Sample records for gannet islands labrador

  1. Age at First Return and Breeding of Razorbills (Alca torda) on the Gannet Islands, Labrador and Machias Seal Island, New Brunswick

    E-print Network

    Jones, Ian L.

    30 Age at First Return and Breeding of Razorbills (Alca torda) on the Gannet Islands, Labrador at first return to the natal colony and age at first breeding. In total, 14 one-year-old and 110 two late in the breeding season after laying had occurred, with two-year-olds returning to the colony

  2. Peromyscus maniculatus, a possible reservoir host of Borrelia garinii from the Gannet Islands off Newfoundland and Labrador.

    PubMed

    Baggs, Eric M; Stack, Stephanie H; Finney-Crawley, Jean R; Simon, Neal P P

    2011-10-01

    Thirty-five deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, were trapped on Gannet Cluster 2 (GC-2), one of a group of islands numbered by convention in the Gannet Island Archipelago, and examined for ectoparasites. One species each of Acari (Ixodes uriae) and Siphonaptera (Orchopeas leucopus) were recovered. Samples of mice favored males to females (3.4?1). Twenty-nine percent (10) of the mice were free of ectoparasites. Males were more heavily parasitized than females when both parasites were considered. No ticks were recovered from the female mice, while the males that were parasitized carried adult Ixodes uriae. These 2 ectoparasites parasitizing P. maniculatus, which is a known reservoir host for Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), may carry B. garinii and their presence would have serious implications for the spread of this human pathogen northward in continental North America. PMID:21506809

  3. Temporal trends of mercury, organochlorines and PCBs in northern gannet (Morus bassanus) eggs from Bonaventure Island, Gulf of St. Lawrence, 1969-2009.

    PubMed

    Champoux, Louise; Rail, Jean-François; Lavoie, Raphael A; Hobson, Keith A

    2015-02-01

    Since 1969, northern gannet (Morus bassanus) eggs from Bonaventure Island, Québec, have been collected to monitor concentrations of contaminants. Levels of p,p'-DDE, which caused low breeding success of Bonaventure gannets in the 1960s, decreased by 99.4% from 1969 to 2009 (17.1-0.1 mg/kg ww), with concomitant improvement of hatching success. PCBs, most organochlorines and mercury also showed decreasing trends. Stable isotopes of carbon (?(13)C) and nitrogen (?(15)N) were measured to track the possible influence of diet changes on concentrations of contaminants over time. The confounding effect of the combustion of fossil fuels on baseline values of ?(13)C (the Suess effect) was taken into account. No temporal trends were observed in ?(13)C and ?(15)N values in gannet eggs. Hence trophic level or foraging area had a negligible influence on temporal trends of contaminants. PMID:25486601

  4. Endocrine status of a migratory bird potentially exposed to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: a case study of northern gannets breeding on Bonaventure Island, Eastern Canada.

    PubMed

    Franci, Cynthia D; Guillemette, Magella; Pelletier, Emilien; Chastel, Olivier; Bonnefoi, Salomé; Verreault, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused the death of a large number of seabirds in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. However, the long term consequences of oil exposure on migratory birds overwintering in this area have received limited attention. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of oil contamination (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) on the circulating status of prolactin and corticosterone, two hormones that influence reproductive success in birds, in Northern gannets (Morus bassanus) breeding on Bonaventure Island, Eastern Canada. Using light-based geolocators, it was found that 23.5% of Northern gannets from Bonaventure Island overwintered in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010-2011; the remainder of this population overwintered along the Atlantic Coast of the United States. PAH concentrations (eight compounds) in gannet blood cells were all found to be under the method limits of quantification, which could be the result of the ability of seabirds to metabolize these compounds and the time elapsed between oil exposure and blood sampling. Corticosterone and prolactin levels as well as body mass did not differ between the two major birds' wintering sites. Moreover, levels of both these hormones did not vary from early to late incubation period. Present results suggest that if Bonaventure Island-breeding Northern gannets had been exposed to oil in the Gulf of Mexico in the aftermath of this historical spill, this exposure could not be associated with changes in hormonal status and body mass in breeding individuals. PMID:24361782

  5. Analyses of sex and individual differences in vocalizations of Australasian gannets using a dynamic time warping algorithm.

    PubMed

    Krull, C R; Ranjard, L; Landers, T J; Ismar, S M H; Matthews, J L; Hauber, M E

    2012-08-01

    The study of the evolution of sexual differences in behavioral and morphological displays requires analyses of the extent of sexual dimorphism across various sensory modalities. In the seabird family Sulidae, boobies show dramatic sexual dimorphism in their vocalizations, and gannet calls have also been suggested to be dimorphic to human observers. This study aimed to evaluate the presence of sexually dimorphic calls in the Australasian gannet (Morus serrator) through the first comprehensive description of its vocalizations recorded at two localities; Cape Kidnappers, where individuals were banded and sexed from DNA samples, and at the Muriwai gannetry, both on the North Island of New Zealand. Calls were first inspected using basic bioacoustic features to establish a library of call element types for general reference. Extensive multivariate tests, based on a dynamic time warping algorithm, subsequently revealed that no sexual differences could be detected in Australasian gannet calls. The analyses, however, indicated extensive and consistent vocal variation between individuals, particularly so in female gannets, which may serve to signal individual identity to conspecifics. This study generates predictions to identify whether differences in Australasian gannet vocalizations play perceptual and functional roles in the breeding and social biology of this long-lived biparental seabird species. PMID:22894237

  6. Nutritional stress in Northern gannets during an unprecedented low reproductive success year: can extreme sea surface temperature event and dietary change be the cause?

    PubMed

    Franci, Cynthia D; Vézina, François; Grégoire, François; Rail, Jean-François; Verreault, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive success of seabirds is tightly associated with availability of their prey for which the spatiotemporal distribution may be influenced by sea surface temperature (SST) fluctuations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether Northern gannets (Morus bassanus) from the largest colony in North America (Bonaventure Island, Quebec, Canada) were in negative nutritional state during the unprecedented low reproductive success year of 2012, and whether this was associated with changes in SST anomalies and diet. The incubation period of gannets in 2012 was characterized by a significant decline, from early to late incubation, in plasma triglyceride levels that was associated with an increase in plasma corticosterone levels. However, no changes in plasma glycerol and ?-hydroxybutyrate levels were noted. SST anomalies recorded in this area (south of the Gulf of St. Lawrence) during the breeding period were consistently higher in 2012 compared to the previous year (a better reproductive success year). Based on signatures of stable carbon (?(13)C) and nitrogen (?(15)N) isotopes in gannet red blood cells and in whole fish homogenates of three major preys (mackerel, herring, and capelin), a minor dietary shift was noted between those years and incubation periods. In light of these findings, it is suggested that the extreme warm-water perturbation event that prevailed in the Gulf of St. Lawrence during summer 2012 was associated with a rapid deterioration of nutritional condition of Bonaventure Island gannets during the incubation. These suboptimal physiological changes likely contributed to the dramatic decline in reproductive success reported in this colony. PMID:25449633

  7. Newfoundland and Labrador Rural Dialogue

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Newfoundland and Labrador Rural Dialogue Discussion Document Prepared by Keith Storey Department of Newfoundland and Labrador. It represents a brief synopsis of a range of issues identified as important for the sustainability and development of rural Newfoundland and Labrador. Small-group consultations were held

  8. Newfoundland and Labrador.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Vianne; Smith, Brenda

    2003-01-01

    This article profiles the educational system of Newfoundland and Labrador and discusses initiatives for students who are at-risk. It describes programs and services for students who are at-risk, relevant educational legislation, areas of strength, challenges that need to be overcome, and areas of action. Agency coordination of services is…

  9. Energy Expenditure of Free-Ranging Chicks of the Cape Gannet Morus capensis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, René A; Mullers, Ralf H E; Meijer, Haro A J; Underhill, Les G

    2015-01-01

    The Cape gannet Morus capensis, a large fish-eating seabird, is endemic to southern Africa. To study the energetics of nestling growth, we used the doubly labeled water technique to measure field metabolic rate (FMR) of nestlings, from hatchings to large partly feathered chicks (n = 17) at Malgas Island, Saldanha Bay, South Africa. At the same time, the growth rate of a large sample of chicks was measured (n = 338). These data, together with literature values on resting metabolic rate and body composition, were used to construct and partition the nestling energy budget. Nestling FMR (kJ d(-1)) increased with body mass according to FMR = 1.23m(0.923), r(2) = 0.944. Mass-specific FMR (FMRratio; kJ d(-1) g(-3/4)) was independent of chick age (r(2) = 0.20, P > 0.05); mean mass-specific FMR was 4.11 ± 1.28, n = 17. Peak daily-metabolized energy (DME), which represents the maximum rate at which parents must supply their nestlings, occurred at age 71 d and was 2,141 kJ d(-1). Between the ages 51 and 92 d (43% of the fledging period), the DME of Cape gannet chicks was equal to or surpassed 90% of adult FMR at the nest. Energy demand during this period of peak DME represented 58% of the total metabolized energy, which was estimated at 150.1 MJ for an average chick during a 97-d period, from hatching to fledging. Sensitivity analysis of the energy budget indicated that the model was robust; the biggest source of error (±15%) was for the mass-FMR equation used in the model. PMID:26052637

  10. Foraging of a coastal seabird: flight patternsand movementsof breeding Cape gannets Morus capensis

    E-print Network

    Altwegg, Res

    the energeticadvantagesof returningwith the prevailing wind. Keywords.Cape gannet,feeding,Morus capenslsForaging of a coastal seabird: flight patternsand movementsof breeding Cape gannets Morus capensis of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa: now School of Natural Sciences. Unitec, New

  11. Stable isotope ratios in Cape gannets around the southern coasts of Africa reveal penetration of biogeographic patterns in oceanic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquemet, Sébastien; McQuaid, Christopher

    2008-11-01

    The southern coasts of Africa are influenced by two major oceanic currents, leading to biogeographic patterns in inshore and offshore species assemblages, and in the stable isotope signatures of suspended particulate matter and filter-feeding mussels. We used the stable isotope ratios of carbon ( 13C/ 12C) and nitrogen ( 15N/ 14N) from the blood and feathers of adult and chick Cape gannets ( Morus capensis) to investigate whether the geographic differences observed at the lower levels in the marine communities are deep penetrating effects that reach top predators. Additionally, we evaluated whether trophic segregation occurs between adult and reared chick gannets, and whether a shift to wintering habitat occurs in adults. The study was conducted during the 2006 breeding season on Bird Island in the Agulhas system, and on Malgas and Ichaboe Islands, in the south and north Benguela respectively. Our results showed significant differences in the isotope ratios of members of different colonies, but no intra-colony differences between tissues or age groups. These results indicate that there is neither age-related nor temporal segregation in the diet of members of the same colony. Feather isotopic values suggest that adults remain all year round in the same habitats, and do not undertake long migration after reproduction. Since all gannets tend to target similar prey, we attributed among-colony differences in isotope signatures mostly to the oceanic conditions experienced by the main prey of birds rather than substantial differences in diet composition. Overall, isotopic signatures segregate the two current systems, with depleted carbon values in the Agulhas and enriched nitrogen values in the upwelled waters of the Benguela. Within the Benguela birds from Ichaboe in the north had higher ? 15N values than those from Malgas in the south, which we attributed to differences in the functioning of the upwelling cells in the vicinity of the two colonies. Finally, slight variation in the proportion of main prey and discards from fisheries may contribute to the variation in the stable-isotope signatures between colonies in the Benguela.

  12. CFD based investigation on the impact acceleration when a gannet impacts with water during plunge diving.

    PubMed

    Wang, T M; Yang, X B; Liang, J H; Yao, G C; Zhao, W D

    2013-09-01

    Plunge diving is the most commonly used feeding method of a gannet, which can make the gannet transit from air to water rapidly and successfully. A large impact acceleration can be generated due to the air-to-water transition. However, the impact acceleration experienced by the gannet during plunge diving has not been studied. In this paper, this issue is investigated by using the CFD method. The effect of the dropping height and the water-entry inclination angle on the impact acceleration is considered. The results reveal that the impact acceleration along the longitudinal body axis increases with either of the two parameters. The peak time decreases with the dropping height. A quadratic relation is found between the peak impact acceleration and the initial water-entry velocity. According to the computation, when the dropping height is 30 m (most of gannets plunge from about this height), the peak impact acceleration can reach about 23 times the gravitational acceleration, which will exert a considerable force on the gannet body. Furthermore, the pressure distribution of different water-entry inclination angles indicates that the large pressure asymmetry caused by a small oblique angle may lead to a large impact acceleration in the direction perpendicular to the longitudinal body axis and cause damage to the neck of the gannet, which partly explains the reason why a gannet performing a high plunge diving in nature enters water with a large oblique angle from the perspective of impact mechanics. The investigation on the plunge-diving behavior in this paper will inspire and promote the development of a biomimetic amphibious robot that transits from air to water with the plunge-diving mode. PMID:23851321

  13. Newfoundland Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador

    E-print Network

    Oyet, Alwell

    INTANGIBLE CULTURAL HERITAGE Newfoundland Labrador Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador of Newfoundland and Labrador has included the preservation of ICH as a key initiative in its Provincial Strategic to achieve them. The strategic vision is: "To ensure that the intangible cultural heritage of Newfoundland

  14. Mercury, DDE, and PCB's in eggs from a Norwegian gannet colony

    SciTech Connect

    Fimreite, N.; Kveseth, N.; Brevik, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Eggs taken from gannet nests in Norway were analyzed for mercury, DDE, and PCB's. Eggs collected in 1972 had mercury levels averaging 0.58 ppM, DDE levels averaging 2.1 ppM, and PCB levels averaging 7.7 ppM. While 1978 egg samples yielded lower DDE and PCB concentrations (0.66 ppM and 3.5 ppM respectively), mercury levels increased to 0.80 ppM. DDE levels were too low to affect eggshell thickness of gannet eggs. (14 references, 1 table)

  15. Seasonal variability of the Labrador Current and shelf circulation off Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi; Lu, Zhaoshi; Wang, Zeliang; Helbig, James; Chen, Nancy; De Young, Brad

    2008-10-01

    Three-dimensional finite element models were established for the Newfoundland and Labrador Shelf to investigate climatological monthly mean wind- and density-driven circulation. The model was forced using wind stresses from the National Center for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis data prescribed at the sea surface, large-scale remote forcing determined from a North Atlantic model, monthly mean temperature and salinity climatology, and M2 tide on the open boundary. The model results were examined against various in situ observations (moored current meter, tide gauge, and vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler data) and satellite drift measurements and discussed together with literature information. The seasonal mean circulation solutions were investigated in terms of relative importance of wind to density forcing for the Labrador Current. The model results indicate significant seasonal and spatial variations, consistent generally with previous study results and in approximate agreement with observations for the major currents. The region is dominated by the equatorward flowing Labrador Current along the shelf edge and along the Labrador and Newfoundland coasts. The Labrador Current is strong in the fall/winter and weak in the spring/summer. The mean transport of the shelf edge Labrador Current is 7.5 Sv at the Seal Island transect and 5.5 Sv through the Flemish Pass. The seasonal ranges are 4.5 and 5.2 Sv at the two sections, respectively. Density- and wind-driven components are both important in the inshore Labrador Current. The density-driven component dominates the mean component of the shelf edge Labrador Current while the large-scale wind-forcing contributes significantly to its seasonal variability.

  16. Mercury and organochlorines in eggs from a Norwegian gannet colony

    SciTech Connect

    Fimreite, N. (Telemark College, BO, Norway); Brevik, E.M.; Torp, R.

    1982-01-01

    The materials for this study consisted of addled eggs that were collected shortly after the laying season and stored frozen until analysis took place. The collection site is located near Nordmjele at 69/sup 0/ 08' N in northern Norway. Eggs were analyzed for DDE, PCBs and HCB by a gas chromatographic method described by BJERK and SUNDBY (1970). The PCBs were determined via pattern recognition using the commercial PCB standard Aroclor 1254, and the sum of peaks numbers 7, 8, and 10 was used (JENSEN 1972). Analysis for total mercury by flameless atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry followed the procedure of HATCH and OTT (1968). Results show a significant decrease in DDE as well as PCBs levels had taken place between the years 1972 and 1978. The 1979 data support the hypothesis that this indicates a trend as the average DDE and PCBs concentrations dropped further by 33 and 43 per cent, respectively. Only the eggs collected in 1979 were analyzed for HCB. The concentrations were very low (0.033 +/- 0.0018 ppm). The average mercury levels increased from 0.58 ppm in 1972 to 0.80 ppm in 1978 and then dropped to 0.36 ppm the following year. The present levels of DDE, PCBs, and HCB are well below those that by experience have caused problems as, for example, eggshell thinning. The mercury concentrations come closer to such levels as 0.5 ppm of mercury in eggs have been associated with reproductive impairment in pheasants. However, since fish and seafood in general, which constitute the diet of gannets, are rich in selenium, a strong antagonist to mercury such concentrations are probably well within safe limits too.

  17. MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada FACULTY in the educational and cultural life of Newfoundland and Labrador. Offering diverse undergraduate and graduate

  18. Perceptions of Distance Education in Newfoundland and Labrador: 1999 2009

    E-print Network

    Oyet, Alwell

    Perceptions of Distance Education in Newfoundland and Labrador: 1999 ­ 2009 ........................................................................................................... 80 #12; 5 Perceptions of Distance Education in Newfoundland and Labrador: 1999 2009

  19. Understanding Regional Governance in Newfoundland and Labrador

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Understanding Regional Governance in Newfoundland and Labrador A Survey of Regional Development of regional governance in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). We would first like to thank, and for their sponsorship of the Rural-Urban Interaction: Understanding and Managing Functional Regions project. The Canada-Newfoundland

  20. Visual accommodation and active pursuit of prey underwater in a plunge-diving bird: the Australasian gannet

    PubMed Central

    Machovsky-Capuska, Gabriel E.; Howland, Howard C.; Raubenheimer, David; Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin; Würsig, Bernd; Hauber, Mark E.; Katzir, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    Australasian gannets (Morus serrator), like many other seabird species, locate pelagic prey from the air and perform rapid plunge dives for their capture. Prey are captured underwater either in the momentum (M) phase of the dive while descending through the water column, or the wing flapping (WF) phase while moving, using the wings for propulsion. Detection of prey from the air is clearly visually guided, but it remains unknown whether plunge diving birds also use vision in the underwater phase of the dive. Here we address the question of whether gannets are capable of visually accommodating in the transition from aerial to aquatic vision, and analyse underwater video footage for evidence that gannets use vision in the aquatic phases of hunting. Photokeratometry and infrared video photorefraction revealed that, immediately upon submergence of the head, gannet eyes accommodate and overcome the loss of greater than 45 D (dioptres) of corneal refractive power which occurs in the transition between air and water. Analyses of underwater video showed the highest prey capture rates during WF phase when gannets actively pursue individual fish, a behaviour that very likely involves visual guidance, following the transition after the plunge dive's M phase. This is to our knowledge the first demonstration of the capacity for visual accommodation underwater in a plunge diving bird while capturing submerged prey detected from the air. PMID:22874749

  1. Generalized tetanus in a Labrador retriever

    PubMed Central

    Sprott, Kerri-Rae

    2008-01-01

    A 10-week-old, intact female, Labrador retriever was presented for progressive extensor rigidity, facial swelling, and difficulty in walking. Generalized tetanus was diagnosed and treated successfully. PMID:19252716

  2. A NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR ENGLISH BIBLIOGRAPHY September 2010

    E-print Network

    Oyet, Alwell

    A NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR ENGLISH BIBLIOGRAPHY September 2010 Sandra Clarke (clarkes at mun.ca) Linguistics Department, Memorial University St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador This bibliography updates, it does not include unpublished papers, including conference papers, which deal with Newfoundland

  3. The daily catch: Flight altitude and diving behavior of northern gannets feeding on Atlantic mackerel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garthe, Stefan; Guse, Nils; Montevecchi, William A.; Rail, Jean-François; Grégoire, François

    2014-01-01

    Predators utilize a variety of behavioral techniques to capture elusive prey. Behavioral flexibility is essential among generalist predators that pursue a diversity of prey types, and capture efficiency is expected to be intense during the breeding season for parents that engage in self- and offspring-provisioning. We studied the foraging behavior of parental northern gannets in the northwestern Atlantic (Gulf of St. Lawrence) when they were feeding on Atlantic mackerel almost exclusively. Data-loggers recorded short (mean duration: 6.3 s), high speed (inferred vertical speeds of up to 54.0 m*s- 1, equivalent to 194 km*h- 1), and shallow dives (mean depth: 4.2 m; maximum: 9.2 m). Dives tended to occur in bouts, varying between 0.3 and 4.6 per hour (mean = 1.6). During foraging, overall flight heights ranged from 0 to 70 m, with no clear preferences for height. Most plunge-dives were initiated at flight altitudes of 11-60 m (mean ± SE = 37.1 ± 2.8 m; range 3-105 m except for 1 of 162 dives that was initiated at the sea surface). Dive depth and flight altitude at plunge-dive initiation were positively and significantly correlated, though it appears that low flight altitudes were sufficient to reach dive depths at which mackerel were present. Almost all dives were V-shaped indicating that a high acceleration attack is the most effective strategy for gannets feeding on large rapid-swimming prey such as mackerel that owing to thermal preferences does not occur below the thermocline and are thus well available and essentially trapped in the water depths exploited by northern gannets.

  4. Flight destinations and foraging behaviour of northern gannets ( Sula bassana) preying on a small forage fish in a low-Arctic ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Garthe; William A. Montevecchi; Gail K. Davoren

    2007-01-01

    We applied data loggers (temperature-depth and GPS-temperature-depth) on individual birds in combination with dietary sampling and a vessel survey of prey availability to assess the foraging behaviour of northern gannets (Sula bassana, Linnaeus 1758) in a low-Arctic ecosystem in the NW Atlantic. We demonstrate that the gannets foraged almost exclusively on inshore and coastal aggregations of capelin. There was a

  5. Flight destinations and foraging behaviour of northern gannets (Sula bassana) preying on a small forage fish in a low-Arctic ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Garthe; William A. Montevecchi; Gail K. Davoren

    2007-01-01

    We applied data loggers (temperature-depth and GPS-temperature-depth) on individual birds in combination with dietary sampling and a vessel survey of prey availability to assess the foraging behaviour of northern gannets (Sula bassana, Linnaeus 1758) in a low-Arctic ecosystem in the NW Atlantic. We demonstrate that the gannets foraged almost exclusively on inshore and coastal aggregations of capelin. There was a

  6. Flight destinations and foraging behaviour of northern gannets ( Sula bassana) preying on a small forage fish in a low-Arctic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garthe, Stefan; Montevecchi, William A.; Davoren, Gail K.

    2007-02-01

    We applied data loggers (temperature-depth and GPS-temperature-depth) on individual birds in combination with dietary sampling and a vessel survey of prey availability to assess the foraging behaviour of northern gannets ( Sula bassana, Linnaeus 1758) in a low-Arctic ecosystem in the NW Atlantic. We demonstrate that the gannets foraged almost exclusively on inshore and coastal aggregations of capelin. There was a strong correspondence between the distributions of capelin and foraging gannets, and gannets exhibited persistence in successive foraging trips to the same foraging areas. The diving activity of gannets was highest during the early morning and evening, when capelin are known to be primarily available in the upper water column. Most of the gannets dive depths were less than 5 m. Flight speeds recorded by GPS were 9% higher than those estimated by previous methods and were shown to benefit from tail wind. This study shows how a combination of ship-based surveys and individually tagged birds can help understanding predator-prey intersection in a three-dimensional space in the marine environment.

  7. ACTION CANADA PAPERS on Labrador Mining, Aboriginal Governance and Muskrat Falls

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Valley- Goose Bay, in Newfoundland and Labrador. In preparation for the event of Newfoundland and Labrador, and former chair of the Public Utilities Board of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Crown agency responsible for regulating

  8. Incidence of entanglements with marine debris by northern gannets (Morus bassanus) in the non-breeding grounds.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Beneharo; Bécares, Juan; Rodríguez, Airam; Arcos, José Manuel

    2013-10-15

    The quantification of entanglements of megafauna with plastic debris at sea is difficult to assess for several reasons, such as detection and reporting biases. We used standardized vessel based counts to describe and quantify the occurrence of marine debris entanglements in northern gannets Morus bassanus at five of its main wintering areas. We observed 34 entangled birds in total, representing 0.93% of all gannets counted (n=3672 individuals). The incidence of entanglements largely varied geographically, being exceptionally high off Mauritania (20.2% of the birds in late spring). Most birds affected were immature (1.88% compared to 0.06% in adults), which in turn represented 52.4% of all the birds. Entanglements in the lower bill mandible were the most frequent, mainly with red-colored plastic objects. Further research is urgently needed to evaluate the impact of entanglements at the population level and its occurrence in other marine species, and to seek potential solutions. PMID:23932474

  9. Viewbook 2012-2013 Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    E-print Network

    Oyet, Alwell

    Changer Viewbook 2012-2013 Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada #12;imaginer and immersed in soulful, unique Newfoundland and Labrador culture. We make waves with kayak paddles, bold of MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND The largest university in Atlantic Canada, Memorial offers 100+ degree

  10. The Condor 102:703-708 0 TheCooperOrnithologicalSociety2000

    E-print Network

    Jones, Ian L.

    -activity budgetsof Harlequin Ducks(Histrionicus histrionicus) molting at the Gannet Islands,Labrador in the summerof to fly at an earlier stageof wing molt. Key words: foraging, Harlequin Ducks, Histrion- icus histrionicusDuck (Histrionicus histrionicus) becausethey areaccessibleandeasilyob- served while they molt (Robertsonet al. 1997

  11. Seasonal variability of the Labrador Current and shelf circulation off Newfoundland

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Seasonal variability of the Labrador Current and shelf circulation off Newfoundland Guoqi Han,1 models were established for the Newfoundland and Labrador Shelf to investigate climatological monthly and along the Labrador and Newfoundland coasts. The Labrador Current is strong in the fall/winter and weak

  12. Excess baggage for birds: inappropriate placement of tags on gannets changes flight patterns.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Sylvie P; Grundy, Edward; Friswell, Michael I; Grogan, Adam; Votier, Stephen C; Wilson, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    Devices attached to flying birds can hugely enhance our understanding of their behavioural ecology for periods when they cannot be observed directly. For this, scientists routinely attach units to either birds' backs or their tails. However, inappropriate payload distribution is critical in aircraft and, since birds and planes are subject to the same laws of physics during flight, we considered aircraft aerodynamic constraints to explain flight patterns displayed by northern gannets Sula bassana equipped with (small ca. 14 g) tail- and back-mounted accelerometers and (larger ca. 30 g) tail-mounted GPS units. Tail-mounted GPS-fitted birds showed significantly higher cumulative numbers of flap-glide cycles and a higher pitch angle of the tail than accelerometer-equipped birds, indicating problems with balancing inappropriately placed weights with knock-on consequences relating to energy expenditure. These problems can be addressed by carefully choosing where to place tags on birds according to the mass of the tags and the lifestyle of the subject species. PMID:24671007

  13. Effects of piscivory on the fatty acid profiles and antioxidants of avian yolk: studies on eggs of the gannet, skua, pelican and cormorant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter F. Surai; Gary R. Bortolotti; Andrea L. Fidgett; Jonathan D. Blount; Brian K. Speake

    2001-01-01

    Piscivorous birds consume diets which are rich in highly-polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids; these play vital roles in embryonic development but are very susceptible to oxidative damage. The effects of such diets on the fatty acid composition and antioxidant content of the yolk were investigated in the northern gannet Morus bassanus, the great skua Catharacta skua, the American white pelican Pelecanus

  14. "Labrador lung": an unusual mixed dust pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Edstrom, H. W.; Rice, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-eight workers involved for various periods from 1962 in mining and milling iron-containing rock in the Carol Lake area of western Labrador were found in late 1974 and early 1975 to have pneumoconiosis. Their annual chest roentgenograms demonstrated irregular nodular densities, and several revealed mild hilar lymphadenopathy or pleural thickening. All 48 workers were asymptomatic and had normal pulmonary function; their average age was 38 years. At work they had been exposed to high levels of dust containing iron, silica and anthophyllite, a type of asbestos. Lung biopsy specimens from 13 of them showed widespread focal fibrosis, large amounts of hemosiderin and silica and many ferruginous bodies; one ferruginous body was identified as having a core of anthophyllite. A granulomatous reaction was seen in two biopsy specimens and typical silicotic nodules were found in two others. The relatively brief exposure, especially in ones case (11 months), and the short latent interval before the development of the pneumoconiosis are reasons for concern for the health of iron ore workers. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:6277443

  15. Guidelines for research involving Aboriginal communities in Newfoundland and Labrador Guidelines for research involving

    E-print Network

    Brownstone, Rob

    Guidelines for research involving Aboriginal communities in Newfoundland and Labrador 1 Guidelines for research involving Aboriginal communities in Newfoundland and Labrador Fern Brunger, PhD on behalf #12;Guidelines for research involving Aboriginal communities in Newfoundland and Labrador 2 Table

  16. Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner for Newfoundland and Labrador

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner for Newfoundland and Labrador May 2005 #12;#12;Guidelines for Video Surveillance for Public Bodies in Newfoundland and Labrador May 2005 Office ................................................................................................................................. 9 #12;Guidelines for Video Surveillance for Public Bodies in Newfoundland and Labrador May 2005

  17. Using non-systematic surveys to investigate effects of regional climate variability on Australasian gannets in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Mridula; Dassis, Mariela; Benn, Emily; Stockin, Karen A.; Martinez, Emmanuelle; Machovsky-Capuska, Gabriel E.

    2015-05-01

    Few studies have investigated regional and natural climate variability on seabird populations using ocean reanalysis datasets (e.g. Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA)) that integrate atmospheric information to supplement ocean observations and provide improved estimates of ocean conditions. Herein we use a non-systematic dataset on Australasian gannets (Morus serrator) from 2001 to 2009 to identify potential connections between Gannet Sightings Per Unit Effort (GSPUE) and climate and oceanographic variability in a region of known importance for breeding seabirds, the Hauraki Gulf (HG), New Zealand. While no statistically significant relationships between GSPUE and global climate indices were determined, there was a significant correlation between GSPUE and regional SST anomaly for HG. Also, there appears to be a strong link between global climate indices and regional climate in the HG. Further, based on cross-correlation function coefficients and lagged multiple regression models, we identified potential leading and lagging climate variables, and climate variables but with limited predictive capacity in forecasting future GSPUE. Despite significant inter-annual variability and marginally cooler SSTs since 2001, gannet sightings appear to be increasing. We hypothesize that at present underlying physical changes in the marine ecosystem may be insufficient to affect supply of preferred gannet main prey (pilchard Sardinops spp.), which tolerate a wide thermal range. Our study showcases the potential scientific value of lengthy non-systematic data streams and when designed properly (i.e., contain abundance, flock size, and spatial data), can yield useful information in climate impact studies on seabirds and other marine fauna. Such information can be invaluable for enhancing conservation measures for protected species in fiscally constrained research environments.

  18. Eddy diffusivities estimated from observations in the Labrador Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Funk; P. Brandt; T. Fischer

    2009-01-01

    Eddy diffusivities in the Labrador Sea (LS) are estimated from deep eddy resolving float trajectories, moored current meter records, and satellite altimetry. A mean residence time of 248 days in the central LS is observed with several floats staying for more than 2 years. By applying a simple random walk diffusion model, the observed distribution of float residence times in

  19. Seasonality of the inshore Labrador current over the Newfoundland shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zeliang; Yashayaev, Igor; Greenan, Blair

    2015-06-01

    The seasonality of the inshore Labrador Current over the Newfoundland Shelf is investigated using GLORYS (GLobal Ocean ReanalYses and Simulations, hereafter GLORYS) ocean reanalysis product and current meter data. This study finds that the seasonality of the current tends to change as it passes its bifurcation zone between 48 °30?N and 49 °30?N. In this study, the inshore Labrador Current to the north and south of the bifurcation zone are termed as the North Inshore Labrador Current (hereafter NILC) and the South Inshore Labrador Current (hereafter SILC), respectively. The NILC reaches its maximum (~2.7 Sv) in autumn, and relaxes in late winter and early spring (~1 Sv), while the SILC achieves its maximum (~1 Sv) in late autumn and early winter, and weakens in summer (~0.5 Sv). The SILC is significantly weaker than the NILC. In particular, during July and August, the northern segment of SILC is about 4 times weaker than the NILC. Change of wind patterns is found to be linked with the summer weakening of the SILC.

  20. CES Case Competition: A Newfoundland and Labrador Chapter Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courney, Bea; Etchegary, Holly

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Case Competition established by the Newfoundland and Labrador Chapter of the Canadian Evaluation Society based on the national Case Competition model. Describes the competition as an opportunity for students to gain skills, confidence, and contacts while working as teams. (SLD)

  1. Legislative Provisions for Special Education in Newfoundland and Labrador.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philpott, David; Nesbit, Wayne

    2001-01-01

    This article describes legislative provisions supporting educational services for children with disabilities in Newfoundland and Labrador. It begins by providing educational history information and then reviews The Building Accessibility Act (1990), The Child, Youth and Family Services Act (1998), the Schools Act (1997), and the Human Rights Code…

  2. Current Issues in Rural Education in Newfoundland and Labrador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Dennis M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the author has attempted to provide an overview of some of the issues and challenges confronting rural educators and parents in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. He has chosen to focus on three of the most pressing at this point in time: (1) declining enrollment and its consequences; (2) the continuing pressure on…

  3. Fraser Island Lady Elliot Island

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yan

    Hinchinbrook Island Lizard Island Double Island Green Island Fitzroy Island North and South Stradbroke Islands Moreton Island GOLD COAST Gulf of Carpenteria Thursday Island Torres Strait Horn Island Maroochydore

  4. Fine scale bio-physical oceanographic characteristics predict the foraging occurrence of contrasting seabird species; Gannet (Morus bassanus) and storm petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, B. E.; Webb, A.; Palmer, M. R.; Embling, C. B.; Sharples, J.

    2013-10-01

    As we begin to manage our oceans in much more spatial detail we must understand a great deal more about oceanographic habitat preferences of marine mobile top predators. In this unique field study we test a hypothesis on the mechanisms defining mobile predator foraging habitat characteristics by comparing temporally and spatially detailed bio-physical oceanographic data from contrasting topographical locations. We contrast the foraging locations of two very different seabird species, gannets and storm petrels, by repeatedly sampling a bank and a nearby flat area over daily tidal cycles during spring and neap tides. The results suggest that storm petrels are linked to foraging in specific locations where internal waves are produced, which is mainly on banks. These locations can also include the presence of high biomass of chlorophyll. In contrast, the location where more gannets are foraging is significantly influenced by temporal variables with higher densities of foraging birds much more likely during the neap tide than times of spring tide. The foraging times of both species was influenced by differences between the vertical layers of the water column above and below the thermocline; via either vertical shear of horizontal currents or absolute differences in speed between layers. Higher densities of foraging gannets were significantly more likely to be found at ebb tides in both bank and flat regions however over the bank, the density of foraging gannets was higher when the differences in speed between the layers were at a maximum. Both gannets and storm petrels appear to be more likely to forage when wind direction is opposed to tidal direction. This detailed understanding links foraging behaviour to predictable spatial and temporal bio-physical vertical characteristics and thus can be immediately used to explain variance and increase certainty in past abundance and distributional surveys. These results also illuminate the types of variables that should be considered when assessing potential changes to the distribution and characteristics of habitats from increased anthropogenic disturbances such as large scale offshore wind, wave and tidal renewable deployments.

  5. Histology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea in Labrador.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G. J.; Overall, M.

    1978-01-01

    Nine specimens of the corneas of patients from Labrador and Northern Newfoundland affected by spheroidal degeneration (climatic droplet keratopathy) have been examined microscopically. Histochemical stains confirmed studies of similar corneal degenerations from other geographical areas that the droplets contain a protein which does not have all the characteristic properties of elastic tissue. Staining compatible in some instances with fibrin and "fibrinoid" was found. By immunoperoxidase techniques the droplets were located in the zones of greatest concentration of various plasma constituents, especially albumin and immunoglobulins G and A. Reasons are given why the abnormal deposits are not thought to be derived directly from corneal collagen. It is suggested that some of the plasma proteins, which are known to be diffusing through the cornea from the limbal vessels under normal conditions are acted upon by the ultraviolet light reflected from the ice of Labrador and degraded so that they accumulate in the superficial stroma. Images PMID:629911

  6. Magsat magnetic anomaly contrast across Labrador Sea passive margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Lauren M.; Frey, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Many passive margins not complicated by nearby anomalous crustal structure have satellite elevation crustal magnetic anomaly contrasts across them that are recognizable in reduced-to-pole versions of the Magsat and POGO data. In the Labrador Sea region this contrast is particularly well developed with strong positive anomalies overlying the continental crust of Greenland and eastern Canada and prominent negative anomalies situated over the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. In this work, forward modeling of the large-scale crustal bodies in this region (continental, oceanic, passive margin, several anomalous structures) was used to show that the Magsat anomaly contrast is due simply to the change in crustal susceptibility and thickness at the continental/oceanic crustal transition. Because the thickness varies more than the average susceptibility from continental to oceanic crust, the strong anomaly contrast is essentially an edge effect due mostly to the change in crustal structure.

  7. HOLOCENE GLACIER FLUCTUATIONS IN THE TORNGAT MOUNTAINS, NORTHERN LABRADOR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. McCOY

    01003, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Lichen measurements and other relative-age data were collected from deposits of several cirque glaciers in the Torngat Mountains of northern Labrador. Lichen growth sta­ tions were established, but no lichen-growth curve has yet been determined for the local area. However, moraines can be correlated between valleys on the basis of the largest diameter thallus of Rhizocarpon geographicum

  8. Morphodynamic and Slope Instability Observations at Wabush Lake, Labrador

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Turmel; J. Locat; G. Cauchon-Voyer; C. Lavoie; P. Simpkin; G. Parker; P. Lauzière

    \\u000a Since 1964, Iron Ore Company of Canada (IOCC) has deposited iron tailings resulting from mining operations into Wabush Lake,\\u000a Western Labrador. Bathymetric surveys were carried out between 2004 and 2008 as part of the overall environmental IOCC plans\\u000a to maintain safe disposal strategies of tailings into the lake. In this paper, we present the evolution in distribution and\\u000a morphological characteristics

  9. Oceanography of a tidally choked fjord: Lake Melville, Labrador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deYoung, Brad; Lu, Zhaoshi; Demirov, Entcho

    2013-04-01

    Lake Melville is large and complex sub-Arctic fjord that is a major outlet for freshwater on the Labrador coast. Although it has been the subject of exploration for centuries, we still know relatively little about its oceanography. We are studying the influence of changes in the fresh water discharge on the dynamics and ecosystem of Lake Melville in Labrador and how they interact with long-term climatic variability. Enormous hydroelectric developments have changed the freshwater runoff dynamics with unknown implications for the local and regional oceanography. The fjord is tidally choked, leading to intense flows at the entrance of 3-4 m/s. We will review the role of mixing and seasonal cycles in determining water properties in the lake and how changing climatic and freshwater conditions influence the oceanography and sea-ice dynamics. We will present historical data for the Lake together with results from our recent oceanographic work. We will compare our current measurements with results of a high resolution, variable element, coupled ocean-ice model for the Lake. The long-term exchange between the Labrador Sea and Lake Melville will be studied with this high-resolution ocean model. The implications of interannual ocean and atmospheric variability on the Lake ocean ecosystem will be discussed.

  10. Local Governance, Creativity and Regional Development in Newfoundland and Labrador Lessons for Policy and Practice from Two Projects

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Local Governance, Creativity and Regional Development in Newfoundland and Labrador Lessons for Policy and Practice from Two Projects Celtic Rendezvous, Bauline East, Irish Loop, Newfoundland Development in Newfoundland and Labrador: Lessons for Policy and Practice from Two

  11. Convective to Gyre-Scale Dynamics: Seaglider Campaigns in the Labrador Sea

    E-print Network

    -based surveys have been the dominant source of in situ observations in the Labrador Sea. Because has begun to reduce the fair-weather bias of in situ observations. With the advent of gliders. Because ship-based surveys are sparse in the Labrador Sea, the only interannual estimates

  12. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR Conference OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR May 16, 2007 St. John's Conference Report September and Development, Memorial University of Newfoundland www.mun.ca/harriscentre And The Oil and Gas Development

  13. Attracting and Retaining Immigrants to Newfoundland and Labrador: Dr. Lan Gien and Dr. Rebecca Law

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Attracting and Retaining Immigrants to Newfoundland and Labrador: Dr. Lan Gien and Dr. Rebecca Law contact the Harris Centre. #12;Attracting and Retaining Immigrants to Newfoundland and Labrador: Voices Professor, School of Pharmacy, MUN August 2009 #12;Attracting and Retaining Immigrants to Newfoundland

  14. A preliminary assessment of the true morels (Morchella) in Newfoundland and Labrador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A preliminary assessment of true morels (Morchella) from Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) was obtained by using DNA sequence data from portions of three genes to identify 20 collections from Newfoundland and one from a remote location in Labrador. To place this work in a broader context, data on 25 co...

  15. The phase shift of the Labrador Current on interannual-to-decadal scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi; Chen, Nancy; Ma, Zhimin

    2014-05-01

    The transport of the Labrador Current has substantial interannual-to-decadal variability that may significantly impact the ocean climate and marine ecosystem off Atlantic Canada and Northeast United States. Nevertheless the alongshore coherence of the Labrador Current on the interannual-to-decadal scales has been a long standing question. Here we have used satellite altimetry data to study interannual-to-decadal variability of the unit-depth surface Labrador Current in the past two decades, in the context of the subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic. The surface Labrador Current transport is positively and negatively correlated with the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index (with the transport lagging by about one year) in the north (the Labrador and northeastern Newfoundland Slope) and in the south (the Scotian Slope), respectively. The transport over the Labrador and northeastern Newfoundland Slope is negatively correlated with that over the Scotian Slope, suggesting two distinct regimes. In addition, the surface Labrador Current transport declines over the Labrador Slope and northeastern Newfoundland Slope and increases over the Scotian Slope. The subpolar surface gyre shows notable quasi-decadal oscillations that are significantly correlated with the winter NAO index. The gyre has also been weakening in the past two decades, which is likely to be part of multi-decadal variability.

  16. Petroleum exploration and resource potential of offshore Newfoundland and Labrador

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, D.M.; Dobbin, J.; Sheppard, M.G.

    1983-03-01

    The continental margin of Newfoundland and Labrador, encompassing a total area of 714,000 mi/sup 2/ (1,849,252 km/sup 2/) has been the target of exploratory activity since the early 1960s. Exploratory drilling began on the Grand Banks in 1966 and by 1974 a total of 40 dry wells had been drilled. In 1979 wildcat drilling resumed on the Grand Banks and the Hibernia field was discovered with the drilling of the P-15 well. This well, with an estimated flow potential of more than 20,000 BOPD, was the first oil well drilled on the Atlantic shelf of North America capable of commercial production. Truly a giant, the Hibernia structure has a resource potential of 1.85 billion bbl of oil and 2.0 tcf of gas at a probability level of 50%. Six significant oil discoveries have been made on the Grand Banks. The reservoirs are fluvial-deltaic and shoreline sandstones of Jurassic and Cretaceous age. Since 1971, 25 wells drilled on the Labrador Shelf resulted in one oil and five gas discoveries. The reservoirs are Paleozoic carbonates and Lower Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene sandstones. All are capping or draping basement horst blocks. By the end of 1982, total exploratory efforts had resulted in the drilling of 86 wells and the acquisition of approximately 240,000 line-mi of marine reflection seismic. A total resource potential of these structures has been estimated at 14.7 billion bbl of oil and 88.6 tcf of gas at a 50% probability level. A commercial discovery was long in coming but the recent high success rates confirm this margin as a major frontier of enormous potential.

