Science.gov

Sample records for gas assisted mechanical

  1. Mechanism study on the effects of side assisting gas velocity during CO{sub 2} laser welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Linjie; Zhang Jianxun; Gong Shuili

    2009-07-15

    An experimental study on the effects of side assisting gas during CO{sub 2} laser welding has been carried out, and it is found that side assisting gas velocity can significantly affect the laser induced plasma and the weld cross-sectional geometry. In order to get better understanding on the associated mechanism, a three dimensional model based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy has been developed to simulate the spatial distributions of plasma temperature under different side assisting gas velocities. Furthermore, ray-tracing method is employed to investigate the variation of bremsstrahlung absorption and power density distribution on keyhole walls at different side assisting gas velocities with the assumption of conical keyhole shape. The results show that the diminishing of refraction and bremsstrahlung absorption due to an increase in side assisting gas velocity results in an increase in heat transfer efficiency, which contributes to the increase of weld cross-sectional area and penetration depth.

  2. Plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane at low temperatures: numerical analysis of gas-phase chemical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goujard, Valentin; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Yuzawa, Shuhei; Ağiral, Anil; Okazaki, Ken

    2011-07-01

    Methane partial oxidation was investigated using a plasma microreactor. The experiments were performed at 5 and 300 °C. Microreactor configuration allows an efficient evacuation of the heat generated by methane partial oxidation and dielectric barrier discharges, allowing at the same time a better temperature control. At 5 °C, liquid condensation of low vapour pressure compounds, such as formaldehyde and methanol, occurs. 1H-NMR analysis allowed us to demonstrate significant CH3OOH formation during plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane. Conversion and product selectivity were discussed for both temperatures. In the second part of this work, a numerical simulation was performed and a gas-phase chemical mechanism was proposed and discussed. From the comparison between the experimental results and the simulation it was found that CH3OO· formation has a determinant role in oxygenated compound production, since its fast formation disfavoured radical recombination. At 5 °C the oxidation leads mainly towards oxygenated compound formation, and plasma dissociation was the major phenomenon responsible for CH4 conversion. At 300 °C, higher CH4 conversion resulted from oxidative reactions induced by ·OH radicals with a chemistry predominantly oxidative, producing CO, H2, CO2 and H2O.

  3. [Mechanical resuscitation assist devices].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Breil, M; Ihli, M; Messelken, M; Rauch, S; Schewe, J-C

    2014-03-01

    In Germany 100,000-160,000 people suffer from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) annually. The incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after OHCA varies between emergency ambulance services but is in the range of 30-90 CPR attempts per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Basic life support (BLS) involving chest compressions and ventilation is the key measure of resuscitation. Rapid initiation and quality of BLS are the most critical factors for CPR success. Even healthcare professionals are not always able to ensure the quality of CPR measures. Consequently in recent years mechanical resuscitation devices have been developed to optimize chest compression and the resulting circulation. In this article the mechanical resuscitation devices currently available in Germany are discussed and evaluated scientifically in context with available literature. The ANIMAX CPR device should not be used outside controlled trials as no clinical results have so far been published. The same applies to the new device Corpuls CPR which will be available on the market in early 2014. Based on the current published data a general recommendation for the routine use of LUCAS™ and AutoPulse® CPR cannot be given. The preliminary data of the CIRC trial and the published data of the LINC trial revealed that mechanical CPR is apparently equivalent to good manual CPR. For the final assessment further publications of large randomized studies must be analyzed (e.g. the CIRC and PaRAMeDIC trials). However, case control studies, case series and small studies have already shown that in special situations and in some cases patients will benefit from the automatic mechanical resuscitation devices (LUCAS™, AutoPulse®). This applies especially to emergency services where standard CPR quality is far below average and for patients who require prolonged CPR under difficult circumstances. This might be true in cases of resuscitation due to hypothermia, intoxication and pulmonary embolism as well as

  4. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, Arnold R.

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing he evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  5. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, Arnold R.

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  6. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-06-23

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  7. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-11-24

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  8. Natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Wallman, P. Henrik; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An efficient method of producing hydrogen by high temperature steam electrolysis that will lower the electricity consumption to an estimated 65 percent lower than has been achievable with previous steam electrolyzer systems. This is accomplished with a natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer, which significantly reduces the electricity consumption. Since this natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer replaces one unit of electrical energy by one unit of energy content in natural gas at one-quarter the cost, the hydrogen production cost will be significantly reduced. Also, it is possible to vary the ratio between the electricity and the natural gas supplied to the system in response to fluctuations in relative prices for these two energy sources. In one approach an appropriate catalyst on the anode side of the electrolyzer will promote the partial oxidation of natural gas to CO and hydrogen, called Syn-Gas, and the CO can also be shifted to CO.sub.2 to give additional hydrogen. In another approach the natural gas is used in the anode side of the electrolyzer to burn out the oxygen resulting from electrolysis, thus reducing or eliminating the potential difference across the electrolyzer membrane.

  9. Computer Assisted Introduction to Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha R.

    These six chapters provide an introduction to Newtonian mechanics, based on a coordinated use of text material, laboratory work, and the computer. The material is essentially self-contained so that it can serve as a short text on mechanics or as a text supplement in a regular physics course. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to the computer…

  10. Excitation Mechanism of H, He, C, and F Atoms in Metal-Assisted Atmospheric Helium Gas Plasma Induced by Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure CO2 Laser Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Khumaeni, Ali; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lee, Yong Inn; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    To clarify the excitation mechanism of hydrogen in transversely excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma, atomic emission characteristics of H, C, F, and He were studied using a Teflon sheet (thickness of 2 mm) attached to a metal subtarget. The TEA CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the Teflon sheet in the surrounding He gas at 1 atm. Atomic emissions of H, C, F, and He occurred with a long lifetime, a narrow spectrum width, and a low-background spectrum. The correlation emission intensity curves of H--He and F--He indicated a parabolic functions. To explain the emission characteristics, we offered a model in which helium metastable atoms (He*) play an important role in the excitation processes; namely, atoms collide with helium metastable atoms (He*) to be ionized by the Penning effect, and then recombine with electrons to produce excited states, from which atomic emissions occur.

  11. Excitation Mechanism of H, He, C, and F Atoms in Metal-Assisted Atmospheric Helium Gas Plasma Induced by Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure CO2 Laser Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukra Lie, Zener; Khumaeni, Ali; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Inn Lee, Yong; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    To clarify the excitation mechanism of hydrogen in transversely excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma, atomic emission characteristics of H, C, F, and He were studied using a Teflon sheet (thickness of 2 mm) attached to a metal subtarget. The TEA CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the Teflon sheet in the surrounding He gas at 1 atm. Atomic emissions of H, C, F, and He occurred with a long lifetime, a narrow spectrum width, and a low-background spectrum. The correlation emission intensity curves of H-He and F-He indicated a parabolic functions. To explain the emission characteristics, we offered a model in which helium metastable atoms (He*) play an important role in the excitation processes; namely, atoms collide with helium metastable atoms (He*) to be ionized by the Penning effect, and then recombine with electrons to produce excited states, from which atomic emissions occur.

  12. New modes of assisted mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Sipmann, F

    2014-05-01

    Recent major advances in mechanical ventilation have resulted in new exciting modes of assisted ventilation. Compared to traditional ventilation modes such as assisted-controlled ventilation or pressure support ventilation, these new modes offer a number of physiological advantages derived from the improved patient control over the ventilator. By implementing advanced closed-loop control systems and using information on lung mechanics, respiratory muscle function and respiratory drive, these modes are specifically designed to improve patient-ventilator synchrony and reduce the work of breathing. Depending on their specific operational characteristics, these modes can assist spontaneous breathing efforts synchronically in time and magnitude, adapt to changing patient demands, implement automated weaning protocols, and introduce a more physiological variability in the breathing pattern. Clinicians have now the possibility to individualize and optimize ventilatory assistance during the complex transition from fully controlled to spontaneous assisted ventilation. The growing evidence of the physiological and clinical benefits of these new modes is favoring their progressive introduction into clinical practice. Future clinical trials should improve our understanding of these modes and help determine whether the claimed benefits result in better outcomes. PMID:24507472

  13. Gravity-Assist Mechanical Simulator for Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doody, David F.; White, Victor E.; Schaff, Mitch D.

    2012-01-01

    There is no convenient way to demonstrate mechanically, as an outreach (or inreach) topic, the angular momentum trade-offs and the conservation of angular momentum associated with gravityassist interplanetary trajectories. The mechanical concepts that underlie gravity assist are often misunderstood or confused, possibly because there is no mechanical analog to it in everyday experience. The Gravity Assist Mech - anical Simulator is a hands-on solution to this longstanding technical communications challenge. Users intuitively grasp the concepts, meeting specific educational objectives. A manually spun wheel with high angular mass and low-friction bearings supplies momentum to an attached spherical neodymium magnet that represents a planet orbiting the Sun. A steel bearing ball following a trajectory across a glass plate above the wheel and magnet undergoes an elastic collision with the revolving magnet, illustrating the gravitational elastic collision between spacecraft and planet on a gravity-assist interplanetary trajectory. Manually supplying the angular momentum for the elastic collision, rather than observing an animation, intuitively conveys the concepts, meeting nine specific educational objectives. Many NASA and JPL interplanetary missions are enabled by the gravity-assist technique.

  14. Spatially Assisted Schwinger Mechanism and Magnetic Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Copinger, Patrick; Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-19

    Using the worldline formalism we compute an effective action for fermions under a temporally modulated electric field and a spatially modulated magnetic field. It is known that the former leads to an enhanced Schwinger mechanism, while we find that the latter can also result in enhanced particle production and even cause a reorganization of the vacuum to acquire a larger dynamical mass in equilibrium which spatially assists the magnetic catalysis. PMID:27588845

  15. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs. PMID:27334232

  16. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs.

  17. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs. PMID:27334232

  18. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Mendoza, D.P.; Miller, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    Retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns regarding double-shell tanks (DSTs) containing waste slurries. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry that has settled at the bottom of the DST. However, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. In addition, the presence of retained gas bubbles is expected to affect the physical properties of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of these bubbles. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The objectives of this study are to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to gas bubble retention and release from sludge such as is in Tank 241-SY-101, understand how the bubbles affect the physical properties of the sludge, develop correlations of these physical properties to include in computer models, and collect experimental data on the physical properties of simulated sludges with bubbles. This report presents a theory and experimental observations of bubble retention in simulated sludge and gives correlations and new data on the effect of gas bubbles on sludge yield strength.

  19. Final Report. SFAA No. DEFC02-98CH10961. Technical assistance for joint implementation and other supporting mechanisms and measures for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Denise

    2001-10-15

    IIEC, a division of CERF, has developed an extensive base of experience implementing activities that support climate action by developing USIJI projects in transitional countries within Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and southern Africa. IIEC has been able to provide a range of technical and policy assistance to governments and industry in support of sustainable energy use. IIEC continues to work in key countries with local partners to develop and implement energy efficiency policies and standards, develop site-specific projects, and assist governing bodies to establish national priorities and evaluation criteria for approving GHG-mitigation projects. As part of this project, IIEC focused on promoting a series of activities in Thailand and South Africa in order to identify GHG mitigation projects and work within the national approval process of those countries. The sections of this report outline the activities conducted in each country in order to achieve that goal.

  20. Computer Assisted Mechanical Axis and Kinematic TKA

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Peter; Mahoharan, Varaguna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has traditionally been and largely continues to be aligned mechanically, that being with a neutral coronal plane mechanical tibiofemoral axis and a joint line orientated at 900 to this axis. Femoral component rotation is set by gap balancing or by externally rotating 30 from any of a number femoral reference lines. This produces a rectangular flexion gap and relaxes patellar tracking. Kinematic alignment (KA) is an alternative technique that aims to restore premorbid alignment, joint orientation and ligament tension. The basic premise for this technique is based on evidence that the medial and lateral femoral condyles consistently equate to cylinders of equal or near equal size and that therefore with a fixed radius, cruciate retaining implant, matched distal femoral, posterior femoral and proximal tibial resections, accounting for bone and cartilage already lost will reproduce the premorbid joint line and restore native premorbid kinematics. Femoral rotation is therefore referenced off the prearthritic posterior condylar axis (PCA) that is on average internally rotated to the AP axis. Kinematic alignment therefore has the potential to challenge patellar tracking, increase patellar load and potentially increase patellar complications. Method: Case control study – level of evidence III-2. Between November 2012 and June 2013 the senior author completed 104 consecutive computer assisted (CAS) kinematically aligned total knee arthroplasties (TKA) with a cruciate retaining, fixed bearing, single radius implant. The results of these surgeries were compared with the results of 91 consecutive CAS mechanically aligned TKA done between November 2011 and October 2012 using the same navigation system and implant Implant sizing and positioning as well as gap measurement and ligament balance was done with computer assistance in all cases. Data was collected prospectively and analysed retrospectively. Results: The Oxford Knee Score

  1. Mechanisms of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Experiments describing the mechanism of inert gas narcosis are reported. A strain of mice, genetically altered to increase susceptibility to botulin poisoning (synaptic response) appears to increase metabolic rates while breathing argon; this infers a genetically altered synaptic response to both botulin toxin and narcotic gases. Studies of metabolic depression in human subjects breathing either air or a 30% mixture of nitrous oxide indicate that nitrous oxide narcosis does not produce pronounced metabolic depression. Tests on mice for relative susceptibilities to narcosis and oxygen poisoning as a function of fatty membrane composition show that alteration of the fatty acid composition of phospholipids increases resistance to metabolically depressant effects of argon but bas no effect on nitrous oxide narcosis. Another study suggests that acclimatization to low tension prior to high pressure oxygen treatment enhances susceptibility of mice to convulsions and death; developing biochemical lesions cause CNS metabolite reductions and pulmonary damage.

  2. Ventilator-associated lung injury during assisted mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Saddy, Felipe; Sutherasan, Yuda; Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Assisted mechanical ventilation (MV) may be a favorable alternative to controlled MV at the early phase of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), since it requires less sedation, no paralysis and is associated with less hemodynamic deterioration, better distal organ perfusion, and lung protection, thus reducing the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI). In the present review, we discuss VALI in relation to assisted MV strategies, such as volume assist-control ventilation, pressure assist-control ventilation, pressure support ventilation (PSV), airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), APRV with PSV, proportional assist ventilation (PAV), noisy ventilation, and neurally adjusted ventilatory assistance (NAVA). In summary, we suggest that assisted MV can be used in ARDS patients in the following situations: (1) Pao(2)/Fio(2) >150 mm Hg and positive end-expiratory pressure ≥ 5 cm H(2)O and (2) with modalities of pressure-targeted and time-cycled breaths including more or less spontaneous or supported breaths (A-PCV [assisted pressure-controlled ventilation] or APRV). Furthermore, during assisted MV, the following parameters should be monitored: inspiratory drive, transpulmonary pressure, and tidal volume (6 mL/kg). Further studies are required to determine the impact of novel modalities of assisted ventilation such as PAV, noisy pressure support, and NAVA on VALI. PMID:25105820

  3. Evaluation of Fiber Bundle Rotation for Enhancing Gas Exchange in a Respiratory Assist Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Eash, Heide J.; Mihelc, Kevin M.; Frankowski, Brain J.; Hattler, Brack G.; Federspiel, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Supplemental oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal through an intravenous respiratory assist catheter can be used as a means of treating patients with acute respiratory failure. We are beginning development efforts toward a new respiratory assist catheter with an insertional size <25F, which can be inserted percutaneously. In this study, we evaluated fiber bundle rotation as an improved mechanism for active mixing and enhanced gas exchange in intravenous respiratory assist catheters. Using a simple test apparatus of a rotating densely packed bundle of hollow fiber membranes, water and blood gas exchange levels were evaluated at various rotation speeds in a mock vena cava. At 12,000 RPM, maximum CO2 gas exchange rates were 449 and 523 mL/min per m², water and blood, respectively, but the rate of increase with increasing rotation rate diminished beyond 7500 RPM. These levels of gas exchange efficiency are two‐ to threefold greater than achieved in our previous respiratory catheters using balloon pulsation for active mixing. In preliminary hemolysis tests, which monitored plasma‐free hemoglobin levels in vitro over a period of 6 hours, we established that the rotating fiber bundle per se did not cause significant blood hemolysis compared with an intra‐aortic balloon pump. Accordingly, fiber bundle rotation appears to be a potential mechanism for increasing gas exchange and reducing insertional size in respiratory catheters. PMID:17515731

  4. Mechanisms of gas permeation through polymer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the mechanisms of gas transport in and through polymer membranes and the dependence of these mechanisms on pressure and temperature. This information is required for the development of new, energy-efficient membrane processes for the separation of industrial gas mixtures. Such processes are based on the selective permeation of the components of gas mixtures through nonporous polymer membranes. Recent work has been focused on the permeation of gases through membranes made from glassy polymers, i.e., at temperatures below the glass transition of the polymers (Tg). Glassy polymers are very useful membrane materials for gas separations because of their high selectivity toward different gases. Gases permeate through nonporous polymer membranes by a solution-diffusion'' process. Consequently, in order to understand the characteristics of this process it is necessary to investigate also the mechanisms of gas solution and diffusion in glassy polymers. 23 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. A MECHANISM FOR ASH ASSISTED SLUDGE DEWATERING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of various additives to improve the dewaterability of activated sludge was determined and the surface properties of additives characterized in order to arrive at a mechanism for ash conditioning of activated sludge. The primary additives investigated were fly ash and ...

  6. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  7. Clinical review: Respiratory mechanics in spontaneous and assisted ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Grinnan, Daniel C; Truwit, Jonathon Dean

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary disease changes the physiology of the lungs, which manifests as changes in respiratory mechanics. Therefore, measurement of respiratory mechanics allows a clinician to monitor closely the course of pulmonary disease. Here we review the principles of respiratory mechanics and their clinical applications. These principles include compliance, elastance, resistance, impedance, flow, and work of breathing. We discuss these principles in normal conditions and in disease states. As the severity of pulmonary disease increases, mechanical ventilation can become necessary. We discuss the use of pressure–volume curves in assisting with poorly compliant lungs while on mechanical ventilation. In addition, we discuss physiologic parameters that assist with ventilator weaning as the disease process abates. PMID:16277736

  8. Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin; Thaer N. N. Mahmoud; Daryl S. Sequeira; Amit P. Sharma

    2006-09-30

    This is the final report describing the evolution of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' from its conceptual stage in 2002 to the field implementation of the developed technology in 2006. This comprehensive report includes all the experimental research, models developments, analyses of results, salient conclusions and the technology transfer efforts. As planned in the original proposal, the project has been conducted in three separate and concurrent tasks: Task 1 involved a physical model study of the new GAGD process, Task 2 was aimed at further developing the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for gas-oil miscibility determination, and Task 3 was directed at determining multiphase gas-oil drainage and displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks at realistic pressures and temperatures. The project started with the task of recruiting well-qualified graduate research assistants. After collecting and reviewing the literature on different aspects of the project such gas injection EOR, gravity drainage, miscibility characterization, and gas-oil displacement characteristics in porous media, research plans were developed for the experimental work to be conducted under each of the three tasks. Based on the literature review and dimensional analysis, preliminary criteria were developed for the design of the partially-scaled physical model. Additionally, the need for a separate transparent model for visual observation and verification of the displacement and drainage behavior under gas-assisted gravity drainage was identified. Various materials and methods (ceramic porous material, Stucco, Portland cement, sintered glass beads) were attempted in order to fabricate a satisfactory visual model. In addition to proving the effectiveness of the GAGD process (through measured oil recoveries in the range of 65 to 87% IOIP), the visual models demonstrated three possible

  9. Mechanical Drawing of Gas Sensors on Paper

    PubMed Central

    Mirica, Katherine A.; Weis, Jonathan G.; Schnorr, Jan M.; Esser, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    This communication describes a simple solvent-free method for fabricating chemoresistive gas sensors on the surface of paper. The method involves mechanical abrasion of compressed powders of sensing materials on the fibers of cellulose. We illustrate this approach by depositing conductive layers of several forms of carbon (e.g., single-walled carbon nanotubes [SWCNTs], multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) on the surface of different papers (Figure 1, Figure S1). The resulting sensors based on SWCNTs are capable of detecting NH3 gas at concentrations as low as 0.5 part-per-million. PMID:23037938

  10. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  11. Fundamental mechanisms in flue-gas conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R.S.; Vann Bush, P.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  12. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through homology modeling. PMID:22899100

  13. Study on the gas-liquid interface and polymer melt front in gas-assisted injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.K.

    1997-03-01

    The algorithms are developed to predict the gas-liquid interface in gas-assisted injection molding. The simulation of two-dimensional, transient, non-isothermal and high viscous flow between two parallel plates with the generalized Newtonian fluid is presented in detail. The model takes into account the effects of the gas-liquid interface and polymer melt front.

  14. [Importance of mechanical assist devices in acute circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Markus Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical assist devices are indicated for hemodynamic stabilization in acute circulatory arrest if conventional means of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are unable to re-establish adequate organ perfusion. Their temporary use facilitates further diagnostic and therapeutic options in selected patients, e.g. coronary angiography followed by revascularization.External thorax compression devices allow sufficient cardiac massage in case of preclinical or in-hospital circulatory arrest, especially under complex transfer conditions. These devices perform standardized thorax compressions at a rate of 80-100 per minute. Invasive mechanical support devices are used in the catheter laboratory or in the intensive care unit. Axial turbine pumps, e.g. the Impella, continuously pump blood from the left ventricle into the aortic root. The Impella can also provide right ventricle support by pumping blood from the vena cava into the pulmonary artery. So-called emergency systems or ECMO devices consist of a centrifugal pump and a membrane oxygenator allowing complete takeover of cardiac and pulmonary functions. Withdrawing blood from the right atrium and vena cava, oxygenated blood is returned to the abdominal aorta. Isolated centrifugal pumps provide left heart support without an oxygenator after transseptal insertion of a venous cannula into the left atrium.Mechanical assist devices are indicated for acute organ protection and hemodynamic stabilization for diagnostic and therapeutic measures as well as bridge to myocardial recovery. Future technical developments and better insights into the pathophysiology of mechanical circulatory support will broaden the spectrum of indications of such devices in acute circulatory arrest. PMID:26860409

  15. Plasma Assisted Combustion Mechanism for Hydrogen and Small Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Aleksandrov, Nikolay

    2015-09-01

    The main mechanisms of nonequilibrium gas excitation and their influence on the ignition and combustion were briefly discussed. Rotational excitation, vibrational excitation, electronic excitation, dissociation by electron impact and ionization were all analyzed, as well as the ways in which the selectivity of the gas excitation in the discharge can be controlled. The model consists of two parts. The first part describes gas excitation by electron impact - rotational, vibrational and electronic states population by pulsed discharges. The second part considers energy relaxation in the plasma (formation of Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium across translational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom of molecules), quenching and decomposition of excited states, their reactions and recombination - with formation of thermally-equilibrium pool of radicals, which could be considered as initial conditions for any detailed combustion kinetic mechanism. The mechanism was verified against available kinetic data in a wide temperature range. Despite of some lack of knowledge of mechanism details, nonequilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential for controlling ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and is an extremely promising technology for a very wide range of applications.

  16. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Section 1 of this report records the progress achieved on NASA-LaRC Grant NAG-1-745 (Environment Assisted Degradation Mechanisms in Al-Li Alloys), and is based on research conducted during the period April 1 to November 30, 1987. A discussion of work proposed for the project's second year is included. Section 2 provides an overview of the need for research on the mechanisms of environmental-mechanical degradation of advanced aerospace alloys based on aluminum and lithium. This research is to provide NASA with the basis necessary to permit metallurgical optimization of alloy performance and engineering design with respect to damage tolerance, long term durability and reliability. Section 3 reports on damage localization mechanisms in aqueous chloride corrosion fatigue of aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 4 reports on progress made on measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 5 provides a detailed technical proposal for research on environmental degradation of Al-Li alloys, and the effect of hydrogen in this.

  17. Pulsatile mechanical cardiac assistance in pediatric patients with the Berlin heart ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Frank; Boettcher, Wolfgang; Stiller, Brigitte; Hetzer, Roland

    2003-06-01

    Mechanical cardiac assistance for neonates, infants, children and adolescents may be accomplished with pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VAD) instead of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or centrifugal pumps. The Berlin Heart VAD consists of extracorporeal, pneumatically driven blood pumps for pulsatile univentricular or biventricular assistance for patients of all age groups. The blood pumps are heparin-coated. The stationary driving unit (IKUS) has the required enhanced compressor performance for pediatric pump sizes. The Berlin Heart VAD was used in a total number of 424 patients from 1987 to November 2001 at our institution. In 45 pediatric patients aged 2 days-17 years the Berlin Heart VAD was applied for long-term support (1-111 days, mean 20 days). There were three patient groups: Group I: "Bridge to transplantation" with various forms of cardiomyopathy (N = 21) or chronic stages of congenital heart disease (N = 9); Group II: "Rescue" in intractable heart failure after corrective surgery for congenital disease (N = 7) or in early graft failure after heart transplantation (N = 1); and Group III: "Acute myocarditis" (N = 7) as either bridge to transplantation or bridge to recovery. Seventeen patients were transplanted after support periods of between 4 and 111 days with 12 long-term survivors, having now survived for up to 10 years. Five patients (Groups I and III) were weaned from the system with four long-term survivors. In Group II only one patient survived after successful transplantation. Prolonged circulatory support with the Berlin Heart VAD is an effective method for bridging until cardiac recovery or transplantation in the pediatric age group. Extubation, mobilization, and enteral nutrition are possible. For long-term use, the Berlin Heart VAD offers advantages over centrifugal pumps and ECMO in respect to patient mobility and safety. PMID:12939019

  18. Gas assisted thin-film evaporation from confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Shankar

    A novel cooling mechanism based on evaporation of thin liquid films is presented for thermal management of confined heat sources, such as microprocessor hotspots, high power light emitting diodes and RF packages with a high operational frequency. A thin nanoporous membrane (˜1--5microm) is utilized to maintain microscopically thin liquid films (˜1--5microm) by capillary action, while providing a pathway for the vapor generated due to evaporation at the liquid-vapor interface. The vapor generated by evaporation is continuously removed by using a dry sweeping gas, keeping the membrane outlet dry. This thesis presents a detailed theoretical, computational and experimental investigation of the heat and mass transfer mechanisms that result in cooling the confined heat sources. Performance analysis of this cooling mechanism demonstrates heat fluxes over 600W/cm2 for sufficiently thin membrane and film thicknesses (˜1--5microm) and by using air jet impingement for advection of vapor from the membrane surface. Based on the results from this performance analysis, a monolithic micro-fluidic device is designed and fabricated incorporating micro and nanoscale features. This MEMS/NEMS device serves multiple functionalities of hotspot simulation, temperature sensing, and evaporative cooling. Subsequent experimental investigations using this microfluidic device demonstrate heat fluxes in excess of 600W/cm2 at 90 °C using water as the evaporating coolant. In order to further enhance the device performance, a comprehensive theoretical and computational analysis of heat and mass transfer at micro and nanoscales is carried out. Since the coolant is confined using a nanoporous membrane, a detailed study of evaporation inside a nanoscale cylindrical pore is performed. The continuum analysis of water confined within a cylindrical nanopore determines the effect of electrostatic interaction and Van der Waals forces in addition to capillarity on the interfacial transport

  19. A mechanically assisted heat pipe using micro-pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.L.; Campbell, G.; Hassapis, C.; Chang, W.S.

