for Cryptosporidium spp. infection using molecular tools. DNA was extracted from all samples. Nested PCR was performed to amplify fragments of the SSU rDNA and gp60 genes to determine the presence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Sequence analyses of SSU and gp60 genes revealed four animals positive for the presence of subtype XIIIa A22R9 of the Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype. The infections were not associated with diarrhoea. This study reports, for the first time, the occurrence of Cryptosporidium in Algeria and the first occurrence of the hedgehog genotype in horses. These findings support the potential role of infected horses in sylvatic-domestic transmission of Cryptosporidium. PMID:23731858

  6. Notochord repression of endodermal Sonic hedgehog permits pancreas development

    PubMed Central

    Hebrok, Matthias; Kim, Seung K.; Melton, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    Notochord signals to the endoderm are required for development of the chick dorsal pancreas. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is normally absent from pancreatic endoderm, and we provide evidence that notochord, in contrast to its effects on adjacent neuroectoderm where SHH expression is induced, represses SHH expression in adjacent nascent pancreatic endoderm. We identify activin-βB and FGF2 as notochord factors that can repress endodermal SHH and thereby permit expression of pancreas genes including Pdx1 and insulin. Endoderm treatment with antibodies that block hedgehog activity also results in pancreatic gene expression. Prevention of SHH expression in prepancreatic dorsal endoderm by intercellular signals, like activin and FGF, may be critical for permitting early steps of chick pancreatic development. PMID:9620856

  7. A review of hedgehog signaling in cranial bone development.

    PubMed

    Pan, Angel; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; James, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    During craniofacial development, the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is essential for mesodermal tissue patterning and differentiation. The HH family consists of three protein ligands: Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Indian Hedgehog (IHH), and Desert Hedgehog (DHH), of which two are expressed in the craniofacial complex (IHH and SHH). Dysregulations in HH signaling are well documented to result in a wide range of craniofacial abnormalities, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), hypotelorism, and cleft lip/palate. Furthermore, mutations in HH effectors, co-receptors, and ciliary proteins result in skeletal and craniofacial deformities. Cranial suture morphogenesis is a delicate developmental process that requires control of cell commitment, proliferation and differentiation. This review focuses on both what is known and what remains unknown regarding HH signaling in cranial suture morphogenesis and intramembranous ossification. As demonstrated from murine studies, expression of both SHH and IHH is critical to the formation and fusion of the cranial sutures and calvarial ossification. SHH expression has been observed in the cranial suture mesenchyme and its precise function is not fully defined, although some postulate SHH to delay cranial suture fusion. IHH expression is mainly found on the osteogenic fronts of the calvarial bones, and functions to induce cell proliferation and differentiation. Unfortunately, neonatal lethality of IHH deficient mice precludes a detailed examination of their postnatal calvarial phenotype. In summary, a number of basic questions are yet to be answered regarding domains of expression, developmental role, and functional overlap of HH morphogens in the calvaria. Nevertheless, SHH and IHH ligands are integral to cranial suture development and regulation of calvarial ossification. When HH signaling goes awry, the resultant suite of morphologic abnormalities highlights the important roles of HH signaling in cranial development. PMID:23565096

  8. Targeting the hedgehog pathway for gallbladder cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Mittal, Balraj; Yadav, Saurabh

    2016-02-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is a fatal malignancy of hepatobiliary tract that is generally diagnosed at advanced stages of cancer because of its asymptomatic nature. Advanced GBC tumors are unresectable with poor prognosis. Improvement in GBC patient care requires better understanding of the biological signaling pathways and application of newly discovered drugs for cancer therapy. Herein, we discuss the possibilities and challenges in targeting the hedgehog pathway in gallbladder cancer therapy based on recent developments in the area. PMID:26932426

  9. Point Defects in Nematic Gels: The Case for Hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbow, John; Fried, Eliot; Shen, Amy Q.

    2005-07-01

    We address the question of whether a nematic gel is capable of sustaining a radially-symmetric point defect (or, hedgehog). We consider the special case of a gel cross-linked in a state where the mesogens are randomly aligned, and study the behavior of a spherical specimen with boundary subjected to a uniform radial displacement. For simplicity, we allow only for distortions in which the chain conformation is uniaxial with constant chain anisotropy and, thus, is determined by a unit director field. Further, we use the particular free-energy density function arising from the neo-classical molecular-statistical description of nematic gels. We find that the potential energy of the specimen is a nonconvex function of the boundary displacement and chain anisotropy. In particular, whenever the displacement of the specimen boundary involves a relative radial expansion in excess of 0.35, which is reasonably mild for gel-like substances, the theory predicts an energetic preference for states involving a hedgehog at the center of the specimen. Under such conditions, states in which the chain anisotropy is either oblate or prolate have total free-energy less than that of an isotropic comparison state. However, the oblate alternative always provides the global minimum of the total free-energy. The Cauchy stress associated with an energetically-preferred hedgehog is found to vanish in a relatively large region surrounding the hedgehog. The radial component of Cauchy stress is tensile and exhibits a non-monotonic character with a peak value an order of magnitude less than what would be observed in a specimen consisting of a comparable isotropic gel. The hoop component of Cauchy stress is also non-monotonic, but, as opposed to being purely tensile, goes between a tensile maximum to a compressive minimum at the specimen boundary.

  10. Hedgehogs in higher dimensional gravity with curvature self-interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2001-04-01

    Static solutions of the higher dimensional Einstein-Hilbert gravity supplemented by quadratic curvature self-interactions are discussed in the presence of hedgehog configurations along the transverse dimensions. The quadratic part of the action is parametrized in terms of the (ghost-free) Euler-Gauss-Bonnet curvature invariant. Spherically symmetric profiles of the transverse metric admit exponentially decaying warp factors both for positive and negative bulk cosmological constants.

  11. Topological Analysis of Hedgehog Acyltransferase, a Multipalmitoylated Transmembrane Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Konitsiotis, Antonio D.; Jovanović, Biljana; Ciepla, Paulina; Spitaler, Martin; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Tate, Edward W.; Magee, Anthony I.

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog proteins are secreted morphogens that play critical roles in development and disease. During maturation of the proteins through the secretory pathway, they are modified by the addition of N-terminal palmitic acid and C-terminal cholesterol moieties, both of which are critical for their correct function and localization. Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) is the enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum that palmitoylates Hedgehog proteins, is a member of a small subfamily of membrane-bound O-acyltransferase proteins that acylate secreted proteins, and is an important drug target in cancer. However, little is known about HHAT structure and mode of function. We show that HHAT is comprised of ten transmembrane domains and two reentrant loops with the critical His and Asp residues on opposite sides of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We further show that HHAT is palmitoylated on multiple cytosolic cysteines that maintain protein structure within the membrane. Finally, we provide evidence that mutation of the conserved His residue in the hypothesized catalytic domain results in a complete loss of HHAT palmitoylation, providing novel insights into how the protein may function in vivo. PMID:25505265

  12. Topological analysis of Hedgehog acyltransferase, a multipalmitoylated transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonio D; Jovanović, Biljana; Ciepla, Paulina; Spitaler, Martin; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Tate, Edward W; Magee, Anthony I

    2015-02-01

    Hedgehog proteins are secreted morphogens that play critical roles in development and disease. During maturation of the proteins through the secretory pathway, they are modified by the addition of N-terminal palmitic acid and C-terminal cholesterol moieties, both of which are critical for their correct function and localization. Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) is the enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum that palmitoylates Hedgehog proteins, is a member of a small subfamily of membrane-bound O-acyltransferase proteins that acylate secreted proteins, and is an important drug target in cancer. However, little is known about HHAT structure and mode of function. We show that HHAT is comprised of ten transmembrane domains and two reentrant loops with the critical His and Asp residues on opposite sides of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We further show that HHAT is palmitoylated on multiple cytosolic cysteines that maintain protein structure within the membrane. Finally, we provide evidence that mutation of the conserved His residue in the hypothesized catalytic domain results in a complete loss of HHAT palmitoylation, providing novel insights into how the protein may function in vivo. PMID:25505265

  13. A Hedgehog Survival Pathway in ‘Undead’ Lipotoxic Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Keisuke; Cazanave, Sophie C.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Razumilava, Nataliya; Mertens, Joachim C.; Bronk, Steve F.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Ballooned hepatocytes in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) generate sonic hedgehog (SHH). This observation is consistent with a cellular phenotype in which the cell death program has been initiated but cannot be executed. Our aim was to determine if ballooned hepatocytes have potentially disabled the cell death execution machinery, and if so, can their functional biology be modeled in vitro. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on human NASH specimens. In vitro studies were performed using Huh-7 cells with shRNA targeted knockdown of caspase 9 (shC9 cells) or primary hepatocytes from caspase 3−/− mice. Results Ballooned hepatocytes in NASH display diminished expression of the caspase 9. This phenotype was modeled using shC9 cells; these cells were resistant to lipoapoptosis by palmitate (PA) or lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) despite lipid droplet formation. During lipid loading by either PA or LPC, shC9 cells activate JNK which via AP-1 induces SHH expression. An autocrine hedgehog survival signaling pathway was further delineated in both shC9 and caspase 3−/− cells during lipotoxic stress. Conclusion Ballooned hepatocytes in NASH downregulate caspase 9, a pivotal caspase executing the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Hepatocytes engineered to reduce caspase 9 expression are resistant to lipoapoptosis, in part, due to a hedgehog autocrine survival signaling pathway. PMID:22641094

  14. Primary Cilia Integrate Hedgehog and Wnt Signaling during Tooth Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B.; Chen, S.; Cheng, D.; Jing, W.; Helms, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1Cre+Kif3afl/fl embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development. PMID:24659776

  15. Detection of Canonical Hedgehog Signaling in Breast Cancer by 131-Iodine-Labeled Derivatives of the Sonic Hedgehog Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer; Yang, David; Tworowska, Izabela; Larson, Richard; Smith, Daniel; Tsao, Ning; Opdenaker, Lynn; Mourtada, Firas; Woodward, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Activation of hedgehog (HH) pathway signaling is observed in many tumors. Due to a feedback loop, the HH receptor Patched (PTCH-1) is overexpressed in tumors with activated HH signaling. Therefore, we sought to radiolabel the PTCH-1 ligand sonic (SHH) for detection of cancer cells with canonical HH activity. Receptor binding of 131I-SHH was increased in cell lines with high HH pathway activation. Our findings also show that PTCH-1 receptor expression is decreased upon treatment with HH signaling inhibitors, and receptor binding of 131I-SHH is significantly decreased following treatment with cyclopamine. In vivo imaging and biodistribution studies revealed significant accumulation of 131I-SHH within tumor tissue as compared to normal organs. Tumor-to-muscle ratios were approximately 8 : 1 at 5 hours, while tumor to blood and tumor to bone were 2 : 1 and 5 : 1, respectively. Significant uptake was also observed in liver and gastrointestinal tissue. These studies show that 131I-SHH is capable of in vivo detection of breast tumors with high HH signaling. We further demonstrate that the hedgehog receptor PTCH-1 is downregulated upon treatment with hedgehog inhibitors. Our data suggests that radiolabeled SHH derivatives may provide a method to determine response to SHH-targeted therapies. PMID:22811598

  16. Surgical removal of a mammary adenocarcinoma and a granulosa cell tumor in an African pygmy hedgehog

    PubMed Central

    Wellehan, James F.X.; Southorn, Erin; Smith, Dale A.; Taylor, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A 3-year-old, female African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was referred with a history of hematuria. Hyperglycemia and glucosuria were found at presentation. Mammary adenocarcinoma and a granulosa cell tumor were found and removed surgically. Glucosuria and hematuria resolved, and the hedgehog has done well for 10 mo postoperatively. PMID:12677695

  17. Surgical removal of a mammary adenocarcinoma and a granulosa cell tumor in an African pygmy hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Southorn, Erin; Smith, Dale A; Taylor, W Michael

    2003-03-01

    A 3-year-old, female African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was referred with a history of hematuria. Hyperglycemia and glucosuria were found at presentation. Mammary adenocarcinoma and a granulosa cell tumor were found and removed surgically. Glucosuria and hematuria resolved, and the hedgehog has done well for 10 mo postoperatively. PMID:12677695

  18. Cadherin Cad99C is regulated by Hedgehog signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Karin; Demontis, Fabio; Dahmann, Christian

    2005-03-01

    The subdivision of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc into anterior and posterior compartments requires a transcriptional response to Hedgehog signaling. However, the genes regulated by Hedgehog signal transduction that mediate the segregation of anterior and posterior cells have not been identified. Here, we molecularly characterize the previously predicted gene cad99C and show that it is regulated by Hedgehog signaling. Cad99C encodes a transmembrane protein with a molecular weight of approximately 184 kDa that contains 11 cadherin repeats in its extracellular domain and a conserved type I PDZ-binding site at its C-terminus. The levels of cad99C RNA and protein are low throughout the wing imaginal disc. However, in the pouch region, these levels are elevated in a strip of anterior cells along the A/P boundary where the Hedgehog signal is transduced. Ectopic expression of Hedgehog, or the Hedgehog-regulated transcription factor Cubitus interruptus, induces high-level expression of Cad99C. Conversely, blocking Hedgehog signal transduction by either inactivating Smoothened or Cubitus interruptus reduces high-level Cad99C expression. Finally, by analyzing mutant clones of cells, we show that Cad99C is not essential for cell segregation at the A/P boundary. We conclude that cad99C is a novel Hedgehog-regulated gene encoding a member of the cadherin superfamily in Drosophila. PMID:15708564

  19. Hedgehogs in Wilson loops and phase transition in SU(2) Yang Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavin, V. A.; Chernodub, M. N.; Kozlov, I. E.

    2006-08-01

    We suggest that the gauge-invariant hedgehog-like structures in the Wilson loops are physically interesting degrees of freedom in the Yang-Mills theory. The trajectories of these "hedgehog loops" are closed curves corresponding to center-valued (untraced) Wilson loops and are characterized by the center charge and winding number. We show numerically in the SU(2) Yang-Mills theory that the density of hedgehog structures in the thermal Wilson-Polyakov line is very sensitive to the finite-temperature phase transition. The (additively normalized) hedgehog line density behaves like an order parameter: The density is almost independent of the temperature in the confinement phase and changes substantially as the system enters the deconfinement phase. In particular, our results suggest that the (static) hedgehog lines may be relevant degrees of freedom around the deconfinement transition and thus affect evolution of the quark-gluon plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  20. Infection with Crenosoma striatum lungworm in Long-eared Hedgehog (Hemiechinus auritus) in Kerman province southeast of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Hedgehogs are distributed in different areas of Iran. Unfortunately, clinical and parasitological studies on parasites of hedgehogs are very few. Crenosoma striatum is a common lungworm in hedgehogs. C. striatum infection can cause weight loss, dry cough, bronchitis with ulcerous reactions based on secondary bacterial infections, pulmonary damage, thickening of the tracheal wall, and pulmonary emphysema up to cardiovascular failure. In this survey, six dead hedgehogs (Hemiechinus auritus) were investigated for lungworm infection. All the six hedgehogs had C. striatum infection in their lungs. PMID:25732884

  1. Reproductive characteristics of the african pygmy hedgehog, atelerix albiventris.

    PubMed

    Bedford, J M; Mock, O B; Nagdas, S K; Winfrey, V P; Olson, G E

    2000-09-01

    To obtain further perspective on reproduction and particularly gamete function among so-called primitive mammals presently grouped in the Order Insectivora, we have examined the African hedgehog, Atelerix albiventris, in light of unusual features reported in shrews and moles. Atelerix proves to share many but not all of the characteristics seen in these other insectivores. The penis of Atelerix has a 'snail-like' form, but lacks the surface spines common in insectivores and a number of other mammals. Hedgehog spermatozoa display an eccentric insertion of the tail on the sperm head, and they manifest the barbs on the perforatorium that, in shrews, probably effect the initial binding of the sperm head to the zona pellucida. As a possible correlate, the structural matrix of the hedgehog acrosome comprises only two main components, as judged by immunoblotting, rather than the complex of peptides seen in the matrix of some higher mammals. The Fallopian tube of Atelerix is relatively simple; it displays only minor differences in width and in the arborized epithelium between the isthmus and ampulla, and shows no evidence of the unusual sperm crypts that characterize the isthmus or ampulla, depending on the species, in shrews and moles. In common with other insectivores, Atelerix appears to be an induced ovulator, as judged by the ovulation of some 6-8 eggs by about 23 h after injection of hCG. The dense cumulus oophorus appeared to have little matrix, in keeping with the modest dimensions of the tubal ampulla and, while it was not quite as discrete as that of soricids, it did show the same insensitivity to 0.5% (w/v) ovine or bovine hyaluronidase. PMID:11006156

  2. Hedgehogs and sugar gliders: respiratory anatomy, physiology, and disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Dan H

    2011-05-01

    This article discusses the respiratory anatomy, physiology, and disease of African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) and sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps), two species commonly seen in exotic animal practice. Where appropriate, information from closely related species is mentioned because cross-susceptibility is likely and because these additional species may also be encountered in practice. Other body systems and processes are discussed insofar as they relate to or affect respiratory function. Although some topics, such as special senses, hibernation, or vocalization, may seem out of place, in each case the information relates back to respiration in some important way. PMID:21601815

  3. Hedgehog Signaling and Steroidogenesis Annual Review of Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Finco, Isabella; LaPensee, Christopher R.; Krill, Kenneth T.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery nearly 30 years ago, the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been shown to be pivotal in many developmental and pathophysiological processes in several steroidogenic tissues, including the testis, ovary, adrenal cortex, and placenta. New evidence links the evolutionarily conserved Hh pathway to the steroidogenic organs, demonstrating how Hh signaling can influence their development and homeostasis and can act in concert with steroids to mediate physiological functions. In this review, we highlight the role of the components of the Hh signaling pathway in steroidogenesis of endocrine tissues. PMID:25668018

  4. Mechanism and evolution of cytosolic Hedgehog signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher W.; Chuang, Pao-Tien

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is required for embryonic patterning and postnatal physiology in invertebrates and vertebrates. With the revelation that the primary cilium is crucial for mammalian Hh signaling, the prevailing view that Hh signal transduction mechanisms are conserved across species has been challenged. However, more recent progress on elucidating the function of core Hh pathway cytosolic regulators in Drosophila, zebrafish and mice has confirmed that the essential logic of Hh transduction is similar between species. Here, we review Hh signaling events at the membrane and in the cytosol, and focus on parallel and divergent functions of cytosolic Hh regulators in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:20530542

  5. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance

    PubMed Central

    Kabarriti, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  6. Hedgehog signaling and radiation induced liver injury: a delicate balance.

    PubMed

    Kabarriti, Rafi; Guha, Chandan

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a major limitation of radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of liver cancer. Emerging data indicate that hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in liver fibrosis and regeneration after liver injury. Here, we review the potential role of Hh signaling in RILD and propose the temporary use of Hh inhibition during liver RT to radiosensitize HCC tumor cells and inhibit their progression, while blocking the initiation of the radiation-induced fibrotic response in the surrounding normal liver. PMID:26202634

  7. Suppressors of hedgehog signaling: Linking aberrant development of neural progenitors and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Ferretti, Elisabetta; De Smaele, Enrico; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto

    2006-12-01

    Subversion of signals that physiologically suppress Hedgehog pathway results in aberrant neural progenitor development and medulloblastoma, a malignancy of the cerebellum. The Hedgehog antagonist RENKCTD11 maps to chromosome 17p13.2 and is involved in the withdrawal of the Hedgehog signaling at the granule cell progenitor transition from the outer to the inner external germinal layers, thus promoting growth arrest and differentiation. Deletion of chromosome 17p, the most frequent genetic lesion observed in this tumor, is responsible for the loss of function of RENKCTD11, resulting in upregulated Hedgehog signaling and medulloblastoma. Persistence of signals that limit Hedgehog activity is also associated with malignancy. Hedgehog signaling- induced downregulation of ErbB4 receptor expression is attenuated in medulloblastoma subsets in which the extent of Hedgehog pathway activity is limited, thus favoring the accumulation of ErbB4 with imbalanced alternative splice CYT-1 isoform over the CYT-2. This is responsible for both Neuregulin ligand-induced CYT-1-dependent prosurvival activity and loss of CYT-2-mediated growth arrest. PMID:17308352

  8. SOX18 Is a Novel Target Gene of Hedgehog Signaling in Cervical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Jelena; Schwirtlich, Marija; Rankovic, Branislava; Stevanovic, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Although there is much evidence showing functional relationship between Hedgehog pathway, in particular Sonic hedgehog, and SOX transcription factors during embryonic development, scarce data are available regarding their crosstalk in cancer cells. SOX18 protein plays an important role in promoting tumor angiogenesis and therefore emerged as a promising potential target in antiangiogenic tumor therapy. Recently it became evident that expression of SOX18 gene in tumors is not restricted to endothelium of accompanying blood and lymphatic vessels, but in tumor cells as well.In this paper we have identified human SOX18 gene as a novel target gene of Hedgehog signaling in cervical carcinoma cell lines. We have presented data showing that expression of SOX18 gene is regulated by GLI1 and GLI2 transcription factors, final effectors of Hedgehog signaling, and that modulation of Hedgehog signaling activity in considerably influence SOX18 expression. We consider important that Hedgehog pathway inhibitors reduced SOX18 expression, thus showing, for the first time, possibility for manipulationwith SOX18 gene expression. In addition, we analyzed the role of SOX18 in malignant potential of cervical carcinoma cell line, and showed that its overexpression has no influence on cells proliferation and viability, but substantially promotes migration and invasion of cells in vitro. Pro-migratory effect of SOX18 suggests its role in promoting malignant spreading, possibly in response to Hedgehog activation. PMID:26588701

  9. Feeding behavior and nutrition of the african pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Dierenfeld, Ellen S

    2009-05-01

    Despite their wide global distribution and popularity as pets, little is known concerning specific nutritional requirements of hedgehogs. They inhabit a wide variety of environments from desert to temperate forest, and they display flexible and opportunistic feeding behaviors. Natural diets include invertebrate and vertebrate prey, carrion, and plant material. Hedgehogs have enzymatic ability to digest chitin from insect exoskeletons as a dietary fiber source, but they do not seem to digest cellulose efficiently. Captive diets based on nutritionally balanced commercially available products containing moderate levels of protein (30%-50%, dry basis) and fat (10%-20%) are suitable for the omnivorous hedgehog. PMID:19341959

  10. Hedgehog signalling: how to get from Smo to Ci and Gli.

    PubMed

    Østerlund, Torben; Kogerman, Priit

    2006-04-01

    The secreted morphogens of the Hedgehog family have important roles in normal development as well as in associated pathologies, including cancer. The Hedgehog signalling pathway has been studied in Drosophila and is thought to be conserved in vertebrates. Hedgehog elicits a signalling response that activates Smoothened (Smo). There is evidence of differences between Drosophila and vertebrates concerning signalling downstream of Smo, as well as in Smo itself. Here, we discuss this evidence and its importance for investigations of the pathway and related biology, as well as for the development of drugs targeting components of the pathway for treatment of associated pathologies. PMID:16516476

  11. Rib osteoblastic osteosarcoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; D'Anjou, Marc-André; Girard, Christiane; Langlois, Isabelle

    2006-07-01

    A 3-year-old African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was presented to the Exotic Animal Clinic of the University of Montreal for evaluation of a mass growing on the right thoracic wall. The diagnostic workup, which included helical computed tomography, confirmed the presence of a large mass, originating from the right 7th rib, infiltrating the thoracic wall and cavity. The animal was euthanized due to the poor prognosis. At necropsy, a well-demarcated mass penetrated the thoracic wall and incorporated the 6th to 8th ribs. Cut sections of the tumor were white, glistening, firm, and gritty. Microscopically, it was composed of polyhedral to elongated cells with interspersed trabeculae of osteoid and large areas of coagulative necrosis. On the basis of histopathologic findings, a diagnosis of osteoblastic osteosarcoma was made. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an osteoblastic osteosarcoma on the thoracic wall of an African hedgehog, as well as the first report of the use of helical computed tomography in that species. PMID:16921888

  12. Sonic hedgehog signaling in Basal cell nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Athar, Mohammad; Li, Changzhao; Kim, Arianna L; Spiegelman, Vladimir S; Bickers, David R

    2014-09-15

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is considered to be a major signal transduction pathway during embryonic development, but it usually shuts down after birth. Aberrant Sonic hedgehog (Shh) activation during adulthood leads to neoplastic growth. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is driven by this pathway. Here, we summarize information related to the pathogenesis of this neoplasm, discuss pathways that crosstalk with Shh signaling, and the importance of the primary cilium in this neoplastic process. The identification of the basic/translational components of Shh signaling has led to the discovery of potential mechanism-driven druggable targets and subsequent clinical trials have confirmed their remarkable efficacy in treating BCCs, particularly in patients with nevoid BCC syndrome (NBCCS), an autosomal dominant disorder in which patients inherit a germline mutation in the tumor-suppressor gene Patched (Ptch). Patients with NBCCS develop dozens to hundreds of BCCs due to derepression of the downstream G-protein-coupled receptor Smoothened (SMO). Ptch mutations permit transposition of SMO to the primary cilium followed by enhanced expression of transcription factors Glis that drive cell proliferation and tumor growth. Clinical trials with the SMO inhibitor, vismodegib, showed remarkable efficacy in patients with NBCCS, which finally led to its FDA approval in 2012. PMID:25172843

  13. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in the Lung. From Development to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Alexandra L.; Loomis, Cynthia A.; Munger, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the secreted protein sonic hedgehog (SHH) has emerged as a critical morphogen during embryonic lung development, regulating the interaction between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations in the airway and alveolar compartments. There is increasing evidence that the SHH pathway is active in adult lung diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer, which raises two questions: (1) What role does SHH signaling play in these diseases? and (2) Is it a primary driver of the disease or a response (perhaps beneficial) to the primary disturbance? In this review we aim to fill the gap between the well-studied period of embryonic lung development and the adult diseased lung by reviewing the hedgehog (HH) pathway during the postnatal period and in adult uninjured and injured lungs. We elucidate the similarities and differences in the epithelial–mesenchymal interplay during the fibrosis response to injury in lung compared with other organs and present a critical appraisal of tools and agents available to evaluate HH signaling. PMID:25068457

  14. Mast cells in the sheep, hedgehog and rat forebrain

    PubMed Central

    MICHALOUDI, HELEN C.; PAPADOPOULOS, GEORGIOS C.

    1999-01-01

    The study was designed to reveal the distribution of various mast cell types in the forebrain of the adult sheep, hedgehog and rat. Based on their histochemical and immunocytochemical characteristics, mast cells were categorised as (1) connective tissue-type mast cells, staining metachromatically purple with the toluidine blue method, or pale red with the Alcian blue/safranin method, (2) mucosal-type or immature mast cells staining blue with the Alcian blue/safranin method and (3) serotonin immunopositive mast cells. All 3 types of brain mast cells in all species studied were located in both white and grey matter, often associated with intraparenchymal blood vessels. Their distribution pattern exhibited interspecies differences, while their number varied considerably not only between species but also between individuals of each species. A distributional left-right asymmetry, with more cells present on the left side, was observed in all species studied but it was most prominent in the sheep brain. In the sheep, mast cells were abundantly distributed in forebrain areas, while in the hedgehog and the rat forebrain, mast cells were less widely distributed and were relatively or substantially fewer in number respectively. A limited number of brain mast cells, in all 3 species, but primarily in the rat, were found to react both immunocytochemically to 5-HT antibody and histochemically with Alcian blue/safranin staining. PMID:10634696

  15. Desert hedgehog is a mediator of demyelination in compression neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Jung, James; Frump, Derek; Su, Jared; Wang, Weiping; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Gupta, Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    The secreted protein desert hedgehog (dhh) controls the formation of the nerve perineurium during development and is a key component of Schwann cells that ensures peripheral nerve survival. We postulated that dhh may play a critical role in maintaining myelination and investigated its role in demyelination-induced compression neuropathies by using a post-natal model of a chronic nerve injury in wildtype and dhh(-/-) mice. We evaluated demyelination using electrophysiological, morphological, and molecular approaches. dhh transcripts and protein are down-regulated early after injury in wild-type mice, suggesting an intimate relationship between the hedgehog pathway and demyelination. In dhh(-/-) mice, nerve injury induced more prominent and severe demyelination relative to their wild-type counterparts, suggesting a protective role of dhh. Alterations in nerve fiber characteristics included significant decreases in nerve conduction velocity, increased myelin debris, and substantial decreases in internodal length. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that dhh blockade via either adenovirus-mediated (shRNA) or pharmacological inhibition both resulted in severe demyelination, which could be rescued by exogenous Dhh. Exogenous Dhh was protective against this demyelination and maintained myelination at baseline levels in a custom in vitro bioreactor to applied biophysical forces to myelinated DRG/Schwann cell co-cultures. Together, these results demonstrate a pivotal role for dhh in maintaining myelination. Furthermore, dhh signaling reveals a potential target for therapeutic intervention to prevent and treat demyelination of peripheral nerves in compression neuropathies. PMID:25936873

  16. Involvement of the Sonic hedgehog gene in chick feather formation.

    PubMed

    Nohno, T; Kawakami, Y; Ohuchi, H; Fujiwara, A; Yoshioka, H; Noji, S

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of chick feather formation, we observed expression patterns of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene, which is one of the vertebrate homologs of the Drosophila segment polarity gene, hedgehog, and encodes a signaling molecule functioning in limb pattern formation and motor neuron induction. We found that the Shh gene is also expressed in the apical region of the feather placodes and then in nine to eleven longitudinal stripes along feather filaments. The stripe was found to correspond to one of the outer marginal zones of each barb ridge, termed the zone of Shh expression. No significant expression signal was detected in the scale bud of developing legs. Thus, Shh is likely to function as an epithelial signaling molecule in epithelio-mesenchymal interaction during feather formation. Furthermore, since genes of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) are coexpressed with Shh during feather formation as observed in limb morphogenesis, interactions among FGF-4, Shh and BMP-2 may be involved in formation of feather filaments and barbs in a similar fashion as elucidated in limb pattern formation. PMID:7818537

  17. A new role for Hedgehogs in juxtacrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Christopher A; Asp, Eva; Emerson, Charles P

    2014-02-01

    The Hedgehog pathway plays important roles in embryonic development, adult stem cell maintenance and tumorigenesis. In mammals these effects are mediated by Sonic, Desert and Indian Hedgehog (Shh, Dhh and Ihh). Shh undergoes autocatalytic cleavage and dual lipidation prior to secretion and forming a response gradient. Post-translational processing and secretion of Dhh and Ihh ligands has not previously been investigated. This study reports on the synthesis, processing, secretion and signaling activities of SHH, IHH and DHH preproteins expressed in cultured cells, providing unexpected evidence that DHH does not undergo substantial autoprocessing or secretion, and does not function in paracrine signaling. Rather, DHH functions as a juxtacrine signaling ligand to activate a cell contact-mediated HH signaling response, consistent with its localised signaling in vivo. Further, the LnCAP prostate cancer cell, when induced to express endogenous DHH and SHH, is active only in juxtacrine signaling. Domain swap studies reveal that the C-terminal domain of HH regulates its processing and secretion. These findings establish a new regulatory role for HHs in cell-mediated juxtacrine signaling in development and cancer. PMID:24342078

  18. The Role of Sonic Hedgehog Reemergence During Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jason; Donnelly, Jessica M.; Houghton, JeanMarie

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been extensively studied for its role in developmental biology and cancer biology. The association between Shh and cancer development in general is well established but the functional role of Shh in the development and progression of gastric cancer specifically is largely unknown. Bone marrow-derived stem cells, specifically mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) infiltrate and engraft into the gastric mucosa in response to the chronic inflammatory environment of Helicobacter infection. In this review, MSC infiltration and changes in the cytokine and cellular profiles of later-stage chronic environments will be tied into their interactions with the Shh pathway. We will discuss how these changes shape tumorigenesis and tumor progression in the gastric mucosa. The current review focuses on the Shh signaling pathway and its role in the development of gastric cancer, specifically in response to Helicobacter pylori infection. We follow with an in-depth discussion of the regulation of the Hedgehog pathway during acute and chronic gastric inflammation with a focus on signaling within the MSC compartment. PMID:20437100

  19. Expression of hedgehog pathway components in prostate carcinoma microenvironment: shifting the balance towards autocrine signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Karlou, Maria; Wen, Sijin; Hoang, Anh; Logothetis, Christopher; Troncoso, Patricia; Efstathiou, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Aims The hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis and aggressiveness of prostate cancer through epithelial–mesenchymal interactions. The aim of this study was to elucidate the cell-type partitioned expression of the Hh pathway biomarkers in the non-neoplastic and tumour microenvironments and to correlate it with the grade and stage of prostate cancer. Methods and results Expression of the Hh pathway components (Shh, Smo, Ptch, Gli1) in the microenvironment of non-neoplastic peripheral zone (n = 119), hormone-naive primary prostate carcinoma (n = 141) and castrate-resistant bone marrow metastases (n = 53) was analysed using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays and bone marrow sections. Results showed that epithelial Shh, Smo and Ptch expression was up-regulated, whereas stromal Smo, Ptch, and Gli1 expression was down-regulated in prostate carcinomas compared to non-neoplastic peripheral zone tissue. Ptch expression was modulated further in high-grade and high-stage primary tumours and in bone marrow metastases. Hh signalling correlated with ki67 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) but not with CD31 expression. Conclusion Our results highlight the importance of Hh-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal interactions in the non-neoplastic prostate and imply that shifting the balance from paracrine towards autocrine signalling is important in the pathogenesis and progression of prostate carcinoma. PMID:21707705

  20. Sonic hedgehog signalling in neurons of adult ventrolateral nucleus tractus solitarius.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Olivier; Traiffort, Elisabeth; Baker, Darren P; Galdes, Alphonse; Ruat, Martial; Champagnat, Jean

    2005-07-01

    The transmembrane receptor Patched (Ptc) mediates the action of the diffusing factor Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which is implicated in establishing morphogenetic gradients during embryonic development. Whereas alteration of Ptc function is associated with developmental abnormalities and brain tumors, its functional activity and roles in the adult brain have yet to be elucidated. Here we describe the complementary pattern of Shh and Ptc expression in the rat dorsal vagal motor nucleus and the ventrolateral nucleus tractus solitarius (vNTS), respectively. Those two interconnected structures regulate the cardiorespiratory function during hypoxia. Bath application of a subnanomolar concentration of aminoterminal Shh protein (ShhN) to a slice preparation of the vNTS induces a rapid decrease in neuronal firing followed by a bursting activity that propagates in the neuronal network. Intracellular current injections show that bursts result from an action on the neuronal membrane electro-responsiveness. Both inhibiting and bursting effects are blocked by the monoclonal Shh antibody 5E1 and may require the Ptc binding site of ShhN. Thus, ShhN acting on specific neuronal sites controls electrophysiological properties of differentiated neurons of the vNTS. We speculate on a retrocontrol of cardiorespiratory signals in the vNTS, by Shh generated in dorsal vagal motoneurons. PMID:16045492

  1. Neuropilin-2 contributes to tumorigenicity in a mouse model of Hedgehog pathway medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hayden Gephart, Melanie G; Su, YouRong Sophie; Bandara, Samuel; Tsai, Feng-Chiao; Hong, Jennifer; Conley, Nicholas; Rayburn, Helen; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Meyer, Tobias; Scott, Matthew P

    2013-11-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the most common childhood brain tumor, medulloblastoma (MB). Given the toxicity of post-surgical treatments for MB, continued need exists for new, targeted therapies. Based upon our finding that Neuropilin (Nrp) transmembrane proteins are required for Hh signal transduction, we investigated the role of Nrp in MB cells. Cultured cells derived from a mouse Ptch (+/-) ;LacZ MB (Med1-MB), effectively modeled the Hh pathway-related subcategory of human MBs in vitro. Med1-MB cells maintained constitutively active Hh target gene transcription, and consistently formed tumors within one month after injection into mouse cerebella. The proliferation rate of Med1-MBs in culture was dependent upon Nrp2, while reducing Nrp1 function had little effect. Knockdown of Nrp2 prior to cell implantation significantly increased mouse survival, compared to transfection with a non-targeting siRNA. Knocking down Nrp2 specifically in MB cells avoided any direct effect on tumor vascularization. Nrp2 should be further investigated as a potential target for adjuvant therapy in patients with MB. PMID:24026530

  2. A Screen for Modifiers of Hedgehog Signaling in Drosophila melanogaster Identifies swm and mts

    PubMed Central

    Casso, David J.; Liu, Songmei; Iwaki, D. David; Ogden, Stacey K.; Kornberg, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Signaling by Hedgehog (Hh) proteins shapes most tissues and organs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, and its misregulation has been implicated in many human diseases. Although components of the signaling pathway have been identified, key aspects of the signaling mechanism and downstream targets remain to be elucidated. We performed an enhancer/suppressor screen in Drosophila to identify novel components of the pathway and identified 26 autosomal regions that modify a phenotypic readout of Hh signaling. Three of the regions include genes that contribute constituents to the pathway—patched, engrailed, and hh. One of the other regions includes the gene microtubule star (mts) that encodes a subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. We show that mts is necessary for full activation of Hh signaling. A second region includes the gene second mitotic wave missing (swm). swm is recessive lethal and is predicted to encode an evolutionarily conserved protein with RNA binding and Zn+ finger domains. Characterization of newly isolated alleles indicates that swm is a negative regulator of Hh signaling and is essential for cell polarity. PMID:18245841

  3. Molecular pathways: novel approaches for improved therapeutic targeting of Hedgehog signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Justilien, Verline; Fields, Alan P

    2015-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is critical for embryonic development. In adult tissues, Hh signaling is relatively quiescent with the exception of roles in tissue maintenance and repair. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling is implicated in multiple aspects of transformation, including the maintenance of the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. Preclinical studies indicate that CSCs from many tumor types are sensitive to Hh pathway inhibition and that Hh-targeted therapeutics block many aspects of transformation attributed to CSCs, including drug resistance, relapse, and metastasis. However, to date, Hh inhibitors, specifically those targeting Smoothened [such as vismodegib, BMS-833923, saridegib (IPI-926), sonidegib/erismodegib (LDE225), PF-04449913, LY2940680, LEQ 506, and TAK-441], have demonstrated good efficacy as monotherapy in patients with basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma, but have shown limited activity in other tumor types. This lack of success is likely due to many factors, including a lack of patient stratification in early trials, cross-talk between Hh and other oncogenic signaling pathways that can modulate therapeutic response, and a limited knowledge of Hh pathway activation mechanisms in CSCs from most tumor types. Here, we discuss Hh signaling mechanisms in the context of human cancer, particularly in the maintenance of the CSC phenotype, and consider new therapeutic strategies that hold the potential to expand considerably the scope and therapeutic efficacy of Hh-directed anticancer therapy. PMID:25646180

  4. Tamoxifen Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells: Impact on Hedgehog/GLI1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victoria E; Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Annaratone, Laura; Castellano, Isabella; Grismaldo, Adriana; Sapino, Anna; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator tamoxifen (TAM) has become the standard therapy for the treatment of ER+ breast cancer patients. Despite the obvious benefits of TAM, a proportion of patients acquire resistance to treatment, and this is a significant clinical problem. Consequently, the identification of possible mechanisms involved in TAM-resistance should help the development of new therapeutic targets. In this study, we present in vitro data using a panel of different breast cancer cell lines and demonstrate the modulatory effect of TAM on cellular proliferation and expression of Hedgehog signaling components, including the terminal effector of the pathway, the transcription factor GLI1. A variable pattern of expression following TAM administration was observed, reflecting the distinctive properties of the ER+ and ER- cell lines analyzed. Remarkably, the TAM-induced increase in the proliferation of the ER+ ZR-75-1 and BT474 cells parallels a sustained upregulation of GLI1 expression and its translocation to the nucleus. These findings, implicating a TAM-GLI1 signaling cross-talk, could ultimately be exploited not only as a means for novel prognostication markers but also in efforts to effectively target breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26927093

  5. Mutations of the Sonic Hedgehog Pathway Underlie Hypothalamic Hamartoma with Gelastic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Griffin, Nicole G; Damiano, John A; Cops, Elisa J; Burgess, Rosemary; Ozturk, Ezgi; Jones, Nigel C; Leventer, Richard J; Freeman, Jeremy L; Harvey, A Simon; Sadleir, Lynette G; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Major, Heather; Darbro, Benjamin W; Allen, Andrew S; Goldstein, David B; Kerrigan, John F; Berkovic, Samuel F; Heinzen, Erin L

    2016-08-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) with gelastic epilepsy is a well-recognized drug-resistant epilepsy syndrome of early life.(1) Surgical resection allows limited access to the small deep-seated lesions that cause the disease. Here, we report the results of a search for somatic mutations in paired hamartoma- and leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 38 individuals which we conducted by using whole-exome sequencing (WES), chromosomal microarray (CMA), and targeted resequencing (TRS) of candidate genes. Somatic mutations were identified in genes involving regulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway in 14/38 individuals (37%). Three individuals had somatic mutations in PRKACA, which encodes a cAMP-dependent protein kinase that acts as a repressor protein in the Shh pathway, and four subjects had somatic mutations in GLI3, an Shh pathway gene associated with HH. In seven other individuals, we identified two recurrent and three single brain-tissue-specific, large copy-number or loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) variants involving multiple Shh genes, as well as other genes without an obvious biological link to the Shh pathway. The Shh pathway genes in these large somatic lesions include the ligand itself (SHH and IHH), the receptor SMO, and several other Shh downstream pathway members, including CREBBP and GLI2. Taken together, our data implicate perturbation of the Shh pathway in at least 37% of individuals with the HH epilepsy syndrome, consistent with the concept of a developmental pathway brain disease. PMID:27453577

  6. Diet controls Drosophila follicle stem cell proliferation via Hedgehog sequestration and release.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Tiffiney R; Strochlic, Todd I; Ji, Yingbiao; Zinshteyn, Daniel; O'Reilly, Alana M

    2013-05-27

    A healthy diet improves adult stem cell function and delays diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurodegeneration. Defining molecular mechanisms by which nutrients dictate stem cell behavior is a key step toward understanding the role of diet in tissue homeostasis. In this paper, we elucidate the mechanism by which dietary cholesterol controls epithelial follicle stem cell (FSC) proliferation in the fly ovary. In nutrient-restricted flies, the transmembrane protein Boi sequesters Hedgehog (Hh) ligand at the surface of Hh-producing cells within the ovary, limiting FSC proliferation. Upon feeding, dietary cholesterol stimulates S6 kinase-mediated phosphorylation of the Boi cytoplasmic domain, triggering Hh release and FSC proliferation. This mechanism enables a rapid, tissue-specific response to nutritional changes, tailoring stem cell divisions and egg production to environmental conditions sufficient for progeny survival. If conserved in other systems, this mechanism will likely have important implications for studies on molecular control of stem cell function, in which the benefits of low calorie and low cholesterol diets are beginning to emerge. PMID:23690177

  7. Histone acetyltransferase PCAF is required for Hedgehog-Gli-dependent transcription and cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malatesta, Martina; Steinhauer, Cornelia; Mohammad, Faizaan; Pandey, Deo P; Squatrito, Massimo; Helin, Kristian

    2013-10-15

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in embryonic patterning and development of many tissues and organs as well as in maintaining and repairing mature tissues in adults. Uncontrolled activation of the Hh-Gli pathway has been implicated in developmental abnormalities as well as in several cancers, including brain tumors like medulloblastoma and glioblastoma. Inhibition of aberrant Hh-Gli signaling has, thus, emerged as an attractive approach for anticancer therapy; however, the mechanisms that mediate Hh-Gli signaling in vertebrates remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the histone acetyltransferase PCAF/KAT2B is an important factor of the Hh pathway. Specifically, we show that PCAF depletion impairs Hh activity and reduces expression of Hh target genes. Consequently, PCAF downregulation in medulloblastoma and glioblastoma cells leads to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. In addition, we found that PCAF interacts with GLI1, the downstream effector in the Hh-Gli pathway, and that PCAF or GLI1 loss reduces the levels of H3K9 acetylation on Hh target gene promoters. Finally, we observed that PCAF silencing reduces the tumor-forming potential of neural stem cells in vivo. In summary, our study identified the acetyltransferase PCAF as a positive cofactor of the Hh-Gli signaling pathway, leading us to propose PCAF as a candidate therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with medulloblastoma and glioblastoma. PMID:23943798

  8. The C-terminal tail of the Hedgehog receptor Patched regulates both localization and turnover

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xingwu; Liu, Songmei; Kornberg, Thomas B.