  17. Labrador tea - the aromatic beverage and spice: a review of origin, processing and safety.

    PubMed

    Dampc, Anna; Luczkiewicz, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Labrador tea is a name for the dried leaves of Rhododendron groenlandicum, R. tomentosum or R. neoglandulosum (family Ericaceae, previously genus Ledum) as well as for the beverage native to North America, which is made from them. The above species are rich in the essential oil, which gives a conifer aroma to the tisane. Labrador tea is a valuable source of ascorbic acid, with tonic, improving digestion and relaxing activity. However, this beverage should not be drunk more than once daily because of the ledol and grayanotoxin toxicity. The common recipe for making Labrador tea is to add one teaspoonful of dried leaves to one cup of boiling water and to brew for 5?min. It is often sweetened or enriched with other flavors. Additionally, Labrador tea dried leaves are used to spice meat, soups, sauces, salads, beer, cakes and other dishes. In agriculture, its insecticidal properties can be useful for controlling pests. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25156477

  18. Absence of deep-water formation in the Labrador Sea during the last interglacial period.

    PubMed

    Hillaire-Marcel, C; de Vernal, A; Bilodeau, G; Weaver, A J

    2001-04-26

    The two main constituent water masses of the deep North Atlantic Ocean-North Atlantic Deep Water at the bottom and Labrador Sea Water at an intermediate level-are currently formed in the Nordic seas and the Labrador Sea, respectively. The rate of formation of these two water masses tightly governs the strength of the global ocean circulation and the associated heat transport across the North Atlantic Ocean. Numerical simulations have suggested a possible shut-down of Labrador Sea Water formation as a consequence of global warming. Here we use micropalaeontological data and stable isotope measurements in both planktonic and benthic foraminifera from deep Labrador Sea cores to investigate the density structure of the water column during the last interglacial period, which was thought to be about 2 degrees C warmer than present. Our results indicate that today's stratification between Labrador Sea Water and North Atlantic Deep Water never developed during the last interglacial period. Instead, a buoyant surface layer was present above a single water mass originating from the Nordic seas. Thus the present situation, with an active site of intermediate-water formation in the Labrador Sea, which settled some 7,000 years ago, has no analogue throughout the last climate cycle. PMID:11323666

  19. The Social Dynamics of Economic Performance: Innovation and Creativity in City-Regions Newfoundland and Labrador Project Preliminary Findings St. John's, Clarenville, Corner Brook & Labrador West

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    The Social Dynamics of Economic Performance: Innovation and Creativity in City-Regions Newfoundland of Newfoundland and Labrador #12;Prepared by: Heather M. Hall Ph.D. Candidate Queen's University Kingston ON Tel .....................................................................................................................3! ISRN PROJECT ­ NATIONAL AND NEWFOUNDLAND OVERVIEW

  20. Ice-sheet sourced juxtaposed turbidite systems in Labrador Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hesse, R.; Klaucke, I.; Ryan, William B. F.; Piper, D.J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Ice-sheet sourced Pleistocene turbidite systems of the Labrador Sea are different from non-glacially influenced systems in their facies distribution and depositional processes. Two large-scale sediment dispersal systems are juxtaposed, one mud-dominated and associated with the Northwest Atlantic Mid-Ocean Channel (NAMOC), the other sand-dominated and forming a huge submarine braided sandplain. Co-existence of the two systems reflects grain-size separation of the coarse and fine fractions on an enormous scale, caused by sediment winnowing at the entrance points of meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) to the sea (Hudson Strait, fiords) and involves a complex interplay of depositional and redepositional processes. The mud-rich NAMOC system is multisourced and represents a basinwide converging system of tributary canyons and channels. It focusses its sand load to the central trunk channel in basin centre, in the fashion of a "reverse" deep-sea fan. The sand plain received its sediment from the Hudson Strait by turbidity currents that were generated either by failure of glacial prodelta slopes at the ice margin, or by direct meltwater discharges with high bedload concentration. We speculate that the latter might have been related to subglacial-lake outburst flooding through the Hudson Strait, possibly associated with ice-rafting (Heinrich) events.

  1. Granulomatous lymphadenitis caused by Talaromyces helicus in a Labrador Retriever.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Julie Kristy; Cooley, Avery James; Zhang, Shuping; Johnson, Melanie Elaine

    2011-12-01

    A 3-year-old spayed female Labrador Retriever was presented for right prescapular lymphadenomegaly. Examination of fine-needle aspirates and impression smears of the node revealed many short hyphal structures found within macrophages and extracellularly. Hyphae were approximately 3 ?m in diameter, were irregularly septate with nonparallel walls, and had a small clear halo surrounding a partially stained basophilic internal structure. Hyphae were tapered on one end and had oval to pyriform swellings of 7-10 ?m on the other, resulting in a bulbous appearance. Fungal elements stained positively with Gomori methenamine silver and Periodic acid-Schiff stains. The dog was euthanized at the owner's request, and necropsy revealed marked peripheral and visceral lymphadenomegaly. Histopathologic examination of lymph nodes confirmed granulomatous lymphadenitis with many fungal hyphae. Fungal culture yielded pure cultures of organisms that failed to produce ascospores or conidia precluding morphologic identification. PCR was performed using pan-fungal primers, ITS-1 and ITS-2, to amplify the intergenic spacer regions of ribosomal RNA; the PCR product was sequenced and a BLAST search of the GenBank databases at NCBI revealed 100% identity of the organism with Talaromyces helicus, the sexual form of Penicillium helicum. Talaromyces helicus has not previously been reported to cause disease in people or animals. PMID:22136479

  2. Influences Preceding "Nunatsiavut" Self-Determination: Historical, Political and Educational Influences on the People of Northern Labrador (Canada)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kirk David

    2007-01-01

    What were the influences on the Inuit of Northern Labrador preceding the creation of the self-governing territory of Nunatsiavut? What are the preterritorial influences of the Inuit on the territory's five schools? To answer these questions and to share the success of one Indigenous people, the Nunatsiavut Inuit (the Inuit of Northern Labrador

  3. The paucity of ethics in Canadian environmental affairs. R. J. Gibson, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador,

    E-print Network

    Jones, Ian L.

    of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, A1C 5S7, Canada. P. Gallaugher, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5A 1S6, Canada. R.L. Haedrich, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, A1C 5S7, Canada. Abstract: Canadian natural resources are recognized

  4. The Effectiveness of Web-Delivered Learning with Aboriginal Students: Findings from a Study in Coastal Labrador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philpott, David; Sharpe, Dennis; Neville, Rose

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines the findings of a study that explores perspectives of e-learning for aboriginal students in five coastal communities in Labrador, Canada. The rural nature of many communities in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, coupled with a dramatically declining enrollment, has resulted in expanding use of e-learning as a means to…

  5. Canine hip and elbow dysplasia in UK Labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, J A; Lewis, T W; Blott, S C

    2011-08-01

    This paper examines the outcomes from recent genetic analyses of hip and elbow scores from British Veterinary Association (BVA)/UK Kennel Club (KC) screening programmes targeted at reducing the prevalence of hip dysplasia (HD) and elbow dysplasia in UK Labrador retrievers. The analyses made use of 25,243 hip scores and 3613 elbow scores. Heritabilities (± standard error) for hip score, analysed on a log scale, and for elbow score were 0.35±0.02 and 0.19±0.04, respectively, with a genetic correlation of 0.41±0.09. For both hip and elbow scores, there was a near perfect genetic correlation between the left and right joint; analysis of hip score showed a predictive benefit of using the total of left and right scores rather than worst score and the benefit of using all component scores rather than their aggregate score. Downward genetic trends were observed in both hip and elbow scores, although the latter was consistent with it being correlated to response to genetic change in hip score. Estimated breeding values (EBVs) offered substantial benefits in accuracy and hence genetic progress when compared to the use of phenotypes for both hip and elbow scores. There are major opportunities for improving selection against elbow dysplasia through the use of bivariate evaluations, although progress against dysplasia would be improved by more widespread elbow scoring. The studies highlighted a number of ways in which data recording for addressing complex traits may be improved in the future. Ongoing advances in genomic technology may be utilised for increasing the rate of genetic progress in selection against HD and for complex diseases in general, through the use of genomic evaluations. PMID:21737322

  6. Matriculating Eastward: Maritime Student Migration to Newfoundland & Labrador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Dale; Greene, Melanie; Bourgeois, Monique; Sharpe, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the number of both out-of-province Canadian and international students enrolled at Memorial University of Newfoundland has increased substantially. During this period, the enrollment levels of students from the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island have undergone an increase of approximately ten-fold.…

  7. Clinical Phenotype of X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy in Labrador Retriever Puppies

    PubMed Central

    Snead, E.C.R.; Taylor, S.M.; van der Kooij, M.; Cosford, K.; Beggs, A.H.; Shelton, G.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Seven male Labrador Retriever puppies from 3 different litters, born to clinically normal dams and sires, were evaluated for progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. Muscle biopsies identified a congenital myopathy with pathologic features consistent with myotubular myopathy. Further investigations identified a pathogenic mutation in the myotubularin gene, confirming that these puppies had X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM). Objective To review the clinical phenotype, electrodiagnostic and laboratory features of XLMTM in this cohort of Labrador Retrievers. Results Male puppies with XLMTM were small and thin compared with their normal littermates. Generalized weakness and muscle atrophy were present by 7 weeks of age in some puppies and evident to most owners by 14 weeks of age. Affected puppies stood with an arched spine and low head carriage, and walked with a short, choppy stride. Muscle atrophy was severe and progressive. Patellar reflexes were absent. Laryngeal and esophageal dysfunction, and weakness of the masticatory muscles occurred in puppies surviving beyond 4 months of age. Serum creatine kinase activity was normal or only mildly increased. EMG findings were nonspecific and included positive sharp waves and fibrillation potentials. Clinical signs progressed rapidly, with most affected puppies unable to walk within 3–4 weeks after clinical signs were first noticed. Conclusions and Clinical Importance Although initial clinical signs of XLMTM are similar to the phenotypically milder centronuclear myopathy in Labrador Retrievers, XLMTM is a rapidly progressive and fatal myopathy. Clinicians should be aware of these 2 distinct myopathies with similar clinical presentations in the Labrador retriever breed. PMID:25581576

  8. Developing a Physician Management & Leadership Program (PMLP) in Newfoundland and Labrador.

    PubMed

    Maddalena, Victor; Fleet, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - This article aims to document the process the province of Newfoundland and Labrador used to develop an innovative Physician Management and Leadership Program (PMLP). The PMLP is a collaborative initiative among Memorial University (Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Business), the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, and the Regional Health Authorities. As challenges facing health-care systems become more complex there is a growing need for management and leadership training for physicians. Design/methodology/approach - Memorial University Faculty of Medicine and the Gardiner Centre in the Faculty of Business in partnership with Regional Health Authorities and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador identified the need for a leadership and management education program for physician leaders. A provincial needs assessment of physician leaders was conducted to identify educational needs to fill this identified gap. A Steering Committee was formed to guide the design and implementation and monitor delivery of the 10 module Physician Management and Leadership Program (PMLP). Findings - Designing management and leadership education programs to serve physicians who practice in a large, predominately rural geographic area can be challenging and requires efficient use of available resources and technology. Originality/value - While there are many physician management and leadership programs available in Canada and abroad, the PMLP was designed to meet the specific educational needs of physician leaders in Newfoundland and Labrador. PMID:25751247

  9. WHERE DO YOU DRAW THE LINE? Regionalization in Newfoundland and Labrador

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    WHERE DO YOU DRAW THE LINE? Regionalization in Newfoundland and Labrador A comparative synopsis of selected stakeholders' input #12;#12;Where do you draw the line? Regionalization in Newfoundland For the Leslie Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development Memorial University of Newfoundland Jan. 25, 2008

  10. Educational Psychologists' Perspectives on Their Professional Practice in Newfoundland and Labrador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gregory E.; Joy, Rhonda M.

    2010-01-01

    Educational psychology is in the midst of examination and potential change in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Unfortunately, there has been a paucity of published empirical research investigating educational psychology in the province. The current study surveyed educational psychologists from the four English districts in Newfoundland…

  11. The Rocky Crags and Seascapes of Outdoor Education and Outdoor Recreation in Newfoundland and Labrador.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Gregory

    1997-01-01

    Four formal outdoor education programs in Newfoundland and Labrador are briefly described: Brother Brennan Environmental Education Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, and College of the North Atlantic. Cooperation among these formal environmental and outdoor recreation programs, informal community outdoor…

  12. Teacher Education and Development in Newfoundland and Labrador in a Time of Restructuring and Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samson, Florence

    2001-01-01

    Through reference to policy and research documents, this paper provides insight into how educational restructuring and reform are planned, presented, and implemented in Canada's Atlantic provinces, particularly Newfoundland and Labrador. It suggests that such reform and restructuring occur at the interface of a province's history, geography, and…

  13. Maintaining Quality Programming in Rural Newfoundland and Labrador: A Case Study in Policy and Structural Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Harold; Galway, Gerald; Collins, Alice

    2003-01-01

    Newfoundland and Labrador has many rural communities, low literacy rates, high unemployment, declining enrollment and population, and teacher shortages. Policy responses have been to consolidate schools, increase rural teacher pay, increase teacher recruitment, implement distance learning and distance professional development, intensify…

  14. Government of Newfoundland and Labrador ATIPP Office, Office of Public Engagement

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    Government of Newfoundland and Labrador ATIPP Office, Office of Public Engagement Request for Correction of Personal Information Form Personal information on this form is collected under the Newfoundland University of Newfoundland #12;Instructions Please · Describe the records or information you are seeking

  15. Activity patterns, diet, and feeding efficiency of Harlequin Ducks breeding in northern Labrador

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael S. Rodway

    1998-01-01

    The lack of data on summer diet and feeding behaviour for the endangered eastern North American population of Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) prompted a study of activity patterns and feeding ecology in a coastal stream in Hebron Fiord, Labrador. Diurnal activity patterns varied by habitat and changed through the season. Extensive feeding occurred in slow-moving waters, contrary to expectation. Females

  16. The Role of Irminger Current Eddies for the Restratification of the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, C. A.; Spall, M. A.; Pickart, R. S.

    2003-04-01

    The Labrador Sea is one of the few regions in the world ocean where deep convection occurs, and is thus of crucial importance for our understanding of the thermohaline circulation. The properties of the deep, convected water masses are not only set by the winter conditions in the area, but also by the degree of restratification over summer. Observations show that three to four months after wintertime convection, a stratified layer of ˜1000 m caps the convected Labrador Sea Water again. This rapid restratification process is yet poorly understood. Previous work suggests that geostrophic eddies spawned by the baroclinic instability of the convected area are responsible. In this study, we focus on the possible role of Irminger Current eddies for the restratification process. These eddies, which are shed on a regular basis from the boundary current near the west coast of Greenland, are known to carry warm, salty waters into the Labrador Sea interior. In an idealized model set-up, we study the formation of the eddies and the underlying instability mechanism. For a realistic 'end-of-winter'-state, in the absence of the Irminger Current, it is shown that the interior convection site generates only weak baroclinic currents, so that restratification by the resulting instabilities is insufficient. By contrast, cases in which Irminger Current eddies are formed along the coast of Greenland are shown to rapidly restratify the convected water mass in the interior of the Labrador Sea. Finally, we demonstrate that Irminger Current eddies can balance a significant portion of the the atmospheric heat loss, and thus play an important role for the water mass transformation in the Labrador Sea.

  17. Rare-earth elements and Nd and Pb isotopes as source indicators for Labrador Sea clay-size sediments during Heinrich event 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Barber, David; Andrews, John T.; Taylor, H.; Lamothe, P.

    2003-01-01

    Elemental abundances and Nd and Pb isotope ratios were determined on samples from the carbonate-free, clay-size fractions of sediments from intervals above, within, and below Heinrich event 2 (H-2) in core HU87-9 from the Northwest Labrador Sea slope. In HU87-9, rare-earth element (REE) distributions and elemental concentrations within the H-2 event are distinct from those outside this event, ??Nd(0) and 206Pb/204Pb data also indicate different values for sediments deposited within and outside the H-2 event. Comparisons of REE patterns from the H-2 interval with those from bedrock units in Baffin Island, northern Quebec, and Labrador indicate that the Lake Harbour Group (LHG), which crops out on the north side of the Hudson Strait, is the most probable bedrock source of the clay-size fraction found within the H-2 interval in HU87-9. The Tasiuyak Gneiss (TG) and Lac Lomier Complex (LLC) have REE patterns (including a negative Eu anomaly) similar to those found in H-2 sediments; however, the La/Yb ratios of these units are smaller than those associated with H-2 sediments. The Nd and Pb isotope data support and complement REE-based interpretations of provenance; i.e., the Nd-Pb signatures of sediments deposited at the HU87-9 site during the H-2 event are similar to Nd-Pb signatures obtained on diamicts from the western end of Hudson Strait. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Processes Governing the Location and Depth of Convection in the Labrador Sea - Lessons Learned from an Idealized Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, C. A.; Gelderloos, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Labrador Sea is one of the few locations in the world's oceans where deep convection occurs. The convectively-formed Labrador Sea Water (LSW) contributes to the lower limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). In light of its link to the AMOC, it is important to understand the annual cycle of Labrador Sea convection and restratification, and the role that both atmospheric and oceanic conditions play for the formation of LSW. Convection in the Labrador Sea is highly variable in time, and observations indicate that also the location of deepest convection varies. It is obvious that the atmospheric heat loss is an important factor in governing these characteristics of wintertime convection. However, the story is probably more complicated than that. Over the year, the Labrador Sea loses heat to the atmosphere, and this loss is compensated by lateral eddy buoyancy fluxes originating from the boundary current. This implies that variations in the pattern and magnitude of these eddy fluxes may play a role as well for setting the preferred convection sites. In this study, a highly idealized model is applied to investigate the competing impacts of surface heat loss and lateral buoyancy fluxes in setting the characteristics of Labrador Sea convection, and to assess how sensitive the convection is to variations in these two processes. In particular, the impacts of Irminger Rings shed near Greenland's west coast are highlighted.

  19. Island Biogeography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Jungck (BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium; Biology)

    2005-12-16

    This excel workbook demonstrates the principles of the MacArthur-Wilson theory of Island Biogeography. It allows the user to define the mainland species pool, area of the island, and distance of the island from the mainland. Graphical output included species richness equilibrium at varying island size and distance. The workbook also allows the user to calculate a species-area function for data entered into the data input page. Several datasets on island area and species richness are included for various types of islands and species. Variables and formulas are defined in the accompanying tutorial.

  20. On the mid-depth circulation in the Labrador and Irminger Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käse, R. H.; Biastoch, A.; Stammer, D. B.

    A numerical circulation model with 1/6° resolution and an accurate topography formulation explains details of the observed circulation in the Irminger and Labrador Seas that were recently revealed by Lavender et al. [2000]. We show that the recirculation pattern is established through a locally wind induced flow controlled by the bottom topography and enhanced through remote baroclinic forcing by the dense plume of Denmark Strait overflow water. The basic circulation is a robust feature in a hierarchy of model setups. It exists in the purely barotropic case driven by steady winds and is even maintained when realistic daily forcing is added. The narrow recirculation zone is manifested by a sea level depression spanning from the Denmark Strait across the Irminger into the Labrador Sea.

  1. Age and evolution of the Grenville Province in eastern Labrador from UPb systematics in accessory minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Schärer; T. E. Krogh; C. F. Gower

    1986-01-01

    U-Pb isotope analysis of zircon, titanite, monazite and rutile extracted from 15 different Grenville Province rocks in eastern Labrador reveals: 1) major crust formation through magmatism between 1,710 and 1,630 Ma ago; no evidence of older crustal material was found. 2) Pegmatite and gabbro intrusions between 1,500 and 1,400 Ma ago, probably related to incomplete rifting of the earlier formed

  2. Long-Term Health Effects of Neutering Dogs: Comparison of Labrador Retrievers with Golden Retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Benjamin L.; Hart, Lynette A.; Thigpen, Abigail P.; Willits, Neil H.

    2014-01-01

    Our recent study on the effects of neutering (including spaying) in Golden Retrievers in markedly increasing the incidence of two joint disorders and three cancers prompted this study and a comparison of Golden and Labrador Retrievers. Veterinary hospital records were examined over a 13-year period for the effects of neutering during specified age ranges: before 6 mo., and during 6–11 mo., year 1 or years 2 through 8. The joint disorders examined were hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tear and elbow dysplasia. The cancers examined were lymphosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, and mammary cancer. The results for the Golden Retriever were similar to the previous study, but there were notable differences between breeds. In Labrador Retrievers, where about 5 percent of gonadally intact males and females had one or more joint disorders, neutering at <6 mo. doubled the incidence of one or more joint disorders in both sexes. In male and female Golden Retrievers, with the same 5 percent rate of joint disorders in intact dogs, neutering at <6 mo. increased the incidence of a joint disorder to 4–5 times that of intact dogs. The incidence of one or more cancers in female Labrador Retrievers increased slightly above the 3 percent level of intact females with neutering. In contrast, in female Golden Retrievers, with the same 3 percent rate of one or more cancers in intact females, neutering at all periods through 8 years of age increased the rate of at least one of the cancers by 3–4 times. In male Golden and Labrador Retrievers neutering had relatively minor effects in increasing the occurrence of cancers. Comparisons of cancers in the two breeds suggest that the occurrence of cancers in female Golden Retrievers is a reflection of particular vulnerability to gonadal hormone removal. PMID:25020045

  3. Glucocorticoid-dependent hypoadrenocorticism with thrombocytopenia and neutropenia mimicking sepsis in a Labrador retriever dog

    PubMed Central

    Snead, Elisabeth; Vargo, Cheryl; Myers, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism (GDH) with immune-mediated-neutropenia (IMN) and -thrombocytopenia (IMT) were diagnosed in a 3-year-old Labrador retriever dog. Glucocorticoid-deficient hypoadrenocorticism is rare and diagnostically challenging as clinical signs and laboratory abnormalities are often nonspecific. Immune-mediated cytopenias and other autoimmune disorders, as part of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome have been reported with hypoadrenocorticism in humans. This is the first reported case of hypoadrenocorticism and bicytopenia in a dog. PMID:22467971

  4. Long-term health effects of neutering dogs: comparison of Labrador Retrievers with Golden Retrievers.

    PubMed

    Hart, Benjamin L; Hart, Lynette A; Thigpen, Abigail P; Willits, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    Our recent study on the effects of neutering (including spaying) in Golden Retrievers in markedly increasing the incidence of two joint disorders and three cancers prompted this study and a comparison of Golden and Labrador Retrievers. Veterinary hospital records were examined over a 13-year period for the effects of neutering during specified age ranges: before 6 mo., and during 6-11 mo., year 1 or years 2 through 8. The joint disorders examined were hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tear and elbow dysplasia. The cancers examined were lymphosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, and mammary cancer. The results for the Golden Retriever were similar to the previous study, but there were notable differences between breeds. In Labrador Retrievers, where about 5 percent of gonadally intact males and females had one or more joint disorders, neutering at <6 mo. doubled the incidence of one or more joint disorders in both sexes. In male and female Golden Retrievers, with the same 5 percent rate of joint disorders in intact dogs, neutering at <6 mo. increased the incidence of a joint disorder to 4-5 times that of intact dogs. The incidence of one or more cancers in female Labrador Retrievers increased slightly above the 3 percent level of intact females with neutering. In contrast, in female Golden Retrievers, with the same 3 percent rate of one or more cancers in intact females, neutering at all periods through 8 years of age increased the rate of at least one of the cancers by 3-4 times. In male Golden and Labrador Retrievers neutering had relatively minor effects in increasing the occurrence of cancers. Comparisons of cancers in the two breeds suggest that the occurrence of cancers in female Golden Retrievers is a reflection of particular vulnerability to gonadal hormone removal. PMID:25020045

  5. Atmospheric conditions associated with oceanic convection in the south-east Labrador Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. J. Sproson; Ian A. Renfrew; Karen J. Heywood

    2008-01-01

    It has been speculated that low-level reverse tip-jets, caused by the interaction of synoptic-scale atmospheric flow and Greenland, are an important mechanism for forcing open ocean convection in the south-east Labrador Sea. Here float data and meteorological reanalysis fields from the winter of 1996\\/1997, in combination with a simple mixed-layer ocean model, are used to show that, although relatively deep

  6. Seasonal patterns in zooplankton community structure on the Newfoundland and Labrador Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Pierre; Colbourne, Eugene; Maillet, Gary

    2011-11-01

    We report on the patterns in zooplankton community structure on the Newfoundland and Labrador Shelf from seasonal collections along oceanographic sections during 2000-2007. We use a combination of constrained and unconstrained multivariate methods to assess latitudinal and cross shelf patterns in community structure. Both physical and biological features of the region are dominated by the cross-shelf gradient in water mass characteristics although there is evidence of a latitudinal gradient that may be a reflection of the influence of freshwater outflow from the Arctic. All analyses reveal a strong and consistent pattern in species composition among water masses that extends across spring, summer and autumn, although there are some variations that occur among seasons that reflect differences in development state of certain taxa. The strong association between community structure and water mass characteristics in the region may be the result of the Newfoundland and Labrador Shelf being at the intersection of several major oceanographic domains, bounded by strong Labrador and Gulf Stream currents, that allows the formation and persistence of well defined zooplankton communities. Our findings have implications for the region’s potential as a monitoring location for long term changes in ocean state.

  7. D-penicillamine treatment of copper-associated hepatitis in Labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Fieten, Hille; Dirksen, Karen; van den Ingh, Ted S G A M; Winter, Esther A; Watson, Adrian L; Leegwater, Peter A J; Rothuizen, Jan

    2013-06-01

    d-penicillamine is effectively used in the lifelong treatment of copper toxicosis in Bedlington terriers and Wilson's disease in humans. A complex form of copper-associated hepatitis has recently been characterized in the Labrador retriever. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of d-penicillamine treatment for copper-associated hepatitis in this breed, to study the effects on hepatic copper, iron and zinc concentrations, and to evaluate parameters to predict optimal duration of treatment. Forty-three client owned Labrador retrievers that were diagnosed with increased hepatic copper were treated with d-penicillamine and underwent at least one follow-up examination including a liver biopsy for histopathological scoring of inflammatory lesions. Hepatic copper, iron and zinc concentrations were determined in the initial and follow-up biopsies by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The influence of initial hepatic copper concentration, sex, age, d-penicillamine formulation and the occurrence of side effects were investigated for their influence on hepatic copper concentration after a certain period of treatment by generalized mixed modelling. d-penicillamine proved to be effective in reducing hepatic copper concentration and associated inflammatory lesions. Parameters derived from the model can be used to estimate the necessary duration of d-penicillamine treatment for Labrador retrievers with increased hepatic copper concentration. Continuous, lifelong d-penicillamine treatment is not recommended in this breed, as there may be a risk for hepatic copper and zinc deficiency. PMID:23375251

  8. Acquisition of a visual discrimination and reversal learning task by Labrador retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Lazarowski, Lucia; Foster, Melanie L.; Gruen, Margaret E.; Sherman, Barbara L.; Case, Beth C.; Fish, Richard E.; Milgram, Norton W.; Dorman, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal cognitive ability is likely important for military working dogs (MWD) trained to detect explosives. An assessment of a dog’s ability to rapidly learn discriminations might be useful in the MWD selection process. In this study, visual discrimination and reversal tasks were used to assess cognitive performance in Labrador retrievers selected for an explosives detection program using a modified version of the Toronto General Testing Apparatus (TGTA), a system developed for assessing performance in a battery of neuropsychological tests in canines. The results of the current study revealed that, as previously found with beagles tested using the TGTA, Labrador retrievers (n=16) readily acquired both tasks, and learned the discrimination task significantly faster than the reversal task. The present study confirmed that the modified TGTA system is suitable for cognitive evaluations in Labrador retriever MWDs and can be used to further explore effects of sex, phenotype, age, and other factors in relation to canine cognition and learning, and may provide an additional screening tool for MWD selection. PMID:24277162

  9. Acquisition of a visual discrimination and reversal learning task by Labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Lazarowski, Lucia; Foster, Melanie L; Gruen, Margaret E; Sherman, Barbara L; Case, Beth C; Fish, Richard E; Milgram, Norton W; Dorman, David C

    2014-05-01

    Optimal cognitive ability is likely important for military working dogs (MWD) trained to detect explosives. An assessment of a dog's ability to rapidly learn discriminations might be useful in the MWD selection process. In this study, visual discrimination and reversal tasks were used to assess cognitive performance in Labrador retrievers selected for an explosives detection program using a modified version of the Toronto General Testing Apparatus (TGTA), a system developed for assessing performance in a battery of neuropsychological tests in canines. The results of the current study revealed that, as previously found with beagles tested using the TGTA, Labrador retrievers (N = 16) readily acquired both tasks and learned the discrimination task significantly faster than the reversal task. The present study confirmed that the modified TGTA system is suitable for cognitive evaluations in Labrador retriever MWDs and can be used to further explore effects of sex, phenotype, age, and other factors in relation to canine cognition and learning, and may provide an additional screening tool for MWD selection. PMID:24277162

  10. MTM1 mutation associated with X-linked myotubular myopathy in Labrador Retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Alan H.; Böhm, Johann; Snead, Elizabeth; Kozlowski, Marek; Maurer, Marie; Minor, Katie; Childers, Martin K.; Taylor, Susan M.; Hitte, Christophe; Mickelson, James R.; Guo, Ling T.; Mizisin, Andrew P.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Tiret, Laurent; Laporte, Jocelyn; Shelton, G. Diane

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the MTM1 gene encoding myotubularin cause X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a well-defined subtype of human centronuclear myopathy. Seven male Labrador Retrievers, age 14–26 wk, were clinically evaluated for generalized weakness and muscle atrophy. Muscle biopsies showed variability in fiber size, centrally placed nuclei resembling fetal myotubes, and subsarcolemmal ringed and central dense areas highlighted with mitochondrial specific reactions. Ultrastructural studies confirmed the centrally located nuclei, abnormal perinuclear structure, and mitochondrial accumulations. Wild-type triads were infrequent, with most exhibiting an abnormal orientation of T tubules. MTM1 gene sequencing revealed a unique exon 7 variant in all seven affected males, causing a nonconservative missense change, p.N155K, which haplotype data suggest derives from a recent founder in the local population. Analysis of a worldwide panel of 237 unaffected Labrador Retrievers and 59 additional control dogs from 25 other breeds failed to identify this variant, supporting it as the pathogenic mutation. Myotubularin protein levels and localization were abnormal in muscles from affected dogs, and expression of GFP-MTM1 p.N155K in COS-1 cells showed that the mutant protein was sequestered in proteasomes, where it was presumably misfolded and prematurely degraded. These data demonstrate that XLMTM in Labrador Retrievers is a faithful genetic model of the human condition. PMID:20682747

  11. Changes in Arctic freshwater export: a new proxy from 30 years of hydrographic surveys in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florindo-Lopez, Cristian; Holliday, N. Penny; Bacon, Sheldon; Aksenov, Yevgeny

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the most rapidly changing environment in the globe. One of the observed changes is a significant increase in the freshwater storage at the region. It is believed that a large and rapid export of this freshwater into the North Atlantic could potentially affect high-latitude dense water formation, the overturning circulation and climate. However, Arctic freshwater fluxes to the Labrador Sea are poorly known and observational time series are not available beyond the last decade. We present a new insight in Labrador shelf dynamics, which allows us to connect locally-observed property variability to net Arctic freshwater exports west of Greenland. By combining the high-resolution (1/12 degree) NEMO model and hydrographic observations at the Labrador Shelf, we describe two major components of the shelf circulation. On the one hand the Labrador Current fills the shelf with Arctic originated waters. On the other hand, the Hudson Strait Outflow generates a very distinctive inshore buoyancy-driven flow. This newly described current is geographically and dynamically independent of the Labrador Current, and we are able to separate it from the waters of Arctic origin which flow further offshore. We apply this methodology to a Labrador hydrographic time series of over 30 years in length, allowing us to generate a proxy that we can use to assess the variability of Arctic freshwater export west of Greenland for over 30 years. We show that on decadal timescales, periods of decreased freshwater export on the Labrador Shelf coincide with periods of increased Arctic freshwater content.

  12. Eastern and Western Boundary Currents in the Labrador Sea, 1995-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.; Torres, D. J.; Yashayaev, I.

    2010-12-01

    Since 1995, the annual occupation of AR7W in the Labrador Sea has usually included LADCP data in addition to hydrographic measurements and tracers. We have previously presented results discussing the section-wide circulation for particular years, comparison with geostrophic velocities, and heat flux as determined from individual as well as composite sections. In this work, we present boundary current transports for a sampling of AR7W sections from 1995 through 2008. Both eastern and western boundary currents (EBCs, WBCs) are examined by combining LADCP data with density (or hydrographic) measurements from ships and profiling floats (Argo, PALACE). The transport estimates from LADCP data are also compared with the currents based on along-track multi-mission altimetry and with the lagrangian velocities from historic float and drifter trajectories. We find that WBC transports are mostly weaker than EBC transports, with slightly less variability year to year. Transports may be underestimated by 2 - 4 Sv when LADCP data are not available far enough onshore, so we extrapolate the velocities (carefully) to improve our estimate. Geostrophic velocities from hydrographic data can also be used to extend the coverage. WBC transports are about 32 Sv in the mean, but range from 22 to as much as 55 Sv. EBC transports range from 26 to 70 (!) Sv, with a mean of about 45 Sv. Higher transports, year to year, result from a combination of greater current width and faster velocities. Baroclinic transport relative to 1500 dbars for the upper level current ranges from 2.5 - 4.6 Sv, in good agreement with Lazier and Wright (1993). Using hydrographic data to determine transport in prescribed density layers, we find reasonable agreement with other recent observations in the Labrador Sea: for the western boundaries, Fischer et al. (2004) and Dengler et al. (2006) (CTD, LADCP and moored array data near 53 N and 56 N, respectively); for the eastern boundaries, Holliday et al. (2009), their Labrador Sea section near 59 N (CTD and LADCP data). For our sections, transport in density layers (in the mean) is conserved only below sigma-theta = 27.8, that is, in the overflow waters of the DWBC. References: Dengler, M., J. Fischer, F. A. Schott and R. Zantopp (2006), Deep Labrador Current and its variability in 1996-2005, Geophys. Res. Letters, vol. 33, L21S06, doi: 10.1029/2006GL026702. Fischer, J., F. Schott, and M. Dengler (2004), Boundary circulation at the exit of the Labrador Sea, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 34, 1548-1570. Holliday, N. P., S. Bacon, J. Allen, and E. L. McDonagh (2009), Circulation and transport in the western boundary currents at Cape Farewell, Greenland, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 39, 1854-1870. Lazier, J. R. N., and D. G. Wright (1993), Annual velocity variations in the Labrador Current, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 23, 659-678.

  13. Earth Island

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Earth Island Web site is maintained by the Earth Island Institute (EII). EII also publishes the Earth Island Journal quarterly. The current issue of the journal can be browsed by section or by subject, and offers current news, world reports, and feature articles on a wide range of environmental subject areas. Earth Island also undertakes a number of projects that are discussed at the site as well as in a portion of the journal. The entire site is searchable. This is an excellent site for those interested in keeping up on environmental issues.

  14. Climate and sea ice variability in the SW Labrador Sea during the late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckström, Kaarina; Massé, Guillaume; Collins, Lewis; Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Olsen, Jesper; Kuijpers, Antoon

    2014-05-01

    The recent rapid decline in Arctic sea ice cover has increased the need to improve the accuracy of the sea ice components in climate models and to provide detailed long-term sea ice records based on proxy data. Recently, the highly branched isoprenoid IP25 has emerged as a potential sea ice specific proxy for past sea ice cover, found in marine sediments underlying seasonal sea ice. We tested the reliability of this biomarker against observational sea ice data off Newfoundland (SW Labrador Sea), where box cores covering the last ca. 100-150 years were collected. Based on the results, IP25 proved to be a robust and reliable proxy for reconstructing variability in past sea ice concentrations in the area. After having successfully validated the proxy in the SW Labrador Sea, we further analysed IP25 from a sediment core NE of Newfoundland covering the last ca. 5000 years, providing the southernmost multi-millennial record of this proxy to date. Based on this record and on diatom and dinoflagellate cyst data and alkenone-based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the same core, we reconstructed climatic conditions in and Arctic sea ice export to the SW Labrador Sea area: Alkenone-based SSTs show a clear albeit variable decline after the Holocene Climate Optimum, while at the same time diatom and dinoflagellate cyst data suggest decreased melt water export from the Arctic. The IP25 record reveals increased sea ice export from the Baffin and Hudson Bays starting ca 1500 yr cal. BP, accelerating ca. 800 yr cal. BP and culminating at the height of the Little Ice Age. Sea ice export during the last century is comparable to the export during the Medieval Climate Anomaly.

  15. Atmospheric forcing on the Canadian Arctic Archipelago freshwater outflow and implications for the Labrador Sea variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houssais, Marie-NoëLle; Herbaut, Christophe

    2011-08-01

    The variability of the freshwater export through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) is analyzed using a hindcast simulation forced by surface atmospheric forcing from the ERA40 reanalysis (1958-2001). Although the two channels representing the archipelago in the model are both sensitive to the along-channel sea surface height (SSH) gradient, they appear to have very distinct behaviors. The outflow to Lancaster Sound is shown to be largely controlled by the magnitude of the upstream SSH gradient across McClure Strait. The gradient shows a close link to the wind stress curl in the western Arctic but also to a large-scale SSH anomaly pattern which has a strong signal over the shelf to the south of McClure Strait. The latter has, however, little statistical connection to the SSH variability in the Beaufort Gyre. By contrast, the outflow through Nares Strait responds preferentially to SSH variations in the northern Baffin Bay which are remotely forced by air-sea heat exchanges in the Labrador Sea. The variability is largely coherent between the two outflows and is controlled by a dipolar atmospheric pattern reminiscent of the North Atlantic/Arctic Oscillation. When entering the subpolar gyre, the CAA freshwater outflow remains confined to the Labrador shelf with little impact on the salinity of the interior Labrador Sea and potentially on the convection. The latter is represented by a distinct mode of salinity variability in the western subpolar gyre which is rather influenced by the variability of the sea ice export through Fram Strait.

  16. Island Hopping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Gayle

    2009-01-01

    At some institutions, it may feel as though faculty live on one island and advancement staff on another. The islands form part of an archipelago, and they exchange ambassadors and send emissaries occasionally, but interactions are limited. It may even seem as though the two groups speak different languages, deal in different currencies, and abide…

  17. Newfoundland and Labrador: 80/20 staffing model pilot in a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Stuckless, Trudy; Power, Margaret

    2012-03-01

    This project, based in Newfoundland and Labrador's Central Regional Health Authority, is the first application of an 80/20 staffing model to a long-term care facility in Canada. The model allows nurse participants to spend 20% of their paid time pursuing a professional development activity instead of providing direct patient care. Newfoundland and Labrador has the highest aging demographic in Canada owing, in part, to the out-migration of younger adults. Recruiting and retaining nurses to work in long-term care in the province is difficult; at the same time, the increasing acuity of long-term care residents and their complex care needs mean that nurses must assume greater leadership roles in these facilities. This project set out to increase capacity for registered nurse (RN) leadership, training and support and to enhance the profile of long-term care as a place to work. Six RNs and one licensed practical nurse (LPN) participated and engaged in a range of professional development activities. Several of the participants are now pursuing further nursing educational activities. Central Health plans to continue a 90/10 model for one RN and one LPN per semester, with the timeframe to be determined. The model will be evaluated and, if it is deemed successful, the feasibility of implementing it in other sites throughout the region will be explored. PMID:22398477

  18. Eddy induced heat transport into and out of the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Vasco; Kieke, Dagmar; Myers, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The mains interest of our work is the distribution of water masses in the subpolar North Atlantic (SPNA). We ask where and how mixing takes place, if there are localized hotspots of mixing and how water masses are transported across horizontal fronts (e.g. the boundary between subpolar and subtropical gyre). To analyze this, a geometry based eddy detection and tracking algorithm is applied to over 20 years of geostrophic velocities from satellite altimetry. The velocity fields are resolved daily on a 1/4° horizontal grid. The largest numbers of eddies are found in the Irminger Sea, the eastern Labrador Sea and along the North American shelf. To estimate the heat content of individual eddies and the respective heat transports, the eddy surface area and translation speed from the eddy detection and tracking algorithm are combined with a real-time global sea surface temperature (SST) analysis and a climatological mixed layer depth. We then calculate timeseries of eddy heat transport across transects at different longitudes and latitudes. For the zonal eddy heat transport, we focus mainly on the north-south transect at 44°W (eddies mostly moving westwards into the Labrador Sea). The meridional eddy heat transport is mainly analyzed at the east-west transect across 47°N (eddies mostly moving southward). This transect is located close to the gyre boundary and there are ship based measurements available for this location in order to further investigate the depth structure of individual eddies.

  19. KIGLAPAIT BIBLIOGRAPHY 13 October 2011 1969 The Kiglapait Layered Intrusion, Labrador. Geol. Soc. Amer. Memoir 112, 204 pp.

    E-print Network

    Bradley, Raymond S.

    Labrador, with Emphasis on Anorthosite. XXIV Internat. Geol. Cong. Guidebook A54, Ottawa, Canada, 72pp. 1994 Berg, Emslie, Hamilton, Morse, Ryan, Wiebe: Anorthositic, granitoid, and related rocks of the Nain above the Snyder Group. In Morse, S. A., Ed., Nain Anorthosite Project, Field Report 1974, UMass Dept. G

  20. The Inclusive Classroom - Can the Teachers Keep Up? A Comparison of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland & Labrador Teachers' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Alan

    2003-01-01

    A study compared the results of a previous study on 725 Nova Scotia teachers' general attitudes toward inclusion and confidence in their abilities with those of 287 teachers from Newfoundland & Labrador. No provincial differences in teachers' perceptions of inclusion were found despite differences in provincial policy/practice. (Contains…

  1. Late Quaternary history of contourite drifts and variations in Labrador Current flow, Flemish Pass, offshore eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Nicole R.; Piper, David J. W.; Saint-Ange, Francky; Campbell, D. Calvin

    2014-10-01

    Contourite drifts of alternating sand and mud, shaped by the Labrador Current, formed during the late Quaternary in Flemish Pass seaward of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, Canada. The drifts preserve a record of Labrador Current flow variations through the last glacial maximum. A high-resolution seismic profile and a transect of four cores were collected across Beothuk drift on the southeast side of Flemish Pass. Downcore and lateral trends in grain size and sedimentation rate provide evidence that, between 16 and 13 ka, sediment was partitioned across Beothuk drift and the adjacent Flemish Pass floor by a strong current flow but, from 29 to 16 ka, sedimentation was more of a blanketing style, represented by draped reflections interpreted as being due to a weaker current. The data poorly resolve the low sedimentation rates since 13 ka, but the modern Labrador Current in Flemish Pass is the strongest it has been in at least the past 29 ka. Pre-29 ka current flow is interpreted based on reflection architecture in seismic profiles. A prominent drift on the southwestern side of Flemish Pass formed above a mid-Miocene erosion surface, but was buried by a mass-transport deposit after the penultimate glacial maximum and after drift deposition switched to eastern Flemish Pass. These findings illustrate the temporal complexity of drift sedimentation and provide the first detailed proxy for Labrador Current flow since the last glacial maximum.

  2. Oceanographic regimes in the northwest Labrador Sea since Marine Isotope Stage 3 based on dinocyst and stable isotope proxy records

    E-print Network

    flows via the Canadian Arctic Archi- pelago and Nares Strait into the Labrador Sea (Serreze et al., 2006 resolution analysis of a core (HU2008-029-004PC) spanning the last w36 ka, raised off Hudson Strait drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz through Hudson Strait, which is dated here at w8.3 cal ka BP

  3. Nihoa Island

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-08-09

    This video segment adapted from the NOW-RAMP 2002 Expedition documents a research expedition to Nihoa Island. It showcases Nihoa's unique birds and plants, the threat posed by invading grasshoppers, and restoration efforts.