    1996-12-31

    A new mechanically assisted heat pipe has been developed and tested by the authors that combines the high performance of a pumped fluid loop with the reliability of passive heat pipes. The new unit employs micro-pumps inside a passive heat pipe to enhance the return of working fluid from the condenser to the evaporator, and thereby increases the capability of the system. This hybrid device is lighter, smaller and handles higher heat flux compared with a passive heat pipe of similar weight and dimensions. Best of all, if the mechanical pump fails, the heat transport will be impaired, but not totally paralyzed, allowing some form of lower level operation. This micro-pump design installs fins at critical locations inside the heat pipe. These fins can be parallel (flag) or perpendicular (flap) to the flow direction. By vibrating these fins in a motion similar to dolphin kicks for the flaps, and in a motion similar to a fishtail for the flags, these fins were found capable of pumping the working fluid effectively. The size and geometry of these fins were tested extensively. Several actuation approaches were examined. The results of these tests are presented in this paper.

  20. Numerical simulations of CO2 -assisted gas production from hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhara, P.; Anderson, B. J.; Myshakin, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experimental studies over the last decade have reviewed the feasibility of using CO2 or CO2+N2 gas mixtures to recover CH4 gas from hydrates deposits. That technique would serve the dual purpose of CO2 sequestration and production of CH4 while maintaining the geo-mechanical stability of the reservoir. In order to analyze CH4 production process by means of CO2 or CO2+N2 injection into gas hydrate reservoirs, a new simulation tool, Mix3HydrateResSim (Mix3HRS)[1], was previously developed to account for the complex thermodynamics of multi-component hydrate phase and to predict the process of CH4 substitution by CO2 (and N2) in the hydrate lattice. In this work, Mix3HRS is used to simulate the CO2 injection into a Class 2 hydrate accumulation characterized by a mobile aqueous phase underneath a hydrate bearing sediment. That type of hydrate reservoir is broadly confirmed in permafrost and along seashore. The production technique implies a two-stage approach using a two-well design, one for an injector and one for a producer. First, the CO2 is injected into the mobile aqueous phase to convert it into immobile CO2 hydrate and to initiate CH4 release from gas hydrate across the hydrate-water boundary (generally designating the onset of a hydrate stability zone). Second, CH4 hydrate decomposition is induced by the depressurization method at a producer to estimate gas production potential over 30 years. The conversion of the free water phase into the CO2 hydrate significantly reduces competitive water production in the second stage, thereby improving the methane gas production. A base case using only the depressurization stage is conducted to compare with enhanced gas production predicted by the CO2-assisted technique. The approach also offers a possibility to permanently store carbon dioxide in the underground formation to greater extent comparing to a direct injection of CO2 into gas hydrate sediment. Numerical models are based on the hydrate formations at the

  1. Thermal and thermo-mechanical simulation of laser assisted machining

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, G.; Dal Santo, P.; Lebrun, J. L.; Bellett, D.; Robert, P.

    2007-04-07

    Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) improves the machinability of materials by locally heating the workpiece just prior to cutting. The heat input is provided by a high power laser focused several millimeters in front of the cutting tool. Experimental investigations have confirmed that the cutting force can be decreased, by as much as 40%, for various materials (tool steel, titanium alloys and nickel alloys). The laser heat input is essentially superficial and results in non-uniform temperature profiles within the depth of the workpiece. The temperature field in the cutting zone is therefore influenced by many parameters. In order to understand the effect of the laser on chip formation and on the temperature fields in the different deformation zones, thermo-mechanical simulation were undertaken. A thermo-mechanical model for chip formation with and without the laser was also undertaken for different cutting parameters. Experimental tests for the orthogonal cutting of 42CrMo4 steel were used to validate the simulation via the prediction of the cutting force with and without the laser. The thermo-mechanical model then allowed us to highlight the differences in the temperature fields in the cutting zone with and without the laser. In particular, it was shown that for LAM the auto-heating of the material in the primary shear zone is less important and that the friction between the tool and chip also generates less heat. The temperature fields allow us to explain the reduction in the cutting force and the resulting residual stress fields in the workpiece.

  2. Mechanism on microwave-assisted acidic solvolysis of black-liquor lignin.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chengjian; Feng, Chunguang; Liu, Qian; Shen, Dekui; Xiao, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Microwave-assisted degradation of black-liquor lignin with formic acid was studied, concerning the product yield and distribution of phenolic compounds against reaction temperature (110-180°C) and reaction time (5-90 min). The liquid product consisting of bio-oil 1 and bio-oil 2, achieved the maxima yield of 64.08% at 160°C and 30 min (bio-oil 1: 9.69% and bio-oil 2: 54.39%). The chemical information of bio-oil 1 and bio-oil 2 were respectively identified by means of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), while the solid residue was analyzed by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). A possible mechanism was proposed for the microwave-assisted acidic solvolysis of lignin, specifying the kinetic relationship among the primary cracking of lignin, repolymerization of the oligomers and formation of solid residue. PMID:24747392

  3. Mechanism of chromophore assisted laser inactivation employing fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mark A; Rajfur, Zenon; Chen, Zaozao; Humphrey, David; Yang, Bing; Sligar, Stephen G; Jacobson, Ken

    2009-03-01

    Chromophore assisted laser inactivation (CALI) is a technique that uses irradiation of chromophores proximate to a target protein to inactivate function. Previously, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) mediated CALI has been used to inactivate EGFP-fusion proteins in a spatio-temporally defined manner within cells, but the mechanism of inactivation is unknown. To help elucidate the mechanism of protein inactivation mediated by fluorescent protein CALI ([FP]-CALI), the activities of purified glutathione-S-transferase-FP (GST-EXFP) fusions were measured after laser irradiation in vitro. Singlet oxygen and free radical quenchers as well as the removal of oxygen inhibited CALI, indicating the involvement of a reactive oxygen species (ROS). At higher concentrations of protein, turbidity after CALI increased significantly indicating cross-linking of proximate fusion proteins suggesting that damage of residues on the surface of the protein, distant from the active site, results in inactivation. Control experiments removed sample heating as a possible cause of these effects. Different FP mutants fused to GST vary in their CALI efficiency in the order enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) > enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) > enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), while a GST construct that binds fluorescein-based arsenical hairpin binder (FlAsH) results in significantly higher CALI efficiency than any of the fluorescent proteins (XFPs) tested. It is likely that the hierarchy of XFP effectiveness reflects the balance between ROS that are trapped within the XFP structure and cause fluorophore and chromophore bleaching and those that escape to effect CALI of proximate proteins. PMID:19199572

  4. Mechanisms of gas permeation through polymer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Progress is reported in two areas: (1) Concentration-temperature superposition principle (CTSP). CTSP is a theoretical model for describing the gas solubility in glassy polymers swollen by the penetrant gas. It has been extended to describe the dependence of gas diffusivity and permeability on penetrant pressure. Further extension to diffusion of gas mixtures is being studied. (2)Solubility of gases in poly(alkyl methacrylates). Solubility of methane in poly(ethyl methacrylate) and poly(n-butyl methacrylate) was measured; the Langmuir capacity constant was found to not reflect a lower excess free volume; an equation is given for relating the constant to the glass transition temperature. Solubility of ethane in the latter polymer is affected by plasticization.

  5. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, T.R.; Vann Bush, P.

    1995-11-01

    The overall goal of this research project has been to formulate a model describing effects of flue gas conditioning on particulate properties. By flue gas conditioning we mean any process by which solids, gases, or liquids are added to the combustor and/or the exhaust stream to the extent that flue gas and particulate properties may be altered. Our modeling efforts, which are included in our Final Report, are based on an understanding of how ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Flue gas conditioning involves the modification of one or more of the parameters that determine the magnitude of forces acting on the fly ash particles, and can take place through many different methods. Modification of particulate properties can alter ash resistivity or ash cohesivity and result in improved or degraded control device performance. Changes to the flue gas, addition or particulate matter such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sorbents, or the addition of reactive gases or liquids can modify these properties. If we can better understand how conditioning agents react with fly ash particles, application of appropriate conditioning agents or processes may result in significantly improved fine particle collection at low capital and operating costs.

  6. The mechanism of galvanic/metal-assisted etching of silicon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Metal-assisted etching is initiated by hole injection from an oxidant catalyzed by a metal nanoparticle or film on a Si surface. It is shown that the electronic structure of the metal/Si interface, i.e., band bending, is not conducive to diffusion of the injected hole away from the metal in the case of Ag or away from the metal/Si interface in the cases of Au, Pd, and Pt. Since holes do not diffuse away from the metals, the electric field resulting from charging of the metal after hole injection must instead be the cause of metal-assisted etching. PMID:25221459

  7. When gas analysis assists with postmortem imaging to diagnose causes of death.

    PubMed

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Giuliani, N; Egger, C; Rinaldi, A; Dominguez, A; Chevallier, C; Bruguier, C; Augsburger, M; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2015-06-01

    Postmortem imaging consists in the non-invasive examination of bodies using medical imaging techniques. However, gas volume quantification and the interpretation of the gas collection results from cadavers remain difficult. We used whole-body postmortem multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) followed by a full autopsy or external examination to detect the gaseous volumes in bodies. Gases were sampled from cardiac cavities, and the sample compositions were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/thermal conductivity detection (HS-GC-MS/TCD). Three categories were defined according to the presumed origin of the gas: alteration/putrefaction, high-magnitude vital gas embolism (e.g., from scuba diving accident) and gas embolism of lower magnitude (e.g., following a traumatic injury). Cadaveric alteration gas was diagnosed even if only one gas from among hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide or methane was detected. In alteration cases, the carbon dioxide/nitrogen ratio was often >0.2, except in the case of advanced alteration, when methane presence was the best indicator. In the gas embolism cases (vital or not), hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and methane were absent. Moreover, with high-magnitude vital gas embolisms, carbon dioxide content was >20%, and the carbon dioxide/nitrogen ratio was >0.2. With gas embolisms of lower magnitude (gas presence consecutive to a traumatic injury), carbon dioxide content was <20% and the carbon dioxide/nitrogen ratio was often <0.2. We found that gas analysis provided useful assistance to the postmortem imaging diagnosis of causes of death. Based on the quantifications of gaseous cardiac samples, reliable indicators were determined to document causes of death. MDCT examination of the body must be performed as quickly as possible, as does gas sampling, to avoid generating any artifactual alteration gases. Because of cardiac gas composition analysis, it is possible to distinguish alteration gases and gas embolisms of different

  8. Iridium single atom tips fabricated by field assisted reactive gas etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John A.; Urban, Radovan; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2016-03-01

    We present a simple, reliable method to fabricate Ir single atom tips (SATs) from polycrystalline wire. An electrochemical etch in CaCl2 solution is followed by a field assisted reactive gas etch in vacuum at room temperature using oxygen as an etching gas and neon as an imaging gas. Once formed, SATs are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures and their underlying structure is examined through evaporation of the apex atoms. Furthermore, a method is developed to repair Ir SATs at liquid nitrogen temperatures when apex atoms evaporate. This method may be used to fabricate Ir SAT ion sources.

  9. Simulation of gas-assisted injection mold-cooling process using line source model approach for gas channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.P.; Hu, S.Y.; Chen, S.C.

    1998-10-01

    Gas-assisted injection molding (GAIM) process, being an innovative injection molding process, can substantially reduce production expenses through reduction in material cost, reduction in clamp tonnage and reduction in cycle time. Whether it is feasible to perform an integrated simulation for process simulation based on a unified CAE model for gas-assisted injection molding (GAIM) is a great concern. In the present study, numerical algorithms based on the same CAE model used for process simulation regarding filling and packaging stages were developed to simulate the cooling phase of GAIM using a cycle-averaged three-dimensional modified boundary element technique similar to that used for conventional injection molding. However, to use the current CAE model for analysis, gas channel was modeled by two-node elements using line source approach. It was found that this new modeling not only affects the mold wall temperature calculation very slightly but also reduces the computer time by 95% as compared with a full gas channel modeling required a lot of triangular elements on gas channel surface. This investigation indicates that it is feasible to achieve an integrated process simulation for GAIM under one CAE model resulting in great computational efficiency for industrial application.

  10. Mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in austenitic stainless steel welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, Dorian K.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Novak, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the hydrogen-assisted fracture susceptibility of gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds in the nitrogen-strengthened, austenitic stainless steels 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn (21-6-9) and 22Cr-13Ni-5Mn (22-13-5). In addition, mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in the welds were identified using electron microscopy and finite-element modeling. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics experiments were conducted on hydrogen-charged GTA welds at 25 C. Results showed that hydrogen dramatically lowered the fracture toughness from 412 kJ/m{sup 2} to 57 kJ/m{sup 2} in 21-6-9 welds and from 91 kJ/m{sup 2} to 26 kJ/m{sup 2} in 22-13-5 welds. Microscopy results suggested that hydrogen served two roles in the fracture of welds: it promoted the nucleation of microcracks along the dendritic structure and accelerated the link-up of microcracks by facilitating localized deformation. A continuum finite-element model was formulated to test the notion that hydrogen could facilitate localized deformation in the ligament between microcracks. On the assumption that hydrogen decreased local flow stress in accordance with the hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility argument, the finite-element results showed that deformation was localized in a narrow band between two parallel, overlapping microcracks. In contrast, in the absence of hydrogen, the finite-element results showed that deformation between microcracks was more uniformly distributed.

  11. Mechanics of buried chilled gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Selvadurai, A.P.S.; Hu, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper examines the factors influencing the modelling of soil-pipeline interaction for a pipeline which is used to transport chilled gas. The soil-pipeline interaction is induced by the generation of discontinuous frost heave at a boundary between soils with differing frost susceptibility. The three-dimensional modelling takes into consideration the time-dependent evolution of frost heave due to moisture migration, the creep and elastic behavior of the frozen soil and flexural behavior of the embedded pipeline. The results of the computational model are compared with experimental results obtained from the frost heave induced soil-pipeline interaction test performed at the full scale test facilities in Caen, France.

  12. MemoPA: Intelligent Personal Assistant Agents with a Case Memory Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jia; Barthès, Jean-Paul

    A Personal Assistant (PA) agent is a software agent capable of helping people to handle tasks in their workplace. The paper proposes a memory mechanism for personal assistant agents in order to enhance agent intelligence while working with the user or with other agents. Inspired by a case memory model in the domain of Case-Based Reasoning (CBR), this paper endows PA agents with a case memory mechanism, which results in improved PA agents: MemoPAs. We present the memory mechanism of MemoPA in detail, and report a first implementation of the method. Finally, future work is outlined for improving the memory mechanism.

  13. Effect of impeller design and spacing on gas exchange in a percutaneous respiratory assist catheter.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, R Garrett; Frankowski, Brian J; Burgreen, Greg W; Federspiel, William J

    2014-12-01

    Providing partial respiratory assistance by removing carbon dioxide (CO2 ) can improve clinical outcomes in patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome. An intravenous respiratory assist device with a small (25 Fr) insertion diameter eliminates the complexity and potential complications associated with external blood circuitry and can be inserted by nonspecialized surgeons. The impeller percutaneous respiratory assist catheter (IPRAC) is a highly efficient CO2 removal device for percutaneous insertion to the vena cava via the right jugular or right femoral vein that utilizes an array of impellers rotating within a hollow-fiber membrane bundle to enhance gas exchange. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of new impeller designs and impeller spacing on gas exchange in the IPRAC using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and in vitro deionized water gas exchange testing. A CFD gas exchange and flow model was developed to guide a progressive impeller design process. Six impeller blade geometries were designed and tested in vitro in an IPRAC device with 2- or 10-mm axial spacing and varying numbers of blades (2-5). The maximum CO2 removal efficiency (exchange per unit surface area) achieved was 573 ± 8 mL/min/m(2) (40.1 mL/min absolute). The gas exchange rate was found to be largely independent of blade design and number of blades for the impellers tested but increased significantly (5-10%) with reduced axial spacing allowing for additional shaft impellers (23 vs. 14). CFD gas exchange predictions were within 2-13% of experimental values and accurately predicted the relative improvement with impellers at 2- versus 10-mm axial spacing. The ability of CFD simulation to accurately forecast the effects of influential design parameters suggests it can be used to identify impeller traits that profoundly affect facilitated gas exchange. PMID:24749994

  14. Effect of Impeller Design and Spacing on Gas Exchange in a Percutaneous Respiratory Assist Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, R. Garrett; Frankowski, Brian J.; Burgreen, Greg W.; Federspiel, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Providing partial respiratory assistance by removing carbon dioxide (CO2) can improve clinical outcomes in patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome. An intravenous respiratory assist device with a small (25 Fr) insertion diameter eliminates the complexity and potential complications associated with external blood circuitry and can be inserted by nonspecialized surgeons. The impeller percutaneous respiratory assist catheter (IPRAC) is a highly efficient CO2 removal device for percutaneous insertion to the vena cava via the right jugular or right femoral vein that utilizes an array of impellers rotating within a hollow-fiber membrane bundle to enhance gas exchange. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of new impeller designs and impeller spacing on gas exchange in the IPRAC using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and in vitro deionized water gas exchange testing. A CFD gas exchange and flow model was developed to guide a progressive impeller design process. Six impeller blade geometries were designed and tested in vitro in an IPRAC device with 2- or 10-mm axial spacing and varying numbers of blades (2–5). The maximum CO2 removal efficiency (exchange per unit surface area) achieved was 573 ± 8 mL/min/m2 (40.1 mL/min absolute). The gas exchange rate was found to be largely independent of blade design and number of blades for the impellers tested but increased significantly (5–10%) with reduced axial spacing allowing for additional shaft impellers (23 vs. 14). CFD gas exchange predictions were within 2–13% of experimental values and accurately predicted the relative improvement with impellers at 2- versus 10-mm axial spacing. The ability of CFD simulation to accurately forecast the effects of influential design parameters suggests it can be used to identify impeller traits that profoundly affect facilitated gas exchange. PMID:24749994

  15. Brillouin microspectroscopy of nanostructured biomaterials: photonics assisted tailoring mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Chitrakar, Chandani; Thakur, Teena; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Developing new biomaterials is essential for the next-generation of materials for bioenergy, bioelectronics, basic biology, medical diagnostics, cancer research, and regenerative medicine. Specifically, recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. The physical properties of nanocomposite biomaterials, including elasticity and viscosity, play key roles in controlling cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. Conventional mechanical tests, including uniaxial compression and tension, dynamic mechanical analysis and shear rheology, require mechanical forces to be directly exerted onto the sample and therefore may not be suitable for in situ measurements or continuous monitoring of mechanical stiffness. In this study, we employ spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy as a viscoelasticity-specific probing technique. We utilized a Brillouin spectrometer to characterize biomaterial's microscopic elasticity and correlated those with conventional mechanical tests (e.g., rheology).

  16. Gas plasma sterilization of microorganisms and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    SHINTANI, HIDEHARU; SAKUDO, AKIKAZU; BURKE, PETER; McDONNELL, GERALD

    2010-01-01

    The use of true gas plasmas for the inactivation of microorganisms is an area of dynamic research. Many types of gases are used as a source of plasma, and different plasma production methods have been applied. The antimicrobial mechanisms of oxygen-based gas plasmas may be due to an etching effect on microbial structures, particularly bacterial endospores resulting in shrinkage. By contrast, the definite mechanisms of actions of other gas plasma sources, such as N2, He, Ne, Ar and Xe gases, have not been clearly defined and indeed may be distinct. The speculated mechanisms of these gas plasmas involve the direct attack of metastable (excited molecular), UV and/or VUV to microbial structures, specifically the inner membrane and DNA in the core of bacterial endospores. According to this speculation, sterilized spore figures would remain unchanged. However, these mechanisms remain to be clarified. Future perspectives on the use of gas plasma for sterilization are of interest, as it is possible that appropriate sterility assurance levels can be obtained in parallel with material and functional compatibility. Traditional sterilization methods are often limited in these requirements. Therefore, gas plasma sterilization may prove to be an appropriate alternative sterilization procedure. PMID:22993596

  17. [Mechanical circulatory assist using a miniaturized Archimedes screw].

    PubMed

    von Segesser, L K; Bisang, B; Leskosek, B; Turina, M

    1991-01-01

    An axial flow blood pump (Archimedes screw) for intraarterial left ventricular assist was evaluated in comparison to standard roller pump left heart bypass (LHBP) in 13 bovine experiments (bodyweight 74 +/- 15 kg). Full systemic heparinization (ACT greater than 500 s) was used for LHBP in comparison to limited systemic heparinization (ACT greater than 180 s) for axial. A standard battery of blood samples was taken before and at regular intervals throughout perfusion: (table; see text) Transarterial access and relatively limited blood trauma appear to be the main advantages of the evaluated axial flow blood pump. However, the impossibility to assess the pump flow may be a major problem for the management of the failing left ventricle. PMID:2050534

  18. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Stoner, G. E.; Swanson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A multifaceted research program on the performance of advanced light metallic alloys in aggressive aerospace environments, and associated environmental failure mechanisms was initiated. The general goal is to characterize alloy behavior quantitatively and to develop predictive mechanisms for environmental failure modes. Successes in this regard will provide the basis for metallurgical optimization of alloy performance, for chemical control of aggressive environments, and for engineering life prediction with damage tolerance and long term reliability.

  19. Tunnel-field-effect-transistor based gas-sensor: Introducing gas detection with a quantum-mechanical transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Deblina; Gossner, Harald; Hansch, Walter; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2013-01-01

    A gas-sensor based on tunnel-field-effect-transistor (TFET) is proposed that leverages the unique current injection mechanism in the form of quantum-mechanical band-to-band tunneling to achieve substantially improved performance compared to conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs) for detection of gas species under ambient conditions. While nonlocal phonon-assisted tunneling model is used for detailed device simulations, in order to provide better physical insights, analytical formula for sensitivity is derived for both metal as well as organic conducting polymer based sensing elements. Analytical derivations are also presented for capturing the effects of temperature on sensor performance. Combining the developed analytical and numerical models, intricate properties of the sensor such as gate bias dependence of sensitivity, relationship between the required work-function modulation and subthreshold swing, counter-intuitive increase in threshold voltage for MOSFETs and reduction in tunneling probability for TFETs with temperature are explained. It is shown that TFET gas-sensors can not only lead to more than 10 000× increase in sensitivity but also provide design flexibility and immunity against screening of work-function modulation through non-specific gases as well as ensure stable operation under temperature variations.

  20. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    The general goals of the research program are to characterize alloy behavior quantitatively and to develop predictive mechanisms for environmental failure modes. Successes in this regard will provide the basis for metallurgical optimization of alloy performance, for chemical control of aggressive environments, and for engineering life prediction with damage tolerance and long term reliability.

  1. Photon assisted hopping conduction mechanism in Tl2SSe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasrawi, A. F.; Ziqan, Abdelhalim M.; Jazzar, Suha Kh.; Gasanly, N. M.

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the powder X-ray diffraction data and the dark and the photo-excited electrical conduction parameters of Tl2SSe crystal are reported. The dark and photon excited electrical conduction in the tetragonal crystal are found to be dominated by thermionic emission assisted variable range hopping conduction (VRH). The dark Mott's VRH parameters representing by the degree of disorder (To), the density of localized states near the Fermi level (N (EF)), the average hopping range (R) and average hopping energy (W) exhibited wide tunability via incremental photon intensity. Particularly, while the dark values of T0 , W and R significantly decreased from 2.32 ×108 to 1.52 ×105 K, 114 to 18.25 meV and from 66.15 to 10.58 A°, respectively, the values of N (EF) increased from 7.23 ×1018 to 1.10 ×1022cm-3 /eV when the crystal was photo-excited with a 53.6 mW/cm2 light intensity. These variations in the hopping parameters via photon excitations are promisig for using the crystal in the fabrication of well controlled, widely tunable, low energy consuming and highly efficient electronic devices.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed

  3. Gas-evaporation in low-gravity field (cogelation mechanism of metal vapors) (M-14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, N.

    1993-01-01

    When metal and alloy compounds are heated and vaporized in a rare gas such as helium, argon, or xenon, the vaporized substances diffused in the rare gas are supersaturated resulting in a smoke of fine particles of the material congealing as snow or fog. The gas vaporizing method is a fine particle generation method. Though the method has a variety of applications, the material vapor flow is disturbed by gravitational convection on Earth. The inability to elucidate the fine particle generation mechanism results in an obstruction to improving the method to mass production levels. As no convection occurs in microgravity in space, the fine particle generation mechanism influenced only by diffusion can be investigated. Investigators expect that excellent particles with homogeneous diameter distribution can be obtained. Experiment data and facts will assist in improving efficiency, quality, and scale or production processes including element processes such as vaporization, diffusion, and condensation. The objective of this experiment is to obtain important information related to the mechanism of particle formation in the gas atmosphere (smoke particles) and the production of submicron powders of extremely uniform size.

  4. Sensing Mechanisms for Carbon Nanotube Based NH3 Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ning; Zhang, Qing; Chow, Chee L.; Tan, Ooi K.; Marzari, Nicola N.

    2009-03-31

    There has been an argument on carbon nanotube (CNT) based gas detectors with a field-effect transistor (FET) geometry: do the response signals result from charge transfer between adsorbed gas molecules and the CNT channel and/or from the gas species induced Schottky barrier modulation at the CNT/metal contacts? To differentiate the sensing mechanisms, we employed three CNTFET structures, i.e., (1) the entire CNT channel and CNT/electrode contacts are accessible to NH3 gas; (2) the CNT/electrode contacts are passivated with a Si3N4 thin film, leaving the CNT channel open to the gas and, in contrast, (3) the CNT channel is covered with the film, while the contacts are open to the gas. We suggest that the Schottky barrier modulation at the contacts is the dominant mechanism from room temperature to 150°C. At higher temperatures, the charge transfer process contributes to the response signals. There is a clear evidence that the adsorption of NH3 on the CNT channel is facilitated by environmental oxygen.

  5. Gas-Assisted Annular Microsprayer for Sample Preparation for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen; Agrawal, Rajendra; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved cryo electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, microfluidic device [9] has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate the thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, while not too thin to be dried out before freezing, i.e., optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6-9 μm, which fulfilled the above droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size is 58×58 μm), and the data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 hour period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieved using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection process with the previous device [9] has shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliter of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction. PMID:25530679

  6. On mechanisms of choked gas flows in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xiaodong; Wang, Moran

    2015-10-01

    Choked gas flows in microchannels have been reported before based solely on experimental measurements, but the underlining physical mechanism has yet to be clarified. In this work, we are to explore the process via numerical modeling of choked gas flows through a straight microchannel that connects two gas reservoirs. The major theoretical consideration lies in that, since the gas in microchannels may not be necessarily rarefied even at a high Knudsen number, a generalized Monte Carlo method based on the Enskog theory, GEMC, was thus used instead of direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). Our results indicate that the choked gas flows in microchannels can be divided into two types: sonic choking and subsonic choking, because the sonic point does not always exist even though the gas flows appear choked, depending on the inlet-outlet pressure ratio and the length-height ratio of the channel. Even if the gas flow does not reach a sonic point at the outlet region, the effective pressure ratio (pi /po) acting on the channel becomes asymptotically changeless when the pressure ratio on the buffer regions (pi‧/po‧) is higher than a certain value. The subsonic choking may caused by the expansion wave or the strong non-equilibrium effect at the outlet.

  7. Gas-assisted gravity drainage (GAGD) process for improved oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Rao, Dandina N.

    2012-07-10

    A rapid and inexpensive process for increasing the amount of hydrocarbons (e.g., oil) produced and the rate of production from subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs by displacing oil downwards within the oil reservoir and into an oil recovery apparatus is disclosed. The process is referred to as "gas-assisted gravity drainage" and comprises the steps of placing one or more horizontal producer wells near the bottom of a payzone (i.e., rock in which oil and gas are found in exploitable quantities) of a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir and injecting a fluid displacer (e.g., CO.sub.2) through one or more vertical wells or horizontal wells. Pre-existing vertical wells may be used to inject the fluid displacer into the reservoir. As the fluid displacer is injected into the top portion of the reservoir, it forms a gas zone, which displaces oil and water downward towards the horizontal producer well(s).

  8. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 15: GAS-ASSISTED GLYCOL PUMPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Amit P. Sharma

    2004-10-01

    This report describes the progress of the project ''Development and Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the second project year (October 1, 2003--September 30, 2004). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is scaled physical model study of GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. In Section I, preliminary design of the scaled physical model using the dimensional similarity approach has been presented. Scaled experiments on the current physical model have been designed to investigate the effect of Bond and capillary numbers on GAGD oil recovery. Experimental plan to study the effect of spreading coefficient and reservoir heterogeneity has been presented. Results from the GAGD experiments to study the effect of operating mode, Bond number and capillary number on GAGD oil recovery have been reported. These experiments suggest that the type of the gas does not affect the performance of GAGD in immiscible mode. The cumulative oil recovery has been observed to vary exponentially with Bond and capillary numbers, for the experiments presented in this report. A predictive model using the bundle of capillary tube approach has been developed to predict the performance of free gravity drainage process. In Section II, a mechanistic Parachor model has been proposed for improved prediction of IFT as well as to characterize the mass transfer effects for miscibility development in reservoir crude oil-solvent systems. Sensitivity studies on model results indicate that provision of a single IFT measurement in the proposed model is sufficient for reasonable IFT predictions. An attempt has been made to correlate the exponent (n) in the mechanistic model with normalized solute compositions present in both fluid phases

  10. Cavopulmonary assist for the failing Fontan circulation: Impact of ventricular function on mechanical support strategy

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Ising, Mickey; Sobieski, Michael A.; Koenig, Steven C; Chen, Jun; Frankel, Steven; Rodefeld, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support - either ventricular assist device (VAD, left-sided systemic support) or cavopulmonary assist device (CPAD, right-sided support) - has been suggested as treatment for Fontan failure. The selection of left- vs. right-sided support for failing Fontan has not been previously defined. Computer simulation and mock circulation models of pediatric Fontan patients (15–25 kg) with diastolic, systolic, and combined systolic and diastolic dysfunction were developed. The global circulatory response to assisted Fontan flow using VAD (HeartWare HVAD, FL) support, CPAD (Viscous Impeller Pump, IN) support, and combined VAD and CPAD support were evaluated. Cavopulmonary assist improves failing Fontan circulation during diastolic dysfunction but preserved systolic function. In the presence of systolic dysfunction and elevated ventricular end-diastolic pressure (VEDP), VAD support augments cardiac output and diminishes VEDP, while increased preload with cavopulmonary assist may worsen circulatory status. Fontan circulation can be stabilized to biventricular values with modest cavopulmonary assist during diastolic dysfunction. Systemic VAD support may be preferable to maintain systemic output during systolic dysfunction. Both systemic and cavopulmonary support may provide best outcome during combined systolic and diastolic dysfunction. These findings may be useful to guide clinical cavopulmonary assist strategies in failing Fontan circulations. PMID:25158887

  11. Cavopulmonary assist for the failing Fontan circulation: impact of ventricular function on mechanical support strategy.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Ising, Mickey; Sobieski, Michael A; Koenig, Steven C; Chen, Jun; Frankel, Steven; Rodefeld, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support--either ventricular assist device (VAD, left-sided systemic support) or cavopulmonary assist device (CPAD, right-sided support)--has been suggested as treatment for Fontan failure. The selection of left- versus right-sided support for failing Fontan has not been previously defined. Computer simulation and mock circulation models of pediatric Fontan patients (15-25 kg) with diastolic, systolic, and combined systolic and diastolic dysfunction were developed. The global circulatory response to assisted Fontan flow using VAD (HeartWare HVAD, Miami Lakes, FL) support, CPAD (Viscous Impeller Pump, Indianapolis, IN) support, and combined VAD and CPAD support was evaluated. Cavopulmonary assist improves failing Fontan circulation during diastolic dysfunction but preserved systolic function. In the presence of systolic dysfunction and elevated ventricular end-diastolic pressure (VEDP), VAD support augments cardiac output and diminishes VEDP, while increased preload with cavopulmonary assist may worsen circulatory status. Fontan circulation can be stabilized to biventricular values with modest cavopulmonary assist during diastolic dysfunction. Systemic VAD support may be preferable to maintain systemic output during systolic dysfunction. Both systemic and cavopulmonary support may provide best outcome during combined systolic and diastolic dysfunction. These findings may be useful to guide clinical cavopulmonary assist strategies in failing Fontan circulations. PMID:25158887

  12. Effect of Mechanical Assistance of the Systemic Ventricle in Single Ventricle Circulation with Cavopulmonary Connection

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Pranava; Deutsch, Nina; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; He, Dingchao; Zurakowski, Mark Nuszkowski David; Jonas, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous attempts to support the single ventricle circulation mechanically have suggested that a custom-built assist device is needed to push rather than pull through the pulmonary circulation. We hypothesized that using a conventional ventricular assist device, with or without conversion of a total cavopulmonary connection to a bidirectional Glenn cavopulmonary connection would allow assistance by pulling blood through the circuit and improve cardiac index (CI). Methods Cavopulmonary connections were established in each of five Yorkshire pigs (25kg) using ePTFE conduits in a “Y” configuration with appropriate clamping of limbs of the Y to achieve: total cavopulmonary Fontan connection (TCPC), SVC cavopulmonary connection (SVC Glenn) and IVC cavopulmonary connection (IVC Glenn). A common atrium had been established previously by balloon septostomy. Mechanical circulatory assistance of the single systemic ventricle was achieved using a centrifugal pump with common atrial inflow and proximal ascending aortic outflow. CI was calculated using an ultrasonic flow meter placed on the distal ascending aorta and compared between assisted and non-assisted circulation for 3 conditions: TCPC, SVC Glenn and IVC Glenn. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), common atrial pressure (LAP), arterial oxygen saturation (SAT), partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PO2) and oxygen delivery (DO2) were calculated. Results Unassisted SVC Glenn CI tended to be higher than TCPC or IVC Glenn (Figure 1). Significant augmentation of total CI was achieved with mechanical assistance for SVC Glenn (109% ± 24%, P =.04) and also with TCPC (130% ± 109%, P = .01). Assisted CI achieved at least mean baseline biventricular CI for all 3-support modes. Oxygen delivery was highest for assisted SVC Glenn 1786 ± 1307 ml/l/min and lowest with TCPC 1146 ± 386 ml/l/min, with a trend toward lower common atrial pressure and lower pulmonary artery pressure for SVC Glenn. Conclusions SVC

  13. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.; Dahlin, R.S.

    1996-03-20

    The US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC) initiated this project as part of a program to study the control of fine particles from coal combustion. Our project focus was flue gas conditioning. Various conditioning processes have lowered operating costs and increased collection efficiency at utility particulate control devices. By improving fine particle collection, flue gas conditioning also helps to control the emission of toxic metals, which are concentrated in the fine particle fraction. By combining a review of pertinent literature, laboratory characterization of a variety of fine powders and ashes, pilot-scale studies of conditioning mechanisms, and field experiences, Southern Research Institute has been able to describe many of the key processes that account for the effects that conditioning can have on fine-particle collection. The overall goal of this research project was to explain the mechanisms by which various flue gas conditioning processes alter the performance of particulate control devices. Conditioning involves the modification of one or more of the parameters that determine the magnitude of the forces acting on the fly ash particles. Resistivity, chemistry, cohesivity, size distribution, and particle morphology are among the basic properties of fly ash that significantly influence fine particle collection. Modifications of particulate properties can result in improved or degraded control device performance. These modifications can be caused by (1) changes to the process design or operation that affect properties of the flue gas, (2) addition of particulate matter such as flue-gas desulfurization sorbents to the process effluent stream, (3) injection of reactive gases or liquids into the flue gas. We recommend that humidification be seriously considered as a flue gas conditioning option. 80 refs., 69 figs., 23 tabs.

  14. Noble gas incorporation in sputtered and ion beam assisted grown silicon films

    SciTech Connect

    van Veen, A. . Inter-Faculty Reactor Inst.); Greuter, M.J.W.; Niesen, L. . Dept. of Physics); Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Gas desorption measurements have been performed on sputter deposited silicon films. The sputter gas was argon or krypton. Parameters influencing the incorporation process e.g. bias voltage, substrate temperature and arrival rate ratio of silicon and noble gas atoms have been systematically varied. The films, a-Si and c-Si, have been characterised by various techniques for composition and defect analysis. A model has been applied to describe the composition of the growing silicon layer. Underlying mechanisms like gas-gas sputtering have been studied in separate ion implantation experiments. For a-Si concentrations as high as 6% Ar and Kr have been found. An important effect is the injection of self-interstitial atoms caused by the low energy heavy ion bombardment. It causes the layer to grow without large open volume defects.

  15. Noble gas incorporation in sputtered and ion beam assisted grown silicon films

    SciTech Connect

    van Veen, A.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Niesen, L.; Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.

    1991-12-31

    Gas desorption measurements have been performed on sputter deposited silicon films. The sputter gas was argon or krypton. Parameters influencing the incorporation process e.g. bias voltage, substrate temperature and arrival rate ratio of silicon and noble gas atoms have been systematically varied. The films, a-Si and c-Si, have been characterised by various techniques for composition and defect analysis. A model has been applied to describe the composition of the growing silicon layer. Underlying mechanisms like gas-gas sputtering have been studied in separate ion implantation experiments. For a-Si concentrations as high as 6% Ar and Kr have been found. An important effect is the injection of self-interstitial atoms caused by the low energy heavy ion bombardment. It causes the layer to grow without large open volume defects.

  16. Solar-assisted gas-energy water-heating feasibility for apartments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of residential energy use, solar-energy technology for buildings, and the requirements for implementing technology in the housing industry led to a project to develop a solar water heater for apartments. A design study for a specific apartment was used to establish a solar water-heater cost model which is based on plumbing contractor bids and manufacturer estimates. The cost model was used to size the system to minimize the annualized cost of hot water. The annualized cost of solar-assisted gas-energy water heating is found to be less expensive than electric water heating but more expensive than gas water heating. The feasibility of a natural gas utility supplying the auxiliary fuel is evaluated. It is estimated that gas-utilizing companies will find it profitable to offer solar water heating as part of a total energy service option or on a lease basis when the price of new base-load supplies of natural gas reaches $2.50-$3.00 per million Btu.

  17. Mechanical Design Technology--Modified. (Computer Assisted Drafting, Computer Aided Design). Curriculum Grant 84/85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoolcraft Coll., Livonia, MI.

    This document is a curriculum guide for a program in mechanical design technology (computer-assisted drafting and design developed at Schoolcraft College, Livonia, Michigan). The program helps students to acquire the skills of drafters and to interact with electronic equipment, with the option of becoming efficient in the computer-aided…

  18. Laser gas assisted treatment of AISI H12 tool steel and corrosion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Toor, Ihsan-ul-Haq; Malik, Jahanzaib; Patel, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser gas assisted treatment of AISI H12 tool steel surface is carried out and the electrochemical response of the laser treated surface is investigated. Morphological and metallurgical changes in the treated layer are examined using a scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Potentiodynamic polarization tests are carried out for untreated and laser treated specimen in 0.2 M NaCl solution at room temperature. It is found that the laser treated AISI H12 workpiece surfaces exhibit higher corrosion resistance as compared to untreated specimen as confirmed by lower corrosion rate, higher pitting potential, and lower passive current density.

  19. Gas detection mechanism for single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony; Dube, Isha; Fedorov, Georgy; Paranjape, Makarand; Barbara, Paola; Georgetown/RRC Kurchatov Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    We study field-effect transistors fabricated with carbon nanotube (CNT) networks to determine whether the gas sensing mechanism is due to molecules adsorbed on the nanotubes, or changes at the interface between the nanotubes and the contacts. Our previous work showed that in devices made with isolated CNT, the response to nitrogen dioxide was mainly due to the contact interfaces. Here, we focus on CNT networks and use SU-8 layers patterned with e-beam lithography to passivate the contact interfaces, while leaving the network exposed. We look to investigate possible differences in sensing mechanism for devices made with isolated tubes versus networks. Work funded by NSF, DMR 1008242.

  20. Pre-breakdown evaluation of gas discharge mechanisms in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2013-04-29

    The individual contributions of various gas discharge mechanisms to total pre-breakdown current in microgaps are quantified numerically. The variation of contributions of field emission and secondary electron emission with increasing electric field shows contrasting behavior even for a given gap size. The total current near breakdown decreases rapidly with gap size indicating that microscale discharges operate in a high-current, low-voltage regime. This study provides the first such analysis of breakdown mechanisms and aids in the formulation of physics-based theories for microscale breakdown.

  1. Cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Jose A.; Tabares, Francisco L.

    2007-03-15

    A simple method is described for the unambiguous identification of the individual components in a gas mixture showing strong overlapping of their mass spectrometric cracking patterns. The method, herein referred to as cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry, takes advantage of the different vapor pressure values of the individual components at low temperature (78 K for liquid nitrogen traps), and thus of the different depletion efficiencies and outgassing patterns during the fast cooling and slow warming up of the trap, respectively. Examples of the use of this technique for gas mixtures with application to plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon and carbon-nitrogen hard films are shown. Detection of traces of specific C{sub 3} hydrocarbons (<50 ppm of initial methane) in methane/hydrogen plasmas and the possible trapping of thermally unstable C-N compounds in N{sub 2} containing deposition plasmas are addressed as representative examples of specific applications of the technique.

  2. The application of an assisting gas plasma generator for low- temperature magnetron sputtering of Ti-C-Mo-S antifriction coatings on titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Savostikov, V. M.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Dudarev, E. F.; Melnikova, E. A.; Shulepov, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    The positive effect of assisting influence of high-density gas plasma formed by an independent plasma generator PINK on mechanical and tribological characteristics of Ti-C- Mo-S magnetron coating on titanium alloys at lowered to 350°C temperature of coating regardless of alloy structural condition was revealed by methods of calotest, nanorecognition, scratch testing and frictional material tests. The coating formed by means of a combined magnetron plasma method reduces titanium alloys friction coefficient in multiple times and increases wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. At the same time the mechanical properties of ultra-fine-grained titanium alloys obtained by nanostructuring do not deteriorate.

  3. Primary in-series palliation of hypoplastic left heart syndrome with mechanical lung assist in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Merklinger, Sandra L; Honjo, Osami; Al-Radi, Osman O; Poe, John; Wang, Jian; Oka, Norihiko; Van Arsdell, Glen S

    2009-01-01

    Less than optimal outcomes for hypoplastic left heart syndrome may be related to unstable in-parallel circulation. Mechanical lung assist by (1) superior vena cava to right atrium pump with oxygenation (oxygenator assist), or (2) superior vena cava to pulmonary artery pump (pump assist) may permit successful neonatal in-series palliation. Nineteen 15-day-old piglets underwent single ventricle and bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt (BCPC) creation without mechanical lung assist (n = 8), with pump assist (n = 5), or with oxygenator assist (n = 6). Baseline hemodynamic measurements were not different between groups. Median survival for the cavopulmonary shunt alone, pump assist, and oxygenator assist groups was 28, 180, and 180 minutes, respectively (p = 0.0006). No differences in arterial oxygen concentration or bicarbonate levels were detected. Arterial carbon dioxide (p < or = 0.007) was higher in the cavopulmonary shunt alone versus lung assist groups. Cavopulmonary shunt alone animals had decreased mean arterial pressure (p < 0.02) and cerebral perfusion pressure (p = 0.029) and elevated left atrial pressure compared with lung assist groups (p < 0.05). This data demonstrates creation of a novel translational neonatal BCPC model in which mechanical lung assist augments survival. Early BCPC death was related to poor ventricular function and an inability to ventilate, issues that were improved with both types of lung assist. PMID:19812479

  4. Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Orme

    2012-08-01

    Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

  5. Cluster Growth Mechanism in Sputtering Gas-Aggregation Nanocluster Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarsem Singh, M.; Han, H.; Sundararajan, J. A.; Qiang, Y.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the influence of some parameters for cluster growth of core shell iron- iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The nanocluster source which combines a magnetron sputtering gun with a gas aggregation chamber is used to produce MNPs. Nanoclusters of various mean sizes ranging from 1-100 nm can be synthesized by varying the aggregation distance, Ar to He gas ratio, pressure in the aggregation tube, sputter power, and temperature of the aggregation tube. Physical properties -- magnetic measurements by VSM and SQUID and size distribution by SEM and TEM were studied for different MNPs. The significance of this research is to understand the growth mechanism and physical properties as the size of particles grow from few nanometer to hundred of nanometer. Growth of the particles is theoretically explained by the homogenous and heterogeneous growth process. Based on this study, different size of MNPs fits into different category of applications from data storage to biomedical field.

  6. Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry investigations of environment-assisted crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chou, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that environment-assisted subcritical crack growth in high-strength steels and other high-strength alloys (particularly in hydrogen and in hydrogenous environments) is an important technological problem of long standing. This problem is directly related to issues of structural integrity, durability, and reliability. The terms 'hydrogen embrittlement' and 'stress corrosion cracking' have been employed to describe the considered phenomenon. This paper provides a summary of contributions made during the past ten years toward the understanding of environmentally assisted crack growth. The processes involved in crack growth are examined, and details regarding crack growth and chemical reactions are discussed, taking into account crack growth in steels exposed to water/water vapor, the effect of hydrogen, reactions involving hydrogen sulfide, and aspects of fracture surface morphology and composition. Attention is also given to the modeling of crack growth response, crack growth in gas mixtures, and the interaction of solute atoms with the crack-tip stress field.

  7. Mechanism study of dual-frequency ultrasound assisted enzymolysis on rapeseed protein by immobilized Alcalase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Meng, Tingting; Ma, Haile; Zhang, Yanyan; Li, Yunliang; Jin, Jian; Ye, Xiaofei

    2016-09-01

    The mechanism of ultrasound field promoting enzymolysis efficiency is difficult to study, because the reaction system mixes with enzymes, proteins and hydrolysates. Immobilized enzyme is a good option that can be used to investigate the mechanism by separating enzymes out from the system after enzymolysis. The objective of this study was by using immobilized Alcalase to investigate the effects and mechanisms of the promotion of dual-frequency ultrasound (DFU) assisted-enzymolysis on rapeseed protein. Based on single factor experiments, response surface methodology model with three factors - hydrolysis time, power density and solid-liquid ratio at three levels was utilized to optimize the degree of hydrolysis (DH). Circular dichroism (CD) was used to analyze the secondary structure change of the protein, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the surface microstructure change of the enzyme. The results showed that with DFU assisted-enzymolysis, the DH increased by 74.38% at the optimal levels for power density 57W/L, solid-liquid ratio 5.3g/L and enzymolysis time 76min. After DFU assisted-enzymolysis, the yield of soluble solids content, including protein, peptides and total sugar in hydrolysate increased by 64.61%, 40.88% and 23.60%, respectively. CD analysis showed that after DFU assisted-enzymolysis, the number of α-helix and random coil decreased by 10.7% and 4.5%, β-chain increased by 2.4%. SEM showed that the degree of surface roughness of immobilized Alcalase increased. The above results indicated that the improvement of hydrolysis by DFU assisted-enzymolysis was achieved by enhancing the solid solubility, changing the molecular structure of protein and increased the surface area of immobilized enzyme. PMID:27150775

  8. Highly selective NH3 gas sensor based on Au loaded ZnO nanostructures prepared using microwave-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Shingange, K; Tshabalala, Z P; Ntwaeaborwa, O M; Motaung, D E; Mhlongo, G H

    2016-10-01

    ZnO nanorods synthesized using microwave-assisted approach were functionalized with gold (Au) nanoparticles. The Au coverage on the surface of the functionalized ZnO was controlled by adjusting the concentration of the Au precursor. According to X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results, it was confirmed that Au form nanoparticles loaded on the surface of ZnO. The small Au loading level of 0.5wt% showed the highest response of 1600-100ppm of NH3 gas at room temperature (RT) whereas further increase of Au loading level resulted in poor detection of NH3. All Au loaded ZnO (Au/ZnO) based sensors exhibited very short recovery and response times compared to unloaded ZnO sensing materials. The responses of ZnO and Au/ZnO based sensors (0.5-2.5wt%) to other flammable gases, including H2, CO and CH4, were considerably less, demonstrating that Au/ZnO based sensors were highly selective to NH3 gas at room temperature. Spill over mechanism which is the main reason for the observed enhanced NH3 response with 0.5 Au loading level is explained in detail. PMID:27388126

  9. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  10. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  11. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  12. Quantification of Conventional and Nonconventional Charge-Assisted Hydrogen Bonds in the Condensed and Gas Phases.

    PubMed

    Katsyuba, Sergey A; Vener, Mikhail V; Zvereva, Elena E; Fei, Zhaofu; Scopelliti, Rosario; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Siankevich, Sviatlana; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-11-01

    Charge-assisted hydrogen bonds (CAHBs) play critical roles in many systems from biology through to materials. In none of these areas has the role and function of CAHBs been explored satisfactorily because of the lack of data on the energy of CAHBs in the condensed phases. We have, for the first time, quantified three types of CAHBs in both the condensed and gas phases for 1-(2'-hydroxylethyl)-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2OHmim][OAc]). The energy of conventional OH···[OAc](-) CAHBs is ∼10 kcal·mol(-1), whereas nonconventional C(sp2)H···[OAc](-) and C(sp3)H···[OAc](-) CAHBs are weaker by ∼5-7 kcal·mol(-1). In the gas phase, the strength of the nonconventional CAHBs is doubled, whereas the conventional CAHBs are strengthened by <20%. The influence of cooperativity effects on the ability of the [OAc](-) anion to deprotonate the imidazolium cation is evaluated. The ability to quantify CAHBs in the condensed phase on the basis of easier accessible gas-phase estimates is highlighted. PMID:26496074

  13. Inert Gas Enhanced Laser-Assisted Purification of Platinum Electron-Beam-Induced Deposits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2015-09-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar-H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. A sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention. PMID:26126173

  14. Review of coaxial flow gas core nuclear rocket fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    Almost all of the fluid mechanics research associated with the coaxial flow gas core reactor ended abruptly with the interruption of NASA's space nuclear program because of policy and budgetary considerations in 1973. An overview of program accomplishments is presented through a review of the experiments conducted and the analyses performed. Areas are indicated where additional research is required for a fuller understanding of cavity flow and of the factors which influence cold and hot flow containment. A bibliography is included with graphic material.

  15. [Stent-assisted mechanical removal of tromboembolism after embolization of middle cerebral artery aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rać, Monika; Sagan, Leszek; Kojder, Ireneusz

    2012-01-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of the middle cerebral artery's branch occurred just after embolization of a nonruptured cerebral aneurysm. Bail-out stent-assisted mechanical thrombectomy of the clot was performed. DSA revealed normal vessel patency at the end of the procedure. There were no adverse events related to this thrombectomy, and the patient recovered from the embolization with minor neurologic deficit. There was no neurologic deficit after 90 days follow-up. PMID:23276015

  16. Thermo-mechanical modeling of the electrically-assisted manufacturing (EAM) technique during open die forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salandro, Wesley A.

    This thesis contains all of the steps which allow the Electrically-Assisted Manufacturing (EAM) technique to be experimentally explored and analytically modeled for an electrically-assisted forging operation. Chapter 1 includes the problem statement, proposed solution, and literature reviews on EAM. Chapter 2 describes a thorough background on the EAM technique, highlights prior EAM research, and explains the research approach taken for this thesis. The coupled thermo-mechanical modeling strategy, along with the introduction of the Electroplastic Effect Coefficient (EEC) is provided in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 explains the two different approaches to determine the EEC profiles when modeling a particular metal. The simplified EAF mechanical model for electrically-assisted forging is presented in Chapter 5. Also in this chapter, the same modeling methodology (i.e. thermo-mechanical, EEC, etc.) is used to predict loads for an electrically-assisted bending (EAB) process. The following chapters explore how different material- and process-based parameters affect the EAF technique. Chapter 6 examines how different workpiece contact areas affect EAF effectiveness, along with an exploration of how well different metal forming lubricants perform with EAF. Chapter 7 explores if there is a difference in the thermal or mechanical profiles of specimens undergoing EAF forging tests with different average grain sizes. Chapter 8 examines the same effects as the previous chapter on specimens with varying levels of prior cold work. The materials- and process-based simplifications and sensitivities of the proposed modeling strategy are outlined in Chapter 9. Chapters 10-14 include the science behind the electroplastic effect, conclusions, future work, broader impacts, and intellectual merit, respectively. The overall intention of this thesis is to show the candidate's ability to take an idea for a new manufacturing process, prove that it works, and then understand and model the process

  17. Sound radiation mechanism in a turbulent gas flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kidin, N.I.; Librovich, V.B.

    1984-01-01

    To describe sound radiation in an ''explosion within a flame'', a model based on gas dynamics equations averaged over volume with a thermal source of chemical nature has been proposed, relating the power of the monopole sound source to the change in heat liberation rate in the combustion reactions within the volume. This mechanism apparently plays a significant role in flame turbulization and sound radiation by a turbulent flame. Equations for the temperature perturbations, a linear differential equation for temperature perturbations of the third order are obtained, after the solution of which the density, mass flow, and geometric factor perturbations are also obtained. Such a mechanism of transition from frontal combustion to reactions within the volume accompanied by intense sound radiation may play a significant role in describing the noise produced by turbulent flames.

  18. Parenchymal mechanics, gas mixing, and the slope of phase III.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2013-07-01

    A model of parenchymal mechanics is revisited with the objective of investigating the differences in parenchymal microstructure that underlie the differences in regional compliance that are inferred from gas-mixing studies. The stiffness of the elastic line elements that lie along the free edges of alveoli and form the boundary of the lumen of the alveolar duct is the dominant determinant of parenchymal compliance. Differences in alveolar size cause parallel shifts of the pressure-volume curve, but have little effect on compliance. However, alveolar size also affects the relation between surface tension and pressure during the breathing cycle. Thus regional differences in alveolar size generate regional differences in surface tension, and these drive Marangoni surface flows that equilibrate surface tension between neighboring acini. Surface tension relaxation introduces phase differences in regional volume oscillations and a dependence of expired gas concentration on expired volume. A particular example of different parenchymal properties in two neighboring acini is described, and gas exchange in this model is calculated. The efficiency of mixing and slope of phase III for the model agree well with published data. This model constitutes a new hypothesis concerning the origin of phase III. PMID:23599394

  19. Schottky Barrier Catalysis Mechanism in Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching of Silicon.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ruby A; Hymel, Thomas M; Narasimhan, Vijay K; Cui, Yi

    2016-04-13

    Metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) is a versatile anisotropic etch for silicon although its mechanism is not well understood. Here we propose that the Schottky junction formed between metal and silicon plays an essential role on the distribution of holes in silicon injected from hydrogen peroxide. The proposed mechanism can be used to explain the dependence of the etching kinetics on the doping level, doping type, crystallographic surface direction, and etchant solution composition. We used the doping dependence of the reaction to fabricate a novel etch stop for the reaction. PMID:27018712

  20. Light assisted room temperature ethanol gas sensing of ZnO-ZnS nanowires.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunghoon; Kim, Soohyun; Ko, Hyunsung; Lee, Chongmu

    2014-12-01

    ZnO-core/ZnS-shell nanowires were synthesized by the thermal evaporation of a mixture of ZnO and graphite powders followed by the thermal evaporation of ZnS powders. Multiple networked nanowire gas sensors were then fabricated using the core-shell nanowires. The morphology, crystal structure and sensing properties of the ZnO-core/ZnS-shell nanowires to C2H5OH gas at room temperature under ultraviolet (UV) illumination were examined. The responses of the ZnO-core/ZnS-shell nanowires to C2H5OH gas were 1.2-2.1 times higher than those of the ZnO nanowires at C2H5OH concentrations ranging from 50 to 250 ppm under UV illumination. On the other hand, the resistance of the ZnO nanowires in the dark at room temperature was too high to measure. The underlying mechanism for the enhanced gas sensing properties of the ZnO-core/ZnS-shell nanowires toward C2H5OH gas is discussed. PMID:25971003

  1. Development of an assistive motorized hip orthosis: kinematics analysis and mechanical design.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jeremy; Bouri, Mohamed; Ortlieb, Amalric; Bleuler, Hannes; Clavel, Reymond

    2013-06-01

    With the increase of life expectancy, a higher number of elderly need assistance to maintain their mobility and their independance. The hip joint is crucial for walking and is problematic for a large number of aged people. In this paper we present a novel design of a motorized hip orthosis to assist elderly people while walking, stair climbing and during the sit-to-stand transistions. The kinematics was developed based on biomechanics considerations. To be able to achieve a large assistance rate, velocity and torques of the hip joint were studied from the literature. In order to fit with these requirements, an amplification mechanism inspired by excavators was developed and implemented. Comfort considerations were also taken into account and a custom interface was designed with the collaboration of a professional orthopaedic technician. First tests with the prototype showed that the workspace is sufficient for walking, for stair climbing as well as for sit-to-stand transitions. The assistance rate can go up to 30% for a 70 kg subject during walking at a cadence of 100 steps/min. The comfort is guaranteed despite the important weight (4.3 kg) of this first prototype. PMID:24187310

  2. Dual gas-bubble-assisted solvothermal synthesis of magnetite with tunable size and structure.

    PubMed

    He, Quanguo; Wu, Zhaohui; Huang, Chunyan

    2011-10-01

    We present a facile solvothermal approach by employing ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) and ammonium acetate (NH4Ac) as dual gas-bubble-generating structure-directing agent to produce of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles with tunable size ranging from 90 nm to 400 nm and controllable structures including porous and hollow construction. The size, morphology and structure of the final products are achieved by simple adjustment of the molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac, ammonium ion concentration and the reaction time. The results reveal that the molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac strongly influenced the morphology and size of magnetite particles, even could decide the kind of architecture including solid, hollow and porous to form. Particularly, ammonium ion molar concentration plays a significant role in controlling size and magnetic property for magnetite particles. Simultaneously, prolonging the reaction time is beneficial to the magnetite particles growth and inner space escalation with altered reaction time at a certain concentration of ammonium and molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac. Such a design conception of dual gas-bubble-assistance used here is promisingly positive and significant for hollow magnetic particles fabrication and may be extended to other nano-scale hollow construction. PMID:22400226

  3. [INVITED] Laser gas assisted treatment of Ti-alloy: Analysis of surface characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Karatas, C.

    2016-04-01

    Laser gas assisted treatment of Ti6Al4V alloy surface is carried out and nitrogen/oxygen mixture with partial pressure of PO2/PN2=1/3 is introduced during the surface treatment process. Analytical tools are used to characterize the laser treated surfaces. The fracture toughness at the surface and the residual stress in the surface region of the laser treated layer are measured. Scratch tests are carried out to determine the friction coefficient of the treated surface. It is found that closely spaced regular laser scanning tracks generates a self-annealing effect in the laser treated layer while lowering the stress levels in the treated region. Introducing high pressure gas mixture impingement at the surface results in formation of oxide and nitride species including, TiO, TiO2, TiN and TiOxNy in the surface region. A dense layer consisting of fine size grains are formed in the surface region of the laser treated layer, which enhances the microhardness at the surface. The fracture toughness reduces after the laser treatment process because of the microhardness enhancement at the surface. The residual stress formed is comprehensive, which is in the order of -350 MPa.

  4. Beyond the VAD: Human Factors Engineering for Mechanically Assisted Circulation in the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Patel-Raman, Sonna M; Fox, Carson S; Bass, Ellen J

    2016-06-01

    Thousands of ventricular assist devices (VADs) currently provide circulatory support to patients worldwide, and dozens of heart pump designs for adults and pediatric patients are under various stages of development in preparation for translation to clinical use. The successful bench-to-bedside development of a VAD involves a structured evaluation of possible system states, including human interaction with the device and auxiliary component usage in the hospital or home environment. In this study, we review the literature and present the current landscape of preclinical design and assessment, decision support tools and procedures, and patient-centered therapy. Gaps of knowledge are identified. The study findings support the need for more attention to user-centered design approaches for medical devices, such as mechanical circulatory assist systems, that specifically involve detailed qualitative and quantitative assessments of human-device interaction to mitigate risk and failure. PMID:26511100

  5. The role of metals and influence of oxygen on ceria supported copper-palladium bimetallic catalysts for the oxygen-assisted water-gas shift reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Elise Bickford

    This study was focused to investigate the roles of Cu and Pd in CuPd/CeO 2 bimetallic catalysts containing 30 wt% Cu and 1 wt% Pd used in the oxygen-assisted water-gas shift (OWGS) reaction employing combined bulk and surface characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), CO chemisorption, and in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The role of oxygen in aiding the water-gas shift reaction was also studied to determine an overall mechanism for the water-gas shift reaction. The catalytic activity for CO conversion and the stability of catalyst during on-stream operation increased upon adding Pd to Cu/CeO2 monometallic catalysts, especially when the OWLS reaction was performed under low temperatures. In-situ XPS studies of reduced catalysts showed the existence of Cu and Pd in their metallic states. The spectra also showed a shift in Cu 2p peaks toward lower binding energy with concommitant shift in the Pd 3d peaks toward higher BE. Addition of Pd decreased the surface Cu concentration while the concentration of Pd remained unaltered. The improved catalytic activity and stability of CuPd/CeO2 bimetallic catalyst was attributed to the Cu-Pd interaction. When the catalyst series was reduced in-situ under UHV conditions in the XPS chamber in order to better understand the metal-support interactions, it was found that the addition of 1%Pd to the Cu/CeO2 catalyst would greatly improve the reduction properties of the Cu and Ce under UHV conditions. When compared with results from the oxygen-assisted water-gas-shift reaction, it was found that the increased reduction from the addition of Pd aided in the reaction. When reaction kinetics of the water-gas shift and the oxygen-assisted water-gas shift reaction were examined, it was found that the addition of a small amount of air improved the overall reaction kinetics. In general, the activation energies decreased for the catalyst series when air was added to the

  6. Improvement of mechanical properties by additive assisted laser sintering of PEEK

    SciTech Connect

    Kroh, M. Bonten, C.; Eyerer, P.

    2014-05-15

    The additive assisted laser sintering was recently developed at IKT: A carbon black (CB) additive is used to adjust the polymer's laser absorption behavior with the aim to improve the interconnection of sintered powder layers. In this paper a parameter study, Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) samples were prepared with different contents of carbon black and were laser sintered with varying thermal treatment. The samples were mechanically tested and investigated by optical light and transmission electron microscopy. An influence on the morphology at the border areas of particles and intersections of laser sintered layers was found. Depending on the viscosity of the raw material and CB content, different shapes of lamellae were observed. These (trans-) crystalline or polymorph structures, respectively, influence the thermal and mechanical behavior of the virgin PEEK. Moreover, the thermal treatment during the sintering process caused an improvement of mechanical properties like tensile strength and elongation at break.

  7. Mechanical behavior of thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.; Phucharoen, W.; Chang, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will enable turbine components to operate at higher temperatures and lower cooling gas flow rates; thereby improving their efficiency. Future developments are limited by precise knowledge of the material properties and failure mechanisms of the coating system. Details of this nature are needed for realistic modeling of the coating system which will, in turn, promote advancements in coating technology. Complementary experiments and analytical modeling which were undertaken in order to define and measure the important failure processes for plasma-sprayed coatings are presented. The experimental portion includes two different tests which were developed to measure coating properties. These are termed tensile adhesion and acoustic emission tests. The analytical modeling section details a finite element method which was used to calculate the stress distribution in the coating system. Some preliminary results are presented.

  8. Do tropical wetland plants possess convective gas flow mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Konnerup, Dennis; Sorrell, Brian K; Brix, Hans

    2011-04-01

    • Internal pressurization and convective gas flow, which can aerate wetland plants more efficiently than diffusion, are common in temperate species. Here, we present the first survey of convective flow in a range of tropical plants. • The occurrence of pressurization and convective flow was determined in 20 common wetland plants from the Mekong Delta in Vietnam. The diel variation in pressurization in culms and the convective flow and gas composition from stubbles were examined for Eleocharis dulcis, Phragmites vallatoria and Hymenachne acutigluma, and related to light, humidity and air temperature. • Nine of the 20 species studied were able to build up a static pressure of > 50 Pa, and eight species had convective flow rates higher than 1 ml min(-1). There was a clear diel variation, with higher pressures and flows during the day than during the night, when pressures and flows were close to zero. • It is concluded that convective flow through shoots and rhizomes is a common mechanism for below-ground aeration of tropical wetland plants and that plants with convective flow might have a competitive advantage for growth in deep water. PMID:21175639

  9. THE FORMATION MECHANISM OF GAS GIANTS ON WIDE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Veras, Dimitri; Ford, Eric B.; Beichman, C. A.

    2009-12-10

    The recent discoveries of massive planets on ultra-wide orbits of HR 8799 and Fomalhaut present a new challenge for planet formation theorists. Our goal is to figure out which of three giant planet formation mechanisms-core accretion (with or without migration), scattering from the inner disk, or gravitational instability-could be responsible for Fomalhaut b, HR 8799 b, c and d, and similar planets discovered in the future. This paper presents the results of numerical experiments comparing the long-period planet formation efficiency of each possible mechanism in model A star, G star, and M star disks. First, a simple core accretion simulation shows that planet cores forming beyond 35 AU cannot reach critical mass, even under the most favorable conditions one can construct. Second, a set of N-body simulations demonstrates that planet-planet scattering does not create stable, wide-orbit systems such as HR 8799. Finally, a linear stability analysis verifies previous work showing that global spiral instabilities naturally arise in high-mass disks. We conclude that massive gas giants on stable orbits with semimajor axes a approx> 35 AU form by gravitational instability in the disk. We recommend that observers examine the planet detection rate as a function of stellar age, controlling for the planets' dimming with time. Any age trend would indicate that planets on wide orbits are transient relics of scattering from the inner disk. If planet detection rate is found to be independent of stellar age, it would confirm our prediction that gravitational instability is the dominant mode of producing detectable planets on wide orbits. We also predict that the occurrence ratio of long-period to short-period gas giants should be highest for M dwarfs due to the inefficiency of core accretion and the expected small fragment mass (approx10 M {sub Jup}) in their disks.

  10. A Consulting System Assisting Naive Users In Decomposing And Constructing A Mechanical Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Norihiro; Tsuji, Saburo

    1984-06-01

    A new consulting system using a natural language and a graphical interface is under construction to assist a naive user in decomposing and constructing a mechanical object with cylindrical bodies. Many trouble shooting systems have been developed so far, but most of them do not tell us the way for decomposing the object to find out trouble points. This system is built to assist naive user in decomposing a mechanical object and in constructing it after repairation. It is difficult for a computer to give him a series of operations necessary for exposing a trouble point by using just simple command suquences, then an integrated instruction facility using a natural language and a visual interface must be offered to users for specifying what portion of the object should be decomposed or constructed at the next stage, and for verifying whether what the user have done to the object is correct or incorrect. The present art of computer vision cannot verify if an act taken by the user is correct or not at each step, because mechanical objects sometimes have involved structures. This system leaves this verification process to the user by showing him two perspective views of the objects, and an explanation on the operation which causes these two views before and after decomposition or construction.

  11. Similarity between the primary and secondary air-assisted liquid jet breakup mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Im, Kyoung-Su; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2008-04-18

    We report an ultrafast synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging study of the primary breakup mechanism of a coaxial air-assisted water jet. There exist great similarities between the primary (jet) and the secondary (drop) breakup, and in the primary breakup on different length scales. A transition from a ligament- to a membrane-mediated breakup is identified around an effective Weber number We' approximately 13. This observation reveals the critical role an effective Weber number plays in determining the atomization process and strongly supports the cascade breakup model. PMID:18518113

  12. Water Assisted Reaction Mechanism of OH- with CCl4 in Aqueous Solution - Hybrid Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanics Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jie; Yin, Hongyun; Wang, Dunyou; Valiev, Marat

    2013-02-20

    The OH- (H2O) + CCl4 reaction in aqueous solution was investigated using the combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics approach. The reaction mechanism of OH- (H2O) + CCl4 consists of two concerted steps - formation of OH- in the favorable attack conformation via the proton transfer process, and the nucleophilic substitution process in which the newly formed OH- attacks the CCl4. The free energy activation barrier is 38.2 kcal/mol at CCSD(T)/MM level of theory for this reaction, which is about 10.3 kcal/mol higher than that of the direct nucleophilic substitution mechanism of the OH- + CCl4 reaction in aqueous solution.

  13. Mechanical Modulation of Phonon-Assisted Field Emission in a Silicon Nanomembrane Detector for Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghoo; Blick, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission in a free-standing silicon nanomembrane detector for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins. The impacts of ion bombardment on the silicon nanomembrane have been explored in both mechanical and electrical points of view. Locally elevated lattice temperature in the silicon nanomembrane, resulting from the transduction of ion kinetic energy into thermal energy through the ion bombardment, induces not only phonon-assisted field emission but also a mechanical vibration in the silicon nanomembrane. The coupling of these mechanical and electrical phenomenon leads to mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission. The thermal energy relaxation through mechanical vibration in addition to the lateral heat conduction and field emission in the silicon nanomembrane offers effective cooling of the nanomembrane, thereby allowing high resolution mass analysis. PMID:26861329

  14. Mechanical Modulation of Phonon-Assisted Field Emission in a Silicon Nanomembrane Detector for Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jonghoo; Blick, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission in a free-standing silicon nanomembrane detector for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins. The impacts of ion bombardment on the silicon nanomembrane have been explored in both mechanical and electrical points of view. Locally elevated lattice temperature in the silicon nanomembrane, resulting from the transduction of ion kinetic energy into thermal energy through the ion bombardment, induces not only phonon-assisted field emission but also a mechanical vibration in the silicon nanomembrane. The coupling of these mechanical and electrical phenomenon leads to mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission. The thermal energy relaxation through mechanical vibration in addition to the lateral heat conduction and field emission in the silicon nanomembrane offers effective cooling of the nanomembrane, thereby allowing high resolution mass analysis. PMID:26861329

  15. Vessel wall perforation mechanism of the excimer laser-assisted non-occlusive anastomosis technique.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Jochem; van Doormaal, Tristan P C; Verweij, Bon H; van der Zwan, Albert; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    The excimer laser assisted non-occlusive anastomosis (ELANA) technique is used to make anastomoses on intracerebral arteries. This end-to-side anastomosis is created without temporary occlusion of the recipient artery using a 308-nm excimer laser with a ring-shaped multi-fiber catheter to punch an opening in the arterial wall. Over 500 patients have received an ELANA bypass. However, the vessel wall perforation mechanism of the laser catheter is not known exactly and not 100 % successful. In this study, we aimed to understand the mechanism of ELANA vessel perforation using specialized imaging techniques to ultimately improve its effectiveness. High-speed imaging, high-contrast imaging, and high-sensitivity thermal imaging were used to study the laser wall perforation mechanism and reveal the mechanical and thermal effects involved. In vitro, rabbit arteries were exposed with the special designed laser catheter in a setup representative for the clinical setting, in which blood was replaced with a transparent UV absorbing liquid for visualization. We observed that laser vessel wall perforation was caused by explosive vapor bubbles tearing through the vessel wall, mostly within the first 20 of the total 200 pulses. Thermal effects were minimal. Unsymmetrical tension in the vessel wall inducing migration of the flap during laser exposure was observed in case of unsuccessful wall perforations. The laser wall perforation mechanism in the ELANA technique is primarily mechanical. Symmetric tension in the recipient vessel wall is essential and should be trained by neurosurgeons. PMID:27220531

  16. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. Comparison of peak expiratory flows with manually assisted and unassisted coughing techniques.

    PubMed

    Bach, J R

    1993-11-01

    Pulmonary complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality for patients with severe expiratory muscle weakness. The purpose of this study was to compare peak cough expiratory flows (PCEFs) during unassisted and assisted coughing and review the long-term use of mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MI-E) for 46 neuromuscular ventilator users. These individuals used noninvasive methods of ventilatory support for a mean of 21.1 h/d for 17.3 +/- 15.5 years. They relied on manually assisted coughing and/or MI-E during periods of productive airway secretion. They reported a mean of 0.7 +/- 1.2 cases of pneumonia and other serious pulmonary complications and 2.8 +/- 5.6 hospitalizations during the 16.4-year period and no complications of MI-E. A sample of 21 of these patients with a mean forced vital capacity of 490 +/- 370 ml had a mean maximum insufflation capacity (MIC) achieved by a combination of air stacking of ventilator insufflations and glossopharyngeal breathing of 1,670 +/- 540 ml. The PCEFs for this sample were: following an unassisted inspiration, 1.81 +/- 1.03 L/s; following a MIC maneuver, 3.37 +/- 1.07 L/s; with manual assistance by abdominal compression following a MIC maneuver, 4.27 +/- 1.29 L/s; and with MI-E, 7.47 +/- 1.02 L/s. Each PCEF was significantly greater than the preceding, respectively (p < 0.01). We conclude that manually assisted coughing and MI-E are effective and safe methods for facilitating airway secretion clearance for neuromuscular ventilator users who would otherwise be managed by endotracheal suctioning. Severely decreased MIC, but not necessarily vital capacity, is an indication for tracheostomy. PMID:8222823

  17. The role of silane gas flow rate on PECVD-assisted fabrication of silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidinezhad, Habib; Ashkarran, Ali Akbar; Abdul-Malek, Zulkurnain

    2016-03-01

    Silicon (Si) core-shell nanowires (NWs) were successfully prepared by very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique, and the effect of silane (SiH4) gas flow rates on physicochemical properties of silicon NWs was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize SiNWs. Structural properties and morphology of NWs were studied as a function of SiH4 gas flow rate. Microscopic analysis revealed the formation of SiNWs with average tip and stem diameters ranging from 18 to 30 and 21 to 67 nm, respectively. Furthermore, the average length of Si NWs calculated based on the FESEM images was about 300-1800 nm. We have found that the growth of SiNWs increased with increasing in SiH4 gas flow rate. XRD, Raman spectra in addition to high-resolution TEM, verified the formation of crystalline SiNWs. A possible growth mechanism was suggested based on our observations.

  18. Accretion and Orbital Inspiral in Gas-assisted Supermassive Black Hole Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-08-01

    Many galaxies are expected to harbor binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in their centers. Their interaction with the surrounding gas results in the accretion and exchange of angular momentum via tidal torques, facilitating binary inspiral. Here, we explore the non-trivial coupling between these two processes and analyze how the global properties of externally supplied circumbinary disks depend on the binary accretion rate. By formulating our results in terms of the angular momentum flux driven by internal stresses, we come up with a very simple classification of the possible global disk structures, which differ from the standard constant \\dot{M} accretion disk solution. The suppression of accretion by the binary tides, leading to a significant mass accumulation in the inner disk, accelerates binary inspiral. We show that once the disk region strongly perturbed by the viscously transmitted tidal torque exceeds the binary semimajor axis, the binary can merge in less than its mass-doubling time due to accretion. Thus, unlike the inspirals driven by stellar scattering, the gas-assisted merger can occur even if the binary is embedded in a relatively low-mass disk (lower than its own mass). This is important for resolving the “last parsec” problem for SMBH binaries and understanding powerful gravitational wave sources in the universe. We argue that the enhancement of accretion by the binary found in some recent simulations cannot persist for a long time and should not affect the long-term orbital inspiral. We also review existing simulations of SMBH binary–disk coupling and propose a numerical setup which is particularly well suited to verifying our theoretical predictions.

  19. Mechanism for accurate, protein-assisted DNA annealing by Deinococcus radiodurans DdrB.

    PubMed

    Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N; Weiss, Yoni M; Junop, Murray S

    2016-04-19

    Accurate pairing of DNA strands is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). How cells achieve accurate annealing when large regions of single-strand DNA are unpaired has remained unclear despite many efforts focused on understanding proteins, which mediate this process. Here we report the crystal structure of a single-strand annealing protein [DdrB (DNA damage response B)] in complex with a partially annealed DNA intermediate to 2.2 Å. This structure and supporting biochemical data reveal a mechanism for accurate annealing involving DdrB-mediated proofreading of strand complementarity. DdrB promotes high-fidelity annealing by constraining specific bases from unauthorized association and only releases annealed duplex when bound strands are fully complementary. To our knowledge, this mechanism provides the first understanding for how cells achieve accurate, protein-assisted strand annealing under biological conditions that would otherwise favor misannealing. PMID:27044084

  20. Etching anisotropy mechanisms lead to morphology-controlled silicon nanoporous structures by metal assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bing; Li, Meicheng; Liang, Yu; Bai, Yang; Song, Dandan; Li, Yingfeng; Luo, Jian

    2016-02-01

    The etching anisotropy induced by the morphology and rotation of silver particles controls the morphology of silicon nanoporous structures, through various underlying complex etching mechanisms. The level of etching anisotropy can be modulated by controlling the morphology of the silver catalyst to obtain silicon nanoporous structures with straight pores, cone-shaped pores and pyramid-shaped pores. In addition, the structures with helical pores are obtained by taking advantage of the special anisotropic etching, which is induced by the rotation and revolution of silver particles during the etching process. An investigation of the etching anisotropy during metal assisted chemical etching will promote a deep understanding of the chemical etching mechanism of silicon, and provide a feasible approach to fabricate Si nanoporous structures with special morphologies. PMID:26785718

  1. Mechanical properties of silicon oxynitride thin films prepared by low energy ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Yukari; Hasuyama, Hiroki; Kondoh, Toshiharu; Imaoka, Yasuo; Watari, Takanori; Baba, Koumei; Hatada, Ruriko

    1999-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride (SiO xN y) films (0.1-0.7 μm) were produced on Si (1 0 0), glass and 316L stainless steel substrates by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) using Si evaporation and the concurrent bombardment with a mixture of 200 eV N 2 and Ar, or O 2 and Ar ions. Adhesion was evaluated by pull-off tests. Film hardness was measured by a nanoindentation system with AFM. The measurement of internal stress in the films was carried out by the Stoney method. The film structure was examined by GXRD. XPS was employed to measure the composition of films and to analyze the chemical bonds. The dependence of mechanical properties on the film thickness and the processing temperature during deposition was studied. Finally, the relations between the mechanical properties of the films and the correlation with corrosion-protection ability of films are discussed and summarized.

  2. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production. PMID:26657698

  3. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production. PMID:26657698

  4. Mechanical circulatory assist devices: a primer for critical care and emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ayan; Larson, Joel S; Kashani, Kianoush B; Libricz, Stacy L; Patel, Bhavesh M; Guru, Pramod K; Alwardt, Cory M; Pajaro, Octavio; Farmer, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory assist devices are now commonly used in the treatment of severe heart failure as bridges to cardiac transplant, as destination therapy for patients who are not transplant candidates, and as bridges to recovery and "decision-making". These devices, which can be used to support the left or right ventricles or both, restore circulation to the tissues, thereby improving organ function. Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are the most common support devices. To care for patients with these devices, health care providers in emergency departments (EDs) and intensive care units (ICUs) need to understand the physiology of the devices, the vocabulary of mechanical support, the types of complications patients may have, diagnostic techniques, and decision-making regarding treatment. Patients with LVADs who come to the ED or are admitted to the ICU usually have nonspecific clinical symptoms, most commonly shortness of breath, hypotension, anemia, chest pain, syncope, hemoptysis, gastrointestinal bleeding, jaundice, fever, oliguria and hematuria, altered mental status, headache, seizure, and back pain. Other patients are seen for cardiac arrest, psychiatric issues, sequelae of noncardiac surgery, and trauma. Although most patients have LVADs, some may have biventricular support devices or total artificial hearts. Involving a team of cardiac surgeons, perfusion experts, and heart-failure physicians, as well as ED and ICU physicians and nurses, is critical for managing treatment for these patients and for successful outcomes. This review is designed for critical care providers who may be the first to see these patients in the ED or ICU. PMID:27342573

  5. Air assist fuel nozzle reduces aircraft gas turbine engine emissions at idle operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Papathakos, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    Reduction in unburned hydrocarbons from jet engine by use of air assist fuel nozzle is discussed. Operation of nozzle for improving combustion efficiency by improving fuel atomization is analyzed. Advantages to be achieved by air assist fuel nozzle are analyzed.

  6. Cutting by a high power laser at a long distance without an assist gas for dismantling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmouch, G.; Meyrueis, P.; Grandjean, P.

    1997-09-01

    As the applications of laser processing progress, new fields of use are being investigated, including dismantling with power lasers. To fulfil our dismantling requirements we propose a new laser method that we have called the laser dismantling (LD) process. This cutting method uses a high-power laser at a long distance, without an assist gas, and with a focal length of the system of 1 m to 10 m. Precision and accuracy in the process are not the same as for laser cutting for production and assembly. The first application of the laser dismantling process, on which we demonstrate our method, is the dismantling of obsolete nuclear plants with remote controlled, or automatic, robots in irradiated environments. For our demonstrator, the beam from a Nd:YAG laser was focused by a multimode optical fibre. The objectives of this paper are: to discuss the criteria for determining the theoretical feasibility of LD; to discuss issues related to future industrial implementation by introducing the process's basic principles; and to compare LD with classical laser processing, which differs not only in the consideration of cutting quality and speed, but also in the cutting irregularities that could be accepted.

  7. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient ‘green technique’, gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm−2h−1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry. PMID:25819091

  8. A novel method for furfural recovery via gas stripping assisted vapor permeation by a polydimethylsiloxane membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Guan, Yu; Cai, Di; Li, Shufeng; Qin, Peiyong; Karim, M. Nazmul; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-03-01

    Furfural is an important platform chemical with a wide range of applications. However, due to the low concentration of furfural in the hydrolysate, the conventional methods for furfural recovery are energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Considering the disadvantages of pervaporation (PV) and distillation in furfural separation, a novel energy-efficient `green technique', gas stripping assisted vapor permeation (GSVP), was introduced in this work. In this process, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was prepared by employing water as solvent. Coking in pipe and membrane fouling was virtually non-existent in this new process. In addition, GSVP was found to achieve the highest pervaporation separation index of 216200 (permeate concentration of 71.1 wt% and furfural flux of 4.09 kgm-2h-1) so far, which was approximately 2.5 times higher than that found in pervaporation at 95°C for recovering 6.0 wt% furfural from water. Moreover, the evaporation energy required for GSVP decreased by 35% to 44% relative to that of PV process. Finally, GSVP also displayed more promising potential in industrial application than PV, especially when coupled with the hydrolysis process or fermentation in biorefinery industry.

  9. The mechanism of small-gas detonation in mechanically activated low-density powder mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkovskii, S. A.; Dolgoborodov, A. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    A mechanism of supersonic propagation of the energy-release wave in mechanically activated small-gas explosive powder mixtures is proposed. It is shown that, under certain conditions, this process exhibits all the signs of detonation and should be recognized as a kind of thereof. On the other hand, this kind of detonation is fundamentally different from classical detonation, e.g., in gases. Instead of a shock wave, the powder mixture features propagation of a compression wave, in which the powder exhibits densification due to the mutual displacement of particles rather than contraction of the particle material. A chemical reaction is initiated by the mutual friction of particles in the compression wave.

  10. Green house gas emissions from composting and mechanical biological treatment.

    PubMed

    Amlinger, Florian; Peyr, Stefan; Cuhls, Carsten

    2008-02-01

    In order to carry out life-cycle assessments as a basis for far-reaching decisions about environmentally sustainable waste treatment, it is important that the input data be reliable and sound. A comparison of the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with each solid waste treatment option is essential. This paper addresses GHG emissions from controlled composting processes. Some important methodological prerequisites for proper measurement and data interpretation are described, and a common scale and dimension of emission data are proposed so that data from different studies can be compared. A range of emission factors associated with home composting, open windrow composting, encapsulated composting systems with waste air treatment and mechanical biological waste treatment (MBT) are presented from our own investigations as well as from the literature. The composition of source materials along with process management issues such as aeration, mechanical agitation, moisture control and temperature regime are the most important factors controlling methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and ammoniac (NH3) emissions. If ammoniac is not stripped during the initial rotting phase or eliminated by acid scrubber systems, biofiltration of waste air provides only limited GHG mitigation, since additional N2O may be synthesized during the oxidation of NH3, and only a small amount of CH4 degradation occurs in the biofilter. It is estimated that composting contributes very little to national GHG inventories generating only 0.01-0.06% of global emissions. This analysis does not include emissions from preceding or post-treatment activities (such as collection, transport, energy consumption during processing and land spreading), so that for a full emissions account, emissions from these activities would need to be added to an analysis. PMID:18338701

  11. Gas exchange mechanism of orthodeoxia in hepatopulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Federico P; Martínez-Pallí, Graciela; Barberà, Joan A; Roca, Josep; Navasa, Miquel; Rodríguez-Roisin, Robert

    2004-09-01

    The mechanism of orthodeoxia (OD), or decreased partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) from supine to upright, a characteristic feature of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), has never been comprehensively elucidated. We therefore investigated the intrapulmonary (shunt and ventilation-perfusion [VA/Q] mismatching) and extrapulmonary factors governing PaO2 in 20 patients with mild to severe HPS (14 males, 6 females; 50 +/- 3 years old SE) at upright and supine, in random order. We set out a cutoff value for OD, namely a PaO2 decrease > or = 5% or > or = 4 mm Hg (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.96 each). Compared to supine, 5 patients showed OD (PaO2 change, -11% +/- 2%, -7 +/- 1 mm Hg, P < .05) with further VA/Q worsening (shunt + low VA/Q mode increased from 19% +/- 7% to 21% +/- 7% of cardiac output [QT], P < .05), as opposed to 15 patients who did not (+2% +/- 2%, +1+/- 1 mm Hg) with VA/Q improvement (from 20% +/- 4% to 16% +/- 4% of QT, P < .01). Cardiac output was significantly lower in OD patients in both positions. Changes in extrapulmonary factors at upright, such as increased minute ventilation and decreased QT, were of similar magnitude in both subsets of patients. In conclusion, our data suggest that gas exchange response to OD in HPS points to a more altered pulmonary vascular tone inducing heterogeneous blood flow redistribution to lung zones with prominent intrapulmonary vascular dilatations. PMID:15349905

  12. Outcomes of patients implanted with a left ventricular assist device at nontransplant mechanical circulatory support centers.

    PubMed

    Katz, Marc R; Dickinson, Michael G; Raval, Nirav Y; Slater, James P; Dean, David A; Zeevi, Gary R; Horn, Evelyn M; Salemi, Arash

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to assess outcomes of patients who underwent implantation of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) at nontransplantation mechanical circulatory support centers. As the availability of LVADs for advanced heart failure has expanded to nontransplantation mechanical circulatory support centers, concerns have been expressed about maintaining good outcomes. Demographics and outcomes were evaluated in 276 patients with advanced heart failure who underwent implantation of LVADs as bridge to transplantation or destination therapy at 27 open-heart centers. Baseline characteristics, operative mortality, length of stay, readmission rate, adverse events, quality of life, and survival were analyzed. The overall 30-day mortality was 3% (8 of 276), and survival rates at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively, were 92±2%, 88±3%, and 84±4% for the bridge-to-transplantation group and 81±3%, 70±5%, and 63±6% for the destination therapy group, comparable with results published by the national Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS). The median length of stay for all patients was 21 days. Bleeding was the most frequent adverse event. Stroke occurred in 4% (bridge to transplantation) and 6% (destination therapy) of patients. Quality-of-life measures and 6-minute walk distances showed sustained improvements throughout support. In conclusion, outcomes with LVAD support at open-heart centers are acceptable and comparable with results from the INTERMACS registry. With appropriate teams, training, center commitment, and certification, LVAD therapy is being disseminated in a responsible way to open-heart centers. PMID:25772738

  13. Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)

    SciTech Connect

    Chad Smutzer

    2006-01-01

    Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

  14. Use of general purpose mechanical computer assisted engineering software in orthopaedic surgical planning: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, C J; Bresina, S J; Gayou, D E

    1994-01-01

    Two surgical plans were developed for an appropriately complex reconstructive orthopaedic surgery case. One plan was developed with customary methods using two-dimensional (2D) radiographs. The second plan was developed with general purpose mechanical computer assisted engineering (MCAE) software using x-ray computed tomography (CT) data. The limitations of each method are identified. To create a surgical plan using three-dimensional (3D) medical datasets and MCAE software, five necessary steps were identified: (a) data reduction; (b) contour extraction; (c) 3D model creation; (d) extraction of mass properties; (e) model idealization. The principal limitation of general purpose MCAE software is the lack of pre-processing modules with which to address the unique requirements of medical image datasets. PMID:7850738

  15. The mechanism of lipids extraction from wet microalgae Scenedesmus sp. by ionic liquid assisted subcritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuanni; Chen, Xiaolin; Xia, Shuwei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the total sugar concentration, protein concentration, lipid yield and morphology characteristics of the algae residue were determined to explain the mechanism of lipids extraction from wet microalgae Scenedesmus sp. by ionic liquid assisted subcritical water. The results showed similar variation for the sugar, protein and lipid. However, the total sugar was more similar to lipids yield, so the results showed that the reaction between ionic liquid and cellulose and hemicellulose in cell wall was the most important step which determined the lipids extration directly. And the total sugar variation may be representing the lipids yield. For later lipids extraction, we can determine the total sugar concentration to predict the extraction end product.

  16. Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S; Atzmon, Michael; Wang, Lumin

    2003-04-28

    The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone.

  17. Stent-assisted mechanical recanalization for symptomatic subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Ma, Ji; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhu, Ming; Han, Xin-Wei; Shui, Shao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and short-term effects of treating patients with subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery (M1) occlusion by stent-assisted mechanical recanalization. Six patients with cerebral arteries occlusion underwent surgery. Six cerebral arteries occlusion in 5 patients were successfully recanalized. On postoperative day 1, four patients’ symptoms were relieved and two patients’ symptoms were exacerbated, of which one was significantly improved after 3 days, the other one’s symptoms were recovered to preoperative levels in 2 weeks. No patients died after surgery. No stroke or transient ischemic attack occurred. The average follow-up of was 4.2 months, no worsening of condition, recurrence or death occurred. The results indicate that for patients with subacute or chronic middle cerebral artery (M1) occlusion, mechanical recanalization was technically feasible under the premise of strict case screening. Mechanical recanalization is able to improve ischemic symptoms and promote dysfunction restoration. But its long-term effect remains to be evaluated by further large samples, long-term follow-up studies. PMID:26885148

  18. Response surface methodology for the modeling and optimization of oil-in-water emulsion separation using gas sparging assisted microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Fouladitajar, Amir; Zokaee Ashtiani, Farzin; Dabir, Bahram; Rezaei, Hamid; Valizadeh, Bardiya

    2015-02-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were used to develop models for optimization and modeling of a gas sparging assisted microfiltration of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion. The effect of gas flow rate (Q G ), oil concentration (C oil ), transmembrane pressure (TMP), and liquid flow rate (Q L ) on the permeate flux and oil rejection were studied by RSM. Two sets of experiments were designed to investigate the effects of different gas-liquid two-phase flow regimes; low and high gas flow rates. Two separate RSM models were developed for each experimental set. The oil concentration and TMP were found to be the most significant factors influencing both permeate flux and rejection. Also, the interaction between these parameters was the most significant one. At low Q G , the more the gas flow rate, the higher the permeate flux; however, in the high gas flow rate region, higher Q G did not necessarily improve the permeate flux. In the case of rejection, gas and liquid flow rates were found to be insignificant. The optimum process conditions were found to be the following: Q G  = 1.0 (L/min), C oil  = 1,290 (mg/L), TMP = 1.58 (bar), and Q L  = 3.0 (L/min). Under these optimal conditions, maximum permeate flux and rejection (%) were 115.9 (L/m(2)h) and 81.1 %, respectively. PMID:25182429

  19. Upper extremity muscle tone and response of tidal volume during manually assisted breathing for patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Akira; Shida, Masahiro; Tanaka, Masashi; Sato, Kimihiro; Seko, Toshiaki; Ito, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Shunichi; Yokoi, Yuka; Takahashi, Naoaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine, in patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation, if the response of tidal volume during manually assisted breathing is dependent upon both upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity of manually assisted breathing. [Subjects] We recruited 13 patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, and assessed their upper extremity muscle tone using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS). The subjects were assigned to either the low MAS group (MAS≤2, n=7) or the high MAS group (MAS≥3, n=6). [Methods] The manually assisted breathing technique was applied at a pressure of 2 kgf and 4 kgf. A split-plot ANOVA was performed to compare the tidal volume of each pressure during manually assisted breathing between the low and the high MAS groups. [Results] Statistical analysis showed there were main effects of the upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity of the manually assisted breathing technique. There was no interaction between these factors. [Conclusion] Our findings reveal that the tidal volume during the manually assisted breathing technique for patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation depends upon the patient’s upper extremity muscle tone and the pressure intensity. PMID:26357431

  20. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  1. Substrate-Assisted Cysteine Deprotonation in the Mechanism of Dimethylargininase (DDAH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Stone,E.; Costello, A.; Tierney, D.; Fast, W.

    2006-01-01

    The enzyme dimethylargininase (also known as dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase or DDAH; EC 3.5.3.18) catalyzes the hydrolysis of endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, N{sup {omega}}-methyl-L-arginine and N{sup {omega}},N{sup {omega}}-dimethyl-L-arginine. Understanding the mechanism and regulation of DDAH activity is important for developing ways to control nitric oxide production during angiogenesis and in many cases of vascular endothelial pathobiology. Several possible physiological regulation mechanisms of DDAH depend upon the presence of an active-site cysteine residue, Cys249 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) DDAH, which is proposed to serve as a nucleophile in the catalytic mechanism. Through the use of pH-dependent ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) difference spectroscopy and inactivation kinetics, the pK{sub a} of the active-site Cys249 in the resting enzyme was found to be unperturbed from pK{sub a} values of typical noncatalytic cysteine residues. In contrast, the pH dependence of k{sub cat} values indicates a much lower apparent pKa value. UV-vis difference spectroscopy between wild-type and C249S DDAH shows absorbance changes consistent with Cys249 deprotonation to the anionic thiolate upon binding positively charged ligands. The proton from Cys249 is lost either to the solvent or to an unidentified general base. A mutation of the active-site histidine residue, H162G, does not eliminate cysteine nucleophilicity, further arguing against a pre-formed ion pair with Cys249. Finally, UV-vis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that inhibitory metal ions can bind at these two active-site residues, Cys249 and His162, and also stabilize the anionic form of Cys249. These results support a proposed substrate-assisted mechanism for Pa DDAH in which ligand binding modulates the reactivity of the active-site cysteine.

  2. Investigation of mechanisms of gas hydrates accumulation in permafrost environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvilin, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    The feature of permafrost sediments is capability to accumulate a quantity of natural gases foremost methane with low admixture of carbon dioxide. In consequence of natural and climatic changes, formation of favorable thermobaric conditions for transformation of intra-permafrost gas accumulations from free state into gas hydrate is possible. In consideration of high gas-saturation of frozen sediments, the active processes of hydrate formation in permafrost during the transgression of arctic seas or under continental glaciations can be expected. A special experimental technique was elaborated to perform physical modeling of hydrate formation conditions in cryogenic ice-containing sediments. The experiments were carried out under constant negative temperatures in interval from -2 oC to -9 oC. Methane (99.98%) was used as hydrate-former gas. During the experiments the kinetics of gas consumption in porous media was investigated and also part of porous water turned into hydrate and hydrate- saturation of sediment samples were estimated. Experiments show that hydrate formation in gas saturated sediments occurs actively not only in freezing sediments (above 0 oC) but also in frozen sediments (below 0 oC). Intensity of hydrate formation in frozen sediments depends on such factors as ice-saturation, thermobaric conditions and gas composition. Experimental data shows that after attenuation of hydrate formation in frozen sediments the considerable activization of hydrate accumulation processes during the increasing of temperature above 0 oC can occur. That leads to the thawing of porous ice, which does not turn into hydrate, and attendant this process structural-textural changes result in appearance of new gas-water contacts. As a result there is second hydrate formation on background of thawing of ice. Based on analysis of geological data and experimental researches possible geological models of gas hydrates formation in shallow permafrost under the sea transgression and

  3. Enhanced growth of high quality single crystal diamond by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at high gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Qi; Chin Chengyi; Lai, Joseph; Yan Chihshiue; Meng Yufei; Mao Hokwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2009-01-12

    Single crystals of diamond up to 18 mm in thickness have been grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at gas pressures of up to 350 torr. Growth rates of up to 165 {mu}m/h at 300 torr at high power density have been achieved. The processes were evaluated by optical emission spectroscopy. The high-quality single-crystal diamond grown at optimized conditions was characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The measurements reveal a direct relationship between residual absorption and nitrogen content in the gas chemistry. Fabrication of high quality single-crystal diamond at higher growth rates should be possible with improved reactor design that allows still higher gas synthesis pressures.

  4. Mechanical analysis of lunar gravity assist in the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yi; Xu, Shijie

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the lunar gravity assist (LGA) is investigated under the planar circular restricted three-body problem (PCRTBP) and two-body model. In the PCRTBP, the approximate expression of energy of the LGA in a small region of the Moon is derived. The expression uncovers the mechanism and mechanical process of the LGA in the framework of the PCRTBP. Based on the expression, the change of energy during the LGA is obtained and analyzed. To solve the limitation of the expressions and complete the research range of the LGA, a numerical methodology based on the patched-conic model is presented to analyze the LGA in a large region near the Moon. This numerical methodology cannot only obtain the change of energy but also may classify the trajectories before and after the LGA. As an application, we present a method to design a special kind of double LGA orbit. The design method synthesizes the preliminary results in the patched-conic model and the optimization in the PCRTBP. We can quickly obtain abundant double LGA orbits for the Earth-Moon transfer and interplanetary spaceflight.

  5. The coercivity mechanism of Pr-Fe-B nanoflakes prepared by surfactant-assisted ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wen-Liang; Zhang, Ming; Niu, E.; Shao, Xiao-Ping; Hu, Feng-Xia; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2015-09-01

    The strong (00l) textured Pr12+xFe82-xB6 (x=0, 1, 2, 3, 4) nanoflakes with high coercivity were prepared by surfactant-assisted ball milling (SABM). The thickness and length of the flakes are mainly in the range of 50-200 nm and 0.5-2 μm, respectively. A coercivity of 4.16 kOe for Pr15Fe79B6 nanoflakes was obtained, which is the maximum coercivity of R2Fe14B (R=Pr, Nd) nanoflakes or nanoparticles reported up to now. The results of XRD and SEM for the aligned Pr15Fe79B6 nanoflakes indicate that a strong (00l) texture is obtained and the easy magnetization direction is parallel to the surface of the flakes. The angular dependence of coercivity for aligned sample indicates that the coercivity mechanism of the as-milled nanoflakes is mainly dominated by domain wall pinning. Meanwhile, the field dependence of coercivity, isothermal (IRM) and dc demagnetizing (DCD) remanence curves also indicate that the coercivity is mainly determined by domain wall pinning, and nucleation also has an important effect. In addition, the mainly interaction of flakes is dipolar coupling. The research of coercivity mechanism for Pr15Fe79B6 nanoflakes is important for guidance the further increase its value, and is useful for the future development of the high performance nanocomposite magnets and soft/hard exchange spring magnets.

  6. Mechanical blood trauma in assisted circulation: sublethal RBC damage preceding hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Olia, Salim E; Maul, Timothy M; Antaki, James F; Kameneva, Marina V

    2016-06-15

    After many decades of improvements in mechanical circulatory assist devices (CADs), blood damage remains a serious problem during support contributing to variety of adverse events, and consequently affecting patient survival and quality of life. The mechanisms of cumulative cell damage in continuous-flow blood pumps are still not fully understood despite numerous in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies of blood trauma. Previous investigations have almost exclusively focused on lethal blood damage, namely hemolysis, which is typically negligible during normal operation of current generation CADs. The measurement of plasma free hemoglobin (plfHb) concentration to characterize hemolysis is straightforward, however sublethal trauma is more difficult to detect and quantify since no simple direct test exists. Similarly, while multiple studies have focused on thrombosis within blood pumps and accessories, sublethal blood trauma and its sequelae have yet to be adequately documented or characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding of sublethal trauma to red blood cells (RBCs) produced by exposure of blood to flow parameters and conditions similar to those within CADs. It also suggests potential strategies to reduce and/or prevent RBC sublethal damage in a clinically-relevant context, and encourages new research into this relatively uncharted territory. PMID:27034320

  7. THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Reid, L. B.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  8. Gas block mechanism for water removal in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Issacci, Farrokh; Rehg, Timothy J.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention is directed to apparatus and method for cathode-side disposal of water in an electrochemical fuel cell. There is a cathode plate. Within a surface of the plate is a flow field comprised of interdigitated channels. During operation of the fuel cell, cathode gas flows by convection through a gas diffusion layer above the flow field. Positioned at points adjacent to the flow field are one or more porous gas block mediums that have pores sized such that water is sipped off to the outside of the flow field by capillary flow and cathode gas is blocked from flowing through the medium. On the other surface of the plate is a channel in fluid communication with each porous gas block mediums. The method for water disposal in a fuel cell comprises installing the cathode plate assemblies at the cathode sides of the stack of fuel cells and manifolding the single water channel of each of the cathode plate assemblies to the coolant flow that feeds coolant plates in the stack.

  9. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Sloan W; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  10. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Sloan W.; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of the beta-alanine + OH gas phase reaction: a quantum mechanical approach.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Armando; Galano, Annia; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raúl

    2006-01-14

    The OH hydrogen abstraction reaction from beta-alanine has been studied using the BHandHLYP hybrid HF-density functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The energies have been improved by single point calculations at the CCSD(T)/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The structures of the different stationary points are discussed. Reaction profiles are modeled including the formation of pre-reactive and product complexes. Negative net activation energy is obtained for the overall reaction. A complex mechanism is proposed, and the rate coefficients are calculated using transition state theory over the temperature range of 250-400 K. The rate coefficients are proposed for the first time and it was found that in the gas phase the hydrogen abstraction occurs mainly from the CH(2) group next to the amino end. The following expressions, in cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), are obtained for the overall rate constants, at 250-400 and 290-310 K, respectively: k(250-400)= 2.36 x 10(-12) exp(340/T), and k(290-310)= 1.296 x 10(-12) exp(743/T). The three parameter expression that best describes the studied reaction is k(250-400)= 1.01 x 10(-21)T(3.09) exp(1374/T). The beta-alanine + OH reaction was found to be 1.5 times faster than the alpha-alanine + OH reaction. PMID:16482271

  12. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered “solid-cored” CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  13. Design of Mechanism for Assisting Standing Movement Using Planar Linkage and Gear Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nango, Jun; Yoshizawa, Hisato; Liu, Jiajun

    The number of people who are in need of nursing care due to difficulties they experience with performing various activities of daily living is increasing. In particular, the action of standing up is performed frequently in daily life, and this action starts to induce pain in joints as people age. In this research, we develop a device whose seat plate follows the movement of the thigh in the action of standing up for the purpose of relieving the burden from the joints and reducing the effort associated with nursing care. The device is designed by using a planar five-link mechanism and a gear train, and only a single input is needed to drive the device. The respective lengths of the links are determined by comparing the movement of the seat plate of the device with the movement of the human thigh in the action of standing up. In addition, this device is expected to be useful for assisting users in standing up in a natural manner, including in the case when the body remains supported by the seat plate, as well as for guiding the individual movements of users in the action of standing up.

  14. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Wu, B. L.; Ng, V.; Asbahi, M.; Yang, J. K. W.

    2014-10-20

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  15. A novel mechanical lung assist system sustains primary bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt circulation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Honjo, Osami; Merklinger, Sandra L; Poe, John; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Alghamdi, Abdullah A; Takatani, Setsuo; Van Arsdell, Glen S

    2007-01-01

    Primary creation of a bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt (BCPS), which provides a stable in-series circulation, might improve survival in patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. However, pulmonary vascular immaturity and high pulmonary vascular resistance must be overcome to achieve a successful primary neonatal BCPS. This study tested the hypothesis that a novel mechanical lung assist (MLA) system would permit a primary BCPS in juvenile pigs. A BCPS (1(1/2) ventricle repair physiology) was created in nine 4-5-week-old pigs (mean weight 17.9 kg), followed by MLA with a miniature centrifugal pump and a hand-made double-lumen cannula for 2 hours. Systemic and cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic data were evaluated. A mean BCPS flow of 331 +/- 56 ml/min was obtained with a mean pump speed of 3899 +/- 306 rpm at 30 minutes after MLA initiation. Adequate oxygenation, ventilation, and hemodynamics were maintained. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound demonstrated consistent pre- and postoperative peak systolic and diastolic velocities of the middle cerebral artery, indicating sustained cerebral perfusion pressure. This study demonstrated that the MLA is able to sustain a high-resistance BCPS and provides a strategy or rationale for developing a primary neonatal cavopulmonary connection in appropriately selected neonates with congenital heart disease. PMID:18043155

  16. Recent advances in computational methodology for simulation of mechanical circulatory assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Long, Christopher C.; Behr, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to offload the work of one or both ventricles during heart failure. They are used in the clinical setting as destination therapy, as bridge to transplant, or more recently as bridge to recovery to allow for myocardial remodeling. Recent developments in computational simulation allow for detailed assessment of VAD hemodynamics for device design and optimization for both children and adults. Here, we provide a focused review of the recent literature on finite element methods and optimization for VAD simulations. As VAD designs typically fall into two categories, pulsatile and continuous flow devices, we separately address computational challenges of both types of designs, and the interaction with the circulatory system with three representative case studies. In particular, we focus on recent advancements in finite element methodology that has increased the fidelity of VAD simulations. We outline key challenges, which extend to the incorporation of biological response such as thrombosis and hemolysis, as well as shape optimization methods and challenges in computational methodology. PMID:24449607

  17. Pearls and pitfalls in short-term mechanical circulatory assist: how to avoid and manage complications.

    PubMed

    Mohite, Prashant N; Maunz, Olaf; Simon, Andre R

    2014-10-01

    In today's era, given the worsening risk profiles of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, the increasing number of complex cardiac surgeries, and the increasing number of patients undergoing thoracic organ transplantation, short-term mechanical circulatory assist (MCA) devices are indispensable. MCA devices are capable of supporting heart and lung function and have emerged as potentially lifesaving instruments, but may prove to be as hazardous as helpful due to their inherent tendency toward hemolysis, thromboembolism, and hemorrhage. Although MCA devices are being used regularly at some specialized centers, surgeries involving MCA are not as common as other routine cardiac surgeries, and even though professionals implanting and maintaining short-term MCAs are well acquainted with operating such devices, it is not uncommon to come across complications as a result of minor mistakes committed while dealing with them. Avoiding simple mistakes and taking proper precautions while implanting and maintaining these devices can prevent major catastrophes. We discuss commonly encountered problems and complications during the implantation and maintenance of short-term MCAs and offer reasonable and practical solutions. In addition, crucial issues such as anticoagulation, replacement of the device circuit, and management of the distal perfusion cannula are discussed. Continuous and efficient monitoring of the MCA device and the patient supported on MCA, together with anticipation and avoidance of complications, is key for successful short-term MCA support. PMID:24533589

  18. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered "solid-cored" CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  19. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered ``solid-cored'' CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process.

  20. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z.

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  1. Mechanisms of gas permeation through polymer membranes. Summary technical report, September 1989--August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the mechanisms of gas transport in and through polymer membranes and the dependence of these mechanisms on pressure and temperature. This information is required for the development of new, energy-efficient membrane processes for the separation of industrial gas mixtures. Such processes are based on the selective permeation of the components of gas mixtures through nonporous polymer membranes. Recent work has been focused on the permeation of gases through membranes made from glassy polymers, i.e., at temperatures below the glass transition of the polymers (Tg). Glassy polymers are very useful membrane materials for gas separations because of their high selectivity toward different gases. Gases permeate through nonporous polymer membranes by a ``solution-diffusion`` process. Consequently, in order to understand the characteristics of this process it is necessary to investigate also the mechanisms of gas solution and diffusion in glassy polymers. 23 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Dynamic gas slippage: A unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1983-10-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numerical simulation and transient well analysis, describing the flow of gas in very tight (k < 0.1 md) porous media has been developed. Unique to this formulation is the dual-mechanism transport of gas. In this formulation gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of two fields: a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's Law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's law (inertial-turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these two flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition, pressure and saturation dependent slippage factor. The pressure dependence arises from treating the gas as a real gas. The dynamic slippage derived from this formulation is found to be most applicable in reservoirs with permeabilities less than or equal to 0.01 md. The results from this study indicate that in reservoirs of this type, differences between recoveries after ten years of production using the dynamic slip described in this paper and constant slip approaches were as great as 10% depending on the initial gas saturation. If an economic production rate is considered, differences as great as 30 can be expected.

  3. Dynamic gas slippage: A unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin, T.; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1986-02-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numerical simulation and transient well analysis that describes the flow of gas in very tight porous media and includes a dual-mechanism transport of gas is developed. Gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's law (inertial/turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these two flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition-, pressure-, and saturation-dependent slippage factor. The pressure dependence arises from treating the gas as a real gas. The derived dynamic slippage is most applicable in reservoirs with permeabilities less than or equal to0.01 md. The results indicate that in reservoirs of this type, differences between recoveries after 10 years of production with the dynamic-slip and constant-slip approaches were as great as 10%, depending on the initial gas saturation. If an economic production rate is considered, differences as great as 30% can be expected.

  4. Landfill gas generation after mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste. Estimation of gas generation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Gioannis, G De; Muntoni, A; Cappai, G; Milia, S

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) of residual municipal solid waste (RMSW) was investigated with respect to landfill gas generation. Mechanically treated RMSW was sampled at a full-scale plant and aerobically stabilized for 8 and 15 weeks. Anaerobic tests were performed on the aerobically treated waste (MBTW) in order to estimate the gas generation rate constants (k,y(-1)), the potential gas generation capacity (L(o), Nl/kg) and the amount of gasifiable organic carbon. Experimental results show how MBT allowed for a reduction of the non-methanogenic phase and of the landfill gas generation potential by, respectively, 67% and 83% (8 weeks treatment), 82% and 91% (15 weeks treatment), compared to the raw waste. The amount of gasified organic carbon after 8 weeks and 15 weeks of treatment was equal to 11.01+/-1.25kgC/t(MBTW) and 4.54+/-0.87kgC/t(MBTW), respectively, that is 81% and 93% less than the amount gasified from the raw waste. The values of gas generation rate constants obtained for MBTW anaerobic degradation (0.0347-0.0803y(-1)) resemble those usually reported for the slowly and moderately degradable fractions of raw MSW. Simulations performed using a prediction model support the hypothesis that due to the low production rate, gas production from MBTW landfills is well-suited to a passive management strategy. PMID:18954969

  5. Multilayered metal oxide thin film gas sensors obtained by conventional and RF plasma-assisted laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitu, B.; Marotta, V.; Orlando, S.

    2006-04-01

    Multilayered thin films of In 2O 3 and SnO 2 have been deposited by conventional and RF plasma-assisted reactive pulsed laser ablation, with the aim to evaluate their behaviour as toxic gas sensors. The depositions have been carried out by a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser ( λ = 532 nm, τ = 7 ns) on Si(1 0 0) substrates, in O 2 atmosphere. The thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical resistance measurements. A comparison of the electrical response of the simple (indium oxide, tin oxide) and multilayered oxides to toxic gas (nitric oxide, NO) has been performed. The influence on the structural and electrical properties of the deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature and RF power is reported.

  6. Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, III, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures.

  7. Dynamic gas slippage: a unique dual-mechanism approach to the flow of gas in tight formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ertekin, T.; King, G.R.; Schwerer, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical formulation, applicable to both numeric simulation and transient well analysis, describing the flow of gas in very tight porous media has been developed. Unique to this formulation is the dual- mechanism transport of gas. In this formulation, gas is assumed to be traveling under the influence of 2 fields: a concentration field and a pressure field. Transport through the concentration field is a Knudsen flow process and is modeled with Fick's Law of diffusion. Transport through the pressure field is a laminar process and is modeled with Darcy's Law (inertial-turbulent effects are ignored). The combination of these 2 flow mechanisms rigorously yields a composition, pressure, and saturation dependent slippage factor. 21 references.

  8. Mechanisms of combustion limits in premixed gas flames at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    A three-year experimental and theoretical research program on the mechanisms of combustion limits of premixed gasflames at microgravity was conducted. Progress during this program is identified and avenues for future studies are discussed.

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of SnO2 nanorods for oxygen gas sensing at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Ameer; Habib, Sami S; Salah, Numan A; Ahmed, Faheem

    2013-01-01

    High-quality single-crystalline SnO2 nanorods were synthesized using a microwave-assisted solution method. The nanorods were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible and Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), and electrical resistance measurements. The XRD pattern indicated the formation of single-phase SnO2 nanorods with rutile structure. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed tetragonal nanorods of about 450–500 nm in length and 60–80 nm in diameter. The nanorods showed a higher BET surface area of 288 m2/g, much higher than that of previously reported work. The Raman scattering spectra indicated a typical rutile phase of the SnO2. The absorption spectrum showed an absorption peak centered at 340 nm, and the band-gap value was found to be 3.64 eV. The gas-sensing properties of the SnO2 nanorods for oxygen gas with different concentrations were measured at room temperature. It was found that the value of resistance increased with the increase in oxygen gas concentration in the test chamber. The SnO2 nanorods exhibited high sensitivity and rapid response-recovery characteristics to oxygen gas, and could detect oxygen concentration as low as 1, 3, 5, and 10 ppm. PMID:24143091

  10. The effects of V/III gas ratios on the catalyst-assisted growths of InGaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei-Che; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2015-11-01

    Single crystalline InGaN nanowires were grown on Si(1 0 0) using Au catalysts at 700 °C in a plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition system. Under the low V/III (nitrogen radicals/(Ga + In vapor)) ratio in the gas phase, poor quality InGaN nanowires were grown along [0 0 0 1] orientation (c-axis) containing a high concentration of stacking faults and a low indium content of 12%. However, under the high V/III gas ratio, very high quality InGaN nanowires could be grown along [ 1 0 1 bar 0 ] orientation (m-axis) free of stacking faults containing a high indium content of 24%. The transformation of nanowire orientation was likely due to the decrease of indium and gallium compositions in gold catalysts from >85% to <60% with increasing the V/III gas ratios. Besides, the increase of V/III gas ratios enhanced the incorporation efficiency of indium into the nanowires and significantly improved the crystal quality of nanowires by stabilizing the formation of InN under a high concentration of nitrogen radicals for reversing the fast thermal decomposition reaction of InN at 700 °C.

  11. Exposing the Gas Braking Mechanism of the β Pictoris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandeker, Alexis

    2011-03-01

    Ever since the discovery of the edge-on circumstellar (CS) disk around β Pictoris, a standing question has been why the gas observed against the star in absorption is not rapidly expelled by the strong radiation pressure from the star. A solution to the puzzle has been suggested to be that the neutral elements that experience the radiation force also are rapidly ionized, and so are only able to accelerate to an average limiting velocity v ion. Once ionized, the elements are rapidly braked by C II, which is observed to be at least 20× overabundant in the disk with respect to other species. A prediction from this scenario is that different neutral elements should reach different v ion, depending on the ionization thresholds and strengths of driving line transitions. In particular, neutral Fe and Na are predicted to reach the radial velocities 0.5 and 3.3 km s-1, respectively, before being ionized. In this paper, we study the absorption profiles of Fe and Na from the CS gas disk around β Pic, as obtained by HARPS at the ESO 3.6 m telescope. We find that the Fe and Na velocity profiles are indeed shifted with respect to each other, confirming the model. The absence of an extended blue wing in the profile of Na, however, indicates that there must be some additional braking on the neutrals. We explore the possibility that the ion gas (dominated by C II) can brake the neutrals and conclude that about 2-5× more C than previously estimated is needed for the predicted line profile to be consistent with the observed one. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory.

  12. Chemical mechanisms for gas generation in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Ashby, E.C.; Liotta, C.; Barefield, E.K.; Meisel, D.; Jonah, C.D.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    The mixing of wastes at Hanford over the years has led to several safety concerns. These safety concerns fall into six categories: wastes that generate flammable gasses or gas mixtures; wastes that contain high concentrations of ferrocyanides or tanks suspected of containing large amounts of ferrocyanides; wastes that contain greater than 3 wt % total organic carbon; wastes from which toxic or noxious vapors are suspected of emanating; wastes that contain high radiolytic heat; and wastes that may contain sufficient fissile material to pose a criticality concern. This report addresses the chemistry associated with the generation of flammable gases.

  13. Characterization and growth mechanisms of boron nitride films synthesized by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burat, O.; Bouchier, D.; Stambouli, V.; Gautherin, G.

    1990-09-01

    We have studied boron nitride films deposited at room temperature by ion-beam-assisted deposition in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus, with ion accelerating voltages ranging between 0.25 and 2 kV. By using complementarily in situ Auger electron spectrometry and ex situ nuclear analyses to determine the respective surface and bulk N concentrations in the deposited films, we were able to identify the different phases of the mechanism leading to the nitridation of evaporated boron by nitrogen ions. For low nitrogen/boron flux ratios, the incorporation of nitrogen seems to be only governed by ion implantation, and, with respect to the depth of the deposit, the surface is found largely depleted in nitrogen, while the N-incorporation yield remains close to one whatever the ion energy. Such a behavior is well verified as long as a critical bulk nitrogen concentration close to 5.5×1022 cm-3 has not been achieved. For concentrations greater than this, superstoichiometric material is obtained up to a saturation which corresponds to a bulk N incorporation ranging from 6 to 7×1022 cm-3. Further increase of the N/B flux ratio induces a strong diffusion process from N-rich bulk to N-depleted surface, which results in the nitridation of surface boron atoms and a loss of nitrogen by sputtering or desorption. The density measurements seem to indicate that the synthesized phase is close to h-BN. However, the density of B-rich layers ([N]/[B]≊0.2-0.3) is found to be very close to that calculated for a mixture of pure boron and c-BN. The transparency and microhardness of the synthesized BN have satisfying values for its application as a wear-resistant optical coating, but it is not c-BN.

  14. Neural Response During a Mechanically Assisted Spinal Manipulation in an Animal Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Liebschner, Michael A.K.; Sozio, Randall S.; Pickar, Joel G.; Gudavalli, Maruti R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mechanoreceptor stimulation is theorized to contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of spinal manipulation. Use of mechanically-assisted spinal manipulation (MA-SM) devices is increasing among manual therapy clinicians worldwide. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility of recording in vivo muscle spindle responses during a MA-SM in an intervertebral fixated animal model. Methods Intervertebral fixation was created by inserting facet screws through the left L5-6 and L6-7 facet joints of a cat spine. Three L6muscle spindle afferents with receptive fields in back muscles were isolated. Recordings were made during MA-SM thrusts delivered to the L7 spinous process using an instrumented Activator IV clinical device. Results Nine MA-SM thrusts were delivered with peak forces ranging from 68-122N and with thrust durations of less than 5ms. High frequency muscle spindle discharge occurred during MA-SM. Following the MA-SM, muscle spindle responses included returning to pre-manipulation levels, slightly decreasing for a short window of time, and greatly decreasing for more than 40s. Conclusion This study demonstrates that recording in vivo muscle spindle response using clinical MA-SM devices in an animal model is feasible. Extremely short duration MA-SM thrusts (<5ms) can have an immediate and/or a prolonged (> 40s) effect on muscle spindle discharge. Greater peak forces during MA-SM thrusts may not necessarily yield greater muscle spindle responses. Determining peripheral response during and following spinal manipulation may be an important step in optimizing its’ clinical efficacy. Future studies may investigate the effect of thrust dosage and magnitude. PMID:26618202

  15. Effects of chemical feedback on respiratory motor and ventilatory output during different modes of assisted mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Mitrouska, J; Xirouchaki, N; Patakas, D; Siafakas, N; Georgopoulos, D

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of chemical feedback on respiratory motor and ventilatory output in conscious subjects ventilated on various modes of assisted mechanical ventilation. Seven subjects were connected to a ventilator and randomly ventilated on assist-volume control (AVC), pressure support (PS) or proportional assist ventilation (PAV). On each mode, the assist level was set to the highest comfortable level. Airway and oesophageal (Poes) pressures, tidal volume, respiratory frequency (fR) and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PET,CO2) were measured breath-by-breath. When the subjects were stable on each mode, the fraction of inspired carbon dioxide (FI,CO2) was increased stepwise, and changes in minute ventilation (V'E) and respiratory motor output, estimated by the pressure-time product of all the respiratory muscles per breath (PTPrm) and per minute (PTPminute), were observed. At zero FI,CO2, PTPminute/PET,CO2 did not differ between modes, while V'E/ PTPminute was significantly lower with PAV than that with PS and AVC. As a result V'E/PET,CO2 was significantly lower with PAV, preventing, unlike AVC and PS, a significant drop in PET,CO2. With PAV, independent of CO2, V'E/PTPminute remained constant, while it decreased significantly with increasing CO2 stimulus with PS and AVC. At high PET,CO2 respiratory effort was significantly lower with PAV than that with PS and AVC. In conclusion, the mode of mechanical ventilation modifies the effects of chemical feedback on respiratory motor and ventilatory output. At all carbon dioxide stimulus levels neuroventilatory coupling was better preserved with proportional assist ventilation than with pressure support and assist-volume control ventilation. PMID:10362056

  16. Microwave plasma assisted supersonic gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, J.J. III; Halpern, B.L.

    1993-10-26

    An apparatus for fabricating thin film materials utilizing high speed gas dynamics relies on supersonic free jets of carrier gas to transport depositing vapor species generated in a microwave discharge to the surface of a prepared substrate where the vapor deposits to form a thin film. The present invention generates high rates of deposition and thin films of unforeseen high quality at low temperatures. 5 figures.

  17. Liquid water transport mechanism in the gas diffusion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P.; Wu, C. W.

    We developed an equivalent capillary model of a microscale fiber-fence structure to study the microscale evolution and transport of liquid in a porous media and to reveal the basic principles of water transport in gas diffusion layer (GDL). Analytical solutions using the model show that a positive hydraulic pressure is needed to drive the liquid water to penetrate through the porous GDL even consisting of the hydrophilic fibers. Several possible contributions for the water configuration, such as capillary pressure, gravity, vapor condensation, wettability and microstructures of the GDL, are discussed using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that the distribution manners of the fibers and the spatial mixed-wettability in the GDL also play an important role in the transport of liquid water.

  18. Two-component co-injection and transfer molding and gas-assisted injection molding of polymers: Simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengtao

    Two-component molding is a novel process for manufacturing polymer products with a sandwich structure or a hollow structure. Typically, two different materials are injected or transferred into a mold sequentially or simultaneously. The skin is generally a prime polymer with required surface and bulk properties for intended use. The core can be solid, foam or gas. Obtaining a uniform encapsulated structure is difficult and there are no science-based rules for optimization of process setup. Thus, a physical model and process simulations have been developed based on the kinematics and dynamics of a moving interface, and Hele-Shaw approximation. The model has incorporated temperature and shear rate dependences of viscosity of both skin and core component into the transient interface evolution. Based on the developed model, simulations have been carried out to study flow rate controlled simultaneous co-injection molding of thermoplastics, pressure-controlled sequential transfer molding of rubber compounds, and gas-assisted injection molding (GAIM). The simulation results were compared with the experimental data, and in general, good agreement was found between the predicted and experimentally measured interface distribution in moldings. For simultaneous co-injection molding, it is found that material pairs with a broad range of viscosities may be utilized. Breakthrough phenomena are mainly determined by the volume of melt of initial single phase injection and rheological properties of material combinations. When the core has a lower viscosity than the skin, or the volume of initial injection of skin melt is smaller, breakthrough is very likely. However, the breakthrough can be eliminated by controlling injection rate of the skin and core melts. For sequential transfer molding, it is found that the rubber distribution in moldings are dominated by the rheological properties of components and the volume fraction transferred, but independent of the gate pressure. When the

  19. 157. ARAIII Reactor building (ARA608) Main gas loop mechanical flow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    157. ARA-III Reactor building (ARA-608) Main gas loop mechanical flow sheet. This drawing was selected as a typical example of mechanical arrangements within reactor building. Aerojet-general 880-area/GCRE-0608-50-013-102634. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. An investigation of cutting mechanics in 2 dimensional ultrasonic vibration assisted milling toward chip thickness and chip formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasidi, I. I.; Rafai, N. H.; Rahim, E. A.; Kamaruddin, S. A.; Ding, H.; Cheng, K.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of 2 dimensional Ultrasonic Vibration Assisted Milling (UVAM) cutting mechanics, considering tool path trajectory and the effect on the chip thickness. The theoretical modelling of cutting mechanics is focused by considering the trajectory of the tool locus into the workpiece during the machining. The studies found the major advantages of VAM are come from the intermittent tool tip interaction phenomena between cutting tool and workpiece. The reduction of thinning chip thickness formations can be identifying advantages from vibration assisted milling in 2 dimensional. The finding will be discussing the comparison between conventional machining the potential of the advantages toward the chip thickness and chip formation in conclusion.

  1. Three-dimensional laser flow measurements of a patient-specific fontan physiology with mechanical circulatory assistance.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Rangus, Owen M; Downs, Emily A; Moskowitz, William B; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical assistance of the Fontan circulation is hypothesized to enhance ventricular preload and improve cardiac output; however, little is known about the fluid dynamics. This study is the first to investigate the three-dimensional flow conditions of a blood pump in an anatomic Fontan. Laser measurements were conducted having an axial flow impeller in the inferior vena cava. Experiments were performed for a physiologic cardiac output, pulmonary arterial flows, and pump speeds of 1000-4000 rpm. The impeller had a modest effect on the flow conditions entering the total cavopulmonary connection at low pump speeds, but a substantial impact on the velocity at higher speeds. The higher speeds of the pump disrupted the recirculation region in the center of the anastomosis, which could be advantageous for washout purposes. No retrograde velocities in the superior vena cava were measured. These findings indicate that mechanical assistance is a viable therapeutic option for patients having dysfunctional single ventricle physiology. PMID:25865262

  2. Gas-assisted dispersive liquid-phase microextraction using ionic liquid as extracting solvent for spectrophotometric speciation of copper.

    PubMed

    Akhond, Morteza; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Pourshamsi, Tayebe; Ramezani, Amir M

    2016-07-01

    Gas-assisted dispersive liquid-phase microextraction (GA-DLPME) has been developed for preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of copper ion in different water samples. The ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and argon gas, respectively, were used as the extracting solvent and disperser. The procedure was based on direct reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, followed by extracting Cu(I) into ionic liquid phase by using neocuproine as the chelating agent. Several experimental variables that affected the GA-DLPME efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions (IL volume, 50µL; pH, 6.0; acetate buffer, 1.5molL(-1); reducing agent concentration, 0.2molL(-1); NC concentration, 120µgmL(-1); Ar gas bubbling time, 6min; argon flow rate, 1Lmin(-1); NaCl concentration, 6% w/w; and centrifugation time, 3min), the calibration graph was linear over the concentration range of 0.30-2.00µgmL(-1) copper ion with a limit of detection of 0.07µgmL(-1). Relative standard deviation for five replicate determinations of 1.0µgmL(-1) copper ion was found to be 3.9%. The developed method was successfully applied to determination of both Cu(I) and Cu(II) species in water samples. PMID:27154700

  3. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Lavoie, Christian; Alptekin, Emre; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Zhu, Frank; Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  4. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

    1999-02-23

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to percolati

  5. Exploring the mechanisms used by promiscuous chaperones to assist protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Andrew I.

    There are two popular theories to explain how molecular chaperones boost the yield of folded protein in the cell: According to the Anfinsen cage model, (ACM) chaperonins protect denatured proteins from aggregation. A competing theory, the iterative annealing model (IAM) claims that ATP regulated chaperone binding and release accelerates folding by freeing proteins from long-lived kinetic traps. We present experimental and kinetic evidence to argue that the IAM is not a complete picture of how the GroEL/ES chaperonin works. Surprisingly some substrate proteins experience folding rate enhancements without undergoing multiple rounds of ATP-induced binding and release from the chaperonin. An explanation of this data requires going beyond the ACM and IAM models. Our work uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the folding of a highly frustrated protein within a chaperonin cavity. The chaperonin interior is modeled by a sphere with variable degree of attraction to the protein inside. We demonstrate that this cavity, similar to the weakly hydrophobic interior of the GroEL cavity upon complexion with ATP and GroES, is sufficient to accelerate the folding of a frustrated protein by more than an order of magnitude. Our simulations uncover a novel form of the IAM in which the substrate exhibits spontaneous binding and release from the wall of the chaperonin cage. This mimics the behavior observed in the standard IAM, with the difference that thermal fluctuations, rather than ATP, allow the substrate to unbind from the chaperone. An growing number of smaller cageless chaperones have been discovered that can assist protein folding without the consumption of ATP, including artificial "minichaperones" (fragments of larger chaperones). It is tempting to speculate that the same thermally-driven IAM mechanism could play a role with these chaperones as well. We performed additional simulations of protein folding outside the sphere. We find that in order to accelerate

  6. Biomolecule-assisted synthesis of single-crystalline selenium nanowires and nanoribbons via a novel flake-cracking mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Ye, Xingchen; Dai, Wei; Hou, Weiyi; Zuo, Fan; Xie, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the biomolecule-assisted synthesis method has been a new and promising focus in the preparation of various nanomaterials. But current works mainly focus on the synthesis of metal nanoparticles and nanowires using macro-biomolecules (e.g. virus, protein and DNA) as templates in the presence of a reducing agent. Beta-carotene, one of the most common bio-antioxidants, can be oxidized to form species with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic ends, which can provide an in situ soft template for the synthesis of nanomaterials. Herein, a simple beta-carotene-assisted method was developed for the first time to synthesize t-Se nanowires and nanoribbons with high crystallinity. We demonstrate that beta-carotene serves as not only the reducing agent, but also an in situ template in the preparation of Se one-dimensional nanostructures. It is found that the growth mechanism of Se nanomaterials is different from the familiar sphere-wire process. A novel flake-cracking mechanism is proposed. By this biomolecule-assisted route, Te one-dimensional nanostructures and Pd nanowires were also fabricated. The assisted-biomolecule in our method may be spread to carotenoids and other antioxidants, and thus broaden the application fields of biomolecules. Our preliminary investigations have shown that the facile, solution-phase biomolecule-assisted method can be potentially extended to the preparation of other low-dimensional nanostructures. The synthesized t-Se nanowires and nanoribbons may serve as templates to generate other tubular functional nanomaterials and find applications in the studies of structure-property relationships as well as in the fabrication of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  7. Rapid, Non-Mechanical, Damage Free Figuring Of Optical Surfaces Using Plasma Assisted Chemical Etching (PACE): Part Ii Theory & Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarowin, C. B.; Bollinger, L. D.

    1989-01-01

    We describe an application of Plasma Assisted Chemical Etching (PACE) to rapid and controllable figuring and smoothing of optical surfaces without mechanical contact. This removes the usual constraints on the design of optical elements imposed by mechanical pro-cesses, such as substrate deformation, edge distortion and subsurface damage or contamination. This process employs a process originally developed to pattern microelectronic circuits by ion enhanced chemical etching of a solid (Si02, Si, Al, Au, etc.) through a relatively nonerodeable photolithographically patterned mask1,-2. The PACE process shapes the optical surface by removing material in a small area under a confined reactive gas plasma (a "puck") moved over this surface. Rates of removal of such processes in microelectronic applications are as high as 10 pm per minute and are very accurately controllable and repeatable. The removal "footprint" of PACE may be varied during the process and it inherently smooths or polishes while exposing a virgin surface free of process generated contamination and subsurface damage. It can operate in two modes: (1) in "contact" with the plasma, where the chemical reaction is driven by the kinetic energy given up at the reacting surface by short lived species such as ions; and (2) downstream of the plasma, by the stored energy freed at the surface by longer lived species such as excited metastable neutrals. Since control of this process is so important to this application, we sketch the generic physics and chemi hi stry1,2 of the PACE figuring and smoothing process, identifying the quantitative relations between the plasma and chemical parameters that control it:rf power density reactive gas pressure reactive gas flow the reactor surface temperatures and the pertinent transport chemistry.

  8. Response Mechanism for Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors Based on Surface-Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiansheng; Lu, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent's method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator) and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC) analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data. PMID:24743157

  9. Structural and composition investigations at delayered locations of low k integrated circuit device by gas-assisted focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dandan Kee Tan, Pik; Yamin Huang, Maggie; Lam, Jeffrey; Mai, Zhihong

    2014-05-15

    The authors report a new delayering technique – gas-assisted focused ion beam (FIB) method and its effects on the top layer materials of integrated circuit (IC) device. It demonstrates a highly efficient failure analysis with investigations on the precise location. After removing the dielectric layers under the bombardment of an ion beam, the chemical composition of the top layer was altered with the reduced oxygen content. Further energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed that the oxygen reduction lead to appreciable silicon suboxide formation. Our findings with structural and composition alteration of dielectric layer after FIB delayering open up a new insight avenue for the failure analysis in IC devices.

  10. Experimental study of the relationship between in-process signals and cut quality in gas-assisted laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H. Y.; Brookfield, D. J.; Steen, William M.

    1990-10-01

    The patented "Acoustic Mirro?' has previously been used to investigate weld quality in laser welding. A good correlation was observed between the acoustic signal and weld quality. This success led the authors to investigate the use of the acoustic mirror in gas assisted laser cutting. A piezoelectric transducer mounted on the rear of the final mirror of the beam path was used to observe high frequency vibration due to reflected energy from the cutting process. Off-line inspection of the cut samples enabled the determination of cut quality. A correlation was obtained between the RMS value of the acoustic signal and full penetration of the laser beam, a decrease in signal corresponding to penetrating. Dross adhesion was also indicated by an increase in the level. Changes in the low frequency modulation showed some correlation to cut quality. Guidelines for the use of the acoustic signal as an indicator of fault cutting are discussed.

  11. Providing training and technical assistance to customs officers and border guards: An effective mechanism to improve export controls

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    With the disintegration of the Soviet Union, an increasing international concern requiring attention is illegal trafficking in nuclear and nuclear-related dual-use commodities. For the past few years, the US government, including the Department of Energy (DOE), has assisted the former Soviet Union in establishing and enhancing national export control systems. Although US assistance has been targeted to help control approved transfers, part of the focus has shifted to prevent the illegal exit of special nuclear material, dual-use items, and other nuclear-related materials. As part of a State Department initiative, a Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (NDF) was established to address various nonproliferation concerns. One project, funded by NDF, US Customs Service (Customs), and the DOE, focuses on assisting transit countries to prevent illegal trafficking. DOE is providing technical expertise to seven countries in the Baltics and Central Europe to help identify materials, equipment, and technology that might transit their borders. Although there are many mechanisms to prevent illegal trafficking, this paper will discuss the importance of providing international customs officials and border guards with training and technical assistance on nuclear materials and nuclear-related dual-use items. More specifically, detail of the DOE training plan will be discussed.

  12. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    SciTech Connect

    Knoops, Harm C. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl; Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  13. Strategies and methodologies to develop techniques for computer-assisted analysis of gas phase formation during altitude decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Hall, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    It would be of operational significance if one possessed a device that would indicate the presence of gas phase formation in the body during hypobaric decompression. Automated analysis of Doppler gas bubble signals has been attempted for 2 decades but with generally unfavorable results, except with surgically implanted transducers. Recently, efforts have intensified with the introduction of low-cost computer programs. Current NASA work is directed towards the development of a computer-assisted method specifically targeted to EVA, and we are most interested in Spencer Grade 4. We note that Spencer Doppler Grades 1 to 3 have increased in the FFT sonogram and spectrogram in the amplitude domain, and the frequency domain is sometimes increased over that created by the normal blood flow envelope. The amplitude perturbations are of very short duration, in both systole and diastole and at random temporal positions. Grade 4 is characteristic in the amplitude domain but with modest increases in the FFT sonogram and spectral frequency power from 2K to 4K over all of the cardiac cycle. Heart valve motion appears to characteristic display signals: (1) the demodulated Doppler signal amplitude is considerably above the Doppler-shifted blow flow signal (even Grade 4); and (2) demodulated Doppler frequency shifts are considerably greater (often several kHz) than the upper edge of the blood flow envelope. Knowledge of these facts will aid in the construction of a real-time, computer-assisted discriminator to eliminate cardiac motion artifacts. There could also exist perturbations in the following: (1) modifications of the pattern of blood flow in accordance with Poiseuille's Law, (2) flow changes with a change in the Reynolds number, (3) an increase in the pulsatility index, and/or (4) diminished diastolic flow or 'runoff.' Doppler ultrasound devices have been constructed with a three-transducer array and a pulsed frequency generator.

  14. Microlenticular lens replication by the combination of gas-assisted imprint technology and LIGA-like process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hung; Shih, Ching-Jui; Wang, Hsuan-Cheng; Chang, Fuh-Yu; Young, Hong-Tsu; Chang, Wen-Chuan

    2012-09-01

    A mold used in creating diffractive optical elements significantly affects the quality of these devices. In this study, we improved traditional microlens fabrication processes, which have shortcomings, mainly by combining gas-assisted imprint technology and the lithographie galvanoformung abformung (LIGA)-like process. This combination resulted in the production of high-quality optical components with high replication rates, high uniformity, large areas and high flexibility. Given the pixel size of the panel used, the optimal viewing distance, the film thickness and the glass thickness in the formula, we could determine the radius of curvature and the thickness of the lens. By the use of U-groove machining, precise electroforming and embossing to produce polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds, lens film elements can be produced via an ultraviolet (UV)-cured molding process that converts microlenses into flexible polyethylene terephthalate films. In this study, the microlenticular lens mold is fabricated by U-groove machining, Ni electroforming and PDMS casting. Then, the PDMS mold with microlenticular lens structure is used in the gas-assisted UV imprint process and the PET film with microlenticular lens array is obtained. The lenticular lens had a radius of curvature and height of 228 and 18 µm, respectively. A 3D confocal laser microscope was used to measure the radius of curvature and the spacing of the metal molds, nickel (Ni) molds, PDMS molds and the finished thin-film products. The geometry of the final microlenticular lens was very close to the design values. All geometric errors were below 5%, the surface roughness reached the optical level (with all Ra values less than 10 nm) and the replication rate was 95%. The results demonstrate that this process can be used to fabricate gapless, lenticular-shaped, high-precision microlens arrays with a unitary curvature.

  15. Comb-assisted cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a buffer-gas-cooled molecular beam.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Luigi; Sarno, Valentina Di; Natale, Paolo De; Rosa, Maurizio De; Inguscio, Massimo; Mosca, Simona; Ricciardi, Iolanda; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Maddaloni, Pasquale

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a partially hydrodynamic molecular beam emerging from a buffer-gas-cooling source. Specifically, the (ν1 + ν3) vibrational overtone band of acetylene (C2H2) around 1.5 μm is accessed using a narrow-linewidth diode laser stabilized against a GPS-disciplined rubidium clock via an optical frequency comb synthesizer. As an example, the absolute frequency of the R(1) component is measured with a fractional accuracy of ∼1 × 10(-9). Our approach represents the first step towards the extension of more sophisticated cavity-enhanced interrogation schemes, including saturated absorption cavity ring-down or two-photon excitation, to buffer-gas-cooled molecular beams. PMID:27273337

  16. Superhard Coatings Synthesis Assisted by Pulsed Beams of High-Energy Gas Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, Alexander; Bolbukov, Vasily; Volosova, Marina; Grigoriev, Sergei; Melnik, Yury; Department of high-efficiency machining technologies Team

    2015-09-01

    For production of nanocomposite superhard (HV 5000) and fracture-tough coatings on dielectric substrates a source of metal atoms accompanied by pulsed beams of 30-keV neutral molecules was used. The source is equipped with two parallel equipotential grids placed between a magnetron target and a substrate. Negative high-voltage pulses applied to the high-transparency grids accelerate from the magnetron plasma ions, which are transformed into high-energy neutral molecules due to charge-exchange collisions with gas molecules between the grids. Mixing of the substrate and coating materials through bombardment by high-energy gas molecules results in an adequate compressive stress of the coating and interface width exceeding 1 μm, which allows deposition of 100- μm-thick coatings with a perfect adhesion. The work was supported by the Grant No. 14-29-00297 of the Russian Science Foundation.

  17. Investigation of Sterilization Mechanism for Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores with Plasma-Excited Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas uses humidified mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores and tyrosine which is amino acid are treated by the plasma-excited neutral gas. Shape change of the treated spore is observed by SEM, and chemical modification of the treated tyrosine is analyzed by HPLC. As a result, the surface of the treated spore shows depression. Hydroxylation and nitration of tyrosine are shown after the treatment. For these reasons, we believe that the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas results from the deformation of spore structure due to the chemical modification of amino acid.

  18. UV-assisted room-temperature gas sensing by HfO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaduman, Irmak; Barin, Özlem; Acar, Selim

    2016-06-01

    This research paper presents a detailed study of the influence of annealing temperature and UV irradiation on the sensitivity to NO2 of HfO2 thin films that can be used for the development of metal-oxide gas sensors. The HfO2 thin films were grown with a 3.3-nm thickness by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and were annealed at different temperatures. The HfO2 thin films were characterized by using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The roughnesses of thin films were seen to have been affected by the annealing treatment. The effects of annealing temperature, as well as the operating temperature, on the response and the recovery characteristics of the HfO2 film were investigated. The results showed that both the annealing temperature and the operating temperature had significant effects on the sensing characteristics. Also, at room-temperature operation, the sensitivity of HfO2 thin films to 5 ppm of NO2 gas in air was investigated under UV irradiation. UV irradiation not only increased the response but also reduced the response and the recovery times during the gas-sensing measurements.

  19. [Ventricular assist device – Possibilities of long-term mechanical circulatory support].

    PubMed

    Englberger, Lars; Reineke, David C; Martinelli, Michele V; Mohacsi, Paul; Carrel, Thierry P

    2015-08-01

    In Switzerland 200’000 people suffer from congestive heart failure. Approximately 10’000 patients find themselves in an advanced state of the disease. When conservative treatment options are no longer available heart transplantation is the therapy of choice. Should this not be an option due to long waiting lists or medical issues assist device therapy becomes an option. Assist device therapy is separated in short-term and long-term support. Long-term support is nowadays performed with ventricular assist devices (VADs). The native heart is still in place and supported in parallel to the remaining function of the heart. The majority of patients are treated with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The right ventrical alone (RVAD) as well as bi-ventricular support (BiVAD) is rarely needed. The modern VADs are implantable and create a non-pulsative bloodflow. A percutaneous driveline enables energy supply and pump-control. Indication strategies for VAD implantations include bridge to transplant (short term support), bridge to candidacy and bridge to transplant. VADs become more and more a definite therapeutic option (destination therapy). VAD therapy might be a realistic alternative to organ transplantation in the near future. PMID:26227978

  20. Mechanical Characteristics of Submerged Arc Weldment in API Gas Pipeline Steel of Grade X65

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. H.; Mohammadyani, D.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of submerged arc weldment (SAW) in gas transportation pipeline steel of grade API X65 (65 ksi yield strength) were investigated. This steel is produced by thermo mechanical control rolled (TMC), and is largely used in Iran gas piping systems and networks. The results from laboratory study on three different regions; i.e. base metal (BM), fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) were used to compare weldment mechanical characteristics with those specified by API 5L (revision 2004) standard code. Different laboratory experiments were conducted on test specimens taken from 48 inch outside diameter and 14.3 mm wall thickness gas pipeline. The test results showed a gradient of microstructure and Vickers hardness data from the centerline of FZ towards the unaffected MB. Similarly, lower Charpy absorbed energy (compared to BM) was observed in the FZ impact specimens. Despite this, the API specifications were fulfilled in three tested zones, ensuring pipeline structural integrity under working conditions.

  1. Spatiotemporal study of gas heating mechanisms in a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, Amelia; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick

    2015-10-01

    A spatiotemporal study of neutral gas temperature during the first 100 s of operation for a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster operating on nitrogen at 60 W and 1.5 Torr is performed to identify the heating mechanisms involved. Neutral gas temperature is estimated from rovibrational band fitting of the nitrogen second positive system. A set of baffles are used to restrict the optical image and separate the heating mechanisms occurring in the central bulk discharge region and near the thruster walls. For each spatial region there are three distinct gas heating mechanisms being fast heating from ion-neutral collisions with timescales of tens of milliseconds, intermediate heating with timescales of 10 s from ion bombardment on the inner thruster tube surface creating wall heating, and slow heating with timescales of 100 s from gradual warming of the entire thruster housing. The results are discussed in relation to optimising the thermal properties of future thruster designs.

  2. Mechanical Characteristics of Submerged Arc Weldment in API Gas Pipeline Steel of Grade X65

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemi, S. H.; Mohammadyani, D.

    2011-01-17

    The mechanical properties of submerged arc weldment (SAW) in gas transportation pipeline steel of grade API X65 (65 ksi yield strength) were investigated. This steel is produced by thermo mechanical control rolled (TMC), and is largely used in Iran gas piping systems and networks. The results from laboratory study on three different regions; i.e. base metal (BM), fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) were used to compare weldment mechanical characteristics with those specified by API 5L (revision 2004) standard code. Different laboratory experiments were conducted on test specimens taken from 48 inch outside diameter and 14.3 mm wall thickness gas pipeline. The test results showed a gradient of microstructure and Vickers hardness data from the centerline of FZ towards the unaffected MB. Similarly, lower Charpy absorbed energy (compared to BM) was observed in the FZ impact specimens. Despite this, the API specifications were fulfilled in three tested zones, ensuring pipeline structural integrity under working conditions.

  3. Photon-assisted tunneling in a biased strongly correlated Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M Eric; Preiss, Philipp M; Bakr, Waseem S; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2011-08-26

    We study the impact of coherently generated lattice photons on an atomic Mott insulator subjected to a uniform force. Analogous to an array of tunnel-coupled and biased quantum dots, we observe sharp, interaction-shifted photon-assisted tunneling resonances corresponding to tunneling one and two lattice sites either with or against the force and resolve multiorbital shifts of these resonances. By driving a Landau-Zener sweep across such a resonance, we realize a quantum phase transition between a paramagnet and an antiferromagnet and observe quench dynamics when the system is tuned to the critical point. Direct extensions will produce gauge fields and site-resolved spin flips, for topological physics and quantum computing. PMID:21929250

  4. Experimental optimisation of the gas-assisted laser cutting of thick steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Malikov, A G; Orishich, Anatolii M; Shulyat'ev, Viktor B

    2009-06-30

    We report on the experimental optimisation of the oxygen-assisted CO{sub 2} laser cutting of low-carbon sheet steel 5 to 25 mm in thickness. It is shown that the cut edge roughness is minimal when the energy input per unit volume of the material removed and the incident beam power per unit sheet thickness remain constant at {approx}20 J mm{sup -3} and {approx}200 W mm{sup -1}, respectively, over the entire range of sheet thicknesses examined. The corresponding Peclet number is Pe = 0.5. These results can be used to determine the optimal beam power and cutting speed for a particular sheet thickness. At sufficiently large thicknesses, the conditions that ensure the minimum roughness can be written in the form of relations between nondimensional parameters. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  5. Photon-Assisted Tunneling in a Biased Strongly Correlated Bose Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Ruichao; Tai, M. Eric; Preiss, Philipp M.; Bakr, Waseem S.; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2011-08-26

    We study the impact of coherently generated lattice photons on an atomic Mott insulator subjected to a uniform force. Analogous to an array of tunnel-coupled and biased quantum dots, we observe sharp, interaction-shifted photon-assisted tunneling resonances corresponding to tunneling one and two lattice sites either with or against the force and resolve multiorbital shifts of these resonances. By driving a Landau-Zener sweep across such a resonance, we realize a quantum phase transition between a paramagnet and an antiferromagnet and observe quench dynamics when the system is tuned to the critical point. Direct extensions will produce gauge fields and site-resolved spin flips, for topological physics and quantum computing.

  6. CO2 Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David

    2014-05-31

    This report outlines the comprehensive bench-scale testing of the CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) solvent platform and its unique Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study outlines all efforts on a candidate CO2BOL solvent molecule, including solvent synthesis, material characterization, preliminary toxicology studies, and measurement of all physical, thermodynamic and kinetic data, including bench-scale testing. Equilibrium and kinetic models and analysis were made using Aspen Plus™. Preliminary process configurations, a technoeconomic assessment and solvent performance projections for separating CO2 from a subcritical coal-fired power plant are compared to the U.S. Department of Energy's Case 10 monoethanolamine baseline.

  7. Mechanisms to enhance the effectiveness of allied health and social care assistants in community-based rehabilitation services: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Moran, Anna; Nancarrow, Susan A; Enderby, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    This research aims to describe the factors associated with successful employment of allied health and social care assistants in community-based rehabilitation services (CBRS) in England. The research involved the thematic analysis of interviews and focus groups with 153 professionally qualified and assistant staff from 11 older people's interdisciplinary community rehabilitation teams. Data were collected between November 2006 and December 2008. Assistants were perceived as a focal point for care delivery and conduits for enabling a service to achieve goals within interdisciplinary team structures. Nine mechanisms were identified that promoted the successful employment of assistants: (i) Multidisciplinary team input into assistant training and support; (ii) Ensuring the timely assessment of clients by qualified staff; (iii) Establishing clear communication structures between qualified and assistant staff; (iv) Co-location of teams to promote communication and skill sharing; (v) Removing barriers that prevent staff working to their full scope of practice; (vi) Facilitating role flexibility of assistants, while upholding the principles of reablement; (vii) Allowing sufficient time for client-staff interaction; (viii) Ensuring an appropriate ratio of assistant to qualified staff to enable sufficient training and supervision of assistants; and (ix) Appropriately, resourcing the role for training and reimbursement to reflect responsibility. We conclude that upholding these mechanisms may help to optimise the efficiency and productivity of assistant and professionally qualified staff in CBRS. PMID:25475506

  8. Electrophilic assistance to the cleavage of an RNA model phopshodiester via specific and general base-catalyzed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Corona-Martínez, David Octavio; Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2012-10-19

    Kinetics of transesterification of the RNA model substrate 2-hydroxypropyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate promoted by Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), the most common biological metals acting as cofactors for nuclease enzymes and ribozymes, as well as by Co(NH(3))(6)(3+), Co(en)(3)(3+), Li(+), and Na(+) cations, often employed as mechanistic probes, was studied in 80% v/v (50 mol %) aqueous DMSO, a medium that allows one to discriminate easily specific base (OH(-)-catalyzed) and general base (buffer-catalyzed) reaction paths. All cations assist the specific base reaction, but only Mg(2+) and Na(+) assist the general base reaction. For Mg(2+)-assisted reactions, the solvent deuterium isotope effects are 1.23 and 0.25 for general base and specific base mechanisms, respectively. Rate constants for Mg(2+)-assisted general base reactions measured with different bases fit the Brønsted correlation with a slope of 0.38, significantly lower than the slope for the unassisted general base reaction (0.77). Transition state binding constants for catalysts in the specific base reaction (K(‡)(OH)) both in aqueous DMSO and pure water correlate with their binding constants to 4-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion (K(NPP)) used as a minimalist transition state model. It was found that K(‡)(OH) ≈ K(NPP) for "protic" catalysts (Co(NH(3))(6)(3+), Co(en)(3)(3+), guanidinium), but K(‡)(OH) ≫ K(NPP) for Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) acting as Lewis acids. It appears from results of this study that Mg(2+) is unique in its ability to assist efficiently the general base-catalyzed transesterification often occurring in active sites of nuclease enzymes and ribozymes. PMID:22991967

  9. Radiation-assisted magnetotransport in two-dimensional electron gas systems: appearance of zero resistance states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yar, Abdullah; Sabeeh, Kashif

    2015-11-01

    Zero-resistance states (ZRS) are normally associated with superconducting and quantum Hall phases. Experimental detection of ZRS in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems irridiated by microwave(MW) radiation in a magnetic field has been quite a surprise. We develop a semiclassical transport formalism to explain the phenomena. We find a sequence of Zero-Resistance States (ZRS) inherited from the suppression of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations under the influence of high-frequency and large amplitude microwave radiation. Furthermore, the ZRS are well pronounced and persist up to broad intervals of magnetic field as observed in experiments on microwave illuminated 2DEG systems.

  10. Theoretical study on the reaction mechanism of the gas-phase H2/CO2/Ni(3D) system.

    PubMed

    Qin, Song; Hu, Changwei; Yang, Huaqing; Su, Zhishan

    2005-07-28

    The ground-state potential energy surface (PES) in the gas-phase H2/CO2/Ni(3D) system is investigated at the CCSD(T)//B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels in order to explore the possible reaction mechanism of the reverse water gas shift reaction catalyzed by Ni(3D). The calculations predict that the C-O bond cleavage of CO2 assisted by co-interacted H2 is prior to the dissociation of the H2, and the most feasible reaction path for Ni(3D) + H2 + CO2 --> Ni(3D) + H2O + CO is endothermic by 12.5 kJ mol(-1) with an energy barrier of 103.9 kJ mol(-1). The rate-determining step for the overall reaction is predicted to be the hydrogen migration with water formation. The promotion effect of H2 on the cleavage of C-O bond in CO2 is also discussed and compared with the analogous reaction of Ni(3D) + CO2 --> NiO + CO, and the difference between triplet and singlet H2/CO2/Ni systems is also discussed. PMID:16833994

  11. [Technical aspects of mechanical insufflator-exsufflators. Construction and function of the Emerson CoughAssist].

    PubMed

    Bosch, A; Winterholler, M

    2008-03-01

    The electromechanical insufflator-exsufflator (Emerson CoughAssist) was developed as an aid for patients with neuromuscular disorders suffering from impaired cough. The insufflator-exsufflator simulates and supports physiological cough by supporting inspiration with positive pressure and shifting this positive pressure rapidly into a negative pressure that supports exsufflation and thus bronchial clearance. Maximum pressures are +/- 60 cm H2O, pressures between 30 and 50 cm H2O are sufficient to produce assisted cough in adults with neuromuscular disease. The pressure shift from positive to negative occurs with 0.02 sec and is regulated by a magnetic valve. An anaesthetic facemask is used as interface, alternatively, a mouthpiece can be used in combination with a nose strap. It is also possible to use the insufflator-exsufflator in patients with tracheostomy. We present in this article detailed information about the technical principles and practical use of the electromechanical insufflator-exsufflator. PMID:18317985

  12. Sandia's Geothermal Advanced Drill Rig Instrumentation Assists Critical Oil and Gas Drilling Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Staller, George E.; Whitlow, Gary

    1999-04-27

    On November 23, 1998, an 18,000-foot-deep wild-cat natural gas well being drilled near Bakersfield, CA blew out and caught fire. All attempts to kill this well failed, and the well continues to flow under limited control, producing large volumes of natural gas, salt water, and some oil. The oil and some of the water is being separated and trucked off site, and the remaining gas and water is being burned at the well head. A relief well is being drilled approximately one-quarter mile away in an attempt to intercept the first well. If the relief well is successful, it will be used to cement in and kill the first well. Epoch Wellsite Services, Inc., the mud-logging company for the initial well and the relief well, requested Sandia's rolling float meter (RFM) for these critical drilling operations. The RFM is being used to measure the mud outflow rate and detect kicks while drilling the relief well, which will undoubtedly encounter reservoir conditions similar to those responsible for the blow out. Based on its prior experience with the RFM, Epoch believes that it is the only instrument capable of providing the level of accuracy and response to mudflow needed to quickly detect kicks and minimize the risk of a blowout on this second critical well. In response to the urgent request from industry, Sandia and Epoch technicians installed the RFM on the relief well return line, and completed its initial calibration. The data from the RFM is displayed in real-time for the driller, the companyman, and the toolpusher via Epochs RIGWATCH Drilling Instmmentation System. The RFM has already detected several small kicks while drilling toward the annulus of the blown out well. A conventional paddle meter is located downstream of the RFM to provide redundancy and the opportunity to compare the two meters in an actual drilling operation, The relief well is nearing 14,000 feet deep, targeting an intercept of the first well near 17,600 feet. The relief well is expected to be completed in

  13. CO{sub 2} laser welding of duplex and super-duplex stainless steels (the effect of argon-nitrogen assist-gas mixtures)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.M.; Reed, R.C.; Camyab, A.

    1996-12-31

    Continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser welds have been fabricated on duplex and super duplex stainless steel substrates at a power of 3.5 kW. The work has examined the influence of Ar-N{sub 2} assist-gas mixtures on weld metal composition and microstructure. Welding in pure argon leads to reduction in the Cr, Ni, Mo and N content of the weld metal and a significant decrease in austenite volume fraction relative to the baseplate. Relative to welding in Ar, the use of a N{sub 2} bearing assist-gas restores the Cr, Ni and Mo levels to those found in the baseplate at the welding speeds employed. Moreover, the N{sub 2} bearing assist-gases result in an increase in the weld metal N content and austenite volume fraction relative to welding in pure Ar.

  14. Impact of Gas-Phase Mechanisms on Weather Research Forecasting Model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) Predictions: Mechanism Implementation and Comparative Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase mechanisms provide important oxidant and gaseous precursors for secondary aerosol formation. Different gas-phase mechanisms may lead to different predictions of gases, aerosols, and aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, WRF/Chem-MADRID simulations are cond...

  15. A mechanism of excessive accumulation of abomasal gas in vagotomized cattle determined using fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Megumi; Sasaki, Naoki; Kawamoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Haruo; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2011-05-01

    To better understand the mechanism of excessive gas accumulation in the abomasum in bovine abomasal displacement, we performed gastric fluoroscopy in vagotomized cattle. Fifteen 6-month-old Holstein steers were divided into three groups: a non-vagotomized control group (Group C; n=5), a ventral thoraco-vagotomized group (Group V; n=5), and a dorsal and ventral thoraco-vagotomized group (Group DV; n=5). These groups were examined by fluoroscopy before and during a 5-week observation period after surgery. In Group C, no change was observed throughout the observation period. In Group DV, immediately after surgery, reticuloruminal motility was completely absent and ruminal distention was seen. Two weeks after surgery, abnormal reticulum motility and increased gas accumulation in the abomasal body were noted. Abomasal dilatation was also observed. In Group V, 1 week after surgery, gas inflow into the abomasum and relatively normal reticulum motility were observed along with a rapid increase in abomasal gas. Abomasal dilatation was also observed. In addition, left-displaced abomasum occurred in one of the steers in this group. From these results, we concluded that one of the mechanisms of excessive gas accumulation in the abomasum is reticulum-mediated gas inflow from the rumen combined with vagotomy-induced hypomotility. PMID:21178321

  16. Mechanical Behavior of Methane Infiltrated Coal: the Roles of Gas Desorption, Stress Level and Loading Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shugang; Elsworth, Derek; Liu, Jishan

    2013-09-01

    We report laboratory experiments to investigate the role of gas desorption, stress level and loading rate on the mechanical behavior of methane infiltrated coal. Two suites of experiments are carried out. The first suite of experiments is conducted on coal (Lower Kittanning seam, West Virginia) at a confining stress of 2 MPa and methane pore pressures in the fracture of 1 MPa to examine the role of gas desorption. These include three undrained (hydraulically closed) experiments with different pore pressure distributions in the coal, namely, overpressured, normally pressured and underpressured, and one specimen under drained condition. Based on the experimental results, we find quantitative evidence that gas desorption weakens coal through two mechanisms: (1) reducing effective stress controlled by the ratio of gas desorption rate over the drainage rate, and (2) crushing coal due to the internal gas energy release controlled by gas composition, pressure and content. The second suite of experiments is conducted on coal (Upper B seam, Colorado) at confining stresses of 2 and 4 MPa, with pore pressures of 1 and 3 MPa, under underpressured and drained condition with three different loading rates to study the role of stress level and loading rate. We find that the Biot coefficient of coal specimens is <1. Reducing effective confining stress decreases the elastic modulus and strength of coal. This study has important implications for the stability of underground coal seams.

  17. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF SOLIDS ASSISTED BY GAS DRAG: SLOWING BY TURBULENT MASS DIFFUSIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Shariff, Karim; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2011-09-01

    The Goldreich and Ward (axisymmetric) gravitational instability of a razor thin particle layer occurs when the Toomre parameter Q{sub T} {identical_to} c{sub p}{Omega}{sub 0}/{pi}G{Sigma}{sub p} < 1 (c{sub p} being the particle dispersion velocity). Ward extended this analysis by adding the effect of gas drag upon particles and found that even when Q{sub T} > 1, sufficiently long waves were always unstable. Youdin carried out a detailed analysis and showed that the instability allows chondrule-sized ({approx}1 mm) particles to undergo radial clumping with reasonable growth times even in the presence of a moderate amount of turbulent stirring. The analysis of Youdin includes the role of turbulence in setting the thickness of the dust layer and in creating a turbulent particle pressure in the momentum equation. However, he ignores the effect of turbulent mass diffusivity on the disturbance wave. Here, we show that including this effect reduces the growth rate significantly, by an amount that depends on the level of turbulence, and reduces the maximum intensity of turbulence the instability can withstand by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The instability is viable only when turbulence is extremely weak and the solid to gas surface density of the particle layer is considerably enhanced over minimum-mass-nebula values. A simple mechanistic explanation of the instability shows how the azimuthal component of drag promotes instability while the radial component hinders it. A gravito-diffusive overstability is also possible but never realized in the nebula models.

  18. Fundamental mechanisms that influence the estimate of heat transfer to gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Estimates of the heat transfer from the gas to stationary (vanes) or rotating blades poses a major uncertainty due to the complexity of the heat transfer processes. The gas flow through these blade rows is three dimensional with complex secondary viscous flow patterns that interact with the endwalls and blade surfaces. In addition, upstream disturbances, stagnation flow, curvature effects, and flow acceleration complicate the thermal transport mechanisms in the boundary layers. Some of these fundamental heat transfer effects are discussed. The chief purpose of the discussion is to acquaint those in the heat transfer community, not directly involved in gas turbines, of the seriousness of the problem and to recommend some basic research that would improve the capability for predicting gas-side heat transfer on turbine blades and vanes.

  19. Gas generation mechanism due to electrolyte decomposition in commercial lithium-ion cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Kazuma; Miyashiro, Hajime; Kobayashi, Yo; Takei, Katsuhito; Ishikawa, Rikio

    To elucidate the gas generation mechanism due to electrolyte decomposition in commercial lithium-ion cells after long cycling, we developed a device which can accurately determine the volume of generated gas in the cell. Experiments on Li xC 6/Li 1- xCoO 2 cells using electrolytes such as 1 M LiPF 6 in propylene carbonate (PC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and diethyl carbonate (DEC) are presented and discussed. In the nominal voltage range (4.2-2.5 V), compositional change due mainly to ester exchange reaction occurs, and gaseous products in the cell are little. Generated gas volume and compositional change in the electrolyte are detected largely in overcharged cells, and we discussed that gas generation due to electrolyte decomposition involves different decomposition reactions in overcharged and overdischarged cells.

  20. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENTALLY-ASSISTED INTERGRANULAR CRACKING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2004-02-13

    Creep and IG cracking of nickel-base alloys depend principally on two factors--the deformation behavior and the effect of the environment. We have shown that both contribute to the observed degradation in primary water. The understanding of cracking does not lie wholly within the environmental effects arena, nor can it be explained only by intrinsic mechanical behavior. Rather, both processes contribute to the observed behavior in primary water. In this project, we had three objectives: (1) to verify that grain boundaries control deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C, (2) to identify the environmental effect on IGSCC, and (3) to combine CSLBs and GBCs to maximize IGSCC resistance in Ni-Cr-Fe in 360 C primary water. Experiments performed in hydrogen gas at 360 C confirm an increase in the primary creep rate in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C due to hydrogen. The creep strain transients caused by hydrogen are proposed to be due to the collapse of dislocation pile-ups, as confirmed by observations in HVEM. The observations only partially support the hydrogen-enhanced plasticity model, but also suggest a potential role of vacancies in the accelerate creep behavior in primary water. In high temperature oxidation experiments designed to examine the potential for selective internal oxidation in the IGSCC process, cracking is greatest in the more oxidizing environments compared to the low oxygen potential environments where nickel metal is stable. In Ni-Cr-Fe alloys, chromium oxides form preferentially along the grain boundaries, even at low oxygen potential, supporting a potential role in grain boundary embrittlement due to preferential oxidation. Experiments designed to determine the role of grain boundary deformation on intergranular cracking have established, for the first time, a cause-and-effect relationship between grain boundary deformation and IGSCC. That is, grain boundary deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe in 360 C primary water leads to IGSCC of the deformed boundaries. As well

  1. A Comparative Data-Based Modeling Study on Respiratory CO2 Gas Exchange during Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Sei; Ansermino, J. Mark; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to derive a minimally complex but credible model of respiratory CO2 gas exchange that may be used in systematic design and pilot testing of closed-loop end-tidal CO2 controllers in mechanical ventilation. We first derived a candidate model that captures the essential mechanisms involved in the respiratory CO2 gas exchange process. Then, we simplified the candidate model to derive two lower-order candidate models. We compared these candidate models for predictive capability and reliability using experimental data collected from 25 pediatric subjects undergoing dynamically varying mechanical ventilation during surgical procedures. A two-compartment model equipped with transport delay to account for CO2 delivery between the lungs and the tissues showed modest but statistically significant improvement in predictive capability over the same model without transport delay. Aggregating the lungs and the tissues into a single compartment further degraded the predictive fidelity of the model. In addition, the model equipped with transport delay demonstrated superior reliability to the one without transport delay. Further, the respiratory parameters derived from the model equipped with transport delay, but not the one without transport delay, were physiologically plausible. The results suggest that gas transport between the lungs and the tissues must be taken into account to accurately reproduce the respiratory CO2 gas exchange process under conditions of wide-ranging and dynamically varying mechanical ventilation conditions. PMID:26870728

  2. STUDIES RELATED TO CHEMICAL MECHANISMS OF GAS FORMATION IN HANFORD HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research has its origin in studies at Georgia Tech into the chemical (as opposed to radiolytic) mechanisms of gas formation (H2, N2O, N2, and NH3) in nuclear waste storage tanks at Hanford, Washington, which has been supported since 1991 under DOE's comprehensive Flammable Ga...

  3. ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION MECHANISM IN AQUEOUS FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field and laboratory study of the adipic acid degradation mechanism in aqueous flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. (Adding adipic acid to limestone-based, SO2 wet scrubbers increases SO2 removal and limestone utilization. However, as much as 80% ...

  4. Pulmonary arterioplasty using video-assisted thoracic surgery mechanical suture technique

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Huang, Jun; Yin, Weiqiang; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Hanzhang; Mo, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer invading pulmonary trunk is a locally advanced condition, which may indicate poor prognosis. Surgical resection of the lesion can significantly improve survival for some patients. Lobectomy/Pneumonectomy with pulmonary arterioplasty via thoracotomy were generally accepted and used in the past. As the rapid development of minimally invasive techniques and devices, pulmonary arterioplasty is feasible via video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). However, few studies have reported the VATS surgical techniques. In this study, we reported the techniques of pulmonary arterioplasty via VATS. PMID:27076961

  5. The Nickel Assisted Decomposition of Pentanal in the Gas Phase at Various Internal Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansell, Adam; Bellert, Darrin

    2014-06-01

    The rate constants for the dissociation of Ni+Pentanal at various internal energies (15000 cm-1-18800 cm-1) were measured using a custom time of flight instrument. Clusters are generated in a large source chamber by ablating the surface of a rotating nickel rod with an excimer and entraining the ablated metal atoms in a helium gas plume slightly doped with pentanal vapor. The molecular beam enters a Wiley-Mclaren type acceleration grid, and cations are accelerated along a 1.8 meter long time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). At the other end of the TOF is a sector and a detector. The sector allows ions of a particular kinetic energy through to the detector. If an ion breaks apart in the time it takes to reach the sector, the mass (and therefore kinetic energy) is reduced, and the sector can be set to allow these fragment ions to reach the detector (fig 2). In our experiment, the energy required to initiate the breakdown is provided by a laser pulse between 15000 cm-1 and 18800 cm-1.

  6. Surfactant assisted growth of nanostructured tin oxide films for gas sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khun, Kamalpreet Khun; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    Porous nanostructured SnO2 films have been prepared using an ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique in conjunction with cationic, anionic and non ionic surfactants namely CTAB (Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide), SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate) and PEG (polyethylene glycol) respectively. The effect of surfactants on the structural, electrical, optical and gas sensing properties of SnO2 films were investigated by using different techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electroscope microscopy (FESEM), two probe technique and Photoluminiscence (PL) studies. The results reveal that the addition of surfactants in the precursor solutions leads to reduction in crystallite size with significant changes in porosity of SnO2 films. PL studies of the films show emissions in the visible region which exhibit changes in the intensities upon variation of surfactants in the precursor solutions. The prepared films were tested for their sensing behaviour towards chlorine and the results reveal that the films prepared in conjunction with cationic surfactant CTAB exhibits a sensing response of 53.5% towards 20 ppm chlorine at a low operating temperature of 150°C.

  7. Controls and measurements of KU engine test cells for biodiesel, SynGas, and assisted biodiesel combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecrle, Eric Daniel

    This thesis is comprised of three unique data acquisition and controls (CDAQ) projects. Each of these projects differs from each other; however, they all include the concept of testing renewable or future fuel sources. The projects were the following: University of Kansas's Feedstock-to-Tailpipe Initiative's Synthesis Gas Reforming rig, Feedstock-to-Tailpipe Initiative's Biodiesel Single Cylinder Test Stand, and a unique Reformate Assisted Biodiesel Combustion architecture. The main responsibility of the author was to implement, develop and test CDAQ systems for the projects. For the Synthesis Gas Reforming rig, this thesis includes a report that summarizes the analysis and solution of building a controls and data acquisition system for this setup. It describes the purpose of the sensors selected along with their placement throughout the system. Moreover, it includes an explanation of the planned data collection system, along with two models describing the reforming process useful for system control. For the Biodiesel Single Cylinder Test Stand, the responsibility was to implement the CDAQ system for data collection. This project comprised a variety of different sensors that are being used collect the combustion characteristics of different biodiesel formulations. This project is currently being used by other graduates in order to complete their projects for subsequent publication. For the Reformate Assisted Biodiesel Combustion architecture, the author developed a reformate injection system to test different hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures as combustion augmentation. Hydrogen combustion has certain limiting factors, such as pre-ignition in spark ignition engines and inability to work as a singular fuel in compression ignition engines. To offset these issues, a dual-fuel methodology is utilized by injecting a hydrogen/carbon monoxide mixture into the intake stream of a diesel engine operating on biodiesel. While carbon monoxide does degrade some of the

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao

    2003-10-01

    This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and

  9. Exploded view of higher order G-quadruplex structures through click-chemistry assisted single-molecule mechanical unfolding.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Sangeetha; Yu, Zhongbo; Mao, Hanbin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the long-range nature of high-order interactions between distal components in a biomolecule, transition dynamics of tertiary structures is often too complex to profile using conventional methods. Inspired by the exploded view in mechanical drawing, here, we used laser tweezers to mechanically dissect high-order DNA structures into two constituting G-quadruplexes in the promoter of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. Assisted with click-chemistry coupling, we sandwiched one G-quadruplex with two dsDNA handles while leaving the other unit free. Mechanical unfolding through these handles revealed transition dynamics of the targeted quadruplex in a native environment, which is named as native mechanical segmentation (NMS). Comparison between unfolding of an NMS construct and that of truncated G-quadruplex constructs revealed a quadruplex-quadruplex interaction with 2 kcal/mol stabilization energy. After mechanically targeting the two G-quadruplexes together, the same interaction was observed during the first unfolding step. The unfolding then proceeded through disrupting the weaker G-quadruplex at the 5'-end, followed by the stronger G-quadruplex at the 3'-end via various intermediates. Such a pecking order in unfolding well reflects the hierarchical nature of nucleic acid structures. With surgery-like precisions, we anticipate this NMS approach offers unprecedented perspective to decipher dynamic transitions in complex biomacromolecules. PMID:26626151

  10. Exploded view of higher order G-quadruplex structures through click-chemistry assisted single-molecule mechanical unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Selvam, Sangeetha; Yu, Zhongbo; Mao, Hanbin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the long-range nature of high-order interactions between distal components in a biomolecule, transition dynamics of tertiary structures is often too complex to profile using conventional methods. Inspired by the exploded view in mechanical drawing, here, we used laser tweezers to mechanically dissect high-order DNA structures into two constituting G-quadruplexes in the promoter of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. Assisted with click-chemistry coupling, we sandwiched one G-quadruplex with two dsDNA handles while leaving the other unit free. Mechanical unfolding through these handles revealed transition dynamics of the targeted quadruplex in a native environment, which is named as native mechanical segmentation (NMS). Comparison between unfolding of an NMS construct and that of truncated G-quadruplex constructs revealed a quadruplex–quadruplex interaction with 2 kcal/mol stabilization energy. After mechanically targeting the two G-quadruplexes together, the same interaction was observed during the first unfolding step. The unfolding then proceeded through disrupting the weaker G-quadruplex at the 5′-end, followed by the stronger G-quadruplex at the 3′-end via various intermediates. Such a pecking order in unfolding well reflects the hierarchical nature of nucleic acid structures. With surgery-like precisions, we anticipate this NMS approach offers unprecedented perspective to decipher dynamic transitions in complex biomacromolecules. PMID:26626151

  11. Fast low-pressure microwave assisted extraction and gas chromatographic determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, M C; Maina, R; Tumiatti, V; Sarzanini, C; Rivoira, L; De Carlo, R M

    2012-11-23

    A new technology equipment for low-pressure microwave assisted extraction (usually employed for organic chemistry reactions), recently launched in the market, is used for the first time in environmental analysis for the extraction of commercial technical Aroclor mixtures from soil. Certified reference materials of Aroclor 1260, Aroclor 1254 and Aroclor 1242 in transformer oils were used to contaminate the soil samples and to optimize the extraction method as well as the subsequent gas chromatographic electron capture detection (GC-ECD) analytical method. The study was performed optimizing the extraction, the purification and the gas chromatographic separation conditions to enhance the resolution of difficult pairs of congeners (C28/31 and C141/179). After optimization, the recovery yields were included within the range 79-84%. The detection limits, evaluated for two different commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures (Aroclor 1260 and Aroclor 1242) were 0.056 ± 0.001 mg/kg and 0.290 ± 0.006 mg/kg, respectively. The method, validated with certified soil samples, was used to analyze a soil sample after an event of failure of a pole-mounted transformer which caused the dumping of PCB contaminated oil in soil. Moreover, the method provides simple sample handling, fast extraction with reduced amount of sample and solvents than usually required, and simple purification step involving the use of solvent (cyclohexane) volumes as low as 5 mL. Reliability and reproducibility of extraction conditions are ensured by direct and continuous monitoring of temperature and pressure conditions. PMID:23084486

  12. Influence of argon gas flow on mechanical and electrical properties of sputtered titanium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojier, Kaykhosrow; Savaloni, Hadi; Shokrai, Ebrahim; Dehghani, Zohreh; Dehnavi, Naser Zare

    2013-07-01

    Titanium nitrides have good mechanical, tribological, electrical, biomedical, and optical properties; therefore, they are used to harden and protect cutting and sliding surfaces, as semiconductor devices, and as a nontoxic exterior for biomedical applications. The dependence of the mechanical and electrical properties of titanium nitride thin films deposited on silicon substrates by direct-current reactive magnetron sputtering technique on argon gas flow (in the range of 8 to 20 sccm) was investigated. The crystallographic structure of the films was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), while surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and electrical properties of these films were investigated by nanoindentation test and a four-point probe instrument, respectively. The XRD patterns showed titanium nitride (TiN) formation with a face-centered cubic structure for all samples. It was also observed that (111) crystallographic direction was the preferred orientation for TiN thin films which became more pronounced with increasing argon gas flow. The AFM images showed a granular structure for TiN layers. The hardness, crystallite/grain size (obtained from XRD and AFM), and surface roughness increased with the flow of argon gas, while elastic modulus and dislocation density in the films decreased. The study on electrical properties showed that the dependence of voltage with current for all samples was linear, and film resistivity was increased with argon gas flow.

  13. Reduced and Validated Kinetic Mechanisms for Hydrogen-CO-sir Combustion in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Yiguang Ju; Frederick Dryer

    2009-02-07

    Rigorous experimental, theoretical, and numerical investigation of various issues relevant to the development of reduced, validated kinetic mechanisms for synthetic gas combustion in gas turbines was carried out - including the construction of new radiation models for combusting flows, improvement of flame speed measurement techniques, measurements and chemical kinetic analysis of H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mixtures, revision of the H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} kinetic model to improve flame speed prediction capabilities, and development of a multi-time scale algorithm to improve computational efficiency in reacting flow simulations.

  14. Nucleation mechanism of gallium-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth of gallium arsenide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Colombo, C.; Abstreiter, G.; Arbiol, J.; Morante, J. R.

    2008-02-11

    Molecular beam epitaxy Ga-assisted synthesis of GaAs nanowires is demonstrated. The nucleation and growth are seen to be related to the presence of a SiO{sub 2} layer previously deposited on the GaAs wafer. The interaction of the reactive gallium with the SiO{sub 2} pinholes induces the formation of nanocraters, found to be the key for the nucleation of the nanowires. With SiO{sub 2} thicknesses up to 30 nm, nanocraters reach the underlying substrate, resulting into a preferential growth orientation of the nanowires. Possibly related to the formation of nanocraters, we observe an incubation period of 258 s before the nanowires growth is initiated.

  15. Analysis of Trace Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (QACs) in Vegetables Using Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lei; Wang, Xiong-Ke; Li, Yan-Wen; Huang, Xian-Pei; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Li, Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui

    2015-08-01

    A reliable, sensitive, and cost-effective method was developed for determining three quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) including dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, and didodecyldimethylammonium chloride in various vegetables using ultrasonic-assisted extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The variety and acidity of extraction solvents, extraction times, and cleanup efficiency of sorbents were estimated to obtain an optimized procedure for extraction of the QACs in nine vegetable matrices. Excellent linearities (R(2) > 0.992) were obtained for the analytes in the nine matrices. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.7-6.0 and 2.3-20.0 μg/kg (dry weight, dw) in various matrices, respectively. The recoveries in the nine matrices ranged from 70.5% to 108.0% with relative standard deviations below 18.0%. The developed method was applied to determine the QACs in 27 vegetable samples collected from Guangzhou in southern China, showing very high detection frequency with a concentration of 23-180 μg/kg (dw). PMID:26165915

  16. Microwave-assisted phase-transfer catalysis for the rapid one-pot methylation and gas chromatographic determination of phenolics.

    PubMed

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C; Karatapanis, Andreas; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2010-01-29

    Microwave-assisted phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) is reported for the first time, for the one-step extraction-derivatization-preconcentration and gas chromatographic determination of twenty phenols and ten phenolic acids. The well established phase-transfer catalytic methylation is largely accelerated when heating is replaced with the "greener" microwave irradiation. The overall procedure was thoroughly optimized and the analytes were determined by GC/MS. The method presented adequate analytical characteristics being more sensitive in analyzing phenols than phenolic acids. The limits of detection without any additional preconcentration steps (e.g. solvent evaporation) were adequate and ranged from 0.4 to 15.8ng/mL while limits of quantitation were between 1.2 and 33.3ng/mL. The method was applied to the determination of phenols, in spiked environmental samples and phenolic acids in aqueous infusions of commercially available pharmaceutical dry plants. The recoveries of fortified composite lake water samples and Mentha spicata aqueous infusions ranged from 89.3% to 117.3% for phenols and 93.3% to 115.2% for phenolic acids. PMID:20022019

  17. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robotic arm therapy devices that incorporate actuated assistance can enhance arm recovery, motivate patients to practice, and allow therapists to deliver semi-autonomous training. However, because such devices are often complex and actively apply forces, they have not achieved widespread use in rehabilitation clinics or at home. This paper describes the design and pilot testing of a simple, mechanically passive device that provides robot-like assistance for active arm training using the principle of mechanical resonance. Methods The Resonating Arm Exerciser (RAE) consists of a lever that attaches to the push rim of a wheelchair, a forearm support, and an elastic band that stores energy. Patients push and pull on the lever to roll the wheelchair back and forth by about 20 cm around a neutral position. We performed two separate pilot studies of the device. In the first, we tested whether the predicted resonant properties of RAE amplified a user’s arm mobility by comparing his or her active range of motion (AROM) in the device achieved during a single, sustained push and pull to the AROM achieved during rocking. In a second pilot study designed to test the therapeutic potential of the device, eight participants with chronic stroke (35 ± 24 months since injury) and a mean, stable, initial upper extremity Fugl-Meyer (FM) score of 17 ± 8 / 66 exercised with RAE for eight 45 minute sessions over three weeks. The primary outcome measure was the average AROM measured with a tilt sensor during a one minute test, and the secondary outcome measures were the FM score and the visual analog scale for arm pain. Results In the first pilot study, we found people with a severe motor impairment after stroke intuitively found the resonant frequency of the chair, and the mechanical resonance of RAE amplified their arm AROM by a factor of about 2. In the second pilot study, AROM increased by 66% ± 20% (p = 0.003). The mean FM score increase was 8.5 ± 4 pts (p = 0

  18. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2013-12-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution.

  19. Arraying single microbeads in microchannels using dielectrophoresis-assisted mechanical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; Temiz, Yuksel; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Manipulating and immobilizing single microbeads in flowing fluids is relevant for biological assays and chemical tests but typically requires expensive laboratory equipment and trapping mechanisms that are not reversible. In this paper, we present a highly efficient and reversible mechanism for trapping microbeads by combining dielectrophoresis (DEP) with mechanical traps. The integration of planar electrodes and mechanical traps in a microchannel enables versatile manipulation of microbeads via DEP for their docking in recessed structures of mechanical traps. By simulating the combined effects of the hydrodynamic drag and DEP forces on microbeads, we explore a configuration of periodic traps where the beads are guided by the electrodes and immobilized in recess areas of the traps. The design of the electrode layout and operating configuration are optimized for the efficient trapping of single microbeads. We demonstrated the predicted guiding and trapping effectiveness of the design as well as the reversibility of the system on 10 μm polystyrene beads. Experimental verification used an array of 96 traps in an area of 420 × 420 μm2, reaching a trapping efficiency of 63% when 7 Vpp is applied to the electrodes under 80 nl min-1 flow rate conditions, and 98% of bead release when the voltage is turned off.

  20. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    PubMed Central

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution. PMID:24231252

  1. A System for Delivering Mechanical Stimulation and Robot-Assisted Therapy to the Rat Whisker Pad during Facial Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Knox, Christopher; Malo, Juan; Kobler, James B.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2013-01-01

    Functional recovery is typically poor after facial nerve transection and surgical repair. In rats, whisking amplitude remains greatly diminished after facial nerve regeneration, but can recover more completely if the whiskers are periodically mechanically stimulated during recovery. Here we present a robotic “whisk assist” system for mechanically driving whisker movement after facial nerve injury. Movement patterns were either pre-programmed to reflect natural amplitudes and frequencies, or movements of the contralateral (healthy) side of the face were detected and used to control real-time mirror-like motion on the denervated side. In a pilot study, twenty rats were divided into nine groups and administered one of eight different whisk assist driving patterns (or control) for 5–20 minutes, five days per week, across eight weeks of recovery after unilateral facial nerve cut and suture repair. All rats tolerated the mechanical stimulation well. Seven of the eight treatment groups recovered average whisking amplitudes that exceeded controls, although small group sizes precluded statistical confirmation of group differences. The potential to substantially improve facial nerve recovery through mechanical stimulation has important clinical implications, and we have developed a system to control the pattern and dose of stimulation in the rat facial nerve model. PMID:23475376

  2. Growth dynamics and gas transport mechanism of nanobubbles in graphene liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongha; Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Bora; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Hong, Byung Hee; Novoselov, Konstantin S.

    2015-02-01

    Formation, evolution and vanishing of bubbles are common phenomena in nature, which can be easily observed in boiling or falling water, carbonated drinks, gas-forming electrochemical reactions and so on. However, the morphology and the growth dynamics of the bubbles at nanoscale have not been fully investigated owing to the lack of proper imaging tools that can visualize nanoscale objects in the liquid phase. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the nanobubbles in water encapsulated by graphene membrane can be visualized by in-situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy. Our microscopic results indicate two distinct growth mechanisms of merging nanobubbles and the existence of a critical radius of nanobubbles that determines the unusually long stability of nanobubbles. Interestingly, the gas transport through ultrathin water membranes at nanobubble interface is free from dissolution, which is clearly different from conventional gas transport that includes condensation, transmission and evaporation.

  3. Growth dynamics and gas transport mechanism of nanobubbles in graphene liquid cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongha; Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Bora; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Hong, Byung Hee; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2015-01-01

    Formation, evolution and vanishing of bubbles are common phenomena in nature, which can be easily observed in boiling or falling water, carbonated drinks, gas-forming electrochemical reactions and so on. However, the morphology and the growth dynamics of the bubbles at nanoscale have not been fully investigated owing to the lack of proper imaging tools that can visualize nanoscale objects in the liquid phase. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the nanobubbles in water encapsulated by graphene membrane can be visualized by in-situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy. Our microscopic results indicate two distinct growth mechanisms of merging nanobubbles and the existence of a critical radius of nanobubbles that determines the unusually long stability of nanobubbles. Interestingly, the gas transport through ultrathin water membranes at nanobubble interface is free from dissolution, which is clearly different from conventional gas transport that includes condensation, transmission and evaporation. PMID:25641584

  4. [Intermediate experiment and mechanism analysis of flue gas desulfurization technology by circulating fluidized bed].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Wu, Shaohua; Ma, Chunyuan; Qin, Yukun

    2002-03-01

    A new Circulating Fluidized Bed was designed for intermediate experiment of flue gas desulphurization, in which the flue gas flow rate was 3500 m3/h. By using it, the basic experiments were carried out to study the influence of Ca/S and supersaturated temperature on desulphurization efficiency and the effect of the recycling solid particle in the sulfur removal column on desulphurization performance. The results showed when Ca/S = 1.2, the desulphurization efficiency was increased by 15% through the recycle of solid particle; the gas velocity inside the bed could be designed higher. The mechanism analysis were also studied and the method to increase effective resident time was introduced. PMID:12048805

  5. Mechanisms of gas exchange response to lung volume reduction surgery in severe emphysema.

    PubMed

    Cremona, George; Barberà, Joan A; Barbara, Joan A; Melgosa, Teresa; Appendini, Lorenzo; Roca, Josep; Casadio, Caterina; Donner, Claudio F; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Wagner, Peter D

    2011-04-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves lung function, respiratory symptoms, and exercise tolerance in selected patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who have heterogeneous emphysema. However, the reported effects of LVRS on gas exchange are variable, even when lung function is improved. To clarify how LVRS affects gas exchange in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 23 patients were studied before LVRS, 14 of whom were again studied afterwards. We performed measurements of lung mechanics, pulmonary hemodynamics, and ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) inequality using the multiple inert-gas elimination technique. LVRS improved arterial Po₂ (Pa(O₂)) by a mean of 6 Torr (P = 0.04), with no significant effect on arterial Pco₂ (Pa(CO₂)), but with great variability in both. Lung mechanical properties improved considerably more than did gas exchange. Post-LVRS Pa(O₂) depended mostly on its pre-LVRS value, whereas improvement in Pa(O(2)) was explained mostly by improved Va/Q inequality, with lesser contributions from both increased ventilation and higher mixed venous Po(2). However, no index of lung mechanical properties correlated with Pa(O₂). Conversely, post-LVRS Pa(CO₂) bore no relationship to its pre-LVRS value, whereas changes in Pa(CO₂) were tightly related (r² = 0.96) to variables, reflecting decrease in static lung hyperinflation (intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure and residual volume/total lung capacity) and increase in airflow potential (tidal volume and maximal inspiratory pressure), but not to Va/Q distribution changes. Individual gas exchange responses to LVRS vary greatly, but can be explained by changes in combinations of determining variables that are different for oxygen and carbon dioxide. PMID:21233341

  6. Comparison of reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for pollutant emissions predictions in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hamer, A.J.; Roby, R.J.; Klassen, M.S.

    1998-07-01

    Predicted flow, temperature, and emissions (CO and NO) concentration fields are presented for an axi-symmetric, swirl-stabilized gas turbine combustor operating at approximately 10 atmospheres. Flow field and emissions predictions were obtained by incorporating four different global kinetics mechanisms into the commercially available STAR{asterisk}CD CFD code. Two of these global reaction mechanisms were developed specifically for lean-premixed gas turbine combustion from the GRI and Miller-Bowman full reaction mechanisms. The other global mechanisms for hydrocarbon oxidation utilized in this study were initially developed for more general usage, but are commonly used in gas turbine applications. The latter mechanisms did not specifically include reactions for NO formation. NO formation was included in these mechanisms through incorporation of two reactions developed from the recently released GRI mechanism. Comparison between integrated exit plant emissions (NO and CO) predictions and laboratory measurements showed varied degrees of agreement for the different mechanisms. In all cases, the trend in NO exhaust emissions with change in operating condition is well predicted. However, the magnitudes of the NO emissions are reasonably predicted only for leanest cases investigated with significant overprediction found as the equivalence ratio approached 0.8 (which was slightly beyond the intended range of the reduced mechanisms). On the other hand, the predicted CO emissions showed significant variation for the different mechanisms. The high CO values predicted by the model were primarily due to quenching of the CO reaction by liner cooing air at the wall. Possible explanations for the discrepancies include current limitations of the model and measurement errors. The current work shows the impact that the choice of reduced global mechanism can have on predictions of flame location, size and emissions. Such a model can be a valuable tool for designers by providing

  7. Mechanical and microstructural/chemical degradation of coating and substrate in gas turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Sugita, Y.; Ito, M.; Sakurai, S.; Gold, C.R.; Bloomer, T.E.; Kameda, J.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanical property degradation (295--1223 K) and microstructural/chemical evolution of CoNiCrAlY coatings and superalloy (Rene 80) substrates in gas turbine blades operated in- service have been studied using a small punch (SP) testing technique and scanning Auger microprobe. In SP tests, coating cracks continuously and discretely propagated at 295 K and higher temperatures, respectively. The ductile-brittle transition temperature of the coatings was increased during long time exposure of gas turbine blades to oxidizing environments while that of the substrate did not change. The low cycle fatigue life of the coatings at 295 K was also reduced in-service. Oxidation and sulfur segregation near the coating surface were found to be major causes of the mechanical degradation of the coatings.

  8. All-fiber photoacoustic gas sensor with graphene nano-mechanical resonator as the acoustic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanzhen, Tan; Fan, Yang; Jun, Ma; Hoi Lut, Ho; Wei, Jin

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical-fiber photoacoustic (PA) spectrometric gas sensor with a graphene nano-mechanical resonator as the acoustic detector. The acoustic detection is performed by a miniature ferrule-top nano-mechanical resonator with a ˜100-nm-thick, 2.5-mm-diameter multilayer graphene diaphragm. Experimental investigation showed that the performance of the PA gas sensor can be significantly enhanced by operating at the resonance of the grapheme diaphragm where a lower detection limit of 153 parts-per-billion (ppb) acetylene is achieved. The all-fiber PA sensor which is immune to electromagnetic interference and safe in explosive environments is ideally suited for real-world remote, space-limited applications and for multipoint detection in a multiplexed fiber optic sensor network.

  9. Spectroscopic investigations of ammonia gas sensing mechanism in polypyrrole nanotubes/nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishpal; Kaur, Amarjeet

    2013-03-01

    In light of spectroscopic and electrical investigations, ammonia gas sensing mechanism in polypyrrole (PPy) nanotubes/nanorods has been discussed. For improvement in the gas sensing properties of PPy and its surface to volume ratio, nanotubes and nanorods have been synthesized by anionic dye and anionic surfactant directed chemical oxidation method. The gas sensing behavior of the prepared samples has been tested by measuring the change in electrical resistance of the samples in ammonia environment. Scanning electron microscopic investigations have confirmed the synthesis of PPy nanotubes having diameter ˜80-90 nm and length ˜1.5-2.0 μm and the PPy nanorods with diameter ˜150-200 nm and length ˜15-20 μm. The chemical analysis and the confirmation of synthesis of PPy were carried out by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Better sensitivity against ammonia has been observed in PPy nanorods. For the first time with the help of Raman spectroscopic investigations, the mechanism of gas sensing has been discussed in detail.

  10. Weak and electromagnetic mechanisms of neutrino-pair photoproduction in a strongly magnetized electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. V.; Kerimov, B. K.; Sizin, P. E.

    2012-11-15

    Expressions for the power of neutrino radiation from a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field are derived for the case of neutrino-pair photoproduction via the weak and electromagnetic interaction mechanisms (it is assumed that the neutrino possesses electromagnetic form factors). It is shown that the neutrino luminosity of a medium in the electromagnetic reaction channel may exceed substantially the luminosity in the weak channel. Relative upper bounds on the effective neutrino magnetic moment are obtained.