    2006-01-01

    Patched (Ptc) is a membrane protein whose function in Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction has been conserved among metazoans and whose malfunction has been implicated in human cancers. Genetic analysis has shown that Ptc negatively regulates Hh signal transduction, but its activity and structure are not known. We investigated the functional and structural properties of Drosophila Ptc and its C-terminal domain (CTD), 183 residues that are predicted to reside in the cytoplasm. Our results show that Ptc, as well as truncated Ptc deleted of its CTD, forms a stable trimer. This observation is consistent with the proposal that Ptc is structurally similar to trimeric transporters. The CTD itself trimerizes and is required for both Ptc internalization and turnover. Two mutant forms of the CTD, one that disrupts trimerization and the other that mutates the target sequence of the Nedd4 ubiquitin ligase, stabilize Ptc but do not prevent internalization and sequestration of Hh. Ptc deleted of its CTD is stable and localizes to the plasma membrane. These data show that degradation of Ptc is regulated at a step subsequent to endocytosis, although endocytosis is a likely prerequisite. We also show that the CTD of mouse Ptc regulates turnover. PMID:16980583

  9. Canonical and noncanonical Hedgehog pathway in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Blotta, Simona; Jakubikova, Jana; Calimeri, Teresa; Roccaro, Aldo M; Amodio, Nicola; Azab, Abdel Kareem; Foresta, Umberto; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Rossi, Marco; Todoerti, Katia; Molica, Stefano; Morabito, Fortunato; Neri, Antonino; Tagliaferri, Piersandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2012-12-13

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is required for cell-fate determination during the embryonic life, as well as cell growth and differentiation in the adult organism, where the inappropriate activation has been implicated in several cancers. Here we demonstrate that Hh signaling plays a significant role in growth and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We observed that CD138(+) MM cells express Hh genes and confirmed Smoothened (Smo)-dependent Hh signaling in MM using a novel synthetic Smo inhibitor, NVP-LDE225 (Novartis), which decreased MM cell viability by inducing specific down-regulation of Gli1 and Ptch1, hallmarks of Hh activity. In addition, we detected a nuclear localization of Gli1 in MM cells, which is completely abrogated by Forskolin, a Gli1-modulating compound, confirming Smo-independent mechanisms leading to Hh activation in MM. Finally, we identified that bone marrow stromal cells are a source of the Shh ligand, although they are resistant to the Hh inhibitor because of defective Smo expression and Ptch1 up-regulation. Further in vitro as well as in vivo studies showed antitumor efficacy of NVP-LDE225 in combination with bortezomib. Altogether, our data demonstrate activation of both canonical and noncanonical Hh pathway in MM, thus providing the rationale for testing Hh inhibitors in clinical trials to improve MM patient outcome. PMID:22821765

  10. Canonical and noncanonical Hedgehog pathway in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Blotta, Simona; Jakubikova, Jana; Calimeri, Teresa; Roccaro, Aldo M.; Amodio, Nicola; Azab, Abdel Kareem; Foresta, Umberto; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Rossi, Marco; Todoerti, Katia; Molica, Stefano; Morabito, Fortunato; Neri, Antonino; Tagliaferri, Piersandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is required for cell-fate determination during the embryonic life, as well as cell growth and differentiation in the adult organism, where the inappropriate activation has been implicated in several cancers. Here we demonstrate that Hh signaling plays a significant role in growth and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We observed that CD138+ MM cells express Hh genes and confirmed Smoothened (Smo)–dependent Hh signaling in MM using a novel synthetic Smo inhibitor, NVP-LDE225 (Novartis), which decreased MM cell viability by inducing specific down-regulation of Gli1 and Ptch1, hallmarks of Hh activity. In addition, we detected a nuclear localization of Gli1 in MM cells, which is completely abrogated by Forskolin, a Gli1-modulating compound, confirming Smo-independent mechanisms leading to Hh activation in MM. Finally, we identified that bone marrow stromal cells are a source of the Shh ligand, although they are resistant to the Hh inhibitor because of defective Smo expression and Ptch1 up-regulation. Further in vitro as well as in vivo studies showed antitumor efficacy of NVP-LDE225 in combination with bortezomib. Altogether, our data demonstrate activation of both canonical and noncanonical Hh pathway in MM, thus providing the rationale for testing Hh inhibitors in clinical trials to improve MM patient outcome. PMID:22821765

  11. Tamoxifen Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells: Impact on Hedgehog/GLI1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victoria E.; Rondón-Lagos, Milena; Annaratone, Laura; Castellano, Isabella; Grismaldo, Adriana; Sapino, Anna; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator tamoxifen (TAM) has become the standard therapy for the treatment of ER+ breast cancer patients. Despite the obvious benefits of TAM, a proportion of patients acquire resistance to treatment, and this is a significant clinical problem. Consequently, the identification of possible mechanisms involved in TAM-resistance should help the development of new therapeutic targets. In this study, we present in vitro data using a panel of different breast cancer cell lines and demonstrate the modulatory effect of TAM on cellular proliferation and expression of Hedgehog signaling components, including the terminal effector of the pathway, the transcription factor GLI1. A variable pattern of expression following TAM administration was observed, reflecting the distinctive properties of the ER+ and ER− cell lines analyzed. Remarkably, the TAM-induced increase in the proliferation of the ER+ ZR-75-1 and BT474 cells parallels a sustained upregulation of GLI1 expression and its translocation to the nucleus. These findings, implicating a TAM-GLI1 signaling cross-talk, could ultimately be exploited not only as a means for novel prognostication markers but also in efforts to effectively target breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26927093

  12. In Vivo RNAi Screen Reveals Neddylation Genes as Novel Regulators of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Liu, Min; Ospina, Jason K.; Yang, Shengyuan; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is highly conserved in all metazoan animals and plays critical roles in many developmental processes. Dysregulation of the Hh signaling cascade has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer. Although key components of the Hh pathway have been identified, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the regulation of individual Hh signaling molecules. Here, we report the identification of novel regulators of the Hh pathway, obtained from an in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila. By selectively targeting critical genes functioning in post-translational modification systems utilizing ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like proteins, we identify two novel genes (dUba3 and dUbc12) that negatively regulate Hh signaling activity. We provide in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrating that dUba3 and dUbc12 are essential components of the neddylation pathway; they function in an enzyme cascade to conjugate the ubiquitin-like NEDD8 modifier to Cullin proteins. Neddylation activates the Cullin-containing ubiquitin ligase complex, which in turn promotes the degradation of Cubitus interruptus (Ci), the downstream transcription factor of the Hh pathway. Our study reveals a conserved molecular mechanism of the neddylation pathway in Drosophila and sheds light on the complex post-translational regulations in Hh signaling. PMID:21931660

  13. Sonic hedgehog initiates cochlear hair cell regeneration through downregulation of retinoblastoma protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Na; Chen, Yan; Wang, Zhengmin; Chen, Guoling; Lin, Qin; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Li, Huawei

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh activation in neonatal cochleae enhances sensory cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating supporting cells can transdifferentiate into hair cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh promotes proliferation by transiently modulating pRb activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh inhibits pRb by inhibiting transcription and increasing phosphorylation of pRb. -- Abstract: Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  14. Structural insights into human Kif7, a kinesin involved in Hedgehog signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Klejnot, Marta Kozielski, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The human Kif7 motor domain structure provides insights into a kinesin of medical significance. Kif7, a member of the kinesin 4 superfamily, is implicated in a variety of diseases including Joubert, hydrolethalus and acrocallosal syndromes. It is also involved in primary cilium formation and the Hedgehog signalling pathway and may play a role in cancer. Its activity is crucial for embryonic development. Kif7 and Kif27, a closely related kinesin in the same subfamily, are orthologues of the Drosophila melano@@gaster kinesin-like protein Costal-2 (Cos2). In vertebrates, they work together to fulfil the role of the single Cos2 gene in Drosophila. Here, the high-resolution structure of the human Kif7 motor domain is reported and is compared with that of conventional kinesin, the founding member of the kinesin superfamily. These data are a first step towards structural characterization of a kinesin-4 family member and of this interesting molecular motor of medical significance.

  15. Murine Joubert syndrome reveals Hedgehog signaling defects as a potential therapeutic target for nephronophthisis

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Ann Marie; Giles, Rachel H.; Srivastava, Shalabh; Eley, Lorraine; Whitehead, Jennifer; Danilenko, Marina; Raman, Shreya; Slaats, Gisela G.; Colville, John G.; Ajzenberg, Henry; Kroes, Hester Y.; Thelwall, Peter E.; Simmons, Nicholas L.; Miles, Colin G.; Sayer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the major cause of pediatric renal failure, yet the disease remains poorly understood, partly due to the lack of appropriate animal models. Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is an inherited ciliopathy giving rise to NPHP with cerebellar vermis aplasia and retinal degeneration. Among patients with JBTS and a cerebello-oculo-renal phenotype, mutations in CEP290 (NPHP6) are the most common genetic lesion. We present a Cep290 gene trap mouse model of JBTS that displays the kidney, eye, and brain abnormalities that define the syndrome. Mutant mice present with cystic kidney disease as neonates. Newborn kidneys contain normal amounts of lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (Lef1) and transcription factor 1 (Tcf1) protein, indicating normal function of the Wnt signaling pathway; however, an increase in the protein Gli3 repressor reveals abnormal Hedgehog (Hh) signaling evident in newborn kidneys. Collecting duct cells from mutant mice have abnormal primary cilia and are unable to form spheroid structures in vitro. Treatment of mutant cells with the Hh agonist purmorphamine restored normal spheroid formation. Renal epithelial cells from a JBTS patient with CEP290 mutations showed similar impairments to spheroid formation that could also be partially rescued by exogenous stimulation of Hh signaling. These data implicate abnormal Hh signaling as the cause of NPHP and suggest that Hh agonists may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:24946806

  16. Chromosome 17p deletion in human medulloblastoma: a missing checkpoint in the Hedgehog pathway.

    PubMed

    De Smaele, Enrico; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Screpanti, Isabella; Alesse, Edoardo; Gulino, Alberto

    2004-10-01

    Although deregulation of Hedgehog signalling is considered to play a crucial oncogenic role and commonly occurrs in medulloblastoma, genetic lesions in components of this pathway are observed in a minority of cases. The recent identification of a novel putative tumor suppressor (REN(KCTD11)) on chromosome 17p13.2, a region most frequently lost in human medulloblastoma, highlights the role of allelic deletion of the gene in this brain malignancy, leading to the loss of growth inhibitory activity via suppression of Gli-dependent activation of Hedgehog target genes. The presence on 17p13 of another tumor suppressor gene (p53) whose inactivation cooperates with Hedgehog pathway for medulloblastoma formation, suggests that 17p deletion unveils haploinsufficiency conditions leading to abrogation of either direct and indirect checkpoints of Hedgehog signalling in cancer. PMID:15467454

  17. Soft tissue sarcomas in the African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris): microscopic and immunohistologic study of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Vara, J A

    2001-09-01

    Three soft tissue tumors from 2 female hedgehogs were examined microscopically and immunohistochemically. Two tumors involved haired skin and the third one was vaginal. Microscopically, the cutaneous tumors had features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), whereas the vaginal tumor was classified only as a spindle cell sarcoma. Immunohistochemically, all 3 tumors were strongly positive for vimentin and strongly to moderately positive for CD10 and neuron-specific enolase but did not stain with antibody to S100 protein, an antigen typically present in human MPNST The cutaneous tumor from hedgehog no. 1 was examined ultrastructurally and the neoplastic cells resembled fibroblasts. Hedgehog no. 1 was euthanized at the time of the biopsy. The outcome of the other hedgehog was unknown. PMID:11580072

  18. Unilateral proptosis and orbital cellulitis in eight African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Wheler, C L; Grahn, B H; Pocknell, A M

    2001-06-01

    Eight African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) were presented with unilateral proptosis. Six animals presented specifically for an ocular problem, whereas two had concurrent neurologic disease. Enucleation and light microscopic examination of tissues was performed in five animals, and euthanasia followed by complete postmortem examination was performed in three animals. Histopathologic findings in all hedgehogs included orbital cellulitis, panophthalmitis, and corneal ulceration, with perforation in seven of eight eyes. The etiology of the orbital cellulitis was not determined, but it appeared to precede proptosis. Orbits in hedgehogs are shallow and the palpebral fissures are large, which may predispose them to proptosis, similar to brachycephalic dogs. This clinical presentation was seen in 15% (8/54) of African hedgehogs presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine over a 2-yr period from January 1995 to December 1996 and warrants further investigation. PMID:12790427

  19. Spontaneous tumours in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris): a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2001-01-01

    Forty tumours were diagnosed in 35 (53%) of 66 captive African hedgehogs documented at Northwest ZooPath (NZP) between 1994 and 1999. Three hedgehogs had more than one type of tumour and the remaining 32 had a single type. Of the 35 hedgehogs with tumours, 14 were female, 11 were male, and 10 were of unknown gender; 21 were from zoological parks and 14 were privately owned. Twenty of the hedgehogs with tumours were adult (>1 year old) with a median age of 3.5 years (range 2-5.5 years); 15, of unreported age, were classified as adult. Thirty-four (85%) of the 40 tumours were classified as malignant and six (15%) as benign. The integumentary, haemolymphatic, digestive and endocrine systems were common sites for tumours. The most common tumours were mammary gland adenocarcinoma, lympho-sarcoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:11222009

  20. Necropsy and histopathologic findings in 14 African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris): a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; White, M R

    1999-06-01

    From fiscal years 1992 through 1996, 14 African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) cases were submitted to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University. The most common diagnoses were splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis (91%), hepatic lipidosis (50%), renal disease (50%), and neoplastic disease (29%). Other less frequent necropsy findings were myocarditis (21%), colitis (14%), bacterial septicemia (14%), and pneumonia (14%). The data indicate that splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, hepatic lipidosis, renal disease, and neoplasms are frequent postmortem findings in hedgehogs. PMID:10484145

  1. Use of permethrin as a miticide in the African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Staley, E C; Staley, E E; Behr, M J

    1994-04-01

    The African hedgehog, Atelerix albiventris (also known as Erinaceous albiventris; 1,2) has recently undergone an increase in popularity as an exotic pet. This popularity (Beatrix Potter not withstanding) is due in part to the small size of the African hedgehog (adults are 4-6 in in length, weighing approximately 1 lb), its lack of hibernation or aestivation if reared under controlled light and temperature, and its general good nature and accommodation to handling. PMID:8197715

  2. Detection and molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium parvum in British European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus).

    PubMed

    Sangster, Lucy; Blake, Damer P; Robinson, Guy; Hopkins, Timothy C; Sa, Ricardo C C; Cunningham, Andrew A; Chalmers, Rachel M; Lawson, Becki

    2016-02-15

    Surveillance was conducted for the occurrence of protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium in European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) in Great Britain. In total, 108 voided faecal samples were collected from hedgehogs newly admitted to eight wildlife casualty treatment and rehabilitation centres. Terminal large intestinal (LI) contents from three hedgehog carcasses were also analysed. Information on host and location variables, including faecal appearance, body weight, and apparent health status, was compiled. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) targeting the 18S ribosomal RNA gene, confirmed by sequencing, revealed an 8% (9/111) occurrence of Cryptosporidium parvum in faeces or LI contents, with no significant association between the host or location variables and infection. Archived small intestinal (SI) tissue from a hedgehog with histological evidence of cryptosporidiosis was also positive for C. parvum by PCR and sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene. No other Cryptosporidium species were detected. PCR and sequencing of the glycoprotein 60 gene identified three known zoonotic C. parvum subtypes not previously found in hedgehogs: IIdA17G1 (n=4), IIdA19G1 (n=1) and IIdA24G1 (n=1). These subtypes are also known to infect livestock. Another faecal sample contained C. parvum IIcA5G3j which has been found previously in hedgehogs, and for which there is one published report in a human, but is not known to affect livestock. The presence of zoonotic subtypes of C. parvum in British hedgehogs highlights a potential public health concern. Further research is needed to better understand the epidemiology and potential impacts of Cryptosporidium infection in hedgehogs. PMID:26827859

  3. Stability of the Melting Hedgehog in the Landau-de Gennes Theory of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat, Radu; Nguyen, Luc; Slastikov, Valeriy; Zarnescu, Arghir

    2014-09-01

    We investigate stability properties of the radially symmetric solution corresponding to the vortex defect (the so called "melting hedgehog") in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes model of nematic liquid crystals. We prove local stability of the melting hedgehog under arbitrary Q-tensor valued perturbations in the temperature regime near the critical supercooling temperature. As a consequence of our method, we also rediscover the loss of stability of the vortex defect in the deep nematic regime.

  4. Stability of the Melting Hedgehog in the Landau-de Gennes Theory of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat, Radu; Nguyen, Luc; Slastikov, Valeriy; Zarnescu, Arghir

    2015-02-01

    We investigate stability properties of the radially symmetric solution corresponding to the vortex defect (the so called "melting hedgehog") in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes model of nematic liquid crystals. We prove local stability of the melting hedgehog under arbitrary Q-tensor valued perturbations in the temperature regime near the critical supercooling temperature. As a consequence of our method, we also rediscover the loss of stability of the vortex defect in the deep nematic regime.

  5. REN(KCTD11) is a suppressor of Hedgehog signaling and is deleted in human medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Ferretti, Elisabetta; De Smaele, Enrico; Argenti, Beatrice; Mincione, Claudia; Zazzeroni, Francesca; Gallo, Rita; Masuelli, Laura; Napolitano, Maddalena; Maroder, Marella; Modesti, Andrea; Giangaspero, Felice; Screpanti, Isabella; Alesse, Edoardo; Gulino, Alberto

    2004-07-20

    Hedgehog signaling is suggested to be a major oncogenic pathway in medulloblastoma, which arises from aberrant development of cerebellar granule progenitors. Allelic loss of chromosome 17p has also been described as the most frequent genetic defect in this human neoplasia. This observation raises the question of a possible interplay between 17p deletion and the Hedgehog tumorigenic pathway. Here, we identify the human orthologue of mouse REN(KCTD11), previously reported to be expressed in differentiating and low proliferating neuroblasts. Human REN(KCTD11) maps to 17p13.2 and displays allelic deletion as well as significantly reduced expression in medulloblastoma. REN(KCTD11) inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and suppresses xenograft tumor growth in vivo. REN(KCTD11) seems to inhibit medulloblastoma growth by negatively regulating the Hedgehog pathway because it antagonizes the Gli-mediated transactivation of Hedgehog target genes, by affecting Gli1 nuclear transfer, and its growth inhibitory activity is impaired by Gli1 inactivation. Therefore, we identify REN(KCTD11) as a suppressor of Hedgehog signaling and suggest that its inactivation might lead to a deregulation of the tumor-promoting Hedgehog pathway in medulloblastoma. PMID:15249678

  6. Ticks of four-toed elephant shrews and Southern African hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Horak, Ivan G; Welman, Shaun; Hallam, Stacey L; Lutermann, Heike; Mzilikazi, Nomakwezi

    2011-01-01

    Several studies on ticks infesting small mammals, including elephant shrews, have been conducted in South Africa; however, these studies have included only a single four-toed elephant shrew and no hedgehogs. This study thus aimed to identify and quantify the ixodid ticks infesting four-toed elephant shrews and Southern African hedgehogs. Four-toed elephant shrews (Petrodromus tetradactylus) were trapped in dense shrub undergrowth in a nature reserve in north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal. They were separately housed, first in cages and later in glass terraria fitted with wire-mesh bases to allow detached ticks to fall through for collection. Southern African hedgehogs (Atelerix frontalis) were hand caught on a farm in the eastern region of the Northern Cape Province and all visible ticks were collected by means of tweezers while the animals were anaesthetised. The ticks from each animal were preserved separately in 70% ethanol for later identification and counting. The immature stages of five ixodid tick species were collected from the elephant shrews, of which Rhipicephalus muehlensi was the most common. It has not been recorded previously on any species of elephant shrew. Three ixodid tick species were collected from the hedgehogs. Large numbers of adult Haemaphysalis colesbergensis, which has not been encountered previously on hedgehogs, were collected from these animals. Four-toed elephant shrews are good hosts of the larvae and nymphs of R. muehlensi, and Southern African hedgehogs are good hosts of adult H. colesbergensis. PMID:23327207

  7. Hedgehog signaling regulates dental papilla formation and tooth size during zebrafish odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeffrey C.; Fox, Zachary D.B.; Crimp, James L.; Littleford, Hana E.; Jowdry, Andrea L.; Jackman, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intercellular communication by the hedgehog cell signaling pathway is necessary for tooth development throughout the vertebrates, but it remains unclear which specific developmental signals control cell behavior at different stages of odontogenesis. To address this issue, we have manipulated hedgehog activity during zebrafish tooth development and visualized the results using confocal microscopy. Results We first established that reporter lines for dlx2b, fli1, NF-κB, and prdm1a are markers for specific subsets of tooth germ tissues. We then blocked hedgehog signaling with cyclopamine and observed a reduction or elimination of the cranial neural crest derived dental papilla, which normally contains the cells that later give rise to dentin-producing odontoblasts. Upon further investigation we observed that the dental papilla begins to form and then regresses in the absence of hedgehog signaling, through a mechanism unrelated to cell proliferation or apoptosis. We also found evidence of an isometric reduction in tooth size that correlates with the time of earliest hedgehog inhibition. Conclusions We hypothesize that these results reveal a previously uncharacterized function of hedgehog signaling during tooth morphogenesis, regulating the number of cells in the dental papilla and thereby controlling tooth size. PMID:25645398

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy in a hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Delk, K W; Eshar, D; Garcia, E; Harkin, K

    2014-03-01

    A one-year-old African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was evaluated for severe respiratory distress. Physical examination findings included marked dyspnoea, cyanosis and tachypnoea. Radiographic findings included an enlarged heart and pulmonary oedema, and dilated cardiomyopathy was confirmed via echocardiogram. The patient was treated for congestive heart failure because of dilated cardiomyopathy with furosemide, enalapril, pimobendan and l-carnitine. Within 24 hours of treatment, the pulmonary oedema and cyanosis had resolved. Following discharge, clinical improvement was noted by the owner and echocardiogram confirmed improved fractional shortening. Cardiomyopathy has been reported at post-mortem examination in hedgehogs, but there are no reports of ante-mortem diagnosis and treatment. Performing baseline cardiac assessment in hedgehogs is recommended, and treatment with l-carnitine and pimobendan may improve outcome, as carnitine deficiency is a possible cause of cardiomyopathy in hedgehogs. Successful emergency treatment of congestive heart failure in the hedgehog of this report may be effective for other hedgehogs presented with similar clinical signs. PMID:24372164

  9. Hedgehog inhibition causes complete loss of limb outgrowth and transformation of digit identity in Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Stopper, Geffrey F; Richards-Hrdlicka, Kathryn L; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-03-01

    The study of the tetrapod limb has contributed greatly to our understanding of developmental pathways and how changes to these pathways affect the evolution of morphology. Most of our understanding of tetrapod limb development comes from research on amniotes, with far less known about mechanisms of limb development in amphibians. To better understand the mechanisms of limb development in anuran amphibians, we used cyclopamine to inhibit Hedgehog signaling at various stages of development in the western clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis, and observed resulting morphologies. We also analyzed gene expression changes resulting from similar experiments in Xenopus laevis. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in X. tropicalis results in limb abnormalities including reduced digit number, missing skeletal elements, and complete absence of limbs. In addition, posterior digits assume an anterior identity by developing claws that are usually only found on anterior digits, confirming Sonic hedgehog's role in digit identity determination. Thus, Sonic hedgehog appears to play mechanistically separable roles in digit number specification and digit identity specification as in other studied tetrapods. The complete limb loss observed in response to reduced Hedgehog signaling in X. tropicalis, however, is striking, as this functional role for Hedgehog signaling has not been found in any other tetrapod. This changed mechanism may represent a substantial developmental constraint to digit number evolution in frogs. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918681

  10. Ticks and Fleas Infestation on East Hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor) in Van Province, Eastern Region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Goz, Yaşar; Yilmaz, Ali Bilgin; Aydin, Abdulalim; Dicle, Yalçın

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ixodid ticks (Acari: İxodidae) and fleas (Siphonaptera) are the major vectors of pathogens threatening animals and human healths. The aim of our study was to detect the infestation rates of East Hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor) with ticks and fleas in Van Province, eastern region of Turkey. Methods: We examined fleas and ticks infestation patterns in 21 hedgehogs, collected from three suburbs with the greater of number gardens. In order to estimate flea and tick infestation of hedgehogs, we immobilized the ectoparasites by treatment the body with a insecticide trichlorphon (Neguvon®-Bayer). Results: On the hedgehogs, 60 ixodid ticks and 125 fleas were detected. All of the ixodid ticks were Rhipicephalus turanicus and all of the fleas were Archaeopsylla erinacei. Infestation rate for ticks and fleas was detected 66.66 % and 100 %, respectively. Conclusion: We detected ticks (R. turanicus) and fleas (A. erinacei) in hedgehogs at fairly high rates. Since many ticks and fleas species may harbor on hedgehogs and transmit some tick-borne and flea-borne patogens, this results are the important in terms of veterinary and public health. PMID:27047971

  11. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Wolff, Carlos; Corradini, Paulina; Cortés, Galaxia

    2005-06-01

    A 6-mo-old, male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) presented with a history of pink urine and demonstrating pink-colored teeth and mild hepatomegaly on examination. Urinalysis revealed no physical, chemical, or cellular abnormalities other than a pink color and fluorescence under ultraviolet light (UV). Also under UV, intense fluorescence of teeth, feet, and spines was noted. Porphyria was suspected. Spectrophotometric evaluation of urine showed extremely elevated levels of copro- and uroporphyrins. Analysis of the urine by thin-layer chromatography showed an abnormal pattern of excreted porphyrin intermediates. Urine high-performance thin-layer chromatography showed that excreted porphyrins were 90-95% of the type-I isomeric form, suggestive of congenital erythropoietic porphyria. PMID:17323578

  12. Hedgehog inhibitors from Artocarpus communis and Hyptis suaveolens.

    PubMed

    Arai, Midori A; Uchida, Kyoko; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Koyano, Takashi; Kowithayakorn, Thaworn; Ishibashi, Masami

    2015-08-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in cell maintenance and proliferation during embryonic development. Naturally occurring Hh inhibitors were isolated from Artocarpus communis and Hyptis suaveolens using our previously constructed cell-based assay system. Bioactivity guided fractionation led to the isolation of 15 compounds, including seven new compounds (4, 5, 6, 7, and 9-11). The isolated compounds showed cytotoxicity against a cancer cell line (PANC1) in which Hh signaling was abnormally activated. Several compounds (12-14; GLI1 transcriptional inhibition IC50=7.6, 4.7, and 4.0 μM, respectively) inhibited Hh related protein (BCL2) expression. Moreover, compounds 1, 12, and 13 disrupted GLI1 and DNA complex formation. PMID:26178912

  13. Knots, Braids and Hedgehogs from the Eikonal Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wereszczyński, A.

    The complex eikonal equation in the three space dimensions is considered. We show that apart from the recently found torus knots, this equation can also generate other topological configurations with a nontrivial value of the π2(S2) index: braided open strings as well as hedgehogs. In particular, cylindric strings, i.e. string solutions located on a cylinder with a constant radius are found. Moreover, solutions describing strings lying on an arbitrary surface topologically equivalent to cylinder are presented. We discuss them in the context of the eikonal knots. The physical importance of the results originates in the fact that the eikonal knots have been recently used to approximate the Faddeev-Niemi hopfions.

  14. Generating amphioxus Hedgehog knockout mutants and phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wang; Guang, Li; Yiquan, Wang

    2015-10-01

    The amphioxus is a promising animal model for evolutionary-developmental studies due to its key position on the animal phylogenetic tree. In the present study, we reported a genetically modified amphioxus strain on the Hedgehog (Hh) gene locus using the TALEN method. The result showed that our TALEN pair injection could bring about 34% mutations in the amphioxus Hh coding region. Further analysis on the F(0) gametic DNA revealed that the mutations had entered into gametes. So, we paired one F(0) male carrying an 8 bp deletion with a wild-type (WT) female, and carefully nursed the F(1) embryos up to adulthood. We then screened F(1) individually via analyzing their genomic DNA from a tiny tail tip, and obtained eight heterozygous mutants from the F(1) offspring. Moreover, our observation on the F(2) embryos generated by mating F(1) mutants also revealed that about 25% of early larvae developed aberrantly with head and tail curving ventrally, agenesis of the mesoblastic tissue under their anterior notochord, and no mouth opening. With the larva growth, deformities (such as twist of head and tail, mouth absent, ventrally localized endostyle and gill slits) became more severe, and eventually those malformed larvae died due to no food intake. Genetic analysis showed that all these deformed embryos were homozygous mutants and the ratio of Hh hetorozygotes vs WT agreed with Mondel's law. WT amphioxus larvae are asymmetric with the mouth on the left and gill slits on the right side. However, the homozygous mutant larvae became left-right symmetric with the gill slits on the ventral side, indicating a conserved role of Hedgehog signaling in establishing the left-right embryonic axis. PMID:26496756

  15. Functional characterization of sonic hedgehog mutations associated with holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Traiffort, Elisabeth; Dubourg, Christèle; Faure, Hélène; Rognan, Didier; Odent, Sylvie; Durou, Marie-Renée; David, Véronique; Ruat, Martial

    2004-10-01

    Mutations of the developmental gene Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and alterations of SHH signaling have been associated with holoprosencephaly (HPE), a rare disorder characterized by a large spectrum of brain and craniofacial anomalies. Based on the crystal structure of mouse N-terminal and Drosophila C-terminal hedgehog proteins, we have developed three-dimensional models of the corresponding human proteins (SHH-N, SHH-C) that have allowed us to identify within these two domains crucial regions associated with HPE missense mutations. We have further characterized the functional consequences linked to 11 of these mutations. In transfected HEK293 cells, the production of the active SHH-N fragment was dramatically impaired for eight mutants (W117R, W117G, H140P, T150R, C183F, L271P, I354T, A383T). The supernatants from these cell cultures showed no significant SHH-signaling activity in a reporter cell-based assay. Two mutants (G31R, D222N) were associated with a lower production of SHH-N and signaling activity. Finally, one mutant harboring the A226T mutation displays an activity comparable with the wild-type protein. This work demonstrates that most of the HPE-associated SHH mutations analyzed have a deleterious effect on the availability of SHH-N and its biological activity. However, because of the lack of correlation between genotype and phenotype for SHH-associated mutations, our study suggests that other factors intervene in the development of the spectrum of HPE anomalies. PMID:15292211

  16. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jui Tung; Bain, Lisa J.

    2014-12-15

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  17. YAP regulates neuronal differentiation through Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Ding, Jing-Ya; Li, Ming-Yang; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Yu, Jenn-Yah

    2012-09-10

    Tight regulation of cell numbers by controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis is important during development. Recently, the Hippo pathway has been shown to regulate tissue growth and organ size in Drosophila. In mammalian cells, it also affects cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues, including the nervous system. Interplay of several signaling cascades, such as Notch, Wnt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways, control cell proliferation during neuronal differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether the Hippo pathway coordinates with other signaling cascades in regulating neuronal differentiation. Here, we used P19 cells, a mouse embryonic carcinoma cell line, as a model to study roles of YAP, a core component of the Hippo pathway, in neuronal differentiation. P19 cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by expressing a neural bHLH transcription factor gene Ascl1. Our results showed that YAP promoted cell proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation. Expression of Yap activated Shh but not Wnt or Notch signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, expression of Yap increased the expression of Patched homolog 1 (Ptch1), a downstream target of the Shh signaling. Knockdown of Gli2, a transcription factor of the Shh pathway, promoted neuronal differentiation even when Yap was over-expressed. We further demonstrated that over-expression of Yap inhibited neuronal differentiation in primary mouse cortical progenitors and Gli2 knockdown rescued the differentiation defect in Yap over-expressing cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that Shh signaling acts downstream of YAP in regulating neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in P19 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes Sonic hedgehog signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Gli2 rescues the Yap

  18. Hedgehog signaling pathway function conserved in Tribolium segmentation.

    PubMed

    Farzana, Laila; Brown, Susan J

    2008-04-01

    In Drosophila, maintenance of parasegmental boundaries and formation of segmental grooves depend on interactions between segment polarity genes. Wingless and Engrailed appear to have similar roles in both short and long germ segmentation, but relatively little is known about the extent to which Hedgehog signaling is conserved. In a companion study to the Tribolium genome project, we analyzed the expression and function of hedgehog, smoothened, patched, and cubitus interruptus orthologs during segmentation in Tribolium. Their expression was largely conserved between Drosophila and Tribolium. Parental RNAi analysis of positive regulators of the pathway (Tc-hh, Tc-smo, or Tc-ci) resulted in small spherical cuticles with little or no evidence of segmental grooves. Segmental Engrailed expression in these embryos was initiated but not maintained. Wingless-independent Engrailed expression in the CNS was maintained and became highly compacted during germ band retraction, providing evidence that derivatives from every segment were present in these small spherical embryos. On the other hand, RNAi analysis of a negative regulator (Tc-ptc) resulted in embryos with ectopic segmental grooves visible during germband elongation but not discernible in the first instar larval cuticles. These transient grooves formed adjacent to Engrailed expressing cells that encircled wider than normal wg domains in the Tc-ptc RNAi embryos. These results suggest that the en-wg-hh gene circuit is functionally conserved in the maintenance of segmental boundaries during germ band retraction and groove formation in Tribolium and that the segment polarity genes form a robust genetic regulatory module in the segmentation of this short germ insect. PMID:18392879

  19. Dendrosomatic Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons Regulates Axon Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling components in the neurons of the hippocampus raises a question about what role the Shh signaling pathway may play in these neurons. We show here that activation of the Shh signaling pathway stimulates axon elongation in rat hippocampal neurons. This Shh-induced effect depends on the pathway transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli1. The axon itself does not respond directly to Shh; instead, the Shh signal transduction originates from the somatodendritic region of the neurons and occurs in neurons with and without detectable primary cilia. Upon Shh stimulation, Smo localization to dendrites increases significantly. Shh pathway activation results in increased levels of profilin1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein. Mutations in Pfn1's actin-binding sites or reduction of Pfn1 eliminate the Shh-induced axon elongation. These findings indicate that Shh can regulate axon growth, which may be critical for development of hippocampal neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although numerous signaling mechanisms have been identified that act directly on axons to regulate their outgrowth, it is not known whether signals transduced in dendrites may also affect axon outgrowth. We describe here a transcellular signaling pathway in embryonic hippocampal neurons in which activation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptors in dendrites stimulates axon growth. The pathway involves the dendritic-membrane-associated Shh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli, which induces the expression of the gene encoding the actin-binding protein profilin 1. Our findings suggest scenarios in which stimulation of Shh in dendrites results in accelerated outgrowth of the axon, which therefore reaches its presumptive postsynaptic target cell more quickly. By this mechanism, Shh may play critical roles in the development of hippocampal neuronal circuits. PMID:26658865

  20. Hedgehog targets in the Drosophila embryo and the mechanisms that generate tissue-specific outputs of Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Biehs, Brian; Kechris, Katerina; Liu, Songmei; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2010-11-01

    Paracrine Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates growth and patterning in many Drosophila organs. We mapped chromatin binding sites for Cubitus interruptus (Ci), the transcription factor that mediates outputs of Hh signal transduction, and we analyzed transcription profiles of control and mutant embryos to identify genes that are regulated by Hh. Putative targets that we identified included several Hh pathway components, mostly previously identified targets, and many targets that are novel. Every Hh target we analyzed that is not a pathway component appeared to be regulated by Hh in a tissue-specific manner; analysis of expression patterns of pathway components and target genes provided evidence of autocrine Hh signaling in the optic primordium of the embryo. We present evidence that tissue specificity of Hh targets depends on transcription factors that are Hh-independent, suggesting that `pre-patterns' of transcription factors partner with Ci to make Hh-dependent gene expression position specific. PMID:20978080

  1. Hedgehog inhibits β-catenin activity in synovial joint development and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rockel, Jason S.; Yu, Chunying; Whetstone, Heather; Craft, April M.; Reilly, Katherine; Ma, Henry; Tsushima, Hidetoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Al-Jazrawe, Mushriq; Keller, Gordon M.; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Both the WNT/β-catenin and hedgehog signaling pathways are important in the regulation of limb development, chondrocyte differentiation, and degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). It is not clear how these signaling pathways interact in interzone cell differentiation and synovial joint morphogenesis. Here, we determined that constitutive activation of hedgehog signaling specifically within interzone cells induces joint morphological changes by selectively inhibiting β-catenin–induced Fgf18 expression. Stabilization of β-catenin or treatment with FGF18 rescued hedgehog-induced phenotypes. Hedgehog signaling induced expression of a dominant negative isoform of TCF7L2 (dnTCF7L2) in interzone progeny, which may account for the selective regulation of β-catenin target genes observed. Knockdown of TCF7L2 isoforms in mouse chondrocytes rescued hedgehog signaling–induced Fgf18 downregulation, while overexpression of the human dnTCF7L2 orthologue (dnTCF4) in human chondrocytes promoted the expression of catabolic enzymes associated with OA. Similarly, expression of dnTCF4 in human chondrocytes positively correlated with the aggrecanase ADAMTS4. Consistent with our developmental findings, activation of β-catenin also attenuated hedgehog-induced or surgically induced articular cartilage degeneration in mouse models of OA. Thus, our results demonstrate that hedgehog inhibits selective β-catenin target gene expression to direct interzone progeny fates and articular cartilage development and disease. Moreover, agents that increase β-catenin activity have the potential to therapeutically attenuate articular cartilage degeneration as part of OA. PMID:27018594

  2. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. Results We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. Conclusion We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution. PMID:21118524

  3. Epigenetic deregulation of Ellis Van Creveld confers robust Hedgehog signaling in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryutaro; Yamagishi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Toshiko; Yamochi, Tadanori; Fujikawa, Dai; Nakashima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer, global gene expression alteration, is closely associated with the development and malignant characteristics associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) as well as other cancers. Here, we show that aberrant overexpression of the Ellis Van Creveld (EVC) family is responsible for cellular Hedgehog (HH) activation, which provides the pro-survival ability of ATL cells. Using microarray, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we have demonstrated that EVC is significantly upregulated in ATL and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Epigenetic marks, including histone H3 acetylation and Lys4 trimethylation, are specifically accumulated at the EVC locus in ATL samples. The HTLV-1 Tax participates in the coordination of EVC expression in an epigenetic fashion. The treatment of shRNA targeting EVC, as well as the transcription factors for HH signaling, diminishes the HH activation and leads to apoptotic death in ATL cell lines. We also showed that a HH signaling inhibitor, GANT61, induces strong apoptosis in the established ATL cell lines and patient-derived primary ATL cells. Therefore, our data indicate that HH activation is involved in the regulation of leukemic cell survival. The epigenetically deregulated EVC appears to play an important role for HH activation. The possible use of EVC as a specific cell marker and a novel drug target for HTLV-1-infected T-cells is implicated by these findings. The HH inhibitors are suggested as drug candidates for ATL therapy. Our findings also suggest chromatin rearrangement associated with active histone markers in ATL. PMID:24996003

  4. Patched Targeting Peptides for Imaging and Treatment of Hedgehog Positive Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel; Kong, Fanlin; Yang, David; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    High tumor hedgehog expression is correlated with poor prognosis in invasive ductal carcinoma. Peptides which bind the patched receptor have recently been reported to have a growth inhibitory effect in tumors with activated hedgehog signaling. We sought to examine growth inhibition with these peptides in breast cancer cells and use these peptides as molecular imaging probes to follow changes in hedgehog expression after chemotherapy. Significant growth inhibition was observed in breast cancer cell lines treated with PTCH-blocking peptides. Significant in vitro uptake was observed with both FITC- and 99mTc-EC-peptide conjugates. In vivo imaging studies displayed greater accumulation of 99mTc-labeled peptides within tumors as compared to adjacent muscle tissue. Patched receptor expression increased after treatment and this correlated with an increase in tumor radiotracer uptake. These studies suggest that peptides which bind the sonic hedgehog docking site in patched receptor correlate with patched expression and can be used to image patched in vivo. Further, our data suggest that radiolabeled peptides may enable us to examine the activity of the hedgehog signaling pathway and to evaluate response to anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25276795

  5. Druggable glycolytic requirement for Hedgehog-dependent neuronal and medulloblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Di Magno, Laura; Manzi, Daniela; D'Amico, Davide; Coni, Sonia; Macone, Alberto; Infante, Paola; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; De Smaele, Enrico; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Screpanti, Isabella; Agostinelli, Enzo; Gulino, Alberto; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activation of SHH pathway is a major cause of medulloblastoma (MB), the most frequent brain malignancy of the childhood. A few Hedgehog inhibitors, all antagonizing the membrane transducer Smo, have been approved or are under clinical trials for the treatment of human MB. However, the efficacy of these drugs is limited by the occurrence of novel mutations or by activation of downstream or non-canonical Hedgehog components. Thus, the identification of novel druggable downstream pathways represents a critical step to overcome this problem. In the present work we demonstrate that aerobic glycolysis is a valuable HH-dependent downstream target, since its inhibition significantly counteracts the HH-mediated growth of normal and tumor cells. Hedgehog activation induces transcription of hexokinase 2 (HK2) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), two key gatekeepers of glycolysis. The process is mediated by the canonical activation of the Gli transcription factors and causes a robust increase of extracellular lactate concentration. We show that inhibition of glycolysis at different levels blocks the Hedgehog-induced proliferation of granule cell progenitors (GCPs), the cells from which medulloblastoma arises. Remarkably, we demonstrate that this glycolytic transcriptional program is also upregulated in SHH-dependent tumors and that pharmacological targeting with the pyruvate kinase inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA) efficiently represses MB growth in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data illustrate a previously uncharacterized pharmacological strategy to target Hedgehog dependent growth, which can be exploited for the treatment of medulloblastoma patients. PMID:25485584

  6. Gravitational field of a hedgehog and the evolution of vacuum bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, E. I.; Rabinowitz, A.

    1991-11-01

    The gravitational field produced by a spherically symmetric ``hedgehog'' configuration in scalar field theories with global SO(3) symmetry (or higher) is studied in the limit in which these models become nonlinear σ models. The same gravitational effect can be generated by a set of cosmic strings intersecting at a point, in the limit that one considers a continuous distribution of such intersecting strings in a spherically symmetric configuration (to be referred to as the ``string hedgehog''). When the energy densities associated with the hedgehog are small, we obtain a static geometry, but for higher values, the resulting geometry is that of an anisotropic cosmology. The evolution of bubbles joining two phases, one of which contains a hedgehog (as defined above) is investigated. The role of such configurations in processes that lead to classical false-vacuum destabilization and in the evolution of inflationary bubbles is discussed. The generalization of our results to the gauged case, i.e., to magnetic-monopole hedgehogs, is discussed.

  7. Gravitational field of a hedgehog and the evolution of vacuum bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Guendelman, E.I. ); Rabinowitz, A. )

    1991-11-15

    The gravitational field produced by a spherically symmetric hedgehog'' configuration in scalar field theories with global SO(3) symmetry (or higher) is studied in the limit in which these models become nonlinear {sigma} models. The same gravitational effect can be generated by a set of cosmic strings intersecting at a point, in the limit that one considers a continuous distribution of such intersecting strings in a spherically symmetric configuration (to be referred to as the string hedgehog''). When the energy densities associated with the hedgehog are small, we obtain a static geometry, but for higher values, the resulting geometry is that of an anisotropic cosmology. The evolution of bubbles joining two phases, one of which contains a hedgehog (as defined above) is investigated. The role of such configurations in processes that lead to classical false-vacuum destabilization and in the evolution of inflationary bubbles is discussed. The generalization of our results to the gauged case, i.e., to magnetic-monopole hedgehogs, is discussed.