  4. Cross-sectional study to investigate the association between vitamin D status and cutaneous mast cell tumours in Labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Wakshlag, Joseph J; Rassnick, Kenneth M; Malone, Erin K; Struble, Angela M; Vachhani, Priyanka; Trump, Donald L; Tian, Lili

    2011-10-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that low serum vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of a variety of human tumours. Cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCT) occur more frequently in dogs than in any other species. Canine MCT express the vitamin D receptor, and vitamin D derivatives have in vitro and in vivo anti-tumour activity. We sought to examine the association between vitamin D serum level and MCT in Labrador retrievers, a dog breed predisposed to MCT development. To examine this association, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) concentrations were examined in eighty-seven Labrador retrievers, including thirty-three with MCT and fifty-four unaffected controls. The relationship between cases and controls and 25(OH)D3 level, age and body condition score were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Potential differences in vitamin D oral intake, calculated on the basis of a dietary questionnaire, were also evaluated between groups. Mean 25(OH)D3 concentration (104 (SD 30) nmol/l) in dogs with MCT was significantly lower than that of unaffected dogs (120 (SD 35) nmol/l; P = 0.027). The mean calculated vitamin D intake per kg body weight in Labrador retrievers with MCT was not statistically different from that of unaffected Labrador retrievers (0.38 (SD 0.25) and 0.31 (SD 0.22) ?g/kg body weight, respectively; P = 0.13). These findings suggest that low levels of 25(OH)D3 might be a risk factor for MCT in Labrador retrievers. Prospective cohort studies are warranted. PMID:22005438

  5. A Cloud Resolving Simulation of a Polar Low Over the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K.; Maesaka, T.; Liu, A.; Tsuboki, K.; Renfrew, I.

    2005-05-01

    Polar lows, high latitude mesoscale marine cyclones, remain one of the most enigmatic of meteorological phenomena. They can be often observed on satellite imagery as spiral cloud systems whose striking organization belies the significant threat they represent to maritime activity as a result of the hurricane force associated with them. Their small horizontal scale, often less than 500km, short life time, typically less than 24 hours, and their tendency to form in data sparse regions make them a challenge to forecast. Polar lows are often associated with significant fluxes of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and ocean that act to modify both fluids. In the atmosphere, the fluxes act to warm and moisten the boundary layer resulting in the formation of 2D roll and 3D cellular convection. In the ocean, fluxes act to densify the surface waters and may contribute to the preconditioning phase of deep ocean convection. The presence of sea ice often introduces a spatial heterogeneity into the air-sea flux fields, In this talk, we will present a numerical simulation of a polar low that formed over the Labrador Sea on February 8 1997 during the Labrador Sea Deep Ocean Convection Experiment. A flight on that date with an instrumented aircraft collected data on the cloud-scale structure of the polar low and its associated air-sea interaction. The simulation was performed with a cloud resolving mesoscale forecast model in a domain with a horizontal scale of 500 km by 400 km at a horizontal resolution of 500m. The high spatial resolution and large domain allowed for an explicit representation of both the cloud-scale and larger-scale circulations associated with the polar low. In addition, the model included an explicit representation of the heterogeneity associated with the Labrador Sea's marginal ice zone. A comparison with satellite and in-situ observations indicate that the simulation is able to capture many of the cloud-scale and large-scale features of this polar low. In particular, the simulated cloud field bears a close resemblance to that associated with the low.

  6. Sedimentary regime of deep submarine canyons around Fylla Banke, northeastern Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Dorthe; Kuijpers, Antoon; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Nielsen, Tove

    2014-05-01

    Sedimentary regime of deep submarine canyons around the Fylla Banke, northeastern Labrador Sea Dorthe Paulsen (1), Antoon Kuijpers (2), Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz (3) and Tove Nielsen (2) 1) Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K 2) Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Øster Voldgde 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. 3) Centre for Past Climate Studies, Department of Geoscience, Aarhus University. Hoegh-Guldbergs Gade 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C The southern end of the Davis Strait, the comparatively shallow-water area separating the Labrador Sea from the Baffin Bay, is cut by two deep submarine canyons of west Greenland, on the western and eastern side of the Fylla Banke, respectively. The purpose of this study is to investigate Late Pleistocene sedimentary processes governing the area of the two canyons in order to test if gravity flows or ocean currents are the most important factors governing canyon sedimentary processes in this region. Furthermore, an account is given on the formation of the two canyons in order to explain the significant difference between them. The study was carried out based on seismic profiles combined with bathymetric information, and a single sidescan sonar profile from one of the canyons (western canyon). Sedimentary information and an age model are derived from of a 5-m long gravity core (TTR13-AT-479G) collected from the mouth of the western canyon (southern end). The data indicates that the sedimentary regime is today highly affected by northward transport of the ocean currents and that gravity flows (southward from shallower to deep waters) are only of limited significance today. The deep southern end of the canyons are influenced by the upper parts of the deep North Atlantic Deep Water, but the majority of the sediment transport is linked to the strong northward flow of the lower parts of the West Greenland Current. For comparison the sediment transport is held up against earlier studies from the Davis Strait area, where 2D seismic profiles were carried out several places of the west coast of Greenland. These studies are from a contourite drift complex at the Davis Strait and north of Labrador Sea. A further possible process operating in maintaining active sediment transport through the canyon may be the cascading of dense winter water formed on the West Greenland shelf.

  7. Telemetric measurement of body core temperature in exercising unconditioned Labrador retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Angle, T. Craig; Gillette, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This project evaluated the use of an ingestible temperature sensor to measure body core temperature (Tc) in exercising dogs. Twenty-five healthy, unconditioned Labrador retrievers participated in an outdoor 3.5-km run, completed in 20 min on a level, 400-m grass track. Core temperature was measured continuously with a telemetric monitoring system before, during, and after the run. Data were successfully collected with no missing data points during the exercise. Core temperature elevated in the dogs from 38.7 ± 0.3°C at pre-exercise to 40.4 ± 0.6°C post-exercise. While rectal temperatures are still the standard of measurement, telemetric core temperature monitors may offer an easier and more comfortable means of sampling core temperature with minimal human and mechanical interference with the exercising dog. PMID:21731189

  8. Clinical features of spongy degeneration of the central nervous system in two Labrador retriever littermates.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D P; Zachary, J F

    1985-06-01

    Spongy degeneration of the CNS was diagnosed in 2 female Labrador Retriever littermates. The dogs had histories of progressive cerebellar ataxia and episodes of extreme extensor rigidity beginning at 4 and 6 months of age. One had a history of hearing difficulties. When examined at 9 months of age, both dogs had moderate ataxia and dysmetria of the head, trunk, and limbs, hyperreflexia with clonus, and extensor rigidity with episodes of exaggerated rigidity and opisthotonos. One dog was euthanatized and the other was monitored for 2 months, during which time her signs progressed to severe dysmetria, weakness, muscle atrophy, and rigidity with marked hyperreflexia. Necropsy of both dogs revealed astrocytic abnormalities and spongy degeneration of the white matter of the CNS. The clinical signs and postmortem findings were similar to the juvenile form of spongy degeneration in man. PMID:4008303

  9. Local contamination, and not feeding preferences, explains elevated PCB concentrations in Labrador ringed seals (Pusa hispida).

    PubMed

    Brown, Tanya M; Iverson, Sara J; Fisk, Aaron T; Macdonald, Robie W; Helbing, Caren C; Reimer, Ken J

    2015-05-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in high trophic level species typically reflect the contributions of myriad sources, such that source apportionment is rarely possible. The release of PCBs by a military radar station into Saglek Bay, Labrador contaminated the local marine food web. For instance, while heavier (higher chlorinated) PCB profiles in some ringed seals (Pusa hispida) were previously attributed to this local source, differences in feeding preferences among seals could not be ruled out as a contributing factor. Herein, similar fatty acid profiles between those seals with 'local' PCB profiles and those with 'long-range' or background profiles indicate little support for the possibility that differential feeding ecologies underlay the divergent PCB profiles. Ringed seals appeared to feed predominantly on zooplankton (Mysis oculata and Themisto libellula), followed by the dusky snailfish (Liparis gibbus), arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). Principal components analysis (PCA) and PCB homolog profiles illustrated the extent of contamination of the Saglek food web, which had very different (and much heavier) PCB profiles than those food web members contaminated by 'long-range' sources. Locally contaminated prey had PCB levels that were higher (2- to 544-fold) than prey contaminated by 'long-range' sources and exceeded wildlife consumption guidelines for PCBs. The application of multivariate analyses to two distinct datasets, including PCB congeners (n=50) and fatty acids (n=65), afforded the opportunity to clearly distinguish the contribution of locally-released PCBs to a ringed seal food web from those delivered via long-ranged transport. Results from the present study strongly suggest that habitat use rather than differences in prey selection is the primary mechanism explaining the divergent PCB patterns in Labrador ringed seals. PMID:25725460

  10. Proterozoic massif anorthosites and related rocks in Labrador: the anorthosite-charnockite connection

    SciTech Connect

    Emslie, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Massif anorthosites of Labrador are closely associated in space and time with voluminous, felsic, fayalite- and ferrous pyroxene-bearing igneous rocks. These include charnockites, monzonites, biotite-hornblende granites, and locally syenites. Igneous charnockites form major parts of some of the granitic complexes. In Mistastin batholith for example, charnockitic assemblages comprise about 35% of a total area of 6500 sq. km. Feldspar pairs and coexisting fayalite-opx-qtz in these rocks indicate P and T near 3.5 kb, 750/sup 0/C, assumed to represent near solidus equilibration. Diorites and monzonites intruded by charnockite have mesoperthites implying crystallization T>900/sup 0/C presumably recording earlier stages of crystallization. Oxide and silicate assemblages indicate redox conditions between FMQ and WM oxygen buffers and water pressures well below Ptotal. Younger biotite-hornblende granites and quartz syenites lack Ti-mt. but retain fayalite suggesting that magmatic crystallization was largely closed to water and oxygen. Initial Sr isotope ratios in charnockite-granite suites of central labrador support derivation of the magmas largely or entirely from crustal source rocks. Compositions of mafic silicates and plagioclase, associated Fe-Ti oxide concentrations, trace elements and Sr isotopes in massif anorthosites are in accord with the rocks being crystallization products of substantially fractionated, originally more mafic, mantle magmas. Close association of high temperature, water-poor, reduced crustal melts is consistent with a fusion process in which heat supply and oxygen buffering were controlled by fractional crystallization of a substantial body of mafic magma subjacent to continental crust.

  11. Dolomitization on an evaporitic Paleoproterozoic ramp: Widespread synsedimentary dolomite in the Denault Formation, Labrador Trough, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentmyer, R. A.; Pufahl, P. K.; James, N. P.; Hiatt, E. E.

    2011-06-01

    The Denault Formation (2.1-1.9 Ga) crops out in the Labrador Trough, northeastern Québec and western Labrador. Rocks surrounding the town of Schefferville, Quebec contain textural characteristics consistent with deposition on the middle and outer portions of a storm-influenced shallow ramp. Mid-ramp facies consist of intraclastic grainstones with hummocky cross-stratification (HCS), swaley cross-stratification (SCS), current ripples, and graded event beds. Further outboard, grainstones grade into deeper-water laminites that are composed of even, mm-scale couplets of flat-lying organic and dolomudstone laminae. Scours within the laminites suggest periodic storm activity. Laminites gradually grade into outer ramp deep-water shales. An isolated eastern stromatolitic buildup is separated from these ramp facies by 50 km (present day). This succession can be interpreted as the remnant of a near-continuous margin or may simply represent an isolated accumulation that developed on a pre-existing topographic high. The presence of gypsum pseudomorphs in all lithofacies indicates that the Denault margin was restricted and evaporitic. Four paragenetic stages are recognized in the diagenetic evolution of the Denault Formation: (1) carbonate deposition, contemporaneous marine cementation, authigenic gypsum growth, and precipitation of authigenic chert; (2) synsedimentary mimetic dolomite precipitation; (3) pore-rimming and pore-occluding shallow burial dolomite cement; and (4) fabric destructive, sutured, anhedral burial dolomite. Gypsum crystals occur in all lithofacies, form the nuclei of interstitial dolomite rhombs, average 10 ?m in length, and often display swallowtail twinning. Paleoproterozoic ocean water had very low concentrations of dissolved sulfate and evaporation in restricted settings would have been required to form gypsum. Formation of microcrystalline gypsum across this restricted ramp facilitated dolomite precipitation by increasing pore water Mg/Ca ratios and lowering its dissolved sulfate concentrations. Such an interpretation may explain why there is an abundance of synsedimentary dolostone in the Precambrian and the relative paucity of Phanerozoic analogs.

  12. Wind and topographic effects on the Labrador Current at Carson Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, E. Douglas; Hay, Alex E.; Denner, Warren W.

    1987-09-01

    We present results from an experimental investigation of the interaction between a shelf break jet and a submarine canyon and of the response of this system to a single upwelling favorable wind event. The field site was Carson Canyon, located at the edge of the Grand Bank of Newfoundland. The shelf break jet is the Labrador Current. The time-averaged current measurements indicate that the interaction between the Labrador Current and the canyon topography is nonlinear and that the mean current crosses isobaths to flow into the canyon on the upstream side but is steered off shelf on the downstream side. The mean flow vorticity balance in the near field and far field is examined, using a two-layer model with the lower layer at rest. In the far field we obtain an interesting result which suggests that the cross-stream shear in combination with bottom friction can drive a significant on-shelf flow. This flow is equivalent to a volume transport of about 60 m3 s-1 per 100 m of along-shelf distance, which is comparable to typical wind-driven Ekman transports on and off continental shelves and which appears to have important implications for the on-off-shelf transport of icebergs in the Grand Banks region. In the near field the Rossby number is of order unity and bottom friction is less important. Many of the observed flow properties can be explained qualitatively in terms of an upstream inertial boundary layer and potential vorticity conservation. The time-dependent response to upwelling favorable winds was registered by current meters in the canyon and at the shelf break at the canyon perimeter. These observations indicate an amplified upwelling response at the shelf break and vertical ascent rates within the canyon of about 0.7 cm s-1.

  13. Recruitment in the Barents Sea, Icelandic, and eastern Newfoundland/Labrador capelin (Mallotus villosus) stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carscadden, James E.; Gjøsæter, Harald; Vilhjálmsson, Hjálmar

    2013-07-01

    Capelin (Mallotus villosus) is a short-lived, coldwater, pelagic species that occurs in large populations in the Barents Sea, around Iceland and in the Newfoundland-Labrador area in the North Atlantic. Most individuals spawn only once at age three or four and die shortly after spawning. The commercial fisheries for capelin in the three areas are prosecuted on the pre-spawning and spawning age groups and knowledge of recruitment to the spawning stock and factors affecting recruitment are important in the management of the fisheries. Herein, we review the state of knowledge regarding recruitment in the three areas and factors that affect recruitment. Year class strength of capelin is fixed fairly early in life; at 0-group stage in the Barents Sea, by age 1 or earlier for Icelandic capelin, and within 2 weeks of hatching for the beach spawners in the Newfoundland area. No obvious single factor, common to the three stocks, has been proven to exert a significant influence on recruitment. In the Barents Sea, juvenile herring prey heavily on capelin larvae and when the estimates of the abundance of these juvenile herring were accounted for in the capelin stock-recruitment analysis, the fit in the stock-recruitment relationship improved. In Iceland, there is no reason to implicate predation as a dominant factor, although detailed studies have not been carried out. In the Newfoundland and Labrador area earlier studies suggested two factors were important for recruitment success: the frequency of onshore winds at a critical period during the residence of newly hatched larvae in the beach gravel and the presence of warm waters during the early larval phase in the pelagic environment. With further testing using more data, the temperature factor was found not to be significant but the frequency of onshore winds still explained a significant portion of the variation in year class strength. There appears to be no significant biological influence, such as predation, that has influenced recruitment in this area.

  14. Effect of anticholinergics (atropine, glycopyrrolate) and prokinetics (metoclopramide, cisapride) on gastric motility in beagles and labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Burger, D M; Wiestner, T; Hubler, M; Binder, H; Keiser, M; Arnold, S

    2006-03-01

    The effect of atropine, glycopyrrolate, metoclopramide and cisapride on the antral motility was investigated in eight dogs (four Beagles and four Labradors) using passive telemetry. Both anticholinergics induced a pronounced and lasting reduction of the intensity and frequency of the contractions. A definite dose-related inhibition of the antral motility was seen in Beagles, similar for both active substances. Low doses of atropine (0.02 mg/kg BW i.m.) and glycopyrrolate (0.005 mg/kg BW i.m.) completely inhibited the gastric motility for at least 30 min, whereas higher doses (0.04 or 0.01 mg/kg BW) caused a cessation of activity for more than 3 h. In Labradors, the effects of both active substances were not so dose related and the effect of glycopyrrolate lasted at least 6 h, whereas the effect of atropine gradually decreased after 3 h. A distinct breed difference regarding the effect of the two prokinetics on the antral motility was also observed. In Beagles, the prokinetics, at a low dose (metoclopramide 0.3 mg/kg BW, cisapride 0.2 mg/kg BW), resulted in a significant increase in the amplitude integral. Higher doses (metoclopramide 0.6 mg/kg BW, cisapride 0.5 mg/kg BW) also increased the integrals of the pressure profiles, but significantly less than with the lower doses. In Labradors, both medications, mainly at higher doses, resulted in an increase of the contraction amplitudes. The low dose had no (cisapride) or only a transient effect (metoclopramide). The frequency of the antral contractions was not at all influenced by cisapride, and only in Beagles metoclopramide resulted in a dose-related increase. It is not clear if the different results in Labradors and Beagles are because of breed or body weight. PMID:16466463

  15. On the factors behind large Labrador Sea tides during the last glacial cycle and the potential implications for Heinrich events

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian K. Arbic; Jerry X. Mitrovica; Douglas R. MacAyeal; Glenn A. Milne

    2008-01-01

    Labrador Sea (LS) tidal elevations over the last glacial cycle are investigated in a near-global numerical model that accurately captures the present-day tides. From ?65 ka to ?7 ka, the modeled elevations at the debouchement point of the Hudson Strait ice stream in the LS are exceptionally large, comparable to the largest elevations seen anywhere in the present-day ocean. New

  16. Grain shape variation and sedimentary processes of the Neogene-Quaternary sediments in Baffin Bay and Labrador Sea

    E-print Network

    Shan, Yongtang

    1989-01-01

    GRAIN SHAPE VARIATION AND SEDIMENTARY PROCESSES OF THE NEOGENE ? QUATERNARY SEDIMENTS IN BAFFIN BAY AND LABRADOR SEA A Thesis by YONGTANG SHAN Approved as to style and content by: Jame f. Mazzullo (Co-Chair of Committee) Thomas T. Tieh... (Member) Philip D. Rabinowitz (Co-Chair of Committee) c? Suzanne O' Connell (Member) John H. Spang (Head of Department) December, 1989 ABSTRACT Grain Shape Variation and Sedimentary Processes of the Neogene ? Quaternary Sediments in Baffin Bay...

  17. Seasonal and interannual variability of the West Greenland Current System in the Labrador Sea in 1993-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykova, Tatiana; Straneo, Fiammetta; Bower, Amy S.

    2015-02-01

    The West Greenland Current System (WGCS) transports heat and freshwater into the Labrador Sea, influencing the formation of Labrador Sea Water, a key component of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Notwithstanding its importance, relatively little is known about the structure and transport of this current system and its seasonal and interannual variability. Here we use historical hydrographic data from 1992 to 2008, combined with AVISO satellite altimetry, to diagnose the mean properties as well as seasonal and interannual variability of the boundary current system. We find that while the surface, fresh, cold West Greenland Current is amplified in summer, the subsurface warm, salty Irminger Current has maximum transport in winter, when its waters are also warmer and saltier. Seasonal changes in the total transport are thus mostly due to changes in the baroclinic structure of the current. By contrast, we find a trend toward warmer/saltier waters and a slowdown of the WGCS, within the period studied. The latter is attributed to changes in the barotropic component of the current. Superimposed on this trend, warm and salty anomalies transit through the system in 1997 and 2003 and are associated with a rapid increase in the transport of the boundary current due to changes in the baroclinic component. The boundary current changes precede similar changes in the interior with a 1-2 year lag, indicating that anomalies advected into the region by the boundary current can play an important role in the modulation of convection in the Labrador Sea.

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyl profiles in ringed seals (Pusa Hispida) reveal historical contamination by a military radar station in Labrador, Canada.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tanya M; Fisk, Aaron T; Helbing, Caren C; Reimer, Ken J

    2014-03-01

    Significant amounts of soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were discovered at a military radar station in Saglek Bay, Labrador, Canada, in 1996. Subsequent work showed elevated PCB concentrations in local marine sediments, in the benthic-associated food web, and in some ringed seals (Pusa hispida). The benthic-associated food web clearly reflected local PCB contamination, but the high PCB concentrations found in some ringed seals remained unexplained. In the present study, the authors assess the extent to which this local PCB source at Saglek Bay is contributing to the contamination of ringed seals in northern Labrador. Among 63 ringed seals sampled along the northern Labrador coast, 5 (8%) had PCB levels that were higher than recorded anywhere else in the Canadian Arctic. In addition, compared with seals exhibiting a long-range signal, 45% and 60% of subadults and adult males, respectively, exhibited heavier PCB congener profiles as characterized by principal components analysis, >1.6-fold higher PCB/organochlorine pesticides ratios, and higher PCB concentration-weighted average log octanol-water partition coefficient values, consistent with a local source. Despite the spatially confined nature of contaminated sediments in Saglek Bay, the influence of this PCB source is not inconsequential; PCB concentrations in locally contaminated adult males are 2-fold higher than concentrations in those exposed only to long-range PCB sources and exceed an established threshold of 1.3 mg/kg for adverse health effects in seals. PMID:24273070

  19. Prevalence of childhood eczema and food sensitization in the First Nations reserve of Natuashish, Labrador, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Mushua Innu of Natuashish, Labrador, Canada seem to have a high rate of childhood eczema. Anecdotally this problem seems to be more common now than 20 years ago. There has been speculation that this could be related to food sensitization that may have arisen coincident with a move away from a traditional Innu diet. We undertook to assess the prevalence and severity of pediatric eczema in Natuashish (population 792), and investigate the level of sensitization to common food antigens. Methods Over a three-month period we performed a population survey of all children in the community from the ages of 2–12 inclusive. The one-year prevalence of eczema was assessed using the United Kingdom Working Party’s diagnostic criteria, and graded on the Nottingham Severity Scale. All children with eczema and twice as many age/sex matched controls were offered complete blood counts, total IgE, and food specific IgE levels for egg white, cow’s milk protein and wheat. Results One hundred and eighty two (95% of the eligible children) were assessed. Of the 182 children examined eczema was diagnosed in 30 (16.5%) - 22 females and 8 males. The majority of children with eczema (20/30) were classified as being in the moderate and severe category. Of the 22 with eczema and 40 controls who consented to venipuncture all but 3 had IgE levels above the lab's reference range. Food specific antibody assays showed that 32, 23, and 5 percent of children with eczema were sensitized to egg, milk, and wheat respectively. None of the controls were sensitized. Conclusions The children of Natuashish, Labrador have a high rate of eczema, much of it graded as moderate or severe. IgE levels were markedly elevated in children with and without eczema, with average values at least ten-fold higher than other populations. There is no evidence of an unusual amount of sensitization to egg, milk or wheat. PMID:24649812

  20. Hindcasting and forecasting of climatology for Gilbert Bay, Labrador: A marine protected area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Sara J.

    Gilbert Bay is a marine protected area (MPA) on the southeastern coast of Labrador, Canada. The MPA was created to conserve a genetically distinctive population of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. Future climate change in the region is expected to have an impact on the coastal marine environment and local communities in the future. This thesis presents results from a hindcast and forecasts study of physical oceanographic conditions for Gilbert Bay. The first section of this thesis examines the interannual variability in atmospheric and physical oceanographic characteristics of Gilbert Bay over the period 1949-2006. The seasonal and interannual variability of the near surface atmospheric parameters are described. Seawater temperature, salinity and sea-ice thickness in winter are simulated with a physical ocean model, the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM). The results of the hindcast model suggest that the atmospheric interannual variability of the Gilbert Bay region is linked to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). A warming trend observed in the subpolar North Atlantic was influenced by the local climate of coastal Labrador during the recent decade of 1995-2005. The second section of this thesis presents a model forecast of the impact of climate change on the physical conditions within Gilbert Bay over the next century. Climate scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment and the US Climate Change Science Program Project (US CCSP), specifically the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES), were used. Atmospheric parameters and related changes in seawater temperature, salinity and sea-ice thickness in winter for three SRES are simulated with the GOTM, and are then compared to the hindcast study results. The results suggest that the water column during future winters will become warmer in the second half of the 21st century. In the summer the atmosphere will be warmer and more humid. Cloudiness and precipitation are expected to increase. This will have an impact on the vertical stratification of the water column. The surface mixed layer is expected to become warmer, fresher and much shallower than seen in the past. The stratification below the seasonal thermocline will weaken and vertical mixing will intensify. A significant change in surface sea-ice coverage is also suggested by the forecast. Continuing reduction in sea-ice formation during the winter months as highlighted by the hindcast study is expected to affect living conditions of the neighbouring coastal communities around the bay, specifically by increasing the danger of travelling across the bay. A warming Gilbert Bay ecosystem may be favourable for cod growth, but reduced sea-ice formation during the winter months increases the danger of travelling across the bay by snowmobile.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance and characterisation of staphylococci isolated from healthy Labrador retrievers in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coagulase-positive (CoPS) and coagulase-negative (CoNS) staphylococci are normal commensals of the skin and mucosa, but are also opportunist pathogens. Meticillin-resistant (MR) and multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates are increasing in human and veterinary healthcare. Healthy humans and other animals harbour a variety of staphylococci, including MR-CoPS and MR-CoNS. The main aims of the study were to characterise the population and antimicrobial resistance profiles of staphylococci from healthy non-vet visiting and non-antimicrobial treated Labrador retrievers in the UK. Results Nasal and perineal samples were collected from 73 Labrador retrievers; staphylococci isolated and identified using phenotypic and biochemical methods. They were also confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), PCR of the nuc gene and PCR and sequencing of the tuf gene. Disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) susceptibility tests were determined for a range of antimicrobials. In total, 102 CoPS (S. pseudintermedius n?=?91, S. aureus n?=?11) and 334 CoNS isolates were detected from 99% of dogs in this study. In 52% of dogs CoNS only were detected, with both CoNS and CoPS detected in 43% dogs and CoPS only detected in 4% of dogs. Antimicrobial resistance was not common among CoPS, but at least one MDR-CoNS isolate was detected in 34% of dogs. MR-CoNS were detected from 42% of dogs but no MR-CoPS were isolated. S. epidermidis (52% of dogs) was the most common CoNS found followed by S. warneri (30%) and S. equorum (27%), with another 15 CoNS species isolated from ? 15% of dogs. S. pseudintermedius and S. aureus were detected in 44% and 8% of dogs respectively. Conclusions MR- and MDR-CoPS were rare. However a high prevalence of MR- and MDR-CoNS were found in these dogs, even though they had no prior antimicrobial treatment or admission to veterinary premises. These findings are of concern due to the potential for opportunistic infections, zoonotic transmission and transmission of antimicrobial resistant determinants from these bacteria to coagulase positive staphylococci. PMID:24423104

  2. Streamlined Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-514, 15 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows a streamlined island in Marte Vallis, a large outflow channel system that crosses the 180oW meridian between the Elysium and Amazonis regions of Mars. The flow patterns on the floor of Marte Vallis might be the remains of lava flows or mud flows. Marte is the Spanish word for Mars. Most of the largest valleys on the red planet are named for 'Mars' in various languages. This island is located near 21.8oN, 175.3oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  3. Thermal Islands

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this problem-based learning unit, students learn about the causes and impacts of urban heat islands. Numerous studies have shown how concrete pavements and buildings retain heat in cities, making cities several degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside. Students investigate the role of cities in our climate, specifically how the urban heat island affects climate. Instructions to access NASA data are provided along with additional resources and activities. This module was developed for use in the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) professional development courses for middle and high school teachers and is also available to teachers to adapt for general classroom use. See Related & Supplemental URLs for a demo course showing how this module is integrated into an ESSEA course for teachers.

  4. Magma evolution in the Nain Complex, Labrador, and implications for the origin of anorthosite

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of over 50 chilled margins of plutons and contemporaneous dikes in the anorthositic Nain Complex reveal a well-defined trend of liquid evolution along a plagioclase-olivine cotectic. Fractional crystallization of olivine and plagioclase has resulted in extreme enrichment of TiO/sub 2/ and FeO/sub T/ and depletion of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the more evolved compositions. The contemporaneous Harp Dikes and Seal Lake Volcanics of southern Labrador also fall along this trend. Although rare, other dikes in the Nain complex are very olivine-rich and the olivine is quench-textured. Modeling of major and trace elements indicates that the leucotroctolitic liquids can be derived from the melatroctolites by olivine removal, and that the more evolved cotectic liquids can be derived from the leucotroctolitic liquids by removal of o1 + plag in a 25:75 ratio. If the equilibrium saturation surface of plagioclase is ignored, continued olivine removal from the leucotroctolites is capable of producing compositions very similar to compositions of hypothesized anorthositic magmas. In the Nain Complex, field evidence for supersaturation of plagioclase is abundant. Since all of the compositions discussed above are low in normative diopside, it may be that such liquids are less capable of nucleating plagioclase than liquid with more normal diopside contents, thus permitting the supersaturation.

  5. Availability of ectomycorrhizal fungi to black spruce above the present treeline in Eastern Labrador.

    PubMed

    Reithmeier, Laura; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECMF) are an important biotic factor in the survival of conifer seedlings under stressful conditions and therefore have the potential to facilitate conifer establishment into alpine and tundra habitats. In order to assess patterns of ectomycorrhizal availability and community structure above treeline, we conducted soil bioassays in which Picea mariana (black spruce) seedlings were grown in field-collected soils under controlled conditions. Soils were collected from distinct alpine habitats, each dominated by a different ectomycorrhizal host shrub: Betula glandulosa, Arctostaphylos alpina or Salix herbacaea. Within each habitat, half of the soils collected contained roots of ectomycorrhizal shrubs (host (+)) and the other half were free of host plants (host(-)). Forest and glacial moraine soils were also included for comparison. Fungi forming ectomycorrhizae during the bioassays were identified by DNA sequencing. Our results indicate that ECMF capable of colonizing black spruce are widespread above the current tree line in Eastern Labrador and that the level of available inoculum has a significant influence on the growth of seedlings under controlled conditions. Many of the host(-) soils possessed appreciable levels of ectomycorrhizal inoculum, likely in the form of spore banks. Inoculum levels in these soils may be influenced by spore production from neighboring soils where ectomycorrhizal shrubs are present. Under predicted temperature increases, ectomycorrhizal inoculum in soils with host shrubs as well as in nearby soils without host shrubs have the potential to facilitate conifer establishment above the present tree line. PMID:24204858

  6. Rock magnetism and Paleomagnetism of Mistastin Lake impact structure, Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, Gwenaël; Gilder, Stuart; Marion, Cassandra; Osinski, Gordon; Pohl, Jean; Sylvester, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The 35.8±1.0 Ma Mistastin Lake impact structure (Labrador, Canada) is characterized by a dominantly anorthositic target, which makes it a good terrestrial analogue for a lunar highland crater. The 28 km-diameter Mistastin structure contains impact melt rocks whose thickness reaches up to 80 meters. We collected 116 oriented cores in melt lithologies from four locations around the crater. Rock magnetic analyses show that the remanent magnetization is carried both by Ti-rich and Ti-poor titanomagnetite. Microscopic observations show that the latter probably resulted from high-temperature oxidation of the Ti-rich titanomagnetite. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetization initially removes a viscous overprint, and then isolates what appears to be a stable thermoremanent magnetization at higher unblocking temperatures and peak fields. The mean direction, assumed to be parallel to the ambient geomagnetic field at the time of the impact, is consistent with the 30 Ma polar wander path of North America. We also collected 25 cores from anorthosite and mangerite from the Mesoproterozoic basement (around 1400 Ma), in order to study the pressure and thermal effects of the impact on the magnetic remanence and rock magnetic properties. Saturation remanence and coercivity increase from the periphery to the centre of the crater. Most samples have remanent magnetization directions similar to those expected for the Mesoproterozoic. Only basement rocks from the South shore lying very close to the contact of the melt rocks have a magnetization parallel to that of the melt.

  7. Congenital abnormality of the vagina complicated by haemato-pyocolpos in a 1-year labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Alonge, S; Romussi, S; Grieco, V; Luvoni, G C

    2015-06-01

    A 1-year-old female Labrador retriever was referred with a few days history of haematic-like vulvar discharge. Physical examination, vaginal inspection and palpation did not reveal any remarkable finding. Transabdominal ultrasound showed echogenic fluid accumulation in the vagina suggesting haemato-pyocolpos. An exploratory laparotomy was performed: a well-delimited ectasic vagina was identified. Ovariohysterectomy and partial vaginectomy and vaginoplasty were performed to spay the bitch and to remove the ectasic vagina. Post-operative recovery and 12-month follow-up were uneventful. Clinical, morphological and histological findings were consistent with a congenital abnormality of the muscular layer of the vagina complicated by haemato-pyocolpos. The disorganization of the vaginal tunica muscularis may have acted as locus minoris resistentiae in the vaginal wall. The organ was dilated and atonic due to the gradual accumulation of physiological fluids complicated by an overgrowth of genital bacteria. This congenital disorder has to be taken into account as differential diagnosis of haemato-pyocolpos with vaginal discharge in young bitches. PMID:25661902

  8. Evaluation of seabirds in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, as hosts of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Wille, Michelle; Huang, Yanyan; Robertson, Gregory J; Ryan, Pierre; Wilhelm, Sabina I; Fifield, David; Bond, Alexander L; Granter, Alissa; Munro, Hannah; Buxton, Rachel; Jones, Ian L; Fitzsimmons, Michelle G; Burke, Chantelle; Tranquilla, Laura McFarlane; Rector, Megan; Takahashi, Linda; Kouwenberg, Amy-Lee; Storey, Anne; Walsh, Carolyn; Hedd, April; Montevecchi, William A; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Ojkic, Davor; Whitney, Hugh; Lang, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses infect a wide range of hosts, including many species of birds. Avian influenza A virus (AIV) infection appears to be most common in Anseriformes (ducks, geese, and swans) and some Charadriiformes (shorebirds and gulls), but many other birds also serve as hosts of AIV. Here, we evaluated the role of seabirds as hosts for AIV. We tested 3,160 swab samples from 13 seabird species between May 2008 and December 2011 in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. We also tested 156 serum samples for evidence of previous infection of AIV in Common Murres (Uria aalge) and Atlantic Puffins (Fratercula arctica). Avian influenza A virus was detected in breeding Common Murres and nonbreeding Thick-billed Murres (Uria lomvia), and Common Murres also had high antibody prevalence (44%). From these findings, combined with other studies showing AIV infection in murres, we conclude that murres are important for the ecology of AIV. For other species (Razorbill, Alca torda; Leach's Storm-Petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa; Black-legged Kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla; Atlantic Puffin) with good coverage (>100 samples) we did not detect AIV. However, serology indicates infection does occur in Atlantic Puffins, with 22% antibody prevalence found. The possibility of virus spread through dense breeding colonies and the long distance movements of these hosts make a more thorough evaluation of the role for seabirds as hosts of AIV important. PMID:24171570

  9. Advection of North Atlantic Deep Water from the Labrador Sea to the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhein, Monika; Kieke, Dagmar; Steinfeldt, Reiner

    2015-04-01

    Recently formed Labrador Seawater (LSW) and overflow water from Denmark Strait (DSOW) are main components of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Both exhibit a distinct chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) maximum. Here we use 25 years of CFC observations in the Atlantic to study the main features of the circulation of LSW and DSOW. From the CFC data, the age and fraction of young deep water are inferred. Due to the superior spatial data resolution compared to former attempts, regional differences in the spreading velocity and pathways of young deep water become evident, dependent on the regional circulation. The observed distributions of young LSW and DSOW showed that the DWBC is the fastest pathway to reach the southern hemisphere. The downstream decrease of the fractions of young LSW in the DWBC is slower compared to model studies. From 47°N to 42°N, DWBC transports of young LSW and DSOW decrease by 44% and 49%, respectively. At 26°N, the DWBC transport of young water is still 39% of the LSW formation rate and 44% of the DSOW overflow transport. Interior pathways also exist, especially in the subpolar North Atlantic and in the transition zone between the subpolar and subtropical gyre. Compared to DSOW, the distributions indicate a higher tendency for LSW to follow additional interior pathways. North of 45°N the major part of LSW is younger than 20 years. The general weakening of new LSW formation since the 1990s worked toward a homogenization between the LSW in the western and the eastern subpolar North Atlantic.

  10. Detrital Carbonate Events on the Labrador Shelf, a 13 to 7 kyr Template for Freshwater Forcing From the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, A. E.; Andrews, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    A complex sequence of abrupt glacial advances and retreats punctuate the late phases of Laurentide Ice Sheet deglaciation. These episodes have been reconstructed from interpretation and mapping of glacial deposits on land and in marine basins proximal to the former ice margins in Hudson Strait, Hudson Bay, and the SE Baffin Island shelf. As these events likely produced pulses of freshwater discharge into the North Altantic, which may be responsible for rapid climate change, their timing and magnitude need to be understood. The timing of these events is well constrained by radiocarbon ages, but the ocean reservoir age in ice proximal areas is subject to very large uncertainties, making it difficult to determine calibrated ages for the glacial events so that they can be compared to other climate records. We suggest that the sequence of high detrital carbonate peaks in Holocene and Late Glacial sediments in the Cartwright Saddle of the Labrador shelf provides a template of the abrupt glacial events of the NE margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, particularly events that issued from Hudson Strait and Hudson Bay, but possibly including events in Baffin Bay. Once the Labrador Shelf was deglaciated and the local ice had retreated inland, the Cartwright Saddle was a distal trap for sediments released from Hudson Strait and other ice sheet outlets farther north as their sediments and meltwater were carried southwards by surface currents. Core MD99-2236 contains a sediment record beginning c. 13.9 cal ka. We assume a marine reservoir age for the Cartwright Saddle of 450 yrs, which is reasonable given the ice distal and oceanic position of the site. Carbonate was measured on average at a 30 yr time resolution. Carbonate values are elevated between 11.7 and 7 cal kyr BP, with six spikes exceeding 30 percent. Each spike corresponds to a light isotope spike in foraminifers, suggesting that each major spike is associated with a pulse of glacial meltwater. Elevated IRD counts associated with the carbonate spikes suggest that at least some of the meltwater was released by icebergs. Age estimates of these peaks are: 11.5, 10.6, 9.5, 9.1, 8.7, and 8.2 cal kyr BP, and their duration ranges between 50 and 200 years. A 'red bed' is associated with a subsidiary carbonate spike 8.57 cal ka, very close to the estimated age of the timing of the final outburst drainage of lakes Agassiz and Ojibway: about 8.47 cal ka BP. A lower carbonate spike at 11.1 cal ka is associated with a light isotope event. The carbonate record of MD99-2236 promises to be an important key to the timing and role of deglacial episodes in freshwater forcing on North Altantic climate.

  11. A Study of Education, Out-Migration of Young Adults, and the Impact of Information and Communications Technologies on the Economies of Rural Communities in Newfoundland and Labrador [Avalon West School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jean; Handrigan, Rachel; Stone, Gordon; Downey, Sherman

    2002-01-01

    This research project is a study of education, out-migration of young adults, and the impact of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) on the education and economies of rural communities in Newfoundland and Labrador. A qualitative study of Newfoundland and Labrador's rural schools were conducted from January to August 2001. This report…

  12. THE FATE OF RURAL NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR has been a sore spot in this province for many years. However, Dr. Ken Stevens, professor and researcher in the Faculty of Education, may have a remedy.

    E-print Network

    Oyet, Alwell

    THE FATE OF RURAL NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR has been a sore spot in this province for many years Minister of Education, the Department of Education of Newfoundland and Labrador, and Industry Canada. That has been a success story." NEWFOUNDLAND: by Heidi Wicks Singapore of the Atlantic? #12;Dr. Stevens

  13. Alcatraz Island

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    â??The Rockâ?, the oft-used vernacular phrase used to describe Alcatraz, is perhaps one of the Bay Areaâ??s most dramatic landscapes, and certainly itâ??s best known island. Over the past several hundred years, it has served at times as a place for protest by Native Americans and a place of incarceration for some of Americaâ??s most hardened (and colorful) criminals. The National Park Service recently created this rather well-done online exhibit that allows users to view objects from Alcatrazâ??s past (such as escape materials and historic photographs) and also to allow them to take a virtual tour of the prison and its grounds. Visitors can also listen to a number of compelling sound clips that discuss the infamous â??Battle of Alcatrazâ? and the cellhouse rules. The site also features a number of thematic slide shows, including one that addresses the occupation of the island by members of the American Indian Movement from 1969 to 1971.

  14. Tenarife Island, Canary Island Archipelago, Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Tenarife Island is one of the most volcanically active of the Canary Island archipelago, Atlantic Ocean, just off the NW coast of Africa, (28.5N, 16.5W). The old central caldera, nearly filled in by successive volcanic activity culminating in two stratocones. From those two peaks, a line of smaller cinder cones extend to the point of the island. Extensive gullies dissect the west side of the island and some forests still remain on the east side.

  15. Island Formation: Constructing a Coral Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Heather; Edd, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    The process of coral island formation is often difficult for middle school students to comprehend. Coral island formation is a dynamic process, and students should have the opportunity to experience this process in a synergistic context. The authors provide instructional guidelines for constructing a coral island. Students play an interactive role…

  16. Arguing for a multi-hazard mapping program in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterson, Martin; Neil, Stapleton

    2010-05-01

    This poster describes efforts to implement a Provincial multi-hazard mapping program, and will explore the challenges associated with this process. Newfoundland and Labrador is on the eastern edge of North America, has a large land area (405,212 km2) and a small population (510,000; 2009 estimate). The province currently has no legislative framework to control development in hazardous areas, but recent landslides in the communities of Daniel's Harbour and Trout River, both of which forced the relocation of residents, emphasize the need for action. There are two factors which confirm the need for a natural hazard mapping program: the documented history of natural disasters, and the future potential impacts of climate change. Despite being relatively far removed from the impacts of earthquake and volcanic activity, Newfoundland and Labrador has a long history of natural disasters. Rockfall, landslide, avalanche and flood events have killed at least 176 people over the past 225 years, many in their own homes. Some of the fatalities resulted from the adjacency of homes to places of employment, and of communities and roads to steep slopes. Others were likely the result of chance, and were thus unavoidable. Still others were the result of poor planning, albeit unwitting. Increasingly however, aesthetics have replaced pragmatism as a selection criterion for housing developments, with residential construction being contemplated for many coastal areas. The issue is exacerbated by the impacts of climate change, which while not a universal bane for the Province, will likely result in rising sea level and enhanced coastal erosion. Much of the Province's coastline is receding at up to 30 cm (and locally higher) per year. Sea level is anticipated to rise by 70cm to over 100 cm by 2099, based on IPCC predictions, plus the effects of enhanced ice sheet melting, plus (or minus) continued local isostatic adjustment. The history of geological disasters, coupled with pressures on development and the threat of rising sea levels, has prompted the initiation of a Provincial multi-hazard mapping program. Initial focus is on the north-east Avalon Peninsula, where the majority of the Province's residents are located and where most development is occurring. A regional land-use plan is being initiated for this area. While there are few, if any, standard protocols in literature for determining variables/data to be included in a hazard assessment, three important factors require consideration: the characteristics and detail of the study area, the availability of digital datasets, and the scale of data. For the north-east Avalon Peninsula hazard mapping will combine slope models generated from DEMs, bedrock/surficial geology mapping at 1:50,000 scale, Provincial flood risk mapping and municipal digital topographic data at 1:2500 scale, and historical research and field work, to produce a ‘traffic-light' designation of potentially hazardous areas. Data will be presented in an ArcGIS environment. Sea-level rise scenarios will also be incorporated into the mapping. Following the experience of flood risk mapping in the Province, which identified hazardous areas for development which nevertheless continued to experience urban expansion, subsequently ensuring the utilization of these maps in future land-use planning will likely require entrenchment in legislation.

  17. Nutritional management of inherited copper-associated hepatitis in the Labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Fieten, Hille; Biourge, Vincent C; Watson, Adrian L; Leegwater, Peter A J; van den Ingh, Ted S G A M; Rothuizen, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Canine hereditary copper-associated hepatitis is characterized by gradual hepatic copper accumulation eventually leading to liver cirrhosis. Therapy is aimed at creating a negative copper balance with metal chelators, of which D-penicillamine is the most commonly used. D-penicillamine often causes gastro-intestinal side effects and life-long continuous therapy may lead to a deficiency of copper and zinc. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of a low-copper, high-zinc diet as an alternative to continuous D-penicillamine treatment for the long-term management of canine copper-associated hepatitis. Sixteen affected Labrador retrievers were followed for a median time period of 19.1 months (range, 5.9-39 months) after being effectively treated with D-penicillamine. The dogs were maintained on a diet containing 1.3±0.3 mg copper/1000 kcal and 64.3±5.9 mg zinc/1000 kcal. Liver biopsies were taken every 6 months for histological evaluation and copper determination. Plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase, as well as serum albumin were determined. Dietary treatment alone was sufficient to maintain hepatic copper concentration below 800 mg/kg dry weight liver in 12 dogs during the study period. Four dogs needed re-treatment with D-penicillamine. ALT activity and albumin concentration were not associated with hepatic copper concentration, but showed a significant association with the stage and grade of hepatitis respectively. In conclusion, a low-copper, high-zinc diet can be a valuable alternative to continuous d-penicillamine administration for long-term management of dogs with copper-associated hepatitis. The copper re-accumulation rate of an individual dog should be considered in the design of a long-term management protocol and in determining re-biopsy intervals. PMID:24439471

  18. Specialists’ perceptions of hereditary colorectal cancer screening in Newfoundland and Labrador

    PubMed Central

    MacEachern, J.; Mathews, M.; Green, J.; Pullman, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (crc) screening is particularly valuable in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), where a substantial proportion of crc cases have a hereditary link. We examined the perceptions of gastroenterologists and general surgeons with respect to screening practices for patients with hereditary crc. Methods We surveyed all gastroenterologists and general surgeons in NL to determine demographic and professional practice characteristics and screening knowledge, practices, and attitudes for four groups of patients with hereditary crc. Results Of the 43 eligible physicians, 36 (83.7%) responded. Most of the physicians surveyed knew the correct age to start screening, preferred screening by colonoscopy, had a systematic means in their own practice of prioritizing patients for screening, and felt that family doctors or patients (or both) should be responsible for monitoring screening compliance. Most physicians reported that patients with hereditary nonpolyposis crc and familial adenomatous polyposis waited 3 months for screening; patients with a family history of crc or adenomatous polyp waited 6 months or longer. Although respondents agreed on the need for a province-wide crc registry [4.36 on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree; 5 = strongly agree)], they disagreed that wait times were reasonable (2.81) and that other health professionals should perform colonoscopies (2.86). They were equivocal about the need for centralized bookings (3.25) and about whether genetic testing is useful for prioritizing patients (3.25). Conclusions Gastroenterologists and general surgeons in NL were knowledgeable about screening, but had varying opinions about individual roles in screening, wait times, and the means for prioritizing and providing screening for patients with hereditary crc. PMID:22670101

  19. Evaluation of Physician Return-for-Service Agreements in Newfoundland and Labrador

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Maria; Heath, Sara Lynn; Neufeld, Shelley May; Samarasena, Asoka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the widespread use of physician return-for-service (RFS) programs in Canada, few have been evaluated. We examined two types of RFS agreements (Family Medicine Bursary and Special Funded Residency Position) and (a) describe the proportion of RFS physicians who complete their service obligation and identify the predictors of completion and (b) compare the retention of RFS physicians to that of non-RFS physicians. Methods: Using administrative data on physicians with RFS agreements in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Memorial University's Postgraduate Medical Education Office and the Physician and Medical Practice Database, we calculated the proportion of RFS physicians (1997–2009) who fulfilled their service obligation and also identified predictors of completion. We then followed to 2010 a cohort of physicians who started practice in NL between 2000 and 2005 to compare the retention of RFS and non-RFS physicians. Results: Ninety-six (71.6%) of 134 RFS physicians fulfilled the service obligation in full. Physicians who held Special Funding Residency Position RFS agreements were 11.1 times less likely (95% CI: 4.0–33.3) to complete their service commitment than physicians who held Family Medicine Bursary RFS agreements. In the cohort of 60 RFS and 67 non-RFS physicians, 16.9% of RFS versus 41.8% of non-RFS physicians left NL by 2010 (p=0.004). RFS physicians were 3.22 times less likely (95% CI: 1.41–7.14) than non-RFS physicians to leave the province. Four years after starting practice, roughly 90% of RFS versus 60% of non-RFS physicians remained in NL; after 10 years, 70% of RFS versus 60% of non-RFS physicians remained (p=0.006). Conclusion: The RFS program improves the retention of physicians in NL. Using RFS tied to bursaries rather than residency positions may increase service completion and retention rates. PMID:23968626

  20. Rhode Island Transportation

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Rhode Island Transportation Fact Book Highlights Transportation Center #12;Transportation in Rhode Island University of Rhode Island Transportation Center 2 Road Conditions / Road Ownership Public Road Length by Ownership 2008 Road Conditions 2008 9% 17% 45% 18% 11% Rhode Island Road Condition (2008

  1. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities. Volume 4. Offshore of Newfoundland and Labrador

    SciTech Connect

    Krason, J.; Rudloff, B.

    1985-09-01

    This document is Volume 4 of a series of reports entitled ''Geological Evolution and Analysis of Confirmed or Suspected Gas Hydrate Localities.'' Volume 4 is an analysis of the ''Formation and Stability of Gas Hydrates Offshore of Newfoundland and Labrador.'' This report presents a geological description of the offshore regions of Newfoundland and Labrador, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, and distribution of hydrates within the sediments. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 183 refs., 64 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Fylla Bank: structure and evolution of a normal-to-shear rifted margin in the northern Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, Arne

    2011-11-01

    Cenozoic seafloor spreading between Greenland and North America is generally considered a major right-stepping ridge-transform-ridge system between NW-SE trending spreading ridge segments in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. The ridges were linked by N-S/NNE-SSW trending transform motions in the Davis Strait, in particular expressed by the ˜1000-km-long Ungava Fault Zone. Fylla Bank, part of the southern West Greenland continental margin, is located in the northernmost Labrador Sea at the transition between the normal and shear rifting regimes of the Labrador Sea and Davis Strait. As such, the Bank may be compared with the Demerara Plateau, part of the French Guinea-Northeast Brazil continental margin. Seismic reflection interpretations presented in this study show that Fylla Bank is situated above an extensive basin complex, herein referred to as Fylla Structural Complex, which contains an up to 5-km-thick Cretaceous-Cenozoic sedimentary succession above an inferred pre-Cretaceous basement. Seismic mapping of basement structures show that the complex is dominated by NNW-/NW-striking rift basins in its southern part and NNE-striking rift basins in its northern part. The rift basins are interpreted to be the result of an initial late-Early Cretaceous rift phase, which mainly resulted in the formation of the NNW-/NW-striking structures, and a subsequent early Campanian rift phase, mainly resulting in the formation of large NNE-striking rotated fault blocks. Resumed rifting in the early Cenozoic deepened the NNE-striking rift basins. The NNE-oriented structures have previously been interpreted to initiate during the latest Cretaceous. However, this study suggests that they initiated transfer faults already during the late-Early Cretaceous rift phase and possibly correlate with along-strike discontinuities in oceanic crust in the Labrador Sea to define margin segmentation in southern West Greenland, including the borders of Fylla Bank. A structural-kinematic model presented here thus suggests that the Cretaceous-Cenozoic poly-phase rifting to some extent was controlled by pre-existing crustal fabric. Combined with an interpreted interplay between normal stresses in the Labrador Sea and oblique-shear stresses in the Davis Strait, this resulted in a very complex structural-tectonic evolution and the formation of several distinct structural styles. The seismic interpretations are supported by maps of the Moho topography and crustal thickness which were compiled from results of pseudo-3-D gravity modelling. The maps show minimum crustal thicknesses (11 km) and maximum Moho uplifts in areas where the NNW-/NW- and NNE-striking structures interact. Moreover, a strong correlation is found between Moho topography, crustal attenuation, rift-enforced thermal uplift and erosion, and post-rift subsidence in the area. This is interpreted to be a result of thermally controlled basin dynamics.

  3. New insights from 182W anomalies in Eoarchean rocks from northern Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Touboul, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Walker, R. J.; Pearson, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision (< ±5 ppm 2? SD on 182W/184W) measurements of W isotopic ratios have boosted recent exploration of early Earth processes [1, 2, 3]. Tungsten isotope anomalies have been reported for ~3.8 Ga rocks from Isua, Greenland [1], 2.8 Ga komatiites from Kostomuksha, Russia [2] and ?3.8 Ga rocks from Nuvvuagittuq, Quebec [3]. All of these rocks are characterized by 182W enrichments of as much as 15 ppm. These compositions are within the estimated mantle composition prior to addition of ~0.5 wt.% of late accreted materials to Earth [4]. However, the calculated higly siderophile element (HSE) contents of the mantle source for the Kostomuksha komatiites and Nuvvuagittug rocks are similar to modern mantle, inconsistent with a source dominated by a pre-late accretionary mantle reservoir. Thus, their mantle source must have incorporated an ancient (while 182Hf was still extant; i.e., <50 Ma after Solar System formation), high Hf/W component [2]. We have determined the W isotopic compositions of >3.8 Ga ultramafic rocks (including mantle peridotites and meta-komatiites), plus tonalitic to mafic Uivak gneisses from northern Labrador, Canada. Within the peridotitic suite, 9 samples show well-resolved, variable 182W enrichments ranging from +9 to +22 ppm, while three meta-komatiites have uniform ~+9 ppm enrichments. The four gneisses also show +8 to +13 ppm enrichments. As with the Kostomuksha and Nuvvuagittuq suites, the relative and absolute HSE abundances in both peridotitic and komatiitic suites are similar to their late Archean equivalents, indicating the delivery of late-accreted materials prior to 3.8 Ga. Prominent W enrichments, relative to elements with similar incompatibilities in peridotitic rocks suggest that W in these rocks may not be representative of their mantle sources, but instead could reflect redistribution of W in the crust by metamorphic processes. The 182W enrichment of this component could be inherited from a pre-late accretionary or early depleted parental mantle reservoir, or late-accreted materials that were preferentially enriched in 182W relative to most such materials. [1] Willbold et al. (2011) Nature 477, 195-198. [2] Touboul et al. (2012) Science 335, 1065-1069. [3] Touboul et al. (2014) Chem. Geol. 383, 63-75. [4] Walker (2009) Chem. der Erde 69, 101-125.

  4. Correlation of Brunhes detrital-layer stratigraphy into the North Atlantic from Orphan Knoll (Labrador Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E.; Hodell, D. A.; Romero, O. E.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; de Vernal, A.; Stoner, J. S.; Mazaud, A.; Roehl, U.

    2011-12-01

    IODP Site U1302-U1303, on the SE flank of Orphan Knoll (Labrador Sea), has a record of detrital layers that extends through most of the Brunhes Chron. The age model is built by tandem matching of relative paleointensity (RPI) and oxygen isotope data (?18O) from Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sin.) to reference records, indicating a mean Brunhes sedimentation rate of 14 cm/kyr. Sedimentation back to marine isotope stage (MIS) 18 is characterized by detrital layers that are detected by higher than background gamma-ray attenuation (GRA) density, peaks in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) indicators for detrital carbonate (Ca/Sr) and detrital silicate (Si/Sr), an ice-rafted debris (IRD) proxy (>106 ?m), magnetic susceptibility, and magnetic grain-size peaks. The age model enables correlation of Site U1302/03 to IODP Site U1308 (re-drill of DSDP Site 609) in the heart of the central Atlantic IRD belt where an age model and a similar set of detrital-layer proxies have already been derived. Ages of Heinrich layers H1, H2, H4, H5 and H6 are within ~2 kyr at the two sites (H0, H3 and H5a are not observed at Site U1308), and agree with previous work at Orphan Knoll within ~3 kyr. At Site U1308, Brunhes detrital layers are restricted to peak glacials and glacial terminations back to MIS16, however, these same proxies at Site U1302/03 indicate detrital layers distributed throughout the record in both glacial and most interglacial stages. At Site U1302/03, we distinguish Heinrich-type layers in glacial stages, which are associated with IRD (some of which have near-synchronous analogues at Site U1308), from detrital layers within interglacial stages manifested by multiple detrital layer proxies (including Ca/Sr) but usually not associated with IRD, that may be attributed to a distinct depositional process, namely drainage and debris-flow events funneled down the nearby NAMOC (North Atlantic Mid-Ocean Channel).

  5. Response to Natural Hazards: Multi-Level Governance Challenges in Newfoundland & Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, N.; Tomblin, S.

    2009-04-01

    Newfoundland and Labrador's perspective on emergency measures in response to natural hazards is shaped by several factors. Climate, meteorology, and terrain are the dominant factors both in the occurrence of events and the responses to them. The economy, dominated by resource-based activities, is a significant influence in accentuating exposure to natural hazards. In this situation, the role of earth scientists is critical. However, effective input from geographers, geomorphologists, and climatologists requires an understanding of the governance regime. For emergency services, both formal public policy responses, informal mechanisms, and the interfacing that exists between public policy mechanisms and social forces are significant. In an era where more and more problems are considered as "interdependent", and require different governmental, social, and professional expertise forces to come together to address objectives, there is interest in exploring and analyzing patterns of communication, interactions and policy learning across inherited silos. A major political-policy struggle is the challenge of managing rural-urban differences in capacity and perspective. Another challenge involves finding ways for professions to merge their protocols and cultures. Embracing best practices associated with natural hazards and emergency preparedness is influenced by the power and independence of various groups involved. Critical events provide windows of opportunity for urging new approaches, but whether these become institutionalized or not normally depends on the interplay of ideas, interests, individuals, and institutions. In coping with natural hazards, renewing governance required finding new incentives to integrate across jurisdictions and disciplinary and governmental-society boundaries. Perception and response to natural hazards is very much connected with the historical-policy context. The pace of effective response indicates the impact of culture, capacity, institutions, and interests in the struggle to shift priorities, especially if these are being imposed externally. Emergency planning involves contestation, shifting priorities, building knowledge capacity, and merging policy and jurisdictional networks based on best practices. It requires renewing governance, coordinating planning, data collection, building infrastructure and establishing a common vision where different interests can work together to promote common values and objectives. However, emergency planning is difficult to change and reform based on a common vision and approach, because the inherited formal and informal structures tend to be very complex multi-disciplinary systems. Not only does this pose difficulties in renewing governance, establishing clear lines of authority, and responsibility across jurisdictions, it is very difficult for previously unrecognized groups to participate. Natural hazard researchers, unfortunately, frequently fit into this latter category.

  6. "Borrowed Black": A Labrador Fantasy from the Book by Ellen Bryan Obed, Adapted for Stage by Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia. Cue Sheet for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Victoria

    This performance guide is designed for teachers to use with students before and after a performance of "Borrowed Black: A Labrador Fantasy," by the Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia. The guide, called a "Cuesheet," contains seven reproducible activity sheets for use in class, addressing: (1) The Story (orienting students to the characters and places…

  7. Lessons Learned from Reconstructing Interactions Between Local Ecological Knowledge, Fisheries Science, and Fisheries Management in the Commercial Fisheries of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grant Murray; Barbara Neis; Jahn Petter Johnsen

    2006-01-01

    Questions centered on the development of local and traditional ecological knowledge and the relationship of that knowledge to the development of conservation and management practices have recently attracted critical attention. We examine these questions with respect to the dynamic commercial fisheries of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The knowledge of fish harvesters coevolves with fishing practices and is

  8. ELSEVIER Earth and Planetary Science Letters I50 (1997) ISI-160 Distribution of 230Thin the Labrador Sea and its relation ito

    E-print Network

    1997-01-01

    ionization mass spectrometry were made on samples collected from the Labrador Sea and the Denmark Strait of 230Th in the western North Atlantic at the Nares and Hatte as 1 Abyssal Plains. A key feature. In fact, low 230Th has recently been reported in the deep Norwegian Sea and Den- mark Strait overflow

  9. Geochemistry of ˜1.9 Ga sedimentary rocks from northeastern Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Holland, Heinrich D.; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1997-10-01

    Fifty-eight rock chips from fifteen samples of sedimentary rocks from the Ramah Group (˜1.9 Ga) in northeastern Labrador, Canada, were analyzed for major and minor elements, including C and S, to elucidate weathering processes on the Earth's surface about 1.9 Ga ago. The samples come from the Rowsell Harbour, Reddick Bight, and Nullataktok Formations. Two rock series, graywacke-gray shales of the Rowsell Harbour, Reddick Bight and Nullataktok Formations, and black shales of the Nullataktok Formation, are distinguishable on the basis of lithology, mineralogy, and major and trace element chemistry. The black shales show lower concentrations than the graywackes-gray shales in TiO 2 (0.3-0.7 wt% vs. 0.7-1.8 wt%), Al 20 3 (9.5-20.1 wt% vs. 13.0-25.0 wt%), and ?Fe (<1 wt% vs. 3.8-13.9 wt% vs FeO). Contents of Zr, Th, U, Nb, Ce, Y, Rb, Y, Co, and Ni are also lower in the black shales. The source rocks for the Ramah Group sediments were probably Archean gneisses with compositions similar to those in Labrador and western Greenland. The major element chemistry of source rocks for the Ramah Group sedimentary rocks was estimated from the Al2O3/TiO2 ratios of the sedimentary rocks and the relationship between the major element contents (e.g., SiO 2 wt%) and Al2O3/TiO2 ratios of the Archean gneisses. This approach is justified, because the Al/Ti ratios of shales generally retain their source rock values; however, the Zr/Al, Zr/Ti, and Cr/Ni ratios fractionate during the transport of sediments. The measured SiO 2 contents of shales in the Ramah Group are generally higher than the estimated SiO 2 contents of source rocks by ˜5 wt%. This correction may also have to be applied when estimating average crustal compositions from shales. Two provenances were recognized for the Ramah Group sediments. Provenance I was comprised mostly of rocks of bimodal compositions, one with SiO 2 contents ˜45 wt% and the other ˜65 wt%, and was the source for most sedimentary rocks of the Ramah Group, except for black shales of the Nullataktok Formation. The black shales were apparently derived from Provenance 11 that was comprised mostly of felsic rocks with SiO 2 contents ˜65 wt%. Comparing the compositions of the Ramah Group sedimentary rocks and their source rocks, we have recognized that several major elements, especially Ca and Mg, were lost almost entirely from the source rocks during weathering and sedimentation. Sodium and potassium were also leached almost entirely during the weathering of the source rocks. However, significant amounts of Na were added to the black shales and K to all the rock types during diagenesis and/or regional metamorphism. The intensity of weathering of source rocks for the Ramah Group sediments was much higher than that of typical Phanerozoic sediments, possibly because of a higher Pco 2 in the Proterozoic atmosphere. Compared to the source rock values, the Fe2+/Ti ratios of many of the graywackes and gray shales of the Ramah Group are higher, the Fe 2+/Ti ratios are lower, and the ?Fe/ Ti ratios are the same. Such characteristics of the Fe geochemistry indicate that these sedimentary rocks are comprised of soils formed by weathering of source rocks under an oxygen-rich atmosphere. The atmosphere about 1.9 Ga was, therefore, oxygen rich. Typical black shales of Phanerozoic age exhibit positive correlations between the organic C contents and the concentrations of S, U, and Mo, because these elements are enriched in oxygenated seawater and are removed from seawater by organic matter in sediments. However, such correlations are not found in the Ramah Group sediments. Black shales of the Ramah Group contain 1.7-2.8 wt%o organic C, but are extremely depleted in ?Fe (< 1 wt% as FeO), S (<0.3 wt%), U (˜1 ppm), Mo (<5 ppm), Ni (<2 ppm), and Co (˜0 ppm). This lack of correlation, however, does not imply that the ˜1.9 Ga atmosphere-ocean system was anoxic. Depletion of these elements from the Ramah Group sediments may have occurred during diagenesis.

  10. Galapagos Islands Flyby

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dave Pape

    1994-03-13

    This animation shows the power of computer graphics to explore data in the sense of virtual reality. In this scene, standard tools are applied to fly around the Galapagos Islands and the ocean floor surrounding the islands.

  11. Overwash on Assateague Island

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Overwash on Assateague Island. Overwash occurs when waves overtop the main sand dune and redistribute the sand along new patterns. Overwash has contributed to the gradual movement of Assateague Island to the south....

  12. Henderson Island, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Henderson Island (24.5S, 128.5W) Pacific Ocean southeast of the Tuamotu Archipelago, is a good example of the many barren islands that but for lack of a source of water could be another lush tropical paradise. The crew of HMS Bounty, in searching for a refuge, sailed past this island but rejected it in favor of nearby Pitcairn Island because of the lack of resources and water.

  13. Falkland Islands, UK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the Falkland Islands (52.0S, 58.5W) was taken with a dual camera mount. Compare this scene with STS048-109-043 to analyze the unique properties of each film type. Seldom seen cloud free, the Falkland Islands lie off the southern coast of Argentina. The cold Falklands Ocean Current keeps the islands chilly, ideal for sheep herding and fishing, the two main industries. Colonies of seals and penguins also thrive on the islands.

  14. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Island Fox Paradox

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sharon Levy (Freelancer; )

    2010-05-03

    Channel Island foxes, long the top predator in their ecosystem, show little fear of humans. Wild foxes often accost visitors on San Nicolas, the island with the most abundant fox population in the island chain. Now, archaeologists have new evidence that suggests foxes were carried to the islands by indigenous people thousands of years ago, and that humans shaped the evolution of the entire species. Do species introduced by native people thousands of years ago deserve protection?

  16. Geochronology and Thermochronology of the Mistastin Lake Impact Structure, Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K. E.; Hodges, K. V.; Van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J.; Mercer, C. M.; Osinski, G. R.; Marion, C.

    2013-12-01

    The accurate and precise dating of terrestrial impact structures is one of our most powerful tools for constraining the bombardment history of the inner Solar System, but reliable data are available for only about 10% of the known structures on Earth. Most of the reliable dates were obtained by applying the U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic techniques to glasses and minerals crystallized from impact melts. Unfortunately, impact melt-bearing impactites are easily eroded and have not been found in many impact structures. Recent research has shown, however, that impact events also have the capacity to reset some target rock isotopic systems that are typically used on Earth for low-temperature thermochronometry (e.g., (U-Th)/He zircon and apatite). For impact structures sufficiently large to have produced impact melt sheets, the combination of geochronology of neoblastic minerals from the impact sheet as well as thermochronology of appropriate minerals from the target rocks can provide valuable insights regarding not just the age of impact but the thermal evolution of the structure during and after impact. We are conducting such research at the Mistastin Lake impact structure in northern Labrador, Canada (55°53'N; 63°18'W). The 28 km-diameter Mistastin structure is regarded as an excellent analogue for lunar impact structures in that the target rocks are Mesoproterozoic anorthosites, mangerites, and granodiorites. Previous attempts to date the Mistastin impact event using by U-Pb geochronology of zircons found within its thick impact melt sheet yielded only pre-impact target rock ages (Marion and Sylvester, 2010, Planetary and Space Science 58), implying that impact temperatures did not reach high enough temperatures for long enough to reset the U-Pb chronometer. Mak et al. (1976, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 31) reported several whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar dates for crystalline impact melt rock that imply an impact age of ca. 36 Ma. We are exploring the use of two different mineral-isotopic techniques for dating the Mistastin impact event: conventional zircon (U-Th)/He and laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar on impact melts. Thus far, we have (U-Th)/He zircon data for both target rocks and impact melt rocks that indicate an impact age of 35.8 × 1.0 Ma at the 95% confidence level but also show that the degree of resetting of the (U-Th)/He zircon chronometer was highly variable within the impact site. In addition to these data, the presentation will include new laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar data for impact melt rocks collected throughout the crater that should reveal the extent of Ar isotopic homogeneity in sampled materials.

  17. Gender and snow crab occupational asthma in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Howse, Dana [SafetyNet, Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Nfld., Canada A1B 3V6 (Canada); Gautrin, Denyse [Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal, Montreal, Que., H4J 1C5 (Canada); Neis, Barbara [SafetyNet, Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Nfld., A1B 3V6 (Canada)]. E-mail: bneis@mun.ca; Cartier, Andre [Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal, Montreal, Que., H4J 1C5 (Canada); Horth-Susin, Lise [Valley Regional Hospital, Kentville, NS, B4N 5E3 (Canada); Jong, Michael [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University and Health Labrador Corporation, Happy Valley, NL, AOP 1EO (Canada); Swanson, Mark C. [Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Fish and shellfish processing employs many thousands of people globally, with shellfish processing becoming more important in recent years. Shellfish processing is associated with multiple occupational health and safety (OHS) risks. Snow crab occupational asthma (OA) is work-related asthma associated with processing snow crab. We present a gender analysis of findings from a 3-year multifaceted study of snow crab OA in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The study was carried out in four snow crab processing communities between 2001 and 2004. An anonymous survey questionnaire on knowledge, beliefs, and concerns related to processing snow crab administered to 158 workers attending community meetings at the start of the research found that women were significantly more likely than men to associate certain health problems, especially chest tightness, difficulty breathing, and cough, with crab processing (P<0.001). Worker health assessments carried out with 215 processing workers (187 current/28 former; 120 female/95 male) found that female participants were more likely to be diagnosed as almost certain/highly probable snow crab OA and allergy (P=0.001) and to be sensitized to snow crab (P=0.01) than male participants. Work histories from the health assessments were used to classify processing jobs as male or female. Allergen sampling (211 allergen samples: 115 area, 96 personal breathing zone) indicated that the plant areas where these male jobs were concentrated were associated with lower levels of aerosolized crab allergens (the agents responsible for OA to snow crab) than areas associated with female jobs. This difference was statistically significant in the two plants with poor ventilation (p<0.001 and P=0.017 for these plants). A gender analysis of work history data showed that female health assessment participants were likely to have worked longer processing snow crab than males (5 years versus 3.5 years, respectively). Cross-referencing of work history results with allergen sampling data for male and female job areas showed a gender difference in median cumulative exposures (duration of exposurexlevel of exposures) for health assessment participants. Health assessment participants with estimated higher median cumulative exposures were more likely to receive a diagnosis of almost certain/highly probable OA and allergy. Semistructured interviews with 27 health assessment participants (24 female/ 3 male) with a diagnosis of almost certain/highly probable or possible snow crab OA indicated that these workers can experience substantial quality of life impacts while working and that they seek to reduce the economic impact of their illness by remaining at their jobs as long as possible. Indications of selection bias and other study limitations point to the need for more research exploring the relationship between the gender division of labor and knowledge, beliefs, and concerns about snow crab processing, as well as gender differences in prevalence, quality of life, and socioeconomic impact.

  18. Islands in Amazonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. T. Prance

    1996-01-01

    There are a number of habitats within the lowland Amazonian rainforest ecosystem that are functional islands. Those that are discussed are savannas, white sand campinas and caatingas, inselbergs and sandstone table mountains or tepuis. Each of these habitats is a series of isolated islands of vegetation and in some cases speciation has taken place between islands, especially the older tepuis,

  19. Overwash on Assateague Island

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Overwash on Assateague Island. When waves wash over the main sand dune on the island, that creates a phenomenon called overwash, where the sand is moved along the path of the wave. Overwash has contributed to the gradual movement of Assateague Island to the south....

  20. Diomede Islands, Bering Straight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Diomede Islands consisting of the western island Big Diomede (also known as Imaqliq, Nunarbuk or Ratmanov Island), and the eastern island Little Diomede (also known as Krusenstern Island or Inaliq), are two rocky islands located in the middle of the Bering Strait between Russia and Alaska. The islands are separated by an international border and the International Date Line which is approximately 1.5 km from each island; you can look from Alaska into tomorrow in Russia. At the closest land approach between the United States, which controls Little Diomede, and Russia, which controls Big Diomede, they are 3 km apart. Little Diomede Island constitutes the Alaskan City of Diomede, while Big Diomede Island is Russia's easternmost point. The first European to reach the islands was the Russian explorer Semyon Dezhnev in 1648. The text of the 1867 treaty finalizing the sale of Alaska uses the islands to designate the border between the two nations.

    The image was acquired July 8, 2000, covers an area of 13.5 x 10.8 km, and is located at 65.8 degrees north latitude, 169 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  1. How Are Islands Formed?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    This lesson provides students with information about how islands are formed, including a basic knowledge of plate tectonics. Using the islands of Hawaii as an example, students learn about the earth processes that cause the formation of islands over time, including volcanoes and hot spots.

  2. Avifauna: Turnover on Islands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernst Mayr

    1965-01-01

    The percentage of endemic species of birds on islands increases with island area at a double logarithmic rate. This relation is apparently due to extinction, which is more rapid the smaller the island. The turnover resulting from extinction and replacement appears to be far more rapid than hitherto suspected.

  3. Malignant uveal schwannoma with peripheral nerve extension in a 12-week-old color-dilute Labrador Retriever.

    PubMed

    Duke, F D; Teixeira, L B C; Galle, L E; Green, N; Dubielzig, R R

    2015-01-01

    The formalin-fixed, amber-colored right globe from a 12-week-old female silver Labrador Retriever dog was submitted to the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin for light microscopic evaluation. The clinical history described a collapsed anterior chamber and multifocal nodular lesions in the peripheral iris. Histologically, immunohistochemically, and ultrastructurally, the uveal mass was consistent with a malignant schwannoma; there was extension along peripheral nerves within the sclera. The signalment and behavior of the neoplasm distinguish it from the uveal schwannoma of blue-eyed dogs and bear some resemblance to the ocular lesions in human neurofibromatosis. The dilute color mutation may contribute to the cause. Six weeks later, the dog did not develop any additional masses. PMID:24513800

  4. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes in Proterozoic intrusives astride the Grenville Front in Labrador - Implications for crustal contamination and basement mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Wooden, J. L.; Emslie, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Trace element and Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic compositions of anorthosites and related rocks, and of younger mafic dikes from Harp Lake and Mealy Mountains in Labrador, Canada are estimated and compared. The effects of crustal component contaminants on the isotopic compositions of the dikes are investigated. The correlation between the isotopic data and the crustal contamination model is studied. It is observed that for Harp Lake the initial Sr ratios are higher and the Nd values are lower than Mealy samples, and the data do not correspond to the crustal contamination model; however, the Pb isotope data favor a crustal contamination model. It is noted that the Labrador segment of the Grenville Front appears to coincide with the southern margin of the Archean North Atlantic craton, and may represent a pre mid-Proterozoic suture.

  5. Rare-earth elements and Nd and Pb isotopes as source indicators for Labrador Sea clay-size sediments during Heinrich event 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry Benson; Don Barber; John T. Andrews; Howard Taylor; Paul Lamothe

    2003-01-01

    Elemental abundances and Nd and Pb isotope ratios were determined on samples from the carbonate-free, clay-size fractions of sediments from intervals above, within, and below Heinrich event 2 (H-2) in core HU87-9 from the Northwest Labrador Sea slope. In HU87-9, rare-earth element (REE) distributions and elemental concentrations within the H-2 event are distinct from those outside this event. ?Nd(0) and

  6. Sea surface pCO2 and carbon export during the Labrador Sea spring-summer bloom: An in situ mass balance approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd R. Martz; Michael D. DeGrandpre; Peter G. Strutton; Wade R. McGillis; William M. Drennan

    2009-01-01

    We report depth-resolved in situ time series of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and other carbon-related parameters spanning the development and decline of a high-latitude phytoplankton bloom. A suite of sensors was deployed on a mooring in the Labrador Sea from June to August 2004. The study became quasi-Lagrangian when the mooring broke free in late June. Measured parameters

  7. Neutron activation analysis and X-ray Rayleigh and Raman scattering of hair and nail clippings as noninvasive bioindicators for Cu liver status in Labrador Retrievers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Bode; Maria Izabel Maretti Silveira Bueno; Gisele G. Bortoleto; Gaby Hoffmann; Ted S. G. A. M. van den Ingh; Jan Rothuizen

    2008-01-01

    The heritability of chronic hepatitis in the Labrador Retriever is studied with the aim of identifying the related gene mutation.\\u000a Identification of cases and controls is largely based on instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) Cu determination\\u000a in liver biopsies. The burden for these companion animals may be reduced if nail clippings and hair (fur) could serve as a\\u000a noninvasive indicator

  8. The Flores Island tsunamis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harry Yeh; Fumihiko Imamura; Costas Synolakis; Yoshinobu Tsuji; Philip Liu; Shaozhong Shi

    1993-01-01

    On December 12, 1992, at 5:30 A.M. GMT, an earthquake of magnitude Ms 7.5 struck the eastern region of Flores Island, Indonesia (Figure 1), a volcanic island located just at the transition between the Sunda and Banda Island arc systems. The local newspaper reported that 25-m high tsunamis struck the town of Maumere, causing substantial casualties and property damage. On

  9. Full-fit reconstruction of opening of Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay: A special focus on continental deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, M.; Müller, R.; Williams, S.

    2012-12-01

    Reconstructing the pre-rift configuration of Greenland and North America, and the early tectonic evaluation within the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay, raises several issues. Some models treat linear magnetic anomalies adjacent to the continental margins of the Labrador Sea as 28-33 seafloor-spreading isochrones. However, more recent seismic data suggest that so-called "transitional crust" extends much further seaward. In addition, various authors have proposed that treating Greenland and North America as rigid plates leads to unreasonable gaps and overlaps in full-fit reconstructions. Extension within Hudson Bay, or large strike-slip motions within Greenland, has been suggested as possible explanations. To address these issues, we investigate the full-fit configuration of Greenland and North America using an approach that considers continental deformation in a quantitative manner, in contrast to traditional models that treat continents as rigid blocks. This new method has been applied in this region to derive new poles of rotation for full-fit plate reconstruction. This method takes in to account the landward limit of thinning and extension in continental crust of the rift margins. We first generate a crustal thickness map using a gravity inversion method, calibrated against all available crustal thickness information from seismic refraction profiles and receiver functions from onshore seismic stations. We also define the extent of the limit of stretched continental crust along each margin. The continental-oceanic boundary (COB) is located using interpreted seismic profiles and revising COBs previously proposed for both margins. Restoration of COBs was accomplished by generating small circle motion paths between UCCL and COB lines. Crustal thickness was extracted along each profile to calculate its length before subjected to stretching. Major corrections in the extent of stretched continental crust, and it's pre-rift thickness were taken into account to achieve the best fitting restored COBs. We also tested models in which the crustal thickness grid was revised to account for the amount of igneous material, ascribed to the influence of the Iceland Plume, added to the lower crust in the Davis Strait. We tested end-member restorations considering the transitional crust as oceanic or continental according to our interpretation of previously studied seismic lines in this region. Fitting the margins and computing total-fit Euler poles was carried out by two different methods: a Visual fitting technique with GPlates software and the quantitative least-squares Hellinger methodology. Conjugate Precambrian bedrock units and structural features onshore of both margins were then correlated and the scenario that showed the maximum compatibility with these observations was most highly ranked. The proposition of the Ungava fault zone in the Davis Strait as a leaky transform fault partly resolves problems in this region in alternative reconstruction scenarios, reducing overlap in the Davis Strait and gaps in the Labrador Sea. These more robust plate reconstructions form the basis for generating topological deforming meshes that represent the kinematic evolution of Greenland-North America rifting.

  10. Ober's Island, One of the Review Islands on Rainy Lake, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ober's Island, One of the Review Islands on Rainy Lake, bounded on the south by The Hawk Island and on the north by The Crow Island. These islands are located seven miles east of Ranier, Minnesota, three miles west of Voyageur National Park, and one mile south of the international border of the United States of America and Canada. The legal description of Mallard Island is Lot 6, Section 19, T-17-N, R-22-W, Koochiching County, Minnesota, Ranier, Koochiching County, MN

  11. Investigating the Effects of Climatic Change and Fire Dynamics on Peatland C Accumulation in Coastal Labrador, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A.; Lesser, D.; Bourakovsky, A.; Hamley, C.; Adams, C.; Westervelt, A.; Camill, P.; Umbanhowar, C. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    High-latitude Canadian peatlands store a significant stock of soil carbon that has the potential to become mobilized to the atmosphere if climate warming leads to changes in the net balance of plant productivity and decomposition. We completed a detailed study of C accumulation rates from the sediment record in coastal eastern Canada to help to determine the relative impacts of regional climate vs. local processes, such as hydrology and fire disturbance, on rates of C storage. Seven cores from subarctic peatlands in Labrador were analyzed to determine the influence of fires on carbon storage over the past 8,000 years, specifically over known warm periods. Calibrated radiocarbon dates, bulk density, and percent carbon were used to calculate carbon accumulation rates. Areal charcoal concentration was used as a proxy for fire severity. Carbon accumulation rates appear to be most strongly controlled by changing regional climatic regimes. From 8,000 cal yr BP to the present, rates of accumulation averaged 23.1 ± 6.7 gC m-2 yr-1. C accumulation rates were highest during the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM, 6,000 - 4,000 cal yr BP), averaging 29.6 ± 2.4 g C m-2 yr-1 compared to 22.7 ± 3.7 and 15.9 ± 2.9 g C m-2 yr-1 before and after the HTM, respectively. Samples containing macroscopic charcoal had an average concentration of 0.62 mm2 cm-3 with a maximum concentration found of 3.51 mm2 cm-3. Consistently low charcoal concentrations indicate that fire was neither common nor severe in these wetter peatlands, implying that fires have historically not been a significant control on C accumulation in Labrador, likely due to the high net moisture of the region. Our work supports a growing body of evidence from high latitude peatlands suggesting that future warming conditions, in the absence of shifts in disturbance regimes, could lead to greater soil C sequestration.

  12. Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes in Proterozoic intrusives astride the Grenville Front in Labrador: Implications for crustal contamination and basement mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashwal, L.D.; Wooden, J.L.; Emslie, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    We report Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of mid-Proterozoic anorthosites and related rocks (1.45-1.65 Ga) and of younger olivine diabase dikes (1.4 Ga) from two complexes on either side of the Grenville Front in Labrador. Anorthositic or diabasic samples from the Mealy Mountains (Grenville Province) and Harp Lake (Nain-Churchill Provinces) complexes have very similar major, minor and trace element compositions, but distinctly different isotopic signatures. All Mealy Mountains samples have ISr = 0.7025-0.7033, ??{lunate}Nd = +0.6 to +5.6 and Pb isotopic compositions consistent with derivation from a mantle source depleted with respect to Nd/Sm and Rb/Sr. Pb isotopic compositions for the Mealy Mountains samples are slightly more radiogenic than model mantle compositions. All Harp Lake samples have ISr = 0.7032-0.7066, ??{lunate}Nd = -0.3 to -4.4 and variable, but generally unradiogenic 207Pb 204Pb and 206Pb 204Pb compared to model mantle, suggesting mixing between a mantle-derived component and a U-depleted crustal contaminant. Crustal contaminants are probably a variety of Archean high-grade quartzofeldspathic gneisses with low U/Pb ratios and include a component that must be isotopically similar to the early Archean (>3.6 Ga) Uivak gneisses of Labrador or the Amitsoq gneisses of west Greenland. This would imply that the ancient gneiss complex of coastal Labrador and Greenland is larger than indicated by present surface exposure and may extend in the subsurface as far west as the Labrador Trough. If Harp Lake and Mealy Mountains samples were subjected to the same degree of contamination, as suggested by their chemical similarities, then the Mealy contaminants must be much younger, probably early or middle Proterozoic in age. The Labrador segment of the Grenville Front, therefore, appears to coincide with the southern margin of the Archean North Atlantic craton and may represent a pre mid-Proterozoic suture. ?? 1986.

  13. Hydrologic data for Block Island, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Emily

    1993-01-01

    This report was compiled as part of a study to assess the hydrogeology and the quality and quantity of fresh ground water on Block Island, Rhode Island. Hydrologic data were collected on Block Island during 1988-91. The data are pre- sented in illustrations and tables. Data collec- ted include precipitation, surfae-water, ground- water, lithologic, and well-construction and dis- charge information. Precipitation data include total monthly precipitation values from 11 rain gages and water-quality analyses of 14 precipi- tation samples from one station. Surface-water data include water-level measurements at 12 ponds, water-quality data for five ponds, and field specific-conductance measurements at 56 surface- water sites (streams, ponds, and springs). Ground- water data include water-level measurements at 159 wells, water-quality data at 150 wells, and field specific-conductance data at 52 wells. Lithologic logs for 375 wells and test borings, and construc- tion and location data for 570 wells, springs, and test borings are included. In addition, the data set contains data on water quality of water samples, collected by the Rhode Island Department of Health during 1976-91, from Fresh and Sands Ponds and from wells at the Block Island Water Company well field north of Sands Pond.

  14. Marine and Island Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Lawrence J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an ecology course which provides students with an opportunity to observe aquatic and terrestrial life in the Bahamas. States that students learn scientific methodology by measuring physical and chemical aspects of the island habitats. Provides information on the island, course description and objectives, transportation, facilities, and…

  15. 75 FR 51098 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ...Wildlife Service [FWS-R1-R-2010-N131; 1265-0000-10137-S3] Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan, Skagit, and Whatcom Counties, WA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  16. Spectral decomposition of deep flow variability at the Greenland-Iceland-Scotland Ridge and the Labrador Sea Western Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Nuno; Käse, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Almost two decades of observed transports in the subpolar deep branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning are available. However, the time series - especially in the Denmark Strait and Labrador Sea - show gaps of considerable length. Linear or polynomial interpolation can introduce spurious periodicity at long periods . By using Statistical Singular Analysis (SSA) techniques, it should be possible to interpolate over data gaps in a spectrally consistent way. We apply gap filling and forecasting techniques to three time series of observations of the deep AMOC with different characteristics. This allows us to restrict the spectral comparsion between the data at most energetic spectral bands. The method is first tested by introducing artificial gaps in a model timeseries and then comparing the gap-filled results with those of the known original series. Since the Faroe Bank Channel observations do not have gaps longer than one month, the procedure is repeated with real observations and applied to the series with longer gaps. Since the only series with strong annual cycle is that of the FBC, only those modes representing energy in the interannual bands are discussed further. They reveal a variability maximum at periods between 3 and 5 years and near 10 years . For multidecadal variability which shows higher energy in climate models there is urgent need to obtain longer term observational data. On the other hand, forecasts for 3-5 years from existing data seem to be possible as is revealed by our simulations.

  17. Ober's Island: The Mallard Ober's Island, One of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ober's Island: The Mallard - Ober's Island, One of the Review Islands on Rainy Lake, bounded on the south by The Hawk Island and on the north by The Crow Island. These islands are located seven miles east of Ranier, Minnesota, three miles west of Voyageur National Park, and one mile south of the international border of the United States of America and Canada. The legal description of Mallard Island is Lot 6, Section 19, T-17-N, R-22-W, Koochiching County, Minnesota, Ranier, Koochiching County, MN

  18. Conservation Strategy for Sable Island

    E-print Network

    Jones, Ian L.

    Towards a Conservation Strategy for Sable Island Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, Atlantic Region #12;SABLE ISLAND CONSERVATION STRATEGY page - i March, 1998 A CONSERVATION STRATEGY FOR SABLE ISLAND PREPARED BY This Conservation Strategy for Sable Island was prepared for Environment Canada

  19. Younger Dryas and Holocene oceanography of the western Labrador Sea region based on foraminifera and sediment proxies from Placentia Bay, Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Christina; Pearce, Christof; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Kuijpers, Antoon; Reynisson, Njáll F.; Zilmer Christensen, Eva; Juncker Hansen, Mette

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages and geochemical analyses from three marine sediment cores from Placentia Bay on the southwest coast of Newfoundland captured the evolving surface and subsurface environment of the eastern Labrador Sea during the late glacial and Holocene. The area, which is today located in the boundary zone between the Arctic Labrador current and the warm Gulf Stream in the eastern margin of the Labrador Sea was during the early part of the Younger Dryas (13.0-12.3 cal. kyr BP) dominated by cold, Arctic conditions and heavy sea-ice cover linked to a strong Polar Water component of the Inner Labrador Current. In the later part of the Younger Dryas (12.3-11.5 kyr BP) the influence of the Labrador Current (LC) became less pronounced resulting in more unstable conditions with varying sea-ice cover and increased influence of Gulf Stream water, presumably linked to an increased strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The earliest Holocene (11.5-10.4 kyr BP) saw slightly warmer subsurface conditions in Placentia Bay and increased productivity, presumably caused by a decreased southward transport of Polar Water via the LC. The onset of a strong AMOC caused the northward movement of the frontal zone between the Subpolar Gyre and the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre in the western North Atlantic region to closer proximity to the southern coast of Newfoundland compared to previously. From ca. 10.4-9.65 kyr BP increased bottom-current speeds and the presence of species often found in connection to oceanic fronts, suggest a further strengthening of the AMOC causing inflow of Atlantic-source water into Placentia Bay. This tendency was further strengthened at 9.65-7.3 kyr BP, which saw a relatively strong inflow of Atlantic-source Gulf Stream water into Placentia Bay, evidenced by high frequencies of Cassidulina neoteretis. This inflow of Atlantic was however temporarily halted around 8.2 kyr BP, when a short-lived, extreme peak in Globobulimina auriculata arctica suggests reduced bottom-water stratification. This may have been caused by an increased freshwater release from the Canadian Arctic, linked to the well-known 8.2-kyr event. Around 7.3 kyr BP, the inflow of warmer subsurface waters decreased, when subsurface waters of Placentia Bay returned to relatively cold, subarctic conditions. An enhanced influx of lower-saline water is inferred both by the presence of Elphidium bartletti, indicating an increased flux of meltwater from the Arctic entering Placentia Bay. This fresher water was likely transported by the Labrador Current and strong northerly winds. This scenario was again interrupted around ca 4.4 kyr BP, when higher C. neoteretis again suggest increase influx of Gulf Stream water, a tendency that continued until today, although with possibly slightly better mixing of LC and GS water after ~2.7 kyr BP. This decrease in the strength of the LC, may be linked to a decreased southward flow of LC water due to decreased meltwater release from the Canadian Arctic or due to a shift to a generally more negative Northern Annular Mode.

  20. 230Th vs. 14C age of a pre-YD deep coral from Orphan Knoll (Labrador Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaleb, B.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2006-12-01

    A deep coral specimen (Desmophyllum cristagalli) raised from the top of Orphan Knoll (50°25.57N ; 46°22.05W ; appr. depth 1700 m), i.e., at the bottom of the modern Labrador Sea Water mass, has been used to investigate the suitability of such material to document DR 14C values from comparative AMS-14C and 230Th-age measurements. Analyses have been performed along a transect from bottom to top of the colony. Calibrated 14C ages have been calculated using the 400 yr standard marine correction. ......U ppm.........234U/238U.......Age 230Th.....Calib Age 1...2,628±0,022...1,144±0,010...14507±399...13462±40 2...2,531±0,020...1,117±0,012...14588±301 3...2,718±0,022...1,145±0,019...13928±288 4...3,278±0,025...1,141±0,016...18535±740 5...3,600±0,029...1,155±0,044...12727±729...13339±42 6...4,256±0,028...1,296±0,010...14709±226 7...3,436±0,022...1,130±0,009...16860±332 8...3,521±0,024...1,137±0,010...17491±271...13398±21 From the above numbers, the following inferences have been made: 1. Such corals develop very rapidly as indicated by the narrow range of 14C-ages yielded by the study specimen. 2. They do not constitute closed systems with respect to U (as illustrated by the strong U-enrichment of samples 4 to 8); this confirms earlier observations made by Pons-Branchu et al. (Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 69, 2005). 3. The uranium diagenetically incorporated into the skeleton occasionally shows departure from the isotopic composition of marine uranium (e.g., samples 6 or 5), suggesting U-relocation from embedding sediment with variable 234U excesses (or deficit). The lowermost samples (with a narrow range of U content) may possibly provide a reasonable estimate for the 230Th age of the coral (ca. 14000-14500). If true, this age would indicate a high DR value (600-1000) during this time interval, at intermediate depths of the Labrador Sea. It is concluded from the study that, despite strong initial expectations with respect to their use for the setting of coupled 230Th-14C ages, such deep-water corals are unlikely to provide reliable U-series ages due to post- mortem U-mobility in their skeleton. In view of their relatively fast growth rates, of the fact that they do not precipitate aragonite/calcite in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water (e.g., Adkins et al., 2003. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 67), their overall suitability for paleoceanography studies seems limited.

  1. Island Watershed Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Rod

    2003-01-01

    Describes a 90-minute "Island Watershed" activity to help earth science students understand the concept of the water cycle. Introduces a surface waters unit appropriate for students in grades 7-10. Includes watershed project guidelines. (Author/KHR)

  2. Small islands adrift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Anna

    2015-07-01

    With the charismatic former president of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, behind bars on a widely derided terrorism charge, Anna Petherick asks whether small island states can really make themselves heard in Paris.

  3. The Island Institute

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Since 1983, the Island Institute has employed a wide range of individuals, including photographers, artists, policy experts, and others, all in the name of maintaining the viability of the fifteen year-round island communities in the Gulf of Maine. They have become well-known for their outreach efforts, and their website will be of great value to anyone interested in this region, or how various island communities remain economically, culturally, and ecologically sustainable. Resources located on the Institute's homepage include information about fellowship opportunities and links to full and annual reports on the Atlantic herring spawning project. Visitors who are hoping to get a sense of the flavor of this unique region should definitely peruse their monthly publication, "The Working Waterfront." Recent articles include opinion pieces on fish hatcheries, the lobster business, and news profiles of local islanders.

  4. Ag-plasma modification enhances bone apposition around titanium dental implants: an animal study in Labrador dogs.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shichong; Cao, Huiliang; Zhao, Xu; Lo, Hueiwen; Zhuang, Longfei; Gu, Yingxin; Shi, Junyu; Liu, Xuanyong; Lai, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants with proper antibacterial ability as well as ideal osseointegration are being actively pursued. The antimicrobial ability of titanium implants can be significantly enhanced via modification with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). However, the high mobility of Ag NPs results in their potential cytotoxicity. The silver plasma immersion ion-implantation (Ag-PIII) technique may remedy the defect. Accordingly, Ag-PIII technique was employed in this study in an attempt to reduce the mobility of Ag NPs and enhance osseointegration of sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) dental implants. Briefly, 48 dental implants, divided equally into one control and three test groups (further treated by Ag-PIII technique with three different implantation parameters), were inserted in the mandibles of six Labrador dogs. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry were used to investigate the surface topography, chemical states, and silver release of SLA- and Ag-PIII-treated titanium dental implants. The implant stability quotient examination, Microcomputed tomography evaluation, histological observations, and histomorphometric analysis were performed to assess the osseointegration effect in vivo. The results demonstrated that normal soft tissue healing around dental implants was observed in all the groups, whereas the implant stability quotient values in Ag-PIII groups were higher than that in the SLA group. In addition, all the Ag-PIII groups, compared to the SLA-group, exhibited enhanced new bone formation, bone mineral density, and trabecular pattern. With regard to osteogenic indicators, the implants treated with Ag-PIII for 30 minutes and 60 minutes, with the diameter of the Ag NPs ranging from 5-25 nm, were better than those treated with Ag-PIII for 90 minutes, with the Ag NPs diameter out of that range. These results suggest that Ag-PIII technique can reduce the mobility of Ag NPs and enhance the osseointegration of SLA surfaces and have the potential for future use. PMID:25609967

  5. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of the Mistastin Lake impact structure (Labrador, Canada): Implications for geomagnetic perturbation and shock effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, Gwenaël; Gilder, Stuart A.; Marion, Cassandra L.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Pohl, Jean; Petersen, Nikolai; Sylvester, Paul J.

    2015-05-01

    We carried out an integrated rock magnetic and paleomagnetic study of the ?36 Ma Mistastin Lake (Labrador, Canada) meteorite impact structure in order to investigate whether energy from the collision influenced the geodynamo and to assess the effects of shock on the magnetic properties of the target basement rocks. Stepwise demagnetization of 114 specimens isolates a well-defined magnetization component throughout the crater whose overall mean deviates slightly from the expected direction for North America at the time of impact. Paleointensity results from seven samples meeting stringent selection criteria show no significant difference with a global compilation from 40 to 30 Ma. The combined results, including those from a ?80 m-thick profile of an impact melt unit (Discovery Hill), lend no support that the impact caused an aberration of the geodynamo within a few centuries of a bolide collision that created the ?28 km-diameter crater. Both titanium-rich and titanium-poor titanomagnetite carry the magnetic remanence in the impact melt rocks; their relative proportions, compositions and domain states are cooling rate dependent. Magnetic hysteresis parameters of the magnetite-bearing anorthositic basement rocks reveal systematic changes as a function of distance from the crater's center with an increasing prevalence of single domain-like grains toward the center. Changes with radial distance are also found in the character of the Verwey transition in magnetite. Basement rocks were thermally overprinted when lying less than a meter from the impact melt rocks; Mesoproterozoic basement rocks more than a meter below the impact melt rocks hold similar magnetization directions to those expected from a 1500 Ma result for Laurentia. No evidence exists that shock heating of the basement rocks exceeded 200 °C at distances of 6-7 km from the crater's center.

  6. On the factors behind large Labrador Sea tides during the last glacial cycle and the potential implications for Heinrich events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbic, Brian K.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Macayeal, Douglas R.; Milne, Glenn A.

    2008-09-01

    Labrador Sea (LS) tidal elevations over the last glacial cycle are investigated in a near-global numerical model that accurately captures the present-day tides. From ˜65 ka to ˜7 ka, the modeled elevations at the debouchement point of the Hudson Strait ice stream in the LS are exceptionally large, comparable to the largest elevations seen anywhere in the present-day ocean. New numerical simulations performed for this article demonstrate that both local changes in basin geometry (e.g., ice cover over Hudson Bay) and changes outside of the LS led to enhanced LS paleotides. New simulations run at higher horizontal resolution and a considered examination of uncertainties, including uncertainties in the adopted sea level models, strengthen confidence in the robustness of the large LS paleotides. The tide model is run with both spatially uniform sea level drops (taken from curves of eustatic and Red Sea sea levels versus time) and spatially variable sea level maps (taken from two different gravitationally self-consistent viscoelastic solid earth/sea level models, which both account for ice sheet geometry). The tides are larger when the spatially variable sea level models are used. Observations in present-day Antarctica indicate that the mechanical action of tides significantly impacts the dynamics of both continental ice streams and their associated floating ice shelves. It is postulated here that large LS paleotides played a key role in the formation of Heinrich event icebergs, that is, massive discharges of ice from the LS into the glacial North Atlantic ocean. The paleotide calculations described here provide a potential explanation for why the LS region, more than any other, dominated the production of Heinrich event icebergs. Most previous hypotheses of a tidal role in climate variability and ice sheet dynamics focus on tidal mixing. In contrast, here the role of tidal mechanical forcing of ice sheets is emphasized.

  7. Genome Wide Analysis Indicates Genes for Basement Membrane and Cartilage Matrix Proteins as Candidates for Hip Dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Lavrijsen, Ineke C. M.; Leegwater, Peter A. J.; Martin, Alan J.; Harris, Stephen J.; Tryfonidou, Marianna A.; Heuven, Henri C. M.; Hazewinkel, Herman A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip dysplasia, an abnormal laxity of the hip joint, is seen in humans as well as dogs and is one of the most common skeletal disorders in dogs. Canine hip dysplasia is considered multifactorial and polygenic, and a variety of chromosomal regions have been associated with the disorder. We performed a genome-wide association study in Dutch Labrador Retrievers, comparing data of nearly 18,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 48 cases and 30 controls using two different statistical methods. An individual SNP analysis based on comparison of allele frequencies with a ?2 statistic was used, as well as a simultaneous SNP analysis based on Bayesian variable selection. Significant association with canine hip dysplasia was observed on chromosome 8, as well as suggestive association on chromosomes 1, 5, 15, 20, 25 and 32. Next-generation DNA sequencing of the exons of genes of seven regions identified multiple associated alleles on chromosome 1, 5, 8, 20, 25 and 32 (p<0.001). Candidate genes located in the associated regions on chromosomes 1, 8 and 25 included LAMA2, LRR1 and COL6A3, respectively. The associated region on CFA20 contained candidate genes GDF15, COMP and CILP2. In conclusion, our study identified candidate genes that might affect susceptibility to canine hip dysplasia. These genes are involved in hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix integrity of basement membrane and cartilage. The functions of the genes are in agreement with the notion that disruptions in endochondral bone formation in combination with soft tissue defects are involved in the etiology of hip dysplasia. PMID:24498183

  8. Galveston Island and erosion 

    E-print Network

    Bolleter, Jim Mason

    1985-01-01

    ABSTRACT Galveston Island and Erosion. (May 1985) Jim Mason Bolleter, B. S. , Texas AM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. R. Benton Jr. Mid-term changes in the beach vegetation line on Galveston Island, I as well as the erosional effects... of recent hurri canes and tropical . storms, wer e documented with multi -date aerial photography. While ~ localized accretion has occurred on East Beach due to the shadowing effect of the South Jetty, West beach has fluctuated between erosion Major...

  9. Melville Island, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Melville Island, just off the coast of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (11.5S, 131.0E) is a sparsely inhabited tropical island with heavy woodland concentrations. The widespread and prominant smoke plumes were most likely set to renew pasture under open canopy woodland. Soil erosion is almost non- existant as can be seen by the clear and clean river flow. The offshore sediments are coastal current borne deposits from King Sound to the west.

  10. Modeling Catastrophic Barrier Island Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, J. W.; McNamara, D.

    2012-12-01

    Barrier islands, thin strips of sand lying parallel to the mainland coastline, along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts appear to have maintained their form for thousands of years in the face of rising sea level. The mechanisms that allow barrier islands to remain robust are transport of sediment from the ocean side of barriers to the top and backside during storms, termed island overwash, and the growth and alongshore propagation of tidal deltas near barrier island inlets. Dynamically these processes provide the necessary feedbacks to maintain a barrier island in an attractor that withstands rising sea level within a phase space of barrier island geometrical characteristics. Current barrier island configurations along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts exist among a wide range of storm climate and underlying geologic conditions and therefore the environment that forces overwash and tidal delta dynamics varies considerably. It has been suggested that barrier islands in certain locations such as those between Avon and Buxton (losing 76% of island width since 1852) and Chandeleur islands (losing 85% of its surface area since 2005) along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, respectively, may be subject to a catastrophic shift in barrier island attractor states - more numerous inlets cutting barriers in some locations and the complete disappearance of barrier islands in other locations. In contrast to common models for barrier islands that neglect storm dynamics and often only consider cross-shore response, we use an alongshore extended model for barrier island dynamics including beach erosion, island overwash and inlet cutting during storms, and beach accretion, tidal delta growth and dune and vegetation growth between storms to explore the response of barrier islands to a wide range of environmental forcing. Results will be presented that show how barrier island attractor states are altered with variations in the rate of sea level rise, storminess, and underlying geology. We will also investigate the conditions necessary for a barrier island attractor similar to those found along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts to become unstable.

  11. Neutron activation analysis and X-ray Rayleigh and Raman scattering of hair and nail clippings as noninvasive bioindicators for Cu liver status in Labrador Retrievers

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Maria Izabel Maretti Silveira; Bortoleto, Gisele G.; Hoffmann, Gaby; van den Ingh, Ted S. G. A. M.; Rothuizen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The heritability of chronic hepatitis in the Labrador Retriever is studied with the aim of identifying the related gene mutation. Identification of cases and controls is largely based on instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) Cu determination in liver biopsies. The burden for these companion animals may be reduced if nail clippings and hair (fur) could serve as a noninvasive indicator for the hepatic Cu concentrations. No correlation was found between hepatic Cu concentrations and Cu concentrations in hair and nail samples. However, hair and nail samples were also analyzed by X-ray tube excitation, taking advantage of the X-ray Compton, Rayleigh, and Raman scattering which reflects the organic components such as the type of melanin. Principal component analysis provided first indications that some differentiation between healthy and sick dogs could indeed be obtained from hair and nail analysis. Figure Principal component analysis of scattered region of x-ray fluorescence spectra of Labrador dog nails, demonstrating the differentiation towards dogs with high and low Cu liver levels (respectively positive and negative PC2 values) reflecting hepatitis, as well as gender (PC1: negative values for female and positive values for males) PMID:18264701

  12. High-Resolution Magnetostratigraphy of Core MD99-2236 (Cartwright Saddle, Offshore Labrador) Since the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Onge, M.; Guillaume, S.; Jennings, A.; Andrews, J. T.

    2009-05-01

    The magnetic properties of a long and well-dated (18 AMS 14C dates) piston core (MD99-2236) sampled offshore Labrador (Cartwright Saddle) on board the R/V Marion Dufresne II in 1999 were analyzed at high- resolution in order to reconstruct the geomagnetic field behavior and to characterize several detrital carbonate events. The Natural, Anhysteretic, Isothermal and Saturated Isothemal Remanent Magnetizations were studied by progressives stepwise alternating field (AF) demagnetization at 1 cm intervals on u-channel samples using a cryogenic magnetometer at the Institut des sciences de la mer de Rimouski (ISMER). Hysteresis curves were also determined with an alternating gradient force magnetometer in order to characterize the magnetic mineralogy and grain size. The results indicate that the NRM is characterized by a strong, stable and single component magnetization most likely carried low coercivity minerals such as magnetite in the pseudo-single domain grain size range. The component inclination and declination were calculated by principal component analysis and exhibit maximum angular deviation values generally lower than 5°, highlighting well-defined directional data, except for some specific intervals characterized by higher carbonate content and multi-domain grains. Moreover, the component inclinations vary around the expected inclination (70.3°) for the latitude of the coring site based on a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) model. Component inclination and declination are presented and compared with other high-resolution paleomagnetic records from Eastern Canada, Iceland (MD99-2322 and -2269) and Europe. This comparison reveals that the sediments recorded coherent paleomagnetic secular variations (PSV), especially from 8 to 14 ka, where sedimentation rates are higher, the data of high quality and where previously published high-resolution RPI and PSV records for this period are rare. In addition, relative paleointensity (RPI) proxies were constructed by normalizing the NRM by the ARM. The quality of these proxies will be assessed and comparison with previously published RPI records will be presented. Finally, the ongoing rock-magnetic measurements performed in the detrital carbonate layers will be discussed.

  13. Seasonal evolution of sea ice cover and shelf water off Labrador simulated in a coupled ice-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Yao, T.; Yao, Q.

    1996-07-01

    The sea ice model developed by Hibler [1979] is coupled with the ocean general circulation model developed by Bryan [1969] and Cox [1984] to examine the seasonal ice cover over the Labrador Shelf as well as dynamic and thermodynamic roles of the shelf/slope water. The model covers the area between 40°N and 65°N, extends nearly to the European coast, and has realistic bottom topography. The model is initialized with the temperature and salinity compiled by Levitus [1982], with fresh and cold shelf water imbedded, and then forced by observed atmospheric data. Simulation is first carried out for individual ice seasons, i.e., 1970/1971 season for 6 months from December 1, 1970. Several case runs are carried out with uncertain parameters varied within their possible ranges. Interannual variabilities are examined in additional simulations for the 1968/1969 and 1971/1972 seasons. General characteristics of the seasonal ice growth and decay are duplicated in the model. However, some discrepancies are observed in the 1970/1971 simulation, including the maximum ice cover about 20 days earlier in the model than in the observation. The earlier start of ice decay is related to a rapid ice melting in March, which could be reduced by increasing water albedo. This modification is justified, because thin ice is forced to merge immediately with thick ice in the present two-category ice model. Heat flux to the shelf area due to advection of the warm offshore water induces long-term warming effects and is also responsible for the excess of ice decay in spring. The interannual variability among the light, medium and heavy ice seasons is well reproduced in the three runs for the 1968/1969, 1970/1971, and 1971/1972 seasons, respectively. The ice-cover variability is related to that in the air-sea heat flux. However, a major part of the heat flux variability is retained in the water, while the ice cover absorbs a minor part. The timing variability among the three seasons is duplicated in the simulations as well.

  14. HEAT ISLAND REDUCTION STRATEGIES GUIDEBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This heat island reduction strategies guidebook provides an overview of urban heat islands and steps communities can take to reduce them. In particular, this guidebook provides background basics and answers the questions: ?What is a heat island?? ?What are its impacts?" "What ar...

  15. Density compensation in island avifaunas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Joseph Wright

    1980-01-01

    This paper analyzes factors which determine the extent of density compensation on islands; i.e., is the summed population density of all species on an island equal to the summed mainland density? A graphical analysis allows quantitative comparisons of density compensation studies. Two hypotheses which are generally applicable predict the extent of density compensation on islands: (1) Niche theory predicts that

  16. Three Mile Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Wood; S. M. Shultz

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is divided into the following categories: Accident Overviews, Sequence and Causes; International Commentary and Reaction; Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Planning; Health Effects; Radioactive Releases and the Environment; Accident Investigations\\/Commissions; Nuclear Industry: Safety, Occupational, and Financial Issues; Media and Communications; Cleanup; Sociopolitical Response and Commentary; Restart; Legal Ramifications; Federal Documents: President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island;

  17. Three Mile Island revisited

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. Lipford; N. M. Cole; T. J. Friderichs

    1991-01-01

    As a result of the accident in March 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel sustained significant internal damage. Approximately half of the reactor core suffered some degree of melting, with 10 to 20 tons of molten core material relocating inside the vessel and flowing down onto the reactor vessel's lower head. The resulting damage and the

  18. URBAN EXTENTS Falkland Islands

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    URBAN EXTENTS BRAZIL CHILE PARAGUAY URUGUAY GRUMPv1 Falkland Islands A t l a n t i c O c e a n P Tropical (CIAT). Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project (GRUMP), Population Density. Palisades, NY: CIESIN Equal Area Projection Urban Extent Administrative Units National Boundaries Note: National boundaries

  19. Atsena Otie Key Island

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Atsena Otie Key is one of thirteen islands on Florida's Gulf Coast that make up Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuge. Nearby waters support a multi-million dollar clam-farming industry. USGS documented pre-oil coastal conditions near the Refuge with baseline petrochemical measurements and aerial phot...

  20. Japan: Shikoku Island

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... energy balance, and directly sampled airborne dust and pollution particles while the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and ... for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 aircraft probed the environment near Oki island, in the upper left part of the images. At the same ...

  1. Siberian Expedition: Wrangel Island

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web site chronicles an American Museum of Natural History research expedition in 1998 to Siberia's Wrangel Island to collect woolly mammoth bones and test the theory that lethal disease caused the mammal's extinction. Information on the team members and journal excerpts are included as well as information on the expedition's objectives and the important tools used by the team.

  2. Kiritimati, Kiribati (Christmas Island)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pronounced 'Ki-ris-mas,' Kiritimati Island has a large infilled lagoon that gives it the largest land area (125 square miles, 321 square km) of any atoll in the world. Captain Cook named the atoll Christmas Island when he arrived on Christmas Eve in 1777. Used for nuclear testing in the 1950s and 1960s, the island is now valued for its marine and wildlife resources. It is particularly important as a seabird nesting site-with an estimated 6 million birds using or breeding on the island, including several million Sooty Terns. Rainfall on Kiritimati is linked to El Nino patterns, with long droughts experienced between the wetter El Nino years. This image is based on a mosaic of four digital photographs taken on 16 January 2002 from the Space Station Alpha as part of the Crew Earth Observations Project. The underlying data have 10 meter spatial resolution. Coral reefs are one of the areas selected as a scientific theme for this project (see also the recent Earth Observatory article, Mapping the Decline of Coral Reefs. The mosaic, based on images ISS004-ESC-6249 to 6252, was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  3. Hawaii's Sugar Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association, Aiea, HI.

    A warm and sunny subtropical climate helps make Hawaii an important sugar producer. History records that sugarcane was already present when Captain James Cook discovered the islands in 1778, and that the first successful sugarcane plantation was started in 1835 by Ladd and Company at Koloa. The first recorded export of Hawaiian sugar was in 1837,…

  4. Colonization of an island volcano, Long Island, Papua New Guinea, and an emergent island,

    E-print Network

    , in its caldera lake. VI. The pioneer arthropod community of Motmot John S. Edwards1 and Ian W. B Wisdom which occupies the caldera of Long Island, Papua New Guinea. Methods Arthropod sampling by means studies on the pioneer biota of an emergent island, Motmot, in Long Island's freshwater caldera lake, Lake

  5. Adapting remotely sensed snow data for daily flow modeling on the Upper Humber River, Newfoundland and Labrador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Melissa

    This thesis investigated the use of remotely sensed snow information to help improve flood forecasting in western Newfoundland's Humber River Basin. Flood forecasting on the Humber River is important because of the large population settlements within the Humber Valley. In this research, two types of remotely sensed snow data were considered for analysis: (1) snow cover (or snow extent) and (2) snow water equivalent (SWE). The majority of this thesis focuses on the remotely sensed snow cover data. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra snow cover images were acquired over the Humber Valley watershed throughout the snowmelt period, from March to June, for the years 2000 to 2009. MODIS is an optical sensor on NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites. Its daily temporal data are advantageous and the data are free and easily accessible. Daily snow cover data were extracted from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) daily snow product, specifically MOD10A1: a product derived from MODIS data, using a custom EASI script run in PCI Geomatica. PCI Geomatica is a robust remote sensing and image processing software. One major obstacle, regarding the acquisition of MODIS imagery over the Humber Valley watershed, is the presence of over 50% cloud cover for 80% of the days on average from March to June every year. This was a concern for data collection: affecting the sample size of acquired data and the accuracy of the snow cover data. When cloud cover is high there is a greater chance that it may be misclassified as snow and/or snow is misclassified as cloud cover. For this reason, a cloud-cover threshold was determined. The Rango-Martinec snowmelt runoff model, a widely used degree-day model which incorporates snow cover data as a direct input, was evaluated. It was found that the next day's flow is highly dependent on the previous day's flow and less dependent on the meteorological data: rainfall, snow cover, and temperature. The results from the snowmelt runoff model using the snow cover data provided very good final Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.85 for the calibration stage and 0.81 for the validation stage, but a consistent one-day lag of the modeled flow values was also observed. Although these results were not superior to currently employed flood forecasting models for the Upper Humber (because of a one-day lag in the modeled flows), the methodology developed herein may be useful for other river basins in NL where the flows are dominated by snowmelt during the spring such as the Exploits River Basin located in central NL. Remotely sensed snow water equivalent (SWE) data obtained from an advanced microwave scanning radiometer (AMSR-E), aboard the Aqua satellite, was also investigated for daily flow modeling applications. SWE often provide a better estimate of snowmelt than snow cover but this data had several disadvantages in the Humber River Basin. The major obstacles included large spatial resolution (25 km), data inaccuracy for wet snow, boreal forest, mountainous regions, and time step irregularities. Extremely large variances in the SWE data rendered the information inaccurate and ineffective for streamflow forecasting on Newfoundland and Labrador's Humber River. This research makes significant contributions to the field of hydrology providing a valuable methodology in adapting remotely sensed snow data to daily flow simulation and will be helpful to local authorities.

  6. Neutron activation analysis and X-ray Rayleigh and Raman scattering of hair and nail clippings as noninvasive bioindicators for Cu liver status in Labrador Retrievers.

    PubMed

    Bode, Peter; Bueno, Maria Izabel Maretti Silveira; Bortoleto, Gisele G; Hoffmann, Gaby; van den Ingh, Ted S G A M; Rothuizen, Jan

    2008-03-01

    The heritability of chronic hepatitis in the Labrador Retriever is studied with the aim of identifying the related gene mutation. Identification of cases and controls is largely based on instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) Cu determination in liver biopsies. The burden for these companion animals may be reduced if nail clippings and hair (fur) could serve as a noninvasive indicator for the hepatic Cu concentrations. No correlation was found between hepatic Cu concentrations and Cu concentrations in hair and nail samples. However, hair and nail samples were also analyzed by X-ray tube excitation, taking advantage of the X-ray Compton, Rayleigh, and Raman scattering which reflects the organic components such as the type of melanin. Principal component analysis provided first indications that some differentiation between healthy and sick dogs could indeed be obtained from hair and nail analysis. PMID:18264701

  7. Glacially-megalineated limestone terrain of Anticosti Island, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada; onset zone of the Laurentian Channel Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, Nick; Putkinen, Niko

    2014-03-01

    Anticosti is a large elongate island (240 km long, 60 km wide) in eastern Canada within the northern part of a deep water trough (Gulf of St. Lawrence) that terminates at the Atlantic continental shelf edge. The island's Pleistocene glaciological significance is that its long axis lay transverse to ice from the Quebec and Labrador sectors of the Laurentide Ice Sheet moving south from the relatively high-standing Canadian Shield. Recent glaciological reconstructions place a fast-flowing ice stream along the axis of the Gulf of St. Lawrence but supporting geologic evidence in terms of recognizing its hard-bedded onset zone and downstream streamlined soft bed is limited. Anticosti Island consists of gently southward-dipping limestone plains composed of Ordovician and Silurian limestones (Vaureal, Becscie and Jupiter formations) with north-facing escarpments transverse to regional ice flow. Glacial deposits are largely absent and limestone plains in the higher central plateau of the island retain a relict apparently ‘preglacial’ drainage system consisting of deeply-incised dendritic bedrock valleys. In contrast, the bedrock geomorphology of the lower lying western and eastern limestone plains of the island is strikingly different having been extensively modified by glacial erosion. Escarpments are glacially megalineated with a distinct ‘zig-zag’ planform reflecting northward-projecting bullet-shaped ‘noses’ (identified as rock drumlins) up to 2 km wide at their base and 4 km in length with rare megagrooved upper surfaces. Drumlins are separated by southward-closing, funnel-shaped ‘through valleys’ where former dendritic valleys have been extensively altered by the streaming of basal ice through gaps in the escarpments. Glacially-megalineated bedrock terrain such as on the western and eastern flanks of Anticosti Island is elsewhere associated with the hard-bedded onset zones of fast flowing ice streams and provides important ground truth for the postulated Laurentian Channel Ice Stream (LCIS) within the Gulf of St. Lawrence sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  8. Pine Island Iceberg Formation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lori Perkins

    2002-01-10

    This animation is a sequence showing the formation of the Pine Island iceberg and the glacial seaward flow upstream from the crack. It is a series of MISR images from the Terra satellite on top of the continental Radarsat view of Antarctica. The Pine Island Glacier is the largest discharger of ice in Antarctica and the continents fastest moving glacier. Even so, when a large crack formed across the glacier in mid 2000, it was surprising how fast the crack expanded, 15 meters per day, and how soon the resulting iceberg broke off, mid-November, 2001. This iceberg, called B-21, is 42 kilometers by 17 kilometers and contains seven years of glacier outflow released to the sea in a single event.

  9. Kodiak Island, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Running vertically between Alaska on the right and Russia on the left, the Bering Strait is mostly free of ice in this true-color MODIS image acquired from data captured on May 31, 2001. To the lower right of the image, a phytoplankton bloom appears to be occurring at the mouth of Norton Sound, and is coloring the darker water a bright bluish green. At the bottom center of the image is snow-covered St. Lawrence Island.

  10. Dauphin Island Sea Lab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dauphin Island Sea Lab is Alabama's marine education and research center. Lab also provides a public aquarium that focuses solely on the native eco-systems of the Mobile Bay estuary. Site provides information on graduate programs, undergraduate opportunities, faculty, facilities, and news and events. Explore the Education and Aquarium sections for teacher resources and information on workshops, student summer camps, and academic-year programs.

  11. Poetic Waves: Angel Island

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    While many visitors to San Francisco may be familiar with Alcatraz Island, they may be less familiar with the story of Angel Island, which is also located nearby. From 1910 to 1940, the island served as immigration station for newly arrived Asian American immigrants to the United States. While here, these people began to bond over their shared experiences, and also started to learn about the difficult time that they would face in this new land. This multimedia website pays tribute to their experiences through offering compelling information about this place through audio narration and music. As the title of the site suggests, visitors can read some of the poetry the immigrants carved into the barracks where they lived when they were being processed upon arrival. The website accurately suggests that â??â?¦there is no direct connection between them except for the languages, the time period, and place.â? Of course, visitors may wish to continue their visit to the site, by taking the online tour of the facility, which includes the hospital building, the pier, and the barracks.

  12. Islands behind Islands: An Unappreciated Coastal Landform Category

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. G. Cooper; O. H. Pilkey; D. A. Lewis

    COOPER, J.A.G., PILKEY, O.H., and LEWIS, D.A. 2007. Islands behind islands: an unappreciated coastal landform category. Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 907 - 911. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749-0208 The 15,000 plus barrier islands in sheltered or fetch-limited, nearshore marine waters have not achieved recognition as a distinct and important landform. As

  13. 75 FR 61993 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ...2120-AA66 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...description of the Class E airspace areas for Kwajalein Island, Bucholz AAF, Marshall Islands, RMI. The...

  14. 77 FR 34894 - Safety Zone; Bostock 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Long Island Sound; Manursing Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...Zone; Bostock 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Long Island Sound; Manursing Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound in the vicinity of Manursing Island, NY...

  15. 75 FR 28643 - Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges, Lee and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ...FWS-R4-R-2010-N051; 40136-1265-0000-S3] Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges...environmental assessment (Draft CCP/EA) for Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and...

  16. 77 FR 51473 - Safety Zone; Bostock 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Long Island Sound; Manursing Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ...Zone; Bostock 50th Anniversary Fireworks, Long Island Sound; Manursing Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final...temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound in the vicinity of Manursing Island, NY...

  17. 50 CFR Appendix E to Part 622 - Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas E Appendix...FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Pt. 622...Appendix E to Part 622—Caribbean Island/Island Group Management...

  18. 50 CFR Appendix E to Part 622 - Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas E Appendix...FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Pt. 622...Appendix E to Part 622—Caribbean Island/Island Group Management...

  19. The College of Staten Island Undergraduate Catalog

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Jay

    The College of Staten Island Undergraduate Catalog 2010-2011 2800 Victory Blvd Staten Island, NY 10314 718.982.2000 www.csi.cuny.edu Statement of Nondiscrimination The College of Staten Island of Staten Island/The City University of New York 2800 Victory Blvd, Staten Island, NY 10314 #12;About

  20. 76 FR 16636 - Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee NWRs, Lee County, FL; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ...FWS-R4-R-2010-N240; 40136-1265-0000-S3] Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and...for the environmental assessment for Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and...notice, we finalize the CCP process for Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay,...

  1. Island biogeography of the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Helmus, Matthew R; Mahler, D Luke; Losos, Jonathan B

    2014-09-25

    For centuries, biogeographers have examined the factors that produce patterns of biodiversity across regions. The study of islands has proved particularly fruitful and has led to the theory that geographic area and isolation influence species colonization, extinction and speciation such that larger islands have more species and isolated islands have fewer species (that is, positive species-area and negative species-isolation relationships). However, experimental tests of this theory have been limited, owing to the difficulty in experimental manipulation of islands at the scales at which speciation and long-distance colonization are relevant. Here we have used the human-aided transport of exotic anole lizards among Caribbean islands as such a test at an appropriate scale. In accord with theory, as anole colonizations have increased, islands impoverished in native species have gained the most exotic species, the past influence of speciation on island biogeography has been obscured, and the species-area relationship has strengthened while the species-isolation relationship has weakened. Moreover, anole biogeography increasingly reflects anthropogenic rather than geographic processes. Unlike the island biogeography of the past that was determined by geographic area and isolation, in the Anthropocene--an epoch proposed for the present time interval--island biogeography is dominated by the economic isolation of human populations. PMID:25254475

  2. Cognitive Constraints and Island Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeister, Philip; Sag, Ivan A.

    2012-01-01

    Competence-based theories of island effects play a central role in generative grammar, yet the graded nature of many syntactic islands has never been properly accounted for. Categorical syntactic accounts of island effects have persisted in spite of a wealth of data suggesting that island effects are not categorical in nature and that non-structural manipulations that leave island structures intact can radically alter judgments of island violations. We argue here, building on work by Deane, Kluender, and others, that processing factors have the potential to account for this otherwise unexplained variation in acceptability judgments. We report the results of self-paced reading experiments and controlled acceptability studies which explore the relationship between processing costs and judgments of acceptability. In each of the three self-paced reading studies, the data indicate that the processing cost of different types of island violations can be significantly reduced to a degree comparable to that of non-island filler-gap constructions by manipulating a single non-structural factor. Moreover, this reduction in processing cost is accompanied by significant improvements in acceptability. This evidence favors the hypothesis that island-violating constructions involve numerous processing pressures that aggregate to drive processing difficulty above a threshold so that a perception of unacceptability ensues. We examine the implications of these findings for the grammar of filler-gap dependencies.* PMID:22661792

  3. Racquel Maronde Location: North Island and South Island, New Zealand

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Racquel Maronde Location: North Island and South Island, New Zealand Term: January Term ESPM Track in New Zealand Visiting New Zealand was the most amazing experience of my life. You travel a lot and get to see every possible landscape of New Zealand - rainforests, mountains, caves, beaches, etc. The most we

  4. Islands of the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdeswell, Julian; Hambrey, Michael

    2002-11-01

    The Arctic islands are characterized by beautiful mountains and glaciers, in which the wildlife lives in delicate balance with its environment. It is a fragile region with a long history of exploration and exploitation that is now experiencing rapid environmental change. All of these themes are explored in Islands of the Arctic, a richly illustrated volume with superb photographs from the Canadian Arctic archipelago, Greenland, Svalbard and the Russian Arctic. It begins with the various processes shaping the landscape: glaciers, rivers and coastal processes, the role of ice in the oceans and the weather and climate. Julian Dowdeswell and Michael Hambrey describe the flora and fauna in addition to the human influences on the environment, from the sustainable approach of the Inuit, to the devastating damage inflicted by hunters and issues arising from the presence of military security installations. Finally, they consider the future prospects of the Arctic islands Julian Dowdeswell is Director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and Professor of Physical Geography at 0he University of Cambridge. He received the Polar Medal from Queen Elizabeth for his contributions to the study of glacier geophysics and the Gill Memorial Award from the Royal Geographical Society. He is chair of the Publications Committee of the International Glaciological Society and head of the Glaciers and Ice Sheets Division of the International Commission for Snow and Ice. Michael Hambrey is Director of the Centre for Glaciology at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. A past recipient of the Polar Medal, he was also given the Earth Science Editors' Outstanding Publication Award for Glaciers (Cambridge University Press). Hambrey is also the author of Glacial Environments (British Columbia, 1994).

  5. 27 CFR 9.170 - Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...section is “Long Island.” (b) Approved...boundary of the Long Island viticultural area are three United States Geological...Boundaries. The Long Island viticultural area includes...approximately 1,170 square miles or 749,146...

  6. 27 CFR 9.170 - Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...section is “Long Island.” (b) Approved...boundary of the Long Island viticultural area are three United States Geological...Boundaries. The Long Island viticultural area includes...approximately 1,170 square miles or 749,146...

  7. 27 CFR 9.170 - Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...section is “Long Island.” (b) Approved...boundary of the Long Island viticultural area are three United States Geological...Boundaries. The Long Island viticultural area includes...approximately 1,170 square miles or 749,146...

  8. 27 CFR 9.170 - Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...section is “Long Island.” (b) Approved...boundary of the Long Island viticultural area are three United States Geological...Boundaries. The Long Island viticultural area includes...approximately 1,170 square miles or 749,146...

  9. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  10. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  11. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  12. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  13. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  14. Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.S.; Shultz, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is divided into the following categories: Accident Overviews, Sequence and Causes; International Commentary and Reaction; Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Planning; Health Effects; Radioactive Releases and the Environment; Accident Investigations/Commissions; Nuclear Industry: Safety, Occupational, and Financial Issues; Media and Communications; Cleanup; Sociopolitical Response and Commentary; Restart; Legal Ramifications; Federal Documents: President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island; Federal Documents: Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Federal Documents: United States Department of Energy; Federal Documents: Miscellaneous Reports; Pennsylvania State Documents; Federal and State Hearings; and Popular Literature.

  15. Three Mile Island assessments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniels

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the accident which occurred at Three Mile Island Unit Two (TMI-2) near Middletown, Pennsylvania, including the radioactivity released, consequences of off-site releases, and subsequent cleanup activities. Population dose estimates are presented from exposure to ⁸⁸Kr, ¹³³Xe, \\/sup 133m\\/Xe, ¹³⁵Xe, \\/sup 135m\\/Xe, and ¹³¹I. Based on animal studies and careful calculations, the health effects group has determined that

  16. Urban heat island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hongsuk H.

    1991-01-01

    The phenomenon of urban heat island was investigated by the use of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data sets collected over the metropolitan area of Washington DC (U.S.). By combining the retrieved spectral albedos and temperatures, urban modification on radiation budgets of five surface categories were analyzed. The surface radiation budget imagery of the area show that urban heating is attributable to a large heat flux from the rapidly heating surfaces of asphalt, bare soil and short grass. In summer, symptoms of diurnal heating begin to appear by mid morning and can be about 10 degrees warmer than nearby woodlands in summer.

  17. Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This pair of MISR images of the Pine Island Glacier in western Antarctica was acquired on December 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 5246. At left is a conventional, true-color image from the downward-looking (nadir) camera. The false-color image at right is a composite of red band data taken by the MISR forward 60-degree, nadir, and aftward 60-degree cameras, displayed in red, green, and blue colors, respectively. Color variations in the left (true-color) image highlight spectral differences. In the multi-angle composite, on the other hand, color variations act as a proxy for differences in the angular reflectance properties of the scene. In this representation, clouds show up as light purple. Blue to orange gradations on the surface indicate a transition in ice texture from smooth to rough. For example, the bright orange 'carrot-like' features are rough crevasses on the glacier's tongue. In the conventional nadir view, the blue ice labeled 'rough crevasses' and 'smooth blue ice' exhibit similar coloration, but the multi-angle composite reveals their different textures, with the smoother ice appearing dark purple instead of orange. This could be an indicator of different mechanisms by which this ice is exposed. The multi-angle view also reveals subtle roughness variations on the frozen sea ice between the glacier and the open water in Pine Island Bay.

    To the left of the 'icebergs' label are chunks of floating ice. Additionally, smaller icebergs embedded in the frozen sea ice are visible below and to the right of the label. These small icebergs are associated with dark streaks. Analysis of the illumination geometry suggests that these streaks are surface features, not shadows. Wind-driven motion and thinning of the sea ice in the vicinity of the icebergs is one possible explanation.

    Recently, Robert Bindschadler, a glaciologist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center discovered in Landsat 7 imagery a newly-formed crack traversing the Pine Island Glacier. This crack is visible as an off-vertical dark line in the MISR nadir view. In the multi-angle composite, the crack and other stress fractures show up very clearly in bright orange. Radar observations of Pine Island Glacier in the 1990's showed the glacier to be shrinking, and the newly discovered crack is expected to eventually lead to the calving of a major iceberg.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  18. FIRST COMPLETE MIGRATION CYCLES FOR JUVENILE BALD EAGLES (HALIAEETUS LEUCOCEPHALUS) FROM LABRADOR DAWN K. LAING AND DAVID M. Brad Arian Science and Conservation Centre, McGill University, 2i, ii i Laheshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TONY E. CHUBBS

    We documented complete annual migratory cycles for five hatch-year Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from central Labrador, Canada. We attached backpack-mounted Platform Transmitter Ter- minals (PTT) to track hatch-year eagle movements from their natal areas. The median departure date from natal areas was 26 October 2002, with the earliest departure occurring on 7 October 2002 and the latest on 12 November

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall August 18, 2003 ­ December 4, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts........................................................................................................................ 16 TABLE OF FIGURES Figure 1 - Site location at Deer Island Outfall site. ......................

  20. The Theory of Island Biogeography

    E-print Network

    Landweber, Laura

    The Theory of Island Biogeography Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson The young biologists" dominated by the collection of data. In The Theory of Island Biogeography they set out to change that by devel- oping a general mathema- tical theory that would make sense of a key ecological problem

  1. Rethinking Easter Island's ecological catastrophe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terry L. Hunt

    2007-01-01

    Rapa Nui (Easter Island) has become a paragon for prehistoric human induced ecological catastrophe and cultural collapse. A popular narrative recounts an obsession for monumental statuary that led to the island's ecological devastation and the collapse of the ancient civilization. Scholars offer this story as a parable of today's global environmental problems. In this paper, I review new and emerging

  2. south georgia & the falkland islands

    E-print Network

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    ANTARCTICA south georgia & the falkland islands Aboard the Clipper Adventurer January 13 ­ February Carcass Island Dear Princetonian © Peter Harrison is Antarctic expedition is ideally timed during into the natural wonders and historic legacy along the way. For Antarctica history buffs, birders, photographers

  3. Okhotskia: International Sakhalin Island Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website presents the International Sakhalin Island Project (ISIP), "an international collaboration of American, Russian, and Japanese scientists to survey the plants, lichens, mosses, liverworts, fungi, insects, spiders, freshwater and terrestrial mollusks, freshwater fishes, amphibians, and reptiles of Sakhalin Island." The website was developed primarily "to provide easy access to project results and databases, both for participants and other interested scientists." Site visitors can link to the project proposal- submitted by the University of Washington, Russian Academy of Sciences, and Hokkaido University- for descriptions of project objectives, anticipated future research, references cited, and more. Links are also provided to project Results including ISIP databases, publications, and NSF reports for ISIP and the Phase One Okhotskia project: the International Kuril Island Project (IKIP). The Sakhalin Island Info page is currently under construction but will eventually feature sections on Lichens, Macrofungi, Mayflies (Ephemeroptera), and many more. The website also offers a small photo gallery with beautiful photographs from Sakhalin Island.

  4. Okhotskia: International Sakhalin Island Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website presents the International Sakhalin Island Project (ISIP), "an international collaboration of American, Russian, and Japanese scientists to survey the plants, lichens, mosses, liverworts, fungi, insects, spiders, freshwater and terrestrial mollusks, freshwater fishes, amphibians, and reptiles of Sakhalin Island." The website was developed primarily "to provide easy access to project results and databases, both for participants and other interested scientists." Site visitors can link to the project proposal submitted by the University of Washington, Russian Academy of Sciences, and Hokkaido University for descriptions of project objectives, anticipated future research, references cited, and more. Links are also provided to project Results including ISIP databases, publications, and NSF reports for ISIP and the Phase One Okhotskia project: the International Kuril Island Project (IKIP). The Sakhalin Island Info page is currently under construction but will ev entually feature sections on Lichens, Macrofungi, Mayflies (Ephemeroptera), and many more. The website also offers a small photo gallery with beautiful photographs from Sakhalin Island.

  5. Drawdown Episodes of the Labrador-Quebec Ice Dome Through Ungava Bay During Heinrich Events? Insights From the Sediment Sources of Ice Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M.; Hemming, S. R.; Parent, M.; Machlus, M.

    2007-12-01

    Glacial terrains surrounding the Ungava Bay region are characterized by abundant drumlins, crag-and-tails, and other lineations indicating convergent ice flow towards the bay. These geomorphologic features have been interpreted to represent a complex network of fast-flowing ice (ice streams), which drained the eastern sector (Labrador-Quebec ice dome) of the Laurentide ice sheet at some time during the last glacial cycle. It was recently proposed that the Ungava Bay ice streams may be responsible for the massive iceberg discharges in the North Atlantic that are at the origin of Heinrich events (e.g. Jansson et al., Boreas, v. 32, p. 256, 2003). Several other provenance studies have attributed the characteristic high detrital carbonate content of these anomalously thick layers of ice rafted deposits (IRD) to a calving ice margin that overrode the carbonate-floored Hudson Bay/Strait, while lead isotopes and 40Ar/39Ar ages measured on feldspar and hornblende grains have identified the rock-source area of Heinrich layers as being the Paleoproterozoic Churchill province of the Canadian Shield. Although the Laurentide ice sheet was unequivocally the main contributor of detrital material to Heinrich layers, the exact sector of the Laurentide ice sheet that collapsed and drained through Hudson Strait has yet to be identified, and is currently ascribed to the broader Hudson Bay/Strait region. Here we evaluate the possible contribution of the Labrador-Quebec ice dome to these iceberg discharges by documenting the provenance of glacial sediments (tills) representing the catchment (source) area of the Ungava Bay ice streams. Specifically, we used the 40Ar/39Ar fusion method to date about 10 individual hornblende grains in 13 samples distributed along a latitudinal transect (lat. 58°) extending east and west of Ungava Bay. We also date hornblende grains from IRD and bounding sediments in a North Atlantic deep-sea core (Orphan Knoll) to evaluate whether the provenance signature of Ungava Bay glacial deposits can be recognized in sediments spanning the time interval comprised between H4 to H0. The results show that most tills located east of Ungava Bay are characterized by grains with early Paleoproterozoic ages (2.0 to 1.8 Ga), with a few till samples containing a small population of grains with Archean ages (>2.6 Ga). Tills west of Ungava Bay are largely dominated by Archean-age grains. These results contrast with the predominant late Paleoproterozoic 40Ar/39Ar ages (1.8 to 1.6 Ga) that characterize hornblende grains in typical Heinrich layers, thereby indicating that drawdown episodes of the Labrador-Quebec ice dome through Ungava Bay during Heinrich events are unlikely. Hornblende grains from marine deposits are currently being analyzed and the results should provide information on when these ice streams were active during the last glaciation.

  6. Island tameness: living on islands reduces flight initiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, William E.; Pyron, R. Alexander; Garland, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    One of Darwin's most widely known conjectures is that prey are tame on remote islands, where mammalian predators are absent. Many species appear to permit close approach on such islands, but no comparative studies have demonstrated reduced wariness quantified as flight initiation distance (FID; i.e. predator–prey distance when the prey begins to flee) in comparison with mainland relatives. We used the phylogenetic comparative method to assess influence of distance from the mainland and island area on FID of 66 lizard species. Because body size and predator approach speed affect predation risk, we included these as independent variables. Multiple regression showed that FID decreases as distance from mainland increases and is shorter in island than mainland populations. Although FID increased as area increased in some models, collinearity made it difficult to separate effects of area from distance and island occupancy. FID increases as SVL increases and approach speed increases; these effects are statistically independent of effects of distance to mainland and island occupancy. Ordinary least-squares models fit the data better than phylogenetic regressions, indicating little or no phylogenetic signal in residual FID after accounting for the independent variables. Our results demonstrate that island tameness is a real phenomenon in lizards. PMID:24403345

  7. SRTM Anaglyph: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930s. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This shaded relief anaglyph image was generated using preliminary topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data from the top (north) to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. The stereoscopic effect was created by first draping the shaded relief image back over the topographic data and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    This image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (about 200 feet) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 192 km (119 miles) x 142 km (88 miles) Location: 17.8 deg. South lat., 178.0 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA

  8. Global Collembola on Deception Island

    PubMed Central

    Greenslade, Penelope; Potapov, Mikhail; Russell, David; Convey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Three new non-indigenous springtail species are recorded in recent collections made on Deception Island, South Shetland Islands, maritime Antarctic: Deuteraphorura (Deuteraphorura) cebennaria (Gisin) (Collembola: Onychiuridae), Mesaphorura macrochaeta Rusek (Tullbergiidae), and Proisotoma minuta Axelson (Isotomidae). One of these, D. (D.) cebennaria, is described. Additionally, two new indigenous species, Mesaphorura macrochaeta Rusek and Proisotoma minuta Axelson, are also recorded. The total number of Collembola species now known from the island is 14, comprised of eight native species and six non-indigenous species. This number of non-indigenous species recorded at Deception Island compares with only a single non-indigenous springtail recorded at any other maritime or continental Antarctic location. The reason underlying this high level of occurrence of non-indigenous species on Deception Island is likely to be a combination of the island's high level of human visitation and the presence of relatively benign terrestrial habitats associated with areas of geothermal activity. Two of the new records represent species recently assessed as being of the highest risk to become invaders in the less extreme environments of the subantarctic, thereby emphasising the importance and urgency of adopting and applying effective biosecurity measures to protect the unique and vulnerable ecosystems of this region. Also documented are the impacts on the soil fauna of the island from human trampling, which drastically reduced densities of both native and non-indigenous species to 1% of the abundance typical of non-trampled sites. PMID:23438196

  9. Clean Waters of Rhode Island Primary Investigators

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Clean Waters of Rhode Island Primary Investigators Harold Knickle Donald Gray #12;Final Report Clean Waters of Rhode Island By Harold Knickle and Donald Gray Department of Chemical Engineering University of Rhode Island Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 May 2007 #12;Abstract There were two thrusts

  10. Origin of barrier islands on sandy coasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1990-01-01

    Many barrier islands on the coasts of the Gulf of Mexico contain one or more nuclei; island growth has taken place more or less seaward from these nuclei, which are the oldest parts of the islands. The nuclei were, at one time, separate islands; the oldest beach ridges wrap around them on two or three sides, showing that they were

  11. Stable C and N isotopic composition of cold-water corals from the Newfoundland and Labrador continental slope: Examination of trophic, depth and spatial effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Owen A.; Jamieson, Robyn E.; Edinger, Evan N.; Wareham, Vonda E.

    2008-10-01

    With the aim of understanding of the trophic ecology of cold-water corals, this paper explores the tissue ?13C and ?15N values of 11 'coral' species (8 alcyonacean, 1 antipatharian, 1 pennatulacean, 1 scleractinian) collected along the Newfoundland and Labrador continental slope. Isotopic results delimit species along continua of trophic level and food lability. With an isotopic signature similar to macrozooplankton, Paragorgia arborea occupies the lowest trophic level and most likely feeds on fresh phytodetritus. Primnoa resedaeformis occupies a slightly higher trophic level, likely supplementing its diet with microzooplankton. Bathypathes arctica, Pennatulacea and other alcyonaceans ( Acanella arbuscula, Acanthogorgia armata, Anthomastus grandiflorus, Duva florida, Keratoisis ornata, Paramuricea sp.) had higher ?13C and ?15N values, suggesting these species feed at higher trophic levels and on a greater proportion of more degraded POM. Flabellum alabastrum had an isotopic signature similar to that of snow crab, indicating a primarily carnivorous diet. Isotopic composition did not vary significantly over a depth gradient of 50-1400 m. Coral ?13C increased slightly (<1‰) from the Hudson Strait to the southern Grand Banks, but ?15N did not. By modulating the availability and quality of suspended foods, substrate likely exerts a primary influence on the feeding habits of cold-water corals.

  12. The Three Mile Island Disaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Emeral

    1980-01-01

    For the past decade, education has been experiencing meltdown, explosions, radiation leaks, heat pollution, and management crises, just like the Three Mile Island disaster. This article offers suggestions on how to deal with these problems. (Author/LD)

  13. Vanishing Island: Sea Level Rise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Massy Halbert

    This video features interviews with native people living on atoll islands in Micronesia, so viewers are able to understand the real, current threats that these people are facing due to climate change.

  14. Wild Ponies on Assateague Island

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wild ponies on Assateague Island. Wild ponies have lived on Assateague since the 1600s, although how they were introduced to Assateague is still debated. There are now around 300 or so wild ponies in Maryland and Virginia....

  15. Synthesizing knowledge of ocean islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, Anne J.; Lees, Jonathan M.; McClinton, Tim

    2011-11-01

    AGU Chapman Conference on the Galápagos as a Laboratory for the Earth Sciences; Puerto Ayora, Galápagos, Ecuador, 25-30 July 2011 An inspiration for Darwin's theory of evolution, the Galápagos Islands and surrounding waters are a natural laboratory for a wide range of Earth science topics. The Galápagos are perfectly situated for geophysical and geochemical investigations of deep-Earth processes at a hot spot, and proximity to a spreading center allows exploration of hot spot-ridge interactions. Several highly active volcanoes show rapid deformation facilitating investigation of melt transport paths and volcanic structure. The islands exhibit a range of ages, eruptive styles, and climatic zones that allow analysis of hydrogeologic and geomorphic processes. The Galápagos Islands are a World Heritage Site and are an ideal setting for developing an integrated biological and geological understanding of ocean island evolution.

  16. Upolu Island, Western Samoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Island nations in the South Pacific Ocean experience natural disasters associated with typhoons, and with their proximity to the Pacific Ocean's 'Ring of Fire.' This radar image shows the western end of the island of Upolu in the nation of Western Samoa. Disaster managers use digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from radar data to assist in research toward disaster mitigation and management. Geologists also use DEM data of volcanic features, such as the circular craters in this image, to study eruption rates and volumes, and volcanic landform evolution.

    Black areas near the top of the image are areas where steep topography causes holes in the data; these holes can be filled in by collecting data at other look directions. Color represents topography and intensity represents across-section of the radar backscatter. Since rough areas return more of the incident signal, they appear brighter on the image than relatively smooth areas, such as the ocean surface at the top of the image.

    This image was acquired by the AIRborne Synthetic Aperture (AIRSAR) radar instrument aboard a DC-8 aircraft operated out of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. AIRSAR collects fully polarimetric data at three wavelengths; C-band (0.057 meter), L-band (0.25 meter) and P-band (0.68 meter). AIRSAR also collects cross-track and along track interferometric data that results in topographic measurements and motion detection, respectively.

    This image was collected during the Pacific Rim mission, a three-month mission from July to October 2000 that collected data at over 200 sites in eighteen countries and territories around the Pacific Rim. AIRSAR is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.

    Size: 10 km (6.2 miles) x 10 km (6.2 miles) Location: 14.02 deg. North lat., 171.52 deg. West Orientation: North at top Date Acquired: August 10, 2000

  17. Upolu Island, Western Samoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Island nations in the South Pacific Ocean experience natural disasters associated with typhoons, and with their proximity to the Pacific Ocean's 'Ring of Fire.' This radar image shows most of the northern coast of the island of Upolu in the nation of Western Samoa. Disaster managers use digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from radar data to assist in research toward disaster mitigation and management. Geologists also use DEM data of volcanic features, such as the line of circular craters in this image, to study eruption rates and volumes, and volcanic landform evolution. The capital of Western Samoa, Apia, is in the lower left of the image.

    Angular black areas in the image are areas where steep topography causes holes in the data; these holes can be filled in by collecting data at other look directions. Color represents topography and intensity represents across-section of the radar backscatter. Since rough areas return more of the incident signal, they appear brighter on the image than relatively smooth areas, such as the ocean surface , along the left side of the image.

    This image was acquired by the AIRborne Synthetic Aperture (AIRSAR) radar instrument aboard a DC-8 aircraft operated out of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. AIRSAR collects fully polarimetric data at three wavelengths; C-band (0.057 meter), L-band (0.25 meter) and P-band (0.68 meter). AIRSAR also collects cross-track and along track interferometric data that results in topographic measurements and motion detection, respectively.

    This image was collected during the Pacific Rim mission, a three-month mission from July to October 2000 that collected data at over 200 sites in eighteen countries and territories around the Pacific Rim. AIRSAR is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C.

    Size: 10 km (6.2 miles) x 63 km (37.3 miles) Location: 14.16 deg. North lat., 171.75 deg. West Orientation: North towards the left side of image Date Acquired: August 10, 2000

  18. SOUTHERN SEASCRUISE IN LUXURY ABOARD CRYSTAL SYMPHONY Easter Island | Pitcairn Island | Moora | Tahiti

    E-print Network

    Liu, Taosheng

    SOUTHERN SEASCRUISE IN LUXURY ABOARD CRYSTAL SYMPHONY Easter Island | Pitcairn Island | Mooréa ethnologist, 1859-1920, "Easter Island," 1912 "Tahiti is lovely; the climate is perfect... The world actually

  19. 76 FR 19781 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, San Juan, Skagit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ...Service [FWS-R1-R-2010-N222; 10137-1265-0000 S3] Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, San Juan, Skagit, Island, and Whatcom Counties, WA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan,...

  20. 78 FR 63860 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...2120-AA66 Amendment of Class D Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...SUMMARY: This action amends the Kwajalein Island Class D airspace description by amending the...

  1. Three Mile Island revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Lipford, B.L.; Cole, N.M.; Friderichs, T.J. (MPR Associates Inc., Washington, DC (US))

    1991-01-01

    As a result of the accident in March 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel sustained significant internal damage. Approximately half of the reactor core suffered some degree of melting, with 10 to 20 tons of molten core material relocating inside the vessel and flowing down onto the reactor vessel's lower head. The resulting damage and the margin to failure of the lower head are of interest to the nuclear industry. In early 1988 the owner and operator of the TMI facility, had completed a large portion of the defueling work in the reactor core region and was preparing to remove the lower structural internals in order to defuel the area within the lower head. At that point the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (NRC-Res) in Washington, D.C., initiated a project to remove metallurgical specimens from the reactor vessel's lower head region. The goal was to determine the extent of damage to the pressure-retaining boundary in the lower head and to learn what happened during the accident.

  2. Bird predation by domestic cats on Hahajima Island, Bonin Islands, Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuto Kawakami; Hiroyoshi Higuchi

    \\u000a The Bonin Islands are oceanic islands situated in the northwest Pacific Ocean 1,000 km south of the Japanese main island of\\u000a Honshu. These islands lacked terrestrial mammalian carnivores until human colonization in 1830. Early immigrants introduced\\u000a domestic cats Felis earns to the islands, some of which escaped from the island's residential area. Even by 1877 there were already reports of

  3. Treeline Dynamics on Southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia

    E-print Network

    Smith, Dan

    Vancouver Island marmot. Keywords: dendroecology, subalpine meadows, seedling establishment, tree rings, Vancouver Island, Vancouver Island marmot. *Corresponding author Western Geography, 10/11(2000/01), pp. 43

  4. OUTERBRIDGE CROSSING BRIDGE IN PERSPECTIVE, STATEN ISLAND ON RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OUTERBRIDGE CROSSING BRIDGE IN PERSPECTIVE, STATEN ISLAND ON RIGHT - Outerbridge Crossing Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  5. Mammals evolve faster on smaller islands.

    PubMed

    Millien, Virginie

    2011-07-01

    Island mammals often display remarkable evolutionary changes in size and morphology. Both theory and empirical data support the hypothesis that island mammals evolve at faster rates than their mainland congeners. It is also often assumed that the island effect is stronger and that evolution is faster on the smallest islands. I used a dataset assembled from the literature to test these assumptions for the first time. I show that mammals on smaller islands do indeed evolve more rapidly than mammals on larger islands, and also evolve by a greater amount. These results fit well the theory of an evolutionary burst due to the opening of new ecological opportunities on islands. This evolutionary burst is expected to be the strongest on the smallest islands where the contrast between the island and the mainland environments is the most dramatic. PMID:21729049

  6. Bryophytes from Simeonof Island in the Shumagin Islands, southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, W.B.; Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    Simeonof Island is located south of the Alaska Peninsula in the hyperoceanic sector of the middle boreal subzone. We examined the bryoflora of Simeonof Island to determine species composition in an area where no previous collections had been reported. This field study was conducted in sites selected to represent the spectrum of environmental variation within Simeonof Island. Data were analyzed using published reports to compare bryophyte distribution patterns at three levels, the Northern Hemisphere, North America, and Alaska. A total of 271 bryophytes were identified: 202 mosses and 69 liverworts. The annotated list of species for Simeonof Island expands the known range for many species and fills distribution gaps within Hulte??n's Western Pacific Coast district. Maps and notes on the distribution of 14 significant distribution records are presented. Compared with bryophyte distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the bryoflora of Simeonof Island primarily includes taxa of boreal (55%), temperate (20%), arctic (10%), and cosmopolitan (8%) distribution; 6% of the moss flora are western North America endemics. A description of the bryophytes present in the vegetation and habitat types is provided as is a quantitative analysis of the most frequently occurring bryophytes in crowberry heath.

  7. Craton reactivation on the Labrador Sea margins: 40Ar/ 39Ar age and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope constraints from alkaline and carbonatite intrusives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, Sebastian; Foley, Stephen F.; Stracke, Andreas; Romer, Rolf L.; Kjarsgaard, Bruce A.; Heaman, Larry M.; Joyce, Nancy

    2007-04-01

    The once-contiguous North Atlantic craton (NAC) is crosscut by the Labrador Sea that opened during the Early Cenozoic after extensive Mesozoic continental rifting and removal of cratonic mantle. This large-scale structural change within the cratonic lithosphere was followed at about 150 Ma by the cessation of ultrapotassic and potassic-to-carbonatitic magma production, which had prevailed throughout much of the NAC history. At Aillik Bay, a sequence of olivine lamproites (1374.2 ± 4.2 Ma, 2 ?), aillikites/carbonatites (590-555 Ma), and nephelinites (141.6 ± 1.0 Ma, 2 ?) erupted through the southern NAC edge on the present-day Labrador Sea margin. Links between these alkaline magma types with diverse petrogeneses as a consequence of large-scale processes in the lithospheric mantle over a period of 1200 Myr are demonstrated utilizing their Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope compositions. The Mesoproterozoic olivine lamproites are characterized by unradiogenic Nd ( ?Nd( i) = - 8.4 to - 5.4), Hf ( ?Hf( i) = - 11 to - 7.8), and Pb ( 206Pb/ 204Pb ( i) = 14.2-14.8) but moderately radiogenic Sr isotope compositions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr ( i) = 0.7047-0.7062) fingerprinting long-term enriched cratonic mantle, which must have reached to depths of more than 150 km at this time. In contrast, Neoproterozoic carbonate-rich aillikites and carbonatites have fairly radiogenic Nd ( ?Nd( i) = 0.1-1.8), Hf ( ?Hf( i) = - 0.9 to + 2.6), and Pb ( 206Pb/ 204Pb ( i) = 17.5-18.8) but unradiogenic Sr isotope compositions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr ( i) = 0.7033-0.7046) that point to the involvement of convective upper mantle material during melting. Simple binary mixing calculations coupled with the observation that carbonate-rich magmatism prevailed for over 30 Myr in the area imply a complex pattern of lithosphere-asthenosphere interaction at depths between ˜180 and 140 km. The Cretaceous nephelinites have slightly unradiogenic Nd ( ?Nd( i) = - 4 to - 1.4), moderately radiogenic initial 87Sr/ 86Sr (0.7044-0.7062), but initial ?Hf (- 3.3 to + 1.4) similar to the aillikites and highly radiogenic Pb ( 206Pb/ 204Pb ( i) = 19.1-20.2) isotope compositions. Their sodic mafic alkaline nature reflects partial melting at a higher level of the cratonic mantle tapping metasomatic components that had been introduced during the > 30 Myr of Neoproterozoic aillikite/carbonatite magmatism. The new 40Ar/ 39Ar age and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope data, along with petrological arguments, suggest that at least 30 km of the cratonic mantle beneath the southern NAC edge had been replaced by the hotter upwelling asthenosphere between ca. 550 Ma, when a thick diamond-bearing lithosphere was present, and 150 Ma. This lithospheric thinning presumably occurred shortly prior to Cretaceous continental rifting in response to enhanced plate-tectonic stresses focused at this zone of persistent lithospheric weakness. It appears, however, that the recurrent volatile-rich alkaline magmatism and associated mantle metasomatism played an important role in destroying the structural integrity of the cratonic mantle thereby aiding the subsequent lithosphere thinning.

  8. Perspective View of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is a perspective view of Umnak Island, one of Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The active Okmok volcano appears in the center of the island.

    The image was created by draping a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image over a digital elevation mosaic derived from Airsar data.

    This work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Perspective View of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is a perspective view of Umnak Island, one of Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The active Okmok volcano appears in the center of the island.

    The image was created by draping a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image over a digital elevation mosaic derived from Airsar data.

    This work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Effect of dietary moisture and sodium content on urine composition and calcium oxalate relative supersaturation in healthy miniature schnauzers and labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, A E; Hynds, W K; Markwell, P J

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this series of studies was to evaluate two possible feeding strategies as methods for reducing the risk of calcium oxalate (CaOx) formation in two breeds of healthy dog. The studies compared the effect of dietary moisture (Study 1) and dietary sodium (Na), (Study 2) on urine composition of labrador retrievers (LR) and miniature schnauzers (MS). A nutritionally complete dry dog food was fed to 16 dogs (eight LR, eight MS; Study 1) and 15 dogs (seven LR, eight MS; Study 2) for 24 days (Study 1), or 36 days (Study 2). The dogs were fed the diet alone (7% moisture, 0.06 g Na/100 kcal), or supplemented with deionised water to 73% moisture (Study 1), or dietary Na, to deliver 0.20 or 0.30 g Na per 100 kcal (Study 2). Urine pH, volume, specific gravity, and concentrations of 12 analytes were measured for each dog. Urinary relative supersaturations (RSS) with CaOx were calculated from these values. The effects of supplemental Na or water were established using t tests (Study 1) or analysis of variance, and multiple range tests (least significant difference) (Study 2); P<0.05 was considered significant. Increasing dietary moisture significantly increased total moisture intake (P=0.001), and reduced urine specific gravity (P=0.003), urinary oxalate concentration (P=0.04), and CaOx relative supersaturation (P=0.04) in the MS. Urinary parameters remained unchanged in the LR, indicating that feeding a high moisture diet may reduce the risk of CaOx formation in high-risk breeds. Increasing dietary Na led to production of urine with a significantly lower CaOx RSS in both breeds, indicating that sodium supplementation to dry diet formats may reduce the risk of CaOx formation. These feeding strategies should be considered when evaluating methods for preventing CaOx formation within high-risk groups. PMID:12589739

  11. Dietary N-nitroso compounds and risk of colorectal cancer: a case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Wang, Peizhon Peter; Zhao, Jing; Green, Roger; Sun, Zhuoyu; Roebothan, Barbara; Squires, Josh; Buehler, Sharon; Dicks, Elizabeth; Zhao, Jinhui; Cotterchio, Michelle; Campbell, Peter T; Jain, Meera; Parfrey, Patrick S; Mclaughlin, John R

    2014-03-28

    Several N-nitroso compounds (NOC) have been shown to be carcinogenic in a variety of laboratory animals, but evidence of their carcinogenicity in humans is lacking. We aimed to examine the association between NOC intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and possible effect modification by vitamins C and E and protein in a large case-control study carried out in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada. A total of 1760 case patients with pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma and 2481 population controls were asked to complete a self-administered FFQ to evaluate their dietary intakes 1 year before diagnosis (for cases) or interview (for controls). Adjusted OR and 95 % CI were calculated across the quintiles of NOC (measured by N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)) intake and relevant food items using unconditional logistic regression. NDMA intake was found to be associated with a higher risk of CRC (highest v. lowest quintiles: OR 1·42, 95 % CI 1·03, 1·96; P for trend = 0·005), specifically for rectal carcinoma (OR 1·61, 95 % CI 1·11, 2·35; P for trend = 0·01). CRC risk also increased with the consumption of NDMA-containing meats when the highest tertile was compared with the lowest tertile (OR 1·47, 95 % CI 1·03, 2·10; P for trend = 0·20). There was evidence of effect modification between dietary vitamin E and NDMA. Individuals with high NDMA and low vitamin E intakes had a significantly increased risk than those with both low NDMA and low vitamin E intakes (OR 3·01, 95 % CI 1·43, 6·51; P for interaction = 0·017). The present results support the hypothesis that NOC intake may be positively associated with CRC risk in humans. Vitamin E, which inhibits nitrosation, could modify the effect of NDMA on CRC risk. PMID:24160559

  12. Comparison of remote sensing reflectance from above-water and in-water measurements west of Greenland, Labrador Sea, Denmark Strait, and west of Iceland.

    PubMed

    Garaba, Shungudzemwoyo P; Zielinski, Oliver

    2013-07-01

    The need to obtain ocean color essential climate variables (OC-ECVs) using hyperspectral technology has gained increased interest in recent years. Assessing ocean color on a large scale in high latitude environments using satellite remote sensing is constrained by polar environmental conditions. Nevertheless, on a small scale we can assess ocean color using above-water and in-water remote sensing. Unfortunately, above-water remote sensing can only determine apparent optical properties leaving the sea surface and is susceptible to near surface environmental conditions for example sky and sunglint. Consequently, we have to rely on accurate in-water remote sensing as it can provide both synoptic inherent and apparent optical properties of seawater. We use normalized water leaving radiance LWN or the equivalent remote sensing reflectance RRS from 27 stations to compare the differences in above-water and in-water OC-ECVs. Analysis of above-water and in-water RRS spectra provided very good match-ups (R2 > 0.97, MSE < 1.8*10(-7)) for all stations. The unbiased percent differences (UPD) between above-water and in-water approaches were determined at common OC-ECVs spectral bands (410, 440, 490, 510 and 555) nm and the classic band ratio (490/555) nm. The spectral average UPD ranged (5 - 110) % and band ratio UPD ranged (0 - 12) %, the latter showing that the 5% uncertainty threshold for ocean color radiometric products is attainable. UPD analysis of these stations West of Greenland, Labrador Sea, Denmark Strait and West of Iceland also suggests that the differences observed are likely a result of environmental and instrumental perturbations. PMID:23842380

  13. Terrestrial ecosystem recovery following removal of a PCB point source at a former pole vault line radar station in Northern Labrador.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Sarah A; Luttmer, Carol; Zeeb, Barbara A; Reimer, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    Saglek Bay (LAB-2), located on the northeast coast of Labrador is a former Polevault station that was operated by the U.S. Air Force from 1953 to 1971 when it was abandoned. An environmental assessment carried out in 1996 determined that the site was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with concentrations in soils far exceeding the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency (CEPA) regulation of 50 ?g/g in three areas of the site (Beach, Site Summit, Antenna Hill). This led to remediation work carried out between 1999 and 2004 to remove and/or isolate all PCB-contaminated soil exceeding 50 ?g/g and to further remediate parts of the site to <5 ?g/g PCBs. In this study, spatial and temporal trends of PCB concentrations in soil, vegetation (Betula glandulosa and Salix spp.), and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were investigated over a period of fourteen (1997-2011) years in an effort to track ecosystem recovery following the removal of the PCB point sources. The data collected shows that PCB levels in vegetation samples are approximately four times lower in 2011 than pre-remediation in 1997. Similarly, PCB concentrations in deer mice in 2011 are approximately three times lower than those measured in 1997/98. Spatial trends in vegetation and deer mice continue to demonstrate that areas close to the former point sources of PCBs have higher PCB concentrations than those further away (and higher than background levels) and these residual PCB levels are not likely to decrease in the foreseeable future given the persistent nature of PCBs in general in the environment, and in particular in cold climates. PMID:23712118

  14. Assessing the validity of a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in the adult population of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Food- Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) is a dietary assessment tool frequently used in large-scale nutritional epidemiology studies. The goal of the present study is to validate a self-administered version of the Hawaii FFQ modified for use in the general adult population of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Methods Over a one year period, 195 randomly selected adults completed four 24-hour dietary recalls (24-HDRs) by telephone and one subsequent self-administered FFQ. Estimates of energy and nutrients derived from the 24-HDRs and FFQs were compared (protein, carbohydrate, fibre, fat, vitamin A, carotene, vitamin D, and calcium). Data were analyzed using the Pearson’s correlation coefficients, cross-classification method, and Bland–Altman plots. Results The mean nutrient intake values of the 24-HDRs were lower than those of the FFQs, except for protein in men. Sex and energy-adjusted de-attenuated Pearson correlation coefficients for each nutrient varied from 0.13 to 0.61. Except for protein in men, all correlations were statistically significant with p?

  15. Distribution and feeding of Benthosema glaciale in the western Labrador Sea: Fish-zooplankton interaction and the consequence to calanoid copepod populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated the distribution of major calanoid copepods in the western Labrador Sea in relation to that of the myctophid Benthosema glaciale, and investigated patterns of prey composition and feeding periodicity by the latter to assess the potential impact of mesopelagic fish on copepod populations that reside in the deep ocean. Hydroacoustic surveys indicated that B. glaciale and the deep-scattering layer are widely distributed throughout the region with limited evidence of patchiness, with an average abundance of 6 fish m-2 and biomass of 9.3 g m-2. There was clear evidence of diurnal variations in feeding activity that was achieved through vertical migration from several hundred meters depths to the surface layer. B. glaciale fed principally on calanoid copepods, with prey size dependent on the length of the fish but the relative variability in prey size was independent of predator length. Average rations were generally less than 1% of body weight per day, and the patterns of diurnal vertical migration by myctophids suggest that individuals fed once every two days rather than daily. The estimated mortality caused by B. glaciale on the calanoid populations, which considers most sources of uncertainty, ranged from 0.002 to 1.8% d-1, with the mid-point of these estimates being ˜0.15% d-1, which is well below the estimated mortality rates of 10-20% d-1 based on vertical life tables. From observations from this and other ecosystems, understanding and contrasting the drivers of population dynamics and productivity of calanoid copepods in different deep basins of the North Atlantic will likely require a more comprehensive characterization of the plankton and pelagic and oceanic fish faunas of the epipelagic and mesopelagic zones and their trophic relationships and interactions.

  16. Thermal island destabilization and the Greenwald limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.; Gates, D. A.; Brennan, D. P.

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic reconnection is ubiquitous in the magnetosphere, the solar corona, and in toroidal fusion research discharges. In a fusion device, a magnetic island saturates at a width which produces a minimum in the magnetic energy of the configuration. At saturation, the modified current density profile, a function of the flux in the island, is essentially flat, the growth rate proportional to the difference in the current at the O-point and the X-point. Further modification of the current density profile in the island interior causes a change in the island stability and additional growth or contraction of the saturated island. Because field lines in an island are isolated from the outside plasma, an island can heat or cool preferentially depending on the balance of Ohmic heating and radiation loss in the interior, changing the resistivity and hence the current in the island. A simple model of island destabilization due to radiation cooling of the island is constructed, and the effect of modification of the current within an island is calculated. An additional destabilization effect is described, and it is shown that a small imbalance of heating can lead to exponential growth of the island. A destabilized magnetic island near the plasma edge can lead to plasma loss, and because the radiation is proportional to plasma density and charge, this effect can cause an impurity dependent density limit.

  17. 3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH ELEVATION IN UNALTERED CONDITION. DATED MARCH 19, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 61, Rodman Avenue & First Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  18. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. LOOKING NORTH AFTER ADDITION OF CONICAL ROOF. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1887. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 53, North Avenue North of Midpoint, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  19. 11. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. BASEMENT, SHOWING ORIGINAL OPEN INTERIOR PLAN. DATED APRIL 7, 1942. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 56, North Avenue & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  20. 10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST. DATED OCTOBER 2, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 138, Second Avenue between South Avenue & Ramsey Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  1. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. INTERIOR AFTER REMODELING INTO OFFICE SPACE. DATED FEBRUARY 13, 1943. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 67, Rodman Avenue & Fourth Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  2. 8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH ELEVATON IN UNALTERED CONDITION. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 68, Rodman Avenue between Fourth Street & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  3. 10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS IN UNALTERED CONDITION. DATED APRIL 18, 1941. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 56, North Avenue & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  4. 3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH ELEVATION IN UNALTERED CONDITION. DATED NOVEMBER 21, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 103, Rodman Avenue & First Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  5. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS. DATED NOVEMBER 21, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 108, Rodman Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  6. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH ELEVATION IN UNALTERED CONDITION. DATED NOVEMBER 21, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 109, Rodman Avenue & Fourth Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  7. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST ELEVATION IN UNALTERED CONDITION. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 280, Sylvan Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  8. 9. Photograph of photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photograph of photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST AND NORTH ELEVATIONS. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1887. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  9. 7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS. DATED MARCH 19, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 62, Rodman Avenue between First & Second Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  10. WAKE ISLAND AIRFIELD TERMINAL, BUILDING 1502 LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WAKE ISLAND AIRFIELD TERMINAL, BUILDING 1502 LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT NORTHWEST FAÇADE AND BLAST WALL, DATE UNKNOWN - Wake Island Airfield, Terminal Building, West Side of Wake Avenue, Wake Island, Wake Island, UM

  11. 11. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 360, Gillespie Avenue between Rodman Avenue & North Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. 21. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. ORIGINAL HORIZONTAL SHAFTING OF GENERAL ELECTRIC GENERATORS. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN 1905. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 160, Sylvan Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  13. Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center (PIERC) is part of the Biological Division of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The mission of PIERC is to provide the scientific understanding and technologies needed to support the sound management and conservation of our Nation's biological resources occurring within the cultural, sociological, and political contexts of the State of Hawaii. The geographical isolation of the Hawaiian Islands has resulted in the evolution of a highly endemic biota, while human colonization has severely impacted native plant and animal populations. The PIERC website provides information and research studies about the Hawaiian Islands ecosystem, as well as staff projects that are currently in progress. Topics include birds, mammals, ecosystem diversity, genetics, wildlife health, plant ecology, and marine biology. There is an education section with outdoor activities, online activities, and a coloring book. Links are provided for further information.

  14. Rhode Island Critical Resource Atlas

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Geographic Information System (GIS) technology is used to assist planners, scientists, geographers, and others to visualize data sets. This particular project created draws on data from the state of Rhode Island's Geographic Information System (RIGIS) database in order to assist land managers and other interested parties. The project was created with support from the Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension, and a number of other organizations. On the site, visitors can click on maps of forests and wetlands, land use patterns, groundwater resources, soil hydrology, and biodiversity. On the site's homepage, visitors can also use the "Towns" drop down menu to look at information for different cities throughout the state. Additionally, the "Watershed Atlas" area provides detailed maps of the twelve watersheds located in Rhode Island.

  15. The Big Island of Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Boasting snow-covered mountain peaks and tropical forest, the Island of Hawaii, the largest of the Hawaiian Islands, is stunning at any altitude. This false-color composite (processed to simulate true color) image of Hawaii was constructed from data gathered between 1999 and 2001 by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) instrument, flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. The Landsat data were processed by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to develop a landcover map. This map will be used as a baseline to chart changes in land use on the islands. Types of change include the construction of resorts along the coastal areas, and the conversion of sugar plantations to other crop types. Hawaii was created by a 'hotspot' beneath the ocean floor. Hotspots form in areas where superheated magma in the Earth's mantle breaks through the Earth's crust. Over the course of millions of years, the Pacific Tectonic Plate has slowly moved over this hotspot to form the entire Hawaiian Island archipelago. The black areas on the island (in this scene) that resemble a pair of sun-baked palm fronds are hardened lava flows formed by the active Mauna Loa Volcano. Just to the north of Mauna Loa is the dormant grayish Mauna Kea Volcano, which hasn't erupted in an estimated 3,500 years. A thin greyish plume of smoke is visible near the island's southeastern shore, rising from Kilauea-the most active volcano on Earth. Heavy rainfall and fertile volcanic soil have given rise to Hawaii's lush tropical forests, which appear as solid dark green areas in the image. The light green, patchy areas near the coasts are likely sugar cane plantations, pineapple farms, and human settlements. Courtesy of the NOAA Coastal Services Center Hawaii Land Cover Analysis project

  16. Critical island-size, stability and island morphology in nanoparticle island self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Jacques; Hubartt, Bradley

    2015-03-01

    The critical island-size, stability, and morphology of 2D colloidal Au nanoparticle (NP) islands formed at the toluene-air interface during drop-drying are studied using molecular dynamics and energetics calculations. Our calculations were carried out using an empirical potential which takes into account interactions between the dodecanethiol ligands and the toluene solvent, ligand-ligand interactions, and the van der Waals interaction between the Au cores. Good agreement with experimental results is obtained for the dependence of the critical island-size on NP diameter. Our results for the critical length-scale for smoothing via edge-diffusion are also consistent with the limited facet size and island-relaxation observed in experiments. The relatively high rate of NP diffusion on an island obtained in our simulations as well as the low calculated activation barrier for interlayer diffusion are also consistent with experimental observations that second-layer growth does not occur until after the first layer is complete. Supported by NSF CHE-1012896 and DMR-1410840

  17. LONG ISLAND SOUND STUDY CCMP, 1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan for Long Island Sound characterizes the priority problems affecting the Sound and identifies specific commitments and recommendations developed by the Long Island Sound Study (LISS) Management Conference. The CCMP provides a hist...

  18. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... twice as likely to have asthma as non-Hispanic whites. National data for this population is very ... had asthma, 2012 Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Non-Hispanic White Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander/ Non-Hispanic White ...

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts........................................................................................................................ 16 TABLE OF FIGURES Figure 1 - Site location at Deer Island Parking Lot site................

  20. Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders were almost four times more likely to ... data available at this time. HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  1. Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander Populations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. According to ... or Other Pacific Islander populations in 2011 were Hawaii (359,000) and California (329,000) . The Native ...

  2. Profile: Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa or other Pacific Islands. According to ... 000 Native Hawaiians or Pacific Islanders reside in Hawaii. Some other states that have a significant Native ...

  3. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation...Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island)....

  4. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation...Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island)....

  5. Numerical Simulations of the Island-Induced Circulations over the Island of Hawaii during HaRP

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yi-Leng

    Numerical Simulations of the Island-Induced Circulations over the Island of Hawaii during HaRP YANG island-scale circulations over the island of Hawaii during the Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP, 11 July

  6. 46 CFR 7.85 - St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. 7.85 Section... § 7.85 St. Simons Island, GA to Little Talbot Island, FL. (a) A line drawn from...thence to the northeasternmost extremity of Little Talbot...

  7. Circulation in Block Island Sound, Rhode Island Sound, and Adjacent Waters, with Emphasis on Subsurface Flows

    E-print Network

    Codiga, Daniel L.

    Circulation in Block Island Sound, Rhode Island Sound, and Adjacent Waters, with Emphasis on Subsurface Flows Daniel L. Codiga, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Presentation for Rhode Island Sea Grant Ronald C. Baird Symposium 2008 Abstract Subsurface flows

  8. ELEVATED FOSSIL CORAL DEPOSITS IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: A MEASURE OF ISLAND UPLIFT IN THE QUATERNARY

    E-print Network

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ELEVATED FOSSIL CORAL DEPOSITS IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: A MEASURE OF ISLAND UPLIFT Gary McMurtry Johanna Resig #12;ABSTRACT The origin of emerged marine fossils in the Hawaiian Islands waves swept up to 326 m on Lanai and neighboring islands depositing marine fossils 105 ka; (3

  9. Origins and antiquity of the island fox ( Urocyon littoralis) on California's Channel Islands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Torben C. Rick; Jon M. Erlandson; René L. Vellanoweth; Todd J. Braje; Paul W. Collins; Daniel A. Guthrie; Thomas W. Stafford Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The island fox (Urocyon littoralis) is one of few reportedly endemic terrestrial mammals on California's Channel Islands. Questions remain about how and when foxes first colonized the islands, with researchers speculating on a natural, human-assisted, or combined dispersal during the late Pleistocene and\\/or Holocene. A natural dispersal of foxes to the northern Channel Islands has been supported by reports of

  10. Flooding of regular islands by chaotic states

    E-print Network

    A. Bäcker; R. Ketzmerick; A. G. Monastra

    2005-02-02

    We introduce a criterion for the existence of regular states in systems with a mixed phase space. If this condition is not fulfilled chaotic eigenstates substantially extend into a regular island. Wave packets started in the chaotic sea progressively flood the island. The extent of flooding by eigenstates and wave packets increases logarithmically with the size of the chaotic sea and the time, respectively. This new effect can be observed for island chains with just 10 islands.

  11. University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island Graduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of Oceanography

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode of Rhode Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography. © Copyright 2002-2008 by University of Rhode Island by the University of Rhode Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography is warranted against defective components

  12. University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island Graduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of Oceanography

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography. © Copyright 2002-2007 by University of Rhode Island ­ Graduate by the University of Rhode Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography is warranted against defective components

  13. Streamlined Islands in Ares Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 June 2002) The Science Although liquid water is not stable on the surface of Mars today, there is substantial geologic evidence that large quantities of water once flowed across the surface in the distant past. Streamlined islands, shown here, are one piece of evidence for this ancient water. The tremendous force of moving water, possibly from a catastrophic flood, carved these teardrop-shaped islands within a much larger channel called Ares Valles. The orientation of the islands can be used as an indicator of the direction the water flowed. The islands have a blunt end that is usually associated with an obstacle, commonly an impact crater. The crater is resistant to erosion and creates a geologic barrier around which the water must flow. As the water flows past the obstacle, its erosive power is directed outward, leaving the area in the lee of the obstacle relatively uneroded. However, some scientists have also argued that the area in the lee of the obstacle might be a depositional zone, where material is dropped out of the water as it briefly slows. The ridges observed on the high-standing terrain in the leeward parts of the islands may be benches carved into the rock that mark the height of the water at various times during the flood, or they might be indicative of layering in the leeward rock. As the water makes its way downstream, the interference of the water flow by the obstacle is reduced, and the water that was diverted around the obstacle rejoins itself at the narrow end of the island. Therefore, the direction of the water flow is parallel to the orientation of the island, and the narrow end of the island points downstream. In addition to the streamlined islands, the channel floor exhibits fluting that is also suggestive of flowing water. The flutes (also known as longitudinal grooves) are also parallel to the direction of flow, indicating that the water flow was turbulent and probably quite fast, which is consistent with the hypothesized catastrophic floods that came through Ares Valles. The Story In symbolism only, these guppy-shaped islands and current-like flutes of land beside them may conjure up a mental image of a flowing Martian river. This picture would only be half-right. Scientifically, no fish ever swam this channel, but these landforms do reveal that catastrophic floods of rushing water probably patterned the land in just this way. Geologists who study flood areas believe that a tremendous force of moving water probably carved both the islands and the small, parallel, 'current-like' ridges around them. The blunt end of the islands (the 'heads' of the 'fish') are probably ancient impact craters that posed obstacles to the water as it rushed down the channel in torrents. Because a crater is resistant to erosion, it creates a geologic barrier around which the water must flow. As the water makes its way downstream, the crater's interference with the water flow is reduced, so the water that was diverted around the obstacle rejoins at the narrow end of the island (the 'tail' of the 'fish'). Therefore, from this information, you can tell that the water flowed from the southeast to the northwest. As a rule of thumb for the future, you can say that the narrow end of the island points downstream. The result may be the island behind the crater, but geologists disagree about the exact process by which the island forms. Some scientists argue that the erosive power of the water is directed outward, leaving the area behind, or in the lee of, the obstacle relatively untouched. Other scientists argue that the water slows when it encounters the crater obstacle, and small particles of sand and 'dirt' drop out of the water and are deposited in the lee. There's another small associated uncertainty too. Look closely at the edges of the islands and notice how the land is terraced. These ledges might mark the height of the water at various times during the flood . . . or they might be an indication that layering occurred. It all depends on your hypothesis. Like the stream

  14. Past, Present, Future Erosion at Locke Island

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2006-08-08

    This report describes and documents the erosion that has occurred along the northeast side of Locke Island over the last 10 to 20 years. The principal cause of this erosion is the massive Locke Island landslide complex opposite the Columbia River along the White Bluffs, which constricts the flow of the river and deflects the river's thalweg southward against the island.

  15. November 2011 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    November 2011 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND Eligibility for InState Tuition and Fees Based Upon Rhode Island High School Attendance Guidance for Students and Families If you are a student, including an undocumented student, who currently attends or plans to attend the University of Rhode Island

  16. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-print Network

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  17. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-print Network

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  18. Island wakes in the Southern California Bight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. A. Caldeira; P. Marchesiello; N. P. Nezlin; P. M. DiGiacomo; J. C. McWilliams

    2005-01-01

    Wind- and current-induced island wakes were investigated using a multiplatform approach of in situ, remote sensing, and numerical model simulations for the Southern California Bight (SCB). Island wind wakes are a result of sheltering from the wind, with weak wind mixing, strong heat storage, and consequent high sea surface temperature (SST). Wind wakes around Santa Catalina Island are most persistent

  19. Heat island development in Mexico City

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernesto Jauregui

    1997-01-01

    The present paper describes the climatology of the near surface urban heat island of Mexico City, using hourly data from two recently installed automatic stations at a rural and an urban site. The results show that the nocturnal heat island was more frequent (75% of the time for the period examined) than daytime cases (25%). The maximum nocturnal heat island

  20. Threats to Avifauna on Oceanic Islands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HEATHER S. TREVINO; AMY L. SKIBIEL; TIM J. KARELS; F. STEPHEN DOBSON

    2007-01-01

    Results of the study by Blackburn et al. (2004a) of avifauna on oceanic islands suggest that distance from the mainland and time since European colonization have major influences on species extinctions and that island area is a significant but secondary contributing factor. After augmenting the data of the study on geographical properties for some of the islands they examined, we

  1. Three Mile Island population registry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Goldhaber; G. K. Tokuhata; E. Digon; G. G. Caldwell; G. F. Stein; G. Lutz; D. Gur

    2009-01-01

    Shortly after the March 28, 1979, accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant outside Harrisburg, Pa., the Pennsylvania Department of Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Bureau of the Census, conducted a census of the 35,930 persons residing within 5 miles of the plant. With the help of 150 enumerators, demographic and

  2. The Three Mile Island crisis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Houts; P. D. Cleary; T. W. Hu

    1988-01-01

    Since the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant, many studies have assessed its impacts. Compiled and summarized in this book are the results of five related surveys, all aimed at the scientific assessment of the psycho-socio-economic behavior of the residents around the TMI facility. These studies are based on a randomly selected, large sample

  3. Pacific Islands Region News Release

    E-print Network

    Braun, contract marine mammal veterinarian for the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center. The mother at weaning. Hence, the need for additional food provided in a captive situation to increase their chances and NOAA Fisheries Service personnel where they will begin a week of marine debris cleanup on and around

  4. The Manitoulin Island Space Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Dianna

    1991-01-01

    Describes a space education program in rural Manitoulin Island, Ontario. Reports that gifted and talented students examined space exploration, built models, met with astronauts, and designed multimedia presentations. Explains that the students also hosted a one-day conference on space for students, teachers, and parents and later visited…

  5. HISTORIC WETLANDS OF PRUDENCE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten wetland sites around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island have been selected for a multidisciplinary study. These wetland sites are being studied to develop indicators of "wetland health." The study includes assessing the ecological conditions of the wetlands in the past, and the c...

  6. Chaos in easter island ecology.

    PubMed

    Sprott, J C

    2011-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that a recently proposed dynamical model for the ecology of Easter Island admits periodic and chaotic attractors, not previously reported. Such behavior may more realistically depict the population dynamics of general ecosystems and illustrates the power of simple models to produce the kind of complex behavior that is ubiquitous in such systems. PMID:21933513

  7. Birds are islands for parasites.

    PubMed

    Koop, Jennifer A H; DeMatteo, Karen E; Parker, Patricia G; Whiteman, Noah K

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the mechanisms driving the extraordinary diversification of parasites is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Co-speciation, one proposed mechanism that could contribute to this diversity is hypothesized to result from allopatric co-divergence of host-parasite populations. We found that island populations of the Galápagos hawk (Buteo galapagoensis) and a parasitic feather louse species (Degeeriella regalis) exhibit patterns of co-divergence across variable temporal and spatial scales. Hawks and lice showed nearly identical population genetic structure across the Galápagos Islands. Hawk population genetic structure is explained by isolation by distance among islands. Louse population structure is best explained by hawk population structure, rather than isolation by distance per se, suggesting that lice tightly track the recent population histories of their hosts. Among hawk individuals, louse populations were also highly structured, suggesting that hosts serve as islands for parasites from an evolutionary perspective. Altogether, we found that host and parasite populations may have responded in the same manner to geographical isolation across spatial scales. Allopatric co-divergence is likely one important mechanism driving the diversification of parasites. PMID:25099959

  8. A Fighter on Long Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    1991-01-01

    Superintendent Dan Domenech unsuccessfully battled New York's governor and legislature about a cut in state funding. Long Island has only 16 percent of the state's population but is being earmarked for 50 percent of the cuts. Domenech's earlier successes included a preschool for disadvantaged children, a full-day kindergarten, and a before- and…

  9. The flora of Antipodes Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Godley

    1989-01-01

    The history of botanical exploration of Antipodes Island begins in 1890 and is outlined up to 1985. The numbers of terrestrial species now known are algae (3), fungi (2), lichens (17), liverworts (37), mosses (21), lycopods (3), ferns (17), and flowering plants (52). Three of the latterare adventive (Poa annua, Stellaria media, Sonchus asper). The 20 species of indigenous monocotyledons

  10. Sex differences in razorbill (Family: Alcidae) parent-offspring vocal recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insley, Stephen J.; Paredes Vela, Rosana; Jones, Ian L.

    2002-05-01

    In this study we examines how a pattern of parental care may result in a sex bias in vocal recognition. In Razorbills (Alca torda), both sexes provide parental care to their chicks while at the nest, after which the male is the sole caregiver for an additional period at sea. Selection pressure acting on recognition behavior is expected to be strongest during the time when males and chicks are together at sea, and as a result, parent-offspring recognition was predicted to be better developed in the male parent, that is, show a paternal bias. In order to test this hypothesis, vocal playback experiments were conducted on breeding Razorbills at the Gannet Islands, Labrador, 2001. The data provide clear evidence of mutual vocal recognition between the male parent and chick but not between the female parent and chick, supporting the hypothesis that parent-offspring recognition is male biased in this species. In addition to acoustic recognition, such a bias could have important social implications for a variety of behavioral and basic life history traits such as cooperation and sex-biased dispersal.

  11. Nanoindentation response of piezoelectric nano-islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guang; Sriram, Sharath; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Venkatesh, T. A.

    2014-09-01

    Through three-dimensional finite element modeling, it is demonstrated that the nanoindentation response of piezoelectric nano-islands is strongly dependent on the shape of the nano-island and the depth of indentation. For indentations that are relatively deep (i.e., greater than 5% of the height of the islands), the substrate's elastic and plastic properties have a strong influence on the indentation response of piezoelectric nano-islands with substrate plasticity resulting in a significant reduction in the mechanical and electrical indentation stiffness. The predictions of the finite element models compare well with experiments on nano-islands of strontium-doped lead zirconate titanate.

  12. Polar Bears International : Wrangel Island, Russia

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-12

    This site describes the ongoing research of the polar bears in the Russian High Arctic. Wrangel Island with neighboring small island, Herald Island, are the key reproductive areas for the Chukchi-Alaskan polar bear population. Marine areas and Wrangel and Herald islands provide optimum foraging habitats for polar bears, and polar bear densities in these marine habitats are high all year round. Approximately 350-500 pregnant female polar bears construct their maternity dens on Wrangel and Herald islands every fall, emerging with their cubs in spring. The research is described in terms of goals and objectives, structure, methods, equipment, staff, and implementations.

  13. Barrier island bistability induced by biophysical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán Vinent, Orencio; Moore, Laura J.

    2015-02-01

    Barrier islands represent about 10% of the world’s coastline, sustain rich ecosystems, host valuable infrastructure and protect mainland coasts from storms. Future climate-change-induced increases in the intensity and frequency of major hurricanes and accelerations in sea-level rise will have a significant impact on barrier islands--leading to increased coastal hazards and flooding--yet our understanding of island response to external drivers remains limited. Here, we find that island response is intrinsically bistable and controlled by previously unrecognized dynamics: the competing, and quantifiable, effects of storm erosion, sea-level rise, and the aeolian and biological processes that enable and drive dune recovery. When the biophysical processes driving dune recovery dominate, islands tend to be high in elevation and vulnerability to storms is minimized. Alternatively, when the effects of storm erosion dominate, islands may become trapped in a perpetual state of low elevation and maximum vulnerability to storms, even under mild storm conditions. When sea-level rise dominates, islands become unstable and face possible disintegration. This quantification of barrier island dynamics is supported by data from the Virginia Barrier Islands, USA and provides a broader context for considering island response to climate change and the likelihood of potentially abrupt transitions in island state.

  14. Alternative energy technologies for the Caribbean islands

    SciTech Connect

    Pytlinski, J.T. (Univ. of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico))

    1992-01-01

    All islands in the Caribbean except Puerto Rico can be classified as developing islands. Of these islands, all except Trinidad and Tobago are oil importers. Uncertainties concerning uninterrupted oil supply and increasing oil prices causes economic, social and political instability and jeopardizes further development of these islands. The paper discusses the energy situation of the Caribbean islands and presents alternative energy options. Several alternative energy projects financed by local, federal and international organizations are presented. Present and future uses of alternative energy technologies are described in different islands. Barrier which handicap developing and implementing alternative energy sources in the Caribbean are discussed. The potential and possible applications of alternative energy technologies such as: solar-thermal energy, photovoltaics, wind energy, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), ocean currents and tides energy, biomass, peat energy, municipal solid wastes, bioconversion, hydropower, geothermal energy, nuclear energy and energy conservation are discussed in detail as means to alleviate the energy situation in the Caribbean islands.

  15. Magnetic island evolution in hot ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Waelbroeck, F. L.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Horton, W. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Effects of finite ion temperature on magnetic island evolution are studied by means of numerical simulations of a reduced set of two-fluid equations which include ion as well as electron diamagnetism in slab geometry. The polarization current is found to be almost an order of magnitude larger in hot than in cold ion plasmas, due to the strong shear of ion velocity around the separatrix of the magnetic islands. As a function of the island width, the propagation speed decreases from the electron drift velocity (for islands thinner than the Larmor radius) to values close to the guiding-center velocity (for islands of order 10 times the Larmor radius). In the latter regime, the polarization current is destabilizing (i.e., it drives magnetic island growth). This is in contrast to cold ion plasmas, where the polarization current is generally found to have a healing effect on freely propagating magnetic island.

  16. 25 CFR 241.2 - Annette Islands Reserve; definition; exclusive fishery; licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Proclamation of April 28, 1916 (39 Stat. 1777), as the waters within three thousand feet from the shore lines at mean low tide of Annette Island, Ham Island, Walker Island, Lewis Island, Spire Island, Hemlock Island, and adjacent rocks and...

  17. 25 CFR 241.2 - Annette Islands Reserve; definition; exclusive fishery; licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Proclamation of April 28, 1916 (39 Stat. 1777), as the waters within three thousand feet from the shore lines at mean low tide of Annette Island, Ham Island, Walker Island, Lewis Island, Spire Island, Hemlock Island, and adjacent rocks and...

  18. 25 CFR 241.2 - Annette Islands Reserve; definition; exclusive fishery; licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Proclamation of April 28, 1916 (39 Stat. 1777), as the waters within three thousand feet from the shore lines at mean low tide of Annette Island, Ham Island, Walker Island, Lewis Island, Spire Island, Hemlock Island, and adjacent rocks and...

  19. Shaded Relief Mosaic of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is a shaded relief mosaic of Umnak Island in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

    It was created with Airsar data that was geocoded and combined into this mosaic as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Barrier Island Failure During Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallenger, A.; Howd, P.; Stockdon, H.; Wright, C. W.; Fauver, L.; Guy, K.

    2006-12-01

    Classical models of barrier-island response to storms predict that wave runup can periodically overtop an island and transport sand from its seaside to its bayside, forcing the island to migrate landward. While this process can destroy fixed human developments, the island survives with little net change in form or dimensions. In contrast, we find that Louisiana's Chandeleur Islands during Hurricane Katrina were not periodically overtopped by waves, but were continuously inundated by storm surge. When such inundation occurs locally on a barrier island, it can force the erosion of a narrow breach that connects sea and bay. However, little is known about the response of a barrier island when it is entirely submerged. Here, we show that the Chandeleur Islands approached complete failure, losing 84% of their surface area. Their Gulf of Mexico shorelines retreated landward an average of 268 m, the largest retreat ever reported for a storm. Sand was stripped from the islands, reducing their peak elevation from >6 m to <3 m and exposing them to further degradation and potential failure by future hurricanes of less intensity than Katrina. Further, the islands that survived Katrina were marsh remnants composed of mud and vegetation that relatively small waves diminished following the storm. The Chandeleur Islands are prone to failure because of their location on the Mississippi delta where small sand supply and large sea-level rise (induced locally by land subsidence) limit natural rebuilding of the islands following a storm. The response of the delta's barrier islands during Hurricane Katrina provides a warning of how the world's barrier islands might respond to storm-surge inundation should predictions of accelerated global sea level rise prove accurate.

  1. Okhotskia: International Kuril Island Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website presents the International Kuril Island Project (IKIP), "an international collaboration of American, Russian, and Japanese scientists to survey the plants, insects, spiders, freshwater and terrestrial mollusks, freshwater fishes, amphibians, and reptiles of the Kuril Archipelago." The website was developed primarily "to provide easy access to project results and databases, both for participants and other interested scientists." Site visitors can link to the project proposal -- submitted by the University of Washington, Russian Academy of Sciences, and Hokkaido University -- to view text and images describing project Objectives, Rationale and Scope, Anticipated Future Research, and more. Links are also provided to project Results (including IKIP databases, publications, and presentations) and Island Info including sections on Vascular Plants, Stoneflies, Nesting Birds, and many more. Additionally, a very nicely organized photo gallery features maps and many beautiful photographs taken by project participants during collecting expeditions to the Kuril Archipelago.

  2. Tsunami Forecast for Galapagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renteria, W.

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to present a model for the short-term and long-term tsunami forecast for Galapagos Islands. For both cases the ComMIT/MOST(Titov,et al 2011) numerical model and methodology have been used. The results for the short-term model has been compared with the data from Lynett et al, 2011 surveyed from the impacts of the March/11 in the Galapagos Islands. For the case of long-term forecast, several scenarios have run along the Pacific, an extreme flooding map is obtained, the method is considered suitable for places with poor or without tsunami impact information, but under tsunami risk geographic location.

  3. Pathogenicity island mobility and gene content.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kelly Porter

    2013-10-01

    Key goals towards national biosecurity include methods for analyzing pathogens, predicting their emergence, and developing countermeasures. These goals are served by studying bacterial genes that promote pathogenicity and the pathogenicity islands that mobilize them. Cyberinfrastructure promoting an island database advances this field and enables deeper bioinformatic analysis that may identify novel pathogenicity genes. New automated methods and rich visualizations were developed for identifying pathogenicity islands, based on the principle that islands occur sporadically among closely related strains. The chromosomally-ordered pan-genome organizes all genes from a clade of strains; gaps in this visualization indicate islands, and decorations of the gene matrix facilitate exploration of island gene functions. A %E2%80%9Clearned phyloblocks%E2%80%9D method was developed for automated island identification, that trains on the phylogenetic patterns of islands identified by other methods. Learned phyloblocks better defined termini of previously identified islands in multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC BAA-2146, and found its only antibiotic resistance island.

  4. Island biology: looking towards the future.

    PubMed

    Kueffer, Christoph; Drake, Donald R; Fernández-Palacios, José María

    2014-10-01

    Oceanic islands are renowned for the profound scientific insights that their fascinating biotas have provided to biologists during the past two centuries. Research presented at Island Biology 2014-an international conference, held in Honolulu, Hawaii (7-11 July 2014), which attracted 253 presenters and 430 participants from at least 35 countries(1)-demonstrated that islands are reclaiming a leading role in ecology and evolution, especially for synthetic studies at the intersections of macroecology, evolution, community ecology and applied ecology. New dynamics in island biology are stimulated by four major developments. We are experiencing the emergence of a truly global and comprehensive island research community incorporating previously neglected islands and taxa. Macroecology and big-data analyses yield a wealth of global-scale synthetic studies and detailed multi-island comparisons, while other modern research approaches such as genomics, phylogenetic and functional ecology, and palaeoecology, are also dispersing to islands. And, increasingly tight collaborations between basic research and conservation management make islands places where new conservation solutions for the twenty-first century are being tested. Islands are home to a disproportionate share of the world's rare (and extinct) species, and there is an urgent need to develop increasingly collaborative and innovative research to address their conservation requirements. PMID:25339655

  5. How to Trace Island Freeboard

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo Alexandre dos Santos Ramalho

    \\u000a The vertical movements affecting island edifices have a direct effect on the evolutionary history of those edifices. During\\u000a the seamount stage, the height of the edifice relative to the ocean’s surface—a parameter that mostly depends on the volcanic\\u000a activity and the uplift\\/subsidence of the edifice—has a strong impact on the dominant eruptive style. This happens because\\u000a the height of the

  6. The Three Mile Island crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, P.S.; Cleary, P.D.; Hu, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    Since the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant, many studies have assessed its impacts. Compiled and summarized in this book are the results of five related surveys, all aimed at the scientific assessment of the psycho-socio-economic behavior of the residents around the TMI facility. These studies are based on a randomly selected, large sample of the population (with telephones) around TMI.

  7. A global analysis of island pyrogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauernicht, C.; Murphy, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Islands have provided insight into the ecological role of fire worldwide through research on the positive feedbacks between fire and nonnative grasses, particularly in the Hawaiian Islands. However, the global extent and frequency of fire on islands as an ecological disturbance has received little attention, possibly because 'natural fires' on islands are typically limited to infrequent dry lightning strikes and isolated volcanic events. But because most contemporary fires on islands are anthropogenic, islands provide ideal systems with which to understand the linkages between socio-economic development, shifting fire regimes, and ecological change. Here we use the density of satellite-derived (MODIS) active fire detections for the years 2000-2014 and global data sets of vegetation, climate, population density, and road development to examine the drivers of fire activity on islands at the global scale, and compare these results to existing pyrogeographic models derived from continental data sets. We also use the Hawaiian Islands as a case study to understand the extent to which novel fire regimes can pervade island ecosystems. The global analysis indicates that fire is a frequent disturbance across islands worldwide, strongly affected by human activities, indicating people can more readily override climatic drivers than on continental land masses. The extent of fire activity derived from local records in the Hawaiian Islands reveals that our global analysis likely underestimates the prevalence of fire among island systems and that the combined effects of human activity and invasion by nonnative grasses can create conditions for frequent and relatively large-scale fires. Understanding the extent of these novel fire regimes, and mitigating their impacts, is critical to reducing the current and rapid degradation of native island ecosystems worldwide.

  8. Floating Cities, Islands and States

    E-print Network

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-04-04

    Many small countries are in need of additional territory. They build landfills and expensive artificial islands. The ocean covers 71 per cent of the Earth surface. Those countries (or persons of wealth) starting the early colonization of the ocean may obtain advantages through additional territory or creating their own independent state. An old idea is building a big ship. The best solution to this problem, however, is the provision of floating cities, islands, and states. The author idea is to use for floating cities, islands, and states a cheap floating platform created from a natural ice field taken from the Arctic or Antarctic oceans. These cheap platforms protected by air-film (bottom and sides) and a conventional insulating cover (top) and having a cooling system can exist for an unlimited time. They can be increased in number or size at any time, float in warm oceans, travel to different continents and countries, serve as artificial airports, harbors and other marine improvements, as well as floating cities and industrial bases for virtually any use. Author researches and computes parameters of these ice floating platforms, other methods of building such floating territory, compares them and shows that the offered method is the most cheap and efficient means of ocean colonization.

  9. Generalized model of island biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David A.; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of a local community of competing species with weak immigration from a static regional pool is studied. Implementing the generalized competitive Lotka-Volterra model with demographic noise, a rich dynamics with four qualitatively distinct phases is unfolded. When the overall interspecies competition is weak, the island species recapitulate the mainland species. For higher values of the competition parameter, the system still admits an equilibrium community, but now some of the mainland species are absent on the island. Further increase in competition leads to an intermittent "disordered" phase, where the dynamics is controlled by invadable combinations of species and the turnover rate is governed by the migration. Finally, the strong competition phase is glasslike, dominated by uninvadable states and noise-induced transitions. Our model contains, as a special case, the celebrated neutral island theories of Wilson-MacArthur and Hubbell. Moreover, we show that slight deviations from perfect neutrality may lead to each of the phases, as the Hubbell point appears to be quadracritical.

  10. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS, BEFORE REMOVAL OF CHIMNEY, FINIALS, GINGERBREAD, AND VARIEGATED SLATE ROOFING. DATED C. 1876. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 321, Rodman Avenue & Rock Island Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  11. Molluscan fauna of Gueishan Island, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Wei; Hsiung, Ta-Wei; Lin, Si-Min; Wu, Wen-Lung

    2013-01-01

    This dataset records the occurrence and inventory of molluscan fauna on Gueishan Island, the only active volcanic island in Taiwan, based on the literature survey and field investigation conducted between 2011 and 2012. The literature review involved seven studies published from 1934 to 2003, which collectively reported 112 species from 61 genera and 37 families of Mollusca on Gueishan Island. Through our field investigation, we identified 34 species from 28 genera and 23 families. Fourteen of these species were new records on Gueishan Island: Liolophura japonica, Lottia luchuana, Nerita costata, Nerita rumphii, Diplommatina suganikeiensis, Littoraria undulata, Solenomphala taiwanensis, Assiminea sp., Siphonaria laciniosa, Laevapex nipponica, Carychium hachijoensis, Succinea erythrophana, Zaptyx crassilamellata, and Allopeas pyrgula. In Total, there are 126 species from 71 genera and 45 families of Mollusca on Gueishan Island. These data have been published through GBIF [http://taibif.org.tw/ipt/resource.do?r=gueishan_island] and integrated into the Taiwan Malacofauna Database (http://shell.sinica.edu.tw/). PMID:23717182

  12. Adaptive Decision Modeling in Wisconsin River Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, R.; Greb, S. R.; Watkins, D. W., Jr.; Block, P.

    2014-12-01

    River islands in Wisconsin are of high ecological significance. Understanding of climate change impacts and appropriate management alternatives in these islands are of great interest to all stakeholders, including the State of Wisconsin and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) who have jurisdiction of these islands in WI. We use historical areal imagery to describe island dynamics and river morphometry, such as changes in island shape and size. Relationships of related changes are explored with concurrent changes in river flow regimes. In an effort to integrate climate change uncertainties into decision making, we demonstrate an application of a multistage adaptive decision making framework to Wisconsin River islands, with a particular emphasis on flood management and planning. The framework is comprised of hydro-climatic ensemble projections generated from CMIP5 climate model outputs and multiple hydrologic models, including statistical and physically based approaches.

  13. Green Island Union Free School District and Green Island Teachers Association

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donna C. Trautwein

    2010-01-01

    Proceeding Between Green Island Union Free School District And Green Island Teachers Association. PERB Case No. M 2009 ? 069. Report and Recommendations of Fact Finder, June 23, 2010 Donna Trautwein, Ph.D., Fact Finder.

  14. Parallel Island Model for Attribute Reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad M. Rahman; Dominik ´ Slezak; Jakub Wroblewski

    2005-01-01

    \\u000a We develop a framework for parallel computation of the optimal rough set decision reducts from data. We adapt the island model\\u000a for evolutionary computing. The idea is to optimize reducts within separate populations (islands) and enable the best reducts-chromosomes\\u000a to migrate among islands. Experiments show that the proposed method speeds up calculations and also provides often better\\u000a quality of results,

  15. Invasive aliens on tropical East Asian islands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard T. Corlett

    2010-01-01

    Tropical East Asia (TEA) has numerous islands, both continental and oceanic. This study uses information on invasive aliens\\u000a in terrestrial habitats on these islands to test the generality of the continental-oceanic contrast in invasibility, assess\\u000a the conservation impacts of invasive species, and suggest ways to mitigate these. The continental islands of Hong Kong and\\u000a Singapore are worst-case scenarios for continental

  16. Quantifying Barrier Island Recovery Following a Hurricane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, B.; Houser, C.

    2014-12-01

    Barrier islands are dynamic landscapes that are believed to minimize storm impact to mainland communities and also provide important ecological services in the coastal environment. The protection afforded by the island and the services it provides, however, depend on island resiliency in the face of accelerated sea level rise, which is in turn dependent on the rate of island recovery following storm events that may also change in both frequency and magnitude in the future. These changes in frequency may affect even large dunes and their resiliency, resulting in the island transitioning from a high to a low elevation. Previous research has shown that the condition of the foredune depends on the recovery of the nearshore and beach profile and the ability of vegetation to capture aeolian-transported sediment. An inability of the foredune to recover may result in mainland susceptibility to storm energy, inability for ecosystems to recover and thrive, and sediment budget instability. In this study, LiDAR data is used to quantify the rates of dune recovery at Fire Island, NY, the Outer Banks, NC, Santa Rosa Island, FL, and Matagorda Island, TX. Preliminary results indicate foredune recovery varies significantly both alongshore and in the cross-shore, suggesting that barrier island response and recovery to storm events cannot be considered from a strictly two-dimensional (cross-shore) perspective.

  17. The evolution of birdsong on islands

    PubMed Central

    Morinay, Jennifer; Cardoso, Gonçalo C; Doutrelant, Claire; Covas, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Islands are simplified, isolated ecosystems, providing an ideal set-up to study evolution. Among several traits that are expected to change on islands, an interesting but poorly understood example concerns signals used in animal communication. Islands are typified by reduced species diversity, increased population density, and reduced mate competition, all of which could affect communication signals. We used birdsong to investigate whether there are systematic changes in communication signals on islands, by undertaking a broad comparison based on pairs of closely related island-mainland species across the globe. We studied song traits related to complexity (number of different syllables, frequency bandwidth), to vocal performance (syllable delivery rate, song duration), and also three particular song elements (rattles, buzzes, and trills) generally implicated in aggressive communication. We also investigated whether song complexity was related to the number of similar sympatric species. We found that island species were less likely to produce broadband and likely aggressive song elements (rattles and buzzes). By contrast, various aspects of song complexity and performance did not differ between island and mainland species. Species with fewer same-family sympatric species used wider frequency bandwidths, as predicted by the character release hypothesis, both on continents and on islands. Our study supports the hypothesis of a reduction in aggressive behavior on islands and suggests that discrimination against closely related species is an important factor influencing birdsong evolution. PMID:24455143

  18. The geomorphology of the Chandeleur Island Wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Debusschere, K.; Penland, S.; Westphal, K. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge (USA)); Handley, L. (Fish and Wildlife Service, Slidell, LA (USA)); Michot, T. (Fish and Wildlife Service, Baton Rouge, LA (USA)); Reed, D.; Seal, R.

    1990-09-01

    The Chandeleur Islands represent the largest and oldest transgressive barrier island arc in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Generated by the transgressive submergence of the St. Bernard delta complex, the Chandeleur Islands form the protective geologic framework for one of the richest areas of salt marsh and seagrass flats in Louisiana. The Chandeleur barrier island arc is 60 km long and consists of five individual islands backed by a linear, multiple bar system enclosing a shallow basin floored by extensive seagrass flats. The northern part of the Chandeleur chain is the highest in relief, elevation, width, and habitat diversity. Nonstorm morphology is predominantly a combination of continuous dunes and dune terraces. Numerous washover channels and large washover fans extend into the backbarrier environment. Further south, the island width decreases and washover flats and terraces dominate the shoreline morphology In the southernmost section, the island arc is fragmented into a series of small islands and shoals separated by tidal inlets. Between 1984 and 1989, aerial videotape, aerial photographic, and bathymetric surveys were used to map and monitor the geomorphic changes occurring along the shoreline and in backbarrier areas. The aerial videotape mapping surveys focused on the impacts of hurricanes Danny, Elena, and Juan on the geomorphology of the islands. Videotape imagery was acquired in July 1984 and in July (prestorm), August (post-Danny), September (post-Elena), and November (post-Juan) 1985. A coastal geomorphic classification was developed to map the spatial and temporal landscape changes between surveys.

  19. Ecological fitness, genomic islands and bacterial pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Jörg; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2001-01-01

    The compositions of bacterial genomes can be changed rapidly and dramatically through a variety of processes including horizontal gene transfer. This form of change is key to bacterial evolution, as it leads to ‘evolution in quantum leaps’. Horizontal gene transfer entails the incorporation of genetic elements transferred from another organism—perhaps in an earlier generation—directly into the genome, where they form ‘genomic islands’, i.e. blocks of DNA with signatures of mobile genetic elements. Genomic islands whose functions increase bacterial fitness, either directly or indirectly, have most likely been positively selected and can be termed ‘fitness islands’. Fitness islands can be divided into several subtypes: ‘ecological islands’ in environmental bacteria and ‘saprophytic islands’, ‘symbiosis islands’ or ‘pathogenicity islands’ (PAIs) in microorganisms that interact with living hosts. Here we discuss ways in which PAIs contribute to the pathogenic potency of bacteria, and the idea that genetic entities similar to genomic islands may also be present in the genomes of eukaryotes. PMID:11375927

  20. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer

    Long, Chuck

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  1. THE IMPACT OF FUNDED RESEARCH BY THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND ON THE RHODE ISLAND ECONOMY IN FY10

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    THE IMPACT OF FUNDED RESEARCH BY THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND ON THE RHODE ISLAND ECONOMY IN FY10 The contributions the University of Rhode Island makes to Rhode Island's economy continue to be highly significant the benefits provided by the University of Rhode Island have become increasingly critical to the economic

  2. Dinosaurs and the island rule: The dwarfed dinosaurs from Haeg Island Michael J. Benton a,

    E-print Network

    Benton, Michael

    Dinosaurs and the island rule: The dwarfed dinosaurs from Haeg Island Michael J. Benton a, , Zoltan 2009 Accepted 21 January 2010 Available online 28 January 2010 Keywords: Dinosaurs Cretaceous, in 1914, to suggest that the latest Cretaceous dinosaurs from Haeg, Romania were an island fauna, based

  3. Status, density and habitat relationships of the endemic terrestrial birds of Socorro Island, Revillagigedo Islands, Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo Rodriguez-Estrella; Jose Luis Leon de la Luz; Aurora Breceda; Aradit Castellanos; Jorge Cancino; Jorge Llinas

    1996-01-01

    Socorro Island supports the highest plant and animal diversity of the Revillagigedo Islands. Eight endemic terrestrial bird species (one endemic genus and seven endemic subspecies) currently are present on the island. One endemic species is now extinct and the status of another endemic subspecies is uncertain. Forty visiting species (both seasonal and accidental) represent the non-endemic terrestrial avifauna of the

  4. Evaluating alternative rodenticides for island conservation: roof rat eradication from the San Jorge Islands, Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Josh Donlan; Gregg R. Howald; Bernie R. Tershy; Donald A. Croll

    2003-01-01

    Introduced commensal rats (Rattus spp.) are a major contributor to the extinction and endangerment of island plants and animals. The use of the toxin brodifacoum to completely eradicate rats from islands is a powerful conservation tool. However, brodifacoum is toxic to animals other than rats and on some islands its use may not be feasible without prohibitively expensive mitigation. As

  5. Crustal Thickness Beneath Ocean Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.; Cullers, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    We measured the thickness of the Earth's crust beneath about two dozen of the GDSN or GEOSCOPE stations located on ocean islands by stacking moveout-corrected high-quality P-to-S receiver functions (RFs). The RFs were filtered in the 0.05-0.5 Hz frequency bands to compress strong noises that are common for ocean island stations. Given the small (less than 2 s) time separation between the direct P and the P-to-S converted phase from the Moho, the PSmS phase, which has a negative polarity and can be clearly observed at almost all the stations, is used for the stacking. Preliminary resulting thickness at each of the stations is as follows: AFI (12.4 km), AIS (13.6), ASCN (9.6), BBSR (9.9), BORG (9.4), CRZF (6.6), GUMO (8.0), HNR (8.0), HOPE (19.0), KIP (13.0), MSEY (10.7), MSVF (15.1), NOUC (15.1), PAF (8.9), POHA (17.0), PPT (12.3), PTCN (10.4), RAR (12.8), RER (13.8), RPN (9.3), SEY (14.9), SHEL (17.5), TBT (14.1), XMAS (11.8). Crustal thickness at some of the stations has been measured previously, and our results are in general agreement with those measurements. Possible age-dependence of the resulting thickness and geological implications in the understanding of plume-lithosphere interactions and formation of ocean islands will be presented.

  6. Vegetation of eastern Unalaska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, Stephen S.; Schofield, Wilfred B.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Daniëls, Fred J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Plant communities of Unalaska Island in the eastern Aleutian Islands of western Alaska, and their relationship to environmental variables, were studied using a combined Braun-Blanquet and multivariate approach. Seventy relevés represented the range of structural and compositional variation in the matrix of vegetation and landform zonation. Eleven major community types were distinguished within six physiognomic–ecological groups: I. Dry coastal meadows: Honckenya peploides beach meadow, Leymus mollis dune meadow. II. Mesic meadows: Athyrium filix-femina – Aconitum maximum meadow, Athyrium filix-femina – Calamagrostis nutkaensis meadow, Erigeron peregrinus – Thelypteris quelpaertensis meadow. III. Wet snowbed meadow: Carex nigricans snowbed meadow. IV. Heath: Linnaea borealis – Empetrum nigrum heath, Phyllodoce aleutica heath, Vaccinium uliginosum – Thamnolia vermicularis fellfield. V. Mire: Carex pluriflora – Plantago macrocarpa mire. VI. Deciduous shrub thicket: Salix barclayi – Athyrium filix-femina thicket. These were interpreted as a complex gradient primarily influenced by soil moisture, elevation, and pH. Phytogeographical and syntaxonomical analysis of the plant communities indicated that the dry coastal meadows, most of the heaths, and the mire vegetation belonged, respectively, to the widespread classes Honckenyo–Elymetea, Loiseleurio–Vaccinietea, and Scheuchzerio–Caricetea, characterized by their circumpolar and widespread species. Amphi-Beringian species were likely diagnostic of amphi-Beringian syntaxa, many of these yet to be described.

  7. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80.1122 Section... COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2...

  8. Perspective overview of Brunot's Island Bridge, looking ENE from west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective overview of Brunot's Island Bridge, looking ENE from west bank of Ohio River. - Ohio Connecting Railway, Brunot's Island Bridge, Spanning Ohio River at Brunot's Island, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 82. Map of Analostan Island from Map of the City ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. Map of Analostan Island from Map of the City of Washington by Robert King Plate No. 1 - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. Recovery Act Invests $116,000 at Apostle Islands

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Secretary Salazar checks out the island's photovoltaic solar panels. Solar panels are the sole source of electricity for the islands and are used to run the interior of the lighthouse on Michigan Island....

  11. 6. Keeper's house, southeast parlor, looking northwest Pumpkin Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Keeper's house, southeast parlor, looking northwest - Pumpkin Island Light Station, Pumpkin Island, at northern end of Eggemoggin Beach, off northwest end of Little Deer Island, Eggemoggin, Hancock County, ME

  12. 77 FR 69648 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated November...in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from Hurricane...

  13. 77 FR 68797 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations...of an emergency for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3355-EM), dated October...in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from Hurricane...

  14. 76 FR 60850 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations...emergency for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3334-EM), dated August...emergency conditions in the State of Rhode Island resulting from Hurricane...

  15. 75 FR 18554 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006 AGENCY...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island, dated 03/29/2010 is...

  16. 75 FR 22872 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006 AGENCY...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island, dated 03/29/2010 is...

  17. 76 FR 61131 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00008

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ...Declaration 12850 and 12851] Rhode Island Disaster RI-00008 AGENCY...of a disaster for the State of Rhode Island dated 09/26/2011. Incident...Providence. Contiguous Counties: Rhode Island: Bristol, Kent....

  18. 75 FR 17178 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ...Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster RI-00006 AGENCY...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated...Economic Injury Loans Only): Rhode Island: Bristol. Connecticut: New...

  19. 77 FR 45988 - Anchorage Regulations; Great Chebeague Island, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...Anchorage Regulations; Great Chebeague Island, ME AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...areas in the vicinity of Great Chebeague Island, Maine. This proposed action is necessary...and property surrounding Great Chebeague Island, improve the safety of anchored...

  20. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Pelagic Fisheries Research Program #12;Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems

  1. 16. Photocopy of illustration from Rattray, Jeannette Edwards, Gardiner's Island, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of illustration from Rattray, Jeannette Edwards, Gardiner's Island, East Hampton, 1958; Photograph by Morton Pennypacker of painting MANOR HOUSE, GARDINER'S ISLAND, 1639 - Gardiner's Island Windmill, Napeague, Suffolk County, NY

  2. PELICAN ISLAND Graded dirt road

    E-print Network

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    1 mile PELICAN ISLAND N 0.4 0 1.3 1.5 2.1 P P P 0.7 2.3 A B C D E Paved road Graded dirt road Audubon SanctuaryRecommended route A B C D E F 0.5 mile BOLIVAR PENINSULA N to Crystal Beach Paved road Graded dirt road Walking path Dike/Berm Mudflat/Estuary/Pond Parking spotP G 1.0 1.2 1.7 3.5 0.65 0.0 0

  3. Submarine landslides around the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastel, Sebastian; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobs, Colin L.; Rihm, Roland; Le Bas, Timothy P.; AlibéS, BáRbara

    2001-01-01

    The morphology and structure of the submarine flanks of the Canary Islands were mapped using the GLORIA long-range side-scan sonar system, bathymetric multibeam systems, and sediment echosounders. Twelve young (<2 Ma) giant landslides have been identified on the submarine flanks of the Canary Islands up to now. Older landslide events are long buried under a thick sediment cover due to high sedimentation rates around the Canary Islands. Most slides were found on the flanks of the youngest and most active islands of La Palma, El Hierro, and Tenerife, but young giant landslides were also identified on the flanks of the older (15-20 Ma) but still active eastern islands. Large-scale mass wasting is an important process during all periods of major magmatic activity. The long-lived volcanic constructive history of the islands of the Canary Archipelago is balanced by a correspondingly long history of destruction, resulting in a higher landslide frequency for the Canary Islands compared to the Hawaiian Islands, where giant landslides only occur late in the period of active shield growth. The lower stability of the flanks of the Canaries is probably due to the much steeper slopes of the islands, a result of the abundance of highly evolved intrusive and extrusive rocks. Another reason for the enhanced slope instability is the abundance of pyroclastic deposits on Canary Islands resulting from frequent explosive eruptions due to the elevated volatile contents in the highly alkalic magmas. Dike-induced rifting is most likely the main trigger mechanism for destabilization of the flanks. Flank collapses are a major geological hazard for the Canary Islands due to the sector collapses themselves as well as triggering of tsunamis. In at least one case, a giant lateral blast occurred when an active magmatic or hydrothermal system became unroofed during flank collapse.

  4. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range...REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas...

  5. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond...

  6. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond...

  7. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island...Special Anchorage Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond...

  8. Barrier island evolution and reworking by inlet migration along the Mississippi-Alabama gulf coast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Rucker; J. O. Snowden

    1990-01-01

    The five barrier islands along the Mississippi-Alabama coast are located 10 to 14 mi (16 to 23 km) offshore and separate Mississippi Sound from the Gulf of Mexico. The barrier islands in the chain are, from east to west: Dauphin Island, Petit Bois Island, Horn Island, Ship Island, and Cat Island. The islands are low sand bodies situated on a

  9. A Survey on Counting Networks Brown University, Rhode Island, USA

    E-print Network

    Busch, Konstantin "Costas"

    A Survey on Counting Networks C. BUSCH Brown University, Rhode Island, USA M. HERLIHY Brown University, Rhode Island, USA Abstract In the counting problem, asynchronous concurrent processes repeatedly

  10. VERRAZANONARROWS BRIDGE, STATEN ISLAND TOWER, FORT WADSWORTH IN BACKGROUND LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VERRAZANO-NARROWS BRIDGE, STATEN ISLAND TOWER, FORT WADSWORTH IN BACKGROUND LEFT - Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, Spanning Narrows between Fort Hamilton (Brooklyn) & Staten Island, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  11. Karst aquifers on small islands--the island of Olib, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Vlahovi?, Tatjana; Munda, Boris

    2012-10-01

    Water supply is a major problem in the Adriatic islands, especially during the summer tourism season, and represents a limiting factor to the islands' further economic development. Much attention has been given to water supply solutions, primarily in terms of attempting to use the existing island water. Unfortunately, few islands have favourable hydrological conditions to accumulate significant quantities of surface water or groundwater. In the period from 2001 to 2004, investigations were conducted on many islands to define their own freshwater or partially brackish water resources since desalinisation technology could resolve a significant part of the water supply demand on small and distant islands. Due to the specificity and complexity of research in karst areas, the study was conducted in phases and included the geological and hydrogeological reconnaissance of the island, aimed at locating possible areas on the island where the necessary quantities of groundwater of adequate quality could be captured; a detailed hydrogeological mapping of the specified areas, geophysical investigation and test drilling; and, over several days, test pumping of the most promising borehole. One of the islands investigated was the island of Olib. The conducted surveys indicated that it is possible to pump about 3.5 L/s of groundwater from the karst aquifer of the island of Olib, which fully complies with the sanitary quality of drinking water. PMID:22048924

  12. Tin diselenide quantum-sized island films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushkhov, A. R.; Gaev, D. S.; Rabinovich, O. I.; Stolyarov, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    Island films based on the intermediate phases forming in Ge-Se and Sn-Se systems are prepared by the incongruent evaporation of film structures of a Sn1 - x Se x composition. The surface morphology of these structures is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of growth conditions on the size distribution of islands is established.

  13. Invasional 'meltdown' on an oceanic island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis J. O'Dowd; Peter T. Green; P. S. Lake

    2003-01-01

    Islands can serve as model systems for understanding how biological invasions affect community structure and ecosystem function. Here we show invasion by the alien crazy ant Anoplolepis gracilipes causes a rapid, catastrophic shift in the rain forest ecosystem of a tropical oceanic island, affecting at least three trophic levels. In invaded areas, crazy ants extirpate the red land crab, the

  14. The Coleoptera of the Seychelles islands

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    , stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical of Endomychidae found in the Seychelles Islands. Key to the Endomychidae of the Seychelles Islands 1. Antennae 5-segmented and stout Trochoideus desjardinsi Antennae 9- or 10-segmented 2 2. Antennae 9-segmented; elytra

  15. Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands 

    E-print Network

    Hall, Hillary

    2012-10-19

    . RESULTS .............................................................................................................. 12 3.1 Cerro Azul Region ........................................................................................ 20 3.2 Le Cumbre... of the western Galapagos Islands ......................................................................... 7 3 Map of the Galapagos Islands with locations of Figures 4-33 ................... 11 4 Cerro Azul sidescan sonar data interpreted...

  16. Mantle reservoirs and ocean island basalts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan McKenzie; R. K. O'Nions

    1983-01-01

    The mantle part of the continental lithosphere possesses in part Sr and Nd isotopic compositions similar to those of ocean island basalts. Here we investigate circumstances under which this mantle material may become detached from continental lithosphere, incorporated into the convective flow and thereby providing a source for some ocean island basalts.

  17. Island Political Economy Geoff Bertram & Bernard Poirine

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In this chapter we build on the observation that island economies, and especially small ones (population below one within larger countries. Indonesia, for example, contains over 18,000 islands, of which around 6,000 are inhabited. Of that country's population of somewhere between 200 and 250 million, the great majority

  18. Booming and Crashing Populations and Easter Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bill Basener; David S. Ross

    2004-01-01

    The population of Easter Island grew steadily for some time and then suddenly decreased dramatically; humans almost disappeared from the island. This is not the sort of behavior pre- dicted by the usual logistic dierential equation model of an iso- lated population or by the predator-prey model for a population using resources. We present a mathematical model that predicts this

  19. The freshwater microcrustacea of Easter Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henri J. Dumont; Koen Martens

    1996-01-01

    The ‘Cladocera’, Copepod and Ostracod fauna of Easter Island amounts to only five species. Three of these are wide-ranging, and four are cyclic parthenogens or at least capable of parthenogenesis. Two, the Cladoceran Alona weinecki and the Ostracod Sarscypridopsis sp., are more interesting from a biogeographic point of view, because restricted (apart from Easter Island) to the subantarctic. It is

  20. A recently extinct palm from Easter Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Dransfield; J. R. Flenley; S. M. King; D. D. Harkness; S. Rapu

    1984-01-01

    The former existence of palms on Easter Island has been demonstrated palynologically1,2, but the genus could not be determined from pollen morphology. We now report the discovery on the island of endocarps (shells) from palm fruits which appear to bethose of an extinct species related to the Chilean `wine palm', Jubaea chilensis (Molina) Baillon. The endocarps, found in caves, have

  1. Andrew shortens lifetime of Louisiana Barrier Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    Because the Isles Dernieres, a series of four barrier islands off the coast of Louisiana, have one of the most rapidly eroding shorelines in the world, geologists at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey have been monitoring erosion activity over the last several years, said Jeff Williams of the USGS in Reston, Va. Hurricane Andrew, which struck the state on August 26, caused severe erosional damage to these islands that has shortened their lifetimes.Before Andrew struck, geologists projected that Raccoon Island would disappear below sea level by the year 2001 and that Whiskey Island would disappear by 2016. Now, due to the severe erosion from Hurricane Andrew, the scientists claim that the islands may disappear before the turn of the century, and the other islands in the Dernieres chain are expected to follow suit within 2 decades. Raccoon, Whiskey, Trinity, and East islands make up the Isles Dernieres, which existed as one island, known as the Isle Derniere, before an 1856 hurricane and subsequent erosion.

  2. COMPUTATIONAL PREDICTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GENOMIC ISLANDS

    E-print Network

    Hammerton, James

    COMPUTATIONAL PREDICTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GENOMIC ISLANDS: INSIGHTS INTO BACTERIAL islands: insights into bacterial pathogenicity Examining Committee: Chair: Dr. Paul C.H. Li Associate will be described; as well as an observation that recently discovered phage defence elements, CRISPRs, are over

  3. Rhode Island Public Library Trustees Handbook. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iacono, Frank P., Comp.

    2006-01-01

    Since the Office of Library and Information Services published the first Rhode Island trustees manual in 1980, Rhode Island public libraries have continued to respond to an ever increasing demand for service. In so doing, they consistently have taken advantage of new opportunities to provide this service more efficiently and effectively via…

  4. ARTHROPODS ON ISLANDS: Colonization, Speciation, and Conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosemary G. Gillespie; George K. Roderick

    2002-01-01

    ? Abstract Islands have traditionally been considered,to be any relatively small body of land completely surrounded by water. However, their primary biological char- acteristic, an extended period of isolation from a source of colonists, is common also to many situations on continents. Accordingly, theories and predictions developed for true islands have been applied to a huge array of systems, from

  5. Genomic islands in pathogenic and environmental microorganisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulrich Dobrindt; Bianca Hochhut; Ute Hentschel; Jörg Hacker

    2004-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important mechanism for the evolution of microbial genomes. Pathogenicity islands — mobile genetic elements that contribute to rapid changes in virulence potential — are known to have contributed to genome evolution by horizontal gene transfer in many bacterial pathogens. Increasing evidence indicates that equivalent elements in non-pathogenic species — genomic islands — are important in

  6. Lichens of subAntarctic Heard Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. O. Øvstedal; N. J. M. Gremmen

    2006-01-01

    A tota1 of 71 lichen species in 42 genera are listed for the island. Three species are described as new: “Arctomia” latispora Øvstedal, Fellhaneropsis subantarctica Øvstedal and Stereocaulon heardii Øvstedal. More than half of the species are restricted to the southern cold zone (Antarctica and sub-Antarctic islands).

  7. Long Island Geographic Information System (LI GIS)

    Cancer.gov

    The Geographic Information System for Breast Cancer Studies on Long Island (LI GIS) is a unique research tool combining an extensive collection of data and other geospatial resources. The LI GIS is designed primarily to study potential relationships between environmental exposures and breast cancer in Nassau and Suffolk counties (Long Island), NY; however, its application can be extended to the study of other diseases.

  8. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND RENAISSANCE YEARBOOK

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND RENAISSANCE YEARBOOK 50 Lower College Road ­ Room 123 Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 401.874.5897 uriyearbook@gmail.com www.uri.edu/yearbook The URI Renaissance Yearbook Order to the URI Renaissance Yearbook. BOLDED years are $50 Other years are $25 All shipping and handling fees

  9. Geological exploration of Cockburn Island, Antarctic Peninsula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEFFREY D. STILWELL

    2002-01-01

    Cockburn Island is one of the most historically significant places on the Ant? arctic continent. The isle was first surveyed in early 1843 during Captain James Ross' fa? mous expedition, but the early explorers failed to recognise its geological and palaeonto? logical significance. Cockburn Island is exceptional for it has the only succession of Upper Cretaceous, Eocene and Miocene-Pliocene rocks

  10. ISLAND SUBSIDENCE, HOT SPOTS, AND LITHOSPHERIC THINNING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert S. Detrick; S. Thomas Crough

    1978-01-01

    Drilling r%sults from several western Pacific atolls indicate the long-term subsidence of these islands is much more than would be expected from the cooling and thick- ening of the underlying lithosphere. This excess subsidence cannot be satisfactorily explained by isostatic adjustments to the weight of the volcano or the coral reef cap. It appears to be related to island formation

  11. Caton Island Alaid I. Puale Bay

    E-print Network

    Sitkinak Round Walrus Islands Kiska I. Sobaka & Vega Cape Ivakin Sea Lion Rocks (Marmot) Amlia I. Sviech.) Agattu I./Gillon Pt Seal Rocks (Cordova) Sea Lion Rock (Amak) Agattu I./Cape Sabak Walrus I. (Pribilofs: Habitat Protection Area: No Bottom Contact BS: Round Island No Entry (Walrus) BS: Walrus Protection Area

  12. Caton Island Alaid I. Puale Bay

    E-print Network

    Shaw I. Sitkinak Cape Sitkinak Round Walrus Islands Kiska I. Sobaka & Vega Cape Ivakin Sea Lion Rocks) Agattu I./Cape Sabak Walrus I. (Pribilofs) Akun Billings Head Attu I Cape Wrangell Amchitka I. East Cape Island No Entry (State: Walrus) BS: Walrus Protection Area: No Transit: April 1-Sep 30 BS: SSL

  13. Long Island Sound Curricular Resource Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Diana, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Long Island Sound is an estuary of national significance and provides important economic, recreational, and aesthetic value to the citizens of Connecticut and New York. Investigations have been conducted regarding living marine resources and nutrient loading. However, Long Island Sound is often overlooked as an educational resource. This guide is…

  14. Palaeotsunamis in the Pacific Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, J.; Chague-Goff, C.; Dominey-Howes, D.; McAdoo, B.; Cronin, S.; Bonte-Grapetin, Michael, M.; Nichol, S.; Horrocks, M.; Cisternas, M.; Lamarche, G.; Pelletier, B.; Jaffe, B.; Dudley, W.

    2011-01-01

    The recent 29 September 2009 South Pacific and 27 February 2010 Chilean events are a graphic reminder that the tsunami hazard and risk for the Pacific Ocean region should not be forgotten. Pacific Islands Countries (PICs) generally have short (<150 years) historic records, which means that to understand their tsunami hazard and risk researchers must study evidence for prehistoric events. However, our current state of knowledge of palaeotsunamis in PICs as opposed to their circum-Pacific counterparts is minimal at best. We briefly outline the limited extent of our current knowledge and propose an innovative methodology for future research in the Pacific. Each PIC represents a point source of information in the Pacific Ocean and this would allow their palaeotsunami records to be treated akin to palaeo-DART?? (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) buoys. Contemporaneous palaeotsunamis from local, regional and distant sources could be identified by using the spatial distribution of island records throughout the Pacific Ocean in conjunction with robust event chronologies. This would be highly innovative and, more importantly, would help provide the building blocks necessary to achieve more meaningful disaster risk reduction for PICs. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Lightning Activity over Tahiti Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, P.; Rodiere, M.; Moreau, C.; Laurent, V.

    2002-12-01

    The lightning activity has been recorded during the last four years with the help of a net of CIGRE Lightning Flash Counters installed all around Tahiti island. Furthermore, an extrapolation in time is done for the last thirty years using the registration (keraunic level) of the main meteorological station of Météo-France. Tahiti is a circular mountainous island with a 30km diameter and culminating at 2.200m The effect of the relief on the lightning activity measurement is discussed. A mean value of 90 days of thunderstorm per year has records. The daily, monthly, seasonal or yearly lightning activity over Tahiti is analysed. FFT analysis revel strong correlations with the cold phase of the ENSO (Ni¤a) and the and the MJO or the TISO. On other hand, the daily lightning activity is confronted to the various stability indices based on the layer stability concepts (Showalter, Adedokun, Telfer.). The sounding balloons executed twice a day by Météo-France allow the computation of such indices.

  16. Electron energization during magnetic island coalescence

    SciTech Connect

    Le, A.; Egedal, J. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Daughton, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Radio emission from colliding coronal mass ejection flux ropes in the interplanetary medium suggested the local generation of superthermal electrons. Inspired by those observations, a fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulation of magnetic island coalescence models the magnetic reconnection between islands as a source of energetic electrons. When the islands merge, stored magnetic energy is converted into electron kinetic energy. The simulation demonstrates that a mechanism for electron energization originally applied to open field line reconnection geometries also operates near the reconnection site of merging magnetic islands. The electron heating is highly anisotropic, and it results mainly from an electric field surrounding the reconnection site that accelerates electrons parallel to the magnetic field. A detailed theory predicts the maximum electron energies and how they depend on the plasma parameters. In addition, the global motion of the magnetic islands launches low-frequency waves in the surrounding plasma, which induce large-amplitude, anisotropic fluctuations in the electron temperature.

  17. Deformation Studies In Andaman and Nicobar Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, B.

    2005-12-01

    Geodetic & Research Branch of Survey of India being the National Mapping Organisation has the responsibility of providing precise horizontal and vertical control network for the country including connecting the various islands to the mainland. Precise GPS, High Precision Levelling and Tidal measurements are routinely taken up in the Andaman & Nicobar Islands, the last epoch from Great Sumatra earthquake being in April 2004. 32 days tidal observations also taken up in various habited islands to study sea level rise/fall to understand land subsidence/upheaval. Comparison of pre and post Tsunami vectors from Mainland to A & N Islands clearly show that the Islands have moved 2 to 3 meters in horizontal position towards the mainland and also the Islands have rotated in anti-clock wise directions. The GPS stations have moved in South Westerly direction with the magnitude varying from 2 to 3 meters in the Andaman Islands and up to 5 to 6 meters in the Great Nicobar Islands. It is also interesting to note that the GPS stations lying in the West coast of A & N Islands have shown greater movements than the stations like Long Islands, Govindgarh etc. lying in the Eastern coast. Thirty-two days tidal analysis was carried out using the tidal observations at Chatham Observatory, Portblair to ascertain the vertical movement. It is observed that there is a rise in local mean sea level of an order of 1.05 m. GPS observations taken just after Tsunami in early January,2005 also indicate the similar trend in the vertical movement. At most of the places it exhibits a subsidence of 0.52 m to 2.86 m except two places Ramakrishnapur and Govindgarh, where a rise of 0.51 m and 0.17 m was observed. This paper discusses the horizontal and vertical movements of the points at various epochs and the effects of the Great Sumatra Tsunami and its Socio economic impact in the region.

  18. De Long Islands: sedimentary history and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershova, Victoria; Prokopiev, Andrei; Khudoley, Andrei; Sobolev, Nikolay; Petrov, Eugeniy

    2014-05-01

    The De Long Islands are an archipelago located in the East Siberian Sea, represent one of the few exposures of the Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic rocks in this part of the Arctic Ocean, and therefore are a very important area for study. It consists of 5 islands: Jeannette, Henrietta, Bennett, Vil'kitsky and Zhokhov. Vil'kitsky and Zhokhov Islands are covered by Cenozoic basalts, therefore are not considered here, whilst the Paleozoic rocks of interest for this study outcrop on Jeannette, Henrietta and Bennett islands. Jeannette Island is the smallest, containing exposures of a highly deformed and tectonized sedimentary succession. This succession is represented by siltstones and argillites, with beds of gravel to cobble conglomerates. The defining characteristic of these deposits is the abundance of tuffaceous beds, along with volcanic pebbles within the conglomerates. On Henrietta Island, four different units have been identified. The oldest one is very similar to the rocks which outcrop across Jeannette Island. The second unit consists of sandstones with lenses and layers of polymictic conglomerates. The third unit is represented by red-colored sandstones, whilst the youngest unit comprises basalt flows of an assumed Middle Paleozoic age. Accordingly detrital zircons data the age of sedimentary succession of Henrietta and Jeannette islands is the Neoproterozoic. On Bennett Island, Cambrian and Ordovician strata mainly consist of carbonates with minor interbedded clastics. We determined U-Pb ages for detrital zircons from 4 samples, from Jeannette and Henrietta Islands. Three samples have similar age populations, although there are some variations in the abundance of each population. The samples are dominated by Neoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic grains with distinct peaks at ca. 550, 660, 1000, 1150, 1450, 1665 Ma. The youngest sedimentary unit on Henrietta Island has a very different detrital zircon distribution. The 550 Ma zircon population prevails (60%), with additional smaller peaks are at 1190 Ma and 1695 Ma. The detrital zircons from two samples collected from the Lower Paleozoic interbedded clastic rocks of Bennett Island have been dated. The zircon age distributions are very similar to those from Jeannette and Henrietta islands. The spectrum of detrital zircons indicates that clastic detritus was derived from multiple sources, including the Grenvillian and Sveconorwegian orogens, as well as a Neoproterozoic ca. 570-550 orogen (Timanian?). This research was supported by RFBR grants 13-05-00700, 13-05-00943, research grant of Saint Petersburg State University and Grant of President of Russia for Young Scientist MK-2902.2013.5.

  19. SRTM Stereo Pair: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930s. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.

    This stereoscopic view was generated using preliminary topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data from the top (north) to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Also, colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to pink at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1300 meters (4300 feet) of total relief. The stereoscopic effect was created by first draping the shading and colors back over the topographic data and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. The 3-D perception is achieved by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    This image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (about 200 feet) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 192 km (119 miles) x 142 km (88 miles) Location: 17.8 deg. South lat., 178.0 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA

  20. Crystalline islands of semiconductor films

    SciTech Connect

    Zmievskaya, G. I.; Bondareva, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, M.V. Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nucleation in the form of powder in a discharge plasma and the formation of thin film islands on a Si(100) substrate in the course of gas-phase epitaxy are simulated numerically. Models of plasma-like media and nonequilibrium processes accompanying phase transitions of the first kind (such as condensation and crystallization) in the initial fast (fluctuation) stage are described. The nonstationary evolution of nuclei size distribution functions is modeled by solving kinetic equations in partial derivatives and stochastic Ito-Stratonovich analog equations. This makes it possible to refine the formation mechanisms of microcrystalline state polytypes and calculate the nucleation rate and the initial roughness of a SiC coating.

  1. Opportunity at 'Cook Islands' (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11854 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11854

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,825th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 12, 2009). North is at the top.

    This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

    The rover had driven half a meter (1.5 feet) earlier on Sol 1825 to fine-tune its location for placing its robotic arm onto an exposed patch of outcrop including a target area informally called 'Cook Islands.' On the preceding sol, Opportunity turned around to drive frontwards and then drove 4.5 meters (15 feet) toward this outcrop. The tracks from the SOl 1824 drive are visible near the center of this view at about the 11 o'clock position. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Opportunity had previously been driving backward as a strategy to redistribute lubrication in a wheel drawing more electrical current than usual.

    The outcrop exposure that includes 'Cook Islands' is visible just below the center of the image.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  2. Amchitka Island, Alaska, special sampling project 1997

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-28

    This 1997 special sampling project represents a special radiobiological sampling effort to augment the 1996 Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program (LTHMP) for Amchitka Island in Alaska. Lying in the western portion of the Aleutian Islands arc, near the International Date Line, Amchitka Island is one of the southernmost islands of the Rat Island Chain. Between 1965 and 1971, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission conducted three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. In 1996, Greenpeace collected biota samples and speculated that several long-lived, man-made radionuclides detected (i.e., americium-241, plutonium-239 and -240, beryllium-7, and cesium-137) leaked into the surface environment from underground cavities created during the testing. The nuclides of interest are detected at extremely low concentrations throughout the environment. The objectives of this special sampling project were to scientifically refute the Greenpeace conclusions that the underground cavities were leaking contaminants to the surface. This was achieved by first confirming the presence of these radionuclides in the Amchitka Island surface environment and, second, if the radionuclides were present, determining if the source is the underground cavity or worldwide fallout. This special sampling and analysis determined that the only nonfallout-related radionuclide detected was a low level of tritium from the Long Shot test, which had been previously documented. The tritium contamination is monitored and continues a decreasing trend due to radioactive decay and dilution.

  3. [Biodemographical study in the Island of Pascua].

    PubMed

    Lazo, B; Campusano, C; Figueroa, H

    1993-06-01

    The aim of this study was to know the degree of miscegenation in the Easter Island population. One hundred two weddings carried out between 1987 and 1991 were recorded and the proportion of marriages between islanders and immigrants was analyzed. Also, ABO and Rh blood groups of all deliveries occurred between 1988 and 1991 were compiled. There was a particular tendency of islanders to marry with immigrants and the proportion of miscegenation was 75.5%. Additionally a decline in the frequency of A blood group is observed, comparing results from studies performed since 1932 up to date. PMID:8278694

  4. DISTRIBUTIONS OF NEW ZEALAND BIRDS ON REAL AND VIRTUAL ISLANDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JARED M. DIAMOND

    Summary: This paper considers how habitat geometry affects New Zealand bird distributions on land-bridge islands, oceanic islands, and forest patches. The data base consists of distributions of 60 native land and freshwater bird species on 31 islands. A theoretical section examines how species incidences should vary with factors such as population density, island area, and dispersal ability, in two cases:

  5. Distributed generation islanding-implications on power system dynamic performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Walling; N. W. Miller

    2002-01-01

    Distributed generation can potentially support unintentional system islands, isolated from the remainder of the system. These islands pose a significant risk to safety and equipment, and need to be quickly detected and eliminated. Islands are detected by sensitive under- and over-voltage and frequency functions, sometimes aided by active island destabilization techniques. Both the passive voltage and frequency trip point and

  6. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH ELEVATION AFTER ADDITION OF REINFORCED-CONCRETE SECTION WITH CYCLONE SEPARATOR. DATED NOVEMBER 11, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 105, South Avenue between Gillespie Avenue & Second Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  7. 6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office, SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS BEFORE REMODELING OF PARAPET. DATED MARCH 8, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 251, Gillespie Avenue & Ramsey Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  8. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH ELEVATION BEFORE REPLACEMENT OF STEEL SASH WITH CONCRETE BLOCK. DATED NOVEMBER 11, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 67, Rodman Avenue & Fourth Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  9. 9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH ELEVATION AFTER ADDITION OF HOSE DRYING TOWER. DATED SEPTEMBER 26, 1919. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 225, Rodman Avenue between Flagler Street & Gillespie Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  10. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS DURING FINAL STAGE OF CONSTRUCTION. DATED 1871. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 104, Rodman Avenue between First & Second Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  11. 6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office, FIRST FLOOR, SHOWING POWER PRESSES FOR LEATHER WORKING IN HARNESS SHOP. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1905. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 110, Rodman Avenue between Fourth Street & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. 9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. INTERIOR OF STEEL-FRAMED SECTION showing ASSEMBLING OF GUN MOUNTS. DATED MAY 24, 1939. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 210, Rodman Avenue & Gronen Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  13. 9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SECOND FLOOR, EAST WING. MOTORIZED MACHINING EQUIPMENT USED IN MANUFACTURE OF MACHINE GUN PARTS. SHOWN IN THE FOREGROUND IS A PRATT & WHITNEY VERTICAL MILLING MACHINE. DATED JANUARY 21, 1943. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 68, Rodman Avenue between Fourth Street & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  14. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH ELEVATION BEFORE REPLACEMENT OF STEEL SASH WITH CONCRETE BLOCK. DATED APRIL 27, 1956. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 109, Rodman Avenue & Fourth Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  15. 4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS BEFORE REMODELING OF PARAPET AND AFTER REMOVAL OF SMOKESTACK FROM SOUTH ELEVATION. DATED APRIL 7, 1941. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 133, Gillespie Avenue between South Avenue & Ramsey Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  16. 6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. BASEMENT, SHOWING ORIGINAL OPEN INTERIOR FLOOR PLAN. DATED C. 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 62, Rodman Avenue between First & Second Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  17. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. BASEMENT, SHOWING ASSEMBLING OF ARTILLERY GUN CARRIAGES. DATED MAY 12, 1904. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 108, Rodman Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  18. 10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND WEST (FRONT) ELEVATIONS; EAST (REAR) AND NORTH ELEVATIONS, BEFORE REMOVAL OF CHIMNEYS AND ADDITION OF WING TO CENTER OF EAST FACADE. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  19. 8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, DOCUMENTING ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION. DATED C. 1875. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 225, Rodman Avenue between Flagler Street & Gillespie Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  20. 11. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS AFTER ADDITION OF WING TO CENTER OF EAST FACADE. DATED NOVEMBER 4, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  1. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS AFTER ADDITION OF STAIR TOWERS ON SOUTH FACADE. DATED NOVEMBER 1, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 104, Rodman Avenue between First & Second Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  2. 6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SECOND FLOOR; WOOD WORKING EQUIPMENT IN CARPENTRY SHOP, ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1905. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 104, Rodman Avenue between First & Second Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  3. 6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS IN FINAL STAGE OF CONSTRUCTION. DATED C. 1870. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 60, Rodman Avenue between Gillespie Avenue & First Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  4. 9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS BEFORE REMOVAL OF VENTILATORS. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 138, Second Avenue between South Avenue & Ramsey Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  5. 7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS, IN UNALTERED CONDITION. PROBABLY TAKEN ABOUT 1910. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 60, Rodman Avenue between Gillespie Avenue & First Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  6. 8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office, NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS (ABOVE) DURING FINAL STAGE OF CONSTRUCTION. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1922. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 210, Rodman Avenue & Gronen Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  7. 3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. LOOKING NORTH; BUILDING IS SHOWN WITH ORIGINAL COPING. DATED C. 1873. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 53, North Avenue North of Midpoint, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  8. 6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. INTERIOR SHOWING STORAGE OF WALNUT FOR GUN STOCKS. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1922. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 140, Second Street between Ramsey Street & South Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  9. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS BEFORE REPLACEMENT OF STRAP-HINGE DOOR. DATED NOVEMBER 1, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 140, Second Street between Ramsey Street & South Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  10. 7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. BASEMENT, SHOWING ASSEMBLING OF 75MM GUN CARRIAGES. DATED AUGUST 23, 1918. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 110, Rodman Avenue between Fourth Street & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  11. 8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. FIRST FLOOR, WEST WING; SHOWING PRATT & WHITNEY RIFLING MACHINES FOR MANUFACTURING 1903 MODEL SPRING-FIELD RIFLE. DATED JULY 4, 1904. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 60, Rodman Avenue between Gillespie Avenue & First Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. 7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. INTERIOR LOOKING EAST, SHOWING STORAGE OF LUMBER. DATED OCTOBER 2, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 140, Second Street between Ramsey Street & South Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  13. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS AFTER ADDITION OF BRICK STAIR TOWERS ON SOUTH FACADE. DATED NOVEMBER 1, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 110, Rodman Avenue between Fourth Street & East Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  14. 5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. EAST AND NORTH ELEVATIONS BEFORE REMOVAL OF STRAP-HINGE DOOR. DATED NOVEMBER 21, 1944. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 139, Second Street between Ramsey Street & South Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  15. 6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. FIRST FLOOR, EAST WING, SHOWING BELT-DRIVEN EQUIPMENT (LATHES, DRILLS, SCREW MACHINES) USED IN MACHINING COMPONENTS FOR ARTILLERY GUN CARRIAGES. DATED MAY 12, 1904. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 108, Rodman Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  16. Vegetation and flora of the Solander Islands, Southern New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. N. Johnson

    1975-01-01

    The Solander Islands, south of South Island, hold 53 vascular plant species, mostly ferns, orchids, and composites with wind-borne propagules. One-third of the species on Big Solander Island are very rare, being either coastal or confined to a sheltered summit plateau. Peat covers the island, supporting Olearia lyallii and some Senecio stewartiae on the plateau, giving way to S. reinoldii

  17. The effects of island ontogeny on species diversity and phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Luis M.; Etienne, Rampal S.; Phillimore, Albert B.

    2014-01-01

    A major goal of island biogeography is to understand how island communities are assembled over time. However, we know little about the influence of variable area and ecological opportunity on island biotas over geological timescales. Islands have limited life spans, and it has been posited that insular diversity patterns should rise and fall with an island's ontogeny. The potential of phylogenies to inform us of island ontogenetic stage remains unclear, as we lack a phylogenetic framework that focuses on islands rather than clades. Here, we present a parsimonious island-centric model that integrates phylogeny and ontogeny into island biogeography and can incorporate a negative feedback of diversity on species origination. This framework allows us to generate predictions about species richness and phylogenies on islands of different ages. We find that peak richness lags behind peak island area, and that endemic species age increases with island age on volcanic islands. When diversity negatively affects rates of immigration and cladogenesis, our model predicts speciation slowdowns on old islands. Importantly, we find that branching times of in situ radiations can be informative of an island's ontogenetic stage. This novel framework provides a quantitative means of uncovering processes responsible for island biogeography patterns using phylogenies. PMID:24759856

  18. 24. Aerial photograph dated 22 April 1942, showing Gould Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Aerial photograph dated 22 April 1942, showing Gould Island from the northeast. Complex under construction includes shop building (large rectangle at north end of island, and firing pier (at far right). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  19. The Rhode Island Geographic Information System 2007 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    The Rhode Island Geographic Information System 2007 Annual Report The Rhode Island Department, Rhode Island 02908-5872 May 15, 2007 This document can be found on line in an electronic format (Adobe pdf) at: www.edc.uri.edu/rigis #12;The Rhode Island Geographic Information System PURPOSE: This report

  20. The Rhode Island Geographic Information System 2006 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    The Rhode Island Geographic Information System 2006 Annual Report The Rhode Island Department of Administration Division of Information Technology-RIGIS Coordinator One Capitol Hill Providence, Rhode Island.edc.uri.edu/rigis #12;The Rhode Island Geographic Information System PURPOSE: This report provides a synopsis of GIS

  1. Islands of Music Analysis, Organization, and Visualization of Music Archives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elias Pampalk

    2001-01-01

    Islands of Music are a graphical user interface to music collections based on a metaphor of geographic maps. Islands represent musical genres. Mountains and hills on these islands represent sub-genres. The islands are situated in such a way that similar genres are close together and might even be connected by a land passage while perceptually very different genres are separated

  2. 14. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. CENTER CRANEWAY, SHOWING MACHINING OF BREECH MECHANISM FOR 155MM ARTILLERY GUN. DATED JUNE 12, 1945. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 250, Gillespie Avenue between Ramsey Street & South Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  3. A global comparison of plant invasions on oceanic islands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph Kueffer; Curtis C. Daehler; Christian W. Torres-Santana; Christophe Lavergne; Jean-Yves Meyer; Rüdiger Otto; Luís Silva

    2010-01-01

    Oceanic islands have long been considered to be particularly vulnerable to biotic invasions, and much research has focused on invasive plants on oceanic islands. However, findings from individual islands have rarely been compared between islands within or between biogeographic regions. We present in this study the most comprehensive, standardized dataset to date on the global distribution of invasive plant species

  4. 9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST WING, WEST ELEVATION AFTER ADDITION OF CHIMNEY. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 106, Rodman Avenue between Second & Third Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  5. 10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. WEST WING, NORTH ELEVATION; AFTER CONSTRUCTION OF SMOKESTACK, ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 64, Rodman Avenue between Second & Third Streets, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  6. 20. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. NORTH (ABOVE) AND SOUTH (BELOW) ELEVATIONS AFTER CONSTRUCTION OF 1903 ADDITION TO EAST ELEVATION. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN 1905. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 160, Sylvan Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  7. Introduced house mice as a conservation concern on Gough Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Jones; S. L. Chown; K. J. Gaston

    2003-01-01

    House mice have previously been identified as a significant threat to both species and ecosystems on Southern Ocean islands. To date, these impacts have been quantified on several sub-Antarctic islands, but the role of house mice on more temperate islands is poorly known. On South Atlantic Gough Island, non-commensal house mice (Mus musculus L.) were probably introduced in the early

  8. The Influence of Synoptic Climatology on Urban Heat Island Intensity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean Michael Model

    1992-01-01

    This study describes the statistical properties of the urban heat island for a city under a variety of synoptic conditions during winter months. The relationships between urban heat island intensity and the identified atmospheric processes is investigated using a proposed heat island index. The urban heat island index (HII) is the difference in air temperature between a weather station located

  9. 2. Photocopy of photograph. View, looking southeast, showing Shooters Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph. View, looking southeast, showing Shooters Island with standard ship building plant in operation. Circa 1930 by Airmap Corporation of America. (Original in Staten Inland Historic Society, Staten Island, New York) - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  10. Preliminary Seismic Tomography of Deception Island Volcano, South Shetland Islands (Antarctica)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Zandomeneghi; A. H. Barclay; T. Ben Zvi; W. Wilcock; J. M. Ibáñez; J. Almendros

    2005-01-01

    Deception Island, 62°59' S, 60°41' W, is an active volcano located in Bransfield Strait between the Antarctic Peninsula and the main South Shetland Islands. The volcano has a basal diameter of ~30 km and rises ~1500 m from the seafloor to a maximum height of over 500 m above sea level. The 15-km-diameter emerged island is horseshoe-shaped with a flooded

  11. Geochemistry of hydrothermal fluids from an intraplate ocean island: Everman volcano, Socorro Island, Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. A. Taran; T. P. Fischer; E. Cienfuegos; P. Morales

    2002-01-01

    Socorro Island, Mexico, still volcanically active, is an alkaline and peralkaline volcanic island in the eastern Pacific Ocean located on a mid-ocean ridge spreading center that was abandoned at ?3.5 Ma. Gas and water samples collected on the island in 1999 from the dome fumaroles and hot springs of Everman volcano have been analyzed for major components, H-O-C-S, He and

  12. SURFACE REMEDIATION IN THE ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A CASE STUDY OF AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. O. Giblin; D. C. Stahl; J. A. Bechtel

    2002-01-01

    Amchitka Island, Alaska, was at one time an integral player in the nation's defense program. Located in the North Pacific Ocean in the Aleutian Island archipelago, the island was intermittently inhabited by several key government agencies, including the U.S. Army, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy), and the U.S. Navy. Since 1993, the

  13. The bootstrap current in small rotating magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, A.; Poli, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP-EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching(Germany); Peeters, A. G. [Department of Physics, Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    The bootstrap current in small magnetic islands of neoclassical tearing modes is studied with guiding center particle simulations including pitch angle scattering. A model for a rotating island and its electric field is used and a new approximation to the electric potential in small islands is derived. Islands with sizes of the order of the ion banana orbit width are studied by means of a two-step model, which allows to treat both ions and electrons kinetically. The bootstrap current in such small islands is found to depend strongly on the direction of rotation of the island. The bootstrap current in small islands rotating in the ion diamagnetic direction is strongly diminished, similarly to what happens in big islands. In small islands rotating in the electron diamagnetic direction, on the contrary, the bootstrap current is almost completely preserved, implying a reduced neoclassical drive of the island growth.

  14. Honey Bee Apis mellifera Parasites in the Absence of Nosema ceranae Fungi and Varroa destructor Mites

    E-print Network

    Shutler, Dave

    Resources, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, 3. destructor are of significant interest. The island of Newfoundland, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, is free of V. destructor; the absence of N. ceranae has not been confirmed. Of 55 Newfoundland

  15. idly, had immediate, major, and visible impacts on the island_s biota and physical landscape, and

    E-print Network

    Bear, Mark

    14, 801 (2004). 8. C. Smith, in The Archaeology of Easter Island, Vol. 1, T. Heyerdahl, E. Ferdon (1971). 11. J. Flenley, in Easter Island Studies: Contributions to the History of Rapanui in Memoryidly, had immediate, major, and visible impacts on the island_s biota and physical landscape

  16. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND Eligibility for In State Tuition and Fees Based Upon Rhode Island High School Attendance

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND Eligibility for In State Tuition and Fees Based Upon Rhode Island High herein, which are all true and correct; and (b) That I currently live in the state of Rhode Island card that lists my address; (c) That I have lived in Rhode Island for three (3) or more years, have

  17. Physically Based Modeling of Delta Island Consumptive Use A case study of Fabian Tract and Staten Island

    E-print Network

    Lund, Jay R.

    Physically Based Modeling of Delta Island Consumptive Use A case study of Fabian Tract and Staten and Staten Island Abstract Continuous water diversions, water operations, and land-use changes in the Delta-resolution topography rather than past approximations. The Delta islands known as Fabian Tract and Staten Island were

  18. 26. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photograph of a photograph in possession of Rock Island Arsenal Historical Office. SERIES OF VIEWS BEFORE CONSTRUCTION OF LOCK AND DAM, SHOWING RAIL BED ON UPPER DECK (UPPER LEFT), SWING SPAN IN ROTATION (UPPER RIGHT), EAST ELEVATION OF SWING SPAN AND BALTIMORE TRUSSES (CENTER), VEHICULAR ROADWAY ON LOWER DECK (LOWER LEFT), AND DRAW PIER. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 1898. - Rock Island Arsenal, Rock Island Bridge, Fort Armstrong Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  19. Simulations of the bootstrap current in small rotating magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, A.; Poli, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Peeters, A. G. [University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-01

    The bootstrap current in small magnetic islands of neoclassical tearing modes is studied in numerical simulations whith the guiding center particle code HAGIS. The contributions of both, electrons and ions, are included, as well as the island rotation and its electric field. The case of islands that are smaller than the ion banana orbit width is studied. We find that the size of the bootstrap current in small islands depends strongly on the rotation frequency of the island.

  20. Lapita colonization of the admiralty islands?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J

    1981-08-14

    Archeological research in the Admiralty Islands provides evidence of occupation by 3500 years ago and suggests settlement by obsidian-using maritime colonists, whose Lapita pottery style underwent gradual modification within the Admiralties. PMID:17834582

  1. Electron acceleration via magnetic island coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, I.; Yumura, T.; Tanaka, K. G.; Fujimoto, M.

    2009-06-01

    Electron acceleration via fast magnetic island coalescence that happens as quick magnetic reconnection triggering (QMRT) proceeds has been studied. We have carried out a three-dimensional full kinetic simulation of the Harris current sheet with a large enough simulation run for two magnetic islands coalescence. Due to the strong inductive electric field associated with the non-linear evolution of the lower-hybrid-drift instability and the magnetic island coalescence process observed in the non-linear stage of the collisionless tearing mode, electrons are significantly accelerated at around the neutral sheet and the subsequent X-line. The accelerated meandering electrons generated by the non-linear evolution of the lower-hybrid-drift instability are resulted in QMRT, and QMRT leads to fast magnetic island coalescence. As a whole, the reconnection triggering and its transition to large-scale structure work as an effective electron accelerator.

  2. Three Guidance Programs in Providence, Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chirico, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes three programs implemented in the Providence, Rhode Island, elementary schools to improve students' self-image. These include a guidance/puppetry program, student of the week awards, and a behavioral management system. (JAC)

  3. A Survey of the Island Province.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Stirling

    1985-01-01

    Briefly reviews some of the findings of the 1984 survey of public attitudes toward the provincial education system conducted by Prince Edward Island's School System Review Commission and discusses some of the commission's resulting 94 recommendations for improvement. (PGD)

  4. Monitoring Oceanic Islands Via Radarsat Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, James B.; Mahmood, Ahmed; Giguere, Christine

    1998-01-01

    Oceanic islands represent an often overlooked aspect of the land surface of Earth, yet they are sensitive, natural laboratories for investigating the impacts of environmental change on landscapes and land-cover systems. For this reason, we have utilized the Canadian Space Agency's RADARSAT satellite to initiate a program for monitoring the landscapes of approximately 20 oceanic islands as part of the RADARSAT Background Mission. To date, we have analyzed high resolution SAR images of 12 islands that extend from the Arctic, throughout the Atlantic and Southern Indian oceans, and into the equatorial Pacific. We have selected islands for monitoring on the basis of their known or suspected history of landscape change in association with environmental factors or anthropogenic effects.

  5. Islands of Adventure New ELI Offices

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    to Bring: Your bus pass, Gator 1 ID card, money for an Islands of Adventure ticket (at least $92), extra can walk through Hogwarts Castle, drink butterbeer (nonalcoholic), and even buy a wand. This is one

  6. US Virgin Islands renewable energy future

    E-print Network

    Oldfield, Brian (Brian K.)

    2013-01-01

    The US Virgin Islands must face drastic changes to its electrical system. There are two problems with electricity production in the USVI-it's dirty and it's expensive. Nearly one hundred percent of the electricity in these ...

  7. Pacific Islands Mass Communications; Selected Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richstad, Jim; McMillan, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of materials on such area of mass communications in the Pacific Islands as broadcasting, radio and television, cinema, communication research, mass media in education, Honululu Media Council, newspapers and newspapermen, and printing and satellite communication. (JEG)

  8. Macroalgal distribution at Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas 

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Jill Christie

    1997-01-01

    from the reef community, macroalgae have been increasing in abundance on the reefs surrounding Lee Stocking Island (LSI), Bahamas. Macroalgal patches prevent coral recruitment and growth, thereby restructuring the reef. In such cases, coral and algal...

  9. In the Shadow of Three Mile Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair-Clough, Ida; Wheeler, Brenda

    1979-01-01

    Describes how teachers turned the reality of the nuclear reactor incident at Three Mile Island into a learning experience for children by recreating the sequence of events through creative dramatics. (CM)

  10. Geologic Studies on Sitkinak Island, Alaska

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Geologists examine an exposure of a tidal marsh bank on Sitkinak Island, Alaska. The bank exposes interbedded peat and silt that records sudden vertical land movements associated with megathrust fault slip during large earthquakes....

  11. Geologic Studies on Sitkinak Island, Alaska

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A tidal marsh bank exposed during low tide on Sitkinak Island, Alaska. The bank reveals ledges of alternating peat and silt. Abrupt uplift and subsidence during large megathrust earthquakes is interpreted to be the cause of the alternating layers....

  12. Impurity-induced island pinning during electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongmanns, M.; Latz, A.; Wolf, D. E.

    2015-04-01

    We study the electromigration-induced drift of monolayer Ag islands on Ag(111) which contain one Cu atom. For this purpose a three-dimensional self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo model was extended, and a realistic many-body potential was used. The only free parameters of the model are the effective valences of the Ag and Cu atoms. Due to the impurity, the island drift is significantly reduced, especially for small islands. This is traced back to sequential pinning and depinning events, which are analyzed in detail. Surprisingly, this phenomenon is qualitatively independent of the impurity's effective valence, as long as the impurity does not detach from the island edge. How strongly the drift velocity is reduced depends on the effective valence.

  13. Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Population Profiles > Asian American > Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders Among Asian/Pacific ... all older age groups. At a Glance – Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  14. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

  15. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

  16. Seed island formation by forced magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Günter, S.; Lackner, K.; Maraschek, M.

    2012-06-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes observed in experiments often grow from seed magnetic islands induced by triggers like sawteeth. The formation of seed islands is studied in this paper using both the reduced MHD and two-fluid equations, with the trigger being modelled by externally applied resonant magnetic perturbations. In the linear phase the growth rate of the driven mode is found to be the same as that of the trigger. A slowly growing trigger drives a tearing mode, while a fast one drives a kink-like mode, which becomes a tearing mode later when the trigger's growth slows down. A finite ion sound Larmor radius (ion Larmor radius by using electron temperature) and electron inertia are found to lead to a larger seed island for a given external perturbation. The electron diamagnetic drift and plasma rotation, if increasing the relative rotation between the trigger and the driven mode, decrease the seed island width.

  17. 1980 volcanic eruption reported on Marion Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilhelm J. Verwoerd; Shaun Russell; Aldo Berruti

    1981-01-01

    The first volcanic eruption in the recorded history of Marion Island (46°54'S, 37°45'E) occurred between February and October 1980 at a locality on the west coast. It was a minor event that passed unnoticed at the meteorological station 20 km distant. The discovery was made on November 4, by five expedition members who walked around the island. When examined in

  18. Late Quaternary pollen records from Easter Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Flenley; Sarah M. King

    1984-01-01

    Easter Island is the most isolated piece of inhabited land in the world. It exhibited an unique megalithic culture1-3, involving the sculpting of giant statues (moai) especially between AD ~1400 and ~16804 when, for unknown reasons, the culture suddenly collapsed. The island is also of interest in relation to Pleistocene climatic change as CLIMAP5 predicted no reduction of sea-surface temperatures

  19. The hydrology of Hatteras Island, North Carolina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Paul Anderson Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This is a study of the groundwater hydrology and groundwater-surface-water interactions of barrier islands. Shallow groundwater is typically the sole source of freshwater on barrier islands. It is threatened by increasing coastal populations (both permanent and seasonal residents). Higher demand for groundwater may induce saltwater intrusion through overpumping. Water quality also is often threatened by inadequate waste-management practices and overwash.

  20. Muria Volcano, Island of Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the north coast of central Java, Indonesia centers on the currently inactive Muria Volcano (6.5S, 111.0E). Muria is 5,330 ft. tall and lies just north of Java's main volcanic belt which runs east - west down the spine of the island attesting to the volcanic origin of the more than 1,500 Indonesian Islands.