Sample records for gas chromatography-electron impact

  1. Interlaboratory reproducibility of fast gas chromatography–electron impact–time of flight mass spectrometry (GC–EI–TOF\\/MS) based plant metabolomics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. William Allwood; Alexander Erban; Sjaak de Koning; Warwick B. Dunn; Alexander Luedemann; Arjen Lommen; Lorraine Kay; Ralf Löscher; Joachim Kopka; Royston Goodacre

    2009-01-01

    The application of gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) to the ‘global’ analysis of metabolites in complex samples\\u000a (i.e. metabolomics) has now become routine. The generation of these data-rich profiles demands new strategies in data mining\\u000a and standardisation of experimental and reporting aspects across laboratories. As part of the META-PHOR project’s (METAbolomics\\u000a for Plants Health and OutReach: http:\\/\\/www.meta-phor.eu\\/) priorities towards robust technology

  2. DETERMINATION OF ACRYLAMIDE IN RAT SERUM AND SCIATIC NERVE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTRON-CAPTURE DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified method for the derivatization and analysis of acrylamide as 2-bromopropenamide by gas chromatography/electron capture detection was validated in serum and sciatic nerve from rats. he method was accurate and precise over the concentration range of 2240 to 74700 ppm (w/v...

  3. Determination of acrylamide in rat serum and sciatic nerve by gas chromatography-electron-capture detection.

    PubMed

    Raymer, J H; Sparacino, C M; Velez, G R; Padilla, S; MacPhail, R C; Crofton, K M

    1993-09-22

    A modified method for the derivatization and determination of acrylamide as 2-bromopropenamide by gas chromatography-electron-capture detection was developed and applied to serum and sciatic nerve from rats. The method was accurate and precise over the calibration range 2.24-7.47 micrograms/ml in serum diluted 1:125 and 4-122 micrograms/g in sciatic nerve homogenate (5 mg/ml). limits of detection were estimated to be 1200 ng/ml in undiluted serum and 3 micrograms/g in intact sciatic nerve. The use of less dilute samples to allow for lower limits of detection appears feasible. The time-course of acrylamide in serum and sciatic nerve was studied after acute dosing and indicated elimination half-lives of 1.8 and 2.0 h for serum and sciatic nerve, respectively. A dose-effect relationship was established for each matrix after acute dosing and the measured acrylamide concentrations in serum (microgram/ml) were approximately the same as in sciatic nerve (microgram/g). PMID:8263094

  4. Quantitative detection of trace explosive vapors by programmed temperature desorption gas chromatography-electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher R; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Giordano, Braden C; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can account for instrumentation losses, which makes it ideal for minimizing variability and quantitative trace chemical detection. Gas chromatography with an electron capture detector is an instrumentation configuration sensitive to nitro-energetics, such as TNT and RDX, due to their relatively high electron affinity. However, vapor quantitation of these compounds is difficult without viable vapor standards. Thus, we eliminate the requirement for vapor standards by combining the sensitivity of the instrumentation with a direct liquid deposition protocol to analyze trace explosive vapor samples. PMID:25145416

  5. Gas chromatography-electron capture determination of styrene-7,8-oxide enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Kezi?, S; Jakasa, I; Wenker, M A; Boogaard, P J; Monster, A C; de Wolff, F A

    2000-12-01

    The enantiomers of styrene-7,8-oxide (phenyloxirane, SO) were determined using a method based on base catalysed hydrolysis with sodium methoxide. The oxirane ring opening resulted in formation, without racemisation, of the enantiomeric pairs of the two regional isomers, 2-methoxy-1-phenylethanol and 2-methoxy-2-phenylethanol. The structure of these regional isomers was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). To improve sensitivity of determination, the formed methoxy alcohols were subsequently derivatised with pentafluoropropionic anhydride enabling electron capture detection. This derivatization proceeded also without racemisation and the formed pentafluoropropionyl derivatives were separated on two serially coupled columns, a non-chiral AT 1705 and a chiral CP Chirasil-Dex-CB. As internal standard 2S,3S-(-)-2-methyl-3-phenyloxirane was used. The limit of quantitation of the method was 0.2 microM. The repeatability of the method was assessed at two concentration levels (2.5 and 25 microM) and ranged from 6 to 9% for both enantiomers. The method was applied to the determination of the rate and enantioselectivity of the cytochrome P-450 dependent oxidation of styrene to SO enantiomers in human liver microsomes. PMID:11145063

  6. PARTICLE BEAM LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTRON IMPACT MASS SPECTROMETRY OF DYES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A liquid chromatograph was interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer by means of a particle beam-type interface. he system was used for the analysis and characterization by electron impact mass spectra of a series of commercial dyes. he pure dyes were separated from t...

  7. Simultaneous determination of amitraz and its metabolite residue in food animal tissues by gas chromatography-electron capture detector and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry with accelerated solvent extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huan Yu; Yanfei Tao; Tao Le; Dongmei Chen; Awais Ishsan; Yu Liu; Yulian Wang; Zonghui Yuan

    2010-01-01

    A new method has been developed for determination and confirmation of amitraz and its main metabolite, 2,4-dimethylaniline, in food animal tissues using gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry detector (GC–MS). This method is based on a new extraction procedure using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). It consists of an n-hexane\\/methanol extraction step, a cleaning-up step by BakerBond octadecyl

  8. Simultaneous analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples by membrane-assisted solvent extraction combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xizhi; Tang, Zigang; Sun, Aili; Zhou, Lei; Zhao, Jian; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong; Pan, Daodong

    2014-12-01

    A highly efficient and environment-friendly membrane-assisted solvent extraction system combined with gas chromatography-electron capture detector was applied in the simultaneous determination of 17 polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples. Variables affecting extraction efficiency, including extraction solvent used, stirring rate, extraction time, and temperature, were optimized extensively. Under optimal extraction conditions, recoveries between 76.9% and 104.6% in seawater samples were achieved, and relative standard deviation values below 10% were obtained. The limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio=3) and limit of quantification (signal-to-noise ratio=10) of 17 polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater ranged from 0.14ngL(-1) to 0.36ngL(-1) and 0.46ngL(-1) to 1.19ngL(-1), respectively. Matrix effects on extraction efficiency were evaluated by comparing with the results obtained using tap water. The extraction effect of developed membrane-assisted solvent extraction method was further demonstrated by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry which can provide structural information of the analytes for more accurate identification, and results identical to those produced by gas chromatography-electron capture detector were obtained. These findings demonstrate the applicability of the developed membrane-assisted solvent extraction determination method for coupling to gas chromatography-electron capture detector or tandem mass spectrometry for determining polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in seawater samples. PMID:25310709

  9. [Analysis of organochlorine pesticides and pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables by gas chromatography-electron capture detection coupled with solid-phase extraction using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haixiang; Jia, Yanxia; Ding, Mingyu; Sun, Dajiang; Zhao, Mengbin

    2011-05-01

    A multi-residue analytical method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbent was developed. The determination of 6 organochlorine pesticides and 7 pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables (including cucumber, cherry tomato, cabbage, lettuce, purple cabbage, leek, shallot and onion) was carried out by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). The GC-ECD method used two columns (HP-50 and HP-1) and two ECD detectors. The HP-50 column was used for the analysis and the HP-1 column for validation. The clean-up conditions were optimized. The analytes were extracted by acetonitrile, and the extract was cleaned up by the MWCNTs SPE cartridge. The extract was re-dissolved by hexane, eluted with acetone-hexane (7:3, v/v) from the columns. The recoveries were over 70% for the 11 pesticides in the 13 pesticides. The results indicated that the MWCNTs SPE cartridge was efficient for 8 vegetable samples, because it reduced the contamination of the coloring materials to GC-ECD. The experimental results showed the MWCNTs SPE cartridge can adsorb the coloring materials and the eluant was nearly colorless. PMID:21847981

  10. Qualitative confirmation procedure for ephedrines as acetonide derivatives in doping urine samples by gas chromatography/electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Porto, Rodny Montes de Oca; Pérez, Arístides Rosado; Vidal, Margarita Teresa Correa; Fraga, Mario Granda

    2009-01-01

    Ephedrines are sympathomimetic amines which have central nervous system stimulating properties and, for this reason, some of them are forbidden in sport by the World Antidoping Agency (WADA). They are screened and quantitated in urine by several published techniques and confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In this paper, a simple and easy confirmation procedure for norpseudoephedrine, norephedrine, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine in human urine by GC/electron ionization (EI)-MS is described. After the addition of diphenylamine as internal standard, a liquid-liquid extraction procedure under alkaline conditions with tert-butyl methyl ether was applied to the samples. The analytes were derivatized with acetone and pyridine to form the correspondent oxazolidine derivatives (acetonide). The EI mass spectra of all the studied substances have many diagnostic ions with relative abundance in accordance with WADA requirements and show great structural information content. The fragmentation of theses derivatives is discussed. PMID:19072865

  11. Optimization of matrix solid phase dispersion coupled with gas chromatography electron capture detection for determination of chlorinated pesticides in soil.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Amir; Shafiei, Elham; Vosough, Maryam

    2012-11-15

    A fast, simple and efficient technique based on matrix solid phase dispersion has been presented for extraction and clean-up of some chlorinated pesticides and derivative products; ?-BHC, ?-BHC, ?-BHC, ?-BHC, heptachlor, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan 1, endosulfan 2, 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDD, heptachlor epoxide, endrin aldehyde, endosulfan sulfate. Box-Behnken response surface methodology was employed for optimization of the extraction efficiency. As the optimized procedure, 0.5 g of dried and sieved soil samples were mixed with 2.0 g of 10% C18 in silica (w/w) as dispersant and after transferring into the extraction tube they were extracted with 8 mL of dichloromethane-n-hexane (1:1, v/v). Gas chromatography with electron capture detector was used for selective and sensitive determination of the analytes. Recoveries for the extraction of the proposed analytes were calculated and were satisfying (more than 75%), except for endrin aldehyde (59%) and endosulfan sulfate (62%). Also the method was linear over the calibration range (R(2)>0.991) and the quantitative results were reasonably reproducible and sensitive (LODs ranged between 0.3 and 1.8 ng g(-1)). PMID:23158355

  12. Analysis of corky off-flavour compounds at ultra trace level with multidimensional gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Slabizki, Petra; Schmarr, Hans-Georg

    2013-01-01

    A robust method for routine quality control of corky off-flavour compounds in wine and cork soak matrices has been established. Based on an automated headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), the method needs only marginal sample preparation and achieves low (sub-ng L(-1)) trace level detection limits (LODs) for the most relevant off-flavour compounds, such as 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole (TeCA) and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA). Particularly for wine matrix, reliable trace level quantification had only been achieved after applying heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography (MDGC). Using a halogen-sensitive electron capture detector (ECD) and quantification with a stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA), LODs of 0.1ng L(-1) for TCA, TeCA and TBA could be obtained. Since a SIDA based quantification method is used with a non-mass spectrometric detector, the necessary chromatographic resolution of internal standard and target analyte peaks resulted from the use of highly deuterated [(2)H(5)]-isotopologues. PMID:23219330

  13. Analysis of organophosphate flame retardants and plasticisers in water by isotope dilution gas chromatography-electron ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teo, Tiffany L L; McDonald, James A; Coleman, Heather M; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-10-01

    The widespread use of organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) in commercial products have led to their increased presence in the environment. In this study, a rapid and reliable analytical method was developed for the analysis of five PFRs in water using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with electron ionisation (EI) and a run time of 13min. The PFRs investigated were tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP). Solid phase extraction (SPE) was undertaken to extract and concentrate target analytes from aqueous matrices. All water samples were extracted from a volume of 500mL. Isotopically labelled compounds were used to account for analytical variability and for accurate quantification by isotope dilution. Method recoveries for all compounds were above 80% in all tested water samples. Method detection limits for all target analytes ranged from 0.3 to 24ng/L in ultrapure water, tap water, seawater, surface water, secondary effluent and swimming pool water. Validation of this method confirmed satisfactory method stability with less than 1% coefficients of variation, verifying that this approach produced good reproducibility. PMID:26078137

  14. Validation of a headspace solid-phase microextraction procedure with gas chromatography-electron capture detection of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mee Kin Chai; Guan Huat Tan

    2009-01-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was evaluated for the determination of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). The fibre used was coated with polydimethylsiloxane (100?m thickness) and the analytical conditions employed have been developed and optimised in a previous work [Chai, M. K., Tan, G. H., & Asha, L. (2008). Optimisation of

  15. Use of green coating (cork) in solid-phase microextraction for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in water by gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Dias, Adriana Neves; Simão, Vanessa; Merib, Josias; Carasek, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    A novel method for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in water samples with extraction using cork fiber and analysis by gas chromatography with electron capture detector was developed. Also, the procedure to extract these pesticides with DVB/Car/PDMS fiber was optimized. The optimization of the variables involved in the extraction of organochlorine pesticides using the aforementioned fibers was carried out by multivariate design. The optimum extraction conditions were sample temperature 75 °C, extraction time 60 min and sodium chloride concentration 10% for the cork fiber and sample temperature 50 °C and extraction time 60 min (without salt) for the DVB/Car/PDMS fiber. The quantification limits for the two fibers varied between 1.0 and 10.0 ng L(-1). The linear correlation coefficients were >0.98 for both fibers. The method applied with the use of the cork fiber provided recovery values between 60.3 and 112.7 and RSD?25.5 (n=3). The extraction efficiency values for the cork and DVB/Car/PDMS fibers were similar. The results show that cork is a promising alternative as a coating for SPME. PMID:25618687

  16. Analysis of C(14)-C(17) Polychloro-n-alkanes in Environmental Matrixes by Accelerated Solvent Extraction-High-Resolution Gas Chromatography/Electron Capture Negative Ion High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tomy, G T; Stern, G A

    1999-11-01

    A method for quantifying medium-chain (C(14)-C(17)) polychloroalkanes (mPCAs) in environmental matrixes by accelerated solvent extraction high-resolution gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion high-resolution mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode is presented. The formula group abundance profiles of industrial mPCA mixtures, which are used as standards, and of samples are first determined by monitoring [M - Cl](-) ions of specific m/z values corresponding to the molecular formulas present and by correcting the integrated ion signals for the fractional abundance of the specific m/z value monitored and the number of chlorine atoms in the formula group. mPCA concentrations in environmental samples are then determined by comparing the response of a specific m/z peak in the sample to that in the standard. Extraction recoveries of mPCAs from spiked fish and sodium sulfate (in place of sediment) were >79%. Method detection limits were 13 ng/g for fish and 1.4 ng/?L for sediment, while the analytical detection limit was ?200 pg, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 4:1. By this method, mPCAs were detected in biota and sediment from the mouth of the Detroit River (MI) and ranged from 70 to 900 ng/g. The simultaneous quantitation of C(10)-C(13) (sPCAs) and C(14)-C(17) PCAs, based on monitoring two specific m/z peaks, one characteristic of sPCAs and the other of mPCAs, is also demonstrated. PMID:21662834

  17. Evaluation of the analyses of tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives of naphthenic acids by gas chromatography–electron impact mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce S. Clemente; Phillip M. Fedorak

    2004-01-01

    Naphthenic acids are a complex mixture of carboxylic acids with the general formula CnH2n+ZO2 and they are natural, toxic components of crude oils. GC–MS analyses of tert-butyldimethylsilyl esters of naphthenic acids are used to estimate component distribution within naphthenic acids mixtures. Our evaluations of the GC–MS method showed that ions from column bleed erroneously appear as C14 Z = ?4

  18. Analysis and characterization of naphthenic acids by gas chromatography–electron impact mass spectrometry of tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne P St. John; Jagdish Rughani; Sarah A Green; Gary D McGinnis

    1998-01-01

    The renewed interest in naphthenic acid (NA) as a wood preservative has driven the need for analytical techniques to characterize commercial supplies of NA. The compositional heterogeneity of NA makes analytical characterization extremely difficult. Fluoride ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (FI-MS) has proven to be an effective technique in NA characterization. However, FI-MS is very complicated and expensive to perform.

  19. FUEL GAS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of continued investigation and further definition of the potential environmental and economic benefits of integrated coal gasification/gas cleanup/combined gas and steam cycle power plants. Reported refinements in plant operating characteristics lower hea...

  20. Impact of gas composition on natural gas storage by adsorption

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José P. B. Mota

    1999-01-01

    Adsorption storage is the most promising low-pressure alternative for storing natural gas, but some operational difficulties hinder the success of this technology. From a modeling perspective, this article addresses the impact of gas composition on the cyclic behavior of adsorptive natural gas storage systems. The cyclic operation of an onboard storage reservoir is modeled as a series of consecutive two-step

  1. IMPACT OF AMMONIA UTILIZATION BY NOX FLUE GAS TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the impact of ammonia (NH3) utilization by NOx flue gas treatment (FGT) processes. The most technolologically advanced FGT system for the highly efficient (about 90%) removal of NOx from power plang stack gas is selective catalytic reduction...

  2. RADIOLOGICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT ON BEHALF OF OIL\\/GAS INDUSTRY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elena Botezatu; C. Grecea

    Aim: to assess the radiological impact of oil and gas industry on the environment and population. Material and Methods: Since 1999 we made environmental monitoring of radioactivity in the surrounding of six oil fields in Bac?u and Br?ila districts. The ground and surface water samples originating from oil areas and the formation water samples arising from oil wells, water injection

  3. Evaluating the income and employment impacts of gas cooling technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Laitner, S.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential employment and income benefits of the emerging market for gas cooling products. The emphasis here is on exports because that is the major opportunity for the U.S. heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry. But domestic markets are also important and considered here because without a significant domestic market, it is unlikely that the plant investments, jobs, and income associated with gas cooling exports would be retained within the United States. The prospects for significant gas cooling exports appear promising for a variety of reasons. There is an expanding need for cooling in the developing world, natural gas is widely available, electric infrastructures are over-stressed in many areas, and the cost of building new gas infrastructure is modest compared to the cost of new electric infrastructure. Global gas cooling competition is currently limited, with Japanese and U.S. companies, and their foreign business partners, the only product sources. U.S. manufacturers of HVAC products are well positioned to compete globally, and are already one of the faster growing goods-exporting sectors of the U.S. economy. Net HVAC exports grew by over 800 percent from 1987 to 1992 and currently exceed $2.6 billion annually (ARI 1994). Net gas cooling job and income creation are estimated using an economic input-output model to compare a reference case to a gas cooling scenario. The reference case reflects current policies, practices, and trends with respect to conventional electric cooling technologies. The gas cooling scenario examines the impact of accelerated use of natural gas cooling technologies here and abroad.

  4. Impact of greenhouse gas emissions reduction in Indonesia: NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susandi, A.

    2004-12-01

    In this study, we develop scenarios of total air pollution from fossil fuel consumption and its impacts for the 21st century, using an inter-temporal general equilibrium model MERGE. The Model for Evaluating the Regional and Global Effects of greenhouse gas reduction policies (MERGE) is used to project energy consumption and production. We use the base scenarios from IPCC (2000). These scenarios assume that no measures are undertaken to control greenhouse gas emissions. We extend the IPCC scenarios with mitigation scenarios, estimating the air pollution impacts of greenhouse gas emission reduction. The MERGE model was extended to analyze emissions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), their concentrations, impacts on human health, and economic valuation. To estimate of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) impacts on respiratory symptoms, we calculated the NO2 concentration as derived from nitrogen oxide (NOx). In the baseline scenario, the concentrations of NO2 are rising to 2,263 ?g/m3 in 2100. If the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries reduce their emissions, respiratory symptoms among adult's associated with NO2 case would reach the highest to 65,741% of adult population cases by the end of century. If all countries reduce their emission in the future, the total health problem cost associated with NO2 will lower 35% of GDP than in the baseline scenario during the century.

  5. Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006

    E-print Network

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

  6. Atmospheric emissions and air quality impacts from natural gas production and use.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T

    2014-01-01

    The US Energy Information Administration projects that hydraulic fracturing of shale formations will become a dominant source of domestic natural gas supply over the next several decades, transforming the energy landscape in the United States. However, the environmental impacts associated with fracking for shale gas have made it controversial. This review examines emissions and impacts of air pollutants associated with shale gas production and use. Emissions and impacts of greenhouse gases, photochemically active air pollutants, and toxic air pollutants are described. In addition to the direct atmospheric impacts of expanded natural gas production, indirect effects are also described. Widespread availability of shale gas can drive down natural gas prices, which, in turn, can impact the use patterns for natural gas. Natural gas production and use in electricity generation are used as a case study for examining these indirect consequences of expanded natural gas availability. PMID:24498952

  7. Impact Studies Using a One Stage Light Gas Gun

    E-print Network

    Jorge Carmona; Mike Cook; Jimmy Schmoke; Katie Harper; Jerry Reay; Lorin Matthews; Truell Hyde

    2004-01-29

    The Center for Astrophysics,Space Physics, and Engineering Research (CASPER) has completed construction and calibration of a Light Gas Gun (LGG), which is used for low velocity impact studies. At geosynchronous orbit, space debris can impact commercial satellites at velocities of 500 m/s [1] reducing their useful lifetime. Additionally, there is an ever-increasing population of abandoned nonoperational satellites and related debris in these orbits [2]. Therefore, it is important to clearly understand the physics behind how such collisions can cause structural damage. This is most easily determined by measuring the damage incurred on representative material exposed to test collisions in the laboratory. Data collected in this manner will not only help illuminate the shock physics involved but can also aid in providing methods for designing advanced shielding for satellites.

  8. Ozone impacts of natural gas development in the Haynesville Shale.

    PubMed

    Kemball-Cook, Susan; Bar-Ilan, Amnon; Grant, John; Parker, Lynsey; Jung, Jaegun; Santamaria, Wilson; Mathews, Jim; Yarwood, Greg

    2010-12-15

    The Haynesville Shale is a subsurface rock formation located beneath the Northeast Texas/Northwest Louisiana border near Shreveport. This formation is estimated to contain very large recoverable reserves of natural gas, and during the two years since the drilling of the first highly productive wells in 2008, has been the focus of intensive leasing and exploration activity. The development of natural gas resources within the Haynesville Shale is likely to be economically important but may also generate significant emissions of ozone precursors. Using well production data from state regulatory agencies and a review of the available literature, projections of future year Haynesville Shale natural gas production were derived for 2009-2020 for three scenarios corresponding to limited, moderate, and aggressive development. These production estimates were then used to develop an emission inventory for each of the three scenarios. Photochemical modeling of the year 2012 showed increases in 2012 8-h ozone design values of up to 5 ppb within Northeast Texas and Northwest Louisiana resulting from development in the Haynesville Shale. Ozone increases due to Haynesville Shale emissions can affect regions outside Northeast Texas and Northwest Louisiana due to ozone transport. This study evaluates only near-term ozone impacts, but the emission inventory projections indicate that Haynesville emissions may be expected to increase through 2020. PMID:21086985

  9. 78 FR 62012 - Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-11

    ...CP13-132-000] Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Rockaway...proposed by Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company (Transco) in the...

  10. 78 FR 23554 - Sierrita Gas Pipeline LLC; Supplemental Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...CP13-73-000] Sierrita Gas Pipeline LLC; Supplemental Notice...Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Sierrita Pipeline Project and Request for...discuss the environmental impact of the Sierrita Pipeline Project (Project)...

  11. The greenhouse impact of unconventional gas for electricity generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathan Hultman; Dylan Rebois; Michael Scholten; Christopher Ramig

    2011-01-01

    New techniques to extract natural gas from unconventional resources have become economically competitive over the past several years, leading to a rapid and largely unanticipated expansion in natural gas production. The US Energy Information Administration projects that unconventional gas will supply nearly half of US gas production by 2035. In addition, by significantly expanding and diversifying the gas supply internationally,

  12. Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China

    E-print Network

    Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

  13. IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1

    E-print Network

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1 Jeffrey L and natural gas development on grouse populations and habitats. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge on the effects of oil and gas development and production on prairie grouse based

  14. Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R. In Pennsylvania, oil and gas wastewater is sometimes treated at brine treatment facilities and discharged to local bioaccumulation in localized areas of shale gas wastewater disposal. INTRODUCTION The safe disposal of large

  15. Impact design methods for ceramic components in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, J.; Cuccio, J.; Kington, H.

    1991-01-01

    Methods currently under development to design ceramic turbine components with improved impact resistance are presented. Two different modes of impact damage are identified and characterized, i.e., structural damage and local damage. The entire computation is incorporated into the EPIC computer code. Model capability is demonstrated by simulating instrumented plate impact and particle impact tests.

  16. Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices 

    E-print Network

    Schlesinger, B.

    1982-01-01

    Major analysis completed recently by the gas transmission and distribution industry concludes that available supplies of gas energy will fall into the range of 23-31 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) by the year 2000, as conventional gas production...

  17. THE IMPACT OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ON GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advancements in United States (U.S.) municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and a focus on the environmental advantages of integrated MSW management have greatly reduced the environmental impacts of MSW management, including greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study ...

  18. Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Sheila M.; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A.; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl?) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl? concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl? concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases. PMID:23479604

  19. Embryo impacts and gas giant mergers II: Diversity of Hot Jupiters' internal structure

    E-print Network

    Liu, Shang-Fei; Lin, D N C; Li, Shu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    We consider the origin of compact, short-period, Jupiter-mass planets. We propose that their diverse structure is caused by giant impacts of embryos and super-Earths or mergers with other gas giants during the formation and evolution of these hot Jupiters. Through a series of numerical simulations, we show that typical head-on collisions generally lead to total coalescence of impinging gas giants. Although extremely energetic collisions can disintegrate the envelope of gas giants, these events seldom occur. During oblique and moderately energetic collisions, the merger products retain higher fraction of the colliders' cores than their envelopes. They can also deposit considerable amount of spin angular momentum to the gas giants and desynchronize their spins from their orbital mean motion. We find that the oblateness of gas giants can be used to infer the impact history. Subsequent dissipation of stellar tide inside the planets' envelope can lead to runaway inflation and potentially a substantial loss of gas ...

  20. Gas filtration during the impact of weak shock waves on granular layers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Britan; G. Ben-Dor; T. Elperin; O. Igra; J. P. Jiang

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the unsteady gas filtration through a granular layer attached to a rigid end-wall when impacted head-on by a weak shock wave in a shock tube. The main goal of the present work is to study the gas pressure field developed inside the granular layer during its compression by the shock wave. A physical model is proposed

  1. Impact of hydrogen injection in natural gas infrastructures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guillermo Hernández-Rodríguez; Luc Pibouleau; Catherine Azzaro-Pantel; Serge Domenech

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the framework of a mathematical formulation for modelling and evaluating natural gas (NG) pipeline networks under hydrogen injection. The model development is based on gas transport through pipelines and compressors which compensate for the pressure drops by implying mainly the mass and energy balances on the basic elements of the network. The model was initially implemented for

  2. Volcanic gas impacts on vegetation at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, R.; Jenkins, M.; Pushnik, J.; Houpis, J. L.; Brown, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Turrialba volcano is an active composite stratovolcano that is located approximately 40 km east of San Jose, Costa Rica. Seismic activity and degassing have increased since 2005, and gas compositions reflect further increased activity since 2007 peaking in January 2010 with a phreatic eruption. Gas fumes dispersed by trade winds toward the west, northwest, and southwest flanks of Turrialba volcano have caused significant vegetation kill zones, in areas important to local agriculture, including dairy pastures and potato fields, wildlife and human populations. In addition to extensive vegetative degradation is the potential for soil and water contamination and soil erosion. Summit fumarole temperatures have been measured over 200 degrees C and gas emissions are dominated by SO2; gas and vapor plumes reach up to 2 km (fumaroles and gases are measured regularly by OVSICORI-UNA). A recent network of passive air sampling, monitoring of water temperatures of hydrothermal systems, and soil pH measurements coupled with measurement of the physiological status of surrounding plants using gas exchange and fluorescence measurements to: (1) identify physiological correlations between leaf-level gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of plants under long term stress induced by the volcanic gas emissions, and (2) use measurements in tandem with remotely sensed reflectance-derived fluorescence ratio indices to track natural photo inhibition caused by volcanic gas emissions, for use in monitoring plant stress and photosynthetic function. Results may prove helpful in developing potential land management strategies to maintain the biological health of the area.

  3. Gas pre-treatment and their impact on liquefaction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Klinkenbijl, J.M.; Dillion, M.L.; Heyman, E.C.

    1999-07-01

    Natural gas generally requires removal of H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, COS, organic sulfur compounds, mercury and water prior to liquefaction in order to meet product specifications, avoid blockages and to prevent damage to process equipment. The cost of pre-treatment is dependent on the type and concentrations of the contaminants in the natural gas. Most of the operational base load LNG plants process feed gas with only low concentrations of CO{sub 2}, mercury and water as contaminants. This type of gas requires the minimum of treating, often comprising of a CO{sub 2} removal unit, molecular sieves for drying and a carbon bed for mercury removal. The Shell sulfinol process is the most widely applied acid gas removal process, serving some 40% of the installed base load LNG capacity, and has proven to be very reliable and cost effective. If substantial quantities of H{sub 2}S are present in the feed, a sulfur recovery unit is required as well. When mercaptans are also present in gas feed, the Shell Sulfinol process is strongly preferred, Almost the automatic choice for as the acid gas removal step, since it combines total CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S removal with mercaptan removal up to 97%. Formulated methyl diethanol amine (MDEA) solvents have a comparable capital cost to Sulfinol, but lack the mercaptan removal capabilities. There is one exception, the Flexsorb formulation (from Exxon) which also contains sulfolane. Later revamp of a gas pre-treatment unit from limited mercaptan handling capability to significant mercaptan handling capability can also elegantly be done using an integrated Sulfinol based concept. Whereas the capital cost for dehydration and mercury removal depend mainly on the natural gas throughput, the relative capital investment for acid gas removal treating in a LNG plant increases significantly with increasing CO{sub 2} content., At 2% mol CO{sub 2} the acid gas unit represents from 6% of the processing equipment cost at 2% mol CO{sub 2} but at 14% mol CO{sub 2} it represents 15% of the processing equipment cost. The capital cost for dehydration and mercury removal depend mainly on the natural gas throughput. New developments such as membrane technologies are starting to be considered as an option for bulk removal of CO{sub 2} but solvent absorption remains the only cost effective treatment process for gas to meet LNG specifications. Further developments may change this in the future.

  4. Impacts of Land Conversion for Biofuel Cropping on Soil Organic Matter and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen J. Del Grosso; Stephen M. Ogle; William J. Parton; Paul R. Adler

    2008-01-01

    To assess the value of biofuels, the environmental costs of their production must be compared with the benefits of displacing fossil fuel. This article focuses on the environmental impacts of biofuel cropping systems and calculates net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions using life cycle analysis. The impacts of corn and switchgrass cropping for ethanol production were calculated for three states in

  5. 2007-No54-BoilingPoint Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2007-No54-BoilingPoint Theme Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel Energy of fossil-fuel energy systems. These scenarios are analysed for various environmental and health impacts from fossil fuels and other energy sources reported by IEA []. In all of these countries except Kenya

  6. Modeling Impacts of Management on Carbon Sequestration and Trace Gas Emissions in Forested

    E-print Network

    Modeling Impacts of Management on Carbon Sequestration and Trace Gas Emissions in Forested Wetland-DNDC, was modified to enhance its capacity to predict the impacts of management practices on carbon sequestration nonnegligible roles in mitigation in comparison with carbon sequestration. Forests are recognized for having

  7. Environmental baseline conditions for impact assessment of unconventional gas exploitation: the G-Baseline project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Mayer, Berhard; Millot, Romain; Parker, Beth L.; Gaucher, Eric; Clarkson, Christopher R.; Cherry, John A.; Humez, Pauline; Cahill, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    A major scientific challenge and an indispensible prerequisite for environmental impact assessment in the context of unconventional gas development is the determination of the baseline conditions against which potential environmental impacts on shallow freshwater resources can be accurately and quantitatively tested. Groundwater and surface water resources overlying the low-permeability hydrocarbon host rocks containing shale gas may be impacted to different extents by naturally occurring saline fluids and by natural gas emanations. Baseline assessments in areas of previous conventional hydrocarbon production may also reveal anthropogenic impacts from these activities not related to unconventional gas development. Once unconventional gas exploitation has started, the baseline may be irrevocably lost by the intricate superposition of geogenic and potential anthropogenic contamination by stray gas, formation waters and chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing. The objective of the Franco-Canadian NSERC-ANR project G-Baseline is to develop an innovative and comprehensive methodology of geochemical and isotopic characterization of the environmental baseline for water and gas samples from all three essential zones: (1) the production zone, including flowback waters, (2) the intermediate zone comprised of overlying formations, and (3) shallow aquifers and surface water systems where contamination may result from diverse natural or human impacts. The outcome will be the establishment of a methodology based on innovative tracer and monitoring techniques, including traditional and non-traditional isotopes (C, H, O, S, B, Sr, Cl, Br, N, U, Li, Cu, Zn, CSIA...) for detecting, quantifying and modeling of potential leakage of stray gas and of saline formation water mixed with flowback fluids into fresh groundwater resources and surface waters taking into account the pathways and mechanisms of fluid and gas migration. Here we present an outline of the project as well as first results from chemical and isotopic analyses on gas, fluid and solid samples collected during a baseline monitoring program at the Carbon Management Canada field research site in south-eastern Alberta, Canada.

  8. Impact of Natural Gas Price Decontrol on Gas Supply, Demand and Prices

    E-print Network

    Schlesinger, B.

    1982-01-01

    and private sources, including the Department of Energy, manufacturers' groups, and the various academic and other research institutes. Although, these generally tend to be increasingly optimistic about the gas supply outlook and the contribution... that gas can make to U.S. energy needs in the future, questions about price deregulation continue to cloud the gas outlook in many minds. Given this, the purposes of this paper are (a) to describe briefly the prospects for natural and supplemental gas...

  9. The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply

    E-print Network

    Yanty, Evi

    2009-06-02

    Alberta. With more than 6,000 CBM wells, production is expected to reach 0.7 Bcf/day this year. 18 Production from tight sands started as early as in the 1990s. Now the Canadian tight gas production has reached several Bcf/day. Gas from organic shales... there is about 182 to 553 Tcf of original gas-in-place associated with coalbeds. About 75% of the NGC is in Alberta province, and the rest is distributed in British Columbia and East Coast provinces. The major coal plays are pooled in the Western Canadian...

  10. The impacts of technology on global unconventional gas supply 

    E-print Network

    Yanty, Evi

    2009-06-02

    in increasing unconventional natural gas production, as observed in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 3D seismic, horizontal drilling, multilateral completion, water and gel based fracturing, coiled tubing rig, enhanced recovery, and produced water...

  11. Integrated Analysis of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options and Related Impacts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased concerns over air pollution (combined with detrimental health effects) and climate change have called for more stringent emission reduction strategies for criteria air pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions. However, stringent regulatory policies can possibly have a...

  12. Embryo impacts and gas giant mergers - II. Diversity of hot Jupiters' internal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang-Fei; Agnor, Craig B.; Lin, D. N. C.; Li, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    We consider the origin of compact, short-period, Jupiter-mass planets. We propose that their diverse structure is caused by giant impacts of embryos and super-Earths or mergers with other gas giants during the formation and evolution of these hot Jupiters. Through a series of numerical simulations, we show that typical head-on collisions generally lead to total coalescence of impinging gas giants. Although extremely energetic collisions can disintegrate the envelope of gas giants, these events seldom occur. During oblique and moderately energetic collisions, the merger products retain higher fraction of the colliders' cores than their envelopes. They can also deposit considerable amount of spin angular momentum to the gas giants and desynchronize their spins from their orbital mean motion. We find that the oblateness of gas giants can be used to infer the impact history. Subsequent dissipation of stellar tide inside the planets' envelope can lead to runaway inflation and potentially a substantial loss of gas through Roche lobe overflow. The impact of super-Earths on parabolic orbits can also enlarge gas giant planets' envelope and elevates their tidal dissipation rate over ˜100 Myr time scale. Since giant impacts occur stochastically with a range of impactor sizes and energies, their diverse outcomes may account for the dispersion in the mass-radius relationship of hot Jupiters.

  13. The impact of feedback on cosmological gas accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Dylan; Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Sijacki, Debora; Torrey, Paul; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-03-01

    We investigate how the way galaxies acquire their gas across cosmic time in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations is modified by a comprehensive physical model for baryonic feedback processes. To do so, we compare two simulations - with and without feedback - both evolved with the moving mesh code AREPO. The feedback runs implement the full physics model of the Illustris simulation project, including star formation driven galactic winds and energetic feedback from supermassive black holes. We explore: (a) the accretion rate of material contributing to the net growth of galaxies and originating directly from the intergalactic medium, finding that feedback strongly suppresses the raw, as well as the net, inflow of this `smooth mode' gas at all redshifts, regardless of the temperature history of newly acquired gas. (b) At the virial radius the temperature and radial flux of inflowing gas is largely unaffected at z = 2. However, the spherical covering fraction of inflowing gas at 0.25 rvir decreases substantially, from more than 80 per cent to less than 50 per cent, while the rates of both inflow and outflow increase, indicative of recycling across this boundary. (c) The fractional contribution of smooth accretion to the total accretion rate is lower in the simulation with feedback, by roughly a factor of 2 across all redshifts. Moreover, the smooth component of gas with a cold temperature history, is entirely suppressed in the feedback run at z < 1. (d) The amount of time taken by gas to cross from the virial radius to the galaxy - the `halo transit time' - increases in the presence of feedback by a factor of ?2-3, and is notably independent of halo mass. We discuss the possible implications of this invariance for theoretical models of hot halo gas cooling.

  14. Comparing the Ecological Impacts of Wind and Oil & Gas Development: A Landscape Scale Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nathan F.; Pejchar, Liba

    2013-01-01

    Energy production in the United States is in transition as the demand for clean and domestic power increases. Wind energy offers the benefit of reduced emissions, yet, like oil and natural gas, it also contributes to energy sprawl. We used a diverse set of indicators to quantify the ecological impacts of oil, natural gas, and wind energy development in Colorado and Wyoming. Aerial imagery was supplemented with empirical data to estimate habitat loss, fragmentation, potential for wildlife mortality, susceptibility to invasion, biomass carbon lost, and water resources. To quantify these impacts we digitized the land-use footprint within 375 plots, stratified by energy type. We quantified the change in impacts per unit area and per unit energy produced, compared wind energy to oil and gas, and compared landscapes with and without energy development. We found substantial differences in impacts between energy types for most indicators, although the magnitude and direction of the differences varied. Oil and gas generally resulted in greater impacts per unit area but fewer impacts per unit energy compared with wind. Biologically important and policy-relevant outcomes of this study include: 1) regardless of energy type, underlying land-use matters and development in already disturbed areas resulted in fewer total impacts; 2) the number and source of potential mortality varied between energy types, however, the lack of robust mortality data limits our ability to use this information to estimate and mitigate impacts; and 3) per unit energy produced, oil and gas extraction was less impactful on an annual basis but is likely to have a much larger cumulative footprint than wind energy over time. This rapid evaluation of landscape-scale energy development impacts could be replicated in other regions, and our specific findings can help meet the challenge of balancing land conservation with society’s demand for energy. PMID:24312296

  15. Limited impact on decadal-scale climate change from increased use of natural gas.

    PubMed

    McJeon, Haewon; Edmonds, Jae; Bauer, Nico; Clarke, Leon; Fisher, Brian; Flannery, Brian P; Hilaire, Jérôme; Krey, Volker; Marangoni, Giacomo; Mi, Raymond; Riahi, Keywan; Rogner, Holger; Tavoni, Massimo

    2014-10-23

    The most important energy development of the past decade has been the wide deployment of hydraulic fracturing technologies that enable the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. If these advanced gas production technologies were to be deployed globally, the energy market could see a large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources. The climate implications of such abundant natural gas have been hotly debated. Some researchers have observed that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Others have reported that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. Assessment of the full impact of abundant gas on climate change requires an integrated approach to the global energy-economy-climate systems, but the literature has been limited in either its geographic scope or its coverage of greenhouse gases. Here we show that market-driven increases in global supplies of unconventional natural gas do not discernibly reduce the trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions or climate forcing. Our results, based on simulations from five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models of energy-economy-climate systems independently forced by an abundant gas scenario, project large additional natural gas consumption of up to +170 per cent by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2 per cent to +11 per cent), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3 per cent to +7 per cent) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that although market penetration of globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy system, it is not necessarily an effective substitute for climate change mitigation policy. PMID:25317557

  16. Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lekov, Alex; Sturges, Andy; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

    2009-12-09

    An increasing share of natural gas supplies distributed to residential appliances in the U.S. may come from liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports. The imported gas will be of a higher Wobbe number than domestic gas, and there is concern that it could produce more pollutant emissions at the point of use. This report will review recently undertaken studies, some of which have observed substantial effects on various appliances when operated on different mixtures of imported LNG. While we will summarize findings of major studies, we will not try to characterize broad effects of LNG, but describe how different components of the appliance itself will be affected by imported LNG. This paper considers how the operation of each major component of the gas appliances may be impacted by a switch to LNG, and how this local impact may affect overall safety, performance and pollutant emissions.

  17. The impact of additional weather inputs on gas load forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Bo

    Natural gas utilities need to estimate their customers' gas demand accurately. This thesis develops a number of daily forecasting models for test the possibility to extend the weather inputs in the current method for three different operating areas. Our goal is to improve the accuracy of our forecast by extending the number of inputs used by the existing GasDay model. We present a detailed explanation of the identification of the significance for each of the new weather input candidates. The significance of the new weather inputs was tested by statistical hypothesis testing, by forecasting performance testing, and by unusual day evaluation. We show that with some combinations of additional weather instruments, the accuracy of the forecast is improved. For most gas utilities, the primary use of natural gas is for space heating, so temperature is a critical factor when we build forecast models. In this thesis, we develop a method to split the Heating Degree Day (HDD) term into smaller pieces and generate the forecast based on these small factors. We name the method that developed as Multiple Weather Station (MWS) model in Chapter 4. We show that the MWS model yields better results compared to the existing method.

  18. Wellbeing Impacts of City Policies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Hiscock, Rosemary; Mudu, Pierpaolo; Braubach, Matthias; Martuzzi, Marco; Perez, Laura; Sabel, Clive

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate climate change, city authorities are developing policies in areas such as transportation, housing and energy use, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to their effects on greenhouse gas emissions, these policies are likely to have consequences for the wellbeing of their populations for example through changes in opportunities to take physical exercise. In order to explore the potential consequences for wellbeing, we first explore what ‘wellbeing’ is and how it can be operationalized for urban planners. In this paper, we illustrate how wellbeing can be divided into objective and subjective aspects which can be measured quantitatively; our review of measures informs the development of a theoretical model linking wellbeing to policies which cities use to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, we discuss the extent to which the links proposed in the conceptual model are supported by the literature and how cities can assess wellbeing implications of policies. PMID:25464129

  19. Evaluating the income and employment impacts of gas cooling technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Hughes; S. Laitner

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential employment and income benefits of the emerging market for gas cooling products. The emphasis here is on exports because that is the major opportunity for the U.S. heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry. But domestic markets are also important and considered here because without a significant domestic market, it is

  20. Impact of Recent Discoveries on Petroleum and Natural Gas Exploration: Emphasis on India

    E-print Network

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Two discoveries have greatly impacted understanding relevant to the origination and emplacement of petroleum and natural gas deposits. One discovery, pertaining to hydrocarbon formation from methane broadens significantly potential regions where abiotic petroleum and natural gas deposits might be found. The other, discovery of the physical impossibility of Earth-mantle convection, restricts the range and domain of geodynamic behavior, and leads to new insights on the formation of petroleum and natural gas deposits. This article highlights the impact and implications of those discoveries, especially as they relate to petroleum and natural gas exploration in India and throughout the world. From the reasoning developed here, the generality of the considerations involved, the understanding developed with respect to the East African Rift System, and the experience garnered from the larger and older Siberian Traps, the prognosis and potential for the region beneath the Deccan Traps of India to eventually become a m...

  1. Determining Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of

    E-print Network

    Dabdub, Donald

    the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed

  2. Impacts of Coal Seam Gas (Coal Bed Methane) and Coal Mining on Water Resources in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mining of coal bed methane deposits (termed ';coal seam gas' in Australia) is a rapidly growing source of natural gas in Australia. Indeed, expansion of the industry is occurring so quickly that in some cases, legislation is struggling to keep up with this expansion. Perhaps because of this, community concern about the impacts of coal seam gas development is very strong. Responding to these concerns, the Australian Government has recently established an Independent Expert Scientific Committee (IESC) to provide advice to the Commonwealth and state regulators on potential water-related impacts of coal seam gas and large coal mining developments. In order to provide the underlying science to the IESC, a program of ';bioregional assessments' has been implemented. One aim of these bioregional assessments is to improve our understanding of the connectivity between the impacts of coal seam gas extraction and groundwater aquifers, as well as their connection to surface water. A bioregional assessment can be defined as a scientific analysis of the ecology, hydrology, geology and hydrogeology of a bioregion, with explicit assessment of the potential direct, indirect and cumulative impacts of coal seam gas and large coal mining development on water resources. These bioregional assessments are now being carried out across large portions of eastern Australia which are underlain by coal reserves. This presentation will provide an overview of the issues related to the impacts of coal seam gas and coal mining on water resources in Australia. The methodology of undertaking bioregional assessments will be described, and the application of this methodology to six priority bioregions in eastern Australia will be detailed. Preliminary results of the program of research to date will be assessed in light of the requirements of the IESC to provide independent advice to the Commonwealth and State governments. Finally, parallels between the expansion of the industry in Australia with that in the United States will be drawn.

  3. 78 FR 65637 - Sierrita Gas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ...CP13-74-000] Sierrita Gas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Availability...Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Sierrita Pipeline Project The staff of...draft environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Sierrita Pipeline Project...

  4. Impact of shale gas development on water resources: a case study in northern poland.

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, Ine; Marí Rivero, Inés; Sala, Serenella; Baranzelli, Claudia; Barranco, Ricardo; Batelaan, Okke; Lavalle, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Shale gas is currently being explored in Europe as an alternative energy source to conventional oil and gas. There is, however, increasing concern about the potential environmental impacts of shale gas extraction by hydraulic fracturing (fracking). In this study, we focussed on the potential impacts on regional water resources within the Baltic Basin in Poland, both in terms of quantity and quality. The future development of the shale play was modeled for the time period 2015-2030 using the LUISA modeling framework. We formulated two scenarios which took into account the large range in technology and resource requirements, as well as two additional scenarios based on the current legislation and the potential restrictions which could be put in place. According to these scenarios, between 0.03 and 0.86 % of the total water withdrawals for all sectors could be attributed to shale gas exploitation within the study area. A screening-level assessment of the potential impact of the chemicals commonly used in fracking was carried out and showed that due to their wide range of physicochemical properties, these chemicals may pose additional pressure on freshwater ecosystems. The legislation put in place also influenced the resulting environmental impacts of shale gas extraction. Especially important are the protection of vulnerable ground and surface water resources and the promotion of more water-efficient technologies. PMID:25877457

  5. Impact of Shale Gas Development on Water Resources: A Case Study in Northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Ine; Marí Rivero, Inés; Sala, Serenella; Baranzelli, Claudia; Barranco, Ricardo; Batelaan, Okke; Lavalle, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Shale gas is currently being explored in Europe as an alternative energy source to conventional oil and gas. There is, however, increasing concern about the potential environmental impacts of shale gas extraction by hydraulic fracturing (fracking). In this study, we focussed on the potential impacts on regional water resources within the Baltic Basin in Poland, both in terms of quantity and quality. The future development of the shale play was modeled for the time period 2015-2030 using the LUISA modeling framework. We formulated two scenarios which took into account the large range in technology and resource requirements, as well as two additional scenarios based on the current legislation and the potential restrictions which could be put in place. According to these scenarios, between 0.03 and 0.86 % of the total water withdrawals for all sectors could be attributed to shale gas exploitation within the study area. A screening-level assessment of the potential impact of the chemicals commonly used in fracking was carried out and showed that due to their wide range of physicochemical properties, these chemicals may pose additional pressure on freshwater ecosystems. The legislation put in place also influenced the resulting environmental impacts of shale gas extraction. Especially important are the protection of vulnerable ground and surface water resources and the promotion of more water-efficient technologies.

  6. Mapping Oil and Gas Development Potential in the US Intermountain West and Estimating Impacts to Species

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Holly E.; Doherty, Kevin E.; Naugle, David E.; Pocewicz, Amy; Kiesecker, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Many studies have quantified the indirect effect of hydrocarbon-based economies on climate change and biodiversity, concluding that a significant proportion of species will be threatened with extinction. However, few studies have measured the direct effect of new energy production infrastructure on species persistence. Methodology/Principal Findings We propose a systematic way to forecast patterns of future energy development and calculate impacts to species using spatially-explicit predictive modeling techniques to estimate oil and gas potential and create development build-out scenarios by seeding the landscape with oil and gas wells based on underlying potential. We illustrate our approach for the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the western US and translate the build-out scenarios into estimated impacts on sage-grouse. We project that future oil and gas development will cause a 7–19 percent decline from 2007 sage-grouse lek population counts and impact 3.7 million ha of sagebrush shrublands and 1.1 million ha of grasslands in the study area. Conclusions/Significance Maps of where oil and gas development is anticipated in the US Intermountain West can be used by decision-makers intent on minimizing impacts to sage-grouse. This analysis also provides a general framework for using predictive models and build-out scenarios to anticipate impacts to species. These predictive models and build-out scenarios allow tradeoffs to be considered between species conservation and energy development prior to implementation. PMID:19826472

  7. Gas desorption and up-scaling errors in CBM groundwater impact simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herckenrath, D.; Doherty, J.

    2013-12-01

    Coalbed Methane (CBM) is a major energy resource in Australia. Production of CBM requires the extraction of large amounts of groundwater to enable gas desorption from the coalbeds. As CBM raises concerns regarding its impact on adjacent aquifer systems, groundwater models are often required for groundwater impact assessment. Questions arise about the suitability of traditional groundwater flow simulators for CBM groundwater impact quantification as 1) the gas phase is not simulated and 2) up-scaled properties are used that might not reflect coalbed properties appropriately. First, this study aims to quantify the errors incurred by neglecting gas desorption by comparing a CBM reservoir simulator (Eclipse) with an equivalent groundwater flow model (MODFLOW-USG) for a single 1m coal seam. Simulations show the groundwater model significantly overestimates drawdowns during the CBM production stage, as the desorbed gas volume is not accounted for, which impacts storage and the relative permeability of water that are assumed to be constant in the groundwater model. To improve the match between the groundwater model and CBM reservoir simulations, MODFLOW-USG was configured to implement a relationship that was obtained using a pseudo steady-state relationship between drawdown and desaturation derived from Eclipse simulations. A second set of simulations for a sequence of coalbeds was performed to quantify the impact of up-scaling on predicting drawdowns and to validate whether relative permeability curves in the CBM reservoir simulator still have integrity in an up-scaled context. These simulations will help understand how physically representative different up-scaled models are, what errors could be made when regional groundwater modelling is undertaken in a CBM environment and ultimately help decide whether a groundwater flow simulator can be used for CBM groundwater impact assessments. Key words: Coalbed Methane, Up-scaling, Reservoir model, Groundwater model, Dual-phase flow, Gas desorption, MODFLOW, Eclipse

  8. Impact of compressed natural gas fueled buses on street pavements

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, D.; Harrison, R.

    1995-07-01

    Capital Metro, the Ausin, Texas transit authority, is currently evaluating a number of CNG fueled buses. As part of the U.S. DOT Region Six University Transportation Centers Program (UTCP), a study was instigated into the scale of incremental pavement consumption associated with the operation of these buses. The study suggests that replacing current vehicles with CNG powered models utilizing aluminum storage tanks would raise average network equivalent single rehabilitation costs across the network of over four percent. Finally, it recommends that full cost study be undertaken with evaluation of the adoption of alternative bus fuels - which includes pavement and environmental impacts.

  9. The impact of gas blockage on the performance of a thermoacoustic refrigerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masoud Akhavanbazaz; M. H. Kamran Siddiqui; Rama B. Bhat

    2007-01-01

    Thermoacoustics deals with the conversion of sound energy into heat and vice versa. Thermoacoustic refrigerator is a device that transfers heat from a cold medium to warm medium by using sound energy as a work input. In this paper, the impact of the gas blockage was investigated for three cases; no heat exchanger, heat exchanger with small thermal contact area

  10. EVALUATION OF VAPOR EQUILIBRATION AND IMPACT OF PURGE VOLUME ON SOIL-GAS SAMPLING RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential sampling was utilized at the Raymark Superfund site to evaluate attainment of vapor equilibration and the impact of purge volume on soil-gas sample results. A simple mass-balance equation indicates that removal of three to five internal volumes of a sample system shou...

  11. Impact of relative permeability models on fluid flow behavior for gas condensate reservoirs 

    E-print Network

    Zapata Arango, Jose? Francisco

    2002-01-01

    and on the quantification of their impact on reservoir fluid flow and well performance. We selected three relative permeability models to compare the results obtained in the modeling of relative permeabilities for a published North Sea gas condensate reservoir. The models...

  12. Field ionization kinetic and electron impact studies of gas phase transition states - The cyclic bromonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. M.; Giguere, R. J.; Falick, A. M.; Aberth, W.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Cis- and trans-isomers of 4-t-butylcyclohexyl bromide were studied to determine the mechanism of cyclic bromonium ion formation. The field ionization kinetic and electron impact data indicate that the formation of the cyclic structure occurs simultaneously with loss of the neutral fragment. The data also show that little or no gas-phase cis-trans isomerization occurs.

  13. Livestock-related greenhouse gas emissions: impacts and options for policy makers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tara Garnett

    2009-01-01

    Research shows that livestock account for a significant proportion of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and global consumption of livestock products is growing rapidly. This paper reviews the life cycle analysis (LCA) approach to quantifying these emissions and argues that, given the dynamic complexity of our food system, it offers a limited understanding of livestock's GHG impacts. It is argued that

  14. Recent developments in environmental regulation impacting oil and gas production and refining

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.E. [Washburn Univ. School of Law, Topeka, KS (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the recent major legal and regulatory developments impacting oil and gas exploration, production, and refining activities. The focus is upon the federal laws governing air, water, and land pollution for the period 1994 to the present.

  15. IMPACT OF NOX SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION PROCESSES ON FLUE GAS CLEANING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the impact of the ammonia leaving a nitrogen oxide (NOx) selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process on downstream flue gas cleaning processes. (NOx emissions from electric utility boilers may be reduced 80-90% by the application of pollutio...

  16. Impact resistance of lightweight hybrid structures for gas turbine engine fan containment applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohan G. Hebsur; Ronald D. Noebe; Duane M. Revilock

    2003-01-01

    The ballistic impact resistance of hybrid composite sandwich structures was evaluated with the ultimate goal of developing new materials or structures for potential gas turbine engine, fan containment applications. The sandwich structures investigated consisted of GLARE-5 (Aviation Equipment, Inc., Costa Mesa, CA) laminates as face sheets with lightweight cellular metallic materials such as honeycomb, foam, and lattice block as a

  17. Corn stover removal impacts on soil greenhouse gas emissions in irrigated continuous corn systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvesting corn stover for livestock feed or for cellulosic biofuel production may impact the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential of high-yield irrigated corn. Soil emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured over the 2011 growing season at two irri...

  18. John Rosenblum, roseenveng@sbcglobal.net 1 REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS IMPACTS IN

    E-print Network

    Keller, Arturo A.

    John Rosenblum, roseenveng@sbcglobal.net 1 REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS IMPACTS IN CALIFORNIA'S URBAN WATER CYCLE John Rosenblum, Ph.D. Rosenblum Environmental Engineering, Sebastopol, CA roseenveng, Santa Barbara, #12;John Rosenblum, roseenveng@sbcglobal.net SANTA ROSA Northern California #12;John

  19. Impacts of Coal Seam Gas (Coal Bed Methane) Extraction on Water Resources in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, David

    2015-04-01

    While extraction of methane from shale gas deposits has been the principal source of the recent expansion of the industry in the United States and Europe, in Australia extraction of methane from coal bed methane deposits (termed 'coal seam gas' in Australia) has been the focus to date. The two sources of methane share many of the same characteristics including the potential requirement for hydraulic fracturing. However as coal seam gas deposits generally occur at shallower depths than shale gas the potential impacts of extraction and hydraulic fracturing on surface and groundwater resources may be of even greater concern for coal seam gas than for shale gas. In Australia an Independent Expert Scientific Committee (IESC) has been established to provide scientific advice to federal and state government regulators on the impact that coal seam gas and large coal mining developments may have on water resources. This advice is provided to enable decisions to be informed by the best available science about the potential water-related impacts associated with these developments. To support this advice the Australian Government Department of the Environment has implemented a three-year programme of research termed 'bioregional assessments' to investigate these potential impacts. A bioregional assessment is defined as a scientific analysis of the ecology, hydrology, geology and hydrogeology of a bioregion with explicit assessment of the potential direct, indirect and cumulative impacts of coal seam gas and large coal mining development on water resources. These bioregional assessments are currently being carried out across large portions of eastern Australia underlain by coal reserves. Further details of the program and results to date can be found at http://www.bioregionalassessments.gov.au. In this presentation the methodology for undertaking bioregional assessments will be described and the application of this methodology to six priority bioregions in eastern Australia will be detailed. Results of the programme to date will be provided (being nearly two years into the three-year study) with a focus on the preliminary results of numerical groundwater modelling. Once completed this modelling will be used to evaluate the impacts of the depressurisation of coal seams on aquifers and associated ecological, economic and socio-cultural water-dependent assets.

  20. The Use of Health Impact Assessment for a Community Undergoing Natural Gas Development

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Lisa; Stinson, Kaylan E.; Scott, Kenneth; Newman, Lee S.; Adgate, John

    2013-01-01

    The development of natural gas wells is rapidly increasing, yet little is known about associated exposures and potential public health consequences. We used health impact assessment (HIA) to provide decision-makers with information to promote public health at a time of rapid decision making for natural gas development. We have reported that natural gas development may expose local residents to air and water contamination, industrial noise and traffic, and community changes. We have provided more than 90 recommendations for preventing or decreasing health impacts associated with these exposures. We also have reflected on the lessons learned from conducting an HIA in a politically charged environment. Finally, we have demonstrated that despite the challenges, HIA can successfully enhance public health policymaking. PMID:23597363

  1. Physicochemical impacts associated with natural gas development on methanogenesis in deep sand aquifers.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Muramoto, Yoshiyuki; Usami, Jun; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2015-02-01

    The Minami-Kanto gas field, where gases are dissolved in formation water, is a potential analogue for a marine gas hydrate area because both areas are characterized by the accumulation of microbial methane in marine turbidite sand layers interbedded with mud layers. This study examined the physicochemical impacts associated with natural gas production and well drilling on the methanogenic activity and composition in this gas field. Twenty-four gas-associated formation water samples were collected from confined sand aquifers through production wells. The stable isotopic compositions of methane in the gases indicated their origin to be biogenic via the carbonate reduction pathway. Consistent with this classification, methanogenic activity measurements using radiotracers, culturing experiments and molecular analysis of formation water samples indicated the predominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The cultivation of water samples amended only with methanogenic substrates resulted in significant increases in microbial cells along with high-yield methane production, indicating the restricted availability of substrates in the aquifers. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity increased with increasing natural gas production from the corresponding wells, suggesting that the flux of substrates from organic-rich mudstones to adjacent sand aquifers is enhanced by the decrease in fluid pressure in sand layers associated with natural gas/water production. The transient predominance of methylotrophic methanogens, observed for a few years after well drilling, also suggested the stimulation of the methanogens by the exposure of unutilized organic matter through well drilling. These results provide an insight into the physicochemical impacts on the methanogenic activity in biogenic gas deposits including marine gas hydrates. PMID:25105906

  2. 77 FR 42761 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Oil and Gas Management Plan at Big South Fork...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Oil and Gas Management Plan (Plan...current and future management of oil and gas at these park units...owners and operators of private oil and gas rights to ensure these...use and experience, and human health and safety. DATES: The...

  3. Investigating links between shale gas development and health impacts through a community survey project in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Steinzor, Nadia; Subra, Wilma; Sumi, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Across the United States, the race for new energy sources is picking up speed and reaching more places, with natural gas in the lead. While the toxic and polluting qualities of substances used and produced in shale gas development and the general health effects of exposure are well established, scientific evidence of causal links has been limited, creating an urgent need to understand health impacts. Self-reported survey research documenting the symptoms experienced by people living in proximity to gas facilities, coupled with environmental testing, can elucidate plausible links that warrant both response and further investigation. This method, recently applied to the gas development areas of Pennsylvania, indicates the need for a range of policy and research efforts to safeguard public health. PMID:23552648

  4. Impacts of Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Production on Regional Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarthout, R.; Russo, R. S.; Zhou, Y.; Mitchell, B.; Miller, B.; Lipsky, E. M.; Sive, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Natural gas is a clean burning alternative to other fossil fuels, producing lower carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions during combustion. Gas deposits located within shale rock or tight sand formations are difficult to access using conventional drilling techniques. However, horizontal drilling coupled with hydraulic fracturing is now widely used to enhance natural gas extraction. Potential environmental impacts of these practices are currently being assessed because of the rapid expansion of natural gas production in the U.S. Natural gas production has contributed to the deterioration of air quality in several regions, such as in Wyoming and Utah, that were near or downwind of natural gas basins. We conducted a field campaign in southwestern Pennsylvania on 16-18 June 2012 to investigate the impact of gas production operations in the Marcellus Shale on regional air quality. A total of 235 whole air samples were collected in 2-liter electropolished stainless- steel canisters throughout southwestern Pennsylvania in a regular grid pattern that covered an area of approximately 8500 square km. Day and night samples were collected at each grid point and additional samples were collected near active wells, flaring wells, fluid retention reservoirs, transmission pipelines, and a processing plant to assess the influence of different stages of the gas production operation on emissions. The samples were analyzed at Appalachian State University for methane (CH4), CO2, C2-C10 nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), C1-C2 halocarbons, C1-C5 alkyl nitrates and selected reduced sulfur compounds. In-situ measurements of ozone (O3), CH4, CO2, nitric oxide (NO), total reactive nitrogen (NOy), formaldehyde (HCHO), and a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were carried out at an upwind site and a site near active gas wells using a mobile lab. Emissions associated with gas production were observed throughout the study region. Elevated mixing ratios of CH4 and CO2 were observed in the southwest and northeast portions of the study area indicating multiple emission sources. We also present comparisons of VOC fingerprints observed in the Marcellus Shale to our previous observations of natural gas emissions from the Denver-Julesburg Basin in northeast Colorado to identify tracers for these different natural gas sources.

  5. Mucosal deformation from an impinging transonic gas jet and the ballistic impact of microparticles.

    PubMed

    Hardy, M P; Kendall, M A F

    2005-10-01

    By means of a transonic gas jet, gene guns ballistically deliver microparticle formulations of drugs and vaccines to the outer layers of the skin or mucosal tissue to induce unique physiological responses for the treatment of a range of conditions. Reported high-speed imaging experiments show that the mucosa deforms significantly while subjected to an impinging gas jet from a biolistic device. In this paper, the effect of this tissue surface deformation on microparticle impact conditions is simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. The microparticles are idealized as spheres of diameters 26.1, 39 and 99 microm and a density of 1050 kg m-3. Deforming surface calculations of particle impact conditions are compared directly with an immobile surface case. The relative velocity and obliquity of the deforming surface decrease the normal component of particle impact velocity by up to 30% at the outer edge of the impinging gas jet. This is qualitatively consistent with reported particle penetration profiles in the tissue. It is recommended that these effects be considered in biolistic studies requiring quantified particle impact conditions. PMID:16177490

  6. Impact of flue gas conditions on mercury uptake by sulfur-impregnated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Vidic, R.D.; Brown, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Novel sulfur-impregnated activated carbons (SIACs) have shown excellent mercury uptake capacity when pure nitrogen was used as a carrier gas. This study investigated the impact of various gas constituents found in a real flue gas on the performance of SIACs. Fixed-bed adsorber tests showed that CO{sub 2} (up to 15%) had no impact on mercury uptake by SIAC, while the presence of O{sub 2}(up to 9{degree}) increased the adsorptive capacity up to 30%. Increase in the amount of oxygen-containing acidic surface functional groups had no impact on mercury uptake, and it is postulated that the enhanced performance was due to the formation of HgS catalyzed by SIAC. Moisture presence can decrease SIAC's capacity for mercury uptake by as much as 25% due to competitive adsorption and additional internal mass transfer resistance. SO{sub 2} and NO exhibited no impact on mercury uptake by SIAC even in the presence of 10% moisture. Adsorptive capacity of SIAC decreased significantly when the reaction temperature increased from 140 to 250 and 400 C due to the pronounced exothermic nature of HgS formation, but increasing the empty-bed contact time can partially offset this loss of capacity.

  7. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation Impacts of a Marcellus Shale Gas Well

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study estimates the life cycle water consumption and wastewater generation impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well from its construction to end of life. Direct water consumption at the well site was assessed by analysis of data from approximately 500 individual well completion reports collected in 2010 by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Indirect water consumption for supply chain production at each life cycle stage of the well was estimated using the economic input–output life cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) method. Life cycle direct and indirect water quality pollution impacts were assessed and compared using the tool for the reduction and assessment of chemical and other environmental impacts (TRACI). Wastewater treatment cost was proposed as an additional indicator for water quality pollution impacts from shale gas well wastewater. Four water management scenarios for Marcellus shale well wastewater were assessed: current conditions in Pennsylvania; complete discharge; direct reuse and desalination; and complete desalination. The results show that under the current conditions, an average Marcellus shale gas well consumes 20?000 m3 (with a range from 6700 to 33?000 m3) of freshwater per well over its life cycle excluding final gas utilization, with 65% direct water consumption at the well site and 35% indirect water consumption across the supply chain production. If all flowback and produced water is released into the environment without treatment, direct wastewater from a Marcellus shale gas well is estimated to have 300–3000 kg N-eq eutrophication potential, 900–23?000 kg 2,4D-eq freshwater ecotoxicity potential, 0–370 kg benzene-eq carcinogenic potential, and 2800–71?000 MT toluene-eq noncarcinogenic potential. The potential toxicity of the chemicals in the wastewater from the well site exceeds those associated with supply chain production, except for carcinogenic effects. If all the Marcellus shale well wastewater is treated to surface discharge standards by desalination, $59?000–270?000 per well would be required. The life cycle study results indicate that when gas end use is not considered hydraulic fracturing is the largest contributor to the life cycle water impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well. PMID:24380628

  8. The economic impact of shale gas development on state and local economies: benefits, costs, and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Barth, Jannette M

    2013-01-01

    It is often assumed that natural gas exploration and development in the Marcellus Shale will bring great economic prosperity to state and local economies. Policymakers need accurate economic information on which to base decisions regarding permitting and regulation of shale gas extraction. This paper provides a summary review of research findings on the economic impacts of extractive industries, with an emphasis on peer-reviewed studies. The conclusions from the studies are varied and imply that further research, on a case-by-case basis, is necessary before definitive conclusions can be made regarding both short- and long-term implications for state and local economies. PMID:23552649

  9. Quantifying habitat impacts of natural gas infrastructure to facilitate biodiversity offsetting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Isabel L; Bull, Joseph W; Milner-Gulland, Eleanor J; Esipov, Alexander V; Suttle, Kenwyn B

    2014-01-01

    Habitat degradation through anthropogenic development is a key driver of biodiversity loss. One way to compensate losses is "biodiversity offsetting" (wherein biodiversity impacted is "replaced" through restoration elsewhere). A challenge in implementing offsets, which has received scant attention in the literature, is the accurate determination of residual biodiversity losses. We explore this challenge for offsetting gas extraction in the Ustyurt Plateau, Uzbekistan. Our goal was to determine the landscape extent of habitat impacts, particularly how the footprint of "linear" infrastructure (i.e. roads, pipelines), often disregarded in compensation calculations, compares with "hub" infrastructure (i.e. extraction facilities). We measured vegetation cover and plant species richness using the line-intercept method, along transects running from infrastructure/control sites outward for 500 m, accounting for wind direction to identify dust deposition impacts. Findings from 24 transects were extrapolated to the broader plateau by mapping total landscape infrastructure network using GPS data and satellite imagery. Vegetation cover and species richness were significantly lower at development sites than controls. These differences disappeared within 25 m of the edge of the area physically occupied by infrastructure. The current habitat footprint of gas infrastructure is 220 ± 19 km(2) across the Ustyurt (total ? 100,000 km(2)), 37 ± 6% of which is linear infrastructure. Vegetation impacts diminish rapidly with increasing distance from infrastructure, and localized dust deposition does not conspicuously extend the disturbance footprint. Habitat losses from gas extraction infrastructure cover 0.2% of the study area, but this reflects directly eliminated vegetation only. Impacts upon fauna pose a more difficult determination, as these require accounting for behavioral and demographic responses to disturbance by elusive mammals, including threatened species. This study demonstrates that impacts of linear infrastructure in regions such as the Ustyurt should be accounted for not just with respect to development sites but also associated transportation and delivery routes. PMID:24455163

  10. Quantifying habitat impacts of natural gas infrastructure to facilitate biodiversity offsetting

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Isabel L; Bull, Joseph W; Milner-Gulland, Eleanor J; Esipov, Alexander V; Suttle, Kenwyn B

    2014-01-01

    Habitat degradation through anthropogenic development is a key driver of biodiversity loss. One way to compensate losses is “biodiversity offsetting” (wherein biodiversity impacted is “replaced” through restoration elsewhere). A challenge in implementing offsets, which has received scant attention in the literature, is the accurate determination of residual biodiversity losses. We explore this challenge for offsetting gas extraction in the Ustyurt Plateau, Uzbekistan. Our goal was to determine the landscape extent of habitat impacts, particularly how the footprint of “linear” infrastructure (i.e. roads, pipelines), often disregarded in compensation calculations, compares with “hub” infrastructure (i.e. extraction facilities). We measured vegetation cover and plant species richness using the line-intercept method, along transects running from infrastructure/control sites outward for 500 m, accounting for wind direction to identify dust deposition impacts. Findings from 24 transects were extrapolated to the broader plateau by mapping total landscape infrastructure network using GPS data and satellite imagery. Vegetation cover and species richness were significantly lower at development sites than controls. These differences disappeared within 25 m of the edge of the area physically occupied by infrastructure. The current habitat footprint of gas infrastructure is 220 ± 19 km2 across the Ustyurt (total ? 100,000 km2), 37 ± 6% of which is linear infrastructure. Vegetation impacts diminish rapidly with increasing distance from infrastructure, and localized dust deposition does not conspicuously extend the disturbance footprint. Habitat losses from gas extraction infrastructure cover 0.2% of the study area, but this reflects directly eliminated vegetation only. Impacts upon fauna pose a more difficult determination, as these require accounting for behavioral and demographic responses to disturbance by elusive mammals, including threatened species. This study demonstrates that impacts of linear infrastructure in regions such as the Ustyurt should be accounted for not just with respect to development sites but also associated transportation and delivery routes. PMID:24455163

  11. Experimental study on the impact of temperature on the dissipation process of supersaturated total dissolved gas.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xia; Liu, Shengyun; Li, Ran; Ou, Yangming

    2014-09-01

    Water temperature not only affects the solubility of gas in water but can also be an important factor in the dissipation process of supersaturated total dissolved gas (TDG). The quantitative relationship between the dissipation process and temperature has not been previously described. This relationship affects the accurate evaluation of the dissipation process and the subsequent biological effects. This article experimentally investigates the impact of temperature on supersaturated TDG dissipation in static and turbulent conditions. The results show that the supersaturated TDG dissipation coefficient increases with the temperature and turbulence intensity. The quantitative relationship was verified by straight flume experiments. This study enhances our understanding of the dissipation of supersaturated TDG. Furthermore, it provides a scientific foundation for the accurate prediction of the dissipation process of supersaturated TDG in the downstream area and the negative impacts of high dam projects on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25193837

  12. Modeled Oil and Gas Atmospheric Impacts in National Parks and Wilderness Areas in the Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.; Barna, M. G.; Schichtel, B. A.; Vimont, J.; Moore, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Oil and gas production in the Western United States has increased considerably over the past 10 years. While many of the still limited oil and gas impact assessments have focused on potential human health impacts, the typically remote locations of production in the Intermountain West suggests that the impacts of oil and gas production on national parks and wilderness areas (class 1&2 areas) could also be important. To evaluate this, we utilize the Comprehensive Air quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) with two year-long modeling episodes representing 2008 and 2011, meteorology and emissions. The model inputs for the 2008 and 2011 episodes were generated as part of the West-wide Jump-start Air Quality Modeling Study (WestJumpAQMS) and Three State Air Quality Study (3SAQS) respectively. Both studies included a detailed assessment of oil and gas (O&G) emissions in Western States for the respective years. Each year-long modeling episode was run both with and without emissions from O&G production. The difference between these two runs provides an estimate of the contribution of the O&G production to air quality. These data were used to assess the contribution of O&G to the 8 hour average ozone concentrations, daily and annual fine particulate concentrations, annual nitrogen deposition totals and visibility in the modeling domain. We present the results for the class 1&2 areas in the Western US. We also present temporal trends of O&G impacts, differentiating between trends in urban and rural areas.

  13. The energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of telecommuting in the U.S

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt W. Roth; Todd Rhodes; R. Ponoum

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions impacts of telecommuting (TC) in the U.S. from a life-cycle perspective. Our assessment evaluates how TC alters transportation, residential building, and commercial building energy consumption patterns and related equivalent CO2 (CO2,e) emissions. We estimate that the 4 million U.S. workers who telecommute an average of one or more day per week

  14. Impact resistance of lightweight hybrid structures for gas turbine engine fan containment applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohan G. Hebsur; Ronald D. Noebe; Duane M. Revilock

    2003-01-01

    The ballistic impact resistance of hybrid composite sandwich structures was evaluated with the ultimate goal of developing\\u000a new materials or structures for potential gas turbine engine, fan containment applications. The sandwich structures investigated\\u000a consisted of GLARE-5 (Aviation Equipment, Inc., Costa Mesa, CA) laminates as face sheets with lightweight cellular metallic\\u000a materials such as honeycomb, foam, and lattice block as a

  15. Mechanisms of inert gas impact induced interlayer mixing in metal multilayers grown by sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. W.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    2001-10-01

    Control of interfacial roughness and chemical mixing is critical in nanomaterials. For example, multilayers composed of ˜20 Å conductive layer sandwiched between two ˜50 Å ferromagnetic layers can exhibit giant magnetoresistance (GMR). This property has caused a tremendous recent increase in hard disk storage capacity, and can potentially result in a new generation of nonvolatile magnetic random access memories. It has been established that good GMR properties can be obtained when the interfacial roughness and interlayer mixing of these multilayers are low. However, flat interfaces in nanoscale multilayers are not thermodynamically stable, and cannot be obtained using thermal energy deposition processes such as molecular-beam epitaxy. Hyperthermal energy sputter deposition techniques using either plasma or ion-beam gun are able to create nonequilibrium flat interfaces, and have been shown to produce better GMR multilayers. In these processes, however, inert gas ions or neutrals with energies between 50 and 200 eV can impact the growth surface. This may be a major source for interlayer mixing. By using a molecular dynamics technique and a reduced order model, the composition profile across the thickness of multiply repeated Ni/Cu/Ni multilayers has been calculated as a function of the energy and the relative flux of the inert gas ions or neutrals as well as the layer thickness. The results indicate that the 50-200 eV inert gas impact caused atomic exchange between adjacent atomic layers near the surface. The probability of exchange increased with impact energy, but decreased with the number of overlayers. The exchange between Ni overlayer and Cu underlayer atoms was much more significant than that between Cu overlayer and Ni underlayer atoms. As a result, the Ni on Cu interfaces were much more diffuse than the Cu on Ni interfaces, in good agreement with experiments. At very high inert gas flux and impact energy, an increased probability for the underlying Cu atoms to be exchanged to the surface resulted in significant Cu surface segregation.

  16. User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind: The Expanded Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI II); Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper we examine the impacts of building new coal, gas, or wind plants in three states: Colorado, Michigan, and Virginia. Our findings indicate that local/state economic impacts are directly related to the availability and utilization of local industries and services to build and operate the power plant. For gas and coal plants, the economic benefit depends significantly on whether the fuel is obtained from within the state, out of state, or some combination. We also find that the taxes generated by power plants can have a significant impact on local economies via increased expenditures on public goods.

  17. EMBRYO IMPACTS AND GAS GIANT MERGERS. I. DICHOTOMY OF JUPITER AND SATURN's CORE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shulin [Department of Astronomy, Kavli Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Agnor, C.B. [Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Lin, D. N. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz (United States)

    2010-09-10

    Interior to the gaseous envelopes of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, there are high-density cores with masses larger than 10 Earth masses. According to the conventional sequential accretion hypothesis, such massive cores are needed for the onset of efficient accretion of their gaseous envelopes. However, Jupiter's gaseous envelope is more massive and its core may be less massive than those of Saturn. In order to account for this structural diversity and the super-solar metallicity in the envelope of Jupiter and Saturn, we investigate the possibility that they may have either merged with other gas giants or consumed several Earth-mass protoplanetary embryos during or after the rapid accretion of their envelope. In general, impinging sub-Earth-mass planetesimals disintegrate in gas giants' envelopes, deposit heavy elements well outside the cores, and locally suppress the convection. Consequently, their fragments sediment to promote the growth of cores. Through a series of numerical simulations, we show that it is possible for colliding super-Earth-mass embryos to reach the cores of gas giants. Direct parabolic collisions also lead to the coalescence of gas giants and merging of their cores. In these cases, the energy released from the impact leads to vigorous convective motion throughout the envelope and the erosion of the cores. This dichotomy contributes to the observed dispersion in the internal structure and atmospheric composition between Jupiter and Saturn and other gas giant planets and elsewhere.

  18. Impacts of natural gas mining on regional methane levels in Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembeck-Edens, A. M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martins, D. K.; Grannas, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Increased natural gas exploration has been hypothesized to be a strong source of atmospheric methane, leading to enhanced regional methane levels. Fugitive methane emissions can result from leaky natural gas wells and pipelines. Pennsylvania is experiencing rapid natural gas well development and operation. In the Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale region, the density of natural gas wells is increasing. Therefore, a field study took place during 8 June to 6 August 2013 to investigate the magnitude of fugitive methane emissions near well sites and along established pipelines, as well as the spatial distribution of methane throughout Pennsylvania. The necessary instruments were mounted on a mobile platform (six-passenger van) to make transects running from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania where the highest density of wells is already established. Methane and carbon dioxide mixing ratios and their respective 13C isotopes were detected using a cavity ring-down spectrometer while the van was moving along pipelines or near natural gas well sites. Air sampling was done in areas away from natural well sites to establish the baseline of methane levels in the rural atmosphere. Also, air sampling took place around barns to distinguish the contribution of cattle to the atmospheric loading of methane. In the rural atmosphere, away from natural gas wells, methane levels remained around (baseline) 1.75 parts per millions (ppm). Methane levels in areas impacted by natural gas wells were higher than the baseline. Along pipelines, methane levels ranged from baseline levels of 1.75 ppm to 5.00 ppm. Near wells, plumes of methane-enriched air reached as high as 15.30 ppm. Although leaks from wells have been noted in previous studies, this investigation suggested that wells intermittently leaked methane. The main conclusion from the present study is that fugitive emissions from natural gas wells and pipelines contribute to enhancing the regional methane levels during daytime conditions, up to an average mixing ratio of 1.95 ppm. Along with ancillary data, we will present and discuss the implications of the results in the context of greenhouse effect forcing and regional air quality impacts.

  19. Synthesis of knowledge of the potential impacts of OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) oil and gas activities on fisheries. Volume 2. Appendix, annotated bibliography for ocs oil and gas impact studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tear, L.M.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of the appendix is to present an annotated bibliography of published and grey literature related to OCS oil and gas activity impacts to finfish and shellfish in marine and estuarine waters. An index is provided to help the reader locate studies related to a particular impact.

  20. Strategic petroleum reserve and liquefied natural gas supplies. Final report. [Impact of LNG and\\/or oil embargo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Fink; B. A. Bancroft; T. M. Palmieri

    1977-01-01

    The United States is planning to import liquefied natural gas (LNG) to offset the effects of our apparent dwindling natural gas supply. These imports would begin by the 1980s and would come from Algeria, Indonesia, Pakistan, Iran, Nigeria, and possibly the Soviet Union. If a disruption in LNG supplies were to occur, the impact to the nation could be eased

  1. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-

    E-print Network

    : Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat overstated. Key words: Centrocercus urophasianus, human­wildlife conflicts, lek counts, oil and gas, sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) lek attendance and population dynamics are well-documented (Walker et al. 2007

  2. Impact of natural gas extraction on PAH levels in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Paulik, L Blair; Donald, Carey E; Smith, Brian W; Tidwell, Lane G; Hobbie, Kevin A; Kincl, Laurel; Haynes, Erin N; Anderson, Kim A

    2015-04-21

    Natural gas extraction, often referred to as "fracking," has increased rapidly in the U.S. in recent years. To address potential health impacts, passive air samplers were deployed in a rural community heavily affected by the natural gas boom. Samplers were analyzed for 62 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results were grouped based on distance from each sampler to the nearest active well. PAH levels were highest when samplers were closest to active wells. Additionally, PAH levels closest to natural gas activity were an order of magnitude higher than levels previously reported in rural areas. Sourcing ratios indicate that PAHs were predominantly petrogenic, suggesting that elevated PAH levels were influenced by direct releases from the earth. Quantitative human health risk assessment estimated the excess lifetime cancer risks associated with exposure to the measured PAHs. Closest to active wells, the risk estimated for maximum residential exposure was 2.9 in 10?000, which is above the U.S. EPA's acceptable risk level. Overall, risk estimates decreased 30% when comparing results from samplers closest to active wells to those farthest. This work suggests that natural gas extraction may be contributing significantly to PAHs in air, at levels that are relevant to human health. PMID:25810398

  3. Acute health impact of the gas release at Lake Nyos, Cameroon, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Peter J.; Kapila, Mukesh

    1989-11-01

    Available medical evidence on the acute health impact of the gas release at Lake Nyos is summarised, including the results of a survey of medical records of 845 survivors treated at Wum and Nkambe hospitals. The main clinical features were compatible with exposure to an asphyxiant gas such as CO 2 but confirmation of the identity of the gas or gases involved was not possible. Exposure to CO 2 over such a large inhabited area and reversible coma lasting for hours after CO 2 gassing do not appear to have been reported before. In some victims, blistering or ulceration of the skin was present which could not be readily explained by local injury from pressure, or burns from acid, or falling near fires. Further epidemiological studies on survivors are unlikely to be feasible, but the possibility of long-term anoxic brain damage among adults and children who had been rendered comatose by the gas should be considered, though overt evidence of major neurological or respiratory disability was not apparent in survivors in the weeks following the disaster. The inadequacy of the toxicological and forensic evidence obtained points to the need for the rapid mobilisation of medical scientists in future disasters of this kind.

  4. A novel high-performance liquid chromatography-electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of guggulsterones, piperine and gallic acid in Triphala guggulu.

    PubMed

    Muguli, Ganesh; Vadaparthi, P R Rao; Ramesh, B; Gowda, Vishakante; Paramesh, Rangesh; Jadhav, Atul N; Babu, K Suresh

    2015-05-01

    "Triphalaguggulu" is an important Ayurvedic formulation comprising of Guggulu, that is, Commiphora wightii (Arn.) Bhandari as a base wherein powdered fruits of triphala, that is, Phyllanthus emblica L., Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb and Terminalia chebula Retz, along with powdered fruit of Piper longum L. are compounded. This polyherbal preparation has been strongly recommended in chronic inflammation, piles, and fistula. However, due to the complexity of compound formulation standardization of commercial products is challenging. In the present communication marker-based standardization of "Triphalaguggulu" preparation using gallic acid (for triphala), piperine (for P. longum L.) and guggulsterones (for guggulu) is reported. These compounds of diverse chemistry were successfully separated on a Waters HR-C18 column by isocratic elution with methanol and water (80:20 v/v) as mobile phase at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min coupled with photodiode array detector. These optimal chromatographic conditions were used for simultaneous quantification of gallic acid, guggulsterones (E and Z) and piperine in commercial samples by high-performance liquid chromatography-electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry and method was validated as per ICH guidelines. PMID:26109777

  5. A novel high-performance liquid chromatography-electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of guggulsterones, piperine and gallic acid in Triphala guggulu

    PubMed Central

    Muguli, Ganesh; Vadaparthi, P. R. Rao; Ramesh, B.; Gowda, Vishakante; Paramesh, Rangesh; Jadhav, Atul N.; Babu, K. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    “Triphalaguggulu” is an important Ayurvedic formulation comprising of Guggulu, that is, Commiphora wightii (Arn.) Bhandari as a base wherein powdered fruits of triphala, that is, Phyllanthus emblica L., Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb and Terminalia chebula Retz, along with powdered fruit of Piper longum L. are compounded. This polyherbal preparation has been strongly recommended in chronic inflammation, piles, and fistula. However, due to the complexity of compound formulation standardization of commercial products is challenging. In the present communication marker-based standardization of “Triphalaguggulu” preparation using gallic acid (for triphala), piperine (for P. longum L.) and guggulsterones (for guggulu) is reported. These compounds of diverse chemistry were successfully separated on a Waters HR-C18 column by isocratic elution with methanol and water (80:20 v/v) as mobile phase at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min coupled with photodiode array detector. These optimal chromatographic conditions were used for simultaneous quantification of gallic acid, guggulsterones (E and Z) and piperine in commercial samples by high-performance liquid chromatography-electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry and method was validated as per ICH guidelines. PMID:26109777

  6. Regional impacts of oil and gas development on ozone formation in the western United States.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Marco A; Barna, Michael G; Moore, Tom

    2009-09-01

    The Intermountain West is currently experiencing increased growth in oil and gas production, which has the potential to affect the visibility and air quality of various Class I areas in the region. The following work presents an analysis of these impacts using the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx). CAMx is a state-of-the-science, "one-atmosphere" Eulerian photochemical dispersion model that has been widely used in the assessment of gaseous and particulate air pollution (ozone, fine [PM2.5], and coarse [PM10] particulate matter). Meteorology and emissions inventories developed by the Western Regional Air Partnership Regional Modeling Center for regional haze analysis and planning are used to establish an ozone baseline simulation for the year 2002. The predicted range of values for ozone in the national parks and other Class I areas in the western United States is then evaluated with available observations from the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET). This evaluation demonstrates the model's suitability for subsequent planning, sensitivity, and emissions control strategy modeling. Once the ozone baseline simulation has been established, an analysis of the model results is performed to investigate the regional impacts of oil and gas development on the ozone concentrations that affect the air quality of Class I areas. Results indicate that the maximum 8-hr ozone enhancement from oil and gas (9.6 parts per billion [ppb]) could affect southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico. Class I areas in this region that are likely to be impacted by increased ozone include Mesa Verde National Park and Weminuche Wilderness Area in Colorado and San Pedro Parks Wilderness Area, Bandelier Wilderness Area, Pecos Wilderness Area, and Wheeler Peak Wilderness Area in New Mexico. PMID:19785277

  7. BAG: A code for predicting the performance of a gas bag impact attenuation system for the PATHFINDER lander

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.K.; Waye, D.E.

    1993-11-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is planning to launch a network of scientific probes to Mars beginning in late 1996. The precursor to this network will be PATHFINDER. Decelerating PATHFINDER from the high speed of its approach to Mars will require the use of several deceleration techniques working in series. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has proposed that gas bags be used to cushion the payload`s ground impact on Mars. This report presents the computer code, BAG, which has been developed to calculate the pneumatic performance of gas bag impact attenuators and the one-dimensional rigid-body dynamic performance of a payload during ground impact.

  8. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.H.; Levine, D.L.; Eversole, R.E.; Mouring, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    The ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant for the transport of cylinders filled with radioactive gases. The shield was evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and the results are reported herein. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for hypothetical accident conditions. Results of the evaluation demonstrate that the container is in compliance with the applicable regulations.

  9. Characteristics of impact-generated plasma with different electron temperature and gas temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianqiao; Song, Weidong; Ning, Jianguo; Tang, Huiping

    2014-07-01

    The characteristics of the plasma with difference between the electron temperature and gas temperature were investigated and the relationship between the plasma ionization degree and the internal energy of a system was obtained. A group of equations included the chemical reaction equilibrium equation, the chemical reaction rate equation and the energy conservation equation were adopted to calculate the electron density, the electron temperature and the atom temperature with a given internal energy. These equations combined with Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations is solved by a smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code. The charges generated in hypervelocity impacts with five different velocities are calculated and verified with the empirical formulas. The influence of a critical velocity for plasma generation is considered in the empirical formula and the parameters are fitted by the numerical results. By comparing with the results in reference, the fitted new empirical formula is verified to be reasonable and useful for a wide range of impact velocity.

  10. A Gas-Actuated Projectile Launcher for High-Energy Impact Testing of Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Lawson, Robin E.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Lyle, Karen H.

    1999-01-01

    A gas-act,uated penetration device has been developed for high-energy impact testing of structures. The high-energy impact. t,estiiig is for experimental simulation of uncontained engine failures. The non-linear transient finite element, code LS-DYNA3D has been used in the numerical simula.tions of a titanium rectangular blade with a.n aluminum target, plate. Threshold velocities for different combinations of pitch and yaw angles of the impactor were obtained for the impactor-target, t8est configuration in the numerica.1 simulations. Complet,e penet,ration of the target plate was also simulat,ed numerically. Finally, limited comparison of analytical and experimental results is presented for complete penetration of the target by the impactor.

  11. Application of the screening potential approach for Electron Impact ionization of rare-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Hari

    2013-05-01

    The triple differential cross section for electron impact ionization of rare-gas atoms will be investigated using our recently extended MCHF method. It is well known electron correlation effects in both the initial and the final states are very important. To incorporate these effects we will use the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method to account for electron correlation in the initial state. The electron correlation in the final state will be taken into account using the angle-dependent screening potential approximation. As a test case, the triple differential cross section (TDCS) will be calculated for electron impact ionization of Argon atom, which has experimental results. Our results will be compared with available experimental and the theoretical observations.

  12. Semi-analytical models of hydroelastic sloshing impact in tanks of liquefied natural gas vessels.

    PubMed

    Ten, I; Malenica, Š; Korobkin, A

    2011-07-28

    The present paper deals with the methods for the evaluation of the hydroelastic interactions that appear during the violent sloshing impacts inside the tanks of liquefied natural gas carriers. The complexity of both the fluid flow and the structural behaviour (containment system and ship structure) does not allow for a fully consistent direct approach according to the present state of the art. Several simplifications are thus necessary in order to isolate the most dominant physical aspects and to treat them properly. In this paper, choice was made of semi-analytical modelling for the hydrodynamic part and finite-element modelling for the structural part. Depending on the impact type, different hydrodynamic models are proposed, and the basic principles of hydroelastic coupling are clearly described and validated with respect to the accuracy and convergence of the numerical results. PMID:21690141

  13. Impact of inerts, diluents and trace constituents in natural gas on the natural gas industry and the interstate pipeline grid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Chao; K. Crippen

    1995-01-01

    This report addresses gas quality concerns that have arisen industry-wide. The traditional properties affecting gas quality and interchangeability are the BTU content, relative density (specific gravity), the hydrogen to carbon ratio, and hydrocarbon dew point. These properties are directly related to the major and minor component composition of natural gas. Components that have a bearing on gas quality and interchangeability

  14. Advanced diagnostics for impact-flash spectroscopy on light-gas guns.

    SciTech Connect

    Breiland, William George; Reinhart, William Dodd; Miller, Paul Albert; Brown, Justin L.; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (,; ); Mangan, Michael A.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Grine, Albert D.; Wanke, Michael Clement; Alexander, C. Scott

    2007-03-01

    This study is best characterized as new technology development for implementing new sensors to investigate the optical characteristics of a rapidly expanding debris cloud resulting from hypervelocity impact regimes of 7 to 11 km/s. Our gas guns constitute a unique test bed that match operational conditions relevant to hypervelocity impact encountered in space engagements. We have demonstrated the use of (1) terahertz sensors, (2) silicon diodes for visible regimes, (3) germanium and InGaAs sensors for the near infrared regimes, and (4) the Sandia lightning detectors which are similar to the silicon diodes described in 2. The combination and complementary use of all these techniques has the strong potential of ''thermally'' characterizing the time dependent behavior of the radiating debris cloud. Complementary spectroscopic measurements provide temperature estimates of the impact generated debris by fitting its spectrum to a blackbody radiation function. This debris is time-dependent as its transport/expansion behavior is changing with time. The rapid expansion behavior of the debris cools the cloud rapidly, changing its thermal/temperature characteristics with time. A variety of sensors that span over a wide spectrum, varying from visible regime to THz frequencies, now gives us the potential to cover the impact over a broader temporal regime starting from high pressures (Mbar) high-temperatures (eV) to low pressures (mbar) low temperatures (less than room temperature) as the debris expands and cools.

  15. Natural gas and CO2 price variation: impact on the relative cost-efficiency of LNG and pipelines.

    PubMed

    Ulvestad, Marte; Overland, Indra

    2012-06-01

    THIS ARTICLE DEVELOPS A FORMAL MODEL FOR COMPARING THE COST STRUCTURE OF THE TWO MAIN TRANSPORT OPTIONS FOR NATURAL GAS: liquefied natural gas (LNG) and pipelines. In particular, it evaluates how variations in the prices of natural gas and greenhouse gas emissions affect the relative cost-efficiency of these two options. Natural gas is often promoted as the most environmentally friendly of all fossil fuels, and LNG as a modern and efficient way of transporting it. Some research has been carried out into the local environmental impact of LNG facilities, but almost none into aspects related to climate change. This paper concludes that at current price levels for natural gas and CO2 emissions the distance from field to consumer and the volume of natural gas transported are the main determinants of transport costs. The pricing of natural gas and greenhouse emissions influence the relative cost-efficiency of LNG and pipeline transport, but only to a limited degree at current price levels. Because more energy is required for the LNG process (especially for fuelling the liquefaction process) than for pipelines at distances below 9100 km, LNG is more exposed to variability in the price of natural gas and greenhouse gas emissions up to this distance. If the prices of natural gas and/or greenhouse gas emission rise dramatically in the future, this will affect the choice between pipelines and LNG. Such a price increase will be favourable for pipelines relative to LNG. PMID:24683269

  16. Natural gas and CO2 price variation: impact on the relative cost-efficiency of LNG and pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Ulvestad, Marte; Overland, Indra

    2012-01-01

    This article develops a formal model for comparing the cost structure of the two main transport options for natural gas: liquefied natural gas (LNG) and pipelines. In particular, it evaluates how variations in the prices of natural gas and greenhouse gas emissions affect the relative cost-efficiency of these two options. Natural gas is often promoted as the most environmentally friendly of all fossil fuels, and LNG as a modern and efficient way of transporting it. Some research has been carried out into the local environmental impact of LNG facilities, but almost none into aspects related to climate change. This paper concludes that at current price levels for natural gas and CO2 emissions the distance from field to consumer and the volume of natural gas transported are the main determinants of transport costs. The pricing of natural gas and greenhouse emissions influence the relative cost-efficiency of LNG and pipeline transport, but only to a limited degree at current price levels. Because more energy is required for the LNG process (especially for fuelling the liquefaction process) than for pipelines at distances below 9100 km, LNG is more exposed to variability in the price of natural gas and greenhouse gas emissions up to this distance. If the prices of natural gas and/or greenhouse gas emission rise dramatically in the future, this will affect the choice between pipelines and LNG. Such a price increase will be favourable for pipelines relative to LNG. PMID:24683269

  17. Scoping Study on the Safety Impact of Valve Spacing in Natural Gas Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, Charles David [ORNL

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) is responsible for ensuring the safe, reliable, and environmentally sound operation of the nation's natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines. Regulations adopted by PHMSA for gas pipelines are provided in 49 CFR 192, and spacing requirements for valves in gas transmission pipelines are presented in 49 CFR 192.179. The present report describes the findings of a scoping study conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assist PHMSA in assessing the safety impact of system valve spacing. Calculations of the pressures, temperatures, and flow velocities during a set of representative pipe depressurization transients were carried out using a one-dimensional numerical model with either ideal gas or real gas properties for the fluid. With both ideal gas and real gas properties, the high-consequence area radius for any resulting fire as defined by Stevens in GRI-00/0189 was evaluated as one measure of the pipeline safety. In the real gas case, a model for convective heat transfer from the pipe wall is included to assess the potential for shut-off valve failures due to excessively low temperatures resulting from depressurization cooling of the pipe. A discussion is also provided of some additional factors by which system valve spacing could affect overall pipeline safety. The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) Using an adaptation of the Stephens hazard radius criteria, valve spacing has a negligible influence on natural gas pipeline safety for the pipeline diameter, pressure range, and valve spacings considered in this study. (2) Over the first 30 s of the transient, pipeline pressure has a far greater effect on the hazard radius calculated with the Stephens criteria than any variations in the transient flow decay profile and the average discharge rate. (3) Other factors besides the Stephens criteria, such as the longer burn time for an accidental fire, greater period of danger to emergency personnel, increased unavoidable loss of gas, and possible depressurization cooling of the shut-off valves may also be important when deciding whether a change in the required valve spacing would be beneficial from a safety standpoint. (4) The average normalized discharge rate of {lambda}{sub avg} = 0.33 assumed by Stephens in developing his safety criteria is an excellent conservative value for natural gas discharge at the pressures, valve spacings, and pipe diameter used in this study. This conclusion remains valid even when real rather than ideal gas properties are considered in the analysis. (5) Significant pipe wall cooling effects (T{sub w} < -50 F or 228 K) can extend for a mile or more upstream from the rupture point within 30 s of a break. These conditions are colder than the temperature range specifications for many valve lubricants. The length of the low-temperature zone due to this cooling effect is also essentially independent of the system shut-off valve spacing or the distance between the break and a compressor station. (6) Having more redundant shut-off valves available would reduce the probability that pipe cooling effects could interfere with isolating the broken area following a pipeline rupture accident.

  18. Gas chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry for determination of impurities in the anti-cancer drug isophosphoramide mustard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Richard B.; Chou, Chau-Wen; Boué, Stephen M.; Leblanc, Blaise W.; Rodgers, Andrew H.; Struck, Robert F.; Morgan, Lee Roy

    2004-02-01

    Isophosphoramide mustard (IPM) is known to have substantial anti-cancer activities in various animal models. Liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ES-MS) and LC-ES-MS/MS methodologies have been developed and applied to the analysis of synthesized preparations of IPM. Our studies reveal that the principal impurity in IPM is N-(2-chloroethyl)-N'-ethylphosphorodiamidic acid (MC-IPM) formed by dehydrochlorination of IPM with subsequent hydrogenation during synthesis. This impurity is present at levels in the range of 2-5% depending upon synthesis conditions. In addition, a second IPM derivative has been characterized by LC-ES-MS/MS and has been shown to be the product of a reaction of IPM with the dilute perchloric acid mobile phase used for liquid chromatography separations. The LC-ES-MS/MS method has been successfully employed to detect IPM spiked into a blood plasma sample. This work establishes that LC-ES-MS/MS is a viable tool for the detailed characterization of IPM and related products.

  19. Determination of chlorophenols in soil samples by microwave-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography–electron-capture detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming-Chi Wei; Jen-Fon Jen

    2003-01-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction was studied and applied for one-step in-situ sample preparation prior to analysis of chlorophenols (CPs) in soil samples. The CPs in soil sample were extracted into the aqueous solution and then directly onto the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber in headspace under the aid of microwave irradiation. After being desorbed from SPME fiber in

  20. Gas chromatography-electron ionization and chemical ionization mass spectrometric analysis of urinary phenmetrazine after derivatization with 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl chloride--a new derivative.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, A; Hart, A; Humphrey, P; Blackwell, W

    1998-05-01

    Phenmetrazine is a central nervous system stimulant currently used as an anorectic agent. The drug is abused and is reported to cause death from overdose. We describe a new derivatization method for phenmetrazine using 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl chloride. Quantitation of urinary phenmetrazine can be easily achieved by using N-ethyl amphetamine as an internal standard. The electron ionization mass spectrum of 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl derivative of phenmetrazine showed a molecular ion at m/z 427 and a base peak at m/z 70. In the methane chemical ionization mass spectrum, the base peak was observed at m/z 428 (protonated molecular ion). In the electron ionization mass spectrum of 4-carbethoxyhexafluorobutyryl derivative of the internal standard, N-ethyl amphetamine we did not observe a molecular ion. However, in the chemical ionization mass spectrum, the protonated molecular ion at m/z 414 was the base peak. The retention time of derivatized phenmetrazine (8.4 min) was substantially longer than the retention time of the underivatized molecule. Moreover, underivatized phenmetrazine showed poor peak shape (substantial tailing) while derivatized phenmetrazine had excellent chromatographic properties. The within-run and between-run precisions of the assay were 2.6% and 3.1% respectively at a urinary phenmetrazine concentration of 10 micrograms/mL. The assay was linear for urinary phenmetrazine concentration of 1 to 100 micrograms/mL with a detection limit of 0.2 microgram/mL. PMID:9608702

  1. Impact of Variations on 1-D Flow in Gas Turbine Engines via Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Khiem Viet; Tumer, Irem

    2004-01-01

    The unsteady compressible inviscid flow is characterized by the conservations of mass, momentum, and energy; or simply the Euler equations. In this paper, a study of the subsonic one-dimensional Euler equations with local preconditioning is presented using a modal analysis approach. Specifically, this study investigates the behavior of airflow in a gas turbine engine using the specified conditions at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine, to determine the impact of variations in pressure, velocity, temperature, and density at low Mach numbers. Two main questions motivate this research: 1) Is there any aerodynamic problem with the existing gas turbine engines that could impact aircraft performance? 2) If yes, what aspect of a gas turbine engine could be improved via design to alleviate that impact and to optimize aircraft performance? This paper presents an initial attempt to model the flow behavior in terms of their eigenfrequencies subject to the assumption of the uncertainty or variation (perturbation). The flow behavior is explored using simulation outputs from a customer-deck model obtained from Pratt & Whitney. Variations of the main variables (i.e., pressure, temperature, velocity, density) about their mean states at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine are modeled. Flow behavior is analyzed for the high-pressure compressor and combustion chamber utilizing the conditions on their left and right boundaries. In the same fashion, similar analyses are carried out for the high-pressure and low-pressure turbines. In each case, the eigenfrequencies that are obtained for different boundary conditions are examined closely based on their probabilistic distributions, a result of a Monte Carlo 10,000 sample simulation. Furthermore, the characteristic waves and wave response are analyzed and contrasted among different cases, with and without preconditioners. The results reveal the existence of flow instabilities due to the combined effect of variations and excessive pressures in the case of the combustion chamber and high-pressure turbine. Finally, a discussion is presented on potential impacts of the instabilities and what can be improved via design to alleviate them for a better aircraft performance.

  2. The Impact of Nuclear Star Formation on Gas Inflow to AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R. I.; Hicks, E.; Schartmann, M.; Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Engel, H.; Burkert, A.; Krause, M.; Sternberg, A.; Mueller Sánchez, F.; Maciejewski, W.

    2010-05-01

    Our adaptive optics observations of nearby AGN at spatial resolutions as small as 0.?085 show strong evidence for recent, but no longer active, nuclear star formation. We begin by describing observations that highlight two contrasting methods by which gas can flow into the central tens of parsecs. Gas accumulation in this region will inevitably lead to a starburst, and we discuss the evidence for such events. We then turn to the impact of stellar evolution on the further inflow of gas by combining a phenomenological approach with analytical modelling and hydrodynamic simulations. These complementary perspectives paint a picture in which all the processes are ultimately regulated by the mass accretion rate into the central hundred parsecs, and the ensuing starburst that occurs there. The resulting supernovae delay accretion by generating a starburst wind, which leaves behind a clumpy interstellar medium. This provides an ideal environment for slower stellar outflows to accrete inwards and form a dense turbulent disk on scales of a few parsecs. Such a scenario may resolve the discrepancy between the larger scale structure seen with adaptive optics and the small-scale structure seen with VLTI.

  3. Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs and their toxicity using PMF: Impact of gas/particle partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bo; Wang, Xin-Ming; Zhao, Xiu-Ying; Ding, Xiang; Fu, Xiao-Xin; Zhang, Yan-Li; He, Quan-Fu; Zhang, Zhou; Liu, Teng-Yu; Huang, Zou-Zhao; Chen, Lai-Guo; Peng, Yan; Guo, Hai

    2015-02-01

    24-h PM2.5 samples were simultaneously collected at six sites in a subtropical city of South China during November-December, 2009. Particle-phase concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organic tracers such as hopanes for vehicular emissions (VE), levoglucosan for biomass burning (BB) and picene for coal combustion (CC) were determined. Meanwhile, their gas-phase concentrations were calculated from gas/particle (G/P) partitioning theory using the particle-phase concentrations. The 4 ring PAHs (fluoranthene to chrysene) had lower particle-phase fractions (10%-79%) than other species. Estimated BaPeq and lifetime cancer risk for particle-only (P-only) vs gas + particle (G + P) data sets showed similar values, indicating PAHs with 5-7 rings dominated the carcinogenicity of PAHs. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was applied on both P-only and G + P data sets to estimate the source contributions to PAHs and their toxicity. Three common sources were identified: VE, BB and CC, with CC as the most significant source for both particulate (58%) and total (G + P, 40%) PAHs. While CC exhibited consistent contributions to BaPeq for P-only (66%) vs G + P (62%) solutions, VE and BB contributions were under- and overestimated by 68% and 47%, respectively by the P-only solution, as compared to the G + P solution. The results provide an insight on the impact of G/P partitioning on the source apportionment of PAHs and their toxicity.

  4. Technical, economic, and environmental impact study of converting Uzbekistan transportation fleets to natural gas operation. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-04-30

    This study, conducted by Radian International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report assesses the feasibility (technical, economic and environmental) of converting the Uzbek transportation fleets to natural gas operation. The study focuses on the conversion of high fuel use vehicles and locomotives to liquefied natural gas (LNG) and the conversion of moderate fuel use veicles to compressed natural gas (CNG). The report is divided into the following sections: Executive Summary; (1.0) Introduction; (2.0) Country Background; (3.0) Characterization of Uzbek Transportation Fuels; (4.0) Uzbek Vehicle and Locomotive Fleet Characterization; (5.0) Uzbek Natural Gas Vehicle Conversion Shops; (6.0) Uzbek Natural Gas Infrastructure; (7.0) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) for Vehicular Fuel in Uzbekistan; (8.0) Economic Feasibility Study; (9.0) Environmental Impact Analysis; References; Appendices A - S.

  5. VARIABILITY IN COAL SEAM GAS CONTENTS THAT IMPACTS ON FUGITIVE GAS EMISSIONS ESTIMATIONS FOR AUSTRALIAN BLACK COALS1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ray Williams; Renate Sliwa

    This study was prompted by a need to understand the factors influencing estimates of fugitive greenhouse gas emissions generated from black coal as a by-product during the mining process. Although they comprise some 3% of Australia's net greenhouse gas emissions, they will be increasingly significant with the increase in coal production. Fugitive gas emissions from coal mining and handling are

  6. Impact resistance of lightweight hybrid structures for gas turbine engine fan containment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Revilock, Duane M.

    2003-08-01

    The ballistic impact resistance of hybrid composite sandwich structures was evaluated with the ultimate goal of developing new materials or structures for potential gas turbine engine, fan containment applications. The sandwich structures investigated consisted of GLARE-5 (Aviation Equipment, Inc., Costa Mesa, CA) laminates as face sheets with lightweight cellular metallic materials such as honeycomb, foam, and lattice block as a core material. The impact resistance of these hybrid sandwich structures was compared with GLARE-5 laminates and 2024-T3 Al sheets, which were tested as a function of areal weight (material thickness). The GLARE-5 laminates exhibited comparable impact properties to that of 2024-T3 Al at low areal weights, even though there were significant differences in the static tensile properties of these materials. The GLARE-5, however, did have a greater ballistic limit than straight aluminum sheet at higher areal weights. Furthermore, there is up to a 25% advantage in ballistic limit for the GLARE-5/foam sandwich structures compared with straight 2024-T3 Al. But no advantage in ballistic limit was observed between any of the hybrid sandwich structures and thicker versions of GLARE-5. Recommendations for future work are provided, based on these preliminary data.

  7. Impact Resistance of Lightweight Hybrid Structures for Gas Turbine Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Revilock, Duane M.

    2003-01-01

    The ballistic impact resistance of hybrid composite sandwich structures was evaluated with the ultimate goal of developing new materials or structures for potential gas turbine engine fan containment applications. The sandwich structures investigated consisted of GLARE-5 laminates as face sheets with lightweight cellular metallic materials such as honeycomb, foam, and lattice block as a core material. The impact resistance of these hybrid sandwich structures was compared to GLARE-5 laminates and 2024-T3 Al sheet, which were tested as a function of areal weight (material thickness). The GLARE-5 laminates exhibited comparable impact properties to that of 2024-T3 Al at low areal weights, even though there were significant differences in the static tensile properties of these materials. The GLARE-5, however, did have a greater ballistic limit than straight aluminum sheet at higher areal weights. Furthermore, there is up to a 25% advantage in ballistic limit for the GLARE-5/foam sandwich structures compared to straight 2024-T3 Al. But no advantage in ballistic limit was observed between any of the hybrid sandwich structures and thicker versions of GLARE-5. Recommendations for future work are provided, based on these preliminary data.

  8. Air Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Development: A Barnett Shale Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. W.; Zielinska, B.; Campbell, D.; Fujita, E.

    2013-12-01

    Many atmospheric pollutants have been linked to the lifecycle of unconventional natural gas. Attributing air emissions to particular segments of the natural gas life cycle can be difficult. Further, describing individual and community exposure to air pollutants is complex since contaminants can vary spatially and temporally, based on proximity to point sources, magnitude, transport and dispersion of emissions. Here we will present data from the Barnett Shale formation near Dallas/Fort Worth, TX with the goal of providing a better understanding of the extent to which population exposure to air toxics is associated with emissions from natural gas production operations in this region. The Barnett Shale formation covers nearly 13000 km2 and is located west of Dallas/Fort Worth, TX. This formation contains natural gas, natural gas condensate, and light oil. Samples were collected in April-May 2010 in two phases with the purpose of Phase 1 being to characterize emissions from major gas production facilities in the area, while Phase 2 involved more intensive monitoring of two residential areas identified in Phase 1. One of the residential areas was downwind of a gas well and two condensate tanks and the other area was close to a compressor station. Phase 1 sampling involved our mobile monitoring system, which includes real-time estimates of volatile organic compounds (VOC), using a portable photoionization detector monitor; continuous NO, PM2.5 mass, and a GasFindIR camera. Phase 1 also included 1-hr integrated canister VOC samples and carbonyl compound samples, using DNPH impregnated Sep-Pac Si cartridges. These samples were analyzed by GC/MS and high performance liquid chromatography with a photodiode array detector. Phase 2 sampling included 7-day integrated passive samples for NOx, NO2 and SO2 using Ogawa passive samplers, and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), 1,3-butadiene, and carbonyl compounds (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein) using Radiello samplers. In addition, weekly PM2.5 samples were collected on Teflon and quartz filters that were analyzed for mass and elements (Teflon filters), for organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) by thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) method and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) using a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique (quartz filters).VOC emissions from condensate tanks were largely low molecular weight hydrocarbons, however these tanks were enhancing local benzene concentrations mostly through malfunctioning valves. PAH concentrations were low (in pg m-3 range) but the average PAH concentration profiles (higher fraction of methylated PAHs) indicated an influence of compressor engine exhausts and increased diesel transportation traffic. These measurements, however, only represent a small 'snap-shot' of the overall emissions picture from this area. For instance during this one month study, the compressor station was predominantly downwind of the community and this may not be the case in other times of the year. Long-term study of these systems, especially in areas that have yet to experience this type of exploration, but will in the future, is needed to truly evaluate the air impacts of unconventional natural gas development.

  9. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  10. The impact of soil amendments on greenhouse gas emissions: a comprehensive life cycle assessment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLonge, M. S.; Ryals, R.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Soil amendments, such as compost and manure, can be applied to grasslands to improve soil conditions and enhance aboveground net primary productivity. Applying such amendments can also lead to soil carbon (C) sequestration and, when materials are diverted from waste streams (e.g., landfills, manure lagoons), can offset greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, amendment production and application is also associated with GHG emissions, and the net impact of these amendments remains unclear. To investigate the potential for soil amendments to reduce net GHG emissions, we developed a comprehensive, field-scale life cycle assessment (LCA) model. The LCA includes GHG (i.e., CO2, CH4, N2O) emissions of soil amendment production, application, and ecosystem response. Emissions avoided by diverting materials from landfills or manure management systems are also considered. We developed the model using field observations from grazed annual grassland in northern California (e.g., soil C; above- and belowground net primary productivity; C:N ratios; trace gas emissions from soils, manure piles, and composting), CENTURY model simulations (e.g., long-term soil C and trace gas emissions from soils under various land management strategies), and literature values (e.g., GHG emissions from transportation, inorganic fertilizer production, composting, and enteric fermentation). The LCA quantifies and contrasts the potential net GHG impacts of applying compost, manure, and commercial inorganic fertilizer to grazing lands. To estimate the LCA uncertainty, sensitivity tests were performed on the most widely ranging or highly uncertain parameters (e.g., compost materials, landfill emissions, manure management system emissions). Finally, our results are scaled-up to assess the feasibility and potential impacts of large-scale adoption of soil amendment application as a land-management strategy in California. Our base case results indicate that C sinks and emissions offsets associated with compost production and application can exceed life cycle emissions, potentially leading to a net reduction in GHG emissions of over 20 Mg CO2e per hectare of treated land. If similar results could be obtained in only 5% of California's 2,550,000 ha of rangeland, compost amendment application could offset the annual emissions of the California agriculture and forestry industries (> 28.25 million Mg CO2e, California Air Resources Board, 2008). Our findings indicate that application of compost amendments to grasslands may be an effective, beneficial, and relatively inexpensive strategy to contribute to climate change mitigation.

  11. Impacts of future Indian greenhouse gas emission scenarios on projected climate change parameters deduced from MAGICC model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mukti Sharma; Chhemendra Sharma; Abdul Qaiyum

    2012-01-01

    The MAGICC (Model for the Assessment of Greenhouse gas Induced Climate Change) model simulation has been carried out for the 2000–2100 period to investigate the impacts of future Indian greenhouse\\u000a gas emission scenarios on the atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide besides other parameters\\u000a like radiative forcing and temperature. For this purpose, the default global GHG (Greenhouse

  12. Using CQIM{trademark} to evaluate the performance and economic impacts of gas co-firing at Conesville Unit 3

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyo, J.A.; Pratapas, J.M.; Bleier, R.

    1996-12-31

    The Coal Quality Impact Model (CQIM{trademark}) was used to perform a case study on the performance and economic impacts of natural gas co-firing at American Electric Power`s Conesville Unit 3, a unit that was originally designed to burn coal. CQIM offers a quick, cost-effective solution to the performance and economic issues not normally considered when the interrelationships between performance improvements and penalties and busbar generation costs are examined. For this case study, gas co-firing was found to be economically advantageous over coal firing for Conesville Unit 3. The design coal was evaluated at 0, 10, 25, 50, and 75 percent gas co-firing at full-load conditions. The effect of gas co-firing on unit performance was a decrease in auxiliary power requirements and boiler efficiency as the amount of gas co-firing increased. Due to the reduction in boiler efficiency, the net unit heat rate increased as the amount of gas co-firing increased. The worsening of the net unit heat rate was offset by an improvement in availability, auxiliary power, and SO{sub 2} emissions as the percentage of gas co-firing was increased. On the basis of the performance improvements and penalties predicted by CQIM, the total fuel-related costs were reduced as the percentage of gas co-firing increased. The annual fuel cost component increased as a result of slightly higher natural gas prices and an increase in the net unit heat rate; however, waste disposal, O and M, and replacement energy costs decreased as the percentage of gas co-firing increased. Most of the O and M cost elements (SO{sub 2} emissions and maintenance) and replacement energy cost elements (availability and auxiliary power) decreased as the amount of gas co-firing increased.

  13. Impact origin of the Avak Structure, Arctic Alaska, and genesis of the Barrow gas fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschner, C.E.; Grantz, A.; Mullen, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    Geophysical and subsurface geologic data suggest that the Avak structure, which underlies the Arctic Coastal Plain 12 km southeast of Barrow, Alaska, is a hypervelocity meteorite or comet impact structure. The structure is a roughly circular area of uplifted, chaotically deformed Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous sedimentary rocks 8 km in diameter that is bounded by a ring of anastomosing, inwardly dipping, listric normal faults 12 km in diameter. Examination of cores from the Barrow gas fields and data concerning the age of the Avak structure suggest that the Avak meteorite struck a Late Cretaceous or Tertiary marine shelf or coastal plain between the Cenomanian (ca. 95 Ma), and deposition of the basal beds of the overlying late Pliocene and Quaternary Gubik Formation (ca. 3 Ma). -from Authors

  14. Bird interactions with offshore oil and gas platforms: review of impacts and monitoring techniques.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Robert A; Allard, Karel A; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of oil and gas platforms are currently operating in offshore waters globally, and this industry is expected to expand in coming decades. Although the potential environmental impacts of offshore oil and gas activities are widely recognized, there is limited understanding of their impacts on migratory and resident birds. A literature review identified 24 studies and reports of bird-platform interactions, most being qualitative and half having been peer-reviewed. The most frequently observed effect, for seabirds and landbirds, is attraction and sometimes collisions associated with lights and flares; episodic events have caused the deaths of hundreds or even thousands of birds. Though typically unpredictable, anecdotally, it is known that poor weather, such as fog, precipitation and low cloud cover, can exacerbate the effect of nocturnal attraction to lights, especially when coincidental with bird migrations. Other effects include provision of foraging and roosting opportunities, increased exposure to oil and hazardous environments, increased exposure to predators, or repulsion from feeding sites. Current approaches to monitoring birds at offshore platforms have focused on observer-based methods which can offer species-level bird identification, quantify seasonal patterns of relative abundance and distribution, and document avian mortality events and underlying factors. Observer-based monitoring is time-intensive, limited in spatial and temporal coverage, and suffers without clear protocols and when not conducted by trained, independent observers. These difficulties are exacerbated because deleterious bird-platform interaction is episodic and likely requires the coincidence of multiple factors (e.g., darkness, cloud, fog, rain conditions, occurrence of birds in vicinity). Collectively, these considerations suggest a need to implement supplemental systems for monitoring bird activities around offshore platforms. Instrument-based approaches, such as radar, cameras, acoustic recordings, and telemetry, hold promise for continuous monitoring. Recommendations are provided for a rigorous and comprehensive monitoring approach within an adaptive management framework. PMID:25261750

  15. Aluminum/ammonia heat pipe gas generation and long term system impact for the Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    In the Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC) project, eight heat pipes (HPs) are used to remove heat from the camera's inner electronic sensors to the spacecraft's outer, cold radiator surface. For proper device functioning and maximization of the signal-to-noise ratios, the Charge Coupled Devices (CCD's) must be maintained at -95 C or lower. Thermoelectric coolers (TEC's) cool the CCD's, and heat pipes deliver each TEC's nominal six to eight watts of heat to the space radiator, which reaches an equilibrium temperature between -15 C to -70 C. An initial problem was related to the difficulty to produce gas-free aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. An investigation was, therefore, conducted to determine the cause of the gas generation and the impact of this gas on CCD cooling. In order to study the effect of gas slugs in the WFPC system, a separate HP was made. Attention is given to fabrication, testing, and heat pipe gas generation chemistry studies.

  16. Impact of Salinity on the Air-Water Partition Coefficient of Gas Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Pope, Gary A.; Evans, John C.; Cameron, Richard J.

    2005-09-01

    The use of a gas partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) has been proposed as a standard approach to the measurement of field-scale vadose zone water saturation fractions. The accuracy of the saturation measurement is largely dependent on the determination of the air-water partitioning coefficient, K, of the tracers; however, in practice, K is also strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the water. In this study, column tests were conducted to investigate the impact of salinity on tracer partitioning coefficients for two promising gas phase candidate tracers, dibromomethane and dimethylether. Sodium thiosulfate was used as a salinity surrogate. The dynamic K values of the two partitioning tracers were measured for sodium thiosulfate concentrations between 0% and 36% by weight. Methane was used as the non-partitioning tracer for all experiments. K values were found to decrease significantly with increasing sodium thiosulfate concentration. Similar correlations between K values and sodium thiosulfate concentration were found for both of the partitioning tracers tested.

  17. ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF TOA PARTITIONING ON DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, G.

    2013-06-18

    An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of increasing the amount of TOA in the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon of the current solvent limit (150 ppm) in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would be about 7% higher and the nonvolatile hydrogen would be 2% higher than the actual current solvent (126 ppm) with an addition of up to 3 ppm of TOA when the concentration of Isopar? L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm and the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle. Therefore, the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 3 ppm of TOA in the effluent based on these assumptions. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

  18. Decreasing Impact Tilt on a High Performance Two-Stage Gas Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, M. E.; Rigg, P. A.; Esparza, J. S.

    2007-06-01

    There are four high-performance two-stage light gas guns in operation in the DOE complex. All four guns are similar in performance and diagnostics capabilities. Projectile velocity on these guns has typically been measured using a combination of magnetic coils and two frames of flash radiography. This requires that the projectile be in 'free flight' for a long distance (18 to 25 inches typical) in order to capture the projectile in flight. This leads to typical projectile tilt at impact in excess of 10 mrad. Recently, we have replaced the coil/x-ray system on the LANL high performance two-stage gun with Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) to obtain high accuracy (0.1%) projectile velocity measurements. This allows us to move the target very close to the end of the barrel to potentially decrease the impact tilt significantly. We will present the results of this study and compare them to the performance of the gun when the free flight section was present.

  19. Air Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Acquisition, Processing, and Use: A Critical Review

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    to rapid and intensive development of many unconventional natural gas plays (e.g., shale gas, tight sand as sandstones (tight-sand gas), shales (shale gas), and coal (coal-bed methane).1 Between 2000 and 2011% and is expected to reach 80% by 2040.1 In particular, annual shale gas production is expected to double from 7

  20. Potential of best practice to reduce impacts from oil and gas projects in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N; Powers, Bill

    2013-01-01

    The western Amazon continues to be an active and controversial zone of hydrocarbon exploration and production. We argue for the urgent need to implement best practices to reduce the negative environmental and social impacts associated with the sector. Here, we present a three-part study aimed at resolving the major obstacles impeding the advancement of best practice in the region. Our focus is on Loreto, Peru, one of the largest and most dynamic hydrocarbon zones in the Amazon. First, we develop a set of specific best practice guidelines to address the lack of clarity surrounding the issue. These guidelines incorporate both engineering-based criteria and key ecological and social factors. Second, we provide a detailed analysis of existing and planned hydrocarbon activities and infrastructure, overcoming the lack of information that typically hampers large-scale impact analysis. Third, we evaluate the planned activities and infrastructure with respect to the best practice guidelines. We show that Loreto is an extremely active hydrocarbon front, highlighted by a number of recent oil and gas discoveries and a sustained government push for increased exploration. Our analyses reveal that the use of technical best practice could minimize future impacts by greatly reducing the amount of required infrastructure such as drilling platforms and access roads. We also document a critical need to consider more fully the ecological and social factors, as the vast majority of planned infrastructure overlaps sensitive areas such as protected areas, indigenous territories, and key ecosystems and watersheds. Lastly, our cost analysis indicates that following best practice does not impose substantially greater costs than conventional practice, and may in fact reduce overall costs. Barriers to the widespread implementation of best practice in the Amazon clearly exist, but our findings show that there can be great benefits to its implementation. PMID:23650541

  1. Enhanced formation of disinfection byproducts in shale gas wastewater-impacted drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Zeng, Teng; Harkness, Jennifer; Vengosh, Avner; Mitch, William A

    2014-10-01

    The disposal and leaks of hydraulic fracturing wastewater (HFW) to the environment pose human health risks. Since HFW is typically characterized by elevated salinity, concerns have been raised whether the high bromide and iodide in HFW may promote the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and alter their speciation to more toxic brominated and iodinated analogues. This study evaluated the minimum volume percentage of two Marcellus Shale and one Fayetteville Shale HFWs diluted by fresh water collected from the Ohio and Allegheny Rivers that would generate and/or alter the formation and speciation of DBPs following chlorination, chloramination, and ozonation treatments of the blended solutions. During chlorination, dilutions as low as 0.01% HFW altered the speciation toward formation of brominated and iodinated trihalomethanes (THMs) and brominated haloacetonitriles (HANs), and dilutions as low as 0.03% increased the overall formation of both compound classes. The increase in bromide concentration associated with 0.01-0.03% contribution of Marcellus HFW (a range of 70-200 ?g/L for HFW with bromide = 600 mg/L) mimics the increased bromide levels observed in western Pennsylvanian surface waters following the Marcellus Shale gas production boom. Chloramination reduced HAN and regulated THM formation; however, iodinated trihalomethane formation was observed at lower pH. For municipal wastewater-impacted river water, the presence of 0.1% HFW increased the formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during chloramination, particularly for the high iodide (54 ppm) Fayetteville Shale HFW. Finally, ozonation of 0.01-0.03% HFW-impacted river water resulted in significant increases in bromate formation. The results suggest that total elimination of HFW discharge and/or installation of halide-specific removal techniques in centralized brine treatment facilities may be a better strategy to mitigate impacts on downstream drinking water treatment plants than altering disinfection strategies. The potential formation of multiple DBPs in drinking water utilities in areas of shale gas development requires comprehensive monitoring plans beyond the common regulated DBPs. PMID:25203743

  2. Green House Gas Emissions and the Economic Impacts EU Climate Change Policies (in Finnish with an English abstract\\/summary)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olavi Rantala

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the main features of a model developed for fore-casting greenhouse gas emissions in major EU countries and Finland as well as for simulating the economic impacts of EU climate change policies. Energy demand and emissions are determined in the model by economic growth and weather conditions. Output growth especially in the energy intensive industry determines the consumption

  3. A Framework to Predict the Impacts of Shale Gas Infrastructures on the Forest Fragmentation of an Agroforest Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racicot, Alexandre; Babin-Roussel, Véronique; Dauphinais, Jean-François; Joly, Jean-Sébastien; Noël, Pascal; Lavoie, Claude

    2014-05-01

    We propose a framework to facilitate the evaluation of the impacts of shale gas infrastructures (well pads, roads, and pipelines) on land cover features, especially with regards to forest fragmentation. We used a geographic information system and realistic development scenarios largely inspired by the PA (United States) experience, but adapted to a region of QC (Canada) with an already fragmented forest cover and a high gas potential. The scenario with the greatest impact results from development limited by regulatory constraints only, with no access to private roads for connecting well pads to the public road network. The scenario with the lowest impact additionally integrates ecological constraints (deer yards, maple woodlots, and wetlands). Overall the differences between these two scenarios are relatively minor, with <1 % of the forest cover lost in each case. However, large areas of core forests would be lost in both scenarios and the number of forest patches would increase by 13-21 % due to fragmentation. The pipeline network would have a much greater footprint on the land cover than access roads. Using data acquired since the beginning of the shale gas industry, we show that it is possible, within a reasonable time frame, to produce a robust assessment of the impacts of shale gas extraction. The framework we propose could easily be applied to other contexts or jurisdictions.

  4. NONWATER QUALITY IMPACTS OF CLOSED-CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS AND THE INTERACTION OF STACK GAS AND COOLING TOWER PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature survey of the nonwater quality impacts of closed-cycle cooling systems. Following discussions of cooling tower and stack gas plumes, interactions of these plumes are considered. For cooling tower plumes, plume types, behavior, salt drift g...

  5. Methodology for assessing onshore impacts for Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development. Volume I. executive summary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tencer

    1980-01-01

    Volume I is the first of three volumes presenting methodologies for assessing onshore impacts for offshore continental shelf oil and gas development. The primary objective of this methodology is to offer guidelines for obtaining early projections of future significant activities. Designed as a primer for potential users to determine whether they want to use all or part of the methodology,

  6. Molasses for ethanol: The economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Molasses for ethanol: The economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol Anand R Gopal1,4,6 and Daniel M Kammen1,2,3,5 1 Energy supplying country for the production of sugarcane ethanol; fresh mill-pressed cane juice from a Brazilian

  7. Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis

  8. Greenhouse Gas and Particulate Emissions and Impacts from Cooking Technologies in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, D. M.; Bailis, R.; Kituyi, E.; Ezzati, M.

    2003-12-01

    In much of Africa, the largest fraction of energy consumption occurs within the residential sector and is derived primarily from woodfuels burned in simple stoves with poor combustion characteristics. Many of the products of incomplete combustion (PICs) are damaging to human health, particularly when they are concentrated in poorly ventilated indoor environments. Incomplete combustion also has potentially harmful impacts on the climate. Prevalent PICs include methane, a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is among the pollutants subject to controls under the Kyoto Protocol as well as carbon monoxide (CO), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and particulate matter (PM), which can all have an effect on climate, but are not subject to controls under Kyoto. In addition, when woodfuels are used at a rate that reduces standing stocks of trees over the medium or long term, the CO2 released by combustion also has an impact. The choice of stove and fuel technology can have a significant impact on the emission of GHGs as well as on human exposure to health damaging pollutants. In this paper we analyze the emissions of different household energy technologies on a life-cycle basis. We use emission factors to estimate the emissions associated with production, distribution and end-use of common household fuels and assess the likely impacts of these emissions on public health and the global environment. We focus largely on charcoal, a popular fuel in many sub-Saharan African countries. Charcoal is produced by heating wood in the absence of sufficient air for complete combustion to occur. This process removes moisture and most of the volatile compounds. The compounds driven off in the process consist of condensable tars as well as many gaseous hydrocarbons, including ~40 g CH4 per kg of charcoal produced. Combining upstream and end-use emissions, every meal cooked with charcoal has 2-10 times the global warming effect of cooking the same meal with firewood and 5-12 times the effect of cooking the same meal with LPG or kerosene. When charcoal is produced in large quantities, as it is in Africa, the net warming effect can exceed the impact from the "modern energy sector" (transportation and industry) by 50-100 percent, even if charcoal is produced on a sustainable cycle so that all of the wood harvested for charcoal production is allowed to regenerate. However, while charcoal may be worse than firewood with respect to greenhouse gas emissions, it is an improvement with respect to exposure to health damaging pollutants, particularly particulate matter (PM). Levels of PM in households using charcoal are over 90 percent lower than households using open wood fires (316 -(159) mg/m3 for households using charcoal in a common improved stove compared to 3764 (360) mg/m3) for households using wood in open fires: mean (standard error)). These differences in exposure are consistent with 30 and 50 percent reductions in the incidence of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in adults and children under 5 respectively. Reconciling the costs and benefits of different household energy technologies creates a difficult policy challenge, particularly with the severe budgetary and resource constraints that household consumers and government agencies face in sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. Reducing Onshore Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Impacts Using a Broad-Based Stakeholder Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Childers

    2011-03-30

    Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research project strived to gain input and insight from such a broad array of stakeholders in order to identify approaches with the potential to satisfy their diverse objectives. The research team examined three of the most vital issue categories facing onshore domestic production today: (1) surface damages including development in urbanized areas, (2) impacts to wildlife (specifically greater sage grouse), and (3) air pollution, including its potential contribution to global climate change. The result of the research project is a LINGO (Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil) handbook outlining approaches aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating environmental impacts. The handbook identifies technical solutions and approaches which can be implemented in a practical and feasible manner to simultaneously achieve a legitimate balance between environmental protection and fluid mineral development. It is anticipated that the results of this research will facilitate informed planning and decision making by management agencies as well as producers of oil and natural gas. In 2008, a supplemental task was added for the researchers to undertake a 'Basin Initiative Study' that examines undeveloped and/or underdeveloped oil and natural gas resources on a regional or geologic basin scope to stimulate more widespread awareness and development of domestic resources. Researchers assessed multi-state basins (or plays), exploring state initiatives, state-industry partnerships and developing strategies to increase U.S. oil and gas supplies while accomplishing regional economic and environmental goals.

  10. Impact of wood pruning to greenhouse gas emissions in three orchards and a vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Sonja; Schleicher, Sarah; Bischoff, Wolf-Anno; Gomez Palermo, Maider; Kern, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Pruning of orchards and vineyards is usually burned or left on the soil for nutrient and organic carbon recycling. Recently the interest rose to extract pruning for energetic use. Very few studies exist that analyzed the effects of pruning removal on soil physical and chemical characteristics. This is linked to the fact that changes are expected rather in the long term, but project funding is typically restricted to 2 or 3 years. Some soil characteristics, however, as organic carbon content and greenhouse gas emissions might also change on the short term as our literature review reveals. The main objective of this research is to determine if pruning extraction from orchards and vineyards impact greenhouse gas emissions (N2O, CH4, and CO2) from soil to the atmosphere, change soil nitrogen and carbon content or effect nitrogen leaching. Results from our study and from the literature will be compiled to formulate best management practices for sustainable pruning utilization from orchards and vineyards. Here we compare four different study sites in a block design over two rows each with two parcels where we extracted pruning and two parcels where pruning was chipped and left on the soil (n=4). Comparisons were made for initial soil chemistry and greenhouse gas emissions in a cherry orchard without irrigation in Germany, a vineyard without irrigation in France, an almond orchard with drip irrigation in Spain and a peach orchard with flood irrigation in Spain. Soil greenhouse gas emissions depend on soil chemistry and soil moisture. These characteristics can be expected to vary between the tree rows and inter-rows of orchards. Therefore we took soil samples from row and inter-row positions of each study site and analyzed them for chemical parameters (pH, total C, N, S, and H, and available PO4, NH4, NO3, K, Mg, Ca). Additionally soil moisture and temperature data have been recorded for tree rows and inter-rows in the cherry orchard and the vineyard. Gas samples were taken with closed chambers twice a month in both row positions from all four study sites. Results reveal some initial differences of soil chemical parameter, in particular for the cherry orchard. No pruning treatment effects were found during the first growing season after treatment installation. We found, however, differences in CO2 emissions according to the sampling position in the orchards during the summer months. CO2 emissions were higher in the inter-row in vineyards than in the vine rows. In the cherry and almond orchard the opposite was found with higher CO2 emissions in tree rows than inter-rows. This finding indicates that possible pruning effects on greenhouse gas emissions that might get apparent in the long term can vary according to sampling position.

  11. The Spatial and Temporal Consumptive Water Use Impacts of Rapid Shale Gas Development and Use in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacsi, A. P.; Allen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several years, the development of shale gas resources has proceeded rapidly in many areas of the United States, and this shale gas development requires the use of millions of gallons of water, per well, for hydraulic fracturing. Recent life cycle assessments of natural gas from shale formations have calculated the potential for water use reduction when water use is integrated along the entire natural gas supply chain, if the shale gas is used in natural-gas power plants to displace coal-fired electricity generation. Actual grid operation, however, is more complicated and would require both that sufficient unused natural gas generation capacity exists for the displacement of coal-fired power generation and that the natural gas price is low enough that the switching is financially feasible. In addition, water savings, which would occur mainly from a reduction in the cooling water demand at coal-fired power plants, may occur in different regions and at different times than water used in natural gas production. Thus, consumptive water impacts may be spatial and temporally disparate, which is not a consideration in current life-cycle literature. The development of shale gas resources in Texas in August 2008 through December 2009 was chosen as a case study for characterizing this phenomenon since Texas accounted for two-thirds of the shale gas produced in the United States during this period and since the price of natural gas for electricity generation dropped significantly over the episode. Changes to the Texas self-contained electric grid (ERCOT) for a scenario with actual natural gas production and prices was estimated using a constrained grid model, rather than assuming that natural gas generation would displace coal-fired power plant usage. The actual development scenario was compared to an alternative development scenario in which natural gas prices remained elevated throughout the episode. Upstream changes in water consumption from lignite (coal) mining and natural gas production in Texas were also estimated, and water consumption was aggregated by river basin for spatial resolution. Temporal results indicated that the development of shale gas resources during the episode led to a net reduction in consumptive water use in Texas but that a lag time existed before the water use in natural gas production regions was offset by changes in the electricity generation and lignite mining sectors. The water impact on specific river basins in production regions was varied. Some river basins had sufficient changes in coal-fired power plant generation to offset increased water use in shale gas production and for cooling at natural-gas fired power plants, while others did not. Thus, some areas have likely experienced increased water use due to shale gas production despite overall reductions in life-cycle consumptive water use in the state. The largest consumptive water use increase for a river basin, however, was less than 1% of its total water consumption.

  12. The impact of CO{sub 2} taxation on oil and gas production in Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Celius, H.K. [IKU Petroleum Research, Trondheim (Norway); Ingeberg, K. [ECON Center for Economic Analysis, Oslo (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    This paper analyses the effect of the CO{sub 2} tax which was imposed on the burning of gas in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea, effective in 1991. The introduction of the tax resulted in a number of technical improvements aimed at the reduction of flaring, and increased energy efficiency of the power generation and total production process. An economic analysis was done to establish the following: (1) How did the tax affect the profitability of the technical measures which were implemented did the tax make it profitable, or would it have been profitable without the tax; (2) can we expect improvements to continue in the coming years; and (3) what will be the impact on the development of new fields, on field abandonment and on measures to improve oil recovery how much more oil will be left in the reservoir because of the tax. The first task was analyzed by an empirical approach, the latter based on models. The reduction in CO{sub 2} discharge during 1990-1993 was in the order of 8%, the main contribution came from reduction in flaring. This rate of improvement is not expected to continue, since most processes have been brought up to {open_quotes}state-of-the-art{close_quotes} by during these initial years. However, continuous energy optimization is still expected to give some improvements The majority of the technical measures taken to reduce the CO{sub 2} discharge proved to be profitable without the tax, and no unprofitable measures were implemented. The effect of earlier abandonment of fields is smaller than expected, advancing the abandonment by a few weeks for a typical North Sea field. The same seems to be the case for development of new fields. The additional reserves needed to compensate for the tax is in the order of 3 - 4% for a medium GOR oil field, above 5% for a larger gas field.

  13. Formation of secondary aerosols: impact of the gas-phase chemical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sartelet, K.; Seigneur, C.

    2010-08-01

    The impact of two recent gas-phase chemical kinetic mechanisms (CB05 and RACM2) on the formation of secondary inorganic and organic aerosols is compared for simulations of PM2.5 over Europe between 15 July and 15 August 2001. The host chemistry transport model is Polair3D of the Polyphemus air-quality platform. Particulate matter is modeled with SIREAM, which is coupled to the thermodynamic model ISORROPIA and to the secondary organic aerosol module MAEC. Model performance is satisfactory with both mechanisms for speciated PM2.5. The monthly-mean difference of the concentration of PM2.5 is less than 1 ?g/m3 (6%) over the entire domain. Secondary chemical components of PM2.5 include sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic aerosols, and the chemical composition of PM2.5 is not significantly different between the two mechanisms. Monthly-mean concentrations of inorganic aerosol are higher with RACM2 than with CB05 (+16% for sulfate, +11% for nitrate, and +12% for ammonium), whereas the concentrations of organic aerosols are slightly higher with CB05 than with RACM2 (+26% for anthropogenic SOA and +1% for biogenic SOA). Differences in the inorganic and organic aerosols result primarily from differences in oxidant concentrations (OH, O3 and NO3). Nitrate formation tends to be HNO3-limited over land and differences in the concentrations of nitrate are due to differences in concentration of HNO3. Differences in aerosols formed from aromatics SVOC are due to different aromatics oxidation between CB05 and RACM2. The aromatics oxidation in CB05 leads to more cresol formation, which then leads to more SOA. Differences in the aromatics aerosols would be significantly reduced with the recent CB05-TU mechanism for toluene oxidation. Differences in the biogenic aerosols are due to different oxidant concentrations (monoterpenes) and different particulate organic mass concentrations affecting the gas-particle partitioning of SOA (isoprene).

  14. Quantitative fluid inclusion gas analysis of airburst, nuclear, impact and fulgurite glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, John (University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK); Newsom, Horton E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Blamey, Nigel J. F. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2010-10-01

    We present quantitative fluid inclusion gas analysis on a suite of violently-formed glasses. We used the incremental crush mass spectrometry method (Norman & Blamey, 2001) to analyze eight pieces of Libyan Desert Glass (LDG). As potential analogues we also analyzed trinitite, three impact crater glasses, and three fulgurites. The 'clear' LDG has the lowest CO{sub 2} content and O{sub 2}/Ar ratios are two orders of magnitude lower than atmospheric. The 'foamy' glass samples have heterogeneous CO{sub 2} contents and O{sub 2}/Ar ratios. N{sub 2}/Ar ratios are similar to atmospheric (83.6). H{sub 2} and He are elevated but it is difficult to confirm whether they are of terrestrial or meteoritic origin. Combustion cannot account for oxygen depletion that matches the amount of CO{sub 2} produced. An alternative mechanism is required that removes oxygen without producing CO{sub 2}. Trinitite has exceedingly high CO{sub 2} which we attribute to carbonate breakdown of the caliche at ground zero. The O{sub 2}/Ar ratio for trinitite is lower than atmospheric but higher than all LDG samples. N{sub 2}/Ar ratios closely match atmospheric. Samples from Lonar, Henbury and Aouelloul impact craters have atmospheric N{sub 2}/Ar ratios. O{sub 2}/Ar ratios at Lonar and Henbury are 9.5 to 9.9 whereas the O{sub 2}/Ar ratio is 0.1 for the Aouelloul sample. In most fulgurites the N{sub 2}/Ar ratio is higher than atmospheric, possibly due to interference from CO. Oxygen ranges from 1.3 to 19.3%. Gas signatures of LDG inclusions neither match those from the craters, trinitite nor fulgurites. It is difficult to explain both the observed depletion of oxygen in the LDG and a CO{sub 2} level that is lower than it would be if the CO{sub 2} were simply a product of hydrocarbon combustion in air. One possible mechanism for oxygen depletion is that as air turbulently mixed with a hot jet of vaporized asteroid from an airburst and expanded, the atmospheric oxygen reacted with the metal vapor to form metal oxides that condensed. This observation is compatible with the model of Boslough & Crawford (2008) who suggest that an airburst incinerates organic materials over a large area, melting surface materials that then quench to form glass. Bubbles would contain a mixture of pre-existing atmosphere with combustion products from organic material and products of the reaction between vaporized cosmic materials (including metals) and terrestrial surface and atmosphere.

  15. Determining air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stephens-Romero, Shane; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jacob; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Adoption of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has been proposed as a strategy to reduce criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector and transition to fuel independence. However, it is uncertain (1) to what degree the reduction in criteria pollutants will impact urban air quality, and (2) how the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission gasoline-powered vehicles projected for a future year (e.g., 2060). To address these questions, the present study introduces a "spatially and temporally resolved energy and environment tool" (STREET) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure and HFCVs at a high level of geographic and temporal resolution. To demonstrate the utility of STREET, two spatially and temporally resolved scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure are evaluated in a prototypical urban airshed (the South Coast Air Basin of California) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed atmospheric chemistry and transport model followed by a comparison to a future gasoline scenario comprised of advanced ICE vehicles. One hydrogen scenario includes more renewable primary energy sources for hydrogen generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen generation, distribution, and fueling strategies. GHG emissions reductions range from 61 to 68% for both hydrogen scenarios in parallel with substantial improvements in urban air quality (e.g., reductions of 10 ppb in peak 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 mug/m(3) in 24-h-averaged particulate matter concentrations, particularly in regions of the airshed where concentrations are highest for the gasoline scenario). PMID:19943683

  16. Greenhouse gas emission impacts of alternative-fueled vehicles: Near-term vs. long-term technology options

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.Q.

    1997-05-20

    Alternative-fueled vehicle technologies have been promoted and used for reducing petroleum use, urban air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, greenhouse gas emission impacts of near-term and long-term light-duty alternative-fueled vehicle technologies are evaluated. Near-term technologies, available now, include vehicles fueled with M85 (85% methanol and 15% gasoline by volume), E85 (85% ethanol that is produced from corn and 15% gasoline by volume), compressed natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. Long-term technologies, assumed to be available around the year 2010, include battery-powered electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles fueled with E85 (ethanol produced from biomass), and fuel-cell vehicles fueled with hydrogen or methanol. The near-term technologies are found to have small to moderate effects on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, the long-term technologies, especially those using renewable energy (such as biomass and solar energy), have great potential for reducing vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. In order to realize this greenhouse gas emission reduction potential, R and D efforts must continue on the long-term technology options so that they can compete successfully with conventional vehicle technology.

  17. Characterization of VOCs Across Pennsylvania: Assessing Emissions from Rural, Forested, Agricultural and Natural Gas Drilling-Impacted Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannas, A. M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Ramos-Garcés, F.; Wang, D. K.; Martins, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of both biogenic and anthropogenic origin are important to troposphere chemistry, particularly the formation of photochemical smog and secondary organic aerosol. There is concern that increased natural gas exploration may lead to increased emissions of certain VOCs during well development and due to fugitive emissions from operational well sites and pipelines. For a six-day period in June 2012, a variety of VOCs were measured using canister sampling from a mobile measurement platform. Transects from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania were studied, with samples obtained in rural, forested, urban, farm-impacted and gas well-impacted sites. As expected, biogenic VOCs and isoprene oxidation products were enhanced in forested regions, while anthropogenic non-methane hydrocarbons were enhanced in urban areas. BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes) was enhanced in urban areas, but the concentrations of BTEX measured near developing and existing natural gas sites were similar to rural and forested sites. Halogenated hydrocarbons and Freon compounds were consistent at all site locations. We will discuss the specific concentrations and signatures of these compounds and assess the potential impact of agricultural activities and gas well development on the observed VOC concentrations and variability.

  18. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.

    2006-05-01

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  19. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.

    2005-08-01

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power, and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  20. Impact of Unconventional Shale Gas Waste Water Disposal on Surficial Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzarelli, I.; Akob, D.; Mumford, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    The development of unconventional natural gas resources has been rapidly increasing in recent years, however, the environmental impacts and risks are not yet well understood. A single well can generate up to 5 million L of produced water (PW) consisting of a blend of the injected fluid and brine from a shale formation. With thousands of wells completed in the past decade, the scope of the challenge posed in the management of this wastewater becomes apparent. The USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Program is studying both intentional and unintentional releases of PW and waste solids. One method for the disposal of PW is underground injection; we are assessing the potential risks of this method through an intensive, interdisciplinary study at an injection disposal facility in the Wolf Creek watershed in WV. Disposal of PW via injection begun in 2002, with over 5.5 mil. L of PW injected to date. The facility consists of the injection well, a tank farm, and two former holding ponds (remediated in early 2014) and is bordered by two small tributaries of Wolf Creek. Water and sediments were acquired from these streams in June 2014, including sites upstream, within, and downstream from the facility. We are analyzing aqueous and solid phase geochemistry, mineralogy, hydrocarbon content, microbial community composition, and potential toxicity. Field measurements indicated that conductivity downstream (416 ?S/cm) was elevated in comparison to upstream (74 ?S/cm) waters. Preliminary data indicated elevated Cl- (115 mg/L) and Br- (0.88 mg/L) concentrations downstream, compared to 0.88 mg/L Cl- and <0.03 mg/L Br- upstream of the facility. Because elevated TDS is a marker of PW, these data provide a first indication that PW from the facility is impacting nearby streams. In addition, total Fe concentrations downstream were 8.1 mg/L, far in excess of the 0.13 mg/L found upstream from the facility, suggesting the potential for microbial Fe cycling. We are conducting a broad suite of experiments to assess the potential for microbial metabolism of the organic components of PW, and to determine the effects of this metabolism on the geochemistry of the site. We anticipate that this study will prove to be a useful model for the potential impact of a PW disposal facility on adjoining surface- and shallow groundwater.

  1. Impact of Asphaltenes and Resins on the Wetting Characteristics of Tars at Former Manufactured Gas Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S. C.; Birak, P. S.; Rylander, S.; Pedit, J. A.; Miller, C. T.

    2008-12-01

    Tars produced as a byproduct of coal and oil gasification at manufactured gas plants (MGPs) during the 19th and early 20th centuries were often released into the environment through poor disposal practices or leaks in holding tanks and piping. These tars are persistent contaminants, leaching polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into groundwater and posing a significant risk to human and ecological health. MGP tars also have several properties that make them notoriously difficult to remediate. They are denser than water, so they can migrate to depths which make direct removal difficult or impossible, and their relatively high viscosities and ability to alter the wetting characteristics of porous media result in inefficient removal by traditional pump-and-treat methods. In this study, we investigate the last of these properties. Previous studies have linked wetting changes to asphaltenes---polar, high molecular weight compounds present in the tars. However, we have conducted qualitative bottle tests for tar samples collected from two former MGPs which indicate that there is no direct correlation between asphaltene concentration and the tendency to alter wetting characteristics of porous media. To better understand the factors controlling wetting behavior, we isolate asphaltenes and resins, another class of polar compounds, from a tar sample and recombine them with the remaining PAH mixture to create a series of tars of varying composition. We assess the relative impact of each of the fractions on wettability through contact angle measurements conducted at three different pHs.

  2. Impact of the Keystone XL pipeline on global oil markets and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Peter; Lazarus, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Climate policy and analysis often focus on energy production and consumption, but seldom consider how energy transportation infrastructure shapes energy systems. US President Obama has recently brought these issues to the fore, stating that he would only approve the Keystone XL pipeline, connecting Canadian oil sands with US refineries and ports, if it `does not significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution'. Here, we apply a simple model to understand the implications of the pipeline for greenhouse gas emissions as a function of any resulting increase in oil sands production. We find that for every barrel of increased production, global oil consumption would increase 0.6 barrels owing to the incremental decrease in global oil prices. As a result, and depending on the extent to which the pipeline leads to greater oil sands production, the net annual impact of Keystone XL could range from virtually none to 110 million tons CO2 equivalent annually. This spread is four times wider than found by the US State Department (1-27 million tons CO2e), who did not account for global oil market effects. The approach used here, common in lifecycle analysis, could also be applied to other pending fossil fuel extraction and supply infrastructure.

  3. Phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in manufactured gas plant-impacted soil.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Thomas; Banks, M Katherine; Schwab, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Contamination of soil by hazardous substances poses a significant threat to human, environmental, and ecological health. Cleanup of the contaminants using destructive, invasive technologies has proven to be expensive and more importantly, often damaging to the natural resource properties of the soil, sediment, or aquifer. Phytoremediation is defined as the cleanup of contaminated sites using plants. There has been evidence of enhanced polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation in rhizosphere soils for a limited number of plants. However, research focusing on the degradation of PAHs in the rhizosphere of trees is lacking. The objective of this study was to assess the potential use of trees to enhance degradation of PAHs located in manufactured gas plant-impacted soils. In greenhouse studies with intact soil cores, acenaphthene, anthracene, fluoranthene, naphthalene, and phenanthrene decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and hybrid poplar (Populus deltoides x P. nigra DN 34) phytoremediation treatments when compared to the unplanted soil control. Increases in PAH microbial degraders in rhizosphere soil were observed when compared to unvegetated soil controls. In addition, the rate of degradation or biotransformation of PAHs was greatest for soils with black willow (Salix nigra Marshall), followed by poplar, ash, and the unvegetated controls. These results support the hypothesis that a variety of plants can enhance the degradation of target PAHs in soil. PMID:16151227

  4. The Impact of a Lower Sea Ice Extent on Arctic Greenhouse Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Christensen, Torben R.; Lotte Sørensen, Lise; Rysgaard, Søren; McGuire, A. David; Miller, Paul A.; Walker, Donald A.

    2013-04-01

    Arctic sea ice extent hit a new record low in September 2012, when it fell to a level about two times lower than the 1979-2000 average. Record low sea ice extents such as these are often hailed as an obvious example of the impact of climate change on the Arctic. Less obvious, however, are the further implications of a lower sea ice extent on Arctic greenhouse gas exchange. For example, a reduction in sea ice, in consort with a lower snow cover, has been connected to higher surface temperatures in the terrestrial part of the Arctic (Screen et al., 2012). These higher temperatures and longer growing seasons have the potential to alter the CO2 balance of Arctic tundra through enhanced photosynthesis and respiration, as well as the magnitude of methane emissions. In fact, large changes are already observed in terrestrial ecosystems (Post et al., 2009), and concerns have been raised of large releases of carbon through permafrost thaw (Schuur et al., 2011). While these changes in the greenhouse gas balance of the terrestrial Arctic are described in numerous studies, a connection with a decline in sea ice extent is nonetheless seldom made. In addition to these changes on land, a lower sea ice extent also has a direct effect on the exchange of greenhouse gases between the ocean and the atmosphere. For example, due to sea ice retreat, more ocean surface remains in contact with the atmosphere, and this has been suggested to increase the oceanic uptake of CO2 (Bates et al., 2006). However, the sustainability of this increased uptake is uncertain (Cai et al., 2010), and carbon fluxes related directly to the sea ice itself add much uncertainty to the oceanic uptake of CO2 (Nomura et al., 2006; Rysgaard et al., 2007). Furthermore, significant emissions of methane from the Arctic Ocean have been observed (Kort et al., 2012; Shakhova et al., 2010), but the consequence of a lower sea ice extent thereon is still unclear. Overall, the decline in sea ice that has been seen in recent years has the potential to influence greenhouse gas exchange across terrestrial ecosystems and the Arctic Ocean, but the overall impact remains unclear. In this study, we therefore try to reduce this uncertainty by addressing the influence of the decline in sea ice extent on all affected greenhouse gas fluxes in the high latitudes. Also, we will address the need for more research, on the ocean and on the land, to understand the impact of a lower sea ice extent on Arctic greenhouse gas exchange. References: Bates, N. R., Moran, S. B., Hansell, D. A. and Mathis, J. T.: An increasing CO2 sink in the Arctic Ocean due to sea-ice loss, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L23609, doi:10.1029/2006GL027028, 2006. Cai, W.-J., Chen, L., Chen, B., Gao, Z., Lee, S. H., Chen, J., Pierrot, D., Sullivan, K., Wang, Y., Hu, X., Huang, W.-J., et al.: Decrease in the CO2 Uptake Capacity in an Ice-Free Arctic Ocean Basin, Science, 329(5991), 556-559, doi:10.1126/science.1189338, 2010. Kort, E. A., Wofsy, S. C., Daube, B. C., Diao, M., Elkins, J. W., Gao, R. S., Hintsa, E. J., Hurst, D. F., Jimenez, R., Moore, F. L., Spackman, J. R., et al.: Atmospheric observations of Arctic Ocean methane emissions up to 82 degrees north, Nature Geosci., 5(5), 318-321, doi:10.1038/NGEO1452, 2012. Nomura, D., Yoshikawa-Inoue, H. and Toyota, T.: The effect of sea-ice growth on air-sea CO2 flux in a tank experiment, vol. 58, pp. 418-426. 2006. Post, E., Forchhammer, M. C., Bret-Harte, M. S., Callaghan, T. V., Christensen, T. R., Elberling, B., Fox, A. D., Gilg, O., Hik, D. S., Høye, T. T., Ims, R. A., et al.: Ecological Dynamics Across the Arctic Associated with Recent Climate Change, Science, 325(5946), 1355-1358, doi:10.1126/science.1173113, 2009. Rysgaard, S., Glud, R. N., Sejr, M. K., Bendtsen, J. and Christensen, P. B.: Inorganic carbon transport during sea ice growth and decay: A carbon pump in polar seas, J. Geophys. Res., 112, C03016, doi:10.1029/2006JC003572, 2007. Schuur, E. A. G., Abbott, B. and Network, P. C.: High risk of permafrost thaw, Nature, 480(7375), 32-33, 2011. Screen, J. A., Deser, C. and

  5. Putting downward pressure on natural gas prices: The impact of renewable energy and energy efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryan Wiser; Mark Bolinger; Matthew St. Clair

    2004-01-01

    Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) is expected to reduce natural gas demand and in turn place downward pressure on gas prices. A number of recent modeling studies include an evaluation of this effect. Based on data compiled from those studies summarized in this paper, each 1% reduction in national natural gas demand appears likely to

  6. Impact of Australian natural gas and coal bed methane composition on PEM fuel cell performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Dicks; Tom Connor; John Bradley; Anna Lashtabeg

    2009-01-01

    Several PEM fuel cell systems are currently being marketed or developed as natural gas fuelled stationary power generation or cogeneration systems. Whilst each of these may perform adequately when fuelled with methane, the composition of natural gas varies widely around the world, according to the source and even the season. This study investigated the variation in composition of fuel gas

  7. The impact of a pulsing groundwater table on greenhouse gas emissions in riparian grey alder stands.

    PubMed

    Mander, Ülo; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Teemusk, Alar; Kanal, Arno; Uri, Veiko; Truu, Jaak

    2015-02-01

    Floods control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in floodplains; however, there is a lack of data on the impact of short-term events on emissions. We studied the short-term effect of changing groundwater (GW) depth on the emission of (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in two riparian grey alder (Alnus incana) stands of different age in Kambja, southern Estonia, using the opaque static chamber (five replicates in each site) and gas chromatography methods. The average carbon and total nitrogen content in the soil of the old alder (OA) stand was significantly higher than in the young alder (YA) stand. In both stands, one part was chosen for water table manipulation (Manip) and another remained unchanged with a stable and deeper GW table. Groundwater table manipulation (flooding) significantly increases CH4 emission (average: YA-Dry 468, YA-Manip 8,374, OA-Dry 468, OA-Manip 4,187 ?g C m(-2) h(-1)) and decreases both CO2 (average: OA-Dry 138, OA-Manip 80 mg C m(-2) h(-1)) and N2O emissions (average: OA-Dry 23.1, OA-Manip 11.8 ?g N m(-2) h(-1)) in OA sites. There was no significant difference in CO2 and CH4 emissions between the OA and YA sites, whereas in OA sites with higher N concentration in the soil, the N2O emission was significantly higher than at the YA sites. The relative CO2 and CH4 emissions (the soil C stock-related share of gaseous losses) were higher in manipulated plots showing the highest values in the YA-Manip plot (0.03 and 0.0030 % C day(-1), respectively). The soil N stock-related N2O emission was very low achieving 0.000019 % N day(-1) in the OA-Dry plot. Methane emission shows a negative correlation with GW, whereas the 20 cm depth is a significant limit below which most of the produced CH4 is oxidized. In terms of CO2 and N2O, the deeper GW table significantly increases emission. In riparian zones of headwater streams, the short-term floods (e.g. those driven by extreme climate events) may significantly enhance methane emission whereas the long-term lowering of the groundwater table is a more important initiator of N2O fluxes from riparian gley soils than flood pulses. PMID:25124475

  8. The impact of sulfur on the performance of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system operated with hydrocarboneous fuel gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Florian P. Nagel; Tilman J. Schildhauer; Josef Sfeir; Alexander Schuler; Serge M. A. Biollaz

    2009-01-01

    The impact of thiophene in the fuel gas of a commercial solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system is investigated for concentrations up to 400ppmV. Based on the measured voltage–current curves, an empiric correlation for the estimation of the expectable power output of the investigated SOFC system when operated with sulfur containing fuel gases is derived. An interrelation between the open

  9. Hurricane Andrew's impact on natural gas and oil facilities on the outer continental shelf (interim report as of November 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The interim report reviews Hurricane Andrew's impact on Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) natural gas and oil drilling and production facilities. The report provides background on Hurricane Andrew's progression, discusses how OCS operators responded to the storm, summarizes the types of damage to offshore facilies caused by Hurricane Andrew, and discusses Minerals Management Service's continuing damage assessment and repair efforts. The summaries of damage estimates are presented in tables in Appendix 1. A glossary of report terminology is provided in Appendix 2.

  10. Impact of Rotor Surface Velocity, Leakage Models and Real Gas Properties on Rotordynamic Force Predictions of Gas Labyrinth Seals 

    E-print Network

    Thorat, Manish R.

    2010-07-14

    -coupled stiffness. A test case is implemented to study the impact of variation of seal axial radial clearance on stability characteristics. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer and subsequent bulk flow models are based on the assumption of isothermal flow across...

  11. Quantitation of opioids in whole blood by electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Shan, Xiaoqin; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate

    2011-03-01

    Opioids are frequently encountered in Forensic Toxicology casework. A PubMed literature search was conducted to find a method using electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine whole blood specimens. A previously published method was identified, and an updated version was provided by the State of North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. This procedure was used as a starting point for development and validation of a refined procedure to be used in the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office Forensic Toxicology laboratory for routine analysis of antemortem forensic toxicology case samples. Materials and instrumentation common to most forensic toxicology laboratories were utilized while obtaining detection limits from 1 to 10 ng/mL and quantitation limits of 2.5 to 10 ng/mL using 1 mL of whole blood. Target compounds were chosen based on applicability to the method as well as availability and common use in the United States and include dihydrocodeine, codeine, morphine, hydrocodone, 6-monoacetylmorphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and oxymorphone. Each analyte demonstrated two zero-order linear ranges (r(2) > 0.990) over the concentrations evaluated (from 2.5 to 500 ng/mL). The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 12%. Quantitative accuracy was within ± 27% at 2.5 ng/mL, ± 11% at 10 ng/mL, and ± 8% at 50 ng/mL. The validated method provides a more sensitive procedure for the quantitation of common opioids in blood using standard laboratory equipment and a small amount of sample. PMID:21396229

  12. Shale Gas, Wind and Water: Assessing the Potential Cumulative Impacts of Energy Development on Ecosystem Services within the Marcellus Play

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jeffrey S.; Kiesecker, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Global demand for energy has increased by more than 50 percent in the last half-century, and a similar increase is projected by 2030. This demand will increasingly be met with alternative and unconventional energy sources. Development of these resources causes disturbances that strongly impact terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. The Marcellus Shale gas play covers more than 160,934 km2 in an area that provides drinking water for over 22 million people in several of the largest metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g. New York City, Washington DC, Philadelphia & Pittsburgh). Here we created probability surfaces representing development potential of wind and shale gas for portions of six states in the Central Appalachians. We used these predictions and published projections to model future energy build-out scenarios to quantify future potential impacts on surface drinking water. Our analysis predicts up to 106,004 new wells and 10,798 new wind turbines resulting up to 535,023 ha of impervious surface (3% of the study area) and upwards of 447,134 ha of impacted forest (2% of the study area). In light of this new energy future, mitigating the impacts of energy development will be one of the major challenges in the coming decades. PMID:24586599

  13. Technological Change and Its Labor Impact in Five Energy Industries. Coal Mining/Oil and Gas Extraction/Petroleum Refining/Petroleum Pipeline Transportation/Electric and Gas Utilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This bulletin appraises major technological changes emerging in five American industries (coal mining, oil and gas extraction, petroleum refining, petroleum pipeline transportation, and electric and gas utilities) and discusses the impact of these changes on productivity and occupations over the next five to ten years. Its separate reports on each…

  14. Gas

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and pain in the belly—especially after a big meal. Foods that can cause gas Some people naturally produce ... your stomach or throw up . Your breasts are big and sore . The area around your nipples gets darker. You crave certain foods. Or you really dislike certain foods. You feel ...

  15. The potential impact of renewable energy deployment on natural gas prices in New England

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2004-09-20

    Concerns about the price and supply of natural gas have deepened in recent years both nationally and in New England. Renewable energy (RE) technologies can directly hedge natural gas price risk by reducing the need to purchase variable-price natural gas-fired electricity generation, and replacing that generation with fixed-price renewable electricity supply. In addition to its direct contribution to price stability, an increasing number of studies show that renewable energy deployment can also put downward pressure on natural gas prices by reducing demand for gas among gas-fired generators. These gas price reductions are, in turn, expected to reduce electricity prices and--more importantly--directly reduce consumer natural gas bills. Many recent studies have found that this effect may be significant, substantially benefiting consumers. These studies are reviewed in the attached paper, published in the proceedings of a recent national energy conference. An important consideration is that--strictly speaking--this price reduction represents a consumer benefit that comes at the expense of producers; it therefore represents a wealth transfer, not a net gain in social welfare. That said, current concerns about the price and supply of natural gas suggest that policymakers may want to pursue actions that reduce the strain of high prices on consumer energy bills.

  16. Regional air quality impacts of increased natural gas production and use in Texas.

    PubMed

    Pacsi, Adam P; Alhajeri, Nawaf S; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Webster, Mort D; Allen, David T

    2013-04-01

    Natural gas use in electricity generation in Texas was estimated, for gas prices ranging from $1.89 to $7.74 per MMBTU, using an optimal power flow model. Hourly estimates of electricity generation, for individual electricity generation units, from the model were used to estimate spatially resolved hourly emissions from electricity generation. Emissions from natural gas production activities in the Barnett Shale region were also estimated, with emissions scaled up or down to match demand in electricity generation as natural gas prices changed. As natural gas use increased, emissions decreased from electricity generation and increased from natural gas production. Overall, NOx and SO2 emissions decreased, while VOC emissions increased as natural gas use increased. To assess the effects of these changes in emissions on ozone and particulate matter concentrations, spatially and temporally resolved emissions were used in a month-long photochemical modeling episode. Over the month-long photochemical modeling episode, decreases in natural gas prices typical of those experienced from 2006 to 2012 led to net regional decreases in ozone (0.2-0.7 ppb) and fine particulate matter (PM) (0.1-0.7 ?g/m(3)). Changes in PM were predominantly due to changes in regional PM sulfate formation. Changes in regional PM and ozone formation are primarily due to decreases in emissions from electricity generation. Increases in emissions from increased natural gas production were offset by decreasing emissions from electricity generation for all the scenarios considered. PMID:23441728

  17. A Study of the Impact of Variations on Aerodynamic Flow in Gas Turbine Engines via Monte-Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Khiem Viet; Tumer, Irem Y.

    2003-01-01

    The unsteady compressible inviscid flow is characterized by the conservations of mass, momentum, and energy; or simply the Euler equations. In this paper, a study of the subsonic one-dimensional Euler equations with local preconditioning is presented with a modal analysis approach. Specifically, this study investigates the behavior of airflow in a gas turbine engine using the specified conditions at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine, under the impact of variations in pressure, velocity, temperature, and density at low Mach numbers. Two main questions that motivate this research are: 1) Is there any aerodynamic problem with the existing gas turbine engines that could impact aircraft performance? 2) If yes, what aspect of a gas turbine engine could be improved via design to alleviate that impact and to optimize aircraft performance. This paper presents an initial attempt to the flow behavior in terms (perturbation) using simulation outputs from a customer-deck model obtained from Pratt&Whitney, (i.e., pressure, temperature, velocity, density) about their mean states at the inflow and outflow boundaries of the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine. Flow behavior is analyzed for the high pressure compressor and combustion chamber employing the conditions on their left and right boundaries. In the same fashion, similar analyses are carried out for the high and low-pressure turbines. In each case, the eigenfrequencies that are obtained for different boundary conditions are examined closely based on their probabilistic distributions, a result of a Monte Carlo 10,000-sample simulation. Furthermore, the characteristic waves and eave response are analyzed and contrasted among different cases, with and without preconditioners. The results reveal the existence of flow instabilities due to the combined effect of variations and excessive pressures; which are clearly the case in the combustion chamber and high-pressure turbine. Finally a discussion is presented on potential impacts of the instabilities and what can be improved via design to alleviate them for a better aircraft performance.

  18. Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range

    SciTech Connect

    Tonse, S. R.; Singer, B. C.

    2011-07-01

    As part of a larger study of liquefied natural gas impacts on device performance and pollutant emissions for existing equipment in California, this report describes a cmoputer modeling study of a partially premixed flame issueing from a single cooktop burner port. The model consisted of a reactive computational fluid dynamics three-dimensional spatial grid and a 71-species chemical mechanism with propane combustion capability. Simulations were conducted with a simplified fuel mixture containing methane, ethane, and propane in proportions that yield properties similar to fuels distributed throughout much of California now and in recent years (baseline fuel), as well as with two variations of simulated liquefied natural gas blends. A variety of simulations were conducted with baseline fuel to explore the effect of several key parameters on pollutant formation and other flame characteristics. Simulations started with fuel and air issuing through the burner port, igniting, and continuing until the flame was steady with time. Conditions at this point were analyzed to understand fuel, secondary air and reaction product flows, regions of pollutant formation, and exhaust concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and formaldehyde. A sensitivity study was conducted, varying the inflow parameters of this baseline gs about real-world operating conditions. Flame properties responded as expected from reactive flow theory. In the simulation, carbon monoxide levels were influenced more by the mixture's inflow velocity than by the gas-to-air ratio in the mixture issuing from the inflow port. Additional simulations were executed at two inflow conditions - high heat release and medium heat release - to examine the impact of replacing the baseline gas with two mixtures representative of liquefied natural gas. Flame properties and pollutant generation rates were very similar among the three fuel mixtures.

  19. First Environmental Impact Statement for an Oil and Gas Project to use the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) for the Far-Field Assessment including Ozone Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L. K.; Shah, T.; Johnson, J.; Grant, J.; Bar-Ilan, A.; Kemball-Cook, S. R.; Zapert, J.; Morris, R.

    2014-12-01

    The CAMx photochemical grid model was used to estimate potential air quality and air quality related values (acid deposition and visibility) impacts caused by the drilling and production of 8950 proposed natural gas wells in southwest Wyoming. This is the first time CAMx has been used to assess the far-field air quality impacts, including ozone, in an environmental impact statement for an oil and gas project. CAMx source apportionment capabilities estimated project-specific contributions to total ambient air concentrations for ozone, NO2, SO2, PM2.5, PM10, as well as acid deposition and potential visibility impacts from the proposed gas wells. The project emissions were based on a very detailed inventory generated with operator input. Ozone impacts caused by the wells were lower than expected in the vicinity of the project, and made no significant contribution to high ozone concentrations (modeled and monitored) northwest of the project area.

  20. Impact of oil and gas infrastructure development in La Manga Canyon, NM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    La Manga Canyon is a small watershed (~20km2) in the San Juan Basin that has historically been developed for natural gas and recently for coal bed methane. Since gas production began in the 1940s, an extensive network of dirt roads have transected the watershed, providing access to well sites. There...

  1. Natural Gas Price Impact on Irrigated Agricultural Water Demands in the Texas Panhandle Region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bridget Guerrero; Stephen Amosson; Thomas Marek; Lal Almas

    2006-01-01

    Rising natural gas prices led to a noticeable decrease in irrigation; however, the magnitude of the reduction in water pumped is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate reduction in irrigation water pumped resulting from high natural gas prices in the Northern Texas High Plains. Farm Service Agency irrigated acreage data were utilized to analyze eight major crop

  2. Results of Two-Stage Light-Gas Gun Development Efforts and Hypervelocity Impact Tests of Advanced Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelison, C. J.; Watts, Eric T.

    1998-01-01

    Gun development efforts to increase the launching capabilities of the NASA Ames 0.5-inch two-stage light-gas gun have been investigated. A gun performance simulation code was used to guide initial parametric variations and hardware modifications, in order to increase the projectile impact velocity capability to 8 km/s, while maintaining acceptable levels of gun barrel erosion and gun component stresses. Concurrent with this facility development effort, a hypervelocity impact testing series in support of the X-33/RLV program was performed in collaboration with Rockwell International. Specifically, advanced thermal protection system materials were impacted with aluminum spheres to simulate impacts with on-orbit space debris. Materials tested included AETB-8, AETB-12, AETB-20, and SIRCA-25 tiles, tailorable advanced blanket insulation (TABI), and high temperature AFRSI (HTA). The ballistic limit for several Thermal Protection System (TPS) configurations was investigated to determine particle sizes which cause threshold TPS/structure penetration. Crater depth in tiles was measured as a function of impact particle size. The relationship between coating type and crater morphology was also explored. Data obtained during this test series was used to perform a preliminary analysis of the risks to a typical orbital vehicle from the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  3. Impact of Shale Gas Development on Water Resource in Fuling, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong; Huang, Xianjin; Yang, Qinyuan; Tu, Jianjun

    2015-04-01

    As a low-carbon energy, shale gas rapidly developed in U.S. in last years due to the innovation of the technique of hydraulic fracture, or fracking. Shale gas boom produces more gas with low price and reduced the reliance on fuel import. To follow the American shale gas success, China made an ambitious plan of shale gas extraction, 6.5 billion m3 by 2015. To extract shale gas, huge amount water is needed to inject into each gas well. This will intensify the competition of water use between industry, agricultural and domestic sectors. It may finally exacerbate the water scarcity in China. After the extraction, some water was returned to the ground. Without adequate treatment, the flowback water can introduce heavy metal, acids, pesticides, and other toxic material into water and land. This may inevitably worsen the water and land contamination. This study analysed the potential water consumption and wastewater generation in shale gas development in Fuling, Southwest China. The survey found the average water consumption is 30,000 cubic meter for one well, higher than shale well in U.S. Some 2%-20% water flowed back to the ground. The water quality monitoring showed the Total Suspended Solid (TSS) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) were the main factors above those specified by China's water regulation. Shale gas is a lower-carbon energy, but it is important to recognize the water consuming and environmental pollution during the fracking. Strict monitoring and good coordination during the shale gas exploitation is urgently needed for the balance of economic development, energy demand and environmental protection.

  4. Possibility of production of amino acids by impact reaction using a light-gas gun as a simulation of asteroid impacts.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Kazuki; Mieno, Tetsu; Kondo, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kurosawa, Kosuke

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate impact production of carbonaceous products by asteroids on Titan and other satellites and planets, simulation experiments were carried out using a 2-stage light gas gun. A small polycarbonate or metal bullet with about 6.5 km/s was injected into a pressurized target chamber filled with 1 atm of nitrogen gas, to collide with a ice + iron target or an iron target or a ice + hexane + iron target. After the impact, black soot including fine particles was deposited on the chamber wall. The soot was carefully collected and analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Laser Desorption Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (LD-ToF-MS). As a result of the HPLC analysis, about 0.04-8 pmol of glycine, and a lesser amount of alanine were found in the samples when the ice + hexane + iron target was used. In case of the ice + iron target and the iron target, less amino acids were produced. The identification of the amino acids was also supported by FTIR and LD-ToF-MS analysis. PMID:25796389

  5. Possibility of Production of Amino Acids by Impact Reaction Using a Light-Gas Gun as a Simulation of Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okochi, Kazuki; Mieno, Tetsu; Kondo, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kurosawa, Kosuke

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate impact production of carbonaceous products by asteroids on Titan and other satellites and planets, simulation experiments were carried out using a 2-stage light gas gun. A small polycarbonate or metal bullet with about 6.5 km/s was injected into a pressurized target chamber filled with 1 atm of nitrogen gas, to collide with a ice + iron target or an iron target or a ice + hexane + iron target. After the impact, black soot including fine particles was deposited on the chamber wall. The soot was carefully collected and analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Laser Desorption Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (LD-ToF-MS). As a result of the HPLC analysis, about 0.04-8 pmol of glycine, and a lesser amount of alanine were found in the samples when the ice + hexane + iron target was used. In case of the ice + iron target and the iron target, less amino acids were produced. The identification of the amino acids was also supported by FTIR and LD-ToF-MS analysis.

  6. The impact of gravity segregation on multiphase non-Darcy flow in hydraulically fractured gas wells 

    E-print Network

    Dickins, Mark Ian

    2008-10-10

    Multiphase and non-Darcy flow effects in hydraulically fractured gas wells reduce effective fracture conductivity. Typical proppant pack laboratory experiments are oriented in such a way such that phase segregation is not possible, which results...

  7. Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guihua Wang; Joan M. Ogden; Michael A. Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we examine the potential air quality impacts of hydrogen transportation fuel from a lifecycle analysis perspective, including impacts from fuel production, delivery, and vehicle use. We assume that hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are introduced in a specific region, Sacramento County, California. We consider two levels of market penetration where 9% or 20% of the light duty fleet

  8. Electron energy distribution functions and transport coefficients relevant for air plasmas in the troposphere: impact of humidity and gas temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Donkó, Z.

    2009-08-01

    A Boltzmann and Monte Carlo analysis of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and transport coefficients for air plasmas is presented for the conditions of the Earth troposphere where some transient luminous events (TLEs) such as blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets have been observed. According to recent model results (Minschwaner et al 2004 J. Climate 17 1272) supported by the halogen occultation experiment, the relative humidity of the atmospheric air between 0 and 15 km can change between 15% and 100% depending on the altitude investigated and the ground temperature. The latter results cover a region of latitudes between -25°S and +25°N, that is, the Earth tropical region where lightning and TLE activity is quite high. The calculations shown here suggest that the relative humidity has a clear impact on the behaviour of the EEDF and magnitude of the transport coefficients of air plasmas at ground (0 km) and room temperature conditions (293 K). At higher altitudes (11 and 15 km), the influence of the relative humidity is negligible when the values of the gas temperature are assumed to be the 'natural' ones corresponding to those altitudes, that is, ~215 K (at 11 km) and ~198 K (at 15 km). However, it is found that a small enhancement (of maximum 100 K) in the background gas temperature (that could be reasonably associated with the TLE activity) would lead to a remarkable impact of the relative humidity on the EEDF and transport coefficients of air plasmas under the conditions of blue jets, blue starters and gigantic jets at 11 and 15 km. The latter effects are visible for relatively low reduced electric fields (E/N <= 25 Td) that could be controlling the afterglow kinetics of the air plasmas generated by TLEs. However, for much higher fields such as, for instance, 400 Td (representative of the fields in the streamer coronas and lightning leaders), the impact of increasing the relative humidity and gas temperature is only slightly noticeable in the attachment coefficient that can exhibit an increase of up to one order of magnitude at 11 km and 15 km for temperatures of 313 K and 308 K, respectively. Finally, a brief analysis is carried out on the impact of the gas temperature on the diffusion coefficients of neutrals and ions. The present results show quite reasonable agreement with available measurements in dry and moist air.

  9. Electricity price impacts of alternative Greenhouse gas emission cap-and-trade programs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelston, Bruce; Armstrong, Dave; Kirsch, Laurence D.; Morey, Mathew J.

    2009-07-15

    Limits on greenhouse gas emissions would raise the prices of the goods and services that require such emissions for their production, including electricity. Looking at a variety of emission limit cases and scenarios for selling or allocating allowances to load-serving entities, the authors estimate how the burden of greenhouse gas limits are likely to be distributed among electricity consumers in different states. (author)

  10. Impact of Fuel Interchangeability on dynamic Instabilities in Gas Turbine Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, D.H.; Straub, D.L.; Richards, G.A.; Robey, E.H.

    2007-03-01

    Modern, low NOx emitting gas turbines typically utilize lean pre-mixed (LPM) combustion as a means of achieving target emissions goals. As stable combustion in LPM systems is somewhat intolerant to changes in operating conditions, precise engine tuning on a prescribed range of fuel properties is commonly performed to avoid dynamic instabilities. This has raised concerns regarding the use of imported liquefied natural gas (LNG) and natural gas liquids (NGL’s) to offset a reduction in the domestic natural gas supply, which when introduced into the pipeline could alter the fuel BTU content and subsequently exacerbate problems such as combustion instabilities. The intent of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of dynamically unstable test rigs to changes in fuel composition and heat content. Fuel Wobbe number was controlled by blending methane and natural gas with various amounts of ethane, propane and nitrogen. Changes in combustion instabilities were observed, in both atmospheric and pressurized test rigs, for fuels containing high concentrations of propane (> 62% by vol). However, pressure oscillations measured while operating on typical “LNG like” fuels did not appear to deviate significantly from natural gas and methane flame responses. Mechanisms thought to produce changes in the dynamic response are discussed.

  11. [Impact of introduction of O2 on the welding arc of gas pool coupled activating TIG].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Guo

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper, Boltzmann plot method was applied to analyze the temperature distributions of the are plasma when the gas pool coupled activating TIG welding was at different coupling degrees with the outer gas being O2. Based on this study of temperature distributions, the changing regularities of are voltage and are appearance were studied. The result shows that compared with traditional TIG welding, the introduction of O2 makes the welding arc constricted slightly, the temperature of the are center build up, and the are voltage increase. When argon being the inner gas, oxygen serving as the outer gas instead of argon makes the are constricted more obviously. When the coupling degree increases from 0 to 2, the temperature of the are center and the are voltage both increase slightly. In the gas pool coupled activating TIG welding the are is constricted not obviously, and the reason why the weld penetration is improved dramatically in the welding of stainless steel is not are constriction. PMID:25095400

  12. Impact of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sterilization on Nosocomial Organism Viability in a Hospital Room

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, John J.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Iwen, Peter C.; Smith, Philip W.; Hewlett, Angela L.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of ClO2 to decontaminate pathogens known to cause healthcare-associated infections in a hospital room strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Staphylococcus aureus were spot placed in duplicate pairs at 10 sites throughout a hospital room and then exposed to ClO2 gas. Organisms were collected and evaluated for reduction in colony forming units following gas exposure. Six sterilization cycles with varied gas concentrations, exposure limits, and relative humidity levels were conducted. Reductions in viable organisms achieved ranged from 7 to 10-log reductions. Two sterilization cycles failed to produce complete inactivation of organisms placed in a bathroom with the door closed. Reductions of organisms in the bathroom ranged from 6-log to 10-log reductions. Gas leakage between hospital floors did not occur; however, some minor gas leakage from the door of hospital room was measured which was subsequently sealed to prevent further leakage. Novel technologies for disinfection of hospital rooms require validation and safety testing in clinical environments. Gaseous ClO2 is effective for sterilizing environmental contamination in a hospital room. Concentrations of ClO2 up to 385 ppm were safely maintained in a hospital room with enhanced environmental controls. PMID:23792697

  13. Impact of chlorine dioxide gas sterilization on nosocomial organism viability in a hospital room.

    PubMed

    Lowe, John J; Gibbs, Shawn G; Iwen, Peter C; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of ClO2 to decontaminate pathogens known to cause healthcare-associated infections in a hospital room strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Staphylococcus aureus were spot placed in duplicate pairs at 10 sites throughout a hospital room and then exposed to ClO2 gas. Organisms were collected and evaluated for reduction in colony forming units following gas exposure. Six sterilization cycles with varied gas concentrations, exposure limits, and relative humidity levels were conducted. Reductions in viable organisms achieved ranged from 7 to 10-log reductions. Two sterilization cycles failed to produce complete inactivation of organisms placed in a bathroom with the door closed. Reductions of organisms in the bathroom ranged from 6-log to 10-log reductions. Gas leakage between hospital floors did not occur; however, some minor gas leakage from the door of hospital room was measured which was subsequently sealed to prevent further leakage. Novel technologies for disinfection of hospital rooms require validation and safety testing in clinical environments. Gaseous ClO2 is effective for sterilizing environmental contamination in a hospital room. Concentrations of ClO2 up to 385 ppm were safely maintained in a hospital room with enhanced environmental controls. PMID:23792697

  14. Tensile and impact properties of candidate alloys for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bruch, U.; te Heesen, E.; Ennis, F.J.; Schuhmacher, D.

    1984-08-01

    The tensile properties of solution-treated Incoloy alloy 800H, Hastelloy-X, Nimonic-86, and Inconel-617 have been determined in the temperature range 20 to 1000/sup 0/C. The strength parameters at temperatures above 700/sup 0/C showed a strong dependence on the strain rate; at low strain rates the deformation was dominated by creep effects, the strain rate and maximum stress being related by the Norton creep equation. The tensile and impact properties of the alloys were also determined after exposure at 700 to 1000/sup 0/C for up to 30 000 h. For Incoloy-800H, the results showed good retention of ductility and impact strength. The nickel-base alloys, in contrast, were found to have low room-temperature impact resistance after long time exposure at 700 to 900/sup 0/C, typical values being 10 to 20 J x cm/sup -2/. In impact tests at the exposure temperature, impact strengths were generally above 50 J x cm/sup -2/. At room temperature, allowances in design must be made for the low impact strength of the nickel-base alloys to ensure against brittle fracture. For example, excessive stresses during cooling of components following shutdown should be avoided.

  15. Impact of alternative fuels on emissions characteristics of a gas turbine engine - part 1: gaseous and particulate matter emissions.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Prem; Rye, Lucas; Williams, Paul I; Christie, Simon; Uryga-Bugajska, Ilona; Wilson, Christopher W; Hagen, Donald E; Whitefield, Philip D; Blakey, Simon; Coe, Hugh; Raper, David; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Growing concern over emissions from increased airport operations has resulted in a need to assess the impact of aviation related activities on local air quality in and around airports, and to develop strategies to mitigate these effects. One such strategy being investigated is the use of alternative fuels in aircraft engines and auxiliary power units (APUs) as a means to diversify fuel supplies and reduce emissions. This paper summarizes the results of a study to characterize the emissions of an APU, a small gas turbine engine, burning conventional Jet A-1, a fully synthetic jet fuel, and other alternative fuels with varying compositions. Gas phase emissions were measured at the engine exit plane while PM emissions were recorded at the exit plane as well as 10 m downstream of the engine. Five percent reduction in NO(x) emissions and 5-10% reduction in CO emissions were observed for the alternative fuels. Significant reductions in PM emissions at the engine exit plane were achieved with the alternative fuels. However, as the exhaust plume expanded and cooled, organic species were found to condense on the PM. This increase in organic PM elevated the PM mass but had little impact on PM number. PMID:22913288

  16. Exploring the Impact of Marcellus Shale Gas on Welding and Related Occupations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This teacher's guide presents lessons on Marcellus Shale, which is sedimentary rock containing natural gas reserves. Students will look at how changes in the world affect their career options and choices; in this case looking at the welding occupations that are related to extracting gas from Marcellus Shale deposits. The unit is intended for grade 11 and would take seven to eight 45 minute class periods to complete in full. The material is specifically designed for students in Pennsylvania, but could be adapted for schools in other areas. This document may be downloaded in Microsoft Word file format.

  17. Environmental Protection Versus Energy Supply Security - The Shale Gas Case and Its Impact on Ecosystem Services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonie Reins

    2012-01-01

    The complexity, interrelation and competition between environmental protection and energy supply security is an emerging problem. Often, State environmental protection concerns and standards are outweighed by a competing interest, such as ensuring energy supply security. This paper discusses the benefits and risks of an ecosystem service approach in connection with shale gas extraction in the United States and the European

  18. Impact of biochar field aging on laboratory greenhouse gas production potentials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent observations of decreased greenhouse gas (GHG) production from biochar amended soils have been used to further substantiate the environmental benefit of biochar production and soil incorporation strategies. However, the mechanisms behind the “biochar effect” have not been fully elucidated. In...

  19. Impact of Liquefied Natural Gas usage and payload size on Hybrid Wing Body aircraft fuel efficiency

    E-print Network

    Mody, Pritesh (Pritesh Chetan)

    2010-01-01

    This work assessed Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft in the context of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel usage and payload/range scalability at three scales: H1 (B737), H2 (B787) and H3 (B777). The aircraft were optimized for ...

  20. Assessment of saltwater intrusion impact on gas exchange behavior of Louisiana Gulf Coast wetland species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Pezeshki; R. D. DeLaune

    1989-01-01

    A review of gas exchange responses of wetland plants to salinity is presented for several species representative of different wetland habitats extending along water level and salinity gradients in the Louisiana Gulf Coast, U.S.A. The information was synthesized from earlier plant physiological response studies. Vegetation examined represent a broad range of sensitivity to salt, including brackish marsh, freshwater marsh, and

  1. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  2. Cropping System Management Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Cool, Humid Northeastern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimating global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions requires regional measurements be made within different production systems. A long-term potato cropping system experiment established in 2004 in Presque Isle, ME, on a sandy loam soil was designed to contribute to three of the following scenarios rel...

  3. Impact study on the use of biomass-derived fuels in gas turbines for power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, C.A.; Bernstein, H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report evaluates the properties of fuels derived from biomass, both gaseous and liquid, against the fuel requirements of gas turbine systems for gernating electrical power. The report attempts to be quantitative rather than merely qualitative to establish the significant variations in the properties of biomass fuels from those of conventional fuels. Three general categories are covered: performance, durability, and storage and handling.

  4. Identifying emerging smart grid impacts to upstream and midstream natural gas operations.

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Annie

    2010-09-01

    The Smart Grid has come to describe a next-generation electrical power system that is typified by the increased use of communications and information technology in the generation, delivery and consumption of electrical energy. Much of the present Smart Grid analysis focuses on utility and consumer interaction. i.e. smart appliances, home automation systems, rate structures, consumer demand response, etc. An identified need is to assess the upstream and midstream operations of natural gas as a result of the smart grid. The nature of Smart Grid, including the demand response and role of information, may require changes in upstream and midstream natural gas operations to ensure availability and efficiency. Utility reliance on natural gas will continue and likely increase, given the backup requirements for intermittent renewable energy sources. Efficient generation and delivery of electricity on Smart Grid could affect how natural gas is utilized. Things that we already know about Smart Grid are: (1) The role of information and data integrity is increasingly important. (2) Smart Grid includes a fully distributed system with two-way communication. (3) Smart Grid, a complex network, may change the way energy is supplied, stored, and in demand. (4) Smart Grid has evolved through consumer driven decisions. (5) Smart Grid and the US critical infrastructure will include many intermittent renewables.

  5. Integrating Gas Turbines with Cracking Heaters - Impact on Emissions and Energy Efficiency 

    E-print Network

    Platvoet, E.

    2011-01-01

    Zink Company, Tulsa, Oklahoma - 1993 (7) ? Investigation on the in-flame NO reburning in turbine exhaust gas - Mario Ditaranto, J?rgen Hals, Tor Bj?rge, Proceedings of the Combustion Institute 32 (2009) 2659?2666 (8) ? Modeling of nitrogen...

  6. Rate impacts and key design elements of gas and electric utility decoupling: a comprehensive review

    SciTech Connect

    Lesh, Pamela G.

    2009-10-15

    Opponents of decoupling worry that customers will experience frequent and significant rate increases as a result of its adoption, but a review of 28 natural gas and 17 electric utilities suggests that decoupling adjustments are both refunds to customers as well as charges and tend to be small. (author)

  7. Solidphase extraction on sorbents of different retention mechanisms followed by determination by gas chromatography–mass spectrometric and gas chromatography–electron capture detection of pesticide residues in crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Balinova; Rositsa Mladenova; Deyana Shtereva

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of a mixed-mode solid-phase extraction is discussed as a promising approach for matrix clean-up in multiresidue\\/multimatrix methods. Sorbents characterized by different mechanisms of sorption such as reversed-phase (graphitized carbon), weak anion exchange (primary–secondary amine) and strong anion exchange (quaternary amine) were studied for their effectiveness in the removal of the matrix co-extractives in grains, fruits and vegetables for trace

  8. The interaction between an impact-produced neutral gas cloud and the solar wind at the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindeman, R. A.; Vondrak, R. R.; Freeman, J. W.; Snyder, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    On Apr. 15, 1970, the Apollo 13 S-IVB stage impacted the nighttime lunar surface. Beginning 20 sec after impact, the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment and the Solar Wind Spectrometer observed a large flux of positive ions (maximum flux of about 3 x 10 to the 8th ions/sq cm/sec/ster) and electrons. Two separate streams of ions were observed: a horizontal flux that appeared to be deflected solar wind ions and a smaller vertical flux of predominantly heavy ions (greater than 10 amu), which probably were material vaporized from the S-IVB stage. An examination of the data shows that collisions between neutral molecules and hot electrons (50 eV) were probably an important ionization mechanism in the impact-produced neutral gas cloud. These electrons, which were detected by the Solar Wind Spectrometer, are thought to have been energized in a shock front or some form of intense interaction region between the cloud and the solar wind. Thus strong ionization and acceleration are seen under conditions approaching a collisionless state.

  9. Impact of Contaminants Present in Coal-Biomass Derived Synthesis Gas on Water-gas Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhan Alptekin

    2012-09-30

    Co-gasification of biomass and coal in large-scale, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants increases the efficiency and reduces the environmental impact of making synthesis gas ("syngas") that can be used in Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes for producing transportation fuels. However, the water-gas shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts used in these processes may be poisoned by multiple contaminants found in coal-biomass derived syngas; sulfur species, trace toxic metals, halides, nitrogen species, the vapors of alkali metals and their salts (e.g., KCl and NaCl), ammonia, and phosphorous. Thus, it is essential to develop a fundamental understanding of poisoning/inhibition mechanisms before investing in the development of any costly mitigation technologies. We therefore investigated the impact of potential contaminants (H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, HCN, AsH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3}, HCl, NaCl, KCl, AS{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}OH, KNO{sub 3}, HBr, HF, and HNO{sub 3}) on the performance and lifetime of commercially available and generic (prepared in-house) WGS and FT catalysts; ferrochrome-based high-temperature WGS catalyst (HT-WGS, Shiftmax 120�, Süd-Chemie), low-temperature Cu/ZnO-based WGS catalyst (LT-WGS, Shiftmax 230�, Süd-Chemie), and iron- and cobalt-based Fischer-Trospch synthesis catalysts (Fe-FT & Co-FT, UK-CAER). In this project, TDA Research, Inc. collaborated with a team at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) led by Dr. Burt Davis. We first conducted a detailed thermodynamic analysis. The three primary mechanisms whereby the contaminants may deactivate the catalyst are condensation, deposition, and reaction. AsH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HCl, NH{sub 3} and HCN were found to have a major impact on the Fe-FT catalyst by producing reaction products, while NaCl, KCl and PH{sub 3} produce trace amounts of deposition products. The impact of the contaminants on the activity, selectivity, and deactivation rates (lifetime) of the catalysts was determined in bench-scale tests. Most of the contaminants appeared to adsorb onto (or react with) the HT- and LT-WGS catalysts were they were co-fed with the syngas: � 4.5 ppmv AsH{sub 3} or 1 ppmv PH{sub 3} in the syngas impacted the selectivity and CO conversion of both catalysts; � H{sub 2}S slowly degraded both WGS catalysts; - A binary mixture of H{sub 2}S (60 ppmv) and NH{sub 3} (38 ppmv) impacted the activity of the LT-WGS catalyst, but not the HT-WGS catalyst � Moderate levels of NH{sub 3} (100 ppmv) or HCN (10 ppmv) had no impact � NaCl or KCl had essentially no effect on the HT-WGS catalyst, but the activity of the LT-WGS catalyst decreased very slowly Long-term experiments on the Co-FT catalyst at 260 and 270 °C showed that all of the contaminants impacted it to some extent with the exception of NaCl and HF. Irrespective of its source (e.g., NH{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, or HNO{sub 3}), ammonia suppressed the activity of the Co-FT catalyst to a moderate degree. There was essentially no impact the Fe-FT catalyst when up to 100 ppmw halide compounds (NaCl and KCl), or up to 40 ppmw alkali bicarbonates (NaHCO{sub 3} and KHCO{sub 3}). After testing, BET analysis showed that the surface areas, and pore volumes and diameters of both WGS catalysts decreased during both single and binary H2S and NH3 tests, which was attributed to sintering and pore filling by the impurities. The HT-WGS catalyst was evaluated with XRD after testing in syngas that contained 1 ppmv PH{sub 3}, or 2 ppmv H{sub 2}S, or both H{sub 2}S (60 ppmv) and NH{sub 3} (38 ppmv). The peaks became sharper during testing, which was indicative of crystal growth and sintering, but no new phases were detected. After LT-WGS tests (3-33 ppmv NH{sub 3} and/or 0-88 ppmv H{sub 2}S) there were a few new phases that appeared, including sulfides. The fresh Fe-FT catalyst was nanocrystalline and amorphous. ICP-AA spectroscopy and other methods (e.g., chromatography) were used to analyze for

  10. The impacts of nitrous oxide gas on sleep quality during alcohol withdrawal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tuuli Lahti; Taina Methuen; Risto Roine; Kaija-Liisa Seppä; David Sinclair; Markku Partinen; Hannu Alho

    2011-01-01

    Background  Poor quality of sleep among alcoholics and persons undergoing alcohol withdrawal has been described as a possible cause of\\u000a alcohol relapse. It has been suggested earlier that nitrous oxide gas has a significant effect on the signs of alcohol withdrawal\\u000a syndrome (AWS) and thus might be expected to reduce sleep disturbance during withdrawal. The aim of the present study was

  11. Precompression and desensitization of a high explosive by trapped gas in plate impacts--new measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W. W. (William W.); Fritz, J. N. (Joseph N.); Kennedy, J. E. (James E.); Shaw, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    It has long been known that trapped gas between an impactor and high explosive will precompress a layer of the explosive. Most quantitative studies measure the resulting decrease in shock sensitivity. There have been no studies really aimed at measuring the properties of the precompressed layer. Experiments at Los Alamos originally to study release behavior allow the layer to be probed in PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% KeI-F 800).

  12. Impact of Intrafractional Bowel Gas Movement on Carbon Ion Beam Dose Distribution in Pancreatic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Motoki [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [Hospital, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Mori, Shinichiro [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: shinshin@nirs.go.jp; Yanagi, Takeshi [Hospital, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Asakura, Hiroshi [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, Chiba (Japan); Kishimoto, Riwa; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi [Hospital, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess carbon ion beam dose variation due to bowel gas movement in pancreatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten pancreatic cancer inpatients were subject to diagnostic contrast-enhanced dynamic helical CT examination under breath-holding conditions, which included multiple-phase dynamic CT with arterial, venous, and delayed phases. The arterial-venous phase and arterial-delayed phase intervals were 35 and 145 s, respectively. A compensating bolus was designed to cover the target obtained at the arterial phase. Carbon ion dose distribution was calculated by applying the bolus to the CT data sets at the other two phases. Results: Dose conformation to the clinical target volume was degraded by beam overshoot/undershoot due to bowel gas movement. The D95 for clinical target volume was degraded from 98.2% (range, 98.0-99.1%) of the prescribed dose to 94.7% (range, 88.0-99.0%) at 145 s. Excessive dosing to normal tissues varied among tissues and was, for example, 12.2 GyE/13.1 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the cord and 38.8 GyE/39.8 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the duodenum. The magnitude of beam overshoot/undershoot was particularly exacerbated from the anterior and left directions. Conclusions: Bowel gas movement causes dosimetric variation to the target during treatment for radiotherapy. The effect of bowel gas movement varies with beam angle, with greatest influence on the anterior-posterior and left-right beams.

  13. Impact of process design on greenhouse gas (GHG) generation by wastewater treatment plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Bani Shahabadi; L. Yerushalmi; F. Haghighat

    2009-01-01

    The overall on-site and off-site greenhouse gas emissions by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of food processing industry were estimated by using an elaborate mathematical model. Three different types of treatment processes including aerobic, anaerobic and hybrid anaerobic\\/aerobic processes were examined in this study. The overall on-site emissions were 1952, 1992, and 2435 kg CO2e\\/d while the off-site emissions were 1313, 4631,

  14. The impact of ten years at -20°C on gas exchange in five lichen species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Larson

    1989-01-01

    Rates of net CO2 exchange in five sympatric species of Umbilicaria were measured after 10 years at-20°C. During that time, the lichens had been at either a high (saturated) or a low (air-dry) water content. The results showed an immediate, return to normal rates of gas exchange for air-dried then frozen U.vellea. Rates returned to normal for air-dried U. deusta

  15. Methodology for assessing onshore impacts for Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development. Volume II. methodology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tencer

    1978-01-01

    As the key document in a three-volume study, Volume II details methodologies for assessing the onshore implications of outer continental shelf (OCS) oil and gas exploration, development\\/production, and well workover. Chapters are based on six major elements: industry requirements--a means for estimating the material, job, salary, transportation, onshore facility, capital cost, and environmental demands associated with offshore development activities; location

  16. The impact of gravity segregation on multiphase non-Darcy flow in hydraulically fractured gas wells

    E-print Network

    Dickins, Mark Ian

    2008-10-10

    water saturation for Geertsma’s correlation and Frederick and Graves’ 1st correlation ..................................................... 27 2.10 Injection pattern for mixed-flow case (top) and segregated-flow case (bottom.../gas ratio. Using non- linear relative permeabilities with Frederick and Graves 1st correlation shows that the difference is primarily due to non-linear relative permeabilities, as Frederick and Graves correlation shows very small non-Darcy effects...

  17. An assessment of radiolytic gas generation: Impacts from Rocky Flats Plant residue elimination alternatives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-26

    This report evaluates the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque analytical model that is used to support present wattage limit decisions for various matrix forms from the Residue Elimination Project for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste acceptability. This study includes (1) a comparison of the SNL-A model to Rocky Flats Plant models for consistency of assumptions and the phenomena considered in the models, and (2) an evaluation of the appropriateness of the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque model to Rocky Flats Plant residues, considering that the original intent was to model wastes rather than residues. The study draws the following conclusions: (1) only real-time gas generation testing of specific waste streams may provide a sound basis for an increase in the transportation wattage limit of specific waste streams, and (2) the radiolytic gas generation rate from Residue Elimination Project waste emplaced at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, under worst-case conditions, is not a significant factor in comparison to the total gas generation rate due to radiolysis, microbial degradation, and corrosion.

  18. Evaluating 2012 Ozone Impacts of Natural Gas Development in the Haynesville Shale with an Updated Emission Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemball-Cook, S. R.; Bar-Ilan, A.; Yarwood, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Haynesville Shale, located approximately 10,000-13,000 feet beneath Northeast Texas and Northwest Louisiana contains very large recoverable reserves of natural gas. Development of the Haynesville began in 2008, and since then, more than 3,000 wells have been drilled. The development of natural gas resources in the Haynesville is economically important, but also generates emissions of ozone precursors in a region with several ozone monitors that are close to or exceeding the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standard. During 2009, we developed an emission inventory of ozone precursors for projected future Haynesville Shale development from 2009 through 2020. Photochemical modeling with the 2012 emission inventory showed significant ozone impacts within Northeast Texas and Northwest Louisiana as a result of Haynesville emissions, with projected 8-hour ozone design value increases up to 5 ppb at area monitors. The original emission inventory was assembled during spring 2009, early in the development of the Haynesville when available data were limited. Since then, development in the Haynesville has continued, and additional data are now available and were used to refine the development projections and emission inventory through the year 2020. The updated 2012 emission inventory is now based on actual data rather than projections made in 2009. The number of drilling rigs operating in 2012 was lower than projected, but the well count was higher due intensive drilling activity in 2010-2011 that exceeded projections. The updated emission inventory draws on more Haynesville-specific data than the previous inventory. Energy producers currently active in the Haynesville were surveyed and provided information that included well drilling times, equipment used for well construction, production equipment present at typical Haynesville wells, and produced gas composition analyses. Producers provided information on the amount of truck traffic associated with transport of materials, equipment, and personnel to and from wells and the types and activity of non-road equipment operating at well sites. Well production data for 2009 through 2012 from Texas and Louisiana state regulatory agencies was used to update the well decline curve used to project formation-wide gas production. The updated emission inventory was used to quantify 2012 ozone impacts from the Haynesville with the CAMx photochemical grid model. The ozone contribution from truck traffic was determined. We evaluated the effect of the Haynesville on ozone design values in Northeast Texas and Northwest Louisiana as well as on regional ozone. The model projections for ozone were compared to recent trends in observed ozone.

  19. Chemical effects of low energy electron impact on hydrocarbons in the gas phase. I. Neopentane. [''Simulated'' radiolysis of neopentane; 3. 5-15. 0 eV electrons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Derai; P. Nectoux; J. Danon

    1976-01-01

    The chemical effects induced by impact of low energy electrons of gaseous neopentane were investigated. An original set-up for the irradiation of a flowing gas at low pressure (10⁻²Torr) with 3.5--15.0 eV electrons was used. Electron beam energy definition and current intensity were +- 0.6 eV and 7--15 ..mu..A, respectively. Analysis of the products was performed by gas chromatography. The

  20. The Impact of Farm Machinery Management on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Canadian Agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Dyer; R. L. Desjardins

    2003-01-01

    The impact of proposed changes in field operations and land use on fossil fuel consumption on Canadian farms was analyzed using a computer model of the mechanics of farm machinery. The model predicted tractor\\/harvester power needs (kW), implement sizes and work required (kW-h) to complete each field operation on model farms in Canada's four farming regions. These predictions were integrated

  1. Mapping Oil and Gas Development Potential in the US Intermountain West and Estimating Impacts to Species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holly E. Copeland; Kevin E. Doherty; David E. Naugle; Amy Pocewicz; Joseph M. Kiesecker; Adina Maya Merenlender

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundMany studies have quantified the indirect effect of hydrocarbon-based economies on climate change and biodiversity, concluding that a significant proportion of species will be threatened with extinction. However, few studies have measured the direct effect of new energy production infrastructure on species persistence.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsWe propose a systematic way to forecast patterns of future energy development and calculate impacts to species

  2. A comparison of particle impact in gas-solid and liquid-solid erosion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hector McI Clark

    1995-01-01

    The sizes of craters formed on cylindrical, electro-polished, OFHC copper erosion specimens subjected to impact by closely-sized glass beads, average diameter 540 ?m, suspended in diesel oil in a slurry-pot erosion tester operating at nominal rotation speeds of 18.7, 14.0 and 9.35 m s?1 have been compared with those produced in an identical apparatus operating at the same speeds, in

  3. Impacts of Application of Methane Fermentation Digested Liquid on Green House Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Leaching from Upland Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masato; Fujikawa, Tomonori; Yuyama, Yoshito; Maeda, Morihiro; Yamaoka, Masaru

    Nitrogen uptake by crops, green-house gas emissions and nitrogen leaching were studied by using monolith lysimeters applied with digested liquid or ammonium sulfate to evaluate the environmental impacts of applications of methane fermentation digested liquid on Andosol upland field. A two-year experiment indicated the percentages of nitrogen uptake, leached nitrogen and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to each material-derived nitrogen were 27%, 44% and 0.41% in the digested liquid plot and 32%, 46% and 0.11% in the ammonium sulfate plot. The results show that digested liquid is readily release fertilizer like ammonium sulfate, and nitrogen is leached as easily from the digested liquid as from the ammonium sulfate and the N2O emissions from the digested liquid plot are higher than from the ammonium sulfate plot.

  4. The impact of full-scale leachate recirculation on leachate and gas characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, D.R. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Dept.; Al-Yousfi, A.B. [Union Carbide Corp., South Charleston, WV (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Data from full-scale recirculating landfills were analyzed and compared with data from pilot and laboratory-scale investigations, and found to support conclusions drawn from tests, i.e., an acceleration of stabilization processes, leachate management opportunities, and enhancement of gas production can be expected during leachate recirculation. Leachate characteristics follow patterns observed in conventionally operated landfills, however degradation occurs at a faster rate. Leachate production rates are a function of landfill operations, climate, and recirculation rates. On-site storage is critical to leachate management and can dramatically reduce volume of leachate treated off-site.

  5. Assessing environmental impact from gas and oil exploration in the SW Barents Sea using benthic foraminiferal assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, N.; Junttila, J.; Husum, K.; Carroll, J.; Hald, M.

    2012-04-01

    During the last decades petroleum industry and shipping activities have increased in the SW Barents Sea. Oil exploration wells were drilled in the 1980s with production starting in 2007. These activities are projected to expand in the coming years. As part of the Northern Environmental Waste Management (EWMA) project, a competence cluster for petroleum industry related waste handling, we investigate the impacts of enhanced anthropogenic activities on benthic foraminiferal assemblages in the SW Barents Sea. Sediment cores (0-20 cm) from sites in proximity to two oil- and gas fields are under investigation. These sediment cores, dated with the 210Pb method, represent the last 90 to 150 years. Both dead and living benthic foraminifera (100 µm-1 mm) were counted to elucidate differences in foraminiferal assemblages between pre-impact and recent conditions. In addition, the heavy metal concentrations, persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations, grain size and total organic content (TOC) of the sediment cores have been analyzed. Pollution levels of the surface sediments (0-1 cm) are of background to good level (level I-II) according to the definitions of the Water Framework Directorate (WFD). Patterns in living benthic foraminiferal assemblages identified in the sea floor surface sediments, are the result of natural environmental changes such as depth, water mass and sediment composition. Further downcore (1-20 cm) pollution levels are in general of background environmental status (WFD level I). However, at some depth intervals, especially in sediment cores from the near proximity of the oil- and gas- fields, pollution levels are slightly enhanced (WFD level II). Further work will include statistical comparison of dead and living foraminiferal assemblages with sediment pollution levels, sediment properties, and oceanographic conditions. This research contributes to the development of foraminifera as a useful bio-monitoring technique for the Arctic region as industrial activities increase in the coming years.

  6. Mechanism of charge transfer and its impacts on Fermi-level pinning for gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjie; Yang, Weihuang; Zhu, Huili

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to assess changes in the geometric and electronic structures of monolayer WS2 upon adsorption of various gas molecules (H2, O2, H2O, NH3, NO, NO2, and CO). The most stable configuration of the adsorbed molecules, the adsorption energy, and the degree of charge transfer between adsorbate and substrate were determined. All evaluated molecules were physisorbed on monolayer WS2 with a low degree of charge transfer and accept charge from the monolayer, except for NH3, which is a charge donor. Band structure calculations showed that the valence and conduction bands of monolayer WS2 are not significantly altered upon adsorption of H2, H2O, NH3, and CO, whereas the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of O2, NO, and NO2 are pinned around the Fermi-level when these molecules are adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The phenomenon of Fermi-level pinning was discussed in light of the traditional and orbital mixing charge transfer theories. The impacts of the charge transfer mechanism on Fermi-level pinning were confirmed for the gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The proposed mechanism governing Fermi-level pinning is applicable to the systems of adsorbates on recently developed two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:26049513

  7. Mechanism of charge transfer and its impacts on Fermi-level pinning for gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changjie; Yang, Weihuang; Zhu, Huili

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to assess changes in the geometric and electronic structures of monolayer WS2 upon adsorption of various gas molecules (H2, O2, H2O, NH3, NO, NO2, and CO). The most stable configuration of the adsorbed molecules, the adsorption energy, and the degree of charge transfer between adsorbate and substrate were determined. All evaluated molecules were physisorbed on monolayer WS2 with a low degree of charge transfer and accept charge from the monolayer, except for NH3, which is a charge donor. Band structure calculations showed that the valence and conduction bands of monolayer WS2 are not significantly altered upon adsorption of H2, H2O, NH3, and CO, whereas the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of O2, NO, and NO2 are pinned around the Fermi-level when these molecules are adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The phenomenon of Fermi-level pinning was discussed in light of the traditional and orbital mixing charge transfer theories. The impacts of the charge transfer mechanism on Fermi-level pinning were confirmed for the gas molecules adsorbed on monolayer WS2. The proposed mechanism governing Fermi-level pinning is applicable to the systems of adsorbates on recently developed two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides.

  8. Quantifying the impact of nitric oxide calibration gas mixture oxidation on reported nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Bryan P.; Quincey, Paul G.; Green, David; Fuller, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    Chemiluminescent analysers for measuring nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in ambient air are generally calibrated with certified gas standard cylinders of NO in nitrogen. Verification of the NOx and NO amount fractions has been carried out on many such 'on-site' calibration cylinders at air quality monitoring stations. These measurements indicate that significant numbers of these gas mixtures have become somewhat degraded, with several percent of the NO oxidised to NO2. The effect of not compensating for this degradation on reported concentrations is discussed. If such degradation is not quantified and corrected for, there will be a systematic under-reporting of NO2 concentrations, which, due to the non-linearity of the effect, could reduce high reported NO2 concentrations at kerbside sites by around 20%. This could significantly reduce the number of reported exceedances of the NO2 limit value at such sites, compared to results obtained where there is no degradation of the NO cylinder.

  9. Amperometric Enzyme-based Gas Sensor for Formaldehyde: Impact of Possible Interferences

    PubMed Central

    Achmann, Sabine; Hämmerle, Martin; Moos, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    In this work, cross-sensitivities and environmental influences on the sensitivity and the functionality of an enzyme-based amperometric sensor system for the direct detection of formaldehyde from the gas phase are studied. The sensor shows a linear response curve for formaldehyde in the tested range (0 - 15 vppm) with a sensitivity of 1.9 ?A/ppm and a detection limit of about 130 ppb. Cross-sensitivities by environmental gases like CO2, CO, NO, H2, and vapors of organic solvents like methanol and ethanol are evaluated as well as temperature and humidity influences on the sensor system. The sensor showed neither significant signal to CO, H2, methanol or ethanol nor to variations in the humidity of the test gas. As expected, temperature variations had the biggest influence on the sensor sensitivity with variations in the sensor signal of up to 10 % of the signal for 5 vppm CH2O in the range of 25 - 30 °C.

  10. Low temperature impact toughness of the main gas pipeline steel after long-term degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruschak, Pavlo; Danyliuk, Iryna; Bishchak, Roman; Vuherer, Tomaž

    2014-12-01

    The correlation of microstructure, temperature and Charpy V-notch impact properties of a steel 17G1S pipeline steel was investigated in this study. Within the concept of physical mesomechanics, the dynamic failure of specimens is represented as a successive process of the loss of shear stability, which takes place at different structural/scale levels of the material. Characteristic stages are analyzed for various modes of failure, moreover, typical levels of loading and oscillation periods, etc. are determined. Relations between low temperature derived through this test, microstructures and Charpy (V-notch) toughness test results are also discussed in this paper.

  11. The impact of oxygen on the morphology of gas-phase prepared Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, D.; Surrey, A.; Schultz, L. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Rellinghaus, B. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-24

    We present an easy procedure for the synthesis of single crystalline gold nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 4 nm using a DC-sputtering in an argon-oxygen gas mixture. Morphology population statistics have been determined to quantify the influence of oxygen. It is found that the particles undergo a structural transition from predominantly icosahedral to single crystalline particles with increasing amount of oxygen. Aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation proves that likewise prepared single crystalline nanoparticles are defect and oxygen free. In contrast, the icosahedral particles prepared with pure argon show the presence of edge dislocations pointing to an energetic disfavoring already at these relatively small particle sizes. This morphology control of clean and uncovered Au nanoparticles provides a high application potential, e.g., for studying the influence of the particle morphology on plasmonic and catalytic properties.

  12. THE IMPACT OF COLD GAS ACCRETION ABOVE A MASS FLOOR ON GALAXY SCALING RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bouche, N.; Genzel, R.; Genel, S.; Cresci, G.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Davies, R. I.; Tacconi, L. [Max Planck Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dekel, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Shapiro, K. L., E-mail: nbouche@physics.ucsb.ed [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, 94720 CA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Using the cosmological baryonic accretion rate and normal star formation (SF) efficiencies, we present a very simple model for star-forming galaxies that accounts for the mass and redshift dependences of the star formation rate (SFR)-mass and Tully-Fisher (TF) relations from z {approx} 2 to the present. The time evolution follows from the fact that each modeled galaxy approaches a steady state where the SFR follows the (net) cold gas accretion rate. The key feature of the model is a halo mass floor M {sub min} {approx_equal} 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} below which accretion is quenched in order to simultaneously account for the observed slopes of the SFR-mass and TF relations. The same successes cannot be achieved via an SF threshold (or delay) nor by varying the SF efficiency or the feedback efficiency. Combined with the mass ceiling for cold accretion due to virial shock heating, the mass floor M{sub min} explains galaxy 'downsizing', where more massive galaxies formed earlier and over a shorter period of time. It turns out that the model also accounts for the observed galactic baryon and gas fractions as a function of mass and time, and the cosmic SFR density, which are all resulting from the mass floor M {sub min}. The model helps us to understand that it is the cosmological decline of accretion rate that drives the decrease of cosmic SFR density between z {approx} 2 and z = 0 and the rise of the cosmic SFR density from z {approx} 6 to z {approx} 2 that allows us to put a constraint on our main parameter M {sub min} {approx_equal} 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}. Among the physical mechanisms that could be responsible for the mass floor, our view is that photoionization feedback (from first in situ hot stars) lowering the cooling efficiency is likely to play a large role.

  13. The Impacts of a 2-Degree Rise in Global Temperatures upon Gas-Phase Air Pollutants in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Laura; Josse, Béatrice; Marecal, Virginie; Lacressonnière, Gwendoline; Vautard, Robert; Gauss, Michael; Engardt, Magnuz; Nyiri, Agnes; Siour, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    The 15th session of the Conference of Parties (COP 15) in 2009 ratified the Copenhagen Accord, which "recognises the scientific view that" global temperature rise should be held below 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels in order to limit the impacts of climate change. Due to the fact that a 2-degree limit has been frequently referred to by policy makers in the context of the Copenhagen Accord and many other high-level policy statements, it is important that the impacts of this 2-degree increase in temperature are adequately analysed. To this end, the European Union sponsored the project IMPACT2C, which uses a multi-disciplinary international team to assess a wide variety of impacts of a 2-degree rise in global temperatures. For example, this future increase in temperature is expected to have a significant influence upon meteorological conditions such as temperature, precipitation, and wind direction and intensity; which will in turn affect the production, deposition, and distribution of air pollutants. For the first part of the air quality analysis within the IMPACT2C project, the impact of meteorological forcings on gas phase air pollutants over Europe was studied using four offline atmospheric chemistry transport models. Two sets of meteorological forcings were used for each model: reanalysis of past observation data and global climate model output. Anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors for the year 2005 were used for all simulations in order to isolate the impact of meteorology and assess the robustness of the results across the different models. The differences between the simulations that use reanalysis of past observation data and the simulations that use global climate model output show how global climate models modify climate hindcasts by boundary conditions inputs: information that is necessary in order to interpret simulations of future climate. The baseline results were assessed by comparison with AirBase (Version 7) measurement data, and were then used as a reference for an analysis of future climate scenarios upon European air quality. The future scenarios included two types of emission data for the year 2050: one set of emission data corresponding to a current legislation scenario and another corresponding to a scenario with a maximum feasible reduction in emissions. The future scenarios were run for the time period that corresponds to a 2-degree increase in global temperatures; a time period that varies depending on which global climate model is used. In order to calculate the effect of climate change on emission reduction scenarios, the "climate penalty", the future simulations were compared to a simulation using the same future emissions but with current (2005) climate. Results show that climate change will have consequential impacts with regards to the production and geographical distribution of ozone and nitrogen oxides.

  14. DESIGNING AND CONDUCTING WORKSHOPS: LESSONS FROM A TWO-YEAR PROJECT (ONSHORE IMPACTS OF OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENT: A TRAINING PROJECT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the process of developing and conducting two series of workshops on 'Onshore Impact of Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Development'. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the workshops from the standpoint of their objectives, content, teaching methods...

  15. Polychaete\\/amphipod ratio as an indicator of environmental impact related to offshore oil and gas production along the Norwegian continental shelf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hector Andrade; Paul E. Renaud

    Benthic faunal data is regularly collected worldwide to assess the ecological quality of marine environments. Recently, there has been renewed interest in developing biological indices able to identify environmental status and potential anthropogenic impacts. In this paper we evaluate the performance of a general polychaete\\/amphipod ratio along the Norwegian continental shelf as an environmental indicator for offshore oil and gas

  16. A Satellite Formation Due to A Giant Impact: The Effect of the Protoplanet Mass and Its Composition on the Disk Gas Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Genda, H.; Asphaug, E. I.; Ida, S.

    2010-12-01

    It has been thought that the Moon is formed by a giant impact in the late stage of the Earth formation. The impact generates a debris disk around the earth, from which the Moon is accreted. This type of satellite formation is believed to be common in the solar and extra solar systems, such as Pluto and its moon, Charon. Recent study has revealed that the initial gas mass fraction in an impact-generated disk can highly affect the satellite formation process. It also means that a satellite mass depends on the initial disk gas ratio. Machida and Abe (2004) have shown that the higher disk gas ratio creates smaller satellite mass. They have also found out that if evaporation rate exceeds 70%, no satellite can be formed from the disk since solid/liquid materials in the disk fall into the Earth or escape before the disk cooling. Wada et al. (2006) have suggested that strong shocks occur in a gas rich disk, which causes most of the disk material falls into the earth within a few days. Thus, initial disk gas ratio must be taken into account in order to understand the satellite formation process, however, its effect has not been considered carefully yet. In our work, we have investigated the disk gas ratio as a function of protoplanet mass and its material, based on the idea that impact energy and the latent heat of disk material basically define the disk gas ratio. We have performed giant impact simulations of water-icy and rocky protoplanets using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. ANEOS and SESAME equation of states are used. As a result, the disk evaporation is negligible in a Pluto-Chaon mass-size impact, but for an Earth-Moon size, the disk evaporation rate of the water-icy protoplanet can exceed 70%, whereas that of rocky one is about 10-30%. For a 5 Earth mass size system, most of the disk material evaporates in both icy and rocky protoplanet impacts. The result suggests that protoplanet mass and its material also affect the satellite mass. In our presentation, we will also discuss the disk evolution after the debris disk formation, taking into account the disk cooling and hydrodynamic escape.

  17. Gas Gun Impact Testing of PZT 95/5, Part 1: Unpoled State

    SciTech Connect

    FURNISH,MICHAEL D.; SETCHELL,ROBERT E.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; MONTGOMERY,STEPHEN T.

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, 10 impact tests were conducted on unpoled PZT 95/5, with 9% porosity and 2 at% Nb doping. These tests were instrumented to obtain time-resolved loading, unloading and span signatures. As well, PVDF gauges allowed shock timing to be established explicitly. The ferroelectric/antiferroelectric phases transition was manifested as a ramp to 0.4 GPa. The onset of crushup produced the most visible signature: a clear wave separation at 2.2 GPa followed by a highly dispersive wave. The end states also reflected crushup, and are consistent with earlier data and with related poled experiments. A span strength value of 0.17 GPa was measured for a shock stress of 0.5 GPa, this decreased to a very small value (no visible pullback signature) for a shock strength of 1.85 GPa.

  18. Wastewater treatment process impact on energy savings and greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Mamais, D; Noutsopoulos, C; Dimopoulou, A; Stasinakis, A; Lekkas, T D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the energy consumption of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), to apply a mathematical model to evaluate their carbon footprint, and to propose energy saving strategies that can be implemented to reduce both energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Greece. The survey was focused on 10 WWTPs in Greece with a treatment capacity ranging from 10,000 to 4,000,000 population equivalents (PE). Based on the results, annual specific energy consumption ranged from 15 to 86 kWh/PE. The highest energy consumer in all the WWTPs was aeration, accounting for 40-75% of total energy requirements. The annual GHG emissions varied significantly according to the treatment schemes employed and ranged between 61 and 161 kgCO2e/PE. The highest values of CO2 emissions were obtained in extended aeration systems and the lowest in conventional activated sludge systems. Key strategies that the wastewater industry could adopt to mitigate GHG emissions are identified and discussed. A case study is presented to demonstrate potential strategies for energy savings and GHG emission reduction. Given the results, it is postulated that the reduction of dissolved oxygen (DO) set points and sludge retention time can provide significant energy savings and decrease GHG emissions. PMID:25633956

  19. Impact of process design on greenhouse gas (GHG) generation by wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Bani Shahabadi, M; Yerushalmi, L; Haghighat, F

    2009-06-01

    The overall on-site and off-site greenhouse gas emissions by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of food processing industry were estimated by using an elaborate mathematical model. Three different types of treatment processes including aerobic, anaerobic and hybrid anaerobic/aerobic processes were examined in this study. The overall on-site emissions were 1952, 1992, and 2435 kg CO2e/d while the off-site emissions were 1313, 4631, and 5205 kg CO2e/d for the aerobic, anaerobic and hybrid treatment systems, respectively, when treating a wastewater at 2000 kg BOD/d. The on-site biological processes made the highest contribution to GHG emissions in the aerobic treatment system while the highest emissions in anaerobic and hybrid treatment systems were obtained by off-site GHG emissions, mainly due to on-site material usage. Biogas recovery and reuse as fuel cover the total energy needs of the treatment plants for aeration, heating and electricity for all three types of operations, and considerably reduce GHG emissions by 512, 673, and 988 kg CO2e/d from a total of 3265, 6625, and 7640 kg CO2e/d for aerobic, anaerobic, and hybrid treatment systems, respectively. Considering the off-site GHG emissions, aerobic treatment is the least GHG producing type of treatment contrary to what has been reported in the literature. PMID:19375775

  20. Gas phase hydrolysis of formaldehyde to form methanediol: impact of formic acid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Montu K; Francisco, Joseph S; Sinha, Amitabha

    2013-11-21

    We find that formic acid (FA) is very effective at facilitating diol formation through its ability to reduce the barrier for the formaldehyde (HCHO) hydrolysis reaction. The rate limiting step in the mechanism involves the isomerization of a prereactive collision complex formed through either the HCHO···H2O + FA and/or HCHO + FA···H2O pathways. The present study finds that the effective barrier height, defined as the difference between the zero-point vibrational energy (ZPE) corrected energy of the transition state (TS) and the HCHO···H2O + FA and HCHO + FA···H2O starting reagents, are respectively only ?1 and ?4 kcal/mol. These barriers are substantially lower than the ?17 kcal/mol barrier associated with the corresponding step in the hydrolysis of HCHO catalyzed by a single water molecule (HCHO + H2O + H2O). The significantly lower barrier heights for the formic acid catalyzed pathway reveal a new important role that organic acids play in the gas phase hydrolysis of atmospheric carbonyl compounds. PMID:23614454

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Na; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Miao; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing

    2012-12-01

    Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO(2)-eq t(-1) rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO(2) from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO(2)-eq t(-1) rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO(2)-eq t(-1) rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs. PMID:22796016

  2. The impact of the weather conditions on the cooling performance of the heat pump driven by an internal natural gas combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janovcová, Martina; Janda?ka, Jozef; Malcho, Milan

    2015-05-01

    Market with sources of heat and cold offers unlimited choice of different power these devices, design technology, efficiency and price categories. New progressive technologies are constantly discovering, about which is still little information, which include heat pumps powered by a combustion engine running on natural gas. A few pieces of these installations are in Slovakia, but no studies about their work and effectiveness under real conditions. This article deals with experimental measurements of gas heat pump efficiency in cooling mode. Since the gas heat pump works only in system air - water, air is the primary low - energy source, it is necessary to monitor the impact of the climate conditions for the gas heat pump performance.

  3. Unravelling the impact of hydrocarbon structure on the fumarate addition mechanism--a gas-phase ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Vyas, Shubham; Villano, Stephanie M; Maupin, C Mark; Dean, Anthony M

    2015-02-14

    The fumarate addition reaction mechanism is central to the anaerobic biodegradation pathway of various hydrocarbons, both aromatic (e.g., toluene, ethyl benzene) and aliphatic (e.g., n-hexane, dodecane). Succinate synthase enzymes, which belong to the glycyl radical enzyme family, are the main facilitators of these biochemical reactions. The overall catalytic mechanism that converts hydrocarbons to a succinate molecule involves three steps: (1) initial H-abstraction from the hydrocarbon by the radical enzyme, (2) addition of the resulting hydrocarbon radical to fumarate, and (3) hydrogen abstraction by the addition product to regenerate the radical enzyme. Since the biodegradation of hydrocarbon fuels via the fumarate addition mechanism is linked to bio-corrosion, an improved understanding of this reaction is imperative to our efforts of predicting the susceptibility of proposed alternative fuels to biodegradation. An improved understanding of the fuel biodegradation process also has the potential to benefit bioremediation. In this study, we consider model aromatic (toluene) and aliphatic (butane) compounds to evaluate the impact of hydrocarbon structure on the energetics and kinetics of the fumarate addition mechanism by means of high level ab initio gas-phase calculations. We predict that the rate of toluene degradation is ?100 times faster than butane at 298 K, and that the first abstraction step is kinetically significant for both hydrocarbons, which is consistent with deuterium isotope effect studies on toluene degradation. The detailed computations also show that the predicted stereo-chemical preference of the succinate products for both toluene and butane are due to the differences in the radical addition rate constants for the various isomers. The computational and kinetic modeling work presented here demonstrates the importance of considering pre-reaction and product complexes in order to accurately treat gas phase systems that involve intra and inter-molecular non-covalent interactions. PMID:25566585

  4. Multiresidue method for the simultaneous determination of four groups of pesticides in ground and drinking waters, using solid-phase microextraction–gas chromatography with electron-capture and thermionic specific detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Gonçalves; M. F Alpendurada

    2002-01-01

    A common sample preparation procedure capable of efficiently concentrating various groups of pesticides, taking advantage of universal detectors like the mass spectrometer or combined techniques of group selective detectors like gas chromatography–electron capture detection (ECD)\\/thermionic specific detection (TSD), is desirable in environmental analysis. Six solid-phase microextraction fibres available for analysis of semi-volatiles (7, 30 and 100 ?m poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), 85

  5. Health And Economic Impact Of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction In Indonesia: SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susandi, A.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study is to assess Indonesia's air quality. This comprised an assessment of Indonesia's air pollution levels and their impact on the development of health and the economics. Estimates are given of concentrations of one of the major pollutants: sulfur dioxide (SO2). Emissions are estimated for Indonesian region, based on energy consumption, derived from the MERGE simulation model. The air pollution levels projection for the year 2000 to the year 2100 are based on the IPCC scenarios, extended with some mitigation scenarios for the energy sector. If the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries reduce their emissions, Indonesian oil consumption increases, and the emissions of SO2 are higher than in the baseline scenario. Health problems increase substantially, peaking to the middle of century in the A1B and B1 scenarios, and rising to the end of century in the A2 and B2 scenarios, while the health problem costs will be the highest during the middle of century in the A1B and B1 scenarios and toward the end of century in the A2 and B2 scenarios. With international trade in emission permits, Indonesia would be higher than in the baseline scenario, since more and more oil and coal using in domestic sources of energy, followed by higher of health problem cases and higher of health problem costs. The total cases of health problem are higher 18.5% than in the baseline scenario. If all countries reduce their emission, including Indonesia, the total concentrations of SO2 are lower than previous scenarios. The cases of health problem associated with SO2 are lower than in the baseline scenario and follow by the lower of the health problem costs. The costs of health problem associated with SO2 are to 35% lower than in the baseline scenario during the simulation period.

  6. The Impact of Region, Nitrogen Use Efficiency, and Grower Incentives on Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Canola (Brassica napus) Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammac, W. A.; Pan, W.; Koenig, R. T.; McCracken, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated through the second renewable fuel standard (RFS2) that biodiesel meet a minimum threshold requirement (50% reduction) for greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction compared to fossil diesel. This designation is determined by life cycle assessment (LCA) and carries with it potential for monetary incentives for biodiesel feedstock growers (Biomass Crop Assistance Program) and biodiesel processors (Renewable Identification Numbers). A national LCA was carried out for canola (Brassica napus) biodiesel feedstock by the EPA and it did meet the minimum threshold requirement. However, EPA's national LCA does not provide insight into regional variation in GHG mitigation. The authors propose for full GHG reduction potential of biofuels to be realized, LCA results must have regional specificity and should inform incentives for growers and processors on a regional basis. The objectives of this work were to determine (1) variation in biofuel feedstock production related GHG emissions between three agroecological zones (AEZs) in eastern Washington State (2) the impact of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) on GHG mitigation potential for each AEZ and (3) the impact of incentives on adoption of oilseed production. Results from objective (1) revealed there is wide variability in range for GHG estimates both across and within AEZs based on variation in farming practices and environment. It is expected that results for objective (2) will show further GHG mitigation potential due to minimizing N use and therefore fertilizer transport and soil related GHG emission while potentially increasing biodiesel production per hectare. Regional based incentives may allow more timely achievement of goals for bio-based fuels production. Additionally, incentives may further increase GHG offsetting by promoting nitrogen conserving best management practices implementation. This research highlights the need for regional assessment/incentive based strategies for maximizing GHG mitigation potential of biofuel feedstocks.

  7. Impacts of woodchip biochar additions on greenhouse gas production and sorption/degradation of two herbicides in a Minnesota soil.

    PubMed

    Spokas, K A; Koskinen, W C; Baker, J M; Reicosky, D C

    2009-10-01

    A potential abatement to increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the atmosphere is the use of pyrolysis to convert vegetative biomass into a more stable form of carbon (biochar) that could then be applied to the soil. However, the impacts of pyrolysis biochar on the soil system need to be assessed before initiating large scale biochar applications to agricultural fields. We compared CO(2) respiration, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production, methane (CH(4)) oxidation and herbicide retention and transformation through laboratory incubations at field capacity in a Minnesota soil (Waukegan silt loam) with and without added biochar. CO(2) originating from the biochar needs to be subtracted from the soil-biochar combination in order to elucidate the impact of biochar on soil respiration. After this correction, biochar amendments reduced CO(2) production for all amendment levels tested (2, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60% w/w; corresponding to 24-720 tha(-1) field application rates). In addition, biochar additions suppressed N(2)O production at all levels. However, these reductions were only significant at biochar amendment levels >20% w/w. Biochar additions also significantly suppressed ambient CH(4) oxidation at all levels compared to unamended soil. The addition of biochar (5% w/w) to soil increased the sorption of atrazine and acetochlor compared to non-amended soils, resulting in decreased dissipation rates of these herbicides. The recalcitrance of the biochar suggests that it could be a viable carbon sequestration strategy, and might provide substantial net greenhouse gas benefits if the reductions in N(2)O production are lasting. PMID:19647284

  8. Impacts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hellmuth; P. Kabat

    2003-01-01

    Even without the impacts of climate change, water managers face prodigious challenges in meeting sustainable development goals. Growing populations need affordable food, water and energy. Industrial development demands a growing share of water resources and contaminates those same resources with its untreated wastes. Nature is at the back of the queue, but preserving enough flows to sustain aquatic ecosystems is

  9. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  10. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas information program. Outer Continental Shelf and onshore oil and gas activities and impacts in the Arctic: a summary report. Update 1, May 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.B.; Pretz, B.C.

    1982-05-01

    This report was written to provide State and local officials in Alaska and other interested parties with current planning information about oil- and gas-related activities on the North Slope. Although only one exploratory well has been drilled on the Arctic OCS, the area has a long history of oil- and gas-related activities. The State has leased land on the North Slope since 1963, and the discovery of oil and gas at Prudhoe Bay was announced in 1968. The exploration of tracts leased in the Joint Sale and increased oil- and gas-related activity are expected. The amount and pace of development will be determined by the amount of oil and gas discovered in the Arctic; the outcome of existing and proposed litigation; the type of coastal zone management program implemented by the North Slope Borough; and the types of transportation systems built or adopted. Impacts resulting from development will be significant. The physical, biological, and social environments of the Arctic will continue to be altered. However, because of the length of time needed for the planning of new oil- and gas-related facilities in the Arctic, it is unlikely that any new facilities, other than those discussed in this report, will be built during the next 6 months.

  11. Impact of mine wastewaters on greenhouse gas emissions from northern peatlands used for mine water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Katharina; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Klöve, Björn; Hynynen, Jenna; Maljanen, Marja

    2015-04-01

    The amount of wastewaters generated during mining operations is increasing along with the increasing number of operation mines, which poses great challenges for mine water management and purification. Mine wastewaters contain high concentrations of nitrogen compounds such as nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) originating from remnant explosives as well as sulfate (SO42-) originating from the oxidation of sulfidic ores. At a mine site in Finnish Lapland, two natural peatlands have been used for cost-effective passive wastewater treatment. One peatland have been used for the treatment of drainage waters (TP 1), while the other has been used for the treatment of process-based wastewaters (TP 4). In this study, the impact of mine water derived nitrogen compounds as well as SO42- on the emission of the potent greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from those treatment peatlands was investigated. Contaminant concentrations in the input and output waters of the treatment peatlands were monitored which allowed for the calculation of contaminant-specific retention efficiencies. Treatment peatlands showed generally good retention efficiencies for metals and metalloids (e.g. nickel, arsenic, antimony, up to 98% reduction in concentration) with rather low input-concentrations (i.e., in the ?g/l-range). On the other hand, retention of contaminants with high input-concentrations (i.e., in mg/l-range) such as NO3-, NH4+ and SO42- was much lower (4-41%, 30-60% and -42-30%, respectively), indicating the limited capability of the treatment peatlands to cope with such high input concentrations. NO3- and NH4+ concentrations were determined in surface and pore water from TP 4 in July 2013 as well as in surface water from TP 1 and TP 4 in October 2013. Up to 720 ?M NO3- and up to 600 ?M NH4+ were detected in surface water of TP 4 in July 2013. NO3- and NH4+ concentrations in surface waters were highest near the mine wastewater distribution ditch and decreased with increasing distances from the ditch. NO3- concentrations were lower in pore water than in surface water, and the peak in NO3- concentration shifted further away from the distribution ditch with increasing depth. On the contrary, NH4+ concentrations were generally higher in pore water than in surface water, and peak concentrations increased with increasing depth. Highest NH4+ concentrations were detected in 30 to 60 cm depth near the outlet at the south end of TP 4. Fluxes of the greenhouse gases CH4 and N2O from 4 sampling points (2 from TP 4, 1 from TP 1, 1 from reference area) were measured on 7 different occasions 2013 and 2014. CH4 emissions were in the same range as measured in other northern pristine peatlands in the reference area, which is not influenced by mine wastewaters. Treatment peatlands showed only very minor CH4 emissions or even CH4 uptake. On the other hand, treatment peatlands showed high N2O emissions, which were in the same range as N2O emissions observed from northern peat soils used for agriculture. Highest emissions were generally observed near the wastewater distribution ditch of TP 4. N2O emissions from the reference area were negligible or even negative. NO3-, NH4+ and SO42- concentrations were determined from surface waters from each sampling point and sampling occasion. N2O emissions were positively correlated with NO3- concentrations, indicating denitrification-derived N2O production in treatment peatlands. On the other hand, CH4 emissions were negatively correlated with SO42- and NO3- concentrations, indicating that the presence of alternative electron acceptors in large amounts suppresses CH4 production in treatment peatlands. In conclusion, the study revealed that (i) treatment peatlands receive high loads of NO3-, NH4+ and SO42- which are not well retained in the peatlands, (ii) mine wastewaters positively and negatively affect N2O and CH4 emissions, respectively, (iii) N2O emissions are positively correlated with NO3- concentrations, and (iv) CH4 emissions are negatively correlated with NO3- and SO42- concentrations. This study

  12. A full fuel-cycle analysis of energy and emissions impacts of transportation fuels produced from natural gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Q. Wang; H. S. Huang

    2000-01-01

    Because of its abundance and because it offers significant energy and evironmental advantages, natural gas has been promoted for use in motor vehicles. A number of transportation fuels are produced from natural gas; each is distinct in terms of upstream production activities and vehicle usage. In this study, the authors avaluate eight fuels produced from natural gas - compressed natural

  13. Toward the Impact of Fuel Evaporation-Combustion Interaction on Spray Combustion in Gas Turbine Combustion Chambers. Part I: Effect of Partial Fuel Vaporization on Spray Combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amsini Sadiki; W. Ahmadi; Mouldi Chrigui; J. Janicka

    \\u000a This work aims at investigating the impact of the interaction between evaporation process and combustion on spray combustion\\u000a characteristics in gas turbine combustion chambers. It is subdivided into two parts. The first part studies how the evaporation\\u000a process affects the behavior of partially pre-vaporized spray combustion. The second part attempts to answer the question\\u000a how the fuel evaporation process behaves

  14. Reversible and irreversible impacts of greenhouse gas emissions in multi-century projections with the NCAR global coupled carbon cycle-climate model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas L. Frölicher; Fortunat Joos

    2010-01-01

    The legacy of historical and the long-term impacts of 21st century greenhouse gas emissions on climate, ocean acidification,\\u000a and carbon-climate feedbacks are investigated with a coupled carbon cycle-climate model. Emission commitment scenarios with\\u000a zero emissions after year 2100 and 21st century emissions of 1,800, 900, and 0 gigatons of carbon are run up to year 2500.\\u000a The reversibility and irreversibility

  15. Complete characterisation of lanolin steryl esters by sub-ambient pressure gas chromatography–mass spectrometry in the electron impact and chemical ionisation modes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Jover; Zaharie Moldovan; Josep Maria Bayona

    2002-01-01

    Steryl esters occurring in lanolin have been characterised by sub-ambient pressure gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Electron impact and chemical ionisation modes with different reagent gases have been evaluated in order to carry out unambiguous peak identification. Steryl esters with different sterol (i.e. cholesterol, lanosterol and dihydrolanosterol) and acid moieties either according to carbon number (i.e C10–C23) or isomeric

  16. Modeling Impacts of Farming Management Alternatives on Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Case Study for Rice Agriculture of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Frolking, S.; Xiao, X.; Salas, W.; Moore, B.; Boles, S.; Qiu, J.; Huang, Y.; Sass, R.

    2004-05-01

    Since early 1980s, water management for rice agriculture in China has substantially changed, with midseason drainage gradually replacing the traditional practice, continuous flooding over this 20-year period. This change provided an opportunity for us to estimate how a management alternative could impact greenhouse gas emissions at a large regional scale. To answer this question, we developed a tool by integrating a process-based model, DNDC, with a GIS database. With this tool, we simulated carbon sequestration in and CH4 and N2O emissions from all of the rice paddies (about 30 million ha) in China based on 1990 climate and management conditions. Two water management scenarios, continuous flooding and midseason drainage, were applied in the simulations to quantify their effects on emissions of the three greenhouse gases. The modeled results indicated significant impacts of the change in water management on both CH4 and N2O emissions although CO2 fluxes were only slightly altered. Methane emissions were reduced over the 20-year period by about 40 percent, or by 5 Tg/yr, roughly 5-10 percent of total global methane emissions from rice paddies. The mitigating effect of midseason drainage on CH4 was highly uneven across the country with the highest reduction rates (200-290 kg CH4-C/ha) for provinces Hainan, Sichuan, Hubei and Guangdong where double- or triple-cropping rice systems dominated with warm weather and high-clay soils, and the lowest reduction rates (less than 25 kg CH4-C/ha) for Tianjin, Hebei, Ningxia, Liaoning and Gansu where there were only single cropping systems with relatively cool weather and low-clay soils. Shifting water management from continuous flooding to midseason drainage increased N2O emissions from Chinese rice paddies by 0.15 Tg N per year, which offset a large fraction (65 percent) of the greenhouse gas benefit gained by the decrease in CH4 emissions. The midseason drainage-induced N2O fluxes were high (higher than 8.0 kg N/ha) in Jilin, Liaoning, Heilongjiang and Xinjiang where the paddy soils contained relatively high organic matter. In conclusion, the water management alternative (i.e., midseason drainage) has been predicted to have very different effects on mitigation when it is implemented across climatic zones, soil types, or cropping systems. The maximum CH4 reductions and minimum N2O increases can be obtained when the alternative management is applied in the rice areas with warm weather, high soil clay content, and low soil organic matter content. The provinces of Sichuan, Hubei, Hunan, Guangdong, Guangxi, Anhui and Jiangsu, which possess 60 percent of the rice paddies in China and produce 65 percent of China's rice harvest, fall into the category.

  17. Photolytic clean-up of biological samples for gas chromatographic analysis of chlorinated paraffins.

    PubMed

    Fridén, Ulrika; Jansson, Bo; Parlar, Harun

    2004-02-01

    A method based on gas chromatography electron capture detection (GC-ECD) for the analysis of chlorinated paraffins (CPs) in biological samples has been investigated. The method includes photolytic destruction of halogenated aromatic compounds, such as PCBs, to eliminate some of the interferences in the analysis of CPs in environmental samples. Gel permeation chromatography was used to isolate CPs from the interfering components of Toxaphene and chlordane after the photolysis. GC-ECD gave a detection limit of 20 ng CPs/g fresh muscle tissue. The recovery of CPs from a spiked moose liver sample was estimated to 94%. PMID:14664836

  18. Impact of biochar application to a Mediterranean wheat crop on soil microbial activity and greenhouse gas fluxes.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, S; Riondino, M; Baronti, S; Esposito, F R; Marzaioli, R; Rutigliano, F A; Vaccari, F P; Miglietta, F

    2011-11-01

    Biochar has been recently proposed as a management strategy to improve crop productivity and global warming mitigation. However, the effect of such approach on soil greenhouse gas fluxes is highly uncertain and few data from field experiments are available. In a field trial, cultivated with wheat, biochar was added to the soil (3 or 6 kg m(-2)) in two growing seasons (2008/2009 and 2009/2010) so to monitor the effect of treatments on microbial parameters 3 months and 14 months after char addition. N(2)O, CH(4) and CO(2) fluxes were measured in the field during the first year after char addition. Biochar incorporation into the soil increased soil pH (from 5.2 to 6.7) and the rates of net N mineralization, soil microbial respiration and denitrification activity in the first 3 months, but after 14 months treated and control plots did not differ significantly. No changes in total microbial biomass and net nitrification rate were observed. In char treated plots, soil N(2)O fluxes were from 26% to 79% lower than N(2)O fluxes in control plots, excluding four sampling dates after the last fertilization with urea, when N(2)O emissions were higher in char treated plots. However, due to the high spatial variability, the observed differences were rarely significant. No significant differences of CH(4) fluxes and field soil respiration were observed among different treatments, with just few exceptions. Overall the char treatments showed a minimal impact on microbial parameters and GHG fluxes over the first 14 months after biochar incorporation. PMID:21944041

  19. Determination of glycols in biological specimens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gembus, Vincent; Goullé, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Christian

    2002-01-01

    A simple extraction and derivatization procedure for the analysis of eight glycols (ethylene glycol, EG; diethylene glycol, DEG; triethylene glycol, TEG; 1,2-propanediol, 1,2-PD; 1,3-propanediol, 1,3-PD; 1,2-butanediol, 1,2-BD; 2,3-butanediol, 2,3-BD; and hexylene glycol, HXG) using a 2-microL serum or blood sample is described. Following deproteinisation with acetonitrile, derivatization to its mono or di TMS derivative, glycols were detected using gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry equipped with a split-spitless inlet and a DB-5MS column in the scan mode from 40 to 500 amu. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate-d6 (GHB-d6) was used as the internal standard. The limits of detection and quantitation in 2 pL of serum ranged, respectively, from 0.7 mg/L for EG to 8.5 mg/L for TEG and from 1.3 mg/L for EG to 18.2 mg/L for 1,2-PD. A linear response was observed over the concentration range from 1 to 800 mg/L for EG and 18 from 800 for TEG and 1,2-PD for serum and blood. Coefficients of variation for both intra-assay precision and interassay reproductibility ranged respectively between 1.9% for TEG to 4.9% for 1,2-PD (11.8% for HXG) and 3.5% for DEG to 9% for 2,3-BD (20.4 for HXG) at the 400 mg/L serum level. The method was applied to plasma and whole blood. PMID:12166815

  20. Evaluation of impact of shale gas operations in the Barnett Shale region on volatile organic compounds in air and potential human health risks.

    PubMed

    Bunch, A G; Perry, C S; Abraham, L; Wikoff, D S; Tachovsky, J A; Hixon, J G; Urban, J D; Harris, M A; Haws, L C

    2014-01-15

    Shale gas exploration and production (E&P) has experienced substantial growth across the U.S. over the last decade. The Barnett Shale, in north-central Texas, contains one of the largest, most active onshore gas fields in North America, stretching across 5000 square miles and having an estimated 15,870 producing wells as of 2011. Given that these operations may occur in relatively close proximity to populated/urban areas, concerns have been expressed about potential impacts on human health. In response to these concerns, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality established an extensive air monitoring network in the region. This network provides a unique data set for evaluating the potential impact of shale gas E&P activities on human health. As such, the objective of this study was to evaluate community-wide exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Barnett Shale region. In this current study, more than 4.6 million data points (representing data from seven monitors at six locations, up to 105 VOCs/monitor, and periods of record dating back to 2000) were evaluated. Measured air concentrations were compared to federal and state health-based air comparison values (HBACVs) to assess potential acute and chronic health effects. None of the measured VOC concentrations exceeded applicable acute HBACVs. Only one chemical (1,2-dibromoethane) exceeded its applicable chronic HBACV, but it is not known to be associated with shale gas production activities. Annual average concentrations were also evaluated in deterministic and probabilistic risk assessments and all risks/hazards were below levels of concern. The analyses demonstrate that, for the extensive number of VOCs measured, shale gas production activities have not resulted in community-wide exposures to those VOCs at levels that would pose a health concern. With the high density of active wells in this region, these findings may be useful for understanding potential health risks in other shale play regions. PMID:24076504

  1. Modeling of Future-Year Emissions Control Scenarios for the Lower Fraser Valley: Impacts of Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Technologies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedley, M.; Jiang, W.; McLaren, R.; Singleton, D. L.

    1998-10-01

    The MC2-CALGRID photochemical modeling system is used to simulate the impact of two fuel substitution scenarios on ozone levels for a future year in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The relative impacts of selected natural gas and propane vehicle technologies are compared for the year 2005. The chosen natural gas technology imposes large reductions in nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions with moderate reductions in nitrogen oxide emissions, while the propane technology greatly lowers nitrogen oxide emissions with only small changes to nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions.The model results showed that replacing the entire light-duty gasoline car and truck fleet with the selected natural gas vehicle technology in the year 2005 in the Canadian portion of the Lower Fraser Valley yielded significant benefits in terms of reducing potential exposures to elevated ozone levels in suburban and rural areas. Sites closer to the urban core were less affected. For the propane fuel substitution, benefits were realized in terms of lowering ozone concentrations and ozone exposures in the rural areas. Within the urban and suburban areas, ozone exposures tended to increase. The exposures to peroxyacetyl nitrate were universally smaller in the alternative fuel scenarios.The nature of an effective control strategy for the Lower Fraser Valley is discussed, and it is suggested that in addition to the propane fuel substitution, moderate controls on the primary NOx sources in conjunction with moderate nonmethane hydrocarbon controls could be the preferred route to lower ozone exposures.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Subsurface Transport and Groundwater Impacts from Hydraulic Fracturing of Tight/Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. T.; Moridis, G. J.; Keen, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown tremendously over the last decade, and concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways that could connect the stimulated reservoir to shallower groundwater aquifers. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a deeper tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying groundwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, assuming that the formation of a connecting pathway has already occurred. We focus on two general transport scenarios: 1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and 2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. The simulations explore a range of permeabilities and geometries over time scales, and evaluate the mechanisms and factors that could lead to the escape of gas or reservoir fluid and the contamination of groundwater resources. We also examine the effects of overpressured reservoirs, and explore long-term transport processes as part of a continuing study. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Gas production from the reservoir via a horizontal well is likely to mitigate release through the reduction of available free gas and the lowering of reservoir pressure. We also find that fractured tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of large volumes of migrating gas, and incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  3. The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas

    E-print Network

    Victoria, University of

    The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse of the author. #12;ii Supervisory Committee The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid reliance on fossil fuels. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) and wind power represent two practical

  4. Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Financial impacts on utilities of load shape changes project. Stage II technical report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Eto; J. McMahon; P. Chan

    1984-01-01

    The goal of this LBL project is to develop tools and procedures that measure the financial impacts of load shape changes to utility stockholders. In this application, the financial impacts of exogenous policies that raise the efficiencies of residential appliances are studied. The analysis is based on detailed forecasts of energy use by computer simulation models developed at LBL. These

  5. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Fritz; S. Harris; H. M. Edenborn; J. Sams

    2011-01-01

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania,;\\u000aClarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236.;\\u000aImpacts a\\/Sedimentation\\/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent;\\u000aWatersheds a\\/the Allegheny National Forest a\\/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest;\\u000a(ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest

  6. Single microparticle launching method using two-stage light-gas gun for simulating hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids and space debris

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Nobuaki; Tsurui, Kenji; Hasegawa, Sunao; Sato, Eiichi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    A single microparticle launching method is described to simulate the hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids and microdebris on space structures at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. A microparticle placed in a sabot with slits is accelerated using a rifled two-stage light-gas gun. The centrifugal force provided by the rifling in the launch tube separates the sabot. The sabot-separation distance and the impact-point deviation are strongly affected by the combination of the sabot diameter and the bore diameter, and by the projectile diameter. Using this method, spherical projectiles of 1.0-0.1 mm diameter were launched at up to 7 km/s.

  7. Polychaete/amphipod ratio as an indicator of environmental impact related to offshore oil and gas production along the Norwegian continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Hector; Renaud, Paul E

    2011-12-01

    Benthic faunal data is regularly collected worldwide to assess the ecological quality of marine environments. Recently, there has been renewed interest in developing biological indices able to identify environmental status and potential anthropogenic impacts. In this paper we evaluate the performance of a general polychaete/amphipod ratio along the Norwegian continental shelf as an environmental indicator for offshore oil and gas impacts. Two main trends are apparent: first, a contamination gradient is discernible from where production takes place compared to stations 10,000 m away. Second, the quality of the marine environment has improved over time. These results are consistent with monitoring reports employing a combination of uni- and multi-variate statistics. Thus, we consider this ratio as a relatively simple, useful and potentially cost-effective complement to other more demanding assessment techniques. Because of its strong theoretical basis, it may also be useful for detecting ecological change as a result of other activities. PMID:22000480

  8. Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganji, A. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1992-07-01

    Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California`s and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

  9. Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California

    SciTech Connect

    Ganji, A. (San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering)

    1992-07-01

    Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California's and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

  10. [Health and environmental licensing: a methodological proposal for assessment of the impact of the oil and gas industry].

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Eduardo Macedo; Barata, Matha Macedo de Lima; Hacon, Sandra de Souza

    2012-02-01

    Bearing in mind the importance of the impacts of the oil industry on human health, this article seeks to present a methodological proposal for analysis of these aspects in environmental impact assessment studies, based on the established legal parameters and a validated matrix for the hydroelectric sector. The lack of health considerations in the environmental impact assessment was detected in most of the 21 oil production enterprises analyzed, that were licensed in the period from January 1, 2004 through October 30, 2009. The health matrix proved to be an appropriate methodological approach to analyze these aspects in the environmental licensing process, guiding decisions and interventions in socio-environmental management. PMID:22267026

  11. Using a two-layered sphere model to investigate the impact of gas vacuoles on the inherent optical properties of M. aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, M. W.; Bernard, S.

    2013-06-01

    A two-layered sphere model is used to investigate the impact of gas vacuoles on the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of the cyanophyte Microcystis aeruginosa. Enclosing a vacuole-like particle within a chromatoplasm shell layer significantly altered spectral scattering and increased backscattering. The two-layered sphere model reproduced features in the spectral attenuation and volume scattering function (VSF) that have previously been attributed to gas vacuoles. This suggests the model is good at least as a first approximation for investigating how gas vacuoles alter the IOPs. The central value of the real refractive index, 1+ ?, for the shell layer was determined using a radiative transfer model and measured remote sensing reflectance, Rrs, and IOP data. For a cell with 50% vacuole volume, the mean 1+ ? value for the shell layer was 1.12. The corresponding chl a specific phytoplankton backscattering coefficient, bb?*, ranged between 3.9 × 10-3 and 7.2 × 10-3 m2 mg-1 at 510 nm. This agrees closely with in situ particulate backscattering measurements and values reported elsewhere. Rrs simulated for a population of vacuolate cells was greatly enlarged relative to a homogeneous population. Empirical algorithms based on Rrs were derived for estimating chl a in eutrophic/hypertrophic waters dominated by M. aeruginosa. The study confirms that gas vacuoles cause significant increase in backscattering and are responsible for the high Rrs values observed in buoyant cyanobacterial blooms. Gas vacuoles are therefore one of the most important bio-optical substructures influencing the IOPs in phytoplankton.

  12. Using a two-layered sphere model to investigate the impact of gas vacuoles on the inherent optical properties of Microcystis aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, M. W.; Bernard, S.

    2013-12-01

    A two-layered sphere model is used to investigate the impact of gas vacuoles on the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of the cyanophyte Microcystis aeruginosa. Enclosing a vacuole-like particle within a chromatoplasm shell layer significantly altered spectral scattering and increased backscattering. The two-layered sphere model reproduced features in the spectral attenuation and volume scattering function (VSF) that have previously been attributed to gas vacuoles. This suggests the model is good at least as a first approximation for investigating how gas vacuoles alter the IOPs. Measured Rrs was used to provide a range of values for the central value of the real refractive index, 1 + ?, for the shell layer using measured IOPs and a radiative transfer model. Sufficient optical closure was obtained for 1 + ? between 1.1 and 1.14, which had corresponding Chl a-specific phytoplankton backscattering, bb?*, between 3.9 and 7.2 × 10-3 m2 mg-1 at 510 nm. The bb?* values are in close agreement with the literature and in situ particulate backscattering measurements. Rrs simulated for a population of vacuolate cells was greatly enlarged relative to a homogeneous population. A sensitivity analysis of empirical algorithms for estimating Chl a in eutrophic/hypertrophic waters suggests these are robust under variable constituent concentrations and likely to be species-sensitive. The study confirms that gas vacuoles cause significant increase in backscattering and are responsible for the high Rrs values observed in buoyant cyanobacterial blooms. Gas vacuoles are therefore one of the most important bio-optical substructures influencing the IOPs in phytoplankton.

  13. How Deep is the Critical Zone: A Scientific Question with Potential Impact For Decision-makers in Areas of Shale-Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Citizens living in areas of shale-gas development such as the Marcellus gas play in Pennsylvania and surrounding states are cognizant of the possibility that drilling and production of natural gas -- including hydraulic fracturing -- may have environmental impacts on their water. The Critical Zone is defined as the zone from vegetation canopy to the lower limits of groundwater. This definition is nebulous in terms of the lower limit, and yet, defining the bottom of the Critical Zone is important if citizens are to embrace shale-gas development. This is because, although no peer-reviewed study has been presented that documents a case where hydraulic fracturing or formation fluids have migrated upwards from fracturing depths to drinking water resources, a few cases of such leakage have been alleged. On the other hand, many cases of methane migration into aquifers have been documented to occur and some have been attributed to shale-gas development. The Critical Zone science community has a role to play in understanding such contamination problems, how they unfold, and how they should be ameliorated. For example, one big effort of the Critical Zone science community is to promote sharing of data describing the environment. This data effort has been extended to provide data for citizens to understand water quality by a team known as the Shale Network. As scientists learn to publish data online, these efforts must also be made accessible to non-scientists. As citizens access the data, the demand for data will grow and all branches of government will eventually respond by providing more accessible data that will help the public and policy-makers make decisions.

  14. Impact of hot fluid advection on hydrocarbon gas production and seepage in mud volcano sediments of thick Cenozoic deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, Marianne; Elvert, Marcus; Schmidt, Mark; Scholz, Florian; Reitz, Anja; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hensen, Christian

    2012-08-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps are ubiquitous at gas-prone Cenozoic deltas such as the Nile Deep Sea Fan (NDSF) On the contrary at the periphery, a lower but sustained CH4 flux is indicated by deeper sulphate-methane transition zones and the presence of 13C-depleted biomarkers of AOM, consistent with predominantly immature organic matter. Values of ?13C-CH4?-60‰VPDB and decreased concentrations of 13C-enriched C2+ are typical of mixed microbial CH4 and biodegraded thermogenic gas from Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs of the region. The maturity of gas condensate migrated from pre-Miocene sources into Miocene reservoirs of the Western NDSF is higher than that of the gas vented at the centre of NAMV, supporting the hypothesis that it is rather released from the degradation of oil in Neogene reservoirs. Combined with the finding of hot pore water and petroleum at the centre, our results suggest that clay mineral dehydration of Neogene sediments, which takes place posterior to reservoir filling, may contribute to intense gas generation at high sedimentation rate deltas.

  15. 78 FR 42516 - Iroquois Gas Transmission System, L.P.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...Transmission System, L.P. (Iroquois) and Constitution Pipeline Company, LLC (Constitution). On September 7, 2012, the FERC issued...Environmental Impact Statement for the Planned Constitution Pipeline Project, [[Page 42517

  16. 77 FR 47052 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ...right-of-way after construction; Impacts on threatened and endangered species (including the masked bobwhite quail, Pima pineapple cactus, and Chiricahua leopard frog) and other sensitive species (including the cactus ferruginous pygmy owl); and...

  17. The impact of plasma-wall interaction on the gas mixing efficiency in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Stiebing, K. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik der J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    It is generally accepted that different effects are necessary to explain the gas mixing method of increasing the output of highly charged ions from an ECRIS. The two most important effects are the mass effect and the dilution effect. Their relative weights have not been determined experimentally yet, but it is generally assumed that the mass effect is dominant in standard ECRIS installations with stainless steel plasma chambers. In order to gain more insight into the physics of the gas mixing effect and in particular on the relevance of the dilution process, we have carried out a study where we have investigated the role of the plasma-wall interaction on the gas mixing effect. In this contribution, we shall discuss Charge state distributions spectra, measured at the Frankfurt ECRIS using different working gases, pure argon, a mixture of argon and oxygen, and argon mixed with neon.

  18. Regional air quality impacts of hydraulic fracturing and shale natural gas activity: Evidence from ambient VOC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinciguerra, Timothy; Yao, Simon; Dadzie, Joseph; Chittams, Alexa; Deskins, Thomas; Ehrman, Sheryl; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, concentrations of many anthropogenic pollutants have been successfully reduced, improving air quality. However, a new influx of emissions associated with hydraulic fracturing and shale natural gas operations could be counteracting some of these benefits. Using hourly measurements from Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) in the Baltimore, MD and Washington, DC areas, we observed that following a period of decline, daytime ethane concentrations have increased significantly since 2010, growing from ?7% of total measured nonmethane organic carbon to ?15% in 2013. This trend appears to be linked with the rapidly increasing natural gas production in upwind, neighboring states, especially Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Ethane concentrations failed to display this trend at a PAMS site outside of Atlanta, GA, a region without new widespread natural gas operations.

  19. An integrated approach for the evaluation of technological hazard impacts on air quality: the case of the Val d'Agri oil/gas plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvello, M.; Esposito, F.; Trippetta, S.

    2014-08-01

    The Val d'Agri area (southern Italy) hosts one of the biggest onshore European reservoir and the largest oil/gas pre-treatment plant, named Centro Olio Val d'Agri (COVA), located in a rural/anthropized context. Several hazards are associated with this plant. These are mainly represented by possible impacts of the COVA atmospheric emissions on the local air quality and human health. This work uses a novel approach based on the integration of air quality measurements from the regional monitoring network, additional experimental measurements (i.e. sub-micrometre particulate matter (PM1) and black carbon (BC)) and advanced statistical analyses to provide a preliminary evaluation of the Val d'Agri air quality state and give some indication of specific areas potentially affected by COVA hazards. Results show that the COVA plant emissions have a particular impact on the air quality of the area closest to it. In this area several pollutants specifically related to the COVA combustion processes (i.e. nitrogen oxides, benzene and toluene) show the highest concentration values and significant correlations. The proposed approach represents a first step in the assessment of the risks associated with oil/gas exploration and pre-treatment activities and a starting point for the development of effective and exportable air quality monitoring strategies.

  20. An integrated approach for the evaluation of technological hazard impacts on air quality: the case of the Val d'Agri oil/gas plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvello, M.; Esposito, F.; Trippetta, S.

    2014-04-01

    The Val d'Agri area (southern Italy) hosts the biggest on-shore European reservoir and the largest oil/gas pre-treatment plant, named Centro Olio Val d'Agri (COVA), located in a rural/anthropized context. Several hazards are associated to this plant. These are mainly represented by possible impacts of the COVA atmospheric emissions on the local air quality and human health. This work uses a novel approach based on the integration of air quality measurements from the regional monitoring network, additional experimental measurements (i.e., sub-micrometric particulate matter - PM1 and Black Carbon - BC) and advanced statistical analyses to provide a preliminary evaluation of the Val d'Agri air quality state and give some indications of specific areas potentially affected by COVA hazards. Results show that the COVA plant emissions exert an impact especially on the air quality of the area closest to it. In this area several pollutants specifically related to the COVA combustion processes (i.e., nitrogen oxides, benzene and toluene) show the highest concentration values and significant correlations. The proposed approach represents a first step in the assessment of the risks associated to oil/gas exploration and pre-treatment activities and a starting point for the development of effective and exportable air quality monitoring strategies.

  1. Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)

    EIA Publications

    2007-01-01

    This analysis was updated for Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO): Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the states of Alaska and Virginia have asked the federal government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

  2. A system to damp the free piston oscillations in a two-stage light-gas gun used for hypervelocity impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavarin, D.; Francesconi, A.; Angrilli, F.

    2004-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments that reproduce on-orbit collisions between micrometeoroids or orbital debris and space structures are commonly performed by means of propellant-driven two-stage light-gas guns. Such devices accelerate projectiles using the thrust of a light propellant gas that is compressed to high pressure and temperature by a piston running in a pump tube. Though these guns have the unique capability of accelerating particles up to 9 km/s, many components of the gun must be checked and/or substituted after each shot making test sessions long and expensive. In order to have a lot of and many different types of hypervelocity impact data, the Center of Studies and activities for Space CISAS "G. Colombo" of Padua University developed a high-shot-frequency two-stage light-gas gun that can increase the shot repetition rate of standard facilities by a factor of 5 or more and at the same time reduce the shot cost by a factor of 2 or more. This is made possible through the use of special mechanical and diagnostic solutions that were designed to operate the gun for more than 50 shots in sequence without having to carry out maintenance operations. This article presents the design and operation of the CISAS two-stage light-gas gun damping system, which is one of the subsystems that makes it possible to achieve high-shot frequency. The damping system is in charge of controlling the piston oscillations in the pump tube, making it possible for the piston to withstand more than 100 shots without any damage. In particular, the damping system avoids piston strikes onto the gun head at the end of each compression stroke and allows the piston to be positioned at the base of the pump tube after each shot. The sensitivity of the piston oscillations to the damping operations and main subsystem design parameters were identified using numerical simulations, carried out according to a model that describes every working phase of the gun. Moreover, in this paper, the technical solutions for the damping system implementation are presented and the numerical predictions are compared with experimental results. For the CISAS high-shot-frequency gas gun, an efficient damping system proved to be a fundamental requirement to reliably accelerate 100 mg projectiles above 5 km/s and 70 mg projectiles at 5.5 km/s with a shot frequency of 10 shots per day at least, including the time needed for replacing the target and pumping down the target vacuum chamber.

  3. TECHNICAL-ECONOMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND CORRESPONDING SUSTAINABILITY INDICATORS OF THE USE OF NATURAL GAS IN MEXICO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariano Bauer; Eva Melgar; Rafael Villaseñor; Moisés Magdaleno; Alberto Elizalde; Elizabeth Mar; Eugenio Ceballos; Gloria Yáñez

    1. INTRODUCTION Gaseous hydrocarbons constitute an important share of the internal energy supply on which the country's development depends, and will continue to be so, in particular in view of the proposed intensified use of natural gas. Recently, on the grounds of environmental concerns to a large extent, Mexico's energy policy has been directed to promote the use of natural

  4. Impact of using high-density polyethylene geomembrane layer as landfill intermediate cover on landfill gas extraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhi; Gong, Huijuan; Zhang, Mengqun; Wu, Weili; Liu, Yu; Feng, Jin

    2011-05-01

    Clay is widely used as a traditional cover material for landfills. As clay becomes increasingly costly and scarce, and it also reduces the storage capacity of landfills, alternative materials with low hydraulic conductivity are employed. In developing countries such as China, landfill gas (LFG) is usually extracted for utilization during filling stage, therefore, the intermediate covering system is an important part in a landfill. In this study, a field test of LFG extraction was implemented under the condition of using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane layer as the only intermediate cover on the landfill. Results showed that after welding the HDPE geomembranes together to form a whole airtight layer upon a larger area of landfill, the gas flow in the general pipe increased 25% comparing with the design that the HDPE geomembranes were not welded together, which means that the gas extraction ability improved. However as the heat isolation capacity of the HDPE geomembrane layer is low, the gas generation ability of a shallow landfill is likely to be weakened in cold weather. Although using HDPE geomembrane layer as intermediate cover is acceptable in practice, the management and maintenance of it needs to be investigated in order to guarantee its effective operation for a long term. PMID:21232931

  5. DAYCENT Model Projections of Land Use Change Impacts on N Gas Emissions in the Central US (Invited)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Del Grosso; W. J. Parton; S. M. Ogle

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen additions to cropped soils from fertilizers and symbiotic N fixation are an important source of N2O, NOx, and NH3 emissions. As the need for biofuel feedstock increases, pasture, prairie, and other lands are being converted to biofuel cropping systems. We used the DAYCENT biogeochemical model to quantify emission patterns of N gas related aerosol precursors under current land use

  6. Impact of alternative n fertilizer sources on cotton yield and greenhouse gas emissions in a coastal plain soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in the use of alternative fertilizer sources have increased in recent years. This is partially attributed to the belief that the new enhanced-efficiency N fertilizer sources can potentially increase crop yield, while at the same time decreasing greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, a field stud...

  7. Impact of oil and gas vents and slicks on petroleum exploration in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Kornacki; J. W. Kendrick; J. L. Berry

    1994-01-01

    Active petroleum vents and slicks have been identified in the deep water of the northern Gulf of Mexico using numerous techniques. The occurrence and distribution of these petroleum vents are strongly influenced by the local geological framework—especially the presence of vertical migration pathways into shallow sediments. Oil and gas vents may be more useful for establishing the existence of petroleum

  8. Volumetric strain associated with methane desorption and its impact on coalbed gas production from deep coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Earth & Ocean Science

    2005-09-01

    For deep coal seams, significant reservoir pressure drawdown is required to promote gas desorption because of the Langmuir-type isotherm that typifies coals. Hence, a large permeability decline may occur because of pressure drawdown and the resulting increase in effective stress, depending on coal properties and the stress field during production. However, the permeability decline can potentially be offset by the permeability enhancement caused by the matrix shrinkage associated with methane desorption. The predictability of varying permeability is critical for coalbed gas exploration and production-well management. We have investigated quantitatively the effects of reservoir pressure and sorption-induced volumetric strain on coal-seam permeability with constraints from the adsorption isotherm and associated volumetric strain measured on a Cretaceous Mesaverde Group coal (Piceance basin) and derived a stress-dependent permeability model. Our results suggest that the favorable coal properties that can result in less permeability reduction during earlier production and an earlier strong permeability rebound (increase in permeability caused by coal shrinkage) with methane desorption include (1) large bulk or Young's modulus; (2) large adsorption or Langmuir volume; (3) high Langmuir pressure; (4) high initial permeability and dense cleat spacing; and (5) low initial reservoir pressure and high in-situ gas content. Permeability variation with gas production is further dependent on the orientation of the coal seam, the reservoir stress field, and the cleat structure. Well completion with injection of N2 and displacement of CH{sub 4} only results in short-term enhancement of permeability and does not promote the overall gas production for the coal studied.

  9. MOF-74 building unit has a direct impact on toxic gas adsorption T. Grant Glover a,n

    E-print Network

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    capacities of the analogs were compared to 13X zeolite and BPL activated carbon. The impact of the metal materials, such as activated carbons and zeolites, to separate. Of the current MOF materials, MOF-74 Breakthrough Adsorption Packed bed Porous media Filtration a b s t r a c t Metal organic framework (MOF-74

  10. Impacts of woodchip biochar additions on greenhouse gas production and sorption\\/degradation of two herbicides in a Minnesota soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Spokas; W. C. Koskinen; J. M. Baker; D. C. Reicosky

    2009-01-01

    A potential abatement to increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is the use of pyrolysis to convert vegetative biomass into a more stable form of carbon (biochar) that could then be applied to the soil. However, the impacts of pyrolysis biochar on the soil system need to be assessed before initiating large scale biochar applications to agricultural

  11. IMPACTS OF GREENHOUSE GAS AND PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM WOODFUEL PRODUCTION AND END-USE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Bailis; David Pennise; Majid Ezzati; Daniel M. Kammen; Evans Kituyi

    Household energy in sub-Saharan Africa is largely derived from woodfuels burned in simple stoves with poor combustion characteristics. These devices emit products of incomplete combustion (PICs) that both damage human health and negatively impact the atmospheric radiation budget. We use empirical studies and published emission factors to estimate the pollution associated with production, distribution and end-use of common household fuels

  12. Trade-linked Canada–United States household environmental impact analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas M. Ferguson; Heather L. MacLean

    2011-01-01

    We compare energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with total household expenditures and activities in Canada and US in 1997, the first detailed estimate of environmental burdens for Canadian households. We estimate direct burdens from published government data and indirect burdens using an industry-by-commodity, bi-national economic input–output life cycle assessment model developed in this study. Comparing 30 expenditure

  13. A mathematical model to predict impact toughness of pulsed-current gas tungsten arc-welded titanium alloy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Balasubramanian; V. Jayabalan; V. Balasubramanian

    2008-01-01

    Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight\\u000a ratio, such as in the applications of transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers, and space vehicles. The\\u000a preferred welding process for welding titanium alloy is frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTA) due to its comparatively\\u000a easier applicability and better economy. In the

  14. The variation in molecular gas depletion time among nearby galaxies - II. The impact of galaxy internal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Ling; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2015-06-01

    We use a data set of nearby galaxies drawn from the HERA CO-Line Extragalactic Survey, ATLAS3D, and COLD GASS surveys to study variations in molecular gas depletion time (tdep) in galaxy structures such as bulges, grand-design spiral arms, bars and rings. Molecular gas is traced by CO line emission and star formation rate (SFR) is derived using the combination of far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared (MIR) data. The contribution of old stars to MIR emission for the ATLAS3D sample is corrected using 2MASS K-band images. We apply a two-dimensional image decomposition algorithm to decompose galaxies into bulges and discs. Spiral arms, bars and rings are identified in the residual maps, and molecular gas depletion times are derived on a square grid of 1 kpc2 size. In previous work, we showed that tdep correlates strongly with specific star formation rate (sSFR). We now find that at a given sSFR, the bulge has shorter tdep than the disc. The shift to shorter depletion times is most pronounced in the inner bulge (R < 0.1 Re). Grids from galaxies with bars and rings are similar to those from galactic bulges in that they have reduced tdep at a given sSFR. In contrast, the tdep versus sSFR relation in the discs of galaxies with spiral arms is displaced to longer tdep at fixed sSFR. We then show that the differences in the tdep-sSFR relation for bulges, discs, arms, bars and rings can be linked to variations in stellar, rather than gas surface density between different structures. Our best current predictor for tdep, both globally and for 1 kpc grids, is given by tdep = -0.36 log (?SFR) - 0.50 log (?*) + 5.87.

  15. LARGE-SCALE SHOCK-IONIZED AND PHOTOIONIZED GAS IN M83: THE IMPACT OF STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sungryong; Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dopita, Michael A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Balick, Bruce [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Carollo, Marcella [Department of Physics, ETH-Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Disney, Michael J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Frogel, Jay A. [Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Washington, DC 20005 (United States); Hall, Donald [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kimble, Randy A. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McCarthy, Patrick J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101-1292 (United States); O'Connell, Robert W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Paresce, Francesco [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, INAF, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Saha, Abhijit [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Silk, Joseph I. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Trauger, John T. [NASA-Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Walker, Alistair R., E-mail: wpb@pha.jhu.edu [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2011-04-10

    We investigate the ionization structure of the nebular gas in M83 using the line diagnostic diagram, [O III](5007 A)/H{beta} versus [S II](6716 A+6731 A)/H{alpha}, with the newly available narrowband images from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We produce the diagnostic diagram on a pixel-by-pixel (0.''2 x 0.''2) basis and compare it with several photo- and shock-ionization models. We select four regions from the center to the outer spiral arm and compare them in the diagnostic diagram. For the photoionized gas, we observe a gradual increase of the log ([O III]/H{beta}) ratios from the center to the spiral arm, consistent with the metallicity gradient, as the H II regions go from super-solar abundance to roughly solar abundance from the center out. Using the diagnostic diagram, we separate the photoionized from the shock-ionized component of the gas. We find that the shock-ionized H{alpha} emission ranges from {approx}2% to about 15%-33% of the total, depending on the separation criteria used. An interesting feature in the diagnostic diagram is a horizontal distribution around log ([O III]/H{beta}) {approx} 0. This feature is well fit by a shock-ionization model with 2.0 Z{sub sun} metallicity and shock velocities in the range of 250-350 km s{sup -1}. A low-velocity shock component, <200 km s{sup -1}, is also detected and is spatially located at the boundary between the outer ring and the spiral arm. The low-velocity shock component can be due to (1) supernova remnants located nearby, (2) dynamical interaction between the outer ring and the spiral arm, and (3) abnormal line ratios from extreme local dust extinction. The current data do not enable us to distinguish among those three possible interpretations. Our main conclusion is that, even at the HST resolution, the shocked gas represents a small fraction of the total ionized gas emission at less than 33% of the total. However, it accounts for virtually all of the mechanical energy produced by the central starburst in M83.

  16. Comparison of the limulus amebocyte lysate test and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for measuring lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins) in airborne dust from poultry-processing industries.

    PubMed Central

    Sonesson, A; Larsson, L; Schütz, A; Hagmar, L; Hallberg, T

    1990-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) content in airborne dust samples from three different poultry slaughterhouses was determined with both the chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of lipopolysaccharide-derived 3-hydroxy fatty acids. Gram-negative cell walls were also measured by using two-dimensional gas chromatography/electron-capture analysis of diaminopimelic acid originating from the peptidoglycan. The correlation between the results of the Limulus assay and those of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for determination of the lipopolysaccharide content in the dust samples was poor, whereas a good correlation was obtained between lipopolysaccharide and diaminopimelic acid concentrations with the gas chromatographic methods. The results suggest that it is predominantly cell-wall-dissociated lipopolysaccharides that are measured with the Limulus assay, whereas the gas chromatographic methods allow determination of total concentrations of lipopolysaccharide, including Limulus-inactive lipopolysaccharide, gram-negative cells, and cellular debris. PMID:2187411

  17. Strengthening of oxidation resistant materials for gas turbine applications. [treatment of silicon ceramics for increased flexural strength and impact resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics were treated to form compressive surface layers. On the silicon carbide, quenching and thermal exposure treatments were used, and on the silicon nitride, quenching, carburizing, and a combination of quenching and carburizing were used. In some cases substantial improvements in impact resistance and/or flexural strength were observed. The presence of compressive surface stresses was demonstrated by slotted rod tests.

  18. Vesiculation, melt formation, noble gas/nitrogen behaviour, and impact chronology on a planetary regolith : the case of Benccubbin (CB) meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, B.; Turner, G.; Kelley, S. P.

    2008-12-01

    The Benccubbin meteorite is a member of the CB peculiar meteorite family, which all have reduced silicates, metal zoning, solar Ni/Co and large enrichments in 15N, that have been regarded as relics of their very primitive character. However, these meteorites also show tugsten isotopic ratios suggesting metal differentiation events several Ma after start of solar system formation. The Benccubbin mineralogy is best explained as being an heterogeneous planetary regolith containing clasts of different origins (e.g., CO, CI chondrules and clasts, silicates of unknown origin). This meteorite presents evidence of having been impacted, such as melt, temperature gradient recorded at the silicate/metal interface, and textures indicative of rapid cooling. Notably, Benccubbin contains vesicles in several phases : partially molten silicate clasts and CO chondrules, impact melt, and the so-called bubble grains 1. We have analysed several Benccubbin mineral and metal phases for N and noble gas isotopes and abundances by both laser fusion and vacuum crushing. 15N-rich nitrogen (d15N up to +1,000 per mil) is ubiquituous, particularly inside vesicles, and is associated with noble gases. Notably, N and noble gases appear to have largely exchanged between silicate and vesicles, reaching locally equilibrium partitioning. Gases are still released after extensive crushing up to 4,000 strokes, in contrast to the case of MORB glasses and suggesting a foam-like, decompression structure of the impacted melt. N and Ar correlate well, showing that the N solubility was comparable to that of Ar and therefore that the redox conditions were above IW, according to 2. From the N content of the glass, we estimate that it equilibrated with a vapor plume in which the pressure of nitrogen was ~300 Bar. Radiogenic 40Ar is present inside the vesicles, showing that the vesiculation event was not an early process. Ar-Ar dating of Benccubbin suggests involvement in an impact around 4.2 Ga. In contrast to very variable N and primordial noble gas contents among different phases, cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne and 38Ar abundances are uniform, and vesicles contain little cosmogenic isotopes, showing that space exposure occurred after the vesicle forming impact event. Hence the event that led to the ejection of the Benccubbin meteorite was distinct from the vesiculation one, and occurred 40-50 Ma ago according to cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne and 38Ar isotopes and 38Ar-37Ar correlation. Noble gases have been well preserved in vesicles from cosmic ray isotope contributions, permitting to determine their origin precisely despite extensive exposure in space. Noble gases present Q-like isotopic ratios but highly fractionated abundances with respect to Q. The fact that comets are definitely rich in 15N 3 and may also have Q-like noble gas signature in their refractory phases 4 is suggestive of a possible link between cometary matter and CBs. 1. Perron, C., Fieni, C. and Guilhaumou, N. Geochim.Cosmochim. Acta 72, 959-977 (2008). 2. Libourel, G., Marty, B. and Humbert, F. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 67, 4123-4135 (2003). 3. Bockelee-Morvan, D. et al. Large excess of heavy nitrogen in both hydrogen cyanide and cyanogen from comet 17P/Holmes. Ap J.679, L49-L52 (2008). 4. Marty, B. et al. Science 319, 75-78 (2008).

  19. DAYCENT Model Projections of Land Use Change Impacts on N Gas Emissions in the Central US (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Grosso, S.; Parton, W. J.; Ogle, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrogen additions to cropped soils from fertilizers and symbiotic N fixation are an important source of N2O, NOx, and NH3 emissions. As the need for biofuel feedstock increases, pasture, prairie, and other lands are being converted to biofuel cropping systems. We used the DAYCENT biogeochemical model to quantify emission patterns of N gas related aerosol precursors under current land use and land use changes. DAYCENT is the daily time step version of the CENTURY model and simulates plant growth, soil organic matter decomposition, and the microbial processes that result in N gas emissions. Land use change scenarios considered include conversion of current cropland, pasture, CRP, and abandoned crop land to different biofuel cropping systems under conventional and improved management scenarios. Model results suggest that conversion of cropland to corn ethanol cropping would result in a small increase in emissions but use of improved fertilizers would mitigate this increase. Conversion of pasture, CRP, and abandoned crop land to corn ethanol cropping results in substantial increases in emissions that would only be partially mitigated by using improved fertilizers. However, converting these non-cropped lands to cellulosic biofuel cropping systems, such as switchgrass and miscanthus, would result in a more modest increase in emissions. Converting land already used for cropping to cellulosic biofuel crops would likely result in a decrease in emissions. We conclude that previous land use interacts with current land management strategies to control emissions.

  20. Potential impacts of electric power production utilizing natural gas, renewables and carbon capture and sequestration on US Freshwater resources.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Vincent C; Malczynski, Leonard A; Kobos, Peter H; Klise, Geoffrey T; Shuster, Erik

    2013-08-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has important implications relative to future thermoelectric water use. A bounding analysis is performed using past greenhouse gas emission policy proposals and assumes either all effected capacity retires (lower water use bound) or is retrofitted (upper bound). The analysis is performed in the context of recent trends in electric power generation expansion, namely high penetration of natural gas and renewables along with constrained cooling system options. Results indicate thermoelectric freshwater withdrawals nationwide could increase by roughly 1% or decrease by up to 60% relative to 2009 levels, while consumption could increase as much as 21% or decrease as much as 28%. To identify where changes in freshwater use might be problematic at a regional level, electric power production has been mapped onto watersheds with limited water availability (where consumption exceeds 70% of gauged streamflow). Results suggest that between 0.44 and 0.96 Mm(3)/d of new thermoelectric freshwater consumption could occur in watersheds with limited water availability, while power plant retirements in these watersheds could yield 0.90 to 1.0 Mm(3)/d of water savings. PMID:23789965

  1. NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Apte, Michael G.; Black, Douglas R.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Lucas, Donald; Lunden, Melissa M.; Mirer, Anna G.; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of liquefied natural gas on pollutant emissions was evaluated experimentally with used and new appliances in the laboratory and with appliances installed in residences, targeting information gaps from previous studies. Burner selection targeted available technologies that are projected to comprise the majority of installed appliances over the next decade. Experiments were conducted on 13 cooktop sets, 12 ovens, 5 broiler burners, 5 storage water heaters, 4 forced air furnaces, 1 wall furnace, and 6 tankless water heaters. Air-free concentrations and fuel-based emission factors were determined for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide, and the number of (predominantly ultrafine) particles over complete burns?including transient effects (device warm-up and intermittent firing of burners) following ignition--and during more stable end-of-burn conditions. Formaldehyde was measured over multi-burn cycles. The baseline fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number (a measure of fuel energy delivery rate) of 1320-1340; test fuels had Wobbe numbers of roughly 1390 and 1420, and in some cases 1360. No ignition or operational problems were observed during test fuel use. Baseline emissions varied widely across and within burner groups and with burner operational mode. Statistically significant emissions changes were observed for some pollutants on some burners.

  2. Impact of alternative fuels on emissions characteristics of a gas turbine engine - part 2: volatile and semivolatile particulate matter emissions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul I; Allan, James D; Lobo, Prem; Coe, Hugh; Christie, Simon; Wilson, Christopher; Hagen, Donald; Whitefield, Philip; Raper, David; Rye, Lucas

    2012-10-01

    The work characterizes the changes in volatile and semivolatile PM emissions from a gas turbine engine resulting from burning alternative fuels, specifically gas-to-liquid (GTL), coal-to-liquid (CTL), a blend of Jet A-1 and GTL, biodiesel, and diesel, to the standard Jet A-1. The data presented here, compares the mass spectral fingerprints of the different fuels as measured by the Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. There were three sample points, two at the exhaust exit plane with dilution added at different locations and another probe located 10 m downstream. For emissions measured at the downstream probe when the engine was operating at high power, all fuels produced chemically similar organic PM, dominated by C(x)H(y) fragments, suggesting the presence of long chain alkanes. The second largest contribution came from C(x)H(y)O(z) fragments, possibly from carbonyls or alcohols. For the nondiesel fuels, the highest loadings of organic PM were from the downstream probe at high power. Conversely, the diesel based fuels produced more organic material at low power from one of the exit plane probes. Differences in the composition of the PM for certain fuels were observed as the engine power decreased to idle and the measurements were made closer to the exit plane. PMID:22913312

  3. Effect of placements (horizontal with vertical) on gas-solid flow and particle impact erosion in gate valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhe; Zhu, Linhang; Cui, Baoling; Li, Yi; Ruan, Xiaodong

    2014-12-01

    Gate valve has various placements in the practical usages. Due to the effect of gravity, particle trajectories and erosions are distinct between placements. Thus in this study, gas-solid flow properties and erosion in gate valve for horizontal placement and vertical placement are discussed and compared by using Euler-Lagrange simulation method. The structure of a gate valve and a simplified structure are investigated. The simulation procedure is validated in our published paper by comparing with the experiment data of a pipe and an elbow. The results show that for all investigated open degrees and Stokes numbers (St), there are little difference of gas flow properties and flow coefficients between two placements. It is also found that the trajectories of particles for two placements are mostly identical when St « 1, making the erosion independent of placement. With the increase of St, the distinction of trajectories between placements becomes more obvious, leading to an increasing difference of the erosion distributions. Besides, the total erosion ratio of surface T for horizontal placement is two orders of magnitudes larger than that for vertical placement when the particle diameter is 250?m.

  4. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 2; Ballistic Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revilock, D. M.; Pereira, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the ballistic impact testing that was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade-out events in fabric containment systems. The ballistic impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar(TradeName) 49 and Zylon(TradeName) AS (as spun) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation, and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases, the tests were designed so the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models to predict the response of fabrics under conditions that simulate those of a jet engine blade-release situation. In addition, some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different fabric materials.

  5. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Hladik, Michelle L; Vajda, Alan M; Fitzgerald, Kevin C; Douville, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000m(3)d(-1) design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration=2.7?gL(-1); n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration=4.5?gL(-1)), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration=1.4?gL(-1)) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative proportions of nitrogenous, brominated, and iodinated HDBPs than the chlorinated tap water. Conversion of the WWTF to UV disinfection reduced the loading of HDBPs to the receiving stream by >90%. PMID:26025637

  6. The impact of gas-surface reactions on mass spectrometric measurements of atomic nitrogen. [determination of atmosphere ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a simplified model of the ion source chemistry, explains several details of the data reduction method used in obtaining atomic-nitrogen (N) densities from OSS data, and discusses implications of gas-surface reactions for the design of future satellite-borne mass spectrometers. Because of various surface reactions, N appears in three different forms in the ion source, as N, NO, and NO2. Considering the rather small spin modulation of NO and NO2 in the semi-open ionization chamber used in the OSS instrument, it is not surprising that these reaction products have not been previously identified in closed source instruments as a measure of the presence of atomic nitrogen. Warmup and/or outgassing of the ion source are shown to drastically reduce the NO2 concentration, thereby making possible reliable measurement of ambient N densities.

  7. First controlled sub-seabed CO2 release experiment: Insights into gas migration pathways and impacts on sediment physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevatoglu, M.; Bull, J. M.; Vardy, M. E.; Wright, I. C.; Gernon, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a key technology to potentially mitigate global warming by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial facilities and power generation that escapes into the atmosphere. In order to broaden the usage of geological storage as a safe and reliable climate change mitigation option, it is vital to understand CO2 behaviour after its injection within a storage reservoir, including its migration through overlying sediments, as well as its biogeochemical and ecological impacts in the event of leakage at the seafloor. To address these issues, the first controlled CO2 release experiment, entitled 'Quantifying and Monitoring Potential Ecosystem Impacts of Geological Carbon Storage (QICS)', took place in Ardmucknish Bay, Oban, in May-July 2012. This experiment involved the injection of CO2 of known flux under shallow unconsolidated marine sediments over 36 days and repeated monitoring using geophysical and geochemical techniques. High resolution seismic reflection data (chirp and boomer), covering both pre-release and release stages, allows the detection of various CO2-related anomalies including seismic chimneys, enhanced reflectors within the sediment overburden and bubbles into the overlying water column. CO2 migration pattern is predominantly controlled by the stratigraphy in the early stages of the experiment. However, the increasing flow rate becomes the dominant factor determining CO2 migration, towards the end of the experiment. In addition, analysis of reflection coefficients and seismic attenuation indicates the effect of CO2 on sediment physical properties.

  8. The impact of deep overshooting convection on the water vapour and trace gas distribution in the TTL and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P. M.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    Overshooting convection penetrating the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and the lower stratosphere has a significant impact on the redistribution of water vapour and further trace gases. This is of importance for the stratospheric water vapour budget, which plays a central role in radiative and chemical processes. Modelling studies and in situ measurements show the hydration potential of convective overshooting partly by direct injection of ice particles into the stratosphere and subsequent sublimation. However, processes leading to dehydration of the TTL may also impact the stratospheric humidity by limiting the amount of water vapour carried aloft. While the large scale drives some of the dehydrating processes, others are of convective origin, for example gravity waves and cooling associated with overshooting turrets. Furthermore, downdrafts may transport dry and ozone rich air masses from the stratosphere into the TTL. Improving our understanding of overshooting convection and its influence on TTL water vapour will ultimately place better constraints on the budget of water vapour in the stratosphere.In this study we use three-dimensional cloud resolving (WRF-ARW) simulations of a deep convective thunderstorm (Hector) to study the redistribution of water vapour and trace gases in the upper TTL/lower stratosphere. Passive tracers are initialised to investigate the transport of air masses. The simulations focus on an Hector event that has been probed by aircraft during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Observations were performed in and around overshoots that even penetrated the stratosphere. These observations as well as the model simulations show downward transport and mixing of air masses from the stratosphere, though less strong and more localised in the simulation. Furthermore, the simulations shows a layering of hydrated and dehydrated air masses post-convection in the upper TTL and lower stratosphere. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the transport and also expose areas of inconsistencies between the model and observations.

  9. Updating the lake-atmosphere gas transfer velocity with impacts on the role of lake ecosystems in global carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskanen, J. J.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Vesala, T.; Pumpanen, J. S.; Ojala, A.

    2013-12-01

    Currently, the global estimate for the amount of carbon bound in terrestrial ecosystems is 3.0 × 0.9 Pg C y-1 [Le Quéré et al., 2009]. Lakes are not explicitly included in currently used global carbon models [Randall et al., 2007] but it has been estimated that the global net CO2 flux from lakes to the atmosphere range from 0.07 to 0.15 Pg C y-1 [Cole et al., 2007], corresponding to 2.3-5.0% of the total average terrestrial net uptake of carbon. These lake flux estimates may be considerably biased [MacIntyre et al., 2010], since although the data pertain to about 5000 lakes throughout the world [Sobek and Tranvik, 2005], the estimates are not from direct flux measurements. Instead, they are based on surface-water CO2 partial pressure in combination with the gas transfer velocity, k. The uncertainty in the global net CO2 flux is mostly due to the uncertainties in k, which can vary considerably. Cole and Caraco (1998) measured a range of 1.4 to 4.8 cm h-1 for k, but again, these values are not based on direct flux measurements of CO2. The most widely used empirical models of k have wind speed as the only explaining variable. However, the gas transfer velocity is also known to depend on turbulence in the surface water [MacIntyre et al., 2010], which in turn depends mostly on penetrative water convection at low wind conditions [MacIntyre et al., 2010; MacIntyre et al., 2001] - the conditions often prevailing in lakes [Schladow et al., 2002]. We formulated an improved model for k with heat flux parameterization in addition to a wind-speed parameter, determined from an analysis of 4 months (August - November 2011) of continuous high-frequency data in a typical small boreal lake in southern Finland. The CO2 flux from the lake to the atmosphere, atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, and latent and sensible heat were measured with the EC technique installed on a platform. Ancillary measurements included surface-water CO2 concentration and temperature, and net longwave and shortwave radiation. The modeled average k for the whole period, 9.5 cm h-1, was near to the measured average, 8.7 cm h-1. We used 24-hour averages when comparing the results. The new model for k had an R2 value of 0.66 when its performance was compared to the measured gas transfer velocity. Even though this is a lot higher value than when comparing the measured k with a widely used model for k (Cole and Caraco 1998, R2=0.29), the new model could not predict all the sudden changes in k and still roughly one third of the variation was left unexplained. This might be due to the environmental factors omitted by the model, e.g. surfactants. As a result, we showed that the current estimate of the global net CO2 flux from lakes to the atmosphere triples from 0.07-0.15 Pg C y-1 to 0.23-0.48 Pg C y-1 when the average k by Cole and Caraco (1998) is replaced with the new k. This corresponds to 7.5-16.0% of the total CO2 bound in terrestrial ecosystems compared with the current estimates of 2.3-5.0%. The new parameterization of k, assuming that it represents lakes in general, thus shows that the role of lakes in the global carbon cycle has been heavily underestimated and emphasizes the explicit inclusion of lakes in global carbon models.

  10. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2009-03-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

  11. Impact of oxidation catalysts on exhaust NO2/NOx ratio from lean-burn natural gas engines.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Daniel B; Kohls, Morgan; Arney, Gregg

    2010-07-01

    Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emitted from internal combustion engines are composed primarily of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Exhaust from most combustion sources contains NOx composed primarily of NO. There are two important scenarios specific to lean-burn natural gas engines in which the NO2/NOx ratio can be significant: (1) when the engine is operated at ultralean conditions and (2) when an oxidation catalyst is used. Large NO2/NOx ratios may result in additional uncertainty in NOx emissions measurements because the most common technique (chemiluminescence) was developed for low NO2/NOx ratios. In this work, scenarios are explored in which the NO2/NOx ratio can be large. Additionally, three NOx measurement approaches are compared for exhaust with various NO2/NOx ratios. The three measurement approaches are chemiluminescence, chemical cell, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. A portable analyzer with chemical cell technology was found to be the most accurate for measuring exhaust NOx with large NO2/NOx ratios. PMID:20681434

  12. Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaplygin, S.

    1944-01-01

    A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

  13. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2010-08-18

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

  14. Gas Pressure

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pomplun, Steve

    This radio broadcast discusses the boom in natural gas drilling in the Rocky Mountain region and is possible impacts on the environment. A resource advocate points out the issue of well density, which can range from four wells per square mile to sixteen, 32, or more, and results in fragmentation of habitat as well as an ugly industrial appearance. The clip is 2 minutes in length and is available in MP3 format.

  15. Impact of wildfire emissions on trace gas and aerosol concentration measured at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, A.; Chi, X.; Winderlich, J.; Birmili, W.; Lavri?, J. V.; Andreae, M. O.

    2012-04-01

    Boreal wildfires are large sources of reactive trace gases and aerosols to the atmosphere, accounting for 20% of carbon emissions from global biomass burning. Siberian wildfires are a major extratropical source of carbon monoxide (CO), as well as a significant source of black carbon, smoke aerosols, and other climate-relevant atmospheric gas/particle species. Smoke particles released by Siberian wildfires could be tracked thousands of kilometers downwind in the entire Northern Hemisphere, perturbing regional to global radiation budgets by influencing light scattering and cloud microphysical processes. The boreal regions of the Northern Hemisphere are expected to experience the largest temperature increases, which will likely increase the severity and frequency of fires. Consequently, long-term continuous trace gas and aerosol measurements in central Siberia are vital for assessing the atmospheric impact of Siberian boreal fires on regional to global air quality and climate. Since 2006, the Zotino Tall Tower Facility (ZOTTO; www.zottoproject.org), a unique international research platform for large-scale climatic observations, is operational about 20 km west of the Yenisei river (60.8°N; 89.35°E). A 300 m-tall tower allows regular probing of the mixed part of the boundary layer, which is only moderately influenced by diurnal variations of local surface fluxes and thus, in comparison with surface layer, representative for a larger region. Our investigation of the wildfires' impact on surface air composition in Central Siberia is based on four years of CO/CO2/CH4 and aerosol particle mass data measured at 300 m a.g.l.. Episodes of atmospheric transport from wildfires upwind of the measurements site are identified based on ensembles of HYSPLIT backward trajectories and MODIS active fire products. The emission factors are calculated using the Carbon Mass Balance method. In an effort to simplify combustion to its most fundamental principles, the combustion efficiency (CE) is used to represent the completeness of combustion. The following general notion is applied: if the CE exceeds 90 %, a fire is typically in the flaming phase, whereas if CE is less than 85 % combustion is in the smoldering phase. Most fires can be considered as being in a "mixed" phase. Ideally, the emission ratios can be obtained by dividing the excess concentrations of trace gas species measured in a fire plume (e.g. CO, CO2) by the excess concentration of a measured reference gas from the data set. Ground-based CO and CO2 measurements in plumes from relatively distant fires can usually not be used to extract CO/CO2 emission ratios due to the uncertain contributions of biogenic CO2 from respiration to the plume air. We present our attempt to extract CO/CO2 relationships related to sources from statistical analysis of our data set. The burnt biomass load is taken from the Global Land Cover 2000 project and validated by our in situ data set. Finally, episodes of emissions from the wildfires identified at the given location and time are calculated with a simple bottom-up approach using the equation of Seiler and Crutzen.

  16. Assessing impacts of unconventional natural gas extraction on microbial communities in headwater stream ecosystems in Northwestern Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Ryan; Solomon, Caroline; Brislawn, Colin J; Wright, Justin R; Rosenberger, Abigail; McClure, Erin E; Grube, Alyssa M; Peterson, Mark P; Keddache, Mehdi; Mason, Olivia U; Hazen, Terry C; Grant, Christopher J; Lamendella, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have increased dramatically in Pennsylvania Marcellus shale formations, however the potential for major environmental impacts are still incompletely understood. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was performed to characterize the microbial community structure of water, sediment, bryophyte, and biofilm samples from 26 headwater stream sites in northwestern Pennsylvania with different histories of fracking activity within Marcellus shale formations. Further, we describe the relationship between microbial community structure and environmental parameters measured. Approximately 3.2 million 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from a total of 58 samples. Microbial community analyses showed significant reductions in species richness as well as evenness in sites with Marcellus shale activity. Beta diversity analyses revealed distinct microbial community structure between sites with and without Marcellus shale activity. For example, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) within the Acetobacteracea, Methylocystaceae, Acidobacteriaceae, and Phenylobacterium were greater than three log-fold more abundant in MSA+ sites as compared to MSA- sites. Further, several of these OTUs were strongly negatively correlated with pH and positively correlated with the number of wellpads in a watershed. It should be noted that many of the OTUs enriched in MSA+ sites are putative acidophilic and/or methanotrophic populations. This study revealed apparent shifts in the autochthonous microbial communities and highlighted potential members that could be responding to changing stream conditions as a result of nascent industrial activity in these aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25408683

  17. Assessing impacts of unconventional natural gas extraction on microbial communities in headwater stream ecosystems in Northwestern Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Trexler, Ryan; Solomon, Caroline; Brislawn, Colin J.; Wright, Justin R.; Rosenberger, Abigail; McClure, Erin E.; Grube, Alyssa M.; Peterson, Mark P.; Keddache, Mehdi; Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Grant, Christopher J.; Lamendella, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have increased dramatically in Pennsylvania Marcellus shale formations, however the potential for major environmental impacts are still incompletely understood. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was performed to characterize the microbial community structure of water, sediment, bryophyte, and biofilm samples from 26 headwater stream sites in northwestern Pennsylvania with different histories of fracking activity within Marcellus shale formations. Further, we describe the relationship between microbial community structure and environmental parameters measured. Approximately 3.2 million 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from a total of 58 samples. Microbial community analyses showed significant reductions in species richness as well as evenness in sites with Marcellus shale activity. Beta diversity analyses revealed distinct microbial community structure between sites with and without Marcellus shale activity. For example, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) within the Acetobacteracea, Methylocystaceae, Acidobacteriaceae, and Phenylobacterium were greater than three log-fold more abundant in MSA+ sites as compared to MSA? sites. Further, several of these OTUs were strongly negatively correlated with pH and positively correlated with the number of wellpads in a watershed. It should be noted that many of the OTUs enriched in MSA+ sites are putative acidophilic and/or methanotrophic populations. This study revealed apparent shifts in the autochthonous microbial communities and highlighted potential members that could be responding to changing stream conditions as a result of nascent industrial activity in these aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25408683

  18. Impact of bypass flow rate and catheter position in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on gas exchange in vivo.

    PubMed

    Togo, Konomi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Fujii, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Satoru; Date, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yuji; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    The clinical use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VVECMO) in adult patients with respiratory failure is rapidly increasing. However, recirculation of blood oxygenated by ECMO back into the circuit may occur in VVECMO, resulting in insufficient oxygenation. The cannula position and bypass flow rate are two major factors influencing recirculation, but the relationship and ideal configuration of these factors are not fully understood. In the present study, we attempted to clarify these parameters for effective gas exchange. VVECMO was performed in eight adult goats under general anesthesia. The position of the drainage cannula was fixed in the inferior vena cava (IVC), but the return cannula position was varied between the IVC, right atrium (RA), and superior vena cava (SVC). At each position, the recirculation rates calculated, and the adequacy of oxygen delivery by ECMO in supplying systemic oxygen demand was assessed by measuring the arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and pressure (PaO2). Although the recirculation rates increased as the bypass flow rates increased, SaO2 and PaO2 also increased in any position of return cannula. The recirculation rates and PaO2 were 27 ± 2 % and 162 ± 16 mmHg, 36 ± 6 % and 139 ± 11 mmHg, and 63 ± 6 % and 77 ± 9 mmHg in the SVC, RA and IVC position at 4 L/min respectively. In conclusion, the best return cannula position was the SVC, and a high bypass flow rate was advantageous for effective oxygenation. Both the bypass flow rates and cannula position must be considered to achieve effective oxygenation. PMID:25477271

  19. Response of Soil Biogeochemistry to Freeze-thaw Cycles: Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emission and Nutrient Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Parsons, C. T.; Smeaton, C. M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-12-01

    Freeze-thaw is an abiotic stress applied to soils and is a natural process at medium to high latitudes. Freezing and thawing processes influence not only the physical properties of soil, but also the metabolic activity of soil microorganisms. Fungi and bacteria play a crucial role in soil organic matter degradation and the production of greenhouse gases (GHG) such as CO2, CH4 and N2O. Production and consumption of these atmospheric trace gases are the result of biological processes such as photosynthesis, aerobic respiration (CO2), methanogenesis, methanotrophy (CH4), nitrification and denitrification (N2O). To enhance our understanding of the effects of freeze-thaw cycles on soil biogeochemical transformations and fluxes, a highly instrumented soil column experiment was designed to realistically simulate freeze-thaw dynamics under controlled conditions. Pore waters collected periodically from different depths of the column and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the initial and end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical cycling. CO2, CH4 and N2O production at different depths within the column were quantified from dissolved gas concentrations in pore water. Subsequent emissions from the soil surface were determined by direct measurement in the head space. Pulsed CO2 emission to the headspace was observed at the onset of thawing, however, the magnitude of the pulse decreased with each subsequent freeze-thaw cycle indicating depletion of a "freeze-thaw accessible" carbon pool. Pulsed CO2 emission was due to a combination of physical release of gases dissolved in porewater and entrapped below the frozen zone and changing microbial respiration in response to electron acceptor variability (O2, NO3-, SO42-). In this presentation, we focus on soil-specific physical, chemical, microbial factors (e.g. redox conditions, respiration, fermentation) and the mechanisms that drive GHG emission and nutrient cycling in soils under freeze-thaw cycles.

  20. Impact of N-input by wet deposition on N-trace gas fluxes and CH 4-oxidation in spruce forest ecosystems of the temperate zone in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Gasche, R.; Huber, Ch; Kreutzer, K.; Papen, H.

    In an effort to elucidate the impact of N-deposition from the atmosphere on trace gas fluxes (N 2O, NO, CH 4) from soils of temperate coniferous forests, two spruce forest sites in Germany and Ireland with comparable edaphic and climatic conditions, but with pronounced differences in the amounts of N-input from the atmosphere were compared at different seasons. At the site in Germany trace gas fluxes as well as wet deposition of NH +4 and NO -3 were recorded continuously over the entire year 1994. Correlation analysis between fluxes and N-input data were performed, in order to elucidate if a direct effect between flux and N-deposition could be demonstrated. At all sampling dates N 2O fluxes at the site receiving high atmospheric N-input (Höglwald, Germany) were significantly 1.5-5 fold higher than N 2O emission rates at the site receiving low N-input by wet deposition from the atmosphere (Ballyhooly, Ireland). In contrast to the Höglwald site, at which only emission of N 2O to the atmosphere was observed, at certain periods the Ballyhooly soil functioned as a sink for atmospheric N 2O. Methane oxidation rates were significantly lower at the Höglwald site compared to the Ballyhooly site. At the Höglwald site it could be demonstrated by correlation analysis that the input of NH +4 and NO -3 by wet deposition significantly altered emissions of N 2O and NO (stimulation) and of CH 4 oxidation (reduction). The coefficient of determination was better for NH +4 than for NO -3 for all trace gases studied and was best for the relation between NO emission rates and NH +4-input.

  1. Environmental impacts of the expected increase in sea transportation, with a particular focus on oil and gas scenarios for Norway and northwest Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalsøren, Stig B.; Endresen, Øyvind; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.; Gravir, Gjermund; Sørgârd, Eirik

    2007-01-01

    We have complemented existing global sea transportation emission inventories with new regional emission data sets and scenarios for ship traffic and coastal activity in 2015. Emission inventories for 2000 and 2015 are used in a global Chemical Transport Model (CTM) to quantify environmental atmospheric impacts with particular focus on the Arctic region. Although we assume that ship emissions continue to increase from 2000 to 2015, reductions are assumed for some chemical components and regions because of implementation of new regulations. Current ship traffic (2000) is estimated to contribute significantly to coastal pollution. Norwegian coastal ship traffic is responsible for more than 1/3 and 1/6 of the Norwegian NOx and SO2 emissions, respectively. For these short-lived components the impact of Norwegian coastal emissions is regionally important. For most components the international ship transportation outside coastal waters dominates the effects. Ship emissions increase wet deposition in Scandinavia with 30-50% for nitrate and 10-25% for sulfate. In general, coastal regions with prevailing onshore winds show substantial increases in deposition of acid components. Maximum surface increase in ozone is in excess of 10 ppbv. Column ozone increases are also significant. Assuming no changes in nonshipping emissions, scenarios for shipping activities in 2015 lead to more than 20% increase in NO2 from 2000 to 2015 in some coastal areas. Ozone increases are in general small. Wet deposition of acidic species increases up to 10% in areas where current critical loads are exceeded. Regulations limiting the sulfur content in the fuel in the North Sea and English Channel will be an efficient measure to reduce sulfate deposition in nearby coastal regions. The expected oil and gas transport by ships from Norway and northwest Russia, sea transport along the Northern Sea Route and new Norwegian coastal gas power plants will have a significant regional effect by increases of acid deposition in north Scandinavia and the Kola Peninsula. Augmented levels of particles in the Arctic are calculated, and thus the contribution from ship traffic to phenomena like Arctic haze could be increasing.

  2. Impacts of rice varieties and management on yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions from rice fields in China: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Huang, H.; Yao, L.; Liu, J.; He, H.; Tang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing numbers of studies have suggested that a comprehensive assessment of the impacts of cropping practices on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per unit yield (yield-scaled), rather than by land area (area-scaled), is needed to inform trade-off decisions to increase yields and reduce GHG emissions. We conducted a meta-analysis to quantify impacts of rice varieties on the global warming potential (GWP) of GHG emissions at the yield scale in China. The results showed that significantly higher yield-scaled GWP occurred with indica rice varieties (1101.72 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1) compared to japonica rice varieties (711.38 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1). Lower yield-scaled GHG emissions occurred within 120-130 days of growth duration after transplanting (GDAT; 613.66 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1), followed by 90-100 days of GDAT (749.72 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1), 100-110 days of GDAT (794.29 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1), and 70-80 days of GDAT (800.85 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1). The greatest reduction, 41%, occurred at a rate of 150-200 kg N ha-1 relative to the non-fertilized control. Consequently, appropriate cultivar choice and pairs was of vital importance in the rice cropping system. A further life cycle assessment of GHG emissions among rice varieties at the yield scale is urgently needed to develop win-win policies for rice production to achieve higher yield with lower emissions.

  3. Impacts of rice varieties and management on yield-scaled greenhouse gas emissions from rice fields in China: A meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Huang, H.; Yao, L.; Liu, J.; He, H.; Tang, J.

    2014-07-01

    Increasing numbers of studies have suggested that a comprehensive assessment of the impacts of cropping practices on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per unit yield (yield-scaled), rather than by land area (area-scaled), is needed to inform trade-off decisions to increase yields and reduce GHG emissions. We conducted a meta-analysis to quantify impacts of rice varieties on the global warming potential (GWP) of GHG emissions at the yield scale in China. Our results showed that significantly higher yield-scaled GWP occurred with indica rice varieties (1101.72 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1) than japonica rice varieties (711.38 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1). Lower yield-scaled GHG emissions occurred within 120-130 days of growth duration after transplanting (GDAT; 613.66 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1), followed by 90-100 days of GDAT (749.72 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1, 100-110 days of GDAT (794.29 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1), and 70-80 days of GDAT (800.85 kg CO2 equiv. Mg-1). The fertilizer rate of 150-200 kg N ha-1 resulted in the lowest yield-scaled GWP. Consequently, appropriate cultivar choice and pairs were of vital importance in the rice cropping system. A further life cycle assessment of GHG emissions among rice varieties at the yield scale is urgently needed to develop win-win policies for rice production to achieve higher yield with lower emissions.

  4. Impact of flue gas desulfurization-calcium sulfite and gypsum on soil microbial activity and wheat growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.B.; Bigham, J.M.; Dick, W.A.; Kim, P.J. [RDA, Suwon (Republic of Korea). National Institute for Agricultural Science and Technology

    2008-08-15

    We conducted greenhouse tests to evaluate the effects of FGD-CaSO{sub 3} applied at rates of 0, 2.2, 4.4, and 8.8 Mg ha(-1) on wheat growth, soil enzyme activities, and the chemical properties of two soils with differing pH (4.0 vs. 6.2). A gypsum treatment applied at the rate of 2.2 Mg ha{sup -1} was used as a positive control. Exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and water-extractable Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} increased significantly with increasing FGD-CaSO{sub 3} application. SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} increased in both soils, indicating rapid oxidation of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} when neither water nor oxygen was limiting. No changes in soil pH were measured. Applications of 2.2, 4.4, or 8.8 Mg CaSO{sub 3} ha{sup -1} to the pH 6.2 soil produced no effect on wheat growth or the uptake of N, P, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}. The uptake of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} -S increased, whereas K uptake decreased. No significant differences in the activities of urease, {beta}-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, or arylsulfatase were observed relative to a control. In the acid soil, an application of 2.2 Mg ha{sup -1} FGD-CaSO{sub 3} increased wheat root growth and dry matter yield compared with an untreated control. The uptake of N, P, Ca{sup 2+}, and K{sup +} also increased presumably because of enhanced root development resulting from decreases in exchangeable Al{sup 3+} and increases in soluble Ca{sup 2+}. Wheat growth and alkaline phosphatase and arylsulfatase activities were significantly inhibited by addition of 8.8 Mg ha{sup -1} of FGD-CaSO{sub 3} compared with the untreated control or the same soil receiving 2.2 Mg ha{sup -1} gypsum. We conclude that surface applications of FGD-CaSO{sub 3} may be as effective as gypsum for inhibiting soil crusting, improving water infiltration, and promoting the movement of Ca{sup 2+} into acid subsoils. Moreover, application rates of equal to or less than 4.4 Mg ha-1 should have no negative impact on soil microbial activities or plant growth.

  5. Rapid determination of DDT and related compounds in soils via carbon skeleton gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cooke, M; Khallef, K D; Nickless, G; Roberts, D J

    1979-10-19

    The levels of DDT and related compounds in soil samples from an apple orchard have been determined. Extraction of residues was achieved by cyclic steam extraction and by conventional solvent extraction methods allowing comparison of the two methods. Determination of the organochlorine residues present in the extracts was performed by gas-liquid chromatography-electron-capture detection and by carbon skeleton gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Excellent agreement between the two determination techniques was achieved. Prior to application of p,p'-DDT, a value of approximately 0.4 ppm was obtained for Delta DDT in the soil. The major component of this total was DDE. After spraying the apple trees with technical grade, p,p'-DDT, Delta DDT for the soil rose to 0.6 ppm. This increase was due to translocation of p,p'-DDT from the trees. PMID:528650

  6. Social choice, uncertainty about external costs and trade-off between intergenerational environmental impacts: The emblematic case of gas-based energy supply decentralization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Gullì

    2006-01-01

    The performance of the small natural gas-fired power technologies has improved remarkably over the last decade. This has aroused the interest of operators, regulators and legislators in natural gas-fired distributed generation (gas-fired DG), namely, the integrated or stand-alone use of small, modular gas-fired power generation close to the point of consumption as an alternative to large power generation and electricity

  7. Determination of 5?-androst-16-en-3?-ol in truffle fermentation broth by solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography–flame ionization detector\\/electron impact mass spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guan Wang; Yuan-Yuan Li; Dong-Sheng Li; Ya-Jie Tang

    2008-01-01

    A novel method using solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and flame ionization detector (FID)\\/electron impact mass spectrometry (EIMS) was developed for the determination of 5?-androst-16-en-3?-ol (androstenol), a steroidal compound belonging to the group of musk odorous 16-androstenes, in truffle fermentation broth. Comparison studies between FID and EIMS indicated two detectors gave similar quantitative results. The highest androstenol concentration of

  8. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: fabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel containing uranium-233 and thorium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Roddy; R. E. Blanco; G. S. Hill; R. E. Moore; R. D. Seagren; J. P. Witherspoon

    1976-01-01

    A cost\\/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of various radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from model High-Temperature Gas-Cooled (HTGR) fuel fabrication plants and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term ''as low

  9. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: reprocessing of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel containing U-233 and thorium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Jr. Davis; R. E. Blanco; B. C. Finney; G. S. Hill; R. E. Moore; J. P. Witherspoon

    2011-01-01

    A cost\\/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of various radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel reprocessing plant and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist the U. S. Nuclear

  10. Examining the impacts of ethanol (E85) versus gasoline photochemical production of smog in a fog using near-explicit gas- and aqueous-chemistry mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginnebaugh, Diana L.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates the air quality impacts of using a high-blend ethanol fuel (E85) instead of gasoline in vehicles in an urban setting when a morning fog is present under summer and winter conditions. The model couples the near-explicit gas-phase Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v. 3.1) with the extensive aqueous-phase Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism (CAPRAM 3.0i) in SMVGEAR II, a fast and accurate ordinary differential equation solver. Summer and winter scenarios are investigated during a two day period in the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) with all gasoline vehicles replaced by flex-fuel vehicles running on E85 in 2020. We find that E85 slightly increases ozone compared with gasoline in the presence or absence of a fog under summer conditions but increases ozone significantly relative to gasoline during winter conditions, although winter ozone is always lower than summer ozone. A new finding here is that a fog during summer may increase ozone after the fog disappears, due to chemistry alone. Temperatures were high enough in the summer to increase peroxy radical (RO2) production with the morning fog, which led to the higher ozone after fog dissipation. A fog on a winter day decreases ozone after the fog. Within a fog, ozone is always lower than if no fog occurs. The sensitivity of the results to fog parameters like droplet size, liquid water content, fog duration and photolysis are investigated and discussed. The results support previous work suggesting that E85 and gasoline both enhance pollution with E85 enhancing pollution significantly more at low temperatures. Thus, neither E85 nor gasoline is a ‘clean-burning’ fuel.

  11. TSR versus non-TSR processes and their impact on gas geochemistry and carbon stable isotopes in Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic marine carbonate gas reservoirs in the Eastern Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. Y.; Worden, R. H.; Jin, Z. J.; Liu, W. H.; Li, J.; Gao, B.; Zhang, D. W.; Hu, A. P.; Yang, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Palaeozoic and lowermost Mesozoic marine carbonate reservoirs of the Sichuan Basin in China contain variably sour and very dry gas. The source of the gas in the Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic reservoirs is not known for certain and it has proved difficult to discriminate and differentiate the effects of thermal cracking- and TSR-related processes for these gases. Sixty-three gas samples were collected and analysed for their composition and carbon stable isotope values. The gases are all typically very dry (alkane gases being >97.5% methane), with low (<1%) nitrogen and highly variable H2S and CO2. Carboniferous gas is negligibly sour while the Lower Triassic gas tends to be most sour. The elevated H2S (up to 62%) is due to thermochemical sulphate reduction with the most sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs being deeper than 4800 m. The non-TSR affected Carboniferous gas is a secondary gas that was derived from the cracking of sapropelic kerogen-derived oil and primary gas and is highly mature. Carboniferous (and non-sour Triassic and Permian) gas has unusual carbon isotopes with methane and propane being isotopically heavier than ethane (a reversal of typical low- to moderate-maturity patterns). The gas in the non-sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs has the same geochemical and isotopic characteristics (and therefore the same source) as the Carboniferous gas. TSR in the deepest Triassic reservoirs altered the gas composition reaching 100% dryness in the deepest, most sour reservoirs showing that ethane and propane react faster than methane during TSR. Ethane evolves to heavier carbon isotope values than methane during TSR leading to removal of the reversed alkane gas isotope trend found in the Carboniferous and non-sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs. However, methane was directly involved in TSR as shown by the progressive increase in its carbon isotope ratio as gas souring proceeded. CO2 increased in concentration as gas souring proceeded, but typical CO2 carbon isotope ratios in sour gases remained about -4‰ V-PDB showing that it was not solely derived from the oxidation of alkanes. Instead CO2 may partly result from reaction of sour gas with carbonate reservoir minerals, such as Fe-rich dolomite or calcite, resulting in pyrite growth as well as CO2-generation.

  12. Resumption of exploratory drilling operations by Texaco, Inc. : state oil and gas lesses - PRC 2725. 1 (Jade Prospect), PRC 2206. 1 (Anita Prospect), PRC 2955. 1 (Refugio Prospect), Santa Barbara County. Final environmental impact report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    An update is presented on air quality conditions in Santa Barbara County, Califorina. Data on photochemical oxidants (measured as ozone), nitrogen dioxide, sulfide dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total suspended particulates are included. Also included are the comments received during the public review and during the public hearing on the Draft Environmental Impact Report on Texaco, Inc.'s proposed Resumption of Exploratory Drilling Operations, State Oil and Gas Leases PRC 2725.1, PRC 2206.1 and PRC 2955.1, responses to these written and oral (hearing) comments, and a modification to the Draft EIR Air Quality Setting section, incorporating updated ambient air quality data. This volume, when added to the Draft Environmental Impact Report, constitutes the Final Environmental Impact Report in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the State Lands Commission's regulations implementing CEQA.

  13. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  14. Assessment of Anthropogenic Impact on Marine Ecosystems and Biological Resources in the Process of Oil and Gas Field Development in the Shelf Area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Patin

    2004-01-01

    Current methodology of environmental impact assessment in connection with the environmental consequences of hydrocarbons production in the shelf area is analyzed. Basing on the ecosystem approach, a scheme of environmental impact estimates is suggested, envisaging the use of a set of gradations (scales) to characterize spatial and temporal scope of impacts and their consequences, as well as criteria (thresholds) of

  15. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry of Methyl Mycocerosates Released by Thermochemolysis

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Denise M.; Nicoara, Simona C.; Mutetwa, Reggie; Mungofa, Stanley; Lee, Oona Y-C.; Minnikin, David E.; Bardwell, Max W.; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; McNerney, Ruth; Morgan, Geraint H.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis requires rapid diagnosis to prevent further transmission and allow prompt administration of treatment. Current methods for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis lack sensitivity are expensive or are extremely slow. The identification of lipids using gas chromatography- electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-EI/MS) could provide an alternative solution. We have studied mycocerosic acid components of the phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM) family of lipids using thermochemolysis GC-EI/MS. To facilitate use of the technology in a routine diagnostic laboratory a simple extraction procedure was employed where PDIMs were extracted from sputum using petroleum ether, a solvent of low polarity. We also investigated a method using methanolic tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which facilitates direct transesterification of acidic components to methyl esters in the inlet of the GC-MS system. This eliminates conventional chemical manipulations allowing rapid and convenient analysis of samples. When applied to an initial set of 40 sputum samples, interpretable results were obtained for 35 samples with a sensitivity relative to culture of 94% (95%CI: 69.2,100) and a specificity of 100% (95%CI: 78.1,100). However, blinded testing of a larger set of 395 sputum samples found the assay to have a sensitivity of 61.3% (95%CI: 54.9,67.3) and a specificity of 70.6% (95%CI: 62.3,77.8) when compared to culture. Using the results obtained we developed an improved set of classification criteria, which when applied in a blinded re-analysis increased the sensitivity and specificity of the assay to 64.9% (95%CI: 58.6,70.8) and 76.2% (95%CI: 68.2,82.8) respectively. Highly variable levels of background signal were observed from individual sputum samples that inhibited interpretation of the data. The diagnostic potential of using thermochemolytic GC-EI/MS of PDIM biomarkers for diagnosis of tuberculosis in sputum has been established; however, further refinements in sample processing are required to enhance the sensitivity and robustness of the test. PMID:22403716

  16. A study of the impact of oil and gas development on the Dene First Nations of the Sahtu (Great Bear Lake) Region of the Canadian Northwest Territories (NWT)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leo Paul Dana; Robert Brent Anderson; Aldene Meis-Mason

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – Beneath Canada's Northwest Territories lies a potential of 30 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. Will a $16 billion gas-pipeline bring prosperity or gloom? Will this bring employment opportunities for local people or will more qualified people be brought in from southern communities? The purpose of this paper is to give an account of what Dene residents of

  17. A Satellite Formation Due to A Giant Impact: The Effect of the Protoplanet Mass and Its Composition on the Disk Gas Fraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Nakajima; H. Genda; E. I. Asphaug; S. Ida

    2010-01-01

    It has been thought that the Moon is formed by a giant impact in the late stage of the Earth formation. The impact generates a debris disk around the earth, from which the Moon is accreted. This type of satellite formation is believed to be common in the solar and extra solar systems, such as Pluto and its moon, Charon.

  18. Reducing PM Concentrations in Simulated High Temperature Gas Streams 

    E-print Network

    Luehrs, Daniel R

    2014-08-07

    F). These high temperatures impact the cyclone inlet velocities as a consequence of the reduced gas densities. Changes in gas densities will influence the cyclone design. It was hypothesized that changes in cyclone performances as a consequence lower gas...

  19. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Pacific (Southern California) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macpherson, George S.; Bernstein, Janis

    1980-01-01

    Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas exploration and development have been under way in the Pacific (Southern California) Region since 1966. During that time, there have been four Federal lease sales: in 1966, 1968, 1975 (Sale 35), and 1979 (Sale 48). Oil and gas production from three leases has been going on since 1968. It peaked in 1971 and now averages around 31,400 barrels of oil and 15.4 million cubic feet of gas per day. Discoveries on areas leased in the 1968 and 1975 sales have led to plans for eight new platforms to begin production in the early 1980's. Five platforms are in the eastern end of Santa Barbara Channel, one is in the western Channel, and two are in San Pedro Bay, south of Long Beach. Three rigs are doing exploratory drilling in the Region. The most recent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey of remaining reserves for all identified fields in the Southern California Region are 695 million barrels of oil and 1,575 billion cubic feet of gas (January 1979). The USGS has also made risked estimates of economically recoverable oil and gas resources for all the leased tracts in the Region (March 1980). These risked estimates of economically recoverable resources are 394 billion barrels of oil and 1,295 billion cubic feet of gas. The USGS estimates of undiscovered recoverable resources for the entire Southern California OCS Region (January 1980) are 3,200 million barrels of oil and 3,400 billion cubic feet of gas. Because of the long history of oil and gas production in Southern California from wells onshore and in State waters, there are many existing facilities for the transportation, processing, and refining of oil and gas. Some of the expected new OCS production can be accommodated in these facilities. Four new onshore projects will be required. Two of these are under construction: (1) a 9.6-km (6-mi) onshore oil pipeline (capacity: 60,000 bpd) between Carpinteria (Santa Barbara County) and the existing Mobil-Rincon separation and treatment facility (Ventura County), and (2) a small supply base and dock (upgrade of existing facility) and a 0.4-hectare (1-acre) crude oil distribution facility in Long Beach (Los Angeles County), connected to landfall by a 3-km (1.8-mi) onshore pipeline. The two other facilities are awaiting permit approval: (1) a gas treatment plant at Las Flores Canyon (Santa Barbara County) and (2) a separation and treatment plant at Mandalay Beach (Ventura County) with 4 km (2.5 mi) of onshore pipeline on the same right-of-way from landfall to the plant and from the plant to an existing gas transmission line.

  20. Impacts of rumen fluid modified by feeding Yucca schidigera to lactating dairy cows on in vitro gas production of 11 common dairy feedstuffs, as well as animal performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Singer; P. H. Robinson; A. Z. M. Salem; E. J. DePeters

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to determine effects of feeding increasing levels of a Yucca schidigera extract (YSE) to dairy cows on 24h in vitro gas production and 27h in vitro neutral detergent fibre (aNDFom) digestion of 11 common dairy feedstuffs, as well as in vivo rumen fermentation and performance of the cows to which the YSE was fed. The principle was

  1. Studies on the impact, detection, and control of microbiology influenced corrosion related to pitting failures in the Russian oil and gas industry. Final CRADA report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ehst

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the Project are: (1) to design effective anti-corrosion preparations (biocides, inhibitors, penetrants and their combinations) for gas- and oil-exploration industries; (2) to study a possibility of development of environmentally beneficial ('green') biocides and inhibitors of the new generation; (3) to develop chemical and microbiological methods of monitoring of sites at risk of corrosion; and (4) to evaluate

  2. Gulf of Mexico summary report. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Mexico and their onshore impacts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Lynch; R. W. Rudolph

    1984-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico continues to be the most developed Continental Shelf region in the US and the world. Statistics for the Gulf show that in 1983 the region accounted for 93.7% and 92.1% of domestic Federal offshore oil and gas production, respectively. While shallow water areas of the Continental Shelf of the Gulf have been responsible for most of

  3. Life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of shale gas, natural gas, coal, and petroleum.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Andrew; Han, Jeongwoo; Clark, Corrie E; Wang, Michael; Dunn, Jennifer B; Palou-Rivera, Ignasi

    2012-01-17

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. It has been debated whether the fugitive methane emissions during natural gas production and transmission outweigh the lower carbon dioxide emissions during combustion when compared to coal and petroleum. Using the current state of knowledge of methane emissions from shale gas, conventional natural gas, coal, and petroleum, we estimated up-to-date life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings that need to be further addressed. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than conventional natural gas, 23% lower than gasoline, and 33% lower than coal. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas. Moreover, this life-cycle analysis, among other work in this area, provides insight on critical stages that the natural gas industry and government agencies can work together on to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas. PMID:22107036

  4. Environmental impact of HTGR power stations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Kelly; S. S. Kirslis; R. G. West

    1974-01-01

    From ANS topical meeting on gas-cooled reactors: HTGR and GCFBR; ; Gatlinburg, Tennessee, USA (8 May 1974). The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor ; power station has all of the potential environmental impacts associated with any ; large nuclear station. Construction impacts can be minimized by proper planning ; and are usually of limited duration. The potentially most significant impacts of ;

  5. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  6. Aroma-impact compounds in dried spice as a quality index using solid phase microextraction with olfactometry and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maikhunthod, Bussayarat; Marriott, Philip J

    2013-12-15

    A systematic experimental procedure is used to identify the aroma-impact compounds, leading to a shelf quality index based on head space solid-phase microextraction. Dried (ground) fennel seeds, having shelf life of 6 months (0.5Y) and 5 years (5Y), were used as a spice model for assessment of comparative aroma quality. Aroma-impact odorants were analysed by GC-olfactometry (GC-O) in parallel with comprehensive two-dimensional GC-flame ionisation detection (GC×GC-FID) using a polar/non-polar phase combination for the GC×GC column set. Tentative identification of aroma-impact odorants involved correlating data from the GC-O/FID system with GC×GC-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis by means of retention indices. Major compounds responsible for aroma perception were limonene, 1,8-cineole, terpinen-4-ol, estragole and trans-anethole, and showed an average decrease of 30-50% NIF from 0.5Y to 5Y. Monoterpenes which represent 'freshness', e.g. ?-pinene and ?-myrcene, exhibited identifiable aroma-impact only for the 0.5Y product. Sesquiterpenes and sesquiterpene oxides are suggested as an aging index, being present in increased amounts in 5Y. p-Anisaldehyde odour intensity for both samples remained the same (aroma perception sweet creamy, floral odour and Chinese seasoning powder). PMID:23993622

  7. Environmental impacts of the expected increase in sea transportation, with a particular focus on oil and gas scenarios for Norway and northwest Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stig B. Dalsøren; Øyvind Endresen; Ivar S. A. Isaksen; Gjermund Gravir; Eirik Sørgaûrd

    2007-01-01

    We have complemented existing global sea transportation emission inventories with new regional emission data sets and scenarios for ship traffic and coastal activity in 2015. Emission inventories for 2000 and 2015 are used in a global Chemical Transport Model (CTM) to quantify environmental atmospheric impacts with particular focus on the Arctic region. Although we assume that ship emissions continue to

  8. ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH, AND BEHAVIOR Dietary Sodium Bicarbonate, Cool Temperatures, and Feed Withdrawal: Impact on Arterial and Venous Blood-gas Values in Broilers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. F. Wideman; D. M. Hooge; K. R. Cummings

    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) has been used successfully in mammals and birds to alleviate pul- monary hypertension. Experiment 1 was designed to pro- vide measurements of arterial and venous blood-gas val- ues from unanesthetized male broilers subjected to a cool temperature (16°C) challenge and fed either a control diet or the same diet alkalinized by dilution with 1% NaHCO3. The incidences

  9. Impact of 100 MeV Ag7+ SHI irradiation fluence and N incorporation on structural, optical, electrical and gas sensing properties of ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, L.; Gokul Raj, S.; Meher, S. R.; Asokan, K.; Alex, Z. C.

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the influence of Ag7+ ion irradiation fluence and N incorporation on structural, optical, electrical and gas sensing properties of ZnO thin films. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the retainment of ZnO wurtzite structure even at higher fluence irradiation with slight decrease in crystallinity. Photoluminescence and Hall effect measurement analysis showed an increase in density of defects for high ion fluence irradiation. Atomic force microscope analysis shows that the films irradiated at high ion fluence have vertical standing needle-like morphology and also have high value of roughness compared with the films irradiated at low ion fluence. The ammonia and methanol gas sensing properties of the films have been studied at different operating temperature and gas concentration. It conveys that the films have selectivity towards ammonia than methanol and also that the films irradiated at high ion fluence exhibit better sensitivity, low response and recovery times compared with the films irradiated at low ion fluence. The film grown in oxygen ambience and irradiated at high ion fluence showed good sensing characteristics at all temperatures even at room temperature.

  10. Biochar accelerates organic matter degradation and enhances N mineralisation during composting of poultry manure without a relevant impact on gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, M; Alburquerque, J A; Sánchez-Monedero, M A; Roig, A; Cayuela, M L

    2015-09-01

    A composting study was performed to assess the impact of biochar addition to a mixture of poultry manure and barley straw. Two treatments: control (78% poultry manure+22% barley straw, dry weight) and the same mixture amended with biochar (3% dry weight), were composted in duplicated windrows during 19weeks. Typical monitoring parameters and gaseous emissions (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O and H2S) were evaluated during the process as well as the agronomical quality of the end-products. Biochar accelerated organic matter degradation and ammonium formation during the thermophilic phase and enhanced nitrification during the maturation phase. Our results suggest that biochar, as composting additive, improved the physical properties of the mixture by preventing the formation of clumps larger than 70mm. It favoured microbiological activity without a relevant impact on N losses and gaseous emissions. It was estimated that biochar addition at 3% could reduce the composting time by 20%. PMID:26038333

  11. Investigation of plasma excitation. volume i. electron impact studies of selected ground state and excited state rare gas atoms. Final report 7 Jun 77-20 Sep 80

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, M.L.

    1981-08-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine electron impact cross sections of atoms in metastable states. One or two electron guns were used to first produce atoms in metastable states, then further excite these atoms to other levels. Limits on certain cross sections of helium atoms were obtained, but the detection limits of the apparatus prevented exhaustive study. Excitation functions and cross sections of xenon were obtained in the wavelength range from 3000 A to 9000 A.

  12. Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Anand R.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2009-10-01

    Many biofuel standards, including California's recently adopted low carbon fuel standard, consider just one feedstock from one supplying country for the production of sugarcane ethanol: fresh mill-pressed cane juice from a Brazilian factory. While cane juice is the dominant feedstock for ethanol in most Brazilian factories, a large number of producers in Indonesia, India, and the Caribbean, and a significant number in Brazil, manufacture most of their ethanol from molasses, a low value co-product of raw sugar. Several producers in these countries have the capacity to export ethanol to California, but the GREET (from: greenhouse gas, regulated emissions and energy use in transportation) model, which is the LCA (lifecycle assessment) model of choice for most biofuel regulators including California, does not currently include this production pathway. We develop a modification to GREET to account for this pathway. We use the upstream and process lifecycle results from the existing GREET model for Brazilian ethanol to