  8. A crucial requirement for Hedgehog signaling in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwon-Sik; Martelotto, Luciano G; Peifer, Martin; Sos, Martin L; Karnezis, Anthony N; Mahjoub, Moe R; Bernard, Katie; Conklin, Jamie F; Szczepny, Anette; Yuan, Jing; Guo, Ribo; Ospina, Beatrice; Falzon, Jeanette; Bennett, Samara; Brown, Tracey J; Markovic, Ana; Devereux, Wendy L; Ocasio, Cory A; Chen, James K; Stearns, Tim; Thomas, Roman K; Dorsch, Marion; Buonamici, Silvia; Watkins, D Neil; Peacock, Craig D; Sage, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine subtype of lung cancer for which there is no effective treatment1,2. Using a mouse model in which deletion of Rb1 and Trp53 in the lung epithelium of adult mice induces SCLC3,4, we found that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is activated in SCLC cells independently of the lung microenvironment. Constitutive activation of the Hedgehog signaling molecule Smoothened (Smo) promoted the clonogenicity of human SCLC in vitro and the initiation and progression of mouse SCLC in vivo. Reciprocally, deletion of Smo in Rb1 and Trp53-mutant lung epithelial cells strongly suppressed SCLC initiation and progression in mice. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of Hedgehog signaling inhibited the growth of mouse and human SCLC, most notably following chemotherapy. These findings show a crucial cell-intrinsic role for Hedgehog signaling in the development and maintenance of SCLC and identify Hedgehog pathway inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to slow the progression of disease and delay cancer recurrence in individuals with SCLC. PMID:21983857

  9. GALNT1-Mediated Glycosylation and Activation of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Maintains the Self-Renewal and Tumor-Initiating Capacity of Bladder Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Du, Ying; Yang, Zhao; He, Luyun; Wang, Yanying; Hao, Lu; Ding, Mingxia; Yan, Ruping; Wang, Jiansong; Fan, Zusen

    2016-03-01

    The existence of bladder cancer stem cells (BCSC) has been suggested to underlie bladder tumor initiation and recurrence. Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling has been implicated in promoting cancer stem cell (CSC) self-renewal and is activated in bladder cancer, but its impact on BCSC maintenance is unclear. In this study, we generated a mAb (BCMab1) against CD44(+) human bladder cancer cells that recognizes aberrantly glycosylated integrin α3β1. The combination of BCMab1 with an anti-CD44 antibody identified a BCMab1(+)CD44(+) cell subpopulation as BCSCs with stem cell-like properties. Gene expression analysis revealed that the hedgehog pathway was activated in the BCMab1(+)CD44(+) subpopulation and was required for BCSC self-renewal. Furthermore, the glycotransferase GALNT1 was highly expressed in BCMab1(+)CD44(+) cells and correlated with clinicopathologic features of bladder cancers. Mechanistically, GALNT1 mediated O-linked glycosylation of SHH to promote its activation, which was essential for the self-renewal maintenance of BCSCs and bladder tumorigenesis. Finally, intravesical instillation of GALNT1 siRNA and the SHH inhibitor cyclopamine exerted potent antitumor activity against bladder tumor growth. Taken together, our findings identify a BCSC subpopulation in human bladder tumors that appears to be responsive to the inhibition of GALNT1 and SHH signaling, and thus highlight a potential strategy for preventing the rapid recurrence typical in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:26676748

  10. Sonic Hedgehog Promotes Cementoblastic Differentiation via Activating the BMP Pathways.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won-Jung; Auh, Q-Schick; Lim, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-10-01

    Although sonic hedgehog (SHH), an essential molecule in embryogenesis and organogenesis, stimulates proliferation of human periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells, the effects of recombinant human SHH (rh-SHH) on osteoblastic differentiation are unclear. To reveal the role of SHH in periodontal regeneration, expression of SHH in mouse periodontal tissues and its effects on the osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation in human cementoblasts were investigated. SHH is immunolocalized to differentiating cementoblasts, PDL cells, and osteoblasts of the developing mouse periodontium. Addition of rh-SHH increased cell growth, ALP activity, and mineralization nodule formation, and upregulated mRNA expression of osteoblastic and cementoblastic markers. The osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation of rh-SHH was abolished by the SHH inhibitor cyclopamine (Cy) and the BMP antagonist noggin. rh-SHH increased the expression of BMP-2 and -4 mRNA, as well as levels of phosphorylated Akt, ERK, p38, and JNK, and of MAPK and NF-κB activation, which were reversed by noggin, Cy, and BMP-2 siRNA. Collectively, this study is the first to demonstrate that SHH can promote cell growth and cell osteoblastic/cementoblastic differentiation via BMP pathway. Thus, SHH plays important roles in the development of periodontal tissue, and might represent a new therapeutic target for periodontitis and periodontal regeneration. PMID:27289556

  11. Heterothermy in the southern African hedgehog, Atelerix frontalis.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Stacey L; Mzilikazi, Nomakwezi

    2011-04-01

    Most research on mammalian heterothermic responses in southern Africa tends to be laboratory based and biased towards rodents and smaller members of the Afrotheria. In this study, we continuously measured body temperature of southern African hedgehogs (Atelerix frontalis) between April and August 2009 (-10°C < T (a) < 43°C), kept under semi-captive conditions. A. frontalis showed a high propensity for torpor with animals spending up to 84% of the measurement period torpid. During this study, A. frontalis displayed the lowest T (b min) (ca 1°C) yet recorded in an Afrotropical placental heterotherm. Bout lengths of between 0.7 h (40 min) and 116.3 h (4.8 days) were recorded. Differences in bout length were observed between lighter individuals compared with an individual exhibiting a higher body mass at the onset of winter, with low M (b) individuals exhibiting daily torpor whereas a heavier individual exhibited torpor bouts that were indicative of hibernation. Our results suggest that heterothermic responses are an important feature in the energy balance equation of this species and that body mass at the onset of winter may determine the patterns of heterothermy utilised in this species. PMID:21082184

  12. Thalamo-striatal projections in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, Heinz

    2006-07-19

    Unlike the basal ganglia input from the midline and intralaminar nuclei, the origin and prominence of striatal projections arising in the lateral thalamus varies considerably among mammals being most restricted in the opossum and monkey, most extensive in the rat. To get further insight into the evolution of thalamo-striatal pathways the Madagascar lesser hedgehog tenrec (Afrotheria) was investigated using anterograde and retrograde flow techniques. An extensive medial thalamic region (including presumed equivalents to the paraventricular, parataenial and dorsomedial nuclei as well as the reuniens complex), the rostral (central) and caudal (parafascicular) intralaminar nuclei were shown to give rise to striatal projections. Additional projections originated in the ventral anterolateral nuclear group and regions within and around the medial geniculate complex. Similar to the rat there was also substantial projections from the lateral posterior-pulvinar complex and the ventral posterior nucleus. The fibers terminated extensively across the striatum in a mainly homogeneous fashion. Isolated patches of low-density terminations were found in the caudoputamen. This inhomogeneous labeling pattern appeared similar to one described in the cat with the unlabeled islands showing features of striosomes. The medial and intralaminar nuclei also projected heavily upon the olfactory tubercle. Differential innervation patterns were noted in the polymorphous layer, the deep and the superficial molecular layer. PMID:16777080

  13. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors. PMID:26343726

  14. [Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway and regulation of inner ear development].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xin-Huan; Cao, Xin

    2013-09-01

    During inner ear development, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is involved in the ventral otic identity, cell fate determination of statoacoustic ganglion neurons and hair cell development. Shh protein, secreted from floor plate, antagonizes Wnt protein from roof plate, which refines and maintains dorsoventral axial patterning in the ear. Shh, served as a mitogen during neurogenesis, directly promotes the development of spiral ganglion neuron. After Shh signaling pathway is activated, Ngn1 is freed from Tbx1 repression. As a result, Shh indirectly upregulates the expression of Ngn1, thus regulating neurogenic patterning of inner ear. In addition, Shh regulates the differentiation of hair cells by influencing cell cycle of the progenitor cells located in the cochlea. The basal-to-apical wave of Shh decline ensures the normal devel- opment pattern of hair cells. It is confirmed by a quantity of researches conducted in both animals and patients with hereditary hearing impairment that abnormal Shh signaling results in aberrant transcription of target genes, disturbance of the proper development of inner ear, and human hearing impairment. In humans, diseases accompanied by hearing disorders caused by abnormal Shh signaling include Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS), Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS), Waardenburg syndrome (WS) and medulloblastoma, etc. This review would provide a theoretical basis for further study of molecular mechanisms and clinical use of inner ear development. PMID:24400478

  15. Phosphoinositides Regulate Ciliary Protein Trafficking to Modulate Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Elle C.; Garcia, Galo; Abedin, Monika; Schurmans, Stéphane; Inoue, Takanari; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary cilia interpret vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signals. Why cilia are essential for signaling is unclear. One possibility is that some forms of signaling require a distinct membrane lipid composition, found at cilia. We found that the ciliary membrane contains a particular phosphoinositide, PI(4)P, whereas a different phosphoinositide, PI(4,5)P2, is restricted to the membrane of the ciliary base. This distribution is created by Inpp5e, a ciliary phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase. Without Inpp5e, ciliary PI(4,5)P2 levels are elevated and Hh signaling is disrupted. Inpp5e limits the ciliary levels of inhibitors of Hh signaling, including Gpr161 and the PI(4,5)P2-binding protein Tulp3. Increasing ciliary PI(4,5)P2 levels or conferring the ability to bind PI(4)P on Tulp3 increases the ciliary localization of Tulp3. Lowering Tulp3 in cells lacking Inpp5e reduces ciliary Gpr161 levels and restores Hh signaling. Therefore, Inpp5e regulates ciliary membrane phosphoinositide composition, and Tulp3 reads out ciliary phosphoinositides to control ciliary protein localization, enabling Hh signaling. PMID:26305592

  16. Anorectal malformations caused by defects in sonic hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Mo, R; Kim, J H; Zhang, J; Chiang, C; Hui, C C; Kim, P C

    2001-08-01

    Anorectal malformations are a common clinical problem affecting the development of the distal hindgut in infants. The spectrum of anorectal malformations ranges from the mildly stenotic anus to imperforate anus with a fistula between the urinary and intestinal tracts to the most severe form, persistent cloaca. The etiology, embryology, and pathogenesis of anorectal malformations are poorly understood and controversial. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an endoderm-derived signaling molecule that induces mesodermal gene expression in the chick hindgut. However, the role of Shh signaling in mammalian hindgut development is unknown. Here, we show that mutant mice with various defects in the Shh signaling pathway exhibit a spectrum of distal hindgut defects mimicking human anorectal malformations. Shh null-mutant mice display persistent cloaca. Mutant mice lacking Gli2 or Gli3, two zinc finger transcription factors involved in Shh signaling, respectively, exhibit imperforate anus with recto-urethral fistula and anal stenosis. Furthermore, persistent cloaca is also observed in Gli2(-/-);Gli3(+/-), Gli2(+/-);Gli3(-/-), and Gli2(-/-);Gli3(-/-) mice demonstrating a gene dose-dependent effect. Therefore, Shh signaling is essential for normal development of the distal hindgut in mice and mutations affecting Shh signaling produce a spectrum of anorectal malformations that may reveal new insights into their human disease equivalents. PMID:11485934

  17. Neuropilins are positive regulators of Hedgehog signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hillman, R Tyler; Feng, Brian Y; Ni, Jun; Woo, Wei-Meng; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G; Teruel, Mary N; Oro, Anthony E; Chen, James K; Scott, Matthew P

    2011-11-15

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is essential for vertebrate embryogenesis, and excessive Hh target gene activation can cause cancer in humans. Here we show that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) and Nrp2, transmembrane proteins with roles in axon guidance and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, are important positive regulators of Hh signal transduction. Nrps are expressed at times and locations of active Hh signal transduction during mouse development. Using cell lines lacking key Hh pathway components, we show that Nrps mediate Hh transduction between activated Smoothened (Smo) protein and the negative regulator Suppressor of Fused (SuFu). Nrp1 transcription is induced by Hh signaling, and Nrp1 overexpression increases maximal Hh target gene activation, indicating the existence of a positive feedback circuit. The regulation of Hh signal transduction by Nrps is conserved between mammals and bony fish, as we show that morpholinos targeting the Nrp zebrafish ortholog nrp1a produce a specific and highly penetrant Hh pathway loss-of-function phenotype. These findings enhance our knowledge of Hh pathway regulation and provide evidence for a conserved nexus between Nrps and this important developmental signaling system. PMID:22051878

  18. Mesencephalic basolateral domain specification is dependent on Sonic Hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A; Madrigal, M Pilar; Martinez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In the study of central nervous system morphogenesis, the identification of new molecular markers allows us to identify domains along the antero-posterior and dorso-ventral (DV) axes. In the past years, the alar and basal plates of the midbrain have been divided into different domains. The precise location of the alar-basal boundary is still under discussion. We have identified Barhl1, Nhlh1 and Six3 as appropriate molecular markers to the adjacent domains of this transition. The description of their expression patterns and the contribution to the different mesencephalic populations corroborated their role in the specification of these domains. We studied the influence of Sonic Hedgehog on these markers and therefore on the specification of these territories. The lack of this morphogen produced severe alterations in the expression pattern of Barhl1 and Nhlh1 with consequent misspecification of the basolateral (BL) domain. Six3 expression was apparently unaffected, however its distribution changed leading to altered basal domains. In this study we confirmed the localization of the alar-basal boundary dorsal to the BL domain and demonstrated that the development of the BL domain highly depends on Shh. PMID:25741244

  19. Mesencephalic basolateral domain specification is dependent on Sonic Hedgehog

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E.; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A.; Madrigal, M. Pilar; Martinez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In the study of central nervous system morphogenesis, the identification of new molecular markers allows us to identify domains along the antero-posterior and dorso-ventral (DV) axes. In the past years, the alar and basal plates of the midbrain have been divided into different domains. The precise location of the alar-basal boundary is still under discussion. We have identified Barhl1, Nhlh1 and Six3 as appropriate molecular markers to the adjacent domains of this transition. The description of their expression patterns and the contribution to the different mesencephalic populations corroborated their role in the specification of these domains. We studied the influence of Sonic Hedgehog on these markers and therefore on the specification of these territories. The lack of this morphogen produced severe alterations in the expression pattern of Barhl1 and Nhlh1 with consequent misspecification of the basolateral (BL) domain. Six3 expression was apparently unaffected, however its distribution changed leading to altered basal domains. In this study we confirmed the localization of the alar-basal boundary dorsal to the BL domain and demonstrated that the development of the BL domain highly depends on Shh. PMID:25741244

  20. Repurposing the antihelmintic mebendazole as a hedgehog inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew R; Bai, Ren-Yuan; Chung, Jon H; Borodovsky, Alexandra; Rudin, Charles M; Riggins, Gregory J; Bunz, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is activated in many types of cancer and therefore presents an attractive target for new anticancer agents. Here, we show that mebendazole, a benzamidazole with a long history of safe use against nematode infestations and hydatid disease, potently inhibited Hh signaling and slowed the growth of Hh-driven human medulloblastoma cells at clinically attainable concentrations. As an antiparasitic, mebendazole avidly binds nematode tubulin and causes inhibition of intestinal microtubule synthesis. In human cells, mebendazole suppressed the formation of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based organelle that functions as a signaling hub for Hh pathway activation. The inhibition of Hh signaling by mebendazole was unaffected by mutants in the gene that encodes human Smoothened (SMO), which are selectively propagated in cell clones that survive treatment with the Hh inhibitor vismodegib. Combination of vismodegib and mebendazole resulted in additive Hh signaling inhibition. Because mebendazole can be safely administered to adults and children at high doses over extended time periods, we propose that mebendazole could be rapidly repurposed and clinically tested as a prospective therapeutic agent for many tumors that are dependent on Hh signaling. PMID:25376612

  1. Foretinib is effective therapy for metastatic sonic hedgehog medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Faria, Claudia C; Golbourn, Brian J; Dubuc, Adrian M; Remke, Marc; Diaz, Roberto J; Agnihotri, Sameer; Luck, Amanda; Sabha, Nesrin; Olsen, Samantha; Wu, Xiaochong; Garzia, Livia; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mack, Stephen C; Wang, Xin; Leadley, Michael; Reynaud, Denis; Ermini, Leonardo; Post, Martin; Northcott, Paul A; Pfister, Stefan M; Croul, Sidney E; Kool, Marcel; Korshunov, Andrey; Smith, Christian A; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor, with metastases present at diagnosis conferring a poor prognosis. Mechanisms of dissemination are poorly understood and metastatic lesions are genetically divergent from the matched primary tumor. Effective and less toxic therapies that target both compartments have yet to be identified. Here, we report that the analysis of several large nonoverlapping cohorts of patients with medulloblastoma reveals MET kinase as a marker of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-driven medulloblastoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of phosphorylated, active MET kinase in an independent patient cohort confirmed its correlation with increased tumor relapse and poor survival, suggesting that patients with SHH medulloblastoma may benefit from MET-targeted therapy. In support of this hypothesis, we found that the approved MET inhibitor foretinib could suppress MET activation, decrease tumor cell proliferation, and induce apoptosis in SHH medulloblastomas in vitro and in vivo. Foretinib penetrated the blood-brain barrier and was effective in both the primary and metastatic tumor compartments. In established mouse xenograft or transgenic models of metastatic SHH medulloblastoma, foretinib administration reduced the growth of the primary tumor, decreased the incidence of metastases, and increased host survival. Taken together, our results provide a strong rationale to clinically evaluate foretinib as an effective therapy for patients with SHH-driven medulloblastoma. PMID:25391241

  2. Anorectal Malformations Caused by Defects in Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Rong; Kim, Jae Hong; Zhang, Jianrong; Chiang, Chin; Hui, Chi-chung; Kim, Peter C. W.

    2001-01-01

    Anorectal malformations are a common clinical problem affecting the development of the distal hindgut in infants. The spectrum of anorectal malformations ranges from the mildly stenotic anus to imperforate anus with a fistula between the urinary and intestinal tracts to the most severe form, persistent cloaca. The etiology, embryology, and pathogenesis of anorectal malformations are poorly understood and controversial. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an endoderm-derived signaling molecule that induces mesodermal gene expression in the chick hindgut. However, the role of Shh signaling in mammalian hindgut development is unknown. Here, we show that mutant mice with various defects in the Shh signaling pathway exhibit a spectrum of distal hindgut defects mimicking human anorectal malformations. Shh null-mutant mice display persistent cloaca. Mutant mice lacking Gli2 or Gli3, two zinc finger transcription factors involved in Shh signaling, respectively, exhibit imperforate anus with recto-urethral fistula and anal stenosis. Furthermore, persistent cloaca is also observed in Gli2−/−;Gli3+/−, Gli2+/−;Gli3−/−, and Gli2−/−;Gli3−/− mice demonstrating a gene dose-dependent effect. Therefore, Shh signaling is essential for normal development of the distal hindgut in mice and mutations affecting Shh signaling produce a spectrum of anorectal malformations that may reveal new insights into their human disease equivalents. PMID:11485934

  3. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar; Patra, Samir Kumar

    2012-10-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  4. Bromodomain and hedgehog pathway targets in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Reinhart, Russell A; Monks, Anne; Evans, David; Morris, Joel; Polley, Eric; Teicher, Beverly A

    2016-02-28

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive cancer that frequently recurs. Twenty-three human SCLC lines were selected representing varied Myc status. Gene expression of lung cancer, stem-like, hedgehog pathway, and notch pathway genes were determined by RT(2)-PCR array and Exon 1.0 ST array. Etoposide and topotecan concentration response was examined. The IC50's for etoposide and topotecan ranged over nearly 3 logs upon 96 hrs exposure to the drugs. Myc status, TOP2A, TOP2B and TOP1 mRNA expression or topoisomerase 1 and topoisomerase 2 protein did not account for the range in the sensitivity to the drugs. γ-secretase inhibitors, RO429097 and PF-03084014, had little activity in the SCLC lines over ranges covering the clinical Cmax concentrations. MYC amplified lines tended to be more sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. The Smo antagonists, erismodegib and vismodegib and the Gli antagonists, HPI1 and SEN-450 had a trend toward greater sensitivity of the MYC amplified line. Recurrent SCLC is among the most recalcitrant cancers and drug development efforts in this cancer are a high priority. PMID:26683772

  5. Hedgehog-driven myogenic tumors recapitulate skeletal muscle cellular heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hettmer, Simone; Lin, Michael M; Tchessalova, Daria; Tortorici, Sara J; Castiglioni, Alessandra; Desai, Tushar; Mao, Junhao; McMahon, Andrew P; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation in R26-SmoM2;CAGGS-CreER mice, which carry a tamoxifen-inducible activated Smoothened allele (SmoM2), results in numerous microscopic tumor foci in mouse skeletal muscle. These tumors exhibit a highly differentiated myogenic phenotype and resemble human fetal rhabdomyomas. This study sought to apply previously established strategies to isolate lineally distinct populations of normal mouse myofiber-associated cells in order to examine cellular heterogeneity in SmoM2 tumors. We demonstrate that established SmoM2 tumors are composed of cells expressing myogenic, adipocytic and hematopoietic lineage markers and differentiation capacity. SmoM2 tumors thus recapitulate the phenotypic and functional hetereogeneity observed in normal mouse skeletal muscle. SmoM2 tumors also contain an expanded population of PAX7+ and MyoD+ satellite-like cells with extremely low clonogenic activity. Selective activation of Hh signaling in freshly isolated muscle satellite cells enhanced terminal myogenic differentiation without stimulating proliferation. Our findings support the conclusion that SmoM2 tumors represent an aberrant skeletal muscle state and demonstrate that, similar to normal muscle, myogenic tumors contain functionally distinct cell subsets, including cells lacking myogenic differentiation potential. PMID:26460176

  6. An Nfic-hedgehog signaling cascade regulates tooth root development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Coordination between the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and apical papilla (AP) is crucial for proper tooth root development. The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and Nfic are both involved in tooth root development; however, their relationship has yet to be elucidated. Here, we establish a timecourse of mouse molar root development by histological staining of sections, and we demonstrate that Hh signaling is active before and during root development in the AP and HERS using Gli1 reporter mice. The proper pattern of Hh signaling activity in the AP is crucial for the proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells, because either inhibition with Hh inhibitors or constitutive activation of Hh signaling activity in transgenic mice leads to decreased proliferation in the AP and shorter roots. Moreover, Hh activity is elevated in Nfic(-/-) mice, a root defect model, whereas RNA sequencing and in situ hybridization show that the Hh attenuator Hhip is downregulated. ChIP and RNAscope analyses suggest that Nfic binds to the promoter region of Hhip. Treatment of Nfic(-/-) mice with Hh inhibitor partially restores cell proliferation, AP growth and root development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an Nfic-Hhip-Hh signaling pathway is crucial for apical papilla growth and proper root formation. This discovery provides insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating tooth root development. PMID:26293299

  7. Hedgehog signaling stimulates the conversion of cholesterol to steroids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao; Pan, Yibin; Luo, Huan; Xiong, Wenyi; Zhu, Haibin; Ruan, Hongfeng; Wang, Jirong; Zou, Chaochun; Tang, Lanfang; Iguchi, Takuma; Long, Fanxin; Wu, Ximei

    2015-03-01

    Cholesterol modification of Hedgehog (Hh) ligands is fundamental for the activity of Hh signaling, and cholesterol biosynthesis is also required for intracellular Hh signaling transduction. Here, we investigated the roles and underlying mechanism of Hh signaling in metabolism of cholesterol. The main components of the Hh pathway are abundantly expressed in both human cytotrophoblasts and trophoblast-like cells. Activation of Hh signaling induces the conversion of cholesterol to progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) through up-regulating the expression of steroidogenic enzymes including P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3β-HSD1), and aromatase. Moreover, inhibition of Hh signaling attenuates not only Hh-induced expression of steroidogenic enzymes but also the conversion of cholesterol to P4 and E2. Whereas Gli3 is required for Hh-induced P450scc expression, Gli2 mediates the induction of 3β-HSD1 and aromatase. Finally, in ovariectomized nude mice, systemic inhibition of Hh signaling by cyclopamine suppresses circulating P4 and E2 levels derived from a trophoblast-like choricarcinoma xenograft, and attenuates uterine response to P4 and E2. Together these results uncover a hitherto uncharacterized role of Hh signaling in metabolism of cholesterol. PMID:25582983

  8. Targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway in cancer: beyond Smoothened

    PubMed Central

    Gonnissen, Annelies; Isebaert, Sofie; Haustermans, Karin

    2015-01-01

    An essential role for Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in human cancer has been established beyond doubt. At present, targeting Hh signaling has mainly been investigated with SMO inhibitors. Unfortunately, resistance against currently used SMO inhibitors has already been observed in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients. Therefore, the use of Hh inhibitors targeting the signaling cascade more downstream of SMO could represent a more promising strategy. Furthermore, besides the classical canonical way of Hh signaling activation, non-canonical activation of the GLI transcription factors by multiple important signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK, PI3K, TGFβ) has also been described, pinpointing the importance of targeting the transcription factors GLI1/2. The most promising agent in this context is probably the GLI1/2 inhibitor GANT61 which has been investigated preclinically in numerous tumor types in the last few years. In this review, the emerging role of Hh signaling in cancer is critically evaluated focusing on the potential of targeting Hh signaling more downstream of SMO, i.e. at the level of the GLI transcription factors. Furthermore, the working mechanism and therapeutic potential of the most extensively studied GLI inhibitor in human cancer, i.e. GANT61, is discussed in detail. In conclusion, GANT61 appears to be highly effective against human cancer cells and in xenograft mouse models, targeting almost all of the classical hallmarks of cancer and could hence represent a promising treatment option for human cancer. PMID:26053182

  9. Hedgehog signaling stimulates the conversion of cholesterol to steroids

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chao; Pan, Yibin; Luo, Huan; Xiong, Wenyi; Zhu, Haibin; Ruan, Hongfeng; Wang, Jirong; Zou, Chaochun; Tang, Lanfang; Ikuchi, Takuma; Long, Fanxin; Wu, Ximei

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol modification of Hedgehog (Hh) ligands is fundamental for the activity of Hh signaling, and cholesterol biosynthesis is also required for intracellular Hh signaling transduction. Here, we investigated the roles and underlying mechanism of Hh signaling in metabolism of cholesterol. The main components of the Hh pathway are abundantly expressed in both human cytotrophoblasts and trophoblast-like cells. Activation of Hh signaling induces the conversion of cholesterol to progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) through up-regulating the expression of steroidogenic enzymes including P450 cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3β-HSD1), and aromatase. Moreover, inhibition of Hh signaling attenuates not only Hh-induced expression of steroidogenic enzymes but also the conversion of cholesterol to P4 and E2. Whereas Gli3 is required for Hh-induced P450scc expression, Gli2 mediates the induction of 3β-HSD1 and aromatase. Finally, in ovariectomized nude mice, systemic inhibition of Hh signaling by cyclopamine suppresses circulating P4 and E2 levels derived from a trophoblast-like choricarcinoma xenograft, and attenuates uterine response to P4 and E2. Together these results uncover a hitherto uncharacterized role of Hh signaling in metabolism of cholesterol. PMID:25582983

  10. Hedgehog signaling patterns mesoderm in the sea urchin

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Katherine D.; Warner, Jacob; Hertzler, Philip H.; McClay, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is essential for patterning many structures in vertebrates including the nervous system, chordamesoderm, limb and endodermal organs. In the sea urchin, a basal deuterostome, Hh signaling is shown to participate in organizing the mesoderm. At gastrulation the Hh ligand is expressed by the endoderm downstream of the Brachyury and FoxA transcription factors in the endomesoderm gene regulatory network. The co-receptors Patched (Ptc) and Smoothened (Smo) are expressed by the neighboring skeletogenic and non-skeletogenic mesoderm. Perturbations of Hh, Ptc and Smo cause embryos to develop with skeletal defects and inappropriate non-skeletogenic mesoderm patterning, although initial specification of mesoderm occurs without detectable abnormalities. Perturbations of the pathway caused late defects in skeletogenesis and in the non-skeletogenic mesoderm, including altered numbers of pigment and blastocoelar cells, randomized left-right asymmetry of coelomic pouches, and disorganized circumesophageal muscle causing an inability to swallow. Together the data support the requirement of Hh signaling in patterning each of the mesoderm subtypes in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:19393640

  11. Tunable Fermi level and hedgehog spin texture in gapped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Varykhalov, A.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Marchenko, D.; Hlawenka, P.; Mandal, P. S.; Rader, O.

    2015-01-01

    Spin and pseudospin in graphene are known to interact under enhanced spin–orbit interaction giving rise to an in-plane Rashba spin texture. Here we show that Au-intercalated graphene on Fe(110) displays a large (∼230 meV) bandgap with out-of-plane hedgehog-type spin reorientation around the gapped Dirac point. We identify two causes responsible. First, a giant Rashba effect (∼70 meV splitting) away from the Dirac point and, second, the breaking of the six-fold graphene symmetry at the interface. This is demonstrated by a strong one-dimensional anisotropy of the graphene dispersion imposed by the two-fold-symmetric (110) substrate. Surprisingly, the graphene Fermi level is systematically tuned by the Au concentration and can be moved into the bandgap. We conclude that the out-of-plane spin texture is not only of fundamental interest but can be tuned at the Fermi level as a model for electrical gating of spin in a spintronic device. PMID:26212127

  12. Sequential Phosphorylation of Smoothened Transduces Graded Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Ospina, Jason K.; Zhang, Junzheng; Michelson, Andrew P.; Schoen, Adam M.; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2012-01-01

    The correct interpretation of a gradient of the morphogen Hedgehog (Hh) during development requires phosphorylation of the Hh signaling activator Smoothened (Smo); however, the molecular mechanism by which Smo transduces graded Hh signaling is not well understood. We show that regulation of the phosphorylation status of Smo by distinct phosphatases at specific phosphorylated residues creates differential thresholds of Hh signaling. Phosphorylation of Smo was initiated by adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)–dependent protein kinase (PKA) and further enhanced by casein kinase I (CKI). We found that protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) directly dephosphorylated PKA-phosphorylated Smo to reduce signaling mediated by intermediate concentrations of Hh, whereas PP2A specifically dephosphorylated PKA-primed, CKI-phosphorylated Smo to restrict signaling by high concentrations of Hh. We also established a functional link between sequentially phosphorylated Smo species and graded Hh activity. Thus, we propose a sequential phosphorylation model in which precise interpretation of morphogen concentration can be achieved upon versatile phosphatase-mediated regulation of the phosphorylation status of an essential activator in developmental signaling. PMID:21730325

  13. A Single Aspartate Coordinates Two Catalytic Steps in Hedgehog Autoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian; Owen, Timothy; Xia, Ke; Callahan, Brian; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-08-31

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is driven by the cholesterol-modified Hh ligand, generated by autoprocessing of Hh precursor protein. Two steps in Hh autoprocessing, N-S acyl shift and transesterification, must be coupled for efficient Hh cholesteroylation and downstream signal transduction. In the present study, we show that a conserved aspartate residue, D46 of the Hh autoprocessing domain, coordinates these two catalytic steps. Mutagenesis demonstrated that D46 suppresses non-native Hh precursor autoprocessing and is indispensable for transesterification with cholesterol. NMR measurements indicated that D46 has a pKa of 5.6, ∼2 units above the expected pKa of aspartate, due to a hydrogen-bond between protonated D46 and a catalytic cysteine residue. However, the deprotonated form of D46 side chain is also essential, because a D46N mutation cannot mediate cholesteroylation. On the basis of these data, we propose that the proton shuttling of D46 side chain mechanistically couples the two steps of Hh cholesteroylation. PMID:27529645

  14. [The Cytoskelrtal Protein Zvxin Interacts with the Hedgehog Receptor Patched].

    PubMed

    Martynova, N U; Ermolina, L V; Eroshkin, F M; Zarayskiy, A G

    2015-01-01

    Earlier, we demonstrated Zyxin influence upon Hedgehog (Hh)-signaling pathway during early patterning of the central neural system (CNS) anlage of the Xenopus laevis embryo. Now we show that Zyxin can physically interact with the transmembrane receptor of Hh, Patched2 (Ptc2). Binding of Hh by this receptor activates signaling pathway, which regulates many events, including numerous types of cell differentiation during the embryonic development. In particular, patterning of the CNS anlage. The ability of Zyxin to interact with Ptc2 have been confirmed by immunoprecipitation experiments, in which we tested mutual binding affinity of Zyxin and Ptc2, as well as mutual affinity of their deletion mutants. As a result, we have established that in Xenopus levis, Zyxin binding to Ptc2 is due to the interaction of Zyxin 2nd LIM-domain (530-590 aa) with the under-membrane region of the cytoplasmic C-terminus of Ptc2 (1159-1412 aa). We have also demonstrated that similar interaction is valid for the homologous regions of the human Zyxin and human Hh receptor, Ptc1. The data obtained allow to hypothesize existence of evolutionary conserved mechanism that modulates Hh-signaling and based on the interaction of Zyxin with Ptc. PMID:27125030

  15. Tunable Fermi level and hedgehog spin texture in gapped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varykhalov, A.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Marchenko, D.; Hlawenka, P.; Mandal, P. S.; Rader, O.

    2015-07-01

    Spin and pseudospin in graphene are known to interact under enhanced spin-orbit interaction giving rise to an in-plane Rashba spin texture. Here we show that Au-intercalated graphene on Fe(110) displays a large (~230 meV) bandgap with out-of-plane hedgehog-type spin reorientation around the gapped Dirac point. We identify two causes responsible. First, a giant Rashba effect (~70 meV splitting) away from the Dirac point and, second, the breaking of the six-fold graphene symmetry at the interface. This is demonstrated by a strong one-dimensional anisotropy of the graphene dispersion imposed by the two-fold-symmetric (110) substrate. Surprisingly, the graphene Fermi level is systematically tuned by the Au concentration and can be moved into the bandgap. We conclude that the out-of-plane spin texture is not only of fundamental interest but can be tuned at the Fermi level as a model for electrical gating of spin in a spintronic device.

  16. Dampening the Signals Transduced through Hedgehog via MicroRNA miR-7 Facilitates Notch-Induced Tumourigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Da Ros, Vanina G.; Gutierrez-Perez, Irene; Ferres-Marco, Dolors; Dominguez, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fine-tuned Notch and Hedgehog signalling pathways via attenuators and dampers have long been recognized as important mechanisms to ensure the proper size and differentiation of many organs and tissues. This notion is further supported by identification of mutations in these pathways in human cancer cells. However, although it is common that the Notch and Hedgehog pathways influence growth and patterning within the same organ through the establishment of organizing regions, the cross-talk between these two pathways and how the distinct organizing activities are integrated during growth is poorly understood. Here, in an unbiased genetic screen in the Drosophila melanogaster eye, we found that tumour-like growth was provoked by cooperation between the microRNA miR-7 and the Notch pathway. Surprisingly, the molecular basis of this cooperation between miR-7 and Notch converged on the silencing of Hedgehog signalling. In mechanistic terms, miR-7 silenced the interference hedgehog (ihog) Hedgehog receptor, while Notch repressed expression of the brother of ihog (boi) Hedgehog receptor. Tumourigenesis was induced co-operatively following Notch activation and reduced Hedgehog signalling, either via overexpression of the microRNA or through specific down-regulation of ihog, hedgehog, smoothened, or cubitus interruptus or via overexpression of the cubitus interruptus repressor form. Conversely, increasing Hedgehog signalling prevented eye overgrowth induced by the microRNA and Notch pathway. Further, we show that blocking Hh signal transduction in clones of cells mutant for smoothened also enhance the organizing activity and growth by Delta-Notch signalling in the wing primordium. Together, these findings uncover a hitherto unsuspected tumour suppressor role for the Hedgehog signalling and reveal an unanticipated cooperative antagonism between two pathways extensively used in growth control and cancer. PMID:23667323

  17. First report of acariasis by Caparinia tripilis in African hedgehogs, (Atelerix albiventris), in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Andrés; Troyo, Adriana; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger

    2013-01-01

    The African hedgehog is one of the newly imported exotic pets which have been observed with increasing regularity in veterinary clinics in Costa Rica. Despite their popularity, information about their diseases is scarce. Within skin diseases of hedgehogs, mange caused by Caparinia spp. is a common diagnosis in other countries. Two adult African hedgehogs, one male and one female, were brought to a private clinic in Heredia, Costa Rica, with chronic pruritic dermatitis, scabs, nearly complete loss of spines, lethargy, dehydration, and weight loss. During physical exam, deposits of dry seborrhea were taken and processed for diagnosis. Microscopic examination revealed psoroptid mites identified as Caparinia tripilis. This is the first report of the presence of Caparinia tripilis in Costa Rica and, to the authors' knowledge, the rest of Central America. PMID:24252963

  18. Surgical and medical management of a uterine spindle cell tumor in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Done, Lisa B; Deem, Sharon L; Fiorello, Christine V

    2007-12-01

    A 5-yr-old female African hedgehog (Ateleris albiventris) presented with hematuria. Vulvar culture results revealed a 4+ growth of Enterococcus sp. and gamma-Streptococcus sp. susceptible to trimethoprim sulfa and enrofloxacin. Ultrasound evaluation of the abdomen revealed an unidentifiable tubular structure in the region of the reproductive tract. An exploratory laparotomy and ovariohysterectomy were performed. Pathologic studies of the uterus showed a uterine spindle cell tumor, uterine endometrial polyp, uterine adenomyosis, and a possible acute infarct resulting in uterine wall necrosis. Hematuria did not reoccur, and the hedgehog lived for another 19 mo until she died from an oral squamous cell carcinoma. To date, this is the first report of a uterine spindle cell tumor in an African hedgehog. PMID:18229871

  19. The Crosstalk of mTOR/S6K1 and Hedgehog pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Ding, Qingqing; Yen, Chia-Jui; Xia, Weiya; Izzo, Julie G.; Lang, Jing-Yu; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Jennifer L.; Miller, Stephanie A.; Wang, Xuemei; Lee, Dung-Fang; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Huo, Longfei; LaBaff, Adam M.; Liu, Dong-Ping; Huang, Tzu-Hsuan; Lai, Chien-Chen; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Buttar, Navtej S.; Wang, Kenneth K.; Wu, Yun; Wang, Huamin; Ajani, Jaffer; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2012-01-01

    Summary Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the most prevalent esophageal cancer type in the United States. TNFα/mTOR pathway is known to mediate the development of EAC. Additionally, aberrant activation of Gli1, downstream effector of hedgehog pathway, has been observed in EAC. In this study, we found that activated mTOR/S6K1 pathway promotes Gli1 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function through S6K1-mediated Gli1 phosphorylation at Ser84, which releases Gli1 from its endogenous inhibitor, SuFu. Moreover, elimination of S6K1 activation by mTOR pathway inhibitor enhances the killing effects of the hedgehog pathway inhibitor. Together, our results established a crosstalk between mTOR/S6K1 and the hedgehog pathways, which provides not only a mechanism for SMO-independent Gli1 activation but also a rationale for combination therapy for EAC. PMID:22439934

  20. Histopathologic study of eosinophilic bronchointerstitial pneumonia caused by Crenosoma striatum in the hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Mousapour, Aliasghar; Dozouri, Rohollah; Eshkevari, Shahab Ramezanpour; Nikzad, Mohammad; Nikzad, Reza; Omidzahir, Shila

    2014-06-01

    Crenosoma striatum is a species of parasitic nematodes from the family Crenosomatidae responsible for pathologic lung lesions in the hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus). Infection with C. striatum can cause weight loss, dry cough, and bronchitis. In the present study, hedgehogs killed by road accidents, or trapped and found dead on farms in different parts of Mazandaran province (Iran), were transferred to the laboratory. After dissection, parasite samples collected from the lung were placed into 70% alcohol. After clarification with lactophenol and subsequent staining, the nematodes were identified as C. striatum according to previously published guidelines. For histopathologic examination, lung samples were collected. The tissues were fixed and following routine processing, sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Microscopic diagnoses included hyperemia, eosinophilic bronchointerstitial pneumonia, thickening of the interstitium, and eosinophilic microabscesses in bronchial airways. Eosinophilic pneumonia was characterized by eosinophil and other mononuclear leukocyte infiltration within the lung interstitium. Crenosoma striatum can lead to mortality in hedgehogs. PMID:25000695

  1. Vector-borne agents detected in fleas of the northern white-breasted hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Hornok, Sándor; Földvári, Gábor; Rigó, Krisztina; Meli, Marina L; Tóth, Mária; Molnár, Viktor; Gönczi, Enikő; Farkas, Róbert; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2014-01-01

    This is the first large-scale molecular investigation of fleas from a geographically widespread and highly urbanized species, the northern white-breasted hedgehog. In this study, 759 fleas (the majority were Archaeopsylla erinacei) collected from 134 hedgehogs were molecularly analyzed individually or in pools for the presence of three groups of vector-borne pathogens. All flea samples were positive for rickettsiae: In two samples (1.5%) Rickettsia helvetica and in 10% of the others a novel rickettsia genotype were identified. Additionally, Bartonella henselae (the causative agent of cat scratch disease in humans) was demonstrated in one flea (0.7%), and hemoplasmas of the hemofelis group were identified in seven other samples (5.2%). The findings of vector-borne agents not detected before in A. erinacei fleas broaden the range of those diseases of veterinary-medical importance, of which hedgehogs may play a role in the epidemiology. PMID:24359423

  2. Streptococcus pyogenes Infection in a Free-Living European Hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus).

    PubMed

    Franklinos, Lydia H V; Efstratiou, Androulla; Macgregor, Shaheed K; John, Shinto K; Hopkins, Timothy; Cunningham, Andrew A; Lawson, Becki

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, a common pathogen of humans, was isolated from the carcass of a free-living European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) found in northern England in June 2014. The animal had abscessation of the deep right cervical lymph node, mesenteric lymph nodes and liver. The S. pyogenes strain isolated from the lesions, peritoneal and pleural cavities was characterised as emm 28, which can be associated with invasive disease in humans. This is the first known report of S. pyogenes in a hedgehog and in any free-living wild animal that has been confirmed by gene sequencing. As close associations between wild hedgehogs and people in England are common, we hypothesise that this case might have resulted from anthroponotic infection. PMID:26242215

  3. Sebaceous gland carcinoma and mammary gland carcinoma in an African hedgehog (Ateletrix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Matute, Alonso Reyes; Bernal, Adriana Mendez; Lezama, José Ramírez; Guadalupe, Manzano Pech Linaloe; Antonio, Galicia Avalos Marco

    2014-09-01

    A sebaceous carcinoma was diagnosed, together with a mammary carcinoma, in an adult African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). The first neoplasm was located in the subcutaneous tissue of the neck and extended towards the axillary area of the chest. The second was located in the subcutaneous left caudal abdominal region. The purpose of this paper is to report the histopathologic and ultrastructural features of these neoplasms. Although there is little information about diseases affecting this species, it is known that neoplastic disorders are fairly common in African hedgehogs. The mammary carcinoma is considered to be the most common neoplasm in these animals; however, the presentation of sebaceous carcinoma is rare. In hedgehogs, the simultaneous presence of two neoplasms is common, which is why special attention should be paid to the presentation of other tumors during the early detection of a neoplastic process as this will greatly facilitate the optimal treatment and improve the long-term prognosis of affected animals. PMID:25314843

  4. ZnO three-dimensional hedgehog-like nanostructure: synthesis, growth mechanism and optical enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiqiang; Chu, Sheng; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Shijin; Jin, Bo

    2014-07-01

    The 3D hedgehog-like ZnO nanostructures were synthesized on Si substrate through chemical vapor deposition process. The morphology and structure of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, as well as transmission electron microscopy. The ZnO 3D hedgehog-like architectures were found to consist of a central nucleus and multiple side-growing nanowires with diameter of 100-250 nm and length up to 10 µm. The growth mechanism of the hedgehog-like ZnO nanostructures was studied. It revealed a three-step process during the entire growth. Finally, room temperature photoluminescence spectra of ZnO 3D nanostructures showed that the center excitation would render much stronger PL emission intensity. Furthermore, simulation results indicated that the enhanced emission came from light-trapping-induced excitation light field enhancement.

  5. Sox11 Is Required to Maintain Proper Levels of Hedgehog Signaling during Vertebrate Ocular Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pillai-Kastoori, Lakshmi; Wen, Wen; Wilson, Stephen G.; Strachan, Erin; Lo-Castro, Adriana; Fichera, Marco; Musumeci, Sebastiano A.; Lehmann, Ordan J.; Morris, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular coloboma is a sight-threatening malformation caused by failure of the choroid fissure to close during morphogenesis of the eye, and is frequently associated with additional anomalies, including microphthalmia and cataracts. Although Hedgehog signaling is known to play a critical role in choroid fissure closure, genetic regulation of this pathway remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the transcription factor Sox11 is required to maintain specific levels of Hedgehog signaling during ocular development. Sox11-deficient zebrafish embryos displayed delayed and abnormal lens formation, coloboma, and a specific reduction in rod photoreceptors, all of which could be rescued by treatment with the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor cyclopamine. We further demonstrate that the elevated Hedgehog signaling in Sox11-deficient zebrafish was caused by a large increase in shha transcription; indeed, suppressing Shha expression rescued the ocular phenotypes of sox11 morphants. Conversely, over-expression of sox11 induced cyclopia, a phenotype consistent with reduced levels of Sonic hedgehog. We screened DNA samples from 79 patients with microphthalmia, anophthalmia, or coloboma (MAC) and identified two novel heterozygous SOX11 variants in individuals with coloboma. In contrast to wild type human SOX11 mRNA, mRNA containing either variant failed to rescue the lens and coloboma phenotypes of Sox11-deficient zebrafish, and both exhibited significantly reduced transactivation ability in a luciferase reporter assay. Moreover, decreased gene dosage from a segmental deletion encompassing the SOX11 locus resulted in microphthalmia and related ocular phenotypes. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role for Sox11 in controlling Hedgehog signaling, and suggests that SOX11 variants contribute to pediatric eye disorders. PMID:25010521

  6. Spontaneous proliferative lesions and tumors of the uterus of captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Mikaelian, Igor; Reavill, Drury R; Practice, Avian

    2004-06-01

    Fifteen captive female African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), 3- to 5-yr-old, were diagnosed with proliferative uterine lesions (n = 28). Lesions were associated with vaginal bleeding in all cases, hematuria in 11 of 13 cases, and weight loss in 7 of 12 cases. Lesions were multiple in eight cases and single in seven cases. The lesions identified were 13 adenosarcomas, 7 endometrial stromal sarcomas, 6 endometrial polyps, 1 adenoleiomyosarcoma, and 1 adenoleiomyoma. In one animal with adenosarcoma, peritoneal seeding was detected at the time of hysterectomy. Mean survival time was 303 days (n = 10). Ovariohysterectomy allows prolonged survival of hedgehogs with uterine tumors. PMID:15305518

  7. Cortical and medullary somatosensory projections to the cochlear nuclear complex in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A; Künzle, H

    1997-01-17

    Various tracer substances were injected into the spinal cord, the dorsal column nuclei, the trigeminal nuclear complex and the somatosensory cortex in Madagascan hedgehog tenrecs. With the exception of the cases injected exclusively into the spinal cord all injections gave rise to sparse, but distinct anterograde projections to the cochlear nuclear complex, particularly the granular cell domain within and outside of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. Among these cochlear afferents the projection from the primary somatosensory cortex is the most remarkable because the hedgehog tenrec has one of the lowest encephalisation indices among mammals and a similar cortico-cochlear connection has not been demonstrated so far in other species. PMID:9121680

  8. Dataset for phenotypic classification of genetic modifiers of smoothened and Hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Marada, Suresh; Truong, Ashley; Ogden, Stacey K

    2016-06-01

    This data article includes supporting information for the research article entitled "The Small GTPase Rap1 is a Modulator of Hedgehog Signaling" [1]. Drosophila wing phenotypes induced by expression of a dominant negative Smoothened (Smo) mutant were cataloged into five distinct classes. Class distributions observed following expression of dominant negative Smo in control and sensitized backgrounds were quantified to serve as references for strength of phenotypic modification. Shifts in class distribution of Hedgehog (Hh) wing phenotypes resulting from introduction of loss-of-function alleles of select Ras family G protein genes and the Hh pathway regulators Fused and Suppressor of Fused are shown. PMID:27014736

  9. Advanced diagnostic approaches and current management of internal disorders of select species (rodents, sugar gliders, hedgehogs).

    PubMed

    Evans, Erika E; Souza, Marcy J

    2010-09-01

    African pygmy and European hedgehogs, sugar gliders, and rodents such as rats, mice, gerbils, hamsters, guinea pigs, and chinchillas are becoming increasingly popular as pets in the United States, and more practitioners are being asked to examine, diagnose, and treat these animals for a bevy of disorders and diseases. Many procedures and techniques used in traditional small and large animal medicine are used for these species, with minor adaptations or considerations. This article examines available diagnostic tools and treatment methodologies for use in hedgehogs, sugar gliders, and selected rodents. PMID:20682430

  10. Context-dependent Regulation of the GLI Code in Cancer by HEDGEHOG and Non-HEDGEHOG Signals

    PubMed Central

    Stecca, Barbara; Ruiz i Altaba, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    A surprisingly large and unrelated number of human tumors depend on sustained HEDGEHOG-GLI (HH-GLI) signaling for growth. This includes cancers of the skin, brain, colon, lungs, prostate, blood and pancreas among others. The basis of such commonality is not obvious. HH-GLI signaling has also been shown to be active in and required for cancer stem cell survival and expansion in different cancer types, and its activity is essential not only for tumor growth but also for recurrence and metastatic growth, two key medical problems. Here we review recent data on the role of HH-GLI signaling in cancer focusing on the role of the GLI code, the regulated combinatorial and cooperative function of repressive and activating forms of all Gli transcription factors, as a signaling nexus that integrates not only HH signals but also those of multiple tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Recent data support the view that the context-dependent regulation of the GLI code by oncogenes and tumor suppressors constitutes a basis for the widespread involvement of GLI1 in human cancers, representing a perversion of its normal role in the control of stem cell lineages during normal development and homeostasis. PMID:20083481

  11. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:27543868

  12. Genetic drivers of metastatic dissemination in sonic hedgehog medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Noah C; Kalra, Ricky R; Dubuc, Adrian; Sivakumar, Walavan; Pedone, Carolyn A; Wu, Xiaochong; Taylor, Michael D; Fults, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination (LMD), the metastatic spread of tumor cells via the cerebrospinal fluid to the brain and spinal cord, is an ominous prognostic sign for patients with the pediatric brain tumor medulloblastoma. The need to reduce the risk of LMD has driven the development of aggressive treatment regimens, which cause disabling neurotoxic side effects in long-term survivors. Transposon-mediated mutagenesis studies in mice have revealed numerous candidate metastasis genes. Understanding how these genes drive LMD will require functional assessment using in vivo and cell culture models of medulloblastoma. We analyzed two genes that were sites of frequent transposon insertion and highly expressed in human medulloblastomas: Arnt (aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator) and Gdi2 (GDP dissociation inhibitor 2). Here we show that ectopic expression of Arnt and Gdi2 promoted LMD in mice bearing Sonic hedgehog (Shh)-induced medulloblastomas. We overexpressed Arnt and Gdi2 in a human medulloblastoma cell line (DAOY) and an immortalized, nontransformed cell line derived from mouse granule neuron precursors (SHH-NPD) and quantified migration, invasiveness, and anchorage-independent growth, cell traits that are associated with metastatic competence in carcinomas. In SHH-NPD cells. Arnt and Gdi2 stimulated all three traits. In DAOY cells, Arnt had the same effects, but Gdi2 stimulated invasiveness only. These results support a mechanism whereby Arnt and Gdi2 cause cells to detach from the primary tumor mass by increasing cell motility and invasiveness. By conferring to tumor cells the ability to proliferate without surface attachment, Arnt and Gdi2 favor the formation of stable colonies of cells capable of seeding the leptomeninges. PMID:25059231

  13. Diencephalic connections of the superior colliculus in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1996-10-01

    Using different tracer substances the pathways connecting the superior colliculus with the diencephalon were studied in the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi), a nocturnal insectivore with tiny eyes, a small and little differentiated superior colliculus and a visual cortex with no obvious fourth granular layer. The most prominent tecto-thalamic projection terminated in the ipsilateral dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. The entire region receiving contralateral retinal afferents was labeled with variable density. In addition, there was a widespread, homogeneously distributed collicular input to the lateralis posterior-pulvinar complex and a distinct tectal projection to the suprageniculate nucleus. The latter projections were bilateral with a clear ipsilateral predominance. Among the intra- and paralaminar nuclei the centralis lateralis complex was most heavily labeled on both sides, followed by the nucleus centralis medialis. The paralamellar portion of the nucleus medialis dorsalis and the nucleus parafascicularis received sparse projections. A clear projection to the nucleus ventralis medialis could not be demonstrated but its presence was not entirely excluded either. There were also projections to medial thalamic nuclei, particularly the reuniens complex and the nucleus paraventricularis thalami. The main tecto-subthalamic target regions were the zona incerta, the dorsal hypothalamus and distinct subdivisons of the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus. These regions also gave rise to projections to the superior colliculus, as did the intergeniculate leaflet. The pathways oriented toward the visual or frontal cortex and the projections possibly involved in limbic and circadian mechanisms were compared with the connectivity patterns reported in mammals with more differentiated brains. Particular attention was given to the tenrec's prominent tecto-geniculate projection, the presumed W- or K-pathway directed toward the supragranular layers. PMID:8911930

  14. Trigeminal projections to thalamus and subthalamus in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1998-09-01

    The objective of the present study was the identification and characterization of the trigemino-diencephalic target areas in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec in order to get a more comprehensive view on the mammalian somatosensory thalamus, its evolution and representation in different species. Such an analysis has been considered important because in lower mammals the head and face are relatively well represented, but their ascending trigeminal projections have scarcely been analysed. Following injections of different tracer substances into the rostral and caudal portions of the trigeminal nuclear complex the most prominent area of termination was found in the medial ventroposterior nucleus. These projections were patchy and scarcely overlapped the region previously shown to receive spinal and dorsal column nuclear afferents. On the basis of the laterality and the intensity of the projections, two subdivisions were distinguished, the principal portion and the accessory portion receiving a dense contralateral and a weak bilateral input, respectively. They were considered equivalents to the magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of the medial ventroposterior nucleus in more differentiated mammals. In the latter species, however, the overlap between trigeminal and parabrachial fibres appears less extensive than in the tenrec. In addition, a weak bilateral projection was shown from the caudal trigeminal nucleus to the caudal and dorsal subdivision of the nucleus submedius. There was little, if any evidence for a trigeminal projection to the intralaminar nuclei and we failed to identify a correlate to the posterior nuclear complex of higher mammals. On the other hand, there was a distinct contralateral projection to the ventral portion of the zona incerta. This projection was of similar strength as the projection to the medial ventroposterior nucleus; it supports the notion that the zona incerta may play a crucial role in relaying trigeminal information

  15. Targeting the sonic hedgehog pathway in keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changchun; Amm, Hope M; DeVilliers, Patricia; Wu, Yixin; Deatherage, Joseph R; Liu, Zhongyu; MacDougall, Mary

    2012-08-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) may occur sporadically or associated with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is a benign aggressive tumor of odontogenic epithelial origin with a high rate of recurrence. A primary human keratocystic odontogenic tumor cell population, KCOT-1, has been established from a tumor explant culture. The KCOT-1 cells were characterized by growth rate, gene expression profiles of major tooth enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), ameloblastin (AMBN), amelotin (AMTN), tumor-related proteins enamelysin (MMP-20), kallikrein-4 (KLK-4), and odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cytokeratin 14 (CK14) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, expression of the members of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway, SHH, patched (PTCH-1), smoothened (SMO), GLI-1, and GLI-2 and of the NOTCH signaling pathway, NOTCH-1, NOTCH-2, NOTCH-3, JAG-2 (Jagged-2), and Delta-like-1 (DLL-1) were evaluated. KCOT-1 cells were treated with SMO antagonist cyclopamine. We found that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner and that the effects of cyclopamine were abolished by adding SHH protein. The protein expression of the SHH pathway was down-regulated by cyclopamine, further confirming that cyclopamine inhibits the SHH signaling pathway; SHH down-regulation correlated with the down-regulation of the NOTCH signaling pathway as well. In conclusion, using an established KCOT-1 cell population, we characterized the gene expression profiles related to the EMPs, SHH, and NOTCH signaling pathway and confirmed that cyclopamine significantly arrested the growth of KCOT-1 cells and may be a viable agent as a novel therapeutic. PMID:22679015

  16. Differential developmental strategies by Sonic hedgehog in thalamus and hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanfeng; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The traditional concept of diencephalon (thalamus plus hypothalamus) and with it the entire traditional subdivision of the developing neural tube are being challenged by novel insights obtained by mapping the expression of key developmental genes. A model in which the hypothalamus is placed in the most rostral portion of the neural tube, followed caudally by a diencephalon formed by prethalamus, thalamus and pretectum has been proposed. The adult thalamus and hypothalamus are quite unlike each other in connectivity and functions. Here we review work on the role of the secreted morphogen protein Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the developing diencephalon and hypothalamic region to show how different these two regions are also from this point of view. Shh from the prechordal plate (PCP) induces and patterns the hypothalamus but there is no evidence that this role is fulfilled by a morphogen gradient. Later, the hypothalamic primordium itself expresses Shh and a large part of the hypothalamus belongs to the Shh lineage, including the ventral domains. Neural Shh is necessary to complete the specification (lateral hypothalamus), differentiation and growth of the hypothalamus. Although Gli2A is the major effector of Shh in this region, hypothalamic specification also depends on the suppression of Gli3R by Shh secreted by the PCP as well as the neuroepithelium. The thalamus is patterned by an Shh morphogen gradient originated in the ZLI following similar mechanisms to those in the spinal cord. The thalamus itself does not belong to the Shh lineage. Gli2A is necessary for appropriate growth and specification of the thalamic nuclei, to the exception of the medial and intralaminar groups (limbic-related), whose development depends on Gli3R. Beyond specification and patterning, the scarce data available about cell sorting and aggregation in these two regions shows key differences between them as well. In summary, not only expression patterns but also developmental mechanisms support

  17. Pentoxifylline inhibits liver fibrosis via hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hua, Juan; Guo, Chun-Xia; Wang, Wei-Xian; Wang, Bao-Ju; Yang, Dong-Liang; Wei, Ping; Lu, Yin-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Infection of schistosomiasis japonica may eventually lead to liver fibrosis, and no effective antifibrotic therapies are available but liver transplantation. Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway has been involved in the process and is a promising target for treating liver fibrosis. This study aimed to explore the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) on liver fibrosis induced by schistosoma japonicum infection by inhibiting the HH signaling pathway. Phorbol12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) was used to induce human acute mononuclear leukemia cells THP-1 to differentiate into macrophages. The THP-1-derived macrophages were stimulated by soluble egg antigen (SEA), and the culture supernatants were collected for detection of activation of macrophages. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) was used to detect the cytotoxicity of the culture supernatant and PTX on the LX-2 cells. The LX-2 cells were administered with activated culture supernatant from macrophages and(or) PTX to detect the transforming growth factor-β gene expression. The mRNA expression of shh and gli-1, key parts in HH signaling pathway, was detected. The mRNA expression of shh and gli-1 was increased in LX-2 cells treated with activated macrophages-derived culture supernatant, suggesting HH signaling pathway may play a key role in the activation process of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The expression of these genes decreased in LX-2 cells co-cultured with both activated macrophages-derived culture supernatant and PTX, indicating PTX could suppress the activation process of HSCs. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that PTX prevents liver fibrogenesis in vitro by the suppression of HH signaling pathway. PMID:27376806

  18. Ticks and the city: ectoparasites of the Northern white-breasted hedgehog (Erinaceus roumanicus) in an urban park.

    PubMed

    Földvári, Gábor; Rigó, Krisztina; Jablonszky, Mónika; Biró, Nóra; Majoros, Gábor; Molnár, Viktor; Tóth, Mária

    2011-12-01

    The European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) is known to host several ectoparasites and also tick-borne pathogens, but there is scant information on its eastern relative, the Northern white-breasted hedgehog (Erinaceus roumanicus). We have studied an urban population of E. roumanicus in a city park of central Budapest, Hungary, for 2 years to investigate their tick and flea species. A total of 5063 ticks and 818 fleas were collected from 247 hedgehogs (including 46 recaptures). Ectoparasite prevalence and intensity differed significantly (p<0.001) between the 2 study years attributable to the enhanced tick removal rate due to anaesthesia used in the second year. The most common tick species was Ixodes ricinus (93.7%) followed by unidentified Ixodes larvae (5%). Only 57 hedgehog ticks (I. hexagonus) were removed from 22 hedgehogs. One I. acuminatus and one Hyalomma marginatum nymph were also collected. Mean intensity of tick infestation was 26.5 (range: 0-155 ticks/host) and mean intensity of flea infestation was 6.6 (range: 0-78 fleas/host). Most fleas (99.4%) collected were hedgehog fleas (Archaeopsylla erinacei), dog fleas (Ctenocephalides canis) were found on 2 hedgehogs. Hyalomma marginatum has previously not been found in Hungary, and I. acuminatus was only reported sporadically before. The large number of ectoparasites and the 2 imported tick species may thus survive in close proximity to humans if hedgehogs are present. This calls attention to the risk of possible tick-borne human infections that urban hedgehogs can pose. PMID:22108019

  19. Abnormal hematologic findings in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Helmer, P J

    2000-06-01

    A 4-year-old African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was examined for weight loss and hematochezia, and was subsequently diagnosed with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma. Abnormal hematological findings included marked leukocytosis with lymphocytosis and atypical circulating lymphocytes. This report represents the first documentation of hemogram abnormalities associated with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma in this species. PMID:10857034

  20. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Couture, Émilie L; Langlois, Isabelle; Santamaria-Bouvier, Ariane; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2015-12-01

    A cutaneous mass was surgically excised in a 4-year-old African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). A squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed based on histopathological examination and local recurrence following excision is strongly suspected. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first well-documented report of a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in this species. PMID:26663924

  1. The Zn finger protein Iguana impacts Hedgehog signaling by promoting ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Andrew M; Wilkinson, Alex W; Backer, Chelsea B; Lapan, Sylvain W; Gutzman, Jennifer H; Cheeseman, Iain M; Reddien, Peter W

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is critical for metazoan development and requires cilia for pathway activity. The gene iguana was discovered in zebrafish as required for Hedgehog signaling, and encodes a novel Zn finger protein. Planarians are flatworms with robust regenerative capacities and utilize epidermal cilia for locomotion. RNA interference of Smed-iguana in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea caused cilia loss and failure to regenerate new cilia, but did not cause defects similar to those observed in hedgehog(RNAi) animals. Smed-iguana gene expression was also similar in pattern to the expression of multiple other ciliogenesis genes, but was not required for expression of these ciliogenesis genes. iguana-defective zebrafish had too few motile cilia in pronephric ducts and in Kupffer's vesicle. Kupffer's vesicle promotes left-right asymmetry and iguana mutant embryos had left-right asymmetry defects. Finally, human Iguana proteins (dZIP1 and dZIP1L) localize to the basal bodies of primary cilia and, together, are required for primary cilia formation. Our results indicate that a critical and broadly conserved function for Iguana is in ciliogenesis and that this function has come to be required for Hedgehog signaling in vertebrates. PMID:19852954

  2. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris)

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Émilie L.; Langlois, Isabelle; Santamaria-Bouvier, Ariane; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2015-01-01

    A cutaneous mass was surgically excised in a 4-year-old African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). A squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed based on histopathological examination and local recurrence following excision is strongly suspected. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first well-documented report of a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in this species. PMID:26663924

  3. Accumulation of anticoagulant rodenticides in a non-target insectivore, the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus).

    PubMed

    Dowding, Claire V; Shore, Richard F; Worgan, Andrew; Baker, Philip J; Harris, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Studies on exposure of non-targets to anticoagulant rodenticides have largely focussed on predatory birds and mammals; insectivores have rarely been studied. We investigated the exposure of 120 European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from throughout Britain to first- and second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs and SGARs) using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection (HPLC) and liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS). The proportion of hedgehogs with liver SGAR concentrations detected by HPLC was 3-13% per compound, 23% overall. LCMS identified much higher prevalence for difenacoum and bromadiolone, mainly because of greater ability to detect low-level contamination. The overall proportion of hedgehogs with LCMS-detected residues was 57.5% (SGARs alone) and 66.7% (FGARs and SGARs combined); 27 (22.5%) hedgehogs contained >1 rodenticide. Exposure of insectivores and predators to anticoagulant rodenticides appears to be similar. The greater sensitivity of LCMS suggests that hitherto exposure of non-targets is likely to have been under-estimated using HPLC techniques. PMID:19674821

  4. Integument Mycobiota of Wild European Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Molina-López, R. A.; Adelantado, C.; Arosemena, E. L.; Obón, E.; Darwich, L.; Calvo, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    There are some reports about the risk of manipulating wild hedgehogs since they can be reservoirs of potential zoonotic agents like dermatophytes. The aim of this study was to describe the integument mycobiota, with special attention to dermatophytes of wild European hedgehogs. Samples from spines and fur were cultured separately in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) with antibiotic and dermatophyte test medium (DTM) plates. Nineteen different fungal genera were isolated from 91 cultures of 102 hedgehogs. The most prevalent genera were Cladosporium (79.1%), Penicillium (74.7%), Alternaria (64.8%), and Rhizopus (63.7%). A lower prevalence of Aspergillus (P = 0,035; χ2 = 8,633) and Arthrinium (P = 0,043; χ2 = 8,173) was isolated during the spring time and higher frequencies of Fusarium (P = 0,015; χ2 = 10,533) during the autumn. The prevalence of Acremonium was significantly higher in young animals (70%, 26/37) than in adults (30%, 11/37) (P = 0,019; χ2 = 5,915). Moreover, the majority of the saprophytic species that grew at the SDA culture were also detected at the DTM. Finally, no cases of ringworm were diagnosed and no dermatophytes spp. were isolated. Concluding, this study provides the first description of fungal mycobiota of the integument of wild European hedgehogs in Spain, showing a large number of saprophytic species and the absence of dermatophytes. PMID:23762757

  5. Integument Mycobiota of Wild European Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from Catalonia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Molina-López, R A; Adelantado, C; Arosemena, E L; Obón, E; Darwich, L; Calvo, M A

    2012-01-01

    There are some reports about the risk of manipulating wild hedgehogs since they can be reservoirs of potential zoonotic agents like dermatophytes. The aim of this study was to describe the integument mycobiota, with special attention to dermatophytes of wild European hedgehogs. Samples from spines and fur were cultured separately in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) with antibiotic and dermatophyte test medium (DTM) plates. Nineteen different fungal genera were isolated from 91 cultures of 102 hedgehogs. The most prevalent genera were Cladosporium (79.1%), Penicillium (74.7%), Alternaria (64.8%), and Rhizopus (63.7%). A lower prevalence of Aspergillus (P = 0,035; χ (2) = 8,633) and Arthrinium (P = 0,043; χ (2) = 8,173) was isolated during the spring time and higher frequencies of Fusarium (P = 0,015; χ (2) = 10,533) during the autumn. The prevalence of Acremonium was significantly higher in young animals (70%, 26/37) than in adults (30%, 11/37) (P = 0,019; χ (2) = 5,915). Moreover, the majority of the saprophytic species that grew at the SDA culture were also detected at the DTM. Finally, no cases of ringworm were diagnosed and no dermatophytes spp. were isolated. Concluding, this study provides the first description of fungal mycobiota of the integument of wild European hedgehogs in Spain, showing a large number of saprophytic species and the absence of dermatophytes. PMID:23762757

  6. Characterization of a novel betacoronavirus related to middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in European hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Corman, Victor Max; Kallies, René; Philipps, Heike; Göpner, Gertraude; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Eckerle, Isabella; Brünink, Sebastian; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix

    2014-01-01

    Bats are known to host viruses closely related to important human coronaviruses (HCoVs), such as HCoV-229E, severe-acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV). As RNA viruses may coevolve with their hosts, we sought to investigate the closest sister taxon to bats, the Eulipotyphla, and screened European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from Germany for CoV by nested reverse transcriptase PCR. A novel betacoronavirus species in a phylogenetic sister relationship to MERS-CoV and clade c bat CoVs was detected and characterized on the whole-genome level. A total of 58.9% of hedgehog fecal specimens were positive for the novel CoV (EriCoV) at 7.9 log10 mean RNA copies per ml. EriCoV RNA concentrations were higher in the intestine than in other solid organs, blood, or urine. Detailed analyses of the full hedgehog intestine showed the highest EriCoV concentrations in lower gastrointestinal tract specimens, compatible with viral replication in the lower intestine and fecal-oral transmission. Thirteen of 27 (48.2%) hedgehog sera contained non-neutralizing antibodies against MERS-CoV. The animal origins of this betacoronavirus clade that includes MERS-CoV may thus include both bat and nonbat hosts. PMID:24131722

  7. Ectoparasites infestation of free-ranging hedgehog (Etelerix algirus) in north western Libya.

    PubMed

    Hosni, M M; Maghrbi, A A El

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of ectoparasites in hedgehogs (Etelerix algirus) in north western region of Libya. Seventy hedgehogs were sampled, and 39 (55.7%) were infested with external parasites. A total of 44 ticks, 491 fleas were collected from the infested hedgehogs and four species of ectoparasites were identified, one mite (Sarcoptes scabiei), one tick (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus) and two fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis and Ctenocephalides canis). For ectoparasites, 10/39 (25.6%) were infested by S. scabiei, 8/39 (20.5%) by Rh. appendiculatus and 11/39 (28.2%) by fleas. The prevalence of mixed infestation with S. scabiei and C. canis was 3(7.7%), Rh. appendiculatus and C. canis was 2 (5.1%) and infestation by two species of fleas was 5 (12.8%). The overall mixed infestation was 10 (25.6%). We concluded that the hedgehogs may play an important role in spreading external parasites and transmission of diseases from one region to another and from wildlife animals to domestic animals and human. PMID:26623333

  8. Symmetry of the d-vector hedgehogs in superfluid 3HeA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomaa, M. M.

    1990-08-01

    Core structures of axisymmetric ď-vector monopole states in superfluid 3HeA are classified in terms of discrete symmetries. The pointlike order-parameter singularity may be resolved via the formation of a topologically stable half-integer disclination ring; phase transitions may occur between these ď-hedgehogs.

  9. Seminiferous cord formation is regulated by hedgehog signaling in the marsupial.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin Wei; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-03-01

    The signaling molecule DHH, secreted by Sertoli cells, has essential regulatory functions in testicular differentiation. DHH is required for the differentiation of peritubular myoid cells that line the seminiferous cords and steroidogenic Leydig cells. The testicular cords in Dhh-null male mice lack a basal lamina and develop abnormally. To date, the DHH-signaling pathway has never been examined outside of any eutherian mammals. This study examined the effects of inhibition of DHH signaling in a marsupial mammal, the tammar wallaby, by culturing gonads in vitro in the presence of the hedgehog-signaling inhibitors cyclopamine and forskolin. Disruption of hedgehog signaling in the tammar testes caused highly disorganized cord formation. SOX9 protein remained strongly expressed in Sertoli cells, laminin distribution was highly fragmented, and germ cells were distributed around the cortical regions of treated testes in an ovarianlike morphology. This suggests that hedgehog signaling regulates cord formation in the tammar wallaby testis as it does in eutherian mammals. These data demonstrate that the hedgehog pathway has been highly conserved in mammals for at least 160 million years. PMID:22133695

  10. Ectoparasites infestation of free-ranging hedgehog (Etelerix algirus) in north western Libya

    PubMed Central

    Hosni, M.M.; Maghrbi, A.A. El

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of ectoparasites in hedgehogs (Etelerix algirus) in north western region of Libya. Seventy hedgehogs were sampled, and 39 (55.7%) were infested with external parasites. A total of 44 ticks, 491 fleas were collected from the infested hedgehogs and four species of ectoparasites were identified, one mite (Sarcoptes scabiei), one tick (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus) and two fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis and Ctenocephalides canis). For ectoparasites, 10/39 (25.6%) were infested by S. scabiei, 8/39 (20.5%) by Rh. appendiculatus and 11/39 (28.2%) by fleas. The prevalence of mixed infestation with S. scabiei and C. canis was 3(7.7%), Rh. appendiculatus and C. canis was 2 (5.1%) and infestation by two species of fleas was 5 (12.8%). The overall mixed infestation was 10 (25.6%). We concluded that the hedgehogs may play an important role in spreading external parasites and transmission of diseases from one region to another and from wildlife animals to domestic animals and human. PMID:26623333

  11. Abnormal hematologic findings in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, P J

    2000-01-01

    A 4-year-old African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was examined for weight loss and hematochezia, and was subsequently diagnosed with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma. Abnormal hematological findings included marked leukocytosis with lymphocytosis and atypical circulating lymphocytes. This report represents the first documentation of hemogram abnormalities associated with gastrointestinal lymphosarcoma in this species. PMID:10857034

  12. GATA4 and GATA6 regulate pancreatic endoderm identity through inhibition of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shouhong; Sussel, Lori

    2016-03-01

    GATA4 and GATA6 are zinc finger transcription factors that have important functions in several mesodermal and endodermal organs, including heart, liver and pancreas. In humans, heterozygous mutations of either factor are associated with pancreatic agenesis; however, homozygous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 is necessary to disrupt pancreas development in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that arrested pancreatic development in Gata4(fl/fl); Gata6(fl/fl); Pdx1:Cre (pDKO) embryos is accompanied by the transition of ventral and dorsal pancreatic fates into intestinal or stomach lineages, respectively. These results indicate that GATA4 and GATA6 play essential roles in maintaining pancreas identity by regulating foregut endodermal fates. Remarkably, pancreatic anlagen derived from pDKO embryos also display a dramatic upregulation of hedgehog pathway components, which are normally absent from the presumptive pancreatic endoderm. Consistent with the erroneous activation of hedgehog signaling, we demonstrate that GATA4 and GATA6 are able to repress transcription through the sonic hedgehog (Shh) endoderm-specific enhancer MACS1 and that GATA-binding sites within this enhancer are necessary for this repressive activity. These studies establish the importance of GATA4/6-mediated inhibition of hedgehog signaling as a major mechanism regulating pancreatic endoderm specification during patterning of the gut tube. PMID:26932670

  13. Sonic Hedgehog: A Good Gene Gone Bad? Detection and Treatment of Genetic Abnormalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaich, Lauren E.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a case of a baby born with the genetic condition holoprosencephaly in which students explore the "Sonic hedgehog" gene, signal transduction, and the ethics of body and tissue donation. Presents a two-part assignment that features students writing an informed consent document that explains the science behind this congenital abnormality,…

  14. The transcriptional activity of Gli1 is negatively regulated by AMPK through Hedgehog partial agonism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiuran; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Xin; Yao, Yingmin; Wang, Maode; Liu, Qingguang

    2014-09-01

    The aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in a variety of malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mammalian 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a crucial role in cellular energy homeostasis. However, the interaction between the Hh and AMPK signaling pathways has not been investigated to date. In the present study, to the best of our knowlege, we report for the first time the negative regulation of glioma-associated oncogene 1 (Gli1), an important downstream effector of Hh, by the AMPK signal transduction pathway. Immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down assay showed a direct interaction between AMPK and Gli1. The overexpression of AMPK induced the downregulation of Gli1 expression, while the knockdown of AMPK upregulated Gli1 expression in a relatively short period of time (24 h or less). Our data suggest that AMPK may function as an upstream molecule that regulates Gli1 expression. Therefore, AMPK may play a role in the Hh signaling pathway, through which it regulates tumorigenesis. PMID:25017332

  15. Disruption of sonic hedgehog signaling in Ellis-van Creveld dwarfism confers protection against bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Ginns, E I; Galdzicka, M; Elston, R C; Song, Y E; Paul, S M; Egeland, J A

    2015-10-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, an autosomal recessively inherited chondrodysplastic dwarfism, is frequent among Old Order Amish of Pennsylvania. Decades of longitudinal research on bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) revealed cosegregation of high numbers of EvC and Bipolar I (BPI) cases in several large Amish families descending from the same pioneer. Despite the high prevalence of both disorders in these families, no EvC individual has ever been reported with BPI. The proximity of the EVC gene to our previously reported chromosome 4p16 BPAD locus with protective alleles, coupled with detailed clinical observations that EvC and BPI do not occur in the same individuals, led us to hypothesize that the genetic defect causing EvC in the Amish confers protection from BPI. This hypothesis is supported by a significant negative association of these two disorders when contrasted with absence of disease (P=0.029, Fisher's exact test, two-sided, verified by permutation to estimate the null distribution of the test statistic). As homozygous Amish EVC mutations causing EvC dwarfism do so by disrupting sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, our data implicate Shh signaling in the underlying pathophysiology of BPAD. Understanding how disrupted Shh signaling protects against BPI could uncover variants in the Shh pathway that cause or increase risk for this and related mood disorders. PMID:25311364

  16. The WIF domain of the human and Drosophila Wif-1 secreted factors confers specificity for Wnt or Hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, David; Sierra, Javier; Ortigão-Farias, João Ramalho; Guerrero, Isabel

    2012-10-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt signaling pathways are crucial for development as well as for adult stem cell maintenance in all organisms from Drosophila to humans. Aberrant activation of these pathways has been implicated in many types of human cancer. During evolution, organisms have developed numerous ways to fine-tune Wnt and Hh signaling. One way is through extracellular modulators that directly interact with Wnt or Hh, such as the Wnt inhibitory factor (Wif-1) family of secreted factors. Interestingly, Wif-1 family members have divergent functions in the Wnt and Hh pathways in different organisms. Whereas vertebrate Wif-1 blocks Wnt signaling, Drosophila Wif-1 [Shifted (Shf)] regulates only Hh distribution and spreading through the extracellular matrix. Here, we investigate which parts of the Shf and human Wif-1 (WIF1) proteins are responsible for functional divergence. We analyze the behavior of domain-swap (the Drosophila and human WIF domain and EGF repeats) chimeric constructs during wing development. We demonstrate that the WIF domain confers the specificity for Hh or Wg morphogen. The EGF repeats are important for the interaction of Wif-1 proteins with the extracellular matrix; Drosophila EGF repeats preferentially interact with the glypican Dally-like (Dlp) when the WIF domain belongs to human WIF1 and with Dally when the WIF domain comes from Shf. These results are important both from the evolutionary perspective and for understanding the mechanisms of morphogen distribution in a morphogenetic field. PMID:22951645

  17. RAB23 Mutations in Carpenter Syndrome Imply an Unexpected Role for Hedgehog Signaling in Cranial-Suture Development and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Dagan ; Seelow, Dominik ; Jehee, Fernanda S. ; Perlyn, Chad A. ; Alonso, Luís G. ; Bueno, Daniela F. ; Donnai, Dian ; Josifiova, Dragana ; Mathijssen, Irene M. J. ; Morton, Jenny E. V. ; Ørstavik, Karen Helene ; Sweeney, Elizabeth ; Wall, Steven A. ; Marsh, Jeffrey L. ; Nürnberg, Peter ; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita ; Wilkie, Andrew O. M. 

    2007-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, the cardinal features of which include craniosynostosis, polysyndactyly, obesity, and cardiac defects. Using homozygosity mapping, we found linkage to chromosome 6p12.1-q12 and, in 15 independent families, identified five different mutations (four truncating and one missense) in RAB23, which encodes a member of the RAB guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) family of vesicle transport proteins and acts as a negative regulator of hedgehog (HH) signaling. In 10 patients, the disease was caused by homozygosity for the same nonsense mutation, L145X, that resides on a common haplotype, indicative of a founder effect in patients of northern European descent. Surprisingly, nonsense mutations of Rab23 in open brain mice cause recessive embryonic lethality with neural-tube defects, suggesting a species difference in the requirement for RAB23 during early development. The discovery of RAB23 mutations in patients with Carpenter syndrome implicates HH signaling in cranial-suture biogenesis—an unexpected finding, given that craniosynostosis is not usually associated with mutations of other HH-pathway components—and provides a new molecular target for studies of obesity. PMID:17503333

  18. Fibroblast growth factor signals regulate a wave of Hedgehog activation that is essential for coronary vascular development.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Kory J; White, Andrew C; Park, Changwon; Smith, Craig S; Choi, Kyunghee; Long, Fanxin; Hui, Chi-chung; Ornitz, David M

    2006-06-15

    Myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease are the leading cause of death in the industrial world. Therapies employed for treating these diseases are aimed at promoting increased blood flow to cardiac tissue. Pharmacological induction of new coronary growth has recently been explored, however, clinical trials with known proangiogenic factors have been disappointing. To identify novel therapeutic targets, we have explored signaling pathways that govern embryonic coronary development. Using a combination of genetically engineered mice and an organ culture system, we identified novel roles for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Hedgehog (HH) signaling in coronary vascular development. We show that FGF signals promote coronary growth indirectly by signaling to the cardiomyoblast through redundant function of Fgfr1 and Fgfr2. Myocardial FGF signaling triggers a wave of HH activation that is essential for vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A, Vegf-B, Vegf-C, and angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) expression. We demonstrate that HH is necessary for coronary vascular development and activation of HH signaling is sufficient to promote coronary growth and to rescue coronary defects due to loss of FGF signaling. These studies implicate HH signaling as an essential regulator of coronary vascular development and as a potential therapeutic target for coronary neovascularization. Consistent with this, activation of HH signaling in the adult heart leads to an increase in coronary vessel density. PMID:16778080

  19. Detection of piroplasms infection in sheep, dogs and hedgehogs in Central China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Piroplasms are kinds of tick-borne parasitic apicomplexan protozoa, which are detrimental to humans and animals in tropical and subtropical areas around the world. Up until now, there has been a limited amount of reliable information available about the prevalence of piroplasms infections in wild animals in China. Therefore, we have investigated the infections of Babesia and Theileria species in both domestic and wild animals in Xinyang city, Henan province, where tick-borne diseases have recently been reported. This study aims to analyze the distribution patterns of piroplasms infections in animals, and assess their potential threat to humans in Central China. Methods Blood samples were collected from sheep, dogs and hedgehogs in two regions, including Shihe District and Luoshan County, of Xinyang city, Henan province from August to December 2012. Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and identified by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Moreover, the characteristics of detected piroplasms in different animal hosts were compared between the two study regions. Results A total of 227 blood samples were collected from 73 sheep, two dogs and 152 hedgehogs. Babesia spp. was only detected in the two dogs. Theileria spp. was detected both in the sheep and the hedgehogs, and the total positive rate of Theileria spp. in the sheep and the hedgehogs was 57.53% and 13.82%, respectively. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Theileria spp. detected in the sheep and the hedgehogs were very close to T. lunwenshuni cloned from a small ruminant and Theileria spp. isolated from a febrile hospitalized patient in China. Conclusion Babesia and Theileria infections were detected in both domestic and wild animals in Xinyang city, Henan province in Central China, thus warranting further studies in these regions. PMID:24917932

  20. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Samarzija, Ivana; Beard, Peter

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  1. Codelivery of small molecule hedgehog inhibitor and miRNA for treating pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virender; Mondal, Goutam; Slavik, Paige; Rachagani, Satyanarayna; Batra, Surinder K; Mahato, Ram I

    2015-04-01

    Successful treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a challenge due to the desmoplastic microenvironment that promotes both tumor growth and metastasis and forms a barrier to chemotherapy. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is implicated in initiation and progression of PDAC and also contributes to desmoplasia. While Hh levels are increased in pancreatic cancer cells, levels of tumor suppressor miR-let7b, which targets several genes involved in PDAC pathogenesis, is downregulated. Therefore, our overall objective was to inhibit Hh pathway and restore miR-let7b simultaneously for synergistically treating PDAC. miR-let7b and Hh inhibitor GDC-0449 could inhibit the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, HPAF-II, T3M4, and MIA PaCa-2), and there was synergistic effect when miR-let7b and GDC-0449 were coformulated into micelles using methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(2-methyl- 2-carboxyl-propylenecarbonate-graft-dodecanol-graft-tetraethylene-pentamine) (mPEG-b-PCC-g-DC-g-TEPA). This copolymer self-assembled into micelles of <100 nm and encapsulated hydrophobic GDC-0449 into its core with 5% w/w drug loading and allowed complex formation between miR-let7b and its cationic pendant chains. Complete polyplex formation with miRNA was observed at the N/P ratio of 16/1. Almost 80% of GDC-0449 was released from the polyplex in a sustained manner in 2 days. miRNA in the micelle formulation was stable for up to 24 h in the presence of serum and high uptake efficiency was achieved with low cytotoxicity. This combination therapy effectively inhibited tumor growth when injected to athymic nude mice bearing ectopic tumor generated using MIA PaCa-2 cells compared to micelles carrying GDC-0449 or miR-let7b alone. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed decreased tumor cell proliferation with increased apoptosis in the animals treated with miR-let7b and GDC-0449 combination. PMID:25679326

  2. Macroscopic and microscopic examination of pulmonary Crenosoma striatum in hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Naem, S; Tavakoli, M; Javanbakht, J; Alimohammadi, S; Farshid, A A; Mohammad Hassan, M A

    2014-06-01

    The aim of study was to necropsy and histopathology evaluation of lung Crenosoma striatum in hedgehog. In July 2012, 10 porcupines were collected from Urmia city and transferred to parasitology lab of the veterinary faculty where they were euthanized by ketamine (over 40-90 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. In this study the lungs were assessed through naked eyes regarding parasite presence upon washing. The lung tissue was examined under loop microscope in order to finding small worms in lung parenchyma. The worms were removed by Anse forceps and kept in AFA solution, and collected for diagnosis. In order to carrying out pathological tests, some samples prepared and placed in formalin 10 % for fixation. The counted worms frequency in high severe and moderate lungs were as 86 (50 females and 36 males) and 19 (13 females and 16 males) worms respectively. But no worms were observed in healthy lungs. The infestation severity was as; low infestation (1-7 worms), moderate infestation (8-20), severe infestation (21-50) and very severe infestation (more than 50 worms). The lung examinations of non-infested lungs indicated that the lung tissues had no parasite. In addition, no inflammation reactions as inflammatory cells presence were observed, and the air spaces with alveoles' wall in some regions were observable. On histopathological examination, the observed alteration was primarily inflammatory changes, and in some cases the proliferation was also observable. Hyperemia and inflammatory cell infiltration, somehow the alveolar space was filled, representing bronchopneumonia reaction. The bronchioles had various changes as hypertrophy and hyperplastic in different parts of respiratory system. Hyperemia and hemorrhage were very severe in some cases caused hemosiderosis in the lung. In severe inflammations the pneumonia along with increasing of bronchial cells in the lumen rose as well, leading to severe verminous infestation of the lung. In regard to the obtained results, the

  3. Distinct roles of PTCH2 splice variants in Hedgehog signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Fahimeh; Toftgård, Rune; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2004-01-01

    The human PTCH2 gene is highly similar to PTCH1, a tumour suppressor gene frequently mutated in basal cell carcinoma and several other tumour types. PTCH1 is a transmembrane protein believed to inhibit another transmembrane protein SMO (Smoothened), which mediates HH (Hedgehog) signalling. In this study, we analysed the biological properties of several PTCH2 splice variants. An mRNA form that lacked the last exon was abundantly expressed in all tissues examined, in contrast with the one that included it. Moreover, a transcript lacking exon 9, which is a part of a conserved sterol-sensing domain, was identified in intestine, prostate and cerebellum. In ovary, spleen, testis, cerebellum and skin, an mRNA lacking both exons 9 and 10 could also be observed. The different PTCH2 isoforms localized in the cytoplasm were capable of internalizing the N-terminal fragment of Sonic HH (Shh-N). Additionally, the PTCH2 gene was found to be a target of HH signalling. PTCH2 promoter regulation assays demonstrated that only one of the PTCH2 variants could inhibit the activity of SHH-N, whereas none was capable of inhibiting the activated form of SMO (SMO-M2) and this contrasts with PTCH1. Despite the fact that the PTCH2 isoforms lacked the ability to inhibit SMO-M2 activity, all PTCH2 variants as well as PTCH1, on co-transfection with Smo, were able to change Smo localization from being largely dispersed in the cytoplasm to the juxtanuclear region. Furthermore, the PTCH2 isoforms and PTCH1 co-localized in doubly transfected cells and an interaction between them was confirmed using immunoprecipitation assays. Using Ptch1-/- mouse cells, it was shown that the PTCH2 variants and PTCH1 differentially act to reconstitute not only the SHH but also the Desert HH-dependent transcriptional response. We conclude that in spite of their structural similarities, the PTCH2 isoforms have distinct functional properties when compared with PTCH1. PMID:14613484

  4. Efficacy of a combination of 10% imidacloprid and 1% moxidectin against Caparinia tripilis in African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of a combination formulation of 10% imidacloprid + 1.0% moxidectin spot-on (Advocate® for Cats, Bayer Animal Health GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany) was tested in 40 African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) naturally infested with Caparinia tripilis. Methods The optimal dosage level of the combination for hedgehogs was determined by assigning 20 hedgehogs into three treatment groups (0.1, 0.4 and 1.6 ml/Kg b.w.), and one untreated control group of 5 hedgehogs each. Twenty naturally infested hedgehogs were then randomly assigned to either treatment or control group with 10 animals each, and the number of live mites was counted from 13 body regions on day 0, 3, 9, 16, and 30 after single treatment at the dosage level of 0.1 ml/Kg. Results Before the chemotherapy, the highest density of mite was observed in external ear canals followed by the dorsal and the lowest in the ventral regions of the body surface. The dosage level of 0.1 ml/Kg, which corresponded to the recommended dosage level for cats, containing 10 mg imidacloprid and 1 mg moxidectin was also the optimal dosage level for hedgehogs. No hedgehogs in the treatment group showed live mites from day 3 post treatment. Side effects such as ataxia, depression, nausea, and weight fluctuation were not observed during the whole period of study. Conclusions This report suggests that a combination formulation of 0.1 ml/Kg of 10% imidacloprid + 1% moxidectin spot-on for cats is also useful for the control of Caparinia tripilis infestation in hedgehogs. PMID:22871121

  5. Sex, age, and tissue specific accumulation of eight metals, arsenic, and selenium in the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus).

    PubMed

    Rautio, Anni; Kunnasranta, Mervi; Valtonen, Anu; Ikonen, Mirva; Hyvärinen, Heikki; Holopainen, Ismo J; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2010-11-01

    Many insectivores have been shown to be sensitive to heavy metals and therefore suitable for biomonitoring purposes. In Finland, the hibernation period of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) is long, and during hibernation the stress caused by environmental toxins may be crucial. Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), arsenic (As), and selenium (Se) were measured in a population of hedgehogs in the town of Joensuu in eastern Finland during the summers of 2004 and 2005. The analyzed tissues were kidney, liver, hair, and spine. The sampled hedgehogs (n = 65) were mainly road-killed animals. As expected, the concentrations of heavy metals were low because the hedgehogs were living in a comparatively unpolluted area. Significant increases with age were found in Cd concentrations (kidney, liver, and spine) and some essential elements (Se in spine, kidney, and liver; Mo in kidney and liver; Cu in spine; Fe in liver; and Mn in spine). Age accumulation and correlations between Se and Cd and between Mo and Cd may indicate the protective roles of Se and Mo against Cd toxicity in hedgehogs, in which Cd is already at comparatively low concentrations. Sex had no significant effect on concentrations of the elements studied. In conclusion, age is an important parameter to be taken into account when studying heavy-metal concentrations in hedgehogs and other insectivores. PMID:20372884

  6. The phylogenetic relationships of insectivores with special reference to the lesser hedgehog tenrec as inferred from the complete sequence of their mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Masato; Cao, Ying; Okada, Norihiro; Hasegawa, Masami

    2003-02-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of a lesser hedgehog tenrec Echinops telfairi was determined in this study. It is an endemic African insectivore that is found specifically in Madagascar. The tenrec's back is covered with hedgehog-like spines. Unlike other spiny mammals, such as spiny mice, spiny rats, spiny dormice and porcupines, lesser hedgehog tenrecs look amazingly like true hedgehogs (Erinaceidae). However, they are distinguished morphologically from hedgehogs by the absence of a jugal bone. We determined the complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of a lesser hedgehog tenrec and analyzed the results phylogenetically to determine the relationships between the tenrec and other insectivores (moles, shrews and hedgehogs), as well as the relationships between the tenrec and endemic African mammals, classified as Afrotheria, that have recently been shown by molecular analysis to be close relatives of the tenrec. Our data confirmed the afrotherian status of the tenrec, and no direct relation was recovered between the tenrec and the hedgehog. Comparing our data with those of others, we found that within-species variations in the mitochondrial DNA of lesser hedgehog tenrecs appear to be the largest recognized to date among mammals, apart from orangutans, which might be interesting from the view point of evolutionary history of tenrecs on Madagascar. PMID:12655143

  7. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of breast cancer cell growth by targeting the Hedgehog/GLI pathway with SMO (GDC-0449) or GLI (GANT-61) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    De Smaele, Enrico; Fantini, Massimo; Mattera, Rosanna; Cucchi, Danilo; Bonanno, Elena; Di Stefano, Enrica; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Orlandi, Augusto; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Hedgehog (Hh)/glioma-associated oncogene (GLI) signaling has been implicated in cancer progression. Here, we analyzed GLI1, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and NF-κB expression in 51 breast cancer (ductal carcinoma) tissues using immunohistochemistry. We found a positive correlation between nuclear GLI1 expression and tumor grade in ductal carcinoma cases. Cytoplasmic Shh staining significantly correlated with a lower tumor grade. Next, the in vitro effects of two Hh signaling pathway inhibitors on breast cancer cell lines were evaluated using the Smoothened (SMO) antagonist GDC-0449 and the direct GLI1 inhibitor GANT-61. GDC-0449 and GANT-61 exhibited the following effects: a) inhibited breast cancer cell survival; b) induced apoptosis; c) inhibited Hh pathway activity by decreasing the mRNA expression levels of GLI1 and Ptch and inhibiting the nuclear translocation of GLI1; d) increased/decreased EGFR and ErbB2 protein expression, reduced p21-Ras and ERK1/ERK2 MAPK activities and inhibited AKT activation; and e) decreased the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. However, GANT-61 exerted these effects more effectively than GDC-0449. The in vivo antitumor activities of GDC-0449 and GANT-61 were analyzed in BALB/c mice that were subcutaneously inoculated with mouse breast cancer (TUBO) cells. GDC-0449 and GANT-61 suppressed tumor growth of TUBO cells in BALB/c mice to different extents. These findings suggest that targeting the Hh pathway using antagonists that act downstream of SMO is a more efficient strategy than using antagonists that act upstream of SMO for interrupting Hh signaling in breast cancer. PMID:26843616

  8. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. PMID:27009877

  9. Hedgehog pathway aberrations and gastric cancer; evaluation of prognostic impact and exploration of therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2015-03-01

    Gastric cancer is an important cause for mortality and morbidity worldwide; it lies in the fourt rank as a cause of cancer-related death in males and in the fifth rank of cancer-related death in women. The prognosis of advanced/metastatic gastric cancer cases looks poor with the majority of available therapeutics. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies in this setting have been considered a priority for leading cooperative oncology groups. Hedgehog(Hh) pathway aberrations have sparked particular interest as prognostic markers with data from multiple studies showing consistent evidence of a poor prognostic value of Gli over expression in gastric cancer while on the other hand the prognostic significance of Hh protein over expression (particularly SHH) was not consistent among different studies. This review article revises the prognostic and potential therapeutic opportunities in the targeting of hedgehog pathway in gastric cancer. PMID:25680409

  10. An outbreak of Caparinia tripilis in a colony of African pygmy hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-Hee; Oh, Dae-Sung; Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Shin, Sung-Shik

    2012-06-01

    In February 2010, dermatitis characterized by scale and self-trauma due to puritis was recognized in a group of 22 four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris Wagner, 1841) from a local pet shop in Gwangju, Korea. Microscopic examinations of skin scraping samples showed numerous mites of all developmental stages. Morphologically, pedicels of adult mites were short and unjointed. Tarsal caruncles were bell-shaped on all legs of males while they were absent on legs III and IV of females. Three long setae on the third pair of legs in both sexes were present. Adult males had posterior end of the abdomen with trilobate projection on each side, each lobe with a long seta. Based on these features, the mites were identified as Caparinia tripilis. This is the first report of caparinic mite infestation in hedgehogs from Korea. Identification keys for the family Psoroptidae and the genus Caparinia are provided. PMID:22711928

  11. Fatal herpes simplex infection in a pygmy African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Allison, N; Chang, T C; Steele, K E; Hilliard, J K

    2002-01-01

    An adult pygmy African hedgehog developed acute posterior paresis attributed to a prolapsed intervertebral disc diagnosed by C-T scan. Corticosteroid therapy resulted in prompt resolution of the ataxia, but 2 weeks later the animal became anorexic and died. Macroscopically, the liver was stippled with punctate off-white foci which were confirmed microscopically to be foci of necrosis. Numerous hepatocytes contained intranuclear inclusions and syncytial cell formation was also present. A herpes virus was isolated and identified by fluorescent antibody and polymerase chain reaction studies as herpesvirus simplex type 1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of herpes infection in the African hedgehog and the first time herpes simplex has been identified as a cause of disease in insectivores. PMID:11814325

  12. Thyroid c-cell carcinoma in an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Miller, Debra L; Styer, Eloise L; Stobaeus, Janeen K; Norton, Terry M

    2002-12-01

    A 3-yr-old African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was submitted with dysphagia, weight loss, and tetraparesis. A palpable mass was found on the ventral neck. Histologic examination revealed replacement of the thyroid gland by a highly cellular, expansile, and infiltrative mass composed of lobules of polygonal cells separated by fine fibrovascular septa. Examination of ultrathin sections revealed tumor cells with few to many dense-core neuroendocrine granules, approximately 100-200 nm in diameter, and stromal amyloid. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for neuron-specific enolase. Only rare cells had positive immunohistochemical staining for calcitonin. Findings are consistent with a neuroendocrine tumor of C-cell origin. This is the first report of a C-cell carcinoma in a hedgehog. PMID:12564541

  13. An Outbreak of Caparinia tripilis in a Colony of African Pygmy Hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Hee; Oh, Dae-Sung; Ahn, Kyu-Sung

    2012-01-01

    In February 2010, dermatitis characterized by scale and self-trauma due to puritis was recognized in a group of 22 four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris Wagner, 1841) from a local pet shop in Gwangju, Korea. Microscopic examinations of skin scraping samples showed numerous mites of all developmental stages. Morphologically, pedicels of adult mites were short and unjointed. Tarsal caruncles were bell-shaped on all legs of males while they were absent on legs III and IV of females. Three long setae on the third pair of legs in both sexes were present. Adult males had posterior end of the abdomen with trilobate projection on each side, each lobe with a long seta. Based on these features, the mites were identified as Caparinia tripilis. This is the first report of caparinic mite infestation in hedgehogs from Korea. Identification keys for the family Psoroptidae and the genus Caparinia are provided. PMID:22711928

  14. Quiescent Sox2+ Cells Drive Hierarchical Growth and Relapse in Sonic Hedgehog Subgroup Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Vanner, Robert J.; Remke, Marc; Gallo, Marco; Selvadurai, Hayden J.; Coutinho, Fiona; Lee, Lilian; Kushida, Michelle; Head, Renee; Morrissy, Sorana; Zhu, Xueming; Aviv, Tzvi; Voisin, Veronique; Clarke, Ian D.; Li, Yisu; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Ma, Yussanne; Jones, Steven J.M.; Marra, Marco A.; Malkin, David; Northcott, Paul A.; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M.; Bader, Gary; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D.; Dirks, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Functional heterogeneity within tumors presents a significant therapeutic challenge. Here we show that quiescent, therapy-resistant Sox2+ cells propagate sonic hedgehog subgroup medulloblastoma by a mechanism that mirrors a neurogenic program. Rare Sox2+ cells produce rapidly cycling doublecortin+ progenitors that, together with their postmitotic progeny expressing NeuN, comprise tumor bulk. Sox2+ cells are enriched following anti-mitotic chemotherapy and Smoothened inhibition, creating a reservoir for tumor regrowth. Lineage traces from Sox2+ cells increase following treatment, suggesting that this population is responsible for relapse. Targeting Sox2+ cells with the antineoplastic mithramycin abrogated tumor growth. Addressing functional heterogeneity and eliminating Sox2+ cells presents a promising therapeutic paradigm for treatment of sonic hedgehog subgroup medulloblastoma. PMID:24954133

  15. Quiescent sox2(+) cells drive hierarchical growth and relapse in sonic hedgehog subgroup medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Vanner, Robert J; Remke, Marc; Gallo, Marco; Selvadurai, Hayden J; Coutinho, Fiona; Lee, Lilian; Kushida, Michelle; Head, Renee; Morrissy, Sorana; Zhu, Xueming; Aviv, Tzvi; Voisin, Veronique; Clarke, Ian D; Li, Yisu; Mungall, Andrew J; Moore, Richard A; Ma, Yussanne; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Malkin, David; Northcott, Paul A; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M; Bader, Gary; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Dirks, Peter B

    2014-07-14

    Functional heterogeneity within tumors presents a significant therapeutic challenge. Here we show that quiescent, therapy-resistant Sox2(+) cells propagate sonic hedgehog subgroup medulloblastoma by a mechanism that mirrors a neurogenic program. Rare Sox2(+) cells produce rapidly cycling doublecortin(+) progenitors that, together with their postmitotic progeny expressing NeuN, comprise tumor bulk. Sox2(+) cells are enriched following anti-mitotic chemotherapy and Smoothened inhibition, creating a reservoir for tumor regrowth. Lineage traces from Sox2(+) cells increase following treatment, suggesting that this population is responsible for relapse. Targeting Sox2(+) cells with the antineoplastic mithramycin abrogated tumor growth. Addressing functional heterogeneity and eliminating Sox2(+) cells presents a promising therapeutic paradigm for treatment of sonic hedgehog subgroup medulloblastoma. PMID:24954133

  16. RACK1 Promotes Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Tumorigenicity through Activating Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuo; Deng, Yue-Zhen; Zhao, Jiang-Sha; Ji, Xiao-Dan; Shi, Jun; Feng, Yu-Xiong; Li, Guo; Li, Jing-Jing; Zhu, Di; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Zhao, Yun; Xie, Dong

    2012-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a deadly disease due to lack of effective diagnosis biomarker and therapeutic target. Much effort has been made in defining gene defects in NSCLC, but its full molecular pathogenesis remains unexplored. Here, we found RACK1 (receptor of activated kinase 1) was elevated in most NSCLC, and its expression level correlated with key pathological characteristics including tumor differentiation, stage, and metastasis. In addition, RACK1 activated sonic hedgehog signaling pathway by interacting with and activating Smoothened to mediate Gli1-dependent transcription in NSCLC cells. And silencing RACK1 dramatically inhibited in vivo tumor growth and metastasis by blocking the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway. These results suggest that RACK1 represents a new promising diagnosis biomarker and therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:22262830

  17. The European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus), as a reservoir for helminth parasites in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Naem, Soraya; Pourreza, Behzad; Gorgani-Firouzjaee, Tahmineh

    2015-01-01

    From April 2009 to December 2011, 44 dead hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) were collected incidentally from areas of Urmia, Iran. The overall prevalence of helminth infections was 95.0%. Specific parasites and their prevalences were: Physaloptera clausa (93.0%), Crenosoma striatum (61.0%), Capillaria aerophila (9.0%), Capillarias spp. (4.0%), Brachylaemus erinacei (2.0%) and Hymenolepis erinacei (16.0%). There were no significant differences in helminth occurrence between hedgehog sexes, either in single or in mixed infections (p > 0.05). The mixed infection involving Crenosoma striatum and P. clausa occurred significantly more frequently than other mixed infection (p < 0.05). There were significant differences in prevalence among seasons, with the highest prevalence in summer and spring especially among P. clausa and C. striatum (p < 0.05). PMID:26261711

  18. The European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus), as a reservoir for helminth parasites in Iran.

    PubMed

    Naem, Soraya; Pourreza, Behzad; Gorgani-Firouzjaee, Tahmineh

    2015-01-01

    From April 2009 to December 2011, 44 dead hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) were collected incidentally from areas of Urmia, Iran. The overall prevalence of helminth infections was 95.0%. Specific parasites and their prevalences were: Physaloptera clausa (93.0%), Crenosoma striatum (61.0%), Capillaria aerophila (9.0%), Capillarias spp. (4.0%), Brachylaemus erinacei (2.0%) and Hymenolepis erinacei (16.0%). There were no significant differences in helminth occurrence between hedgehog sexes, either in single or in mixed infections (p > 0.05). The mixed infection involving Crenosoma striatum and P. clausa occurred significantly more frequently than other mixed infection (p < 0.05). There were significant differences in prevalence among seasons, with the highest prevalence in summer and spring especially among P. clausa and C. striatum (p < 0.05). PMID:26261711

  19. Organization of sensory cortex in the East African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Catania, K C; Collins, C E; Kaas, J H

    2000-05-29

    We investigated the organization of neocortex in the East African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) with microelectrode recordings from sensory areas that were later correlated with cytochrome oxidase patterns in sections of flattened cortex. The location of corticospinal projecting neurons was also examined and related to sensory areas by making small injections of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase into the spinal cord. Our goals were to determine how hedgehog cortex is organized, how much sensory areas overlap, and to compare results with recent findings in other insectivores. Evidence was found for three separate topographically organized somatosensory areas, two visual areas, and a caudolateral auditory area. A medial somatosensory area corresponded to S1, the primary somatosensory area, whereas two lateral areas partially encircled auditory cortex and corresponded to the parietal ventral area (PV) and the secondary somatosensory area (S2). Primary visual cortex (V1) was delineated by a caudomedial cytochrome oxidase dark oval, and a more lateral visual area between V1 and somatosensory cortex corresponded to V2, or area 18. Two patches of corticospinal projecting cells were found primarily overlapping S1 and S2. Some bimodal auditory and somatosensory responses were found in parts of PV and S2, but for the most part, areas had relatively sharp histochemically apparent and physiologically defined borders. The present results indicate that the caudal neocortex of hedgehogs has only a few sensory areas, corresponding to those commonly found in several other small-brained mammals. Hedgehog cortical organization differs significantly in somatotopy, number, and position of fields from that of closely related shrews and moles. Thus, clear specializations occur, even within the order Insectivora. PMID:10813786

  20. Evolutionary genomics and adaptive evolution of the Hedgehog gene family (Shh, Ihh and Dhh) in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Jarvis, Erich D; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) gene family codes for a class of secreted proteins composed of two active domains that act as signalling molecules during embryo development, namely for the development of the nervous and skeletal systems and the formation of the testis cord. While only one Hh gene is found typically in invertebrate genomes, most vertebrates species have three (Sonic hedgehog--Shh; Indian hedgehog--Ihh; and Desert hedgehog--Dhh), each with different expression patterns and functions, which likely helped promote the increasing complexity of vertebrates and their successful diversification. In this study, we used comparative genomic and adaptive evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of the Hh genes in vertebrates following the two major whole genome duplication (WGD) events. To overcome the lack of Hh-coding sequences on avian publicly available databases, we used an extensive dataset of 45 avian and three non-avian reptilian genomes to show that birds have all three Hh paralogs. We find suggestions that following the WGD events, vertebrate Hh paralogous genes evolved independently within similar linkage groups and under different evolutionary rates, especially within the catalytic domain. The structural regions around the ion-binding site were identified to be under positive selection in the signaling domain. These findings contrast with those observed in invertebrates, where different lineages that experienced gene duplication retained similar selective constraints in the Hh orthologs. Our results provide new insights on the evolutionary history of the Hh gene family, the functional roles of these paralogs in vertebrate species, and on the location of mutational hotspots. PMID:25549322

  1. Evolutionary Genomics and Adaptive Evolution of the Hedgehog Gene Family (Shh, Ihh and Dhh) in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Joana; Johnson, Warren E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Jarvis, Erich D.; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) gene family codes for a class of secreted proteins composed of two active domains that act as signalling molecules during embryo development, namely for the development of the nervous and skeletal systems and the formation of the testis cord. While only one Hh gene is found typically in invertebrate genomes, most vertebrates species have three (Sonic hedgehog – Shh; Indian hedgehog – Ihh; and Desert hedgehog – Dhh), each with different expression patterns and functions, which likely helped promote the increasing complexity of vertebrates and their successful diversification. In this study, we used comparative genomic and adaptive evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of the Hh genes in vertebrates following the two major whole genome duplication (WGD) events. To overcome the lack of Hh-coding sequences on avian publicly available databases, we used an extensive dataset of 45 avian and three non-avian reptilian genomes to show that birds have all three Hh paralogs. We find suggestions that following the WGD events, vertebrate Hh paralogous genes evolved independently within similar linkage groups and under different evolutionary rates, especially within the catalytic domain. The structural regions around the ion-binding site were identified to be under positive selection in the signaling domain. These findings contrast with those observed in invertebrates, where different lineages that experienced gene duplication retained similar selective constraints in the Hh orthologs. Our results provide new insights on the evolutionary history of the Hh gene family, the functional roles of these paralogs in vertebrate species, and on the location of mutational hotspots. PMID:25549322

  2. Inflammatory PAF Receptor Signaling Initiates Hedgehog Signaling and Kidney Fibrogenesis During Ethanol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Hanouneh, Mohamad; Nagy, Laura E.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation either resolves or proceeds to fibrotic repair that replaces functional tissue. Pro-fibrotic hedgehog signaling and induction of its Gli transcription factor in pericytes induces fibrosis in kidney, but molecular instructions connecting inflammation to fibrosis are opaque. We show acute kidney inflammation resulting from chronic ingestion of the common xenobiotic ethanol initiates Gli1 transcription and hedgehog synthesis in kidney pericytes, and promotes renal fibrosis. Ethanol ingestion stimulated transcription of TGF-ß, collagens I and IV, and alpha-smooth muscle actin with accumulation of these proteins. This was accompanied by deposition of extracellular fibrils. Ethanol catabolism by CYP2E1 in kidney generates local reactive oxygen species that oxidize cellular phospholipids to phospholipid products that activate the Platelet-activating Factor receptor (PTAFR) for inflammatory phospholipids. Genetically deleting this ptafr locus abolished accumulation of mRNA for TGF-ß, collagen IV, and α-smooth muscle actin. Loss of PTAFR also abolished ethanol-stimulated Sonic (Shh) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) expression, and abolished transcription and accumulation of Gli1. Shh induced in pericytes and Ihh in tubules escaped to urine of ethanol-fed mice. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) is required for ethanol-induced kidney inflammation, and Shh was not present in kidney or urine of mpo-/- mice. Shh also was present in urine of patients with acute kidney injury, but not in normal individuals or those with fibrotic liver cirrhosis We conclude neither endogenous PTAFR signaling nor CYP2E1-generated radicals alone are sufficient to initiate hedgehog signaling, but instead PTAFR-dependent neutrophil infiltration with myeloperoxidase activation is necessary to initiate ethanol-induced fibrosis in kidney. We also show fibrogenic mediators escape to urine, defining a new class of urinary mechanistic biomarkers of fibrogenesis for an organ not commonly

  3. ZnRF3 Induces Apoptosis of Gastric Cancer Cells by Antagonizing Wnt and Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongzhen; Cai, Aizhen; Xi, Hongqing; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of malignant cancers of the stomach are gastric adenocarcinoma type. In spite of many studies, the molecular basis for this cancer is still unclear. Deregulated cell proliferative signaling via Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways is considered important in the pathogenesis of many cancers including the gastric cancer. Recent studies identified ZnRF3 protein, which is a E3-ubiquitin ligase and which is either deleted or mutated in cancers, to inhibit Wnt signaling. However, the significance of ZnRF3 in the control of gastric cancer and whether it also regulates Hedgehog signaling pathway, is not known. In the present study, we assessed the expression of ZnRF3 in gastric tumors and paracancerous tissues from 58 patients (44 male and 14 female) of different ages and related this to patient survival. We observed a clear relationship between ZnRF3 expression in paracancerous tissue and tumor size. Also, ZnRF3 expression was much higher in tumors from aged patients. Male patients showed higher mortality than the females. Mechanistic studies using normal gastric cells (GES1) and gastric cancer cells (MGC-803) infected with either AdZnRF3 or AdGFP viral vectors, revealed that ZnRF3 overexpression causes significantly more apoptosis and lowered proliferation of cancer cells. ZnRF3 overexpression led to greatly reduced levels of Lgr5, a component of Wnt signaling and also Gli1, a component of Hedgehog signaling. Thus, ZnRF3 negatively influences both the Wnt and Hedgehog proliferative pathways, and probably this way it negatively regulates cancer progression. These results suggest the importance of normal ZnRF3 function in checking the progression of cancer cell growth and indicate that a lack of this protein can lead to poorer clinical outcomes for gastric cancer patients. PMID:27352324

  4. Hippocampal fields in the hedgehog tenrec. Their architecture and major intrinsic connections.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Radtke-Schuller, S

    2001-11-01

    The Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec was investigated to get insight into the areal evolution of the hippocampal formation in mammals with poorly differentiated brains. The hippocampal subdivisions were analyzed using cyto- and chemoarchitectural criteria; long associational and commissural connections were demonstrated with tracer techniques. The hedgehog tenrec shows a well differentiated dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1. Their major intrinsic connections lie within the band of variations known from other species. The dentate hilar region shows calretinin-positive mossy cells with extensive projections to the molecular layer. The calbindin- and enkephalin-positive granule mossy fibers form a distinct endbulb and do not invade the CA1 as reported in the erinaceous hedgehog. Isolated granule cells with basal dendrites were also noted. A CA2 region is hard to identify architecturally; its presence is suggested due to its contralateral connections. Subicular and perisubicular regions are clearly present along the dorsal aspects of the hemisphere, but we failed to identify them unequivocally along the caudal and ventral tip of the hippocampus. A temporal portion of the subiculum, if present, differs in its chemoarchitecture from its dorsal counterpart. The perisubicular region, located medially adjacent to the dorsal subiculum may be equivalent to the rat's presubiculum; evidence for the presence of a parasubiculum was rather weak. PMID:11672840

  5. TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D.L.

    2003-12-29

    This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

  6. Detection of Bartonella spp. in wild carnivores, hyraxes, hedgehog and rodents from Israel.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Odelya; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Morick, Danny; King, Roni; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Baneth, Gad; Harrus, Shimon

    2016-09-01

    Bartonella infection was explored in wild animals from Israel. Golden jackals (Canis aureus), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), southern white-breasted hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor), social voles (Microtus socialis), Tristram's jirds (Meriones tristrami), Cairo spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus), house mice (Mus musculus) and Indian crested porcupines (Hystrix indica) were sampled and screened by molecular and isolation methods. Bartonella-DNA was detected in 46 animals: 9/70 (13%) golden jackals, 2/11 (18%) red foxes, 3/35 (9%) rock hyraxes, 1/3 (33%) southern white-breasted hedgehogs, 5/57 (9%) Cairo spiny mice, 25/43 (58%) Tristram's jirds and 1/6 (16%) house mice. Bartonella rochalimae and B. rochalimae-like were widespread among jackals, foxes, hyraxes and jirds. This report represents the first detection of this zoonotic Bartonella sp. in rock hyraxes and golden jackals. Moreover, DNA of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, Bartonella acomydis, Candidatus Bartonella merieuxii and other uncharacterized genotypes were identified. Three different Bartonella strains were isolated from Tristram's jirds, and several genotypes were molecularly detected from these animals. Furthermore, this study reports the first detection of Bartonella infection in a southern hedgehog. Our study indicates that infection with zoonotic and other Bartonella species is widespread among wild animals and stresses their potential threat to public health. PMID:27210612

  7. Structural basis of SUFU–GLI interaction in human Hedgehog signalling regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Amy L.; Finta, Csaba; Karlström, Mikael; Jin, Qianren; Schwend, Thomas; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Zubarev, Roman A.; Del Campo, Mark; Criswell, Angela R.; Sanctis, Daniele de; Jovine, Luca Toftgård, Rune

    2013-12-01

    Crystal and small-angle X-ray scattering structures of full-length human SUFU alone and in complex with the conserved SYGHL motif from GLI transcription factors show major conformational changes associated with binding and reveal an intrinsically disordered region crucial for pathway activation. Hedgehog signalling plays a fundamental role in the control of metazoan development, cell proliferation and differentiation, as highlighted by the fact that its deregulation is associated with the development of many human tumours. SUFU is an essential intracellular negative regulator of mammalian Hedgehog signalling and acts by binding and modulating the activity of GLI transcription factors. Despite its central importance, little is known about SUFU regulation and the nature of SUFU–GLI interaction. Here, the crystal and small-angle X-ray scattering structures of full-length human SUFU and its complex with the key SYGHL motif conserved in all GLIs are reported. It is demonstrated that GLI binding is associated with major conformational changes in SUFU, including an intrinsically disordered loop that is also crucial for pathway activation. These findings reveal the structure of the SUFU–GLI interface and suggest a mechanism for an essential regulatory step in Hedgehog signalling, offering possibilities for the development of novel pathway modulators and therapeutics.

  8. Dynamic impact testing of hedgehog spines using a dual-arm crash pendulum.

    PubMed

    Swift, Nathan B; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Kennedy, Emily B; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2016-08-01

    Hedgehog spines are a potential model for impact resistant structures and material. While previous studies have examined static mechanical properties of individual spines, actual collision tests on spines analogous to those observed in the wild have not previously been investigated. In this study, samples of roughly 130 keratin spines were mounted vertically in thin substrates to mimic the natural spine layout on hedgehogs. A weighted crash pendulum was employed to induce and measure the effects of repeated collisions against samples, with the aim to evaluate the influence of various parameters including humidity effect, impact energy, and substrate hardness. Results reveal that softer samples-due to humidity conditioning and/or substrate material used-exhibit greater durability over multiple impacts, while the more rigid samples exhibit greater energy absorption performance at the expense of durability. This trend is exaggerated during high-energy collisions. Comparison of the results to baseline tests with industry standard impact absorbing foam, wherein the spines exhibit similar energy absorption, verifies the dynamic impact absorption capabilities of hedgehog spines and their candidacy as a structural model for engineered impact technology. PMID:27082130

  9. Hedgehog signaling indirectly affects tubular cell survival after obstructive kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Rauhauser, Alysha A; Ren, Chongyu; Lu, Dongmei; Li, Binghua; Zhu, Jili; McEnery, Kayla; Vadnagara, Komal; Zepeda-Orozco, Diana; Zhou, Xin J; Lin, Fangming; Jetten, Anton M; Attanasio, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is an evolutionary conserved signaling pathway that has important functions in kidney morphogenesis and adult organ maintenance. Recent work has shown that Hh signaling is reactivated in the kidney after injury and is an important mediator of progressive fibrosis. Pericytes and fibroblasts have been proposed to be the principal cells that respond to Hh ligands, and pharmacological attenuation of Hh signaling has been considered as a possible treatment for fibrosis, but the effect of Hh inhibition on tubular epithelial cells after kidney injury has not been reported. Using genetically modified mice in which tubule-derived hedgehog signaling is increased and mice in which this pathway is conditionally suppressed in pericytes that express the proteoglycan neuron glial protein 2 (NG2), we found that suppression of Hh signaling is associated with decreased macrophage infiltration and tubular proliferation but also increased tubular apoptosis, an effect that correlated with the reduction of tubular β-catenin activity. Collectively, our data suggest a complex function of hedgehog signaling after kidney injury in initiating both reparative and proproliferative, prosurvival processes. PMID:26290370

  10. Click chemistry armed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure palmitoylation by hedgehog acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Masumoto, Naoko; Bodakh, George; Konitsiotis, Antonio D.; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Rodgers, Ursula R.; Owens, Raymond J.; Magee, Anthony I.; Tate, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is critical for correct embryogenesis and tissue development. However, on maturation, signaling is also found to be aberrantly activated in many cancers. Palmitoylation of the secreted signaling protein sonic hedgehog (Shh) by the enzyme hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat) is required for functional signaling. To quantify this important posttranslational modification, many in vitro Shh palmitoylation assays employ radiolabeled fatty acids, which have limitations in terms of cost and safety. Here we present a click chemistry armed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (click–ELISA) for assessment of Hhat activity through acylation of biotinylated Shh peptide with an alkyne-tagged palmitoyl-CoA (coenzyme A) analogue. Click chemistry functionalization of the alkyne tag with azido-FLAG peptide allows analysis through an ELISA protocol and colorimetric readout. This assay format identified the detergent n-dodecyl β-d-maltopyranoside as an improved solubilizing agent for Hhat activity. Quantification of the potency of RU-SKI small molecule Hhat inhibitors by click–ELISA indicated IC50 values in the low- or sub-micromolar range. A stopped assay format was also employed that allows measurement of Hhat kinetic parameters where saturating substrate concentrations exceed the binding capacity of the streptavidin-coated plate. Therefore, click–ELISA represents a nonradioactive method for assessing protein palmitoylation in vitro that is readily expandable to other classes of protein lipidation. PMID:26334609

  11. The chicken talpid3 gene encodesa novel protein essentialfor Hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Megan G.; Paton, I. Robert; Yin, Yili; Schmidt, Maike; Bangs, Fiona K.; Morrice, David R.; Smith, Terence Gordon; Buxton, Paul; Stamataki, Despina; Tanaka, Mikiko; Münsterberg, Andrea E.; Briscoe, James; Tickle, Cheryll; Burt, Dave W.

    2006-01-01

    Talpid3 is a classical chicken mutant with abnormal limb patterning and malformations in other regions of the embryo known to depend on Hedgehog signaling. We combined the ease of manipulating chicken embryos with emerging knowledge of the chicken genome to reveal directly the basis of defective Hedgehog signal transduction in talpid3 embryos and to identify the talpid3 gene. We show in several regions of the embryo that the talpid3 phenotype is completely ligand independent and demonstrate for the first time that talpid3 is absolutely required for the function of both Gli repressor and activator in the intracellular Hedgehog pathway. We map the talpid3 locus to chromosome 5 and find a frameshift mutation in a KIAA0586 ortholog (ENSGALG00000012025), a gene not previously attributed with any known function. We show a direct causal link between KIAA0586 and the mutant phenotype by rescue experiments. KIAA0586 encodes a novel protein, apparently specific to vertebrates, that localizes to the cytoplasm. We show that Gli3 processing is abnormal in talpid3 mutant cells but that Gli3 can still translocate to the nucleus. These results suggest that the talpid3 protein operates in the cytoplasm to regulate the activity of both Gli repressor and activator proteins. PMID:16702409

  12. Different Parasite Faunas in Sympatric Populations of Sister Hedgehog Species in a Secondary Contact Zone

    PubMed Central

    Pfäffle, Miriam; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Hulva, Pavel; Petney, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Providing descriptive data on parasite diversity and load in sister species is a first step in addressing the role of host-parasite coevolution in the speciation process. In this study we compare the parasite faunas of the closely related hedgehog species Erinaceus europaeus and E. roumanicus from the Czech Republic where both occur in limited sympatry. We examined 109 hedgehogs from 21 localities within this secondary contact zone. Three species of ectoparasites and nine species of endoparasites were recorded. Significantly higher abundances and prevalences were found for Capillaria spp. and Brachylaemus erinacei in E. europaeus compared to E. roumanicus and higher mean infection rates and prevalences for Hymenolepis erinacei, Physaloptera clausa and Nephridiorhynchus major in E. roumanicus compared to E. europaeus. Divergence in the composition of the parasite fauna, except for Capillaria spp., which seem to be very unspecific, may be related to the complicated demography of their hosts connected with Pleistocene climate oscillations and consequent range dynamics. The fact that all parasite species with different abundances in E. europaeus and E. roumanicus belong to intestinal forms indicates a possible diversification of trophic niches between both sister hedgehog species. PMID:25469872

  13. Gli1/DNA interaction is a druggable target for Hedgehog-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Infante, Paola; Mori, Mattia; Alfonsi, Romina; Ghirga, Francesca; Aiello, Federica; Toscano, Sara; Ingallina, Cinzia; Siler, Mariangela; Cucchi, Danilo; Po, Agnese; Miele, Evelina; D'Amico, Davide; Canettieri, Gianluca; De Smaele, Enrico; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Screpanti, Isabella; Uccello Barretta, Gloria; Botta, Maurizio; Botta, Bruno; Gulino, Alberto; Di Marcotullio, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is essential for tissue development and stemness, and its deregulation has been observed in many tumors. Aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling is the result of genetic mutations of pathway components or other Smo-dependent or independent mechanisms, all triggering the downstream effector Gli1. For this reason, understanding the poorly elucidated mechanism of Gli1-mediated transcription allows to identify novel molecules blocking the pathway at a downstream level, representing a critical goal in tumor biology. Here, we clarify the structural requirements of the pathway effector Gli1 for binding to DNA and identify Glabrescione B as the first small molecule binding to Gli1 zinc finger and impairing Gli1 activity by interfering with its interaction with DNA. Remarkably, as a consequence of its robust inhibitory effect on Gli1 activity, Glabrescione B inhibited the growth of Hedgehog-dependent tumor cells in vitro and in vivo as well as the self-renewal ability and clonogenicity of tumor-derived stem cells. The identification of the structural requirements of Gli1/DNA interaction highlights their relevance for pharmacologic interference of Gli signaling. PMID:25476449

  14. Morphometrics of foramen magnum in African four-toed hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Girgiri, I; Olopade, J O; Yahaya, A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the morphometry of the foramen magnum of African four-toed hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) in Maiduguri. Fourteen hedgehog skulls (7 male and 7 female each) were used for this study. The overall mean value of foramen magnum height and width were 0.51 ± 0.05 cm and 0.64 ± 0.04 cm while occipital condylar and interparacondylar widths were 1.00 ± 0.12 cm and 1.62 ± 0.07 cm, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two sexes. The foramen magnum index was 83.4 ± 5.51 cm in males and was significantly higher than 76.3 ± 6.37 cm observed in females. The presences of dorsal notches (occipital dysplasia) were observed, that were of three distinct types. It is envisaged, that the study will provide a valuable database on the anatomy of foramen magnum of hedgehogs in Nigeria for morphological, neurological, zooarchaeological, and comparative anatomical studies. PMID:26050805

  15. Different parasite faunas in sympatric populations of sister hedgehog species in a secondary contact zone.

    PubMed

    Pfäffle, Miriam; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Hulva, Pavel; Petney, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Providing descriptive data on parasite diversity and load in sister species is a first step in addressing the role of host-parasite coevolution in the speciation process. In this study we compare the parasite faunas of the closely related hedgehog species Erinaceus europaeus and E. roumanicus from the Czech Republic where both occur in limited sympatry. We examined 109 hedgehogs from 21 localities within this secondary contact zone. Three species of ectoparasites and nine species of endoparasites were recorded. Significantly higher abundances and prevalences were found for Capillaria spp. and Brachylaemus erinacei in E. europaeus compared to E. roumanicus and higher mean infection rates and prevalences for Hymenolepis erinacei, Physaloptera clausa and Nephridiorhynchus major in E. roumanicus compared to E. europaeus. Divergence in the composition of the parasite fauna, except for Capillaria spp., which seem to be very unspecific, may be related to the complicated demography of their hosts connected with Pleistocene climate oscillations and consequent range dynamics. The fact that all parasite species with different abundances in E. europaeus and E. roumanicus belong to intestinal forms indicates a possible diversification of trophic niches between both sister hedgehog species. PMID:25469872

  16. Structural basis of SUFU-GLI interaction in human Hedgehog signalling regulation.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Amy L; Finta, Csaba; Karlström, Mikael; Jin, Qianren; Schwend, Thomas; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Zubarev, Roman A; Del Campo, Mark; Criswell, Angela R; de Sanctis, Daniele; Jovine, Luca; Toftgård, Rune

    2013-12-01

    Hedgehog signalling plays a fundamental role in the control of metazoan development, cell proliferation and differentiation, as highlighted by the fact that its deregulation is associated with the development of many human tumours. SUFU is an essential intracellular negative regulator of mammalian Hedgehog signalling and acts by binding and modulating the activity of GLI transcription factors. Despite its central importance, little is known about SUFU regulation and the nature of SUFU-GLI interaction. Here, the crystal and small-angle X-ray scattering structures of full-length human SUFU and its complex with the key SYGHL motif conserved in all GLIs are reported. It is demonstrated that GLI binding is associated with major conformational changes in SUFU, including an intrinsically disordered loop that is also crucial for pathway activation. These findings reveal the structure of the SUFU-GLI interface and suggest a mechanism for an essential regulatory step in Hedgehog signalling, offering possibilities for the development of novel pathway modulators and therapeutics. PMID:24311597

  17. Derivation of lung mesenchymal lineages from the fetal mesothelium requires hedgehog signaling for mesothelial cell entry

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Radhika; Ai, Xingbin; Fine, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that mesothelial progenitors contribute to mesenchymal lineages of developing organs. To what extent the overlying mesothelium contributes to lung development remains unknown. To rigorously address this question, we employed Wt1CreERT2/+ mice for high-fidelity lineage tracing after confirming that Cre recombinase was mesothelial specific and faithfully recapitulated endogenous Wilms’ tumor 1 (Wt1) gene expression. We visualized WT1+ mesothelial cell entry into the lung by live imaging and identified their progenies in subpopulations of bronchial smooth muscle cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and desmin+ fibroblasts by lineage tagging. Derivation of these lineages was only observed with Cre recombinase activation during early lung development. Using loss-of-function assays in organ cultures, and targeted mesothelial-restricted hedgehog loss-of-function mice, we demonstrated that mesothelial cell movement into the lung requires the direct action of hedgehog signaling. By contrast, hedgehog signaling was not required for fetal mesothelial heart entry. These findings further support a paradigm wherein the mesothelium is a source of progenitors for mesenchymal lineages during organogenesis and indicate that signals controlling mesothelial cell entry are organ specific. PMID:24130328

  18. Sonic hedgehog derived from human pancreatic cancer cells augments angiogenic function of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Madoka; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Mizukami, Yusuke; Ii, Masaaki; Sasajima, Junpei; Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Nishikawa, Tomoya; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Sato, Kazuya; Maemoto, Atsuo; Tanno, Satoshi; Okumura, Toshikatsu; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kono, Toru; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Ashida, Toshifumi; Chung, Daniel C; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2008-06-01

    Hedgehog signaling is important in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Several recent observations suggest the involvement of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in postnatal neovascularization. We identified a novel role for SHH in tumor-associated angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that patched homolog 1 (PTCH1), both a receptor for and transcriptional target of hedgehog signaling, was expressed in a small fraction of endothelial cells within pancreatic cancer, but not in normal pancreatic tissue. When endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) isolated from human peripheral blood were cultured with supernatant from SHH-transfected 293 cells or pancreatic cancer cells, mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal cell-derived factor-1 and angiopoietin-1 were significantly increased, whereas no such induction was observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC). HUVEC tube formation was stimulated when cocultured with EPC, and preconditioning EPC with supernatant from KP-1 N pancreatic cancer cells highly expressing SHH significantly enhanced the effect. The effect was partially attenuated by specific inhibition of SHH with cyclopamine or a neutralizing antibody. These findings suggest that tumor-derived SHH can induce angiogenesis, and this is mediated by its effects on EPC specifically. Targeting SHH would be a novel therapeutic approach that can inhibit not only proliferation of cancer cells but also EPC-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:18422746

  19. Hedgehog signaling alters reliance on EGF receptor signaling and mediates anti-EGFR therapeutic resistance in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keysar, Stephen B.; Le, Phuong N.; Anderson, Ryan T.; Morton, J. Jason; Bowles, Daniel W.; Paylor, Jeramiah J.; Vogler, Brian W.; Thorburn, Jackie; Fernandez, Pamela; Glogowska, Magdalena J.; Takimoto, Sarah M.; Sehrt, Daniel B.; Gan, Gregory N.; Eagles-Soukup, Justin; Serracino, Hilary; Hirsch, Fred R.; Lucia, M. Scott; Thorburn, Andrew; Song, John I.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Jimeno, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-directed monoclonal antibody cetuximab is the only targeted therapy approved for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but is only effective in a minority of patients. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been implicated as a drug resistance mechanism in multiple cancers, and the EGFR and Hedgehog pathways (HhP) are relevant to this process, but the interplay between the two pathways has not been defined in HNSCC. Here we show that HNSCC cells that were naturally sensitive to EGFR inhibition over time developed increased expression of the HhP transcription factor GLI1 as they became resistant after long-term EGFR inhibitor exposure. This robustly correlated with an increase in Vimentin expression. Conversely, the HhP negatively regulated an EGFR-dependent, EMT-like state in HNSCC cells, and pharmacological or genetic inhibition of HhP signaling pushed cells further into an EGFR-dependent phenotype, increasing expression of ZEB1 and VIM. In vivo treatment with cetuximab resulted in tumor shrinkage in four out of six HNSCC patient-derived xenografts; however they eventually re-grew. Cetuximab in combination with the HhP inhibitor IPI-926 eliminated tumors in two cases and significantly delayed re-growth in the other two cases. Expression of EMT genes TWIST and ZEB2 was increased in sensitive xenografts suggesting a possible resistant mesenchymal population. In summary, we report that EGFR-dependent HNSCC cells can undergo both EGFR-dependent and -independent EMT and HhP signaling is a regulator in both processes. Cetuximab plus IPI-926 forces tumor cells into an EGFR-dependent state delaying or completely blocking tumor recurrence. PMID:23576557

  20. MK-4101, a Potent Inhibitor of the Hedgehog Pathway, Is Highly Active against Medulloblastoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Filocamo, Gessica; Brunetti, Mirko; Colaceci, Fabrizio; Sasso, Romina; Tanori, Mirella; Pasquali, Emanuela; Alfonsi, Romina; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Saran, Anna; Lahm, Armin; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Steinkühler, Christian; Pazzaglia, Simonetta

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of many cancers, including medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In this study, using neonatally irradiated Ptch1(+/-) mice as a model of Hh-dependent tumors, we investigated the in vivo effects of MK-4101, a novel SMO antagonist, for the treatment of medulloblastoma and BCC. Results clearly demonstrated a robust antitumor activity of MK-4101, achieved through the inhibition of proliferation and induction of extensive apoptosis in tumor cells. Of note, beside antitumor activity on transplanted tumors, MK-4101 was highly efficacious against primary medulloblastoma and BCC developing in the cerebellum and skin of Ptch1(+/-) mice. By identifying the changes induced by MK-4101 in gene expression profiles in tumors, we also elucidated the mechanism of action of this novel, orally administrable compound. MK-4101 targets the Hh pathway in tumor cells, showing the maximum inhibitory effect on Gli1 MK-4101 also induced deregulation of cell cycle and block of DNA replication in tumors. Members of the IGF and Wnt signaling pathways were among the most highly deregulated genes by MK-4101, suggesting that the interplay among Hh, IGF, and Wnt is crucial in Hh-dependent tumorigenesis. Altogether, the results of this preclinical study support a therapeutic opportunity for MK-4101 in the treatment of Hh-driven cancers, also providing useful information for combination therapy with drugs targeting pathways cooperating with Hh oncogenic activity. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1177-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26960983

  1. Hedgehog/GLI and PI3K signaling in the initiation and maintenance of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kern, D; Regl, G; Hofbauer, S W; Altenhofer, P; Achatz, G; Dlugosz, A; Schnidar, H; Greil, R; Hartmann, T N; Aberger, F

    2015-10-16

    The initiation and maintenance of a malignant phenotype requires complex and synergistic interactions of multiple oncogenic signals. The Hedgehog (HH)/GLI pathway has been implicated in a variety of cancer entities and targeted pathway inhibition is of therapeutic relevance. Signal cross-talk with other cancer pathways including PI3K/AKT modulates HH/GLI signal strength and its oncogenicity. In this study, we addressed the role of HH/GLI and its putative interaction with the PI3K/AKT cascade in the initiation and maintenance of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Using transgenic mouse models, we show that B-cell-specific constitutive activation of HH/GLI signaling either at the level of the HH effector and drug target Smoothened or at the level of the GLI transcription factors does not suffice to initiate a CLL-like phenotype characterized by the accumulation of CD5(+) B cells in the lymphatic system and peripheral blood. Furthermore, Hh/Gli activation in Pten-deficient B cells with activated Pi3K/Akt signaling failed to enhance the expansion of leukemic CD5(+) B cells, suggesting that genetic or epigenetic alterations leading to aberrant HH/GLI signaling in B cells do not suffice to elicit a CLL-like phenotype in mice. By contrast, we identify a critical role of GLI and PI3K signaling for the survival of human primary CLL cells. We show that combined targeting of GLI and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling can have a synergistic therapeutic effect in cells from a subgroup of CLL patients, thereby providing a basis for the evaluation of future combination therapies targeting HH/GLI and PI3K signaling in this common hematopoietic malignancy. PMID:25639866

  2. Hedgehog signaling pathway: A novel target for cancer therapy: Vismodegib, a promising therapeutic option in treatment of basal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Abidi, Afroz

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway is one of the major regulators of cell growth and differentiation during embryogenesis and early development. It is mostly quiescent in adults but inappropriate mutation or deregulation of the pathway is involved in the development of cancers. Therefore; recently it has been recognized as a novel therapeutic target in cancers. Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and medulloblastomas are the two most common cancers identified with mutations in components of the hedgehog pathway. The discovery of targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibitors has shown promising results in clinical trials, several of which are still undergoing clinical evaluation. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), an oral hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor has reached the farthest in clinical development. Initial clinical trials in basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma have shown good efficacy and safety and hence were approved by U.S. FDA for use in advanced basal cell carcinomas. This review highlights the molecular basis and the current knowledge of hedgehog pathway activation in different types of human cancers as well as the present and future prospects of the novel drug vismodegib. PMID:24550577

  3. First report of natural infection in hedgehogs with Leishmania major, a possible reservoir of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Pérez, Míriam; Khaldi, Mourad; Riera, Cristina; Mozo-León, Denis; Ribas, Alexis; Hide, Mallorie; Barech, Ghania; Benyettou, Meryam; Seghiri, Kamel; Doudou, Souad; Fisa, Roser

    2014-07-01

    We report here the first known cases of natural infection of hedgehogs with Leishmania major. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an important public health problem in the area of M'sila, a semi-arid province in Algeria's northern Sahara, where two species of hedgehog live, Atelerix algirus and Paraechinus aethiopicus. The aim of this research was to survey Leishmania infection in these hedgehogs and evaluate whether they were reservoir hosts of Leishmania in an endemic zoonotic focus of leishmaniasis. Serological and molecular methods were used to determine the presence of Leishmania in 24 hedgehogs caught directly by hand and identified at species level as 19 A. algirus and 5 P. aethiopicus. Specific anti-Leishmania antibodies were detected in 29.2% of individuals by Western blot and in 26.3% by ELISA. The real-time PCR performed in spleen, ear and blood samples detected Leishmania spp. DNA in 12.5% of the individuals, one A. algirus and two P. aethiopicus. Three skin and two spleen samples of these animals were found to be parasitized and were identified by molecular test as L. major. Considering our results, it is suggested that hedgehogs have a potential epidemiological role as reservoir hosts of L. major. PMID:24699087

  4. The expression of Hedgehog genes (Ihh, Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Ptc1, Gli1, Coup-TfII) is affected by estrogenic stimuli in the uterus of immature female rats.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Seiichi; Ashizawa, Koji; Gohma, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Tadahiro; Narumi, Kazunori; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro; Tatemoto, Hideki; Nakada, Tadashi; Nagai, Kenji

    2006-12-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and an ER antagonist on the expression of Hedgehog genes (Indian hedgehog: Ihh; Desert hedgehog: Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Patched 1: Ptc1; glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1: Gli1; chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II: Coup-TfII) in the rat uterus. Immature female rats were administered once with 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol (EE, an ER agonist), propyl pyrazole triole (PPT, an ERalpha-selective agonist), diarylpropionitrile (DPN, an ERbeta-selective agonist), or ICI 182,780 (an ER antagonist). Expression of mRNA for Ihh, Dhh, and Ptc1 was dose-dependently downregulated by EE in the uterus of immature rats, mediated by ER as confirmed by coadministration of ICI 182,780. The mRNA expression levels of Ptc1, Gli1, and Coup-TfII were simultaneously downregulated during the period in which the mRNA expression levels of Ihh and Dhh were downregulated in the uterus after administration of EE. PPT downregulated the transcription of Ihh, Dhh, Ptc1, Gli1, and Coup-TfII, indicating that expression of these genes was regulated by the ERalpha-dependent pathway. DPN also downregulated the transcription of Ihh and Dhh, although the effect was weaker than that of PPT, indicating that the regulation of uterine Ihh and Dhh transcription was also affected by the ERbeta-dependent pathway. These results suggest that the expression of Hedgehog genes (Ihh, Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Ptc1, Gli1, Coup-TfII) is affected by estrogenic stimuli in the uterus of immature female rats. PMID:17109907

  5. The expression of Hedgehog genes (Ihh, Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Ptc1, Gli1, Coup-TfII) is affected by estrogenic stimuli in the uterus of immature female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Seiichi . E-mail: katayama@ankaken.co.jp; Ashizawa, Koji; Gohma, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Tadahiro; Narumi, Kazunori; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro; Tatemoto, Hideki; Nakada, Tadashi; Nagai, Kenji

    2006-12-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and an ER antagonist on the expression of Hedgehog genes (Indian hedgehog: Ihh; Desert hedgehog: Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Patched 1: Ptc1; glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1: Gli1; chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II: Coup-TfII) in the rat uterus. Immature female rats were administered once with 17{alpha}-ethynyl estradiol (EE, an ER agonist), propyl pyrazole triole (PPT, an ER{alpha}-selective agonist), diarylpropionitrile (DPN, an ER{beta}-selective agonist), or ICI 182,780 (an ER antagonist). Expression of mRNA for Ihh, Dhh, and Ptc1 was dose-dependently downregulated by EE in the uterus of immature rats, mediated by ER as confirmed by coadministration of ICI 182,780. The mRNA expression levels of Ptc1, Gli1, and Coup-TfII were simultaneously downregulated during the period in which the mRNA expression levels of Ihh and Dhh were downregulated in the uterus after administration of EE. PPT downregulated the transcription of Ihh, Dhh, Ptc1, Gli1, and Coup-TfII, indicating that expression of these genes was regulated by the ER{alpha}-dependent pathway. DPN also downregulated the transcription of Ihh and Dhh, although the effect was weaker than that of PPT, indicating that the regulation of uterine Ihh and Dhh transcription was also affected by the ER{beta}-dependent pathway. These results suggest that the expression of Hedgehog genes (Ihh, Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Ptc1, Gli1, Coup-TfII) is affected by estrogenic stimuli in the uterus of immature female rats.

  6. The epidemiology and mating behavior of Arthroderma benhamiae var. erinacei in household four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoko; Sano, Ayako; Takizawa, Kayoko; Fukushima, Kazutaka; Miyaji, Makoto; Nishimura, Kazuko

    2003-01-01

    An epidemiological survey of Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. erinacei in the household hedgehog and other rodents was made between January 17, 2002 and February 28, 2002 in Japan. Quills and hairs were collected from sources identified via the internet. The fungus was isolated only from the quills of four-toed hedgehogs (7/18; 39%) from Kanto to Kyushu regions. Isolates were examined morphologically, physiologically and genetically, and identified as T. mentagrophytes var. erinacei anamorph. The isolates were also genetically compared with European hedgehog (Erinaceus europeus)-borne T. mentagrophytes var. erinacei and Kenyan hedgehog (Aterelix albiventris)-borne Arthroderma benhamiae, and their genotypes of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA were all identical. The isolates were crossed with A. benhamiae Americano-European race and African race, A. vanbreuseghemii and A. simii, with the result that they mated only with African race (+) or (-). Mating types of the isolates were (+) in 6 isolates and (-) in one. An intra-isolate mating between one of the 6 plus isolates and the minus one formed abundant mature gymnothesia, the mating type ratio of the F1 progeny was approximately 1:1, and the sib crossings of F1 progeny produced abundant fertile gymnothesia. The present study revealed that the intra-Japanese hedgehog-borne isolate crossing showed complete fertility and that the sexual degeneration pointed out by Takashio (Mycologia 71: 968-976, 1979) did not exist. Two pairs of mating, (+) and (-) mating types of Japanese isolates with (-) and (+) tester strains of A. benhamiae African race formed less gymnothesia, mating type ratios were unbalanced, and sib crossings of F1 progeny produced small gymnothesia containing a low number of asci, pseudogymothesia, or none, respectively. These results show that A. benhamiae var. erinacei, the teleomorph of T. mentagrophytes var. erinacei, belongs to a different mating group (e.g. hedgehog race) than the Americano-European and

  7. Low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation enhances osteoblast proliferation through activation of Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiushi; Qu, Zhou; Chen, Yingxin; Liu, Shujie; Zhou, Yanmin

    2014-12-01

    Low-level laser irradiation has been reported to promote bone formation, but the molecular mechanism is still unclear. Hedgehog signaling pathway has been reported to play an important role in promoting bone formation. The aim of the present study was to examine whether low-level Ga-Al-As laser (808 nm) irradiation could have an effect on Hedgehog signaling pathway during osteoblast proliferation in vitro. Mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 was cultured in vitro. The cultures after laser irradiation (3.75J/cm2) were treated with recombinant N-terminals Sonic Hedgehog (N-Shh)or Hedgehog inhibitor cyclopamine (cy). The experiment was divided into 4 group, group 1:laser irradiation, group 2: laser irradiation and N-Shh, group 3: laser irradiation and cy, group 4:control with no laser irradiation. On day 1,2 and 3,cell proliferation was determined by cell counting, Cell Counting Kit-8.On 12 h and 24 h, cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. Proliferation activity of laser irradiation and N-Shh group was remarkably increased compared with those of laser irradiation group. Proliferation activity of laser irradiation and cy group was remarkably decreased compared with those of laser irradiation group, however proliferation activity of laser irradiation and cy group was remarkably increased compared with those of control group. These results suggest that low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation activate Hedgehog signaling pathway during osteoblast proliferation in vitro. Hedgehog signaling pathway is one of the signaling pathways by which low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation regulates osteoblast proliferation.

  8. Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) as a Source of Ectoparasites in Urban-suburban Areas of Northwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hajipour, Nasser; Tavassoli, Mousa; Gorgani-Firouzjaee, Tahmineh; Naem, Soraya; Pourreza, Behzad; Bahramnejad, Kia; Arjmand, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hedgehogs are small, nocturnal mammals which become popular in the world and have important role in transmission of zoonotic agents. Thus, the present study aimed to survey ectoparasite infestation from April 2010 to December 2011 in urban and suburban parts of Urmia and Tabriz Cities, Northwest of Iran. Methods: A total number of 84 hedgehogs (40 females and 44 males) were examined. They have been carefully inspected for ectoparasites and collected arthropods were stored in 70% ethanol solution. The identification of arthropods was carried out using morphological diagnostic keys. Results: The occurrence of ticks on hedgehogs was 23 (67.7%) with Rhipicephalus turanicus in Urmia and 11 (22%) as well as 1(2%) with Rh. turanicus and Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum in Tabriz, respectively. One flea species, Archaeopsylla erinacei, was found with prevalence of 19 (55.9%) and 27 (54%) in Urmia and Tabriz Cities, respectively. Prevalence of infestation with Rh. turanicus and A. erinacei were not different (P> 0.05) between sexes of hedgehogs in two study areas. Highest prevalence of tick and flea infestation was in June in Urmia, whereas it was observed in August in Tabriz. Both tick and flea parasitizing hedgehogs showed seasonal difference in prevalence (P< 0.05) in Urmia, but it was not detected in Tabriz (P> 0.05). Conclusion: The result showed the high occurrence of ectoparasites in hedgehog population and according to the zoonotic potential of these animals as vector of some agents further studies are needed to investigate in different parts of Iran. PMID:26114147

  9. Coprology of a single Northern white-breasted hedgehog (Erinaceus roumanicus): first report of Isospora rastegaievae in Poland.

    PubMed

    Pyziel, Anna M; Jeżewski, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Coprological analysis of a sample from one free-living hedgehog was done with the use of a direct flotation method with additional incubation of fecal material. The study revealed three types of eggs and oocysts in the feces. The most commonly diagnosed were oocysts of Isospora rastegaievae (543/3g), while oocysts of Monocystis sp. (267/3g) and eggs of Aonchotheca/Eucoleus spp. (52/3g) were seen less often. This is the first report of coccidia I. rastegaievae (Apicomplexa: Eimeriida) and acephaline gregarine Monocystis sp. (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida) infection in a hedgehog in Poland. PMID:27447231

  10. Survivin, a novel target of the Hedgehog/GLI signaling pathway in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vlčková, K; Ondrušová, L; Vachtenheim, J; Réda, J; Dundr, P; Zadinová, M; Žáková, P; Poučková, P

    2016-01-01

    Survivin, an important antiapoptotic protein, is expressed in tumors, whereas in normal tissues the expression of this protein is extremely low, defining a role for survivin as a cancer gene. Survivin exhibits multifunctional activity in tumor cells. However, why survivin expression is sharply and invariably restricted to tumor tissue remains unclear. Here, we identified 11 putative consensus binding sites for GLI transcription factors in the survivin promoter and characterized the promoter activity. Inhibitors of the Hedgehog/GLI pathway, cyclopamine and GANT61, decreased the promoter activity in reporter assays. ΔNGLI2 (which lacks the repressor domain) was the most potent vector in activating the survivin promoter–reporter. Moreover, GANT61, a GLI1/2 inhibitor, repressed endogenous survivin protein and mRNA expression in most cells across a large panel of tumor cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GLI2 binding to the survivin promoter. The ectopic GLI2-evoked expression of endogenous survivin was observed in normal human fibroblasts. GANT61 decreased survivin level in nude mice tumors, mimicking the activity of GANT61 in cultured cells. The immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence of human tumors revealed a correlation between the tissue regions showing high GLI2 and survivin positivity. Thus, these results demonstrated that survivin is a classical transcriptional target of GLI2, a Hedgehog pathway signaling effector. This potentially reflects the high expression of survivin in human tumor cells. As the Hedgehog pathway is upregulated in virtually all types of cancer cells, these findings substantially contribute to the explanation of uniform survivin expression in tumors as a potential target for the development of a more effective treatment of cancers through the inhibition of GLI2 to restrain survivin activity. PMID:26775700

  11. Purkinje cell maturation participates in the control of oligodendrocyte differentiation: role of sonic hedgehog and vitronectin.

    PubMed

    Bouslama-Oueghlani, Lamia; Wehrlé, Rosine; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Chen, Xiao Ru; Jaudon, Fanny; Lemaigre-Dubreuil, Yolande; Rivals, Isabelle; Sotelo, Constantino; Dusart, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation is temporally regulated during development by multiple factors. Here, we investigated whether the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation might be controlled by neuronal differentiation in cerebellar organotypic cultures. In these cultures, the slices taken from newborn mice show very few oligodendrocytes during the first week of culture (immature slices) whereas their number increases importantly during the second week (mature slices). First, we showed that mature cerebellar slices or their conditioned media stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation in immature slices thus demonstrating the existence of diffusible factors controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation. Using conditioned media from different models of slice culture in which the number of Purkinje cells varies drastically, we showed that the effects of these differentiating factors were proportional to the number of Purkinje cells. To identify these diffusible factors, we first performed a transcriptome analysis with an Affymetrix array for cerebellar cortex and then real-time quantitative PCR on mRNAs extracted from fluorescent flow cytometry sorted (FACS) Purkinje cells of L7-GFP transgenic mice at different ages. These analyses revealed that during postnatal maturation, Purkinje cells down-regulate Sonic Hedgehog and up-regulate vitronectin. Then, we showed that Sonic Hedgehog stimulates the proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and inhibits their differentiation. In contrast, vitronectin stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation, whereas its inhibition with blocking antibodies abolishes the conditioned media effects. Altogether, these results suggest that Purkinje cells participate in controlling the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation in the cerebellum through the developmentally regulated expression of diffusible molecules such as Sonic Hedgehog and vitronectin. PMID:23155445

  12. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the hedgehog stomach worm, Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae) nematodes parasitize the stomach of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) and cause weight loss, anorexia and gastric lesions. The present study provides the first morphological description of adult P. clausa from the stomachs of infected hedgehogs, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods From June to October 2011, 10 P. clausa from European hedgehogs were fixed, dried, coated and subjected to SEM examination. Results Males and females (22–30 mm and 28–47 mm, respectively) were stout, with the cuticle reflecting over the lips to form a large cephalic collarette and showing fine transverse striations in both sexes. The mouth was characterized by two large, simple triangular lateral pseudolabia, each armed with external and internal teeth. Inside the buccal cavity, a circle of internal small teeth can be observed. Around the mouth, four sub-median cephalic papillae and two large amphids were also observed. The anterior end of both male and female bore an excretory pore on the ventral side and a pair of lateral ciliated cervical papillae. In the female worm, the vulva was located in the middle and the eggs were characterized by smooth surfaces. The posterior end of the female worm was stumpy with two large phasmids in proximity to its extremity. The posterior end of the male had large lateral alae, joined together anteriorly across the ventral surface, with subequal and dissimilar spicules, as well as four pairs of stalked pre-cloacal papillae, three pairs of post-cloacal papillae, and two phasmids. Three sessile papillae occured anteriorly and four posteriorly to the cloaca. Conclusions The present SEM study provides the first in-depth morphological characterization of adult P. clausa, and highlights similarities and differences with P. bispiculata P. herthameyerae, Heliconema longissimum and Turgida turgida. PMID:23566611

  13. Cysteine-rich domains related to Frizzled receptors and Hedgehog-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Frizzled and Smoothened are homologous seven-transmembrane proteins functioning in the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways, respectively. They harbor an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (FZ-CRD), a mobile evolutionary unit that has been found in a number of other metazoan proteins and Frizzled-like proteins in Dictyostelium. Domains distantly related to FZ-CRDs, in Hedgehog-interacting proteins (HHIPs), folate receptors and riboflavin-binding proteins (FRBPs), and Niemann-Pick Type C1 proteins (NPC1s), referred to as HFN-CRDs, exhibit similar structures and disulfide connectivity patterns compared with FZ-CRDs. We used computational analyses to expand the homologous set of FZ-CRDs and HFN-CRDs, providing a better understanding of their evolution and classification. First, FZ-CRD-containing proteins with various domain compositions were identified in several major eukaryotic lineages including plants and Chromalveolata, revealing a wider phylogenetic distribution of FZ-CRDs than previously recognized. Second, two new and distinct groups of highly divergent FZ-CRDs were found by sensitive similarity searches. One of them is present in the calcium channel component Mid1 in fungi and the uncharacterized FAM155 proteins in metazoans. Members of the other new FZ-CRD group occur in the metazoan-specific RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) proteins that are putative tumor suppressors acting as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases. Finally, sequence and three-dimensional structural comparisons helped us uncover a divergent HFN-CRD in glypicans, which are important morphogen-binding heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Such a finding reinforces the evolutionary ties between the Wnt and Hedgehog signaling pathways and underscores the importance of gene duplications in creating essential signaling components in metazoan evolution. PMID:22693159

  14. Purkinje Cell Maturation Participates in the Control of Oligodendrocyte Differentiation: Role of Sonic Hedgehog and Vitronectin

    PubMed Central

    Bouslama-Oueghlani, Lamia; Wehrlé, Rosine; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Chen, Xiao Ru; Jaudon, Fanny; Lemaigre-Dubreuil, Yolande; Rivals, Isabelle; Sotelo, Constantino; Dusart, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation is temporally regulated during development by multiple factors. Here, we investigated whether the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation might be controlled by neuronal differentiation in cerebellar organotypic cultures. In these cultures, the slices taken from newborn mice show very few oligodendrocytes during the first week of culture (immature slices) whereas their number increases importantly during the second week (mature slices). First, we showed that mature cerebellar slices or their conditioned media stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation in immature slices thus demonstrating the existence of diffusible factors controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation. Using conditioned media from different models of slice culture in which the number of Purkinje cells varies drastically, we showed that the effects of these differentiating factors were proportional to the number of Purkinje cells. To identify these diffusible factors, we first performed a transcriptome analysis with an Affymetrix array for cerebellar cortex and then real-time quantitative PCR on mRNAs extracted from fluorescent flow cytometry sorted (FACS) Purkinje cells of L7-GFP transgenic mice at different ages. These analyses revealed that during postnatal maturation, Purkinje cells down-regulate Sonic Hedgehog and up-regulate vitronectin. Then, we showed that Sonic Hedgehog stimulates the proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and inhibits their differentiation. In contrast, vitronectin stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation, whereas its inhibition with blocking antibodies abolishes the conditioned media effects. Altogether, these results suggest that Purkinje cells participate in controlling the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation in the cerebellum through the developmentally regulated expression of diffusible molecules such as Sonic Hedgehog and vitronectin. PMID:23155445

  15. Malignant Neuroendocrine Tumour (Carcinoid) of the Spleen in an African Pygmy Hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Lowden, L R; Davies, J L

    2016-07-01

    A malignant neuroendocrine tumour (carcinoid) of the spleen was diagnosed on post-mortem examination of a 3-year-old, male African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). The animal presented with a history of inappetence, weight loss, lethargy, a wide-based gait and a palpable abdominal mass. The gross pathological, histopathological, histochemical and immunohistochemical findings are described. Primary splenic carcinoids are reported rarely in the human medical literature and this is believed to be the first report in a non-human animal. PMID:27212029

  16. Natural infection of Algerian hedgehog, Atelerix algirus (Lereboullet 1842) with Leishmania parasites in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Chemkhi, Jomaa; Souguir, Hejer; Ali, Insaf Bel Hadj; Driss, Mehdi; Guizani, Ikram; Guerbouj, Souheila

    2015-10-01

    In Tunisia, Leishmania parasites are responsible of visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania infantum species while three cutaneous disease forms are documented: chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania killicki, sporadic cutaneous form (SCL) caused by L. infantum and the predominant zoonotic cutaneous leishmanaisis (ZCL) due to Leishmania major. ZCL reservoirs are rodents of the Psammomys and Meriones genera, while for SCL the dog is supposed to be a reservoir. Ctenodactylus gundii is involved in the transmission of L. killicki. However, other mammals could constitute potential reservoir hosts in Tunisia and other North African countries. In order to explore the role of hedgehogs as potential reservoirs of leishmaniasis, specimens (N=6) were captured during July-November period in 2011-2013 in an SCL endemic area in El Kef region, North-Western Tunisia. Using morphological characteristics, all specimens were described and measured. Biopsies from liver, heart, kidney and spleen of each animal were used to extract genomic DNA, which was further used in PCR assays to assess the presence of Leishmania parasites. Different PCRs targeting kinetoplast minicircles, ITS1, mini-exon genes and a repetitive Leishmania- specific sequence, were applied. To further identify Leishmania species involved, RFLP analysis of amplified fragments was performed with appropriate restriction enzymes. Using morphological characters, animals were identified as North African hedgehogs, also called Algerian hedgehogs, that belong to the Erinaceidae family, genus Atelerix Pomel 1848, and species algirus (Lereboullet, 1842). PCR results showed in total that all specimens were Leishmania infected, with different organs incriminated, mainly liver and spleen. Results were confirmed by direct sequencing of amplified fragments. Species identification showed that all specimens were infected with L. major, three of which were additionally co-infected with L. infantum. The present study

  17. Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome: clinical case with a novel mutation of sonic hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Garavelli, Livia; Zanacca, C; Caselli, G; Banchini, G; Dubourg, C; David, V; Odent, S; Gurrieri, F; Neri, G

    2004-05-15

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is a rare dental anomaly. It is usually considered as a minor manifestation of holoprosencephaly (HPE). Some reported families had severe cases of HPE in some members and SMMCI in others. Mutations of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) have been documented in these families. SMMCI has also been found as an isolated finding or together with other anomalies such as microcephaly, short stature, endocrine pathology, and choanal atresia. We describe a patient with SMMCI and a novel SHH mutation: Val332Ala. PMID:15103725

  18. Drosophila melanogaster Hedgehog cooperates with Frazzled to guide axons through a non-canonical signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ricolo, Delia; Butí, Elisenda; Araújo, Sofia J

    2015-08-01

    We report that the morphogen Hedgehog (Hh) is an axonal chemoattractant in the midline of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Hh is present in the ventral nerve cord during axonal guidance and overexpression of hh in the midline causes ectopic midline crossing of FasII-positive axonal tracts. In addition, we show that Hh influences axonal guidance via a non-canonical signalling pathway dependent on Ptc. Our results reveal that the Hh pathway cooperates with the Netrin/Frazzled pathway to guide axons through the midline in invertebrates. PMID:25936631

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of novel benzylphthalazine derivatives as hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaolong; Peng, Yuanqiu; Lu, Xiuhong; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Weili; Tan, Wenfu; Dong, Xiaochun

    2016-07-01

    We report herein the design and synthesis of a series of novel benzylphthalazine derivatives as hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors. Gli-luciferase assay demonstrated that changing piperazine ring of Anta XV to different four, five or six-membered heterocyclic building blocks afforded significant influences on Hh pathway inhibition. In particular, compound 10e with piperidin-4-amine moiety was found to possess 12-fold higher Hh inhibitory activities comparing to the lead compound in vitro. In vivo efficacy of 10e in a ptch(+/-)p53(-/-) mouse medulloblastoma allograft model also indicated encouraging results. PMID:27180012

  20. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  1. Inhibition of Hedgehog-Signaling Driven Genes in Prostate Cancer Cells by Sutherlandia frutescens Extract

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan; Starkey, Nicholas; Lei, Wei; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Folk, William R.; Lubahn, Dennis B.

    2015-01-01

    Sutherlandia frutescens (L) R. Br. (Sutherlandia) is a South African botanical that is traditionally used to treat a variety of health conditions, infections and diseases, including cancer. We hypothesized Sutherlandia might act through Gli/ Hedgehog (Hh)-signaling in prostate cancer cells and used RNA-Seq transcription profiling to profile gene expression in TRAMPC2 murine prostate cancer cells with or without Sutherlandia extracts. We found 50% of Hh-responsive genes can be repressed by Sutherlandia ethanol extract, including the canonical Hh-responsive genes Gli1 and Ptch1 as well as newly distinguished Hh-responsive genes Hsd11b1 and Penk. PMID:26710108

  2. Hedgehog pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Silapunt, Sirunya; Chen, Leon; Migden, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of locally advanced basal cell carcinomas (laBCCs) with large, aggressive, destructive, and disfiguring tumors, or metastatic disease is challenging. Dysregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified in the vast majority of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). There are two United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)-approved Hh pathway inhibitors (HPIs) that exhibit antitumor activity in advanced BCC with an acceptable safety profile. Common adverse effects include muscle spasms, dysgeusia, alopecia, fatigue, nausea and weight loss. PMID:27583029

  3. Role of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) Signaling in Bladder Cancer Stemness and Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Syed, Islam S; Pedram, Akbari; Farhat, Walid A

    2016-02-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway has emerged as a critical component of bladder development, cancer initiation, and progression. While the role of Shh signaling in bladder development is well documented, its role in bladder cancer progression is uncertain. Additionally, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been identified to promote bladder cancer progression in the initial stages and also contribute to drug resistance in the later stage and ultimately metastasis. We speculate that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and Shh fuel the carcinogenesis process. This review presents the most recent studies focusing on the role of Shh signaling in bladder cancer progression. PMID:26757905

  4. Pitchfork and Gprasp2 Target Smoothened to the Primary Cilium for Hedgehog Pathway Activation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bomi; Padula, Daniela; Burtscher, Ingo; Landerer, Cedric; Lutter, Dominik; Theis, Fabian; Messias, Ana C; Geerlof, Arie; Sattler, Michael; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane receptor Smoothened (Smo) activates all Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by translocation into the primary cilia (PC), but how this is regulated is not well understood. Here we show that Pitchfork (Pifo) and the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2) are essential components of an Hh induced ciliary targeting complex able to regulate Smo translocation to the PC. Depletion of Pifo or Gprasp2 leads to failure of Smo translocation to the PC and lack of Hh target gene activation. Together, our results identify a novel protein complex that is regulated by Hh signaling and required for Smo ciliary trafficking and Hh pathway activation. PMID:26901434

  5. Pitchfork and Gprasp2 Target Smoothened to the Primary Cilium for Hedgehog Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Padula, Daniela; Burtscher, Ingo; Landerer, Cedric; Lutter, Dominik; Theis, Fabian; Messias, Ana C.; Geerlof, Arie; Sattler, Michael; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane receptor Smoothened (Smo) activates all Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by translocation into the primary cilia (PC), but how this is regulated is not well understood. Here we show that Pitchfork (Pifo) and the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2) are essential components of an Hh induced ciliary targeting complex able to regulate Smo translocation to the PC. Depletion of Pifo or Gprasp2 leads to failure of Smo translocation to the PC and lack of Hh target gene activation. Together, our results identify a novel protein complex that is regulated by Hh signaling and required for Smo ciliary trafficking and Hh pathway activation. PMID:26901434

  6. Trichophyton erinacei kerion barbae from a hedgehog with direct osculatory transfer to another person.

    PubMed

    Sidwell, R U; Chan, I; Francis, N; Bunker, C B

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of kerion tinea barbae infection due to Trichophyton erinacei in a 37-year-old man. The infection had also been transferred to his partner by direct contact from kissing. T. erinacei is a zoophilic dermatophyte occasionally harboured by the hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus). There are few reports of human infection in the literature, and it rarely causes a kerion. There is only one previous report of tinea barbae occurrence due to T. erinacei. This case highlights the possibility of one of the more unusual fungal infections that can be acquired in the UK, and highlights the necessity of asking specific questions to identify possible sources of infection. PMID:24016062

  7. Not so Fast: Co-Requirements for Sonic Hedgehog Induced Brain Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Stacey A.; Rubin, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway plays an integral role in cellular proliferation during normal brain development and also drives growth in a variety of cancers including brain cancer. Clinical trials of Shh pathway inhibitors for brain tumors have yielded disappointing results, indicating a more nuanced role for Shh signaling. We postulate that Shh signaling does not work alone but requires co-activation of other signaling pathways for tumorigenesis and stem cell maintenance. This review will focus on the interplay between the Shh pathway and these pathways to promote tumor growth in brain tumors, presenting opportunities for the study of combinatorial therapies. PMID:26258793

  8. Neurons diversify astrocytes in the adult brain through sonic hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Farmer, W Todd; Abrahamsson, Therése; Chierzi, Sabrina; Lui, Christopher; Zaelzer, Cristian; Jones, Emma V; Bally, Blandine Ponroy; Chen, Gary G; Théroux, Jean-Francois; Peng, Jimmy; Bourque, Charles W; Charron, Frédéric; Ernst, Carl; Sjöström, P Jesper; Murai, Keith K

    2016-02-19

    Astrocytes are specialized and heterogeneous cells that contribute to central nervous system function and homeostasis. However, the mechanisms that create and maintain differences among astrocytes and allow them to fulfill particular physiological roles remain poorly defined. We reveal that neurons actively determine the features of astrocytes in the healthy adult brain and define a role for neuron-derived sonic hedgehog (Shh) in regulating the molecular and functional profile of astrocytes. Thus, the molecular and physiological program of astrocytes is not hardwired during development but, rather, depends on cues from neurons that drive and sustain their specialized properties. PMID:26912893

  9. Generalized hedgehog ansatz and Gribov copies in regions with nontrivial topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Salgado-Rebolledo, Patricio

    2013-02-01

    In this paper the arising of Gribov copies both in Landau and Coulomb gauges in regions with nontrivial topologies but flat metric, (such as closed tubes S1×D2, or R×T2) will be analyzed. Using a novel generalization of the hedgehog ansatz beyond spherical symmetry, analytic examples of Gribov copies of the vacuum will be constructed. Using such ansatz, we will also construct the elliptic Gribov pendulum. The requirement of absence of Gribov copies of the vacuum satisfying the strong boundary conditions implies geometrical constraints on the shapes and sizes of the regions with nontrivial topologies.

  10. The karyotype of the middle-African hedgehog Atelerix albiventris Wagner, 1841 and its cytotaxonomical relationships to other Erinaceinae (Insectivora: Erinaceidae).

    PubMed

    Hübner, R; Maddalena, T; Poduschka, W

    1991-01-01

    Like other hedgehog species investigated hitherto, also the Middle African species Atelerix albiventris has a diploid number of 48 chromosomes. However, Aethechinus and Atelerix display quite distinct cytogenetic characteristics compared to the hedgehog genera Erinaceus, Hemiechinus and Paraechinus. Individual chromosome structures and reactivities permit the recognition of similarities to the Algerian hedgehog Aethechinus algirus and indicate their close relationship. Nevertheless, the proposal by Corbet (1988) to merge the two taxa into one genus, which is contrary to Robbins and Setzer (1985) remains to be clarified by further investigations. PMID:1879689

  11. Anaplastic astrocytoma in the spinal cord of an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Gibson, C J; Parry, N M A; Jakowski, R M; Eshar, D

    2008-11-01

    A 2-year-old, female hedgehog presented with an 8-month history of progressive, ascending paresis/paralysis and was tentatively diagnosed with wobbly hedgehog syndrome. She died awaiting further diagnostic tests, and the owners consented to postmortem examination. Grossly, the bladder was large and flaccid and the cervical and lumbar spinal cord were regionally enlarged, light grey, and friable with multifocal hemorrhages. The thoracic spinal cord was grossly normal. Microscopically all regions of the spinal cord had similar changes, although the cervical and lumbar sections were most severely affected. These regions were completely effaced by a moderately cellular infiltration of highly pleomorphic polygonal to spindle shaped cells, mineralization, and necrosis, which were most consistent with anaplastic astrocytoma. The thoracic spinal cord white matter was similarly infiltrated by the neoplastic cells, with perivascular extension into the otherwise normal grey matter. A diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma was confirmed using immunohistochemical stains that were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100. PMID:18984799

  12. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    SciTech Connect

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  13. Hedgehog associated to microparticles inhibits adipocyte differentiation via a non-canonical pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Audrey; Hoch, Lucile; Martinez, M. Carmen; Faure, Hélène; Taddei, Maurizio; Petricci, Elena; Manetti, Fabrizio; Girard, Nicolas; Mann, André; Jacques, Caroline; Larghero, Jérôme; Ruat, Martial; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Le Lay, Soazig

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a critical regulator of adipogenesis. Extracellular vesicles are natural Hh carriers, as illustrated by activated/apoptotic lymphocytes specifically shedding microparticles (MP) bearing the morphogen (MPHh+). We show that MPHh+ inhibit adipocyte differentiation and orientate mesenchymal stem cells towards a pro-osteogenic program. Despite a Smoothened (Smo)-dependency, MPHh+ anti-adipogenic effects do not activate a canonical Hh signalling pathway in contrast to those elicited either by the Smo agonist SAG or recombinant Sonic Hedgehog. The Smo agonist GSA-10 recapitulates many of the hallmarks of MPHh+ anti-adipogenic effects. The adipogenesis blockade induced by MPHh+ and GSA-10 was abolished by the Smo antagonist LDE225. We further elucidate a Smo/Lkb1/Ampk axis as the non-canonical Hh pathway used by MPHh+ and GSA-10 to inhibit adipocyte differentiation. Our results highlight for the first time the ability of Hh-enriched MP to signal via a non-canonical pathway opening new perspectives to modulate fat development. PMID:27010359

  14. Tachykinin acts upstream of autocrine Hedgehog signaling during nociceptive sensitization in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Im, Seol Hee; Takle, Kendra; Jo, Juyeon; Babcock, Daniel T; Ma, Zhiguo; Xiang, Yang; Galko, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Pain signaling in vertebrates is modulated by neuropeptides like Substance P (SP). To determine whether such modulation is conserved and potentially uncover novel interactions between nociceptive signaling pathways we examined SP/Tachykinin signaling in a Drosophila model of tissue damage-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity. Tissue-specific knockdowns and genetic mutant analyses revealed that both Tachykinin and Tachykinin-like receptor (DTKR99D) are required for damage-induced thermal nociceptive sensitization. Electrophysiological recording showed that DTKR99D is required in nociceptive sensory neurons for temperature-dependent increases in firing frequency upon tissue damage. DTKR overexpression caused both behavioral and electrophysiological thermal nociceptive hypersensitivity. Hedgehog, another key regulator of nociceptive sensitization, was produced by nociceptive sensory neurons following tissue damage. Surprisingly, genetic epistasis analysis revealed that DTKR function was upstream of Hedgehog-dependent sensitization in nociceptive sensory neurons. Our results highlight a conserved role for Tachykinin signaling in regulating nociception and the power of Drosophila for genetic dissection of nociception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10735.001 PMID:26575288

  15. BMP and Hedgehog Regulate Distinct AGM Hematopoietic Stem Cells Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Crisan, Mihaela; Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Neagu, Alex; Karkanpouna, Sofia; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Purini, Caterina; Vink, Chris S; van der Linden, Reinier; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Monteiro, Rui; Mummery, Christine; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the self-renewing cells of the adult blood differentiation hierarchy, are generated during embryonic stages. The first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the embryo through endothelial to a hematopoietic transition. BMP4 and Hedgehog affect their production and expansion, but it is unknown whether they act to affect the same HSCs. In this study using the BRE GFP reporter mouse strain that identifies BMP/Smad-activated cells, we find that the AGM harbors two types of adult-repopulating HSCs upon explant culture: One type is BMP-activated and the other is a non-BMP-activated HSC type that is indirectly controlled by Hedgehog signaling through the VEGF pathway. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that the two HSC types express distinct but overlapping genetic programs. These results revealing the bifurcation in HSC types at early embryonic stages in the AGM explant model suggest that their development is dependent upon the signaling molecules in the microenvironment. PMID:26923823

  16. Using mechanistic Bayesian networks to identify downstream targets of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The topology of a biological pathway provides clues as to how a pathway operates, but rationally using this topology information with observed gene expression data remains a challenge. Results We introduce a new general-purpose analytic method called Mechanistic Bayesian Networks (MBNs) that allows for the integration of gene expression data and known constraints within a signal or regulatory pathway to predict new downstream pathway targets. The MBN framework is implemented in an open-source Bayesian network learning package, the Python Environment for Bayesian Learning (PEBL). We demonstrate how MBNs can be used by modeling the early steps of the sonic hedgehog pathway using gene expression data from different developmental stages and genetic backgrounds in mouse. Using the MBN approach we are able to automatically identify many of the known downstream targets of the hedgehog pathway such as Gas1 and Gli1, along with a short list of likely targets such as Mig12. Conclusions The MBN approach shown here can easily be extended to other pathways and data types to yield a more mechanistic framework for learning genetic regulatory models. PMID:20021670

  17. Vertebrate Hedgehog is secreted on two types of extracellular vesicles with different signaling properties

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Neha; Walvekar, Ankita; Tate, Dhananjay; Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Bansal, Dhiru; Cicero, Alessandra Lo; Raposo, Graca; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a secreted morphogen that elicits differentiation and patterning in developing tissues. Multiple proposed mechanisms to regulate Hh dispersion includes lipoprotein particles and exosomes. Here we report that vertebrate Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is secreted on two types of extracellular-vesicles/exosomes, from human cell lines and primary chick notochord cells. Although largely overlapping in size as estimated from electron micrographs, the two exosomal fractions exhibited distinct protein and RNA composition. We have probed the functional properties of these vesicles using cell-based assays of Hh-elicited gene expression. Our results suggest that while both Shh-containing exo-vesicular fractions can activate an ectopic Gli-luciferase construct, only exosomes co-expressing Integrins can activate endogenous Shh target genes HNF3β and Olig2 during the differentiation of mouse ES cells to ventral neuronal progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that primary vertebrate cells secrete Shh in distinct vesicular forms, and support a model where packaging of Shh along with other signaling proteins such as Integrins on exosomes modulates target gene activation. The existence of distinct classes of Shh-containing exosomes also suggests a previously unappreciated complexity for fine-tuning of Shh-mediated gradients and pattern formation. PMID:25483805

  18. Scube/You activity mediates release of dually lipid-modified Hedgehog signal in soluble form

    PubMed Central

    Creanga, Adrian; Glenn, Thomas D.; Mann, Randall K.; Saunders, Adam M.; Talbot, William S.; Beachy, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their covalent modification by cholesterol and palmitate, Hedgehog (Hh) signaling proteins are localized predominantly to the plasma membrane of expressing cells. Yet Hh proteins are also capable of mobilizing to and eliciting direct responses from distant cells. The zebrafish you gene, identified genetically >15 years ago, was more recently shown to encode a secreted glycoprotein that acts cell-nonautonomously in the Hh signaling pathway by an unknown mechanism. We investigated the function of the protein encoded by murine Scube2, an ortholog of you, and found that it mediates release in soluble form of the mature, cholesterol- and palmitate-modified Sonic hedgehog protein signal (ShhNp) when added to cultured cells or purified detergent-resistant membrane microdomains containing ShhNp. The efficiency of Scube2-mediated release of ShhNp is enhanced by the palmitate adduct of ShhNp and by coexpression in ShhNp-producing cells of mDispatchedA (mDispA), a transporter-like protein with a previously defined role in the release of lipid-modified Hh signals. The structural determinants of Scube2 required for its activity in cultured cell assays match those required for rescue of you mutant zebrafish embryos, and we thus conclude that the role of Scube/You proteins in Hh signaling in vivo is to facilitate the release and mobilization of Hh proteins for distant action. PMID:22677548

  19. Sonic Hedgehog in pancreatic cancer: From bench to bedside, then back to the bench

    PubMed Central

    Rosow, David E.; Liss, Andrew S.; Strobel, Oliver; Fritz, Stefan; Bausch, Dirk; Valsangkar, Nakul P.; Alsina, Janivette; Kulemann, Birte; Park, Joo Kyung; Yamaguchi, Junpei; LaFemina, Jennifer; Thayer, Sarah P.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental genes are known to regulate cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation; thus, it comes as no surprise that the misregulation of developmental genes plays an important role in the biology of human cancers. One such pathway that has received an increasing amount of attention for its function in carcinogenesis is the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Initially the domain of developmental biologists, the Hh pathway and one of its ligands, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), have been shown to play an important role in body planning and organ development, particularly in the foregut endoderm. Their importance in human disease became known to cancer biologists when germline mutations that resulted in the unregulated activity of the Hh pathway were found to cause basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma. Since then, misexpression of the Hh pathway has been shown to play an important role in many other cancers, including those of the pancreas. In many institutions, investigators are targeting misexpression of the Hh pathway in clinical trials, but there is still much fundamental knowledge to be gained about this pathway that can shape its clinical utility. This review will outline the evolution of our understanding of this pathway as it relates to the pancreas, as well as how the Hh pathway came to be a high-priority target for treatment. PMID:22770959

  20. Effect of light entrainment and temperature on the reproductive cycle in the male hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus).

    PubMed

    Saboureau, M; el Omari, B

    1993-11-01

    The role of photoperiod in the entrainment and synchronization of the reproductive cycle of male hedgehogs, seasonal breeders and hibernating mammals, was investigated. Groups of adult hedgehogs were either maintained outdoors (controls, n = 6) or submitted to accelerated 6-month artificial light regimens under constant ambient temperatures (20 +/- 2 degrees C versus 5 +/- 1 degrees C) in light-proofed rooms. The daily duration of light was varied sinusoidally to produce an amplitude change from 8 h (winter solstice) to 16 h (summer solstice) during the 6-month light cycle. Animals were transferred from outdoors to a high ambient temperature (20 +/- 2 degrees C) and submitted to accelerated 6-month light regimens at two times of the year: from winter solstice (Group 1, n = 14) with increasing daylengths (from 8 to 16 h) and from summer solstice (Group 2, n = 8) with decreasing daylengths (from 16 to 8 h). The light regimens were then reversed for Groups 1 and 2. After the first 6-month cycle, the animals in Group 1 were allocated to two groups and maintained under the same initial light regimen but submitted to two ambient temperatures: Group 1 (n = 7) was maintained at 20 +/- 2 degrees C and Group 3 (n = 7) was transferred to a cold environment (5 +/- 1 degrees C). In control and experimental animals, testicular volume was estimated and blood samples were obtained twice a month to measure plasma testosterone and LH concentrations by radioimmunoassay.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8107032

  1. Hedgehog-induced phosphorylation by CK1 sustains the activity of Ci/Gli activator

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qing; Li, Shuang; Li, Shuangxi; Jiang, Alice; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling governs many developmental processes by regulating the balance between the repressor (CiR/GliR) and activator (CiA/GliA) forms of Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) transcription factors. Although much is known about how CiR/GliR is controlled, the regulation of CiA/GliA remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Casein kinase 1 (CK1) sustains Hh signaling downstream of Costal2 and Suppressor of fused (Sufu) by protecting CiA from premature degradation. We show that Hh stimulates Ci phosphorylation by CK1 at multiple Ser/Thr-rich degrons to inhibit its recognition by the Hh-induced MATH and BTB domain containing protein (HIB), a substrate receptor for the Cullin 3 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. In Hh-receiving cells, reduction of CK1 activity accelerated HIB-mediated degradation of CiA, leading to premature loss of pathway activity. We also provide evidence that GliA is regulated by CK1 in a similar fashion and that CK1 acts downstream of Sufu to promote Sonic hedgehog signaling. Taken together, our study not only reveals an unanticipated and conserved mechanism by which phosphorylation of Ci/Gli positively regulates Hh signaling but also provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that substrate recognition by the Cullin 3 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases is negatively regulated by a kinase. PMID:25512501

  2. BMP and Hedgehog Regulate Distinct AGM Hematopoietic Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, Mihaela; Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Neagu, Alex; Karkanpouna, Sofia; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Purini, Caterina; Vink, Chris S.; van der Linden, Reinier; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.; Monteiro, Rui; Mummery, Christine; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the self-renewing cells of the adult blood differentiation hierarchy, are generated during embryonic stages. The first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the embryo through endothelial to a hematopoietic transition. BMP4 and Hedgehog affect their production and expansion, but it is unknown whether they act to affect the same HSCs. In this study using the BRE GFP reporter mouse strain that identifies BMP/Smad-activated cells, we find that the AGM harbors two types of adult-repopulating HSCs upon explant culture: One type is BMP-activated and the other is a non-BMP-activated HSC type that is indirectly controlled by Hedgehog signaling through the VEGF pathway. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that the two HSC types express distinct but overlapping genetic programs. These results revealing the bifurcation in HSC types at early embryonic stages in the AGM explant model suggest that their development is dependent upon the signaling molecules in the microenvironment. PMID:26923823

  3. FOXC1 Activates Smoothened-Independent Hedgehog Signaling in Basal-like Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bingchen; Qu, Ying; Jin, Yanli; Yu, Yi; Deng, Nan; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Na; Bose, Shikha; Wang, Qiang; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Abrol, Ravinder; Jensen, Tor W.; Berman, Benjamin; Tanaka, Hisashi; Johnson, Jeffrey; Gao, Bowen; Hao, Jijun; Liu, Zhenqiu; Buttyan, Ralph; Ray, Partha S.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Giuliano, Armando E.; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mesoderm- and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated transcription factor FOXC1 is specifically overexpressed in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC), but its biochemical function is not understood. Here we demonstrate that FOXC1 controls cancer stem cell (CSC) properties enriched in BLBC cells via activation of Smoothened (SMO)-independent Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. This non-canonical activation of Hh is specifically mediated by Gli2. We further show that the N-terminal domain of FOXC1 (aa 1–68) binds directly to an internal region (aa 898–1168) of Gli2, enhancing the DNA-binding and transcription-activating capacity of Gli2. FOXC1 expression correlates with that of Gli2 and its targets in human breast cancers. Moreover, FOXC1 overexpression reduces sensitivity to anti-Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitors in BLBC cells and xenograft tumors. Together, these findings reveal FOXC1-mediated non-canonical Hh signaling that determines the BLBC stem-like phenotype and anti-Hh sensitivity, supporting inhibition of FOXC1 pathways as potential approaches for improving BLBC treatment. PMID:26565916

  4. Regulator of G-protein signaling - 5 (RGS5) is a novel repressor of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, William M; Gunaje, Jagadambika; Daum, Guenter; Dong, Xiu Rong; Majesky, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo). Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS) proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh)-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases. PMID:23637832

  5. Sonic hedgehog shedding results in functional activation of the solubilized protein.

    PubMed

    Ohlig, Stefanie; Farshi, Pershang; Pickhinke, Ute; van den Boom, Johannes; Höing, Susanne; Jakuschev, Stanislav; Hoffmann, Daniel; Dreier, Rita; Schöler, Hans R; Dierker, Tabea; Bordych, Christian; Grobe, Kay

    2011-06-14

    All Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are released from producing cells despite being synthesized as N- and C-terminally lipidated, membrane-tethered molecules. Thus, a cellular mechanism is needed for Hh solubilization. We previously suggested that a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)-mediated shedding of Sonic hedgehog (ShhNp) from its lipidated N and C termini results in protein solubilization. This finding, however, seemed at odds with the established role of N-terminal palmitoylation for ShhNp signaling activity. We now resolve this paradox by showing that N-palmitoylation of ShhNp N-terminal peptides is required for their proteolytic removal during solubilization. These peptides otherwise block ShhNp zinc coordination sites required for ShhNp binding to its receptor Patched (Ptc), explaining the essential yet indirect role of N-palmitoylation for ShhNp function. We suggest a functional model in which membrane-tethered multimeric ShhNp is at least partially autoinhibited in trans but is processed into fully active, soluble multimers upon palmitoylation-dependent cleavage of inhibitory N-terminal peptides. PMID:21664575

  6. Role of Hedgehog signalling at the transition from double-positive to single-positive thymocyte.

    PubMed

    Furmanski, Anna L; Saldana, Jose Ignacio; Rowbotham, Nicola J; Ross, Susan E; Crompton, Tessa

    2012-02-01

    In the thymus, developing T cells receive signals that determine lineage choice, specificity, MHC restriction and tolerance to self-antigen. One way in which thymocytes receive instruction is by secretion of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from thymic epithelial cells. We have previously shown that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the thymus decreases the CD4:CD8 single-positive (SP) thymocyte ratio. Here, we present data indicating that double-positive (DP) thymocytes are Hh-responsive and that thymocyte-intrinsic Hh signalling plays a role in modulating the production of CD4(+) (SP4), CD8(+) (SP8) and unconventional T-cell subsets. Repression of physiological Hh signalling in thymocytes altered the proportions of DP and SP4 cells. Thymocyte-intrinsic Hh-dependent transcription also attenuated both the production of mature SP4 and SP8 cells, and the establishment of peripheral T-cell compartments in TCR-transgenic mice. Additionally, stimulation or withdrawal of Hh signals in the WT foetal thymus impaired or enhanced upregulation of the CD4 lineage-specific transcription factor Gata3 respectively. These data together suggest that Hh signalling may play a role in influencing the later stages of thymocyte development. PMID:22101858

  7. Ventral specification and perturbed boundary formation in the mouse midbrain in the absence of Hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Jennifer L.; Chiang, Chin; Huang, Xi; Agarwala, Seema

    2008-01-01

    Although Hedgehog (HH) signaling plays a critical role in patterning the ventral midbrain, its role in early midbrain specification is not known. We examined the midbrains of sonic hedgehog (Shh) and smoothened (Smo) mutant mice where HH signaling is respectively attenuated and eliminated. We show that some ventral (Evx1+) cell-fates are specified in the Shh-/- mouse in a Ptc1- and Gli1-independent manner. HH-independent ventral midbrain induction was further confirmed by the presence of a Pax7-negative ventral midbrain territory in both Shh-/- and Smo-/- mice at and before E8.5. Midbrain signaling centers are severely disrupted in the Shh-/- mutant. Interestingly, dorsal markers are upregulated (Wnt1, Gdf7, Pax7), downregulated (Lfng) or otherwise altered (Zic1) in the Shh-/- midbrain. Together with the increased cell-death seen specifically in Shh-/- dorsal midbrains (E8.5-E9), our results suggest specific regulation of dorsal patterning by SHH, rather than a simple deregulation due to its absence. PMID:18429041

  8. Sonic hedgehog gene therapy increases the ability of the dystrophic skeletal muscle to regenerate after injury.

    PubMed

    Piccioni, A; Gaetani, E; Palladino, M; Gatto, I; Smith, R C; Neri, V; Marcantoni, M; Giarretta, I; Silver, M; Straino, S; Capogrossi, M; Landolfi, R; Pola, R

    2014-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a crucial regulator of muscle development during embryogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) regulates postnatal myogenesis in the adult skeletal muscle both directly, by acting on muscle satellite cells, and indirectly, by promoting the production of growth factors from interstitial fibroblasts. Here, we show that in mdx mice, the murine equivalent of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans, progression of the dystrophic pathology corresponds to progressive inhibition of the Hh signaling pathway in the skeletal muscle. We also show that the upregulation of the Hh pathway in response to injury and during regeneration is significantly impaired in mdx muscle. Shh treatment increases the proliferative potential of satellite cells isolated from the muscles of mdx mice. This treatment also increases the production of proregenerative factors, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor, from fibroblasts isolated from the muscle of mdx mice. In vivo, overexpression of the Hh pathway using a plasmid encoding the human Shh gene promotes successful regeneration after injury in terms of increased number of proliferating myogenic cells and newly formed myofibers, as well as enhanced vascularization and decreased fibrosis. PMID:24572787

  9. Advanced basal cell carcinoma, the hedgehog pathway, and treatment options – role of smoothened inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, Leslie A; Sharfman, William H

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer and its incidence is rising worldwide. Ultraviolet radiation exposure, including tanning bed use, as well as host factors play a role in its development. The majority of cases are treated and cured with local therapies including surgery. Yet, the health care costs of diagnosis and treatment of BCCs in the US is substantial. In the United States, the cost of nonmelanoma skin cancer care in the Medicare population is estimated to be US$426 million per year. While rare, locally advanced BCCs that can no longer be controlled with surgery and/or radiation, and metastatic BCCs do occur and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a smoothened inhibitor targeted at the hedgehog pathway, is the first US Food and Drug Association (FDA)-approved agent in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, and metastatic BCCs. This class of agents appears to be changing the survival rates in advanced BCC patients, but appropriate patient selection and monitoring are important. Multidisciplinary assessments are essential for the optimal care and management of these patients. For some patients with locally advanced BCC, treatment with a hedgehog inhibitor may eliminate the need for an excessively disfiguring or morbid surgery. PMID:26604681

  10. Hedgehog signaling regulates FOXA2 in esophageal embryogenesis and Barrett’s metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David H.; Tiwari, Anjana; Kim, Monica E.; Clemons, Nicholas J.; Regmi, Nanda L.; Hodges, William A.; Berman, David M.; Montgomery, Elizabeth A.; Watkins, D. Neil; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qiuyang; Jie, Chunfa; Spechler, Stuart J.; Souza, Rhonda F.

    2014-01-01

    Metaplasia can result when injury reactivates latent developmental signaling pathways that determine cell phenotype. Barrett’s esophagus is a squamous-to-columnar epithelial metaplasia caused by reflux esophagitis. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is active in columnar-lined, embryonic esophagus and inactive in squamous-lined, adult esophagus. We showed previously that Hh signaling is reactivated in Barrett’s metaplasia and overexpression of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) in mouse esophageal squamous epithelium leads to a columnar phenotype. Here, our objective was to identify Hh target genes involved in Barrett’s pathogenesis. By microarray analysis, we found that the transcription factor Foxa2 is more highly expressed in murine embryonic esophagus compared with postnatal esophagus. Conditional activation of Shh in mouse esophageal epithelium induced FOXA2, while FOXA2 expression was reduced in Shh knockout embryos, establishing Foxa2 as an esophageal Hh target gene. Evaluation of patient samples revealed FOXA2 expression in Barrett’s metaplasia, dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma but not in esophageal squamous epithelium or squamous cell carcinoma. In esophageal squamous cell lines, Hh signaling upregulated FOXA2, which induced expression of MUC2, an intestinal mucin found in Barrett’s esophagus, and the MUC2-processing protein AGR2. Together, these data indicate that Hh signaling induces expression of genes that determine an intestinal phenotype in esophageal squamous epithelial cells and may contribute to the development of Barrett’s metaplasia. PMID:25083987

  11. Structure of a Heparin-dependent Complex of Hedgehog and Ihog

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan,J.; Yao, S.; Zheng, X.; Geisbrecht, B.; Ghirlando, R.; Beachy, P.; Leahy, D.

    2006-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling molecules mediate key tissue-patterning events during animal development, and inappropriate activation of Hh signaling in adults has been associated with human cancers. Recently, a conserved family of type I integral membrane proteins required for normal response to the Hh signal was discovered. One member of this family, Ihog (interference hedgehog), functions upstream or at the level of Patched (Ptc), but how Ihog participates in Hh signaling remains unclear. Here, we show that heparin binding induces Ihog dimerization and is required to mediate high-affinity interactions between Ihog and Hh. We also present crystal structures of a Hh-binding fragment of Ihog, both alone and complexed with Hh. Heparin is not well ordered in these structures, but a basic cleft in the first FNIII domain of Ihog (IhogFn1) is shown by mutagenesis to mediate heparin binding. These results establish that Hh directly binds Ihog and provide the first demonstration of a specific role for heparin in Hh responsiveness.

  12. Multicentric epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Choi, Ul-Soo

    2014-12-01

    A 2-year-old female African hedgehog was presented with a 5-month history of pruritus, and diffuse spine and hair loss. A dermatologic examination revealed erythema, excoriation, scales, and crusting affecting the face, flanks, forelimbs, hindlimbs, and dorsal and ventral abdomen. Fine-needle aspiration was performed and skin biopsies were taken from several lesions for cytologic and histologic evaluation. The aspirates yielded smears characterized by a monomorphic population of medium-sized to large lymphocytes with scant to moderate amounts of clear to moderately basophilic cytoplasm and distinct nucleoli along with a low number of cytoplasmic fragments. On histopathologic examination, there were dense dermal lymphoid infiltrates invading the dermis and a monomorphic population of round cells that had infiltrated the overlying epidermis. Epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma was diagnosed based on morphologic features. Additional immunochemical analysis using anti-CD3 and anti-CD79a antibodies revealed strong CD3 expression by the tumor cells, which confirmed epitheliotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This is the first description of a multicentric pattern of epitheliotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in an African hedgehog. PMID:25204556

  13. A Hedgehog- and Antennapedia-dependent niche maintains Drosophila haematopoietic precursors

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Lolitika; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A.; Evans, Cory J.; Hartenstein, Volker; Banerjee, Utpal

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster lymph gland is a haematopoietic organ1–3 in which pluripotent blood cell progenitors proliferate and mature into differentiated haemocytes. Previous work4 has defined three domains, the medullary zone, the cortical zone and the posterior signalling centre (PSC), within the developing third-instar lymph gland. The medullary zone is populated by a core of undifferentiated, slowly cycling progenitor cells, whereas mature haemocytes comprising plasmatocytes, crystal cells and lamellocytes are peripherally located in the cortical zone. The PSC comprises a third region that was first defined as a small group of cells expressing the Notch ligand Serrate5. Here we show that the PSC is specified early in the embryo by the homeotic gene Antennapedia (Antp) and expresses the signalling molecule Hedgehog. In the absence of the PSC or the Hedgehog signal, the precursor population of the medullary zone is lost because cells differentiate prematurely. We conclude that the PSC functions as a haematopoietic niche that is essential for the maintenance of blood cell precursors in Drosophila. Identification of this system allows the opportunity for genetic manipulation and direct in vivo imaging of a haematopoietic niche interacting with blood precursors. PMID:17361183

  14. The Role of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Osteoclastogenesis and Jaw Bone Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Aoyama, Eriko; Takebe, Yuichiro; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Okui, Tatsuo; Kurio, Naito; Takada, Hiroyuki; Obata, Kyoichi; Pang, Pai; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and its signaling have been identified in several human cancers, and increased levels of its expression appear to correlate with disease progression and metastasis. However, the role of SHH in bone destruction associated with oral squamous cell carcinomas is still unclear. In this study we analyzed SHH expression and the role played by SHH signaling in gingival carcinoma-induced jawbone destruction. From an analysis of surgically resected lower gingival squamous cell carcinoma mandible samples, we found that SHH was highly expressed in tumor cells that had invaded the bone matrix. On the other hand, the hedgehog receptor Patched and the signaling molecule Gli-2 were highly expressed in the osteoclasts and the progenitor cells. SHH stimulated osteoclast formation and pit formation in the presence of the receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in CD11b+ mouse bone marrow cells. SHH upregulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, NFATc1, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and Cathepsin K expression in RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest that tumor-derived SHH stimulated the osteoclast formation and bone resorption in the tumor jawbone microenvironment. PMID:27007126

  15. The Role of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Osteoclastogenesis and Jaw Bone Destruction.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Aoyama, Eriko; Takebe, Yuichiro; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Okui, Tatsuo; Kurio, Naito; Takada, Hiroyuki; Obata, Kyoichi; Pang, Pai; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and its signaling have been identified in several human cancers, and increased levels of its expression appear to correlate with disease progression and metastasis. However, the role of SHH in bone destruction associated with oral squamous cell carcinomas is still unclear. In this study we analyzed SHH expression and the role played by SHH signaling in gingival carcinoma-induced jawbone destruction. From an analysis of surgically resected lower gingival squamous cell carcinoma mandible samples, we found that SHH was highly expressed in tumor cells that had invaded the bone matrix. On the other hand, the hedgehog receptor Patched and the signaling molecule Gli-2 were highly expressed in the osteoclasts and the progenitor cells. SHH stimulated osteoclast formation and pit formation in the presence of the receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in CD11b+ mouse bone marrow cells. SHH upregulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, NFATc1, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and Cathepsin K expression in RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest that tumor-derived SHH stimulated the osteoclast formation and bone resorption in the tumor jawbone microenvironment. PMID:27007126

  16. Hedgehog pathway maintains cell survival under stress conditions, and drives drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Erh-Hsuan; Kao, Yu-Rung; Lin, Chih-An; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Yang, Sheng-Ping; Hsu, Chiung-Fang; Chou, Teh-Ying; Ho, Chao-Chi; Wu, Cheng-Wen

    2016-04-26

    Hedgehog (HH) pathway plays an important role in embryonic development, but is largely inactive in adult except for tissue repair. Aberrant activation of HH pathway has been found in a variety of cancer types. In non-small cell lung cancer, however, the role and importance of HH pathway remain controversial. In the current study, we found that HH pathway was maintained in low activity in lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) cells under normal culture condition, but was highly induced in response to stress conditions. Activation of HH pathway promoted cell survival, growth, and invasion partially through HGF and MET signaling. Hedgehog-Interacting Protein (HHIP), a cell-surface negative regulator of HH pathway, was epigenetically silenced in LAC. Overexpression of HHIP blocked the activation of HH and HGF/MET pathways, and made cells significantly more susceptible to stress conditions. In LAC cells with acquired resistance to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosin Kinase Inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), we found that a part of tumor cells were much more sensitive to HH or HGF/MET inhibitors, suggesting an oncogenic addiction shift from EGFR to HH and HGF/MET pathways. In conclusion, this study showed that HH pathway is a survival signaling that drives LAC cell growth under stress conditions, and HHIP is a key regulator to block the induction of HH pathway. Targeting the HH pathway through inhibitors or HHIP thus holds promise to address EGFR-TKI resistance in LAC in clinic. PMID:27015549

  17. Hedgehog signaling regulates myelination in the peripheral nervous system through primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen

    2012-02-01

    Myelination is an essential prerequisite for the nervous system to transmit an impulse efficiently by a saltatory conduction. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells (SCs) engage in myelination. However, a detailed molecular mechanism underlying myelination still remains unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that the primary cilia of SCs are the regulators of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling-mediated myelination. To confirm our hypothesis, we used mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG)/SC co-cultures, wherein the behavior of SCs could be analyzed by maintaining the interaction of SCs with DRG neurons. Under these conditions, SCs had primary cilia, and Hh signaling molecules accumulated on the primary cilia. When the SCs were stimulated by the addition of desert hedgehog or smoothened agonist, formation of myelin segments on the DRG axons was facilitated. On the contrary, upon administration of cyclopamine, an inhibitor of Hh signaling, myelin segments became comparable to those of controls. Of note, the ratio of SCs harboring primary cilium reached the highest point during the early phase of myelination. Furthermore, the strongest effects of Hh on myelination were encountered during the same stage. These results collectively indicate that Hh signaling regulates myelin formation through primary cilia in the PNS. PMID:22101064

  18. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based ELISA for the hedgehog inhibitors cyclopamine and cyclopamine-KAAD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopamine was isolated from Veratrum californicum and identified as the teratogen responsible for severe craniofacial birth defects including cyclops in the offspring of sheep grazing on mountain ranges in central Idaho. More recently, cyclopamine was found to inhibit the hedgehog (Hh) signaling ...

  19. An ancient yet flexible cis-regulatory architecture allows localized Hedgehog tuning by patched/Ptch1

    PubMed Central

    Lorberbaum, David S; Ramos, Andrea I; Peterson, Kevin A; Carpenter, Brandon S; Parker, David S; De, Sandip; Hillers, Lauren E; Blake, Victoria M; Nishi, Yuichi; McFarlane, Matthew R; Chiang, Ason CY; Kassis, Judith A; Allen, Benjamin L; McMahon, Andrew P; Barolo, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway is part of the ancient developmental-evolutionary animal toolkit. Frequently co-opted to pattern new structures, the pathway is conserved among eumetazoans yet flexible and pleiotropic in its effects. The Hedgehog receptor, Patched, is transcriptionally activated by Hedgehog, providing essential negative feedback in all tissues. Our locus-wide dissections of the cis-regulatory landscapes of fly patched and mouse Ptch1 reveal abundant, diverse enhancers with stage- and tissue-specific expression patterns. The seemingly simple, constitutive Hedgehog response of patched/Ptch1 is driven by a complex regulatory architecture, with batteries of context-specific enhancers engaged in promoter-specific interactions to tune signaling individually in each tissue, without disturbing patterning elsewhere. This structure—one of the oldest cis-regulatory features discovered in animal genomes—explains how patched/Ptch1 can drive dramatic adaptations in animal morphology while maintaining its essential core function. It may also suggest a general model for the evolutionary flexibility of conserved regulators and pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13550.001 PMID:27146892

  20. Interplay between menin and Dnmt1 reversibly regulates pancreatic cancer cell growth downstream of the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Wang, Yun-Feng; Li, Gang; Yang, Sheng-sheng; Liu, Che; Hu, Hao; Jin, Gang; Hu, Xian-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Menin, the product of the Men1 gene, which is frequently mutated in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, acts as a chromatin-remodeling factor to modulate the transcription of cell cycle regulators by interacting with histone modification factors. However, the function of menin and its underlying mechanisms in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remain unknown. Here, we found that menin inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and that its expression was gradually lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis. Menin overexpression significantly activated the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p18 and p27, accompanied with a decrease in DNA methylation levels of p18 and p27 promoters. Mechanistically, we found that interaction of menin with DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) competitively pulled down Dnmt1 from p18 and p27 promoters, leading to the downregulation of DNA methylation levels. Moreover, menin expression was suppressed by Dnmt1 downstream of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, and menin overexpression strongly antagonized the promotion effect of hedgehog signaling on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, the interaction between menin and Dnmt1 reversibly regulates pancreatic cancer cell growth downstream of Hedgehog pathways with complex mutual modulation networks, suggesting that the Hedgehog/Dnmt1/menin axis is a potential molecular target for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26454216

  1. Test Plan for Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Hedgehog Shielded Container, Docket 94-39-7A, Type A Container

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.

    1995-02-27

    This report documents the US Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance testing to be followed for qualification of the Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Hedgehog Shielded Container for use as a Type A packaging. The packaging configurations being tested are intended for liquids and solids, and for air transportation.

  2. Hedgehog signaling is a potent regulator of liver lipid metabolism and reveals a GLI-code associated with steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Matz-Soja, Madlen; Rennert, Christiane; Schönefeld, Kristin; Aleithe, Susanne; Boettger, Jan; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Weiss, Thomas S; Hovhannisyan, Amalya; Zellmer, Sebastian; Klöting, Nora; Schulz, Angela; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Guthke, Reinhardt; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in industrialized countries and is increasing in prevalence. The pathomechanisms, however, are poorly understood. This study assessed the unexpected role of the Hedgehog pathway in adult liver lipid metabolism. Using transgenic mice with conditional hepatocyte-specific deletion of Smoothened in adult mice, we showed that hepatocellular inhibition of Hedgehog signaling leads to steatosis by altering the abundance of the transcription factors GLI1 and GLI3. This steatotic 'Gli-code' caused the modulation of a complex network of lipogenic transcription factors and enzymes, including SREBP1 and PNPLA3, as demonstrated by microarray analysis and siRNA experiments and could be confirmed in other steatotic mouse models as well as in steatotic human livers. Conversely, activation of the Hedgehog pathway reversed the "Gli-code" and mitigated hepatic steatosis. Collectively, our results reveal that dysfunctions in the Hedgehog pathway play an important role in hepatic steatosis and beyond. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13308.001 PMID:27185526

  3. Hedgehog signaling is a potent regulator of liver lipid metabolism and reveals a GLI-code associated with steatosis.

    PubMed

    Matz-Soja, Madlen; Rennert, Christiane; Schönefeld, Kristin; Aleithe, Susanne; Boettger, Jan; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Weiss, Thomas S; Hovhannisyan, Amalya; Zellmer, Sebastian; Klöting, Nora; Schulz, Angela; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Guthke, Reinhardt; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in industrialized countries and is increasing in prevalence. The pathomechanisms, however, are poorly understood. This study assessed the unexpected role of the Hedgehog pathway in adult liver lipid metabolism. Using transgenic mice with conditional hepatocyte-specific deletion of Smoothened in adult mice, we showed that hepatocellular inhibition of Hedgehog signaling leads to steatosis by altering the abundance of the transcription factors GLI1 and GLI3. This steatotic 'Gli-code' caused the modulation of a complex network of lipogenic transcription factors and enzymes, including SREBP1 and PNPLA3, as demonstrated by microarray analysis and siRNA experiments and could be confirmed in other steatotic mouse models as well as in steatotic human livers. Conversely, activation of the Hedgehog pathway reversed the "Gli-code" and mitigated hepatic steatosis. Collectively, our results reveal that dysfunctions in the Hedgehog pathway play an important role in hepatic steatosis and beyond. PMID:27185526

  4. Regulation of chondrocyte terminal differentiation in the postembryonic growth plate: the role of the PTHrP-Indian hedgehog axis.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, C; Jefferies, D; Seawright, E; Houston, B

    2001-09-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation during embryonic bone growth is controlled by interactions between PTHrP and Indian hedgehog. We have now determined that the major components of this signaling pathway are present in the postembryonic growth plate. PTHrP was immunolocalized throughout the growth plate, and semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis of maturationally distinct chondrocyte fractions indicated that PTHrP, Indian hedgehog, and the PTH/PTHrP receptor were expressed at similar levels throughout the growth plate. However, patched, the hedgehog receptor, was more highly expressed in proliferating chondrocytes. Although all fractionated cells responded to PTHrP in culture by increasing thymidine incorporation and cAMP production and decreasing alkaline phosphatase activity, the magnitude of response was greatest in the proliferative chondrocytes. Bone morphogenetic proteins are considered likely intermediates in PTHrP signaling. Expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and 4--7 was detected within the growth plate, and PTHrP inhibited the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-4 and 6. Although organ culture studies indicated a possible paracrine role for epiphyseal chondrocyte-derived PTHrP in regulating growth plate chondrocyte differentiation, the presence within the postembryonic growth plate of functional components of the PTHrP-Indian hedgehog pathway suggests that local mechanisms intrinsic to the growth plate exist to control the rate of endochondral ossification. PMID:11517192

  5. Infestation of urban populations of the Northern white-breasted hedgehog, Erinaceus roumanicus, by Ixodes spp. ticks in Poland.

    PubMed

    Dziemian, S; Michalik, J; Pi Łacińska, B; Bialik, S; Sikora, B; Zwolak, R

    2014-12-01

    Infestation by the nest-dwelling Ixodes hexagonus Leach and the exophilic Ixodes ricinus (Linnaeus) (Ixodida: Ixodidae) on the Northern white-breasted hedgehog, Erinaceus roumanicus (Erinaceomorpha: Erinaceidae), was investigated during a 4-year study in residential areas of the city of Poznań, west-central Poland. Of 341 hedgehogs, 303 (88.9%) hosted 10 061 Ixodes spp. ticks encompassing all parasitic life stages (larvae, nymphs, females). Ixodes hexagonus accounted for 73% and I. ricinus for 27% of the collected ticks. Male hedgehogs carried significantly higher tick burdens than females. Analyses of seasonal prevalence and abundance of I. hexagonus revealed relatively stable levels of infestation of all parasitic stages, with a modest summer peak in tick abundance noted only on male hosts. By contrast, I. ricinus females and nymphs peaked in spring and declined steadily thereafter in summer and autumn, whereas the less abundant larvae peaked in summer. This is the first longterm study to evaluate the seasonal dynamics of both tick species on populations of wild hedgehogs inhabiting urban residential areas. PMID:24861150

  6. Immunohistochemical evaluation of hedgehog signalling in epithelial/mesenchymal interactions in squamous cell carcinoma transformation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ana Cristina; Ferreira, Maira; Ariel, Tamires; Reis, Sílvia Regina; Andrade, Zilton; Peixoto Medrado, Alena

    2016-03-01

    Precancerous lesions have been studied because of their carcinogenic potential and their association with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been reported. In the tumour microenvironment, the processes of angiogenesis and tissue remodelling are regulated by a family of proteins (Hedgehog) described as being able to modulate epithelial/mesenchymal interactions. The objective of this study was to perform a comparative study of precancerous lesions and SCCs by immunohistochemistry for the presence of Sonic, Gli2, SMO and Patched proteins, members of the Hedgehog pathway. Sixteen cases diagnosed as actinic cheilitis associated with SCC were compared to normal oral mucosa. The sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry and the positively stained cells were counted by morphometric analysis. There was a significant progressive increase in expression of all proteins of the Hedgehog pathway, both in the epithelium and in the connective tissue, when sections of normal mucosa, dysplasia and carcinoma were compared (P < 0.05). Thus, one may suggest that the Hedgehog pathway in tumour transformation influences SCC, and more studies should be conducted to expand the understanding of the role of these proteins in neoplastic transformation. PMID:26947270

  7. Holoprosencephaly in RSH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome: Does abnormal cholesterol metabolism affect the function of sonic hedgehog?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.I.; Roessler, E.; Muenke, M.

    1996-12-30

    The RAH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (RAH/SLOS) is an autosomal recessive malformation syndrome associated with increased levels of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) and a defect of cholesterol biosynthesis at the level of 3{beta}-hydroxy-steroid-{Delta}{sup 7}-reductase (7-DHC reductase). Because rats exposed to inhibitors of 7-DHC reductase during development have a high frequency of holoprosencephaly (HPE), we have undertaken a search for biochemical evidence of RSH/SLOS and other possible defects of sterol metabolism among patients with various forms of HPE. We describe 4 patients, one with semilobar HPE and three others with less complete forms of the HPE sequence, in whom we have made a biochemical diagnosis of RAH/SLOS. The clinical and biochemical spectrum of these and other patients with RAH/SLOS suggests a role of abnormal sterol metabolism in the pathogenesis of their malformations. The association of HPE and RAH/SLOS is discussed in light of the recent discoveries that mutations in the embryonic patterning gene, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), can cause HPE in humans and that the sonic hedgehog protein product undergoes autoproteolysis to form a cholesterol-modified active product. These clinical, biochemical, and molecular studies suggest that HPE and other malformations in SLOS may be caused by incomplete or abnormal modification of the sonic hedgehog protein and, possibly, other patterning proteins of the hedgehog class, a hypothesis testable in somatic cell systems. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Hedgehog Receptor Patched Is Expressed in a Tissue and Gestation Specific Manner During Early Human and Murine Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is fundamental for appropriate patterning of nearly every organ system in the developing fetus. The Hh receptor, Patched (Ptc), plays a fundamental role in regulating signal transduction in this pathway. Three main 5 splice forms of the Ptc gene (Ptc1B, Ptc1C, and...

  9. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Yang, Su-Qing; An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Su, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Gou, Lan-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001) in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs. PMID:26943330

  10. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Yang, Su-Qing; An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Su, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Gou, Lan-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001) in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs. PMID:26943330

  11. Plasma lipid transport in the hedgehog: partial characterization of structure and function of apolipoprotein A-I.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, D A; Laplaud, P M; Saboureau, M; Zhou, G; Dolphin, P J; Gotto, A M; Sparrow, J T

    1995-03-01

    Apart from exhibiting the presence of lipoprotein [a] in its plasma, another interest of the European hedgehog in lipoprotein research lies in the quantitative prominence of a complex spectrum of high density lipoproteins (HDL) and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) as cholesterol transporters in plasma (Laplaud, P. M. et al. 1989. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1005: 143-156). We, therefore, initiated studies in the field of reverse cholesterol transport in the hedgehog. As a first step, we characterized apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the main protein component of hedgehog HDL and VHDL. Proteolytic cleavage of apoA-I (M(r) approx. 27 kDa) using two different enzymes resulted in two sets of peptides that were subsequently purified by high performance liquid chromatography, and that allowed us determination of the complete protein sequence. Hedgehog apoA-I thus consists of 241 amino acid residues and exhibits an overall 58% homology to its human counterpart, i.e., the lowest value observed to date among mammalian species. However, it retained the general organization common to all known apoA-Is, i.e., a series of amphipathic helical segments punctuated by proline residues. Circular dichroism experiments indicated a helical content of approx. 45%, increasing to approx. 58% in the presence of lecithin unilamellar liposomes. Apart from other differences, amino acid composition analysis shows that hedgehog apoA-I contains four isoleucine residues, while this amino acid is totally absent from the corresponding protein in higher mammals. Polyclonal antibodies raised against hedgehog apoA-I failed to detect any cross-reactivity between the animal and human proteins, although comparative prediction of the respective antigenic structures using the Hopp-Woods algorithm indicated that several potentially antigenic sites may occur in similar regions of the protein. Finally, hedgehog apoA-I was shown to be able to activate lecithin:cholesterol acyl transferase, although it was 4 to 5

  12. Projections of nucleus caudalis and spinal cord to brainstem and diencephalon in the hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus and Paraechinus aethiopicus): a degeneration study.

    PubMed

    Ring, G; Ganchrow, D

    1983-05-10

    thalamus, projections were confined to ipsilateral PO and zona incerta. In rostral diencephalon bilateral fields were noted in LH. NC terminations in PO and VP parallel results of research in hedgehogs on thalamic projections of the dorsal column nuclei (Jane and Schroeder, '71), and particularly the location in VP of most cells responsive to stimulation of the face (Erickson et al., '67). This suggests that somatic input from NC, some of which may be pain-specific, reaches thalamic areas, a portion of whose neurons are characterized as polymodal and at least partially convergent for somatotopy. These results are consistent with the thesis that specific sensory thalamic nuclei evolved from a diffuse sensory region. Response properties of neurons in the dorsomedial portion of the ventral nuclear field, an area which are also received NC efferents, are not known. Last, NC projections to MD and LH implicate the role of "limbic" aspects of nociception. PMID:6863599

  13. Sonic hedgehog inhibitors prevent colitis-associated cancer via orchestrated mechanisms of IL-6/gp130 inhibition, 15-PGDH induction, Bcl-2 abrogation, and tumorsphere inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kangwan, Napapan; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Han, Young Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling is essential in normal development of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, whereas aberrantly activated SHH is implicated in GI cancers because it facilitates carcinogenesis by redirecting stem cells. Since colitis-associated cancer (CAC) is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, in which SHH and IL-6 signaling, inflammation propagation, and cancer stem cell (CSC) activation have been implicated, we hypothesized that SHH inhibitors may prevent CAC by blocking the above SHH-related carcinogenic pathways. In the intestinal epithelial cells IEC-6 and colon cancer cells HCT-116, IL-6 expression and its signaling were assessed with SHH inhibitors and levels of other inflammatory mediators, proliferation, apoptosis, tumorsphere formation, and tumorigenesis were also measured. CAC was induced in C57BL/6 mice by administration of azoxymethane followed by dextran sodium sulfate administration. SHH inhibitors were administered by oral gavage and the mice were sacrificed at 16 weeks. TNF-α–stimulated IEC-6 cells exhibited increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes, whereas SHH inhibitors suppressed TNF-α–induced inflammatory signaling, especially IL-6/IL-6R/gp130 signaling. SHH inhibitors significantly induced apoptosis, inhibited cell proliferation, suppressed tumorsphere formation, and reduced stemness factors. In the mouse model, SHH inhibitors significantly reduced tumor incidence and multiplicity, decreased the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, STAT3, and NF-κB, and significantly induced apoptosis. In colosphere xenografts, SHH inhibitor significantly suppressed tumorigenesis by inhibiting tumorsphere formation. Taken together, our data suggest that administration of SHH inhibitors could be an effective strategy to prevent colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis, mainly by targeting IL-6 signaling, ablating CSCs, and suppressing oncogenic inflammation, achieving chemoquiescence ultimately. PMID:26716648

  14. Sonic hedgehog inhibitors prevent colitis-associated cancer via orchestrated mechanisms of IL-6/gp130 inhibition, 15-PGDH induction, Bcl-2 abrogation, and tumorsphere inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Kim, Yoon-Jae; Han, Young Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-02-16

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling is essential in normal development of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, whereas aberrantly activated SHH is implicated in GI cancers because it facilitates carcinogenesis by redirecting stem cells. Since colitis-associated cancer (CAC) is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, in which SHH and IL-6 signaling, inflammation propagation, and cancer stem cell (CSC) activation have been implicated, we hypothesized that SHH inhibitors may prevent CAC by blocking the above SHH-related carcinogenic pathways. In the intestinal epithelial cells IEC-6 and colon cancer cells HCT-116, IL-6 expression and its signaling were assessed with SHH inhibitors and levels of other inflammatory mediators, proliferation, apoptosis, tumorsphere formation, and tumorigenesis were also measured. CAC was induced in C57BL/6 mice by administration of azoxymethane followed by dextran sodium sulfate administration. SHH inhibitors were administered by oral gavage and the mice were sacrificed at 16 weeks. TNF-α-stimulated IEC-6 cells exhibited increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes, whereas SHH inhibitors suppressed TNF-α-induced inflammatory signaling, especially IL-6/IL-6R/gp130 signaling. SHH inhibitors significantly induced apoptosis, inhibited cell proliferation, suppressed tumorsphere formation, and reduced stemness factors. In the mouse model, SHH inhibitors significantly reduced tumor incidence and multiplicity, decreased the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, STAT3, and NF-κB, and significantly induced apoptosis. In colosphere xenografts, SHH inhibitor significantly suppressed tumorigenesis by inhibiting tumorsphere formation. Taken together, our data suggest that administration of SHH inhibitors could be an effective strategy to prevent colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis, mainly by targeting IL-6 signaling, ablating CSCs, and suppressing oncogenic inflammation, achieving chemoquiescence ultimately. PMID:26716648

  15. Statins activate the canonical hedgehog-signaling and aggravate non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, but inhibit the non-canonical hedgehog signaling and cirrhotic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Uschner, Frank E.; Ranabhat, Ganesh; Choi, Steve S.; Granzow, Michaela; Klein, Sabine; Schierwagen, Robert; Raskopf, Esther; Gautsch, Sebastian; van der Ven, Peter F. M.; Fürst, Dieter O.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Mae Diehl, Anna; Trebicka, Jonel

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis but also portal vein obstruction cause portal hypertension (PHT) and angiogenesis. This study investigated the differences of angiogenesis in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic PHT with special emphasis on the canonical (Shh/Gli) and non-canonical (Shh/RhoA) hedgehog pathway. Cirrhotic (bile duct ligation/BDL; CCl4 intoxication) and non-cirrhotic (partial portal vein ligation/PPVL) rats received either atorvastatin (15 mg/kg; 7d) or control chow before sacrifice. Invasive hemodynamic measurement and Matrigel implantation assessed angiogenesis in vivo. Angiogenesis in vitro was analysed using migration and tube formation assay. In liver and vessel samples from animals and humans, transcript expression was analyzed using RT-PCR and protein expression using Western blot. Atorvastatin decreased portal pressure, shunt flow and angiogenesis in cirrhosis, whereas atorvastatin increased these parameters in PPVL rats. Non-canonical Hh was upregulated in experimental and human liver cirrhosis and was blunted by atorvastatin. Moreover, atorvastatin blocked the non-canonical Hh-pathway RhoA dependently in activated hepatic steallate cells (HSCs). Interestingly, hepatic and extrahepatic Hh-pathway was enhanced in PPVL rats, which resulted in increased angiogenesis. In summary, statins caused contrary effects in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. Atorvastatin inhibited the non-canonical Hh-pathway and angiogenesis in cirrhosis. In portal vein obstruction, statins enhanced the canonical Hh-pathway and aggravated PHT and angiogenesis. PMID:26412302

  16. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Spugnini, Enrico P; Pagotto, Annarita; Zazzera, Francesca; D'Avino, Alfredo; Caruso, Giovanni; Citro, Gennaro; Baldi, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    A three-year-old male African hedgehog was presented for a non healing crusty proliferation on the left pinna. The lesion failed to respond to topical therapy and systemic antibiotic therapy. Whole body radiography and abdominal ultrasonograpy were within normal limits. The lesion was surgically removed. The patient recovered well from the procedure and remained in remission for nine months when he came back as an emergency case and died of an unrelated disease. The histopathology report enabled a diagnosis of completely excised cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This report represents the first successful treatment of a cutanous T-cell lymphoma in this species and might help to plan future therapies. PMID:18396780

  17. Common procedures in hedgehogs, prairie dogs, exotic rodents, and companion marsupials.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Delaney, Cathy A

    2006-05-01

    Nondomesticated species are commonly being kept as companion animals. These include the African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albi-ventris), the North American black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys lu-dovicianus), and exotic rodents such as the degu (Octodon degus)and duprasi or fat-tailed gerbil (Pachyuromys duprasi). Common companion marsupials include the sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps),Bennett's or Tammar (Dama) wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus rufo-griseus and Macropus eugenii, respectively), the Brazilian or South American gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica), and the North American Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Although many of these animals are now bred domestically and are fairly docile when human-raised, they are essentially wild animals and hence have strong instincts to hide illness and pain. PMID:16759954

  18. The crosstalk of mTOR/S6K1 and Hedgehog pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Ding, Qingqing; Yen, Chia-Jui; Xia, Weiya; Izzo, Julie G; Lang, Jing-Yu; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Jennifer L; Miller, Stephanie A; Wang, Xuemei; Lee, Dung-Fang; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Huo, Longfei; Labaff, Adam M; Liu, Dongping; Huang, Tzu-Hsuan; Lai, Chien-Chen; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Wei-Chao; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Buttar, Navtej S; Wang, Kenneth K; Wu, Yun; Wang, Huamin; Ajani, Jaffer; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2012-03-20

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the most prevalent esophageal cancer type in the United States. The TNF-α/mTOR pathway is known to mediate the development of EAC. Additionally, aberrant activation of Gli1, downstream effector of the Hedgehog (HH) pathway, has been observed in EAC. In this study, we found that an activated mTOR/S6K1 pathway promotes Gli1 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function through S6K1-mediated Gli1 phosphorylation at Ser84, which releases Gli1 from its endogenous inhibitor, SuFu. Moreover, elimination of S6K1 activation by an mTOR pathway inhibitor enhances the killing effects of the HH pathway inhibitor. Together, our results established a crosstalk between the mTOR/S6K1 and HH pathways, which provides a mechanism for SMO-independent Gli1 activation and also a rationale for combination therapy for EAC. PMID:22439934

  19. Sonic hedgehog is required for the assembly and remodeling of branchial arch blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Kolesová, Hana; Roelink, Henk; Grim, Milos

    2008-07-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a morphogen involved in many developmental processes. Injection of cells (5E1) that produce a Shh-blocking antibody causes an attenuation of the Shh response, and this causes vascular malformations and impaired remodeling characterized by hemorrhages and protrusions of the anterior cardinal vein and outflow tract, delayed fusion of the dorsal aortae, impaired branching of the internal carotid artery, and delayed remodeling of the aortic arches. Distribution of smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall is unchanged. In 5E1-injected embryos, we also observed impaired assembly of endothelial cells into vascular tubes, particularly in the sixth branchial arch, around the anterior cardinal vein and around the dorsal aorta. In 5E1-treated embryos, increased numbers of macrophage-like cells, apoptotic cells, and a decreased level of proliferation were observed in head mesenchyme. Together, these observations show that Shh signaling is required at multiple stages for proper vessel formation and remodeling. PMID:18570256

  20. Three new alkaloids from Veratrum grandiflorum Loes with inhibition activities on Hedgehog pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lijuan; Chen, Fengyang; Li, Xiaoyu; Xu, Shifang; Huang, Wenhai; Ye, Yiping

    2016-10-01

    Three new steroidal alkaloids 1-3, together with four known compounds 4-7, were isolated from the ethanol extract of Veratrum grandiflorum Loes. Their structures were elucidated by NMR (1D and 2D NMR) and MS spectroscopic data. The inhibition activities on Hedgehog (Hh) pathway were evaluated using a cell-based bioassay system (Shh-LIGHT 2 cells). The results showed that compounds 1-3 and 5 displayed inhibitory activities obviously with the IC50 values of 0.63-3.11μM. Among them, compound 5 showed the most prominent inhibition activity (IC50=0.63±0.02μM). Thus, these active alkaloids may be potent natural compounds as Hh pathway inhibitors for the treatment of various cancers. PMID:27567371

  1. Smoothened regulates activator and repressor functions of Hedgehog signaling via two distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Stacey K; Casso, David J; Ascano, Manuel; Yore, Mark M; Kornberg, Thomas B; Robbins, David J

    2006-03-17

    The secreted protein Hedgehog (Hh) plays an important role in metazoan development and as a survival factor for many human tumors. In both cases, Hh signaling proceeds through the activation of the seven-transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo), which is thought to convert the Gli family of transcription factors from transcriptional repressors to transcriptional activators. Here, we provide evidence that Smo signals to the Hh signaling complex, which consists of the kinesin-related protein Costal2 (Cos2), the protein kinase Fused (Fu), and the Drosophila Gli homolog cubitus interruptus (Ci), in two distinct manners. We show that many of the commonly observed molecular events following Hh signaling are not transmitted in a linear fashion but instead are activated through two signals that bifurcate at Smo to independently affect activator and repressor pools of Ci. PMID:16423832

  2. Gene Regulatory Logic for Reading the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Gradient in the Vertebrate Neural Tube

    PubMed Central

    Balaskas, Nikolaos; Ribeiro, Ana; Panovska, Jasmina; Dessaud, Eric; Sasai, Noriaki; Page, Karen M.; Briscoe, James; Ribes, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Summary Secreted signals, known as morphogens, provide the positional information that organizes gene expression and cellular differentiation in many developing tissues. In the vertebrate neural tube, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) acts as a morphogen to control the pattern of neuronal subtype specification. Using an in vivo reporter of Shh signaling, mouse genetics, and systems modeling, we show that a spatially and temporally changing gradient of Shh signaling is interpreted by the regulatory logic of a downstream transcriptional network. The design of the network, which links three transcription factors to Shh signaling, is responsible for differential spatial and temporal gene expression. In addition, the network renders cells insensitive to fluctuations in signaling and confers hysteresis—memory of the signal. Our findings reveal that morphogen interpretation is an emergent property of the architecture of a transcriptional network that provides robustness and reliability to tissue patterning. PMID:22265416

  3. Notch Activity Modulates the Responsiveness of Neural Progenitors to Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jennifer H.; Yang, Linlin; Dessaud, Eric; Chuang, Katherine; Moore, Destaye M.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Briscoe, James; Novitch, Bennett G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Throughout the developing nervous system, neural stem and progenitor cells give rise to diverse classes of neurons and glia in a spatially and temporally coordinated manner. In the ventral spinal cord, much of this diversity emerges through the morphogen actions of Sonic hedgehog (Shh). Interpretation of the Shh gradient depends on both the amount of ligand and duration of exposure, but the mechanisms permitting prolonged responses to Shh are not well understood. We demonstrate that Notch signaling plays an essential role in this process, enabling neural progenitors to attain sufficiently high levels of Shh pathway activity needed to direct the ventral-most cell fates. Notch activity regulates subcellular localization of the Shh receptor Patched1, gating the translocation of the key effector Smoothened to primary cilia and its downstream signaling activities. These data reveal an unexpected role for Notch shaping the interpretation of the Shh morphogen gradient and influencing cell fate determination. PMID:25936505

  4. A Group of ent-Kaurane Diterpenoids Inhibit Hedgehog Signaling and Induce Cilia Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shiyou; Du, Jiacheng; Kong, Qinghua; Li, Chaocui; Li, Yan; Sun, Handong; Pu, Jianxin; Mao, Bingyu

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays important roles in the tumorigenesis of multiple cancers and is a key target for drug discovery. In a screen of natural products extracted from Chinese herbs, we identified eight ent-Kaurane diterpenoids and two triterpene dilactones as novel Hh pathway antagonists. Epistatic analyses suggest that these compounds likely act at the level or downstream of Smoothened (Smo) and upstream of Suppressor of Fused (Sufu). The ent-Kauranoid-treated cells showed elongated cilia, suppressed Smo trafficking to cilia, and mitotic defects, while the triterpene dilactones had no effect on the cilia and ciliary Smo. These ent-Kaurane diterpenoids provide new prototypes of Hh inhibitors, and are valuable probes for deciphering the mechanisms of Smo ciliary transport and ciliogenesis. PMID:26439749

  5. Basal cell carcinoma and the carcinogenic role of aberrant Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Saran, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequent cancer in the white population and its incidence appears to be increasing worldwide. While the majority of BCCs arise sporadically, many cases are attributable to basal cell nevus syndrome, or Gorlin syndrome, an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder characterized by the occurrence of multiple BCCs and by extracutaneous tumors. Genetic studies on patients with basal cell nevus syndrome indicate deregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in epidermal keratinocytes as the primary event in the pathogenesis of BCC. This article summarizes the recent progress in understanding Hh-dependent BCC tumorigenesis, as well as evidence for deregulation of other molecular pathways, primarily the Wnt developmental pathway. Understanding the molecular genetics of BCC development has provided new opportunities for molecular therapy of this cancer by targeting Hh and other signaling pathways. PMID:20528237

  6. CDO, an Hh-Coreceptor, Mediates Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenicity through Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Young-Eun; Ha, Hye-Lim; Bae, Ju-Hyeon; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays essential roles in various developmental processes, and its aberrant regulation results in genetic disorders or malignancies in various tissues. Hyperactivation of Hh signaling is associated with lung cancer development, and there have been extensive efforts to investigate how to control Hh signaling pathway and regulate cancer cell proliferation. In this study we investigated a role of CDO, an Hh co-receptor, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of Hh signaling by SANT-1 or siCDO in lung cancer cells reduced proliferation and tumorigenicity, along with the decrease in the expression of the Hh components. Histological analysis with NSCLC mouse tissue demonstrated that CDO was expressed in advanced grade of the cancer, and precisely co-localized with GLI1. These data suggest that CDO is required for proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells via Hh signaling. PMID:25369201

  7. Stromal Hedgehog signalling is downregulated in colon cancer and its restoration restrains tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Marco; Büller, Nikè V J A; Kirn, Leonard M; Joost, Simon; Frings, Oliver; Englert, Benjamin; Bergström, Åsa; Kuiper, Raoul V; Blaas, Leander; Wielenga, Mattheus C B; Almer, Sven; Kühl, Anja A; Fredlund, Erik; van den Brink, Gijs R; Toftgård, Rune

    2016-01-01

    A role for Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been proposed. In CRC and other solid tumours, Hh ligands are upregulated; however, a specific Hh antagonist provided no benefit in a clinical trial. Here we use Hh reporter mice to show that downstream Hh activity is unexpectedly diminished in a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer, and that downstream Hh signalling is restricted to the stroma. Functionally, stroma-specific Hh activation in mice markedly reduces the tumour load and blocks progression of advanced neoplasms, partly via the modulation of BMP signalling and restriction of the colonic stem cell signature. By contrast, attenuated Hh signalling accelerates colonic tumourigenesis. In human CRC, downstream Hh activity is similarly reduced and canonical Hh signalling remains predominantly paracrine. Our results suggest that diminished downstream Hh signalling enhances CRC development, and that stromal Hh activation can act as a colonic tumour suppressor. PMID:27492255

  8. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G W; Calicchio, Monica L; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Lehtinen, Maria K; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant Notch signalling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly paediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours, by inducing sustained expression of Notch1, that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signalling. Whole-transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate differentiation. A Shh-driven signalling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from monociliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signalling. Abnormal SHH signalling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting the SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:26999738

  9. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  10. A PTCH1 Homolog Transcriptionally Activated by p53 Suppresses Hedgehog Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jon H.; Larsen, Andrew R.; Chen, Evan; Bunz, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The p53-mediated responses to DNA damage and the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are each recurrently dysregulated in many types of human cancer. Here we describe PTCH53, a p53 target gene that is homologous to the tumor suppressor gene PTCH1 and can function as a repressor of Hh pathway activation. PTCH53 (previously designated PTCHD4) was highly responsive to p53 in vitro and was among a small number of genes that were consistently expressed at reduced levels in diverse TP53 mutant cell lines and human tumors. Increased expression of PTCH53 inhibited canonical Hh signaling by the G protein-coupled receptor SMO. PTCH53 thus delineates a novel, inducible pathway by which p53 can repress tumorigenic Hh signals. PMID:25296753

  11. Sonic hedgehog promotes stem-cell potential of Mueller glia in the mammalian retina

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Jin; Zheng Hua; Xiao Honglei; She Zhenjue; Zhou Guomin

    2007-11-16

    Mueller glia have been demonstrated to display stem-cell properties after retinal damage. Here, we report this potential can be regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Shh can stimulate proliferation of Mueller glia through its receptor and target gene expressed on them, furthermore, Shh-treated Mueller glia are induced to dedifferentiate by expressing progenitor-specific markers, and then adopt cell fate of rod photoreceptor. Inhibition of signaling by cyclopamine inhibits proliferation and dedifferentiation. Intraocular injection of Shh promotes Mueller glia activation in the photoreceptor-damaged retina, Shh also enhances neurogenic potential by producing more rhodopsin-positive photoreceptors from Mueller glia-derived cells. Together, these results provide evidences that Mueller glia act as potential stem cells in mammalian retina, Shh may have therapeutic effects on these cells for promoting the regeneration of retinal neurons.

  12. Sonic hedgehog and Wnt: antagonists in morphogenesis but collaborators in axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, Evelyn C.; Wilson, Nicole H.; Stoeckli, Esther T.

    2013-01-01

    As indicated by their name, morphogens were first identified for their role in the formation of tissues early in development. Secreted from a source, they spread through the tissue to form gradients by which they affect the differentiation of precursor cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In this context, the antagonistic roles of the morphogens of the Wnt family and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the specification of cell types along the dorso-ventral axis of the neural tube have been studied in detail. However, more recently, morphogens have been demonstrated to act well beyond the early stages of nervous system development, as additional roles of morphogen gradients in vertebrate neural circuit formation have been identified. Both Wnt and Shh affect neural circuit formation at several stages by their influence on neurite extension, axon pathfinding and synapse formation. In this review, we will summarize the mechanisms of morphogen function during axon guidance in the vertebrate nervous system. PMID:23772206

  13. Stromal Hedgehog signalling is downregulated in colon cancer and its restoration restrains tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Marco; Büller, Nikè V. J. A.; Kirn, Leonard M.; Joost, Simon; Frings, Oliver; Englert, Benjamin; Bergström, Åsa; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Blaas, Leander; Wielenga, Mattheus C. B.; Almer, Sven; Kühl, Anja A.; Fredlund, Erik; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Toftgård, Rune

    2016-01-01

    A role for Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been proposed. In CRC and other solid tumours, Hh ligands are upregulated; however, a specific Hh antagonist provided no benefit in a clinical trial. Here we use Hh reporter mice to show that downstream Hh activity is unexpectedly diminished in a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer, and that downstream Hh signalling is restricted to the stroma. Functionally, stroma-specific Hh activation in mice markedly reduces the tumour load and blocks progression of advanced neoplasms, partly via the modulation of BMP signalling and restriction of the colonic stem cell signature. By contrast, attenuated Hh signalling accelerates colonic tumourigenesis. In human CRC, downstream Hh activity is similarly reduced and canonical Hh signalling remains predominantly paracrine. Our results suggest that diminished downstream Hh signalling enhances CRC development, and that stromal Hh activation can act as a colonic tumour suppressor. PMID:27492255

  14. Mixed Glioma (Oligoastrocytoma) in the brain of an African Hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Benneter, S S; Summers, B A; Schulz-Schaeffer, W J; Härtig, W; Mollidor, J; Schöniger, S

    2014-11-01

    This report describes an oligoastrocytoma in the brain of a 3.5-year-old female pet African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) that showed progressive central nervous system signs for 6 months. Microscopical examination of the brain revealed a widely infiltrative, deep-seated glioma within the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres, basal nuclei, hippocampus, thalamus, midbrain, pons and the medulla of the cerebellum with extension of neoplastic cells into the cerebral cortex and overlying leptomeninges. Morphological features of the neoplastic cells, together with variable immunohistochemical expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, Olig-2 and Nogo-A, indicated the presence of intermingled astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumour cells with an astrocytic component of approximately 40% consistent with an oligoastrocytoma. The distribution of the tumour is consistent with gliomatosis cerebri. PMID:25172052

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the hedgehog seahorse Hippocampus spinosissimus Weber, 1933 (Gasterosteiformes:Syngnathidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuaishuai; Zhang, Yanhong; Wang, Changming; Lin, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the hedgehog seahorse Hippocampus spinosissimus was first determined in this article. The total length of H. spinosissimus mitogenome is 16 527 bp and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region. The gene order and composition of H. spinosissimus were similar to those of most other vertebrates. The overall base composition of H. spinosissimus is 32.1% A, 30.3% T, 14.9% G and 22.7% C, with a slight A + T-rich feature (62.4%). Phylogenetic analyses based on complete mitochondrial genome sequence showed that H. spinosissimus has a close genetic relationship to H. ingens and H. kuda. PMID:26364951

  16. A shared role for sonic hedgehog signalling in patterning chondrichthyan gill arch appendages and tetrapod limbs.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J Andrew; Hall, Brian K

    2016-04-15

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, skates, rays and holocephalans) possess paired appendages that project laterally from their gill arches, known as branchial rays. This led Carl Gegenbaur to propose that paired fins (and hence tetrapod limbs) originally evolved via transformation of gill arches. Tetrapod limbs are patterned by asonic hedgehog(Shh)-expressing signalling centre known as the zone of polarising activity, which establishes the anteroposterior axis of the limb bud and maintains proliferative expansion of limb endoskeletal progenitors. Here, we use loss-of-function, label-retention and fate-mapping approaches in the little skate to demonstrate that Shh secretion from a signalling centre in the developing gill arches establishes gill arch anteroposterior polarity and maintains the proliferative expansion of branchial ray endoskeletal progenitor cells. These findings highlight striking parallels in the axial patterning mechanisms employed by chondrichthyan branchial rays and paired fins/limbs, and provide mechanistic insight into the anatomical foundation of Gegenbaur's gill arch hypothesis. PMID:27095494

  17. Sonic hedgehog is a regulator of extracellular glutamate levels and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shengjie; Ma, Shaorong; Jia, Caixia; Su, Yujuan; Yang, Shenglian; Zhou, Kechun; Liu, Yani; Cheng, Ju; Lu, Dunguo; Fan, Liu; Wang, Yizheng

    2016-05-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh), both as a mitogen and as a morphogen, plays an important role in cell proliferation and differentiation during early development. Here, we show that Shh inhibits glutamate transporter activities in neurons, rapidly enhances extracellular glutamate levels, and affects the development of epilepsy. Shh is quickly released in response to epileptic, but not physiological, stimuli. Inhibition of neuronal glutamate transporters by Shh depends on heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gαi and enhances extracellular glutamate levels. Inhibiting Shh signaling greatly reduces epileptiform activities in both cell cultures and hippocampal slices. Moreover, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Shh signaling markedly suppresses epileptic phenotypes in kindling or pilocarpine models. Our results suggest that Shh contributes to the development of epilepsy and suppression of its signaling prevents the development of the disease. Thus, Shh can act as a modulator of neuronal activity, rapidly regulating glutamate levels and promoting epilepsy. PMID:27113760

  18. Role of the ABC transporter Mdr49 in Hedgehog signaling and germ cell migration.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Girish; Manry, Diane; Jourjine, Nicholas; Mogila, Vladic; Mozes, Henny; Bialistoky, Tzofia; Gerlitz, Offer; Schedl, Paul

    2016-06-15

    Coalescence of the embryonic gonad in Drosophila melanogaster requires directed migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) towards somatic gonadal precursor cells (SGPs). It was recently proposed that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Mdr49 functions in the embryonic mesoderm to facilitate the transmission of the PGC attractant from the SGPs; however, the precise molecular identity of the Mdr49-dependent guidance signal remained elusive. Employing the loss- and gain-of-function strategies, we show that Mdr49 is a component of the Hedgehog (hh) pathway and it potentiates the signaling activity. This function is direct because in Mdr49 mutant embryos the Hh ligand is inappropriately sequestered in the hh-expressing cells. Our data also suggest that the role of Mdr49 is to provide cholesterol for the correct processing of the Hh precursor protein. Supporting this conclusion, PGC migration defects in Mdr49 embryos are substantially ameliorated by a cholesterol-rich diet. PMID:27122170

  19. Hedgehog spin texture and Berry's phase tuning in a magnetic topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su-Yang; Neupane, Madhab; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Duming; Richardella, Anthony; Andrew Wray, L.; Alidoust, Nasser; Leandersson, Mats; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan; Sánchez-Barriga, Jaime; Rader, Oliver; Landolt, Gabriel; Slomski, Bartosz; Hugo Dil, Jan; Osterwalder, Jürg; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Samarth, Nitin; Zahid Hasan, M.

    2012-08-01

    Understanding and control of spin degrees of freedom on the surfaces of topological materials are key to future applications as well as for realizing novel physics such as the axion electrodynamics associated with time-reversal (TR) symmetry breaking on the surface. We experimentally demonstrate magnetically induced spin reorientation phenomena simultaneous with a Dirac-metal to gapped-insulator transition on the surfaces of manganese-doped Bi2Se3 thin films. The resulting electronic groundstate exhibits unique hedgehog-like spin textures at low energies, which directly demonstrate the mechanics of TR symmetry breaking on the surface. We further show that an insulating gap induced by quantum tunnelling between surfaces exhibits spin texture modulation at low energies but respects TR invariance. These spin phenomena and the control of their Fermi surface geometrical phase first demonstrated in our experiments pave the way for the future realization of many predicted exotic magnetic phenomena of topological origin.

  20. Heavy quark density in {N} = 4 SYM: from hedgehog to Lifshitz spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Prem

    2012-08-01

    We study the effect of an O( N 2) density of heavy quarks in strongly coupled {N} = 4 SUSY Yang-Mills theory in the large N limit. This is achieved in the type IIB supergravity dual by introducing a uniformly smeared density of macroscopic string sources stretching to the boundary of AdS 5 × S 5. The backreacted system exhibits a flow from an AdS 5 "hedgehog" geometry to a scaling Lifshitz-like solution Lif5 × S 5 with dynamical critical exponent z = 7, wherein the scaling symmetry is broken by a logarithmic running dilaton. We find an exact black brane solution within the scaling regime which describes the low temperature thermodynamics of the system.

  1. ZnO hedgehog-like structures for control cell cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neykova, Neda; Brož, Antonín; Remeš, Zdeněk; Hruška, Karel; Kalbáčová, Marie; Kromka, Alexander; Vaněček, Milan

    2012-02-01

    Growth of biocompatible zinc oxide hedgehog-like structures on glass substrates using hydrothermal method at low temperature is demonstrated. The as-grown samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The optical absorption of the as-grown ZnO microstructures measured with photothermal deflection spectroscopy showed very low optical absorption and strong scattering making ZnO microrods an ideal diffuser in the visible and near IR regions. In addition, the effect of ZnO microstructures on the cultivation of osteosarcoma cells (SAOS-2) is presented. During the 48 h cultivation period, no toxic effect of ZnO as a chemical agent on SAOS-2 cells was observed.

  2. Cross-Talk Between Interferon-γ and Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Todoric, Jelena; Strobl, Birgit; Jais, Alexander; Boucheron, Nicole; Bayer, Martina; Amann, Sabine; Lindroos, Josefine; Teperino, Raffaele; Prager, Gerhard; Bilban, Martin; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Krempler, Franz; Müller, Mathias; Wagner, Oswald; Patsch, Wolfgang; Pospisilik, J. Andrew; Esterbauer, Harald

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE T cells and level of the cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) are increased in adipose tissue in obesity. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been shown to potently inhibit white adipocyte differentiation. In light of recent findings in neurons that IFN-γ and Hh signaling cross-talk, we examined their potential interaction in the context of adipogenesis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used Hh reporter cells, cell lines, and primary adipocyte differentiation models to explore costimulation of IFN-γ and Hh signaling. Genetic dissection using Ifngr1−/− and Stat1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and ultimately, anti–IFN-γ neutralization and expression profiling in obese mice and humans, respectively, were used to place the findings into the in vivo context. RESULTS T-cell supernatants directly inhibited hedgehog signaling in reporter and 3T3-L1 cells. Intriguingly, using blocking antibodies, Ifngr1−/− and Stat1−/− cells, and simultaneous activation of Hh and IFN-γ signaling, we showed that IFN-γ directly suppresses Hh stimulation, thus rescuing adipogenesis. We confirmed our findings using primary mouse and primary human (pre)adipocytes. Importantly, robust opposing signals for Hh and T-cell pathways in obese human adipose expression profiles and IFN-γ depletion in mice identify the system as intact in adipose tissue in vivo. CONCLUSIONS These results identify a novel antagonistic cross-talk between IFN-γ and Hh signaling in white adipose tissue and demonstrate IFN-γ as a potent inhibitor of Hh signaling. PMID:21536945

  3. Controllable synthesis of a novel hedgehog-like core/shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shumin; Tian Hongwei; Pei Yanhui; Meng Qingnan; Chen Jianli; Wang Huan; Zeng Yi; Zheng Weitao; Liu Yichun

    2012-02-15

    A novel hedgehog-like core/shell structure, consisting of a high density of vertically aligned graphene sheets and a thin graphene shell/a copper core (VGs-GS/CC), has been synthesized via a simple one-step synthesis route using radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD). Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations show that the morphology of this core/shell material could be controlled by deposition time. For a short deposition time, only multilayer graphene shell tightly surrounds the copper particle, while as the deposition time is relative long, graphene sheets extend from the surface of GS/CC. The GS can protect CC particles from oxidation. The growth mechanism for the obtained GS/CC and VGs-GS/CC has been revealed. Compared to VGs, VGs-GS/CC material exhibits a better electron field emission property. This investigation opens a possibility for designing a core/shell structure of different carbon-metal hybrid materials for a wide variety of practical applications. - Graphical abstract: With increasing deposition time, graphene sheets extend from the surface of GS/CC, causing the multilayer graphene encapsulated copper to be converted into vertically aligned graphene sheets-graphene shell/copper core structure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel hedgehog-like core/shell structure has been synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure consists of vertical graphene sheets-graphene shell and copper core. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology of VGs-GS/CC can be controlled by choosing a proper deposition time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With increasing deposition time, graphene sheets extend from the surface of GS/CC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VGs-GS/CC exhibits a better electron field emission property as compared with VGs.

  4. Targeting of sonic hedgehog-Gli signaling: A potential therapeutic target for patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingqin; Wang, Weifeng; Liu, Di; Zhao, Yang; He, Jianjun; Wang, Xijing; Dai, Zhijun; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer among women. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway serves a key role in malignant cancer cell growth and migration. However, little is known with regard to the specific function of the Hh signaling pathway in human breast cancer. The current study investigated the specific role of Hh signaling in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Expression of components of Shh-Gli signaling, as well as the Gli-responsive genes B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cyclin D1, were investigated in MDA-MB-231 cells using western blotting. The effects of Shh-Gli signaling on MDA-MB-231 proliferation were analyzed by MTT assay. The role of E-cadherin in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process was determined by western blot while matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9/MMP-2 secretion was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that Shh-Gli signaling was activated in MDA-MB-231 cells, significantly enhancing cell viability. Overexpression of Gli positively regulated the transcription of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 thereby regulating MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and survival. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with human sonic hedgehog, n-terminus for 72 h significantly reduced E-cadherin protein levels and enhanced secretion of MMP-9 and MMP-2. These findings suggest that Shh-Gli signaling is significantly activated in human breast cancer cells, and is accompanied by enhanced cell viability, proliferation and migration capacities. PMID:27446389

  5. Antagonizing the Hedgehog Pathway with Vismodegib Impairs Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Growth In Vivo by Affecting Stroma.

    PubMed

    Meerang, Mayura; Bérard, Karima; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Lauk, Olivia; Vrugt, Bart; Boss, Andreas; Kenkel, David; Broggini-Tenzer, Angela; Stahel, Rolf A; Arni, Stephan; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    An autocrine-driven upregulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been described in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), in which the ligand, desert Hh (DHH), was produced from tumor cells. However, our investigation revealed that the Hh pathway is activated in both tumor and stroma of MPM tumor specimens and an orthotopic immunocompetent rat MPM model. This was demonstrated by positive immunohistochemical staining of Glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1) and Patched1 (PTCH1) in both tumor and stromal fractions. DHH was predominantly expressed in the tumor fractions. To further investigate the role of the Hh pathway in MPM stroma, we antagonized Hh signaling in the rat model of MPM using a Hh antagonist, vismodegib, (100 mg/kg orally). Daily treatment with vismodegib efficiently downregulated Hh target genes Gli1, Hedgehog Interacting Protein (Hhip), and Ptch1, and caused a significant reduction of tumor volume and tumor growth delay. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that vismodegib treatment primarily downregulated GLI1 and HHIP in the stromal compartment along with a reduced expression of previously described fibroblast Hh-responsive genes such as Fibronectin (Fn1) and Vegfa Primary cells isolated from the rat model cultured in 3% O2 continued to express Dhh but did not respond to vismodegib in vitro However, culture supernatant from these cells stimulated Gli1, Ptch1, and Fn1 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which was suppressed by vismodegib. Our study provides new evidence regarding the role of Hh signaling in MPM stroma in the maintenance of tumor growth, emphasizing Hh signaling as a treatment target for MPM. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 1095-105. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26839306

  6. The Hedgehog signalling pathway mediates drug response of MCF-7 mammosphere cells in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Fu, Yingzi; Yan, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Qinghuan; Wu, Huizhe; Yao, Weifan; Zhao, Haishan; Zhao, Lin; Jiang, Qian; Yu, Zhaojin; Jin, Feng; Mi, Xiaoyi; Wang, Enhua; Cui, Zeshi; Fu, Liwu; Chen, Jianju; Wei, Minjie

    2015-11-01

    BCSCs (breast cancer stem cells) have been shown to be resistant to chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms underlying BCSC-mediated chemoresistance remain poorly understood. The Hh (Hedgehog) pathway is important in the stemness maintenance of CSCs. Nonetheless, it is unknown whether the Hh pathway is involved in BCSC-mediated chemoresistance. In the present study, we cultured breast cancer MCF-7 cells in suspension in serum-free medium to obtain BCSC-enriched MCF-7 MS (MCF-7 mammosphere) cells. We showed that MCF-7 MS cells are sensitive to salinomycin, but not paclitaxel, distinct from parent MCF-7 cells. The expression of the critical components of Hh pathway, i.e., PTCH (Patched), SMO (Smoothened), Gli1 and Gli2, was significantly up-regulated in MCF-7 MS cells; salinomycin, but not paclitaxel, treatment caused a remarkable decrease in expression of those genes in MCF-7 MS cells, but not in MCF-7 cells. Salinomycin, but not paclitaxel, increased apoptosis, decreased the migration capacity of MCF-7 MS cells, accompanied by a decreased expression of c-Myc, Bcl-2 and Snail, the target genes of the Hh pathway. The salinomycin-induced cytotoxic effect could be blocked by Shh (Sonic Hedgehog)-mediated Hh signalling activation. Inhibition of the Hh pathway by cyclopamine could sensitize MCF-7 MS cells to paclitaxel. In addition, salinomycin, but not paclitaxel, significantly reduced the tumour growth, accompanied by decreased expression of PTCH, SMO, Gli1 and Gli2 in xenograft tumours. Furthermore, the expression of SMO and Gli1 was positively correlated with the expression of CD44+ / CD24-, and the expression of SMO and Gli1 in CD44+ / CD24- tissues was associated with a significantly shorter OS (overall survival) and DFS (disease-free survival) in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. PMID:26201092

  7. Celiac Disease Histopathology Recapitulates Hedgehog Downregulation, Consistent with Wound Healing Processes Activation

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Stefania; Sapone, Anna; Fiorentino, Maria Rosaria; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background In celiac disease (CD), intestinal epithelium damage occurs secondary to an immune insult and is characterized by blunting of the villi and crypt hyperplasia. Similarities between Hedgehog (Hh)/BMP4 downregulation, as reported in a mouse model, and CD histopathology, suggest mechanistic involvement of Hh/BMP4/WNT pathways in proliferation and differentiation of immature epithelial cells in the context of human intestinal homeostasis and regeneration after damage. Herein we examined the nature of intestinal crypt hyperplasia and involvement of Hh/BMP4 in CD histopathology. Methods and Findings Immunohistochemistry, qPCR and in situ hybridization were used to study a cohort of 24 healthy controls (HC) and 24 patients with diagnosed acute celiac disease (A-CD) intestinal biopsies. In A-CD we observed an increase in cells positive for Leucin-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), an epithelial stem cell specific marker and expansion of WNT responding compartment. Further, we observed alteration in number and distribution of mesenchymal cells, predicted to be part of the intestinal stem cells niche. At the molecular level we found downregulation of indian hedgehog (IHH) and other components of the Hh pathway, but we did not observe a concurrent downregulation of BMP4. However, we observed upregulation of BMPs antagonists, gremlin 1 and gremlin 2. Conclusions Our data suggest that acute CD histopathology partially recapitulates the phenotype reported in Hh knockdown models. Specifically, Hh/BMP4 paradigm appears to be decoupled in CD, as the expansion of the immature cell population does not occur consequent to downregulation of BMP4. Instead, we provide evidence that upregulation of BMP antagonists play a key role in intestinal crypt hyperplasia. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying CD histopathology and the limitations in the use of mouse models for celiac disease. PMID:26649570

  8. [Parasitological fecal studies of equids, dogs, cats and hedgehogs during the years 1984-1991].

    PubMed

    Epe, C; Ising-Volmer, S; Stoye, M

    1993-11-01

    The results of the coproscopical examinations in horses, dogs, cats and hedgehogs between 1984 and 1991 are presented. In 9192 samples from horses 55.5% stages of strongylids, 4.0% of Parascaris equorum, 2.2% of anoplocephalids, 1.6% Strongyloides westeri, 0.7% of Oxyuris equi, 0.6% of Eimeria leuckarti, 0.2% of Fasciola hepatica and 0.04% of Dictyocaulus arnfieldi were found. In 48.0% of the 46 samples from donkeys eggs from strongylids were detected, in 17.4% larvae from Dictyocaulus arnfieldi, in 2.2% eggs from Strongyloides westeri, Parascaris equorum and oocysts from Eimeria leuckarti, respectively. In 3329 samples of dogs 6.9% developmental stages of Toxocara canis, 6.0% of Giardia spp., 4.2% of Isospora spp., 3.0% of Sarcocystis spp., 2.5% each of ancylostomids and Trichuris vulpis, 1.1% of Toxascaris leonina and 1.1% of Dipylidium canium, up to 1.0% of taeniids, 0.6% of each Mesocestoides spp. and Metastrongylidae, 0.3% of Strongyloides stercoralis and 0.2% of Capillaria spp. and Hammondia heydorni were detected. In 9.5% of the 1147 samples of cats eggs from Toxocara mystax were found, in 4.7% eggs of taeniids, in 4.6% cysts of Isospora spp., in 2.4% of Giardia spp., in 1.4% eggs of Dipylidium caninum, in 1.0% of Capillaria spp. and Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, in 0.6% development stages of Toxoplasma gondii, in 0.5% of ancylostomids and in 0.3% of Sarcocystis spp. and Opisthorchis felineus. In 1175 samples of hedgehogs 48.8% eggs of Capillaria spp., 35.9% of Crenosoma striatum, 17.9% oocysts of Isospora spp., 2.3% eggs of Brachylaemus erinacei were found. PMID:8261912

  9. Gli1 Protein Participates in Hedgehog-mediated Specification of Osteoblast Lineage during Endochondral Ossification*

    PubMed Central

    Hojo, Hironori; Ohba, Shinsuke; Yano, Fumiko; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Komiyama, Yuske; Nakagata, Naomi; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Chung, Ung-il

    2012-01-01

    With regard to Hedgehog signaling in mammalian development, the majority of research has focused on Gli2 and Gli3 rather than Gli1. This is because Gli1−/− mice do not show any gross abnormalities in adulthood, and no detailed analyses of fetal Gli1−/− mice are available. In this study, we investigated the physiological role of Gli1 in osteogenesis. Histological analyses revealed that bone formation was impaired in Gli1−/− fetuses compared with WT fetuses. Gli1−/− perichondrial cells expressed neither runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) nor osterix, master regulators of osteogenesis, in contrast to WT cells. In vitro analyses showed that overexpression of Gli1 up-regulated early osteogenesis-related genes in both WT and Runx2−/− perichondrial cells, and Gli1 activated transcription of those genes via its association with their 5′-regulatory regions, underlying the function of Gli1 in the perichondrium. Moreover, Gli1−/−;Gli2−/− mice showed more severe phenotypes of impaired bone formation than either Gli1−/− or Gli2−/− mice, and osteoblast differentiation was impaired in Gli1−/−;Gli3−/− perichondrial cells compared with Gli3−/− cells in vitro. These data suggest that Gli1 itself can induce early osteoblast differentiation, at least to some extent, in a Runx2-independent manner. It also plays a redundant role with Gli2 and is involved in the repressor function of Gli3 in osteogenesis. On the basis of these findings, we propose that upon Hedgehog input, Gli1 functions collectively with Gli2 and Gli3 in osteogenesis. PMID:22493482

  10. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Directly Phosphorylates and Destabilizes Hedgehog Pathway Transcription Factor GLI1 in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yen-Hsing; Luo, Jia; Mosley, Yung-Yi C.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Chang, Julia; Zhang, GuangJun; Wang, Yu-Kuo; Banko, Max R.; Brunet, Anne; Kuang, Shihuan; Wu, Jen-Leih; Chang, Chun-Ju; Scott, Matthew P.; Yang, Jer-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway regulates cell differentiation and proliferation during development by controlling the Gli transcription factors. Cell fate decisions and progression toward organ and tissue maturity must be coordinated and how energy sensor regulates Hh pathway is not clear. AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energy stores that controls protein synthesis and other energy-intensive processes. AMPK is directly responsive to intracellular AMP levels, inhibiting a wide range of cell activities if ATP is low and AMP is high. Thus, AMPK can affect development by influencing protein synthesis and other processes needed for growth and differentiation. Activation of AMPK reduces GLI1 protein levels and stability, thus blocking Sonic hedgehog-induced transcriptional activity. AMPK phosphorylates GLI1 at serines 102 and 408 and threonine 1074. Mutation of these three sites into alanine prevents phosphorylation by AMPK. This in turn leads to increased GLI1 protein stability, transcriptional activity, and oncogenic potency. PMID:26190112

  11. Identification of a family of fatty acid-speciated Sonic Hedgehog proteins, whose members display differential biological properties

    PubMed Central

    Houel, Stephane; Rodgriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Singh, Samer; Schilling, Neal; J.Capobianco, Anthony; Ahn, Natalie G.; Robbins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (HH) proteins are proteolytically processed into a biologically active form, which is covalently modified by cholesterol and palmitate. However, most studies of HH biogenesis have characterized protein from cells in which HH is over-expressed. We purified Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) from cells expressing physiologically relevant levels, and showed that it was more potent than SHH isolated from over-expressing cells. Furthermore, the SHH in our preparations were modified with a diverse spectrum of fatty acids on their amino-termini, and this spectrum of fatty acids varied dramatically depending on the growth conditions of the cells. The fatty acid composition of SHH affected its trafficking to lipid rafts, as well as its potency. Our results suggest that HH proteins exist as a family of diverse lipid-speciated proteins, which might be altered in different physiological and pathological contexts to regulate distinct properties of HH proteins. PMID:25732819

  12. The T-box transcription factor Midline regulates wing development by repressing wingless and hedgehog in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chong-Lei; Wang, Xian-Feng; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Dan; Hirose, Susumu; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Wingless (Wg) and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways are key players in animal development. However, regulation of the expression of wg and hh are not well understood. Here, we show that Midline (Mid), an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor, expresses in the wing disc of Drosophila and plays a vital role in wing development. Loss or knock down of mid in the wing disc induced hyper-expression of wingless (wg) and yielded cocked and non-flat wings. Over-expression of mid in the wing disc markedly repressed the expression of wg, DE-Cadherin (DE-Cad) and armadillo (arm), and resulted in a small and blistered wing. In addition, a reduction in the dose of mid enhanced phenotypes of a gain-of-function mutant of hedgehog (hh). We also observed repression of hh upon overexpression of mid in the wing disc. Taken together, we propose that Mid regulates wing development by repressing wg and hh in Drosophila. PMID:27301278

  13. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  14. The T-box transcription factor Midline regulates wing development by repressing wingless and hedgehog in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chong-Lei; Wang, Xian-Feng; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Dan; Hirose, Susumu; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Wingless (Wg) and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways are key players in animal development. However, regulation of the expression of wg and hh are not well understood. Here, we show that Midline (Mid), an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor, expresses in the wing disc of Drosophila and plays a vital role in wing development. Loss or knock down of mid in the wing disc induced hyper-expression of wingless (wg) and yielded cocked and non-flat wings. Over-expression of mid in the wing disc markedly repressed the expression of wg, DE-Cadherin (DE-Cad) and armadillo (arm), and resulted in a small and blistered wing. In addition, a reduction in the dose of mid enhanced phenotypes of a gain-of-function mutant of hedgehog (hh). We also observed repression of hh upon overexpression of mid in the wing disc. Taken together, we propose that Mid regulates wing development by repressing wg and hh in Drosophila. PMID:27301278

  15. Emergency and critical care procedures in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps), African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), and prairie dogs (Cynomys spp).

    PubMed

    Lennox, Angela M

    2007-05-01

    Less common exotic pet mammals are gaining in popularity. The Australian Sugar Glider, African Hedgehog, and prairie dog are seen regularly in exotic animal practices. They are subject to the same types of medical emergencies as more traditional pets, with the unfortunate addition of all too common underlying nutritional and husbandry-related disorders. Emergency stabilization and critical care are important first steps before collection of diagnostic test samples and administration of definitive medical care. PMID:17577562

  16. Sedum sarmentosum Bunge extract induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells via the hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongheng; Chen, Bicheng; Hong, Weilong; Liang, Yong; Zhou, Mengtao; Zhou, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Sedum sarmentosum Bunge, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has a wide range of clinical applications including antibiosis, anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation. In the present study, we identified that its extract (SSBE) exerts pancreatic anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. In the cultured pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cell line, SSBE inhibited cell growth in a concentration-dependent manner, and it was accompanied by the downregulated expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In addition, SSBE treatment also increased cellular apoptosis in a mitochondrial-dependent manner. Moreover, SSBE induced p53 expression, reduced c-Myc expression, and inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The antiproliferative activity of SSBE in the pancreatic cancer cells was found to be closely related to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase by upregulating p21(Waf1/CIP1) expression. Further study showed that this inhibitory effect of SSBE was through downregulation of the activity of the proliferation-related Hedgehog signaling pathway. Exogenous recombinant protein Shh was used to activate Hedgehog signaling, thereby resulting in the abolishment of the SSBE-mediated inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. In animal xenograft models of pancreatic cancer, activated Hedgehog signaling was also observed compared with the vehicle controls, but was reduced by SSBE administration. As a result, SSBE suppressed the growth of pancreatic tumors. Thus, these findings demonstrate that SSBE has therapeutic potential for pancreatic cancer, and this anticancer effect in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:26987050

  17. Recent Expansion of a New Ingi-Related Clade of Vingi non-LTR Retrotransposons in Hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kenji K.; Kapitonov, Vladimir V.; Jurka, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    Autonomous non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons and their repetitive remnants are ubiquitous components of mammalian genomes. Recently, we identified non-LTR retrotransposon families, Ingi-1_AAl and Ingi-1_EE, in two hedgehog genomes. Here we rename them to Vingi-1_AAl and Vingi-1_EE and report a new clade “Vingi,” which is a sister clade of Ingi that lacks the ribonuclease H domain. In the European hedgehog genome, there are 11 non-autonomous families of elements derived from Vingi-1_EE by internal deletions. No retrotransposons related to Vingi elements were found in any of the remaining 33 mammalian genomes nearly completely sequenced to date, but we identified several new families of Vingi and Ingi retrotransposons outside mammals. Our data suggest the horizontal transfer of Vingi elements to hedgehog, although the vertical transfer cannot be ruled out. The compact structure and trans-mobilization of nonautonomous derivatives of Vingi can make them useful for in vivo retrotransposition assay system. PMID:20716533

  18. Indian hedgehog B function is required for the specification of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the zebrafish CNS.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ah-Young; Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Eunmi; Kim, Dohyun; Jeong, Inyoung; Cha, Young Ryun; Bae, Young-ki; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Jehee; Park, Hae-Chul

    2013-01-23

    A subset of ventral spinal cord precursors, known as pMN precursor cells, initially generate motor neurons and then oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which migrate and differentiate as myelinating oligodendrocytes in the developing neural tube. The switch between motor neuron and oligodendrocyte production by the pMN neural precursors is an important step in building a functional nervous system. However, the precise mechanism that orchestrates the sequential generation of motor neurons and oligodendrocytes within the common population of pMN precursors is still unclear. The current study demonstrates that Indian Hedgehog b (Ihhb), previously known as Echidna Hedgehog, begins to be expressed in the floor plate cells of the ventral spinal cord at the time of OPC specification in zebrafish embryos. Ihhb loss-of-function analysis revealed that Ihhb function is required for OPC specification from pMN precursors by negatively regulating the proliferation of neural precursors. Finally, results showed that Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) could not replace Ihhb function in OPC specification, suggesting that Ihhb and Shh play separate roles in OPC specification. Altogether, data from the present study suggested a novel mechanism, mediated by Ihhb, for the sequential generation of motor neurons and oligodendrocytes from pMN precursors in the ventral spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. PMID:23345245

  19. Olfactomedin 4 deficiency promotes prostate neoplastic progression and is associated with upregulation of the hedgehog-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhen; Liu, Wenli; Chen, Weiping; Zhu, Jianqiong; Deng, Chu-Xia; Rodgers, Griffin P

    2015-01-01

    Loss of olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) gene expression is associated with the progression of human prostate cancer, but its role and the molecular mechanisms involved in this process have not been completely understood. In this study, we found that Olfm4-knockout mice developed prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma. Importantly, we found that the hedgehog-signaling pathway was significantly upregulated in the Olfm4-knockout mouse model. We also found that restoration of OLFM4 in human prostate-cancer cells that lack OLFM4 expression significantly downregulated hedgehog signaling-pathway component expression. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the OLFM4 protein interacts with sonic hedgehog protein, as well as significantly inhibits GLI-reporter activity. Bioinformatic and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that decreased OLFM4 and increased SHH expression was significantly associated with advanced human prostate cancer. Thus, olfactomedin 4 appears to play a critical role in regulating progression of prostate cancer, and has potential as a new biomarker for prostate cancer. PMID:26581960

  20. Induction of MITF expression in human cholangiocarcinoma cells and hepatocellular carcinoma cells by cyclopamine, an inhibitor of the Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Samatiwat, Papavee; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Satarug, Soisungwan; Ohba, Koji; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2016-01-29

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a key regulator of differentiation of melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelial cells, but it also has functions in non-pigment cells. MITF consists of multiple isoforms, including widely expressed MITF-A and MITF-H. In the present study, we explored the potential role played by the Hedgehog signaling on MITF expression in two common types of primary liver cancer, using human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines, the KKU-100 and HuCCT1, along with the HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. Importantly, cholangiocarcinoma is characterized by the activated Hedgehog signaling. Here we show that MITF-A mRNA is predominantly expressed in all three human liver cancer cell lines examined. Moreover, cyclopamine, an inhibitor of the Hedgehog signalling, increased the expression levels of MITF proteins in HuCCT1 and HepG2 cells, but not in KKU-100 cells, suggesting that MITF expression may be down-regulated in some liver cancer cases. PMID:26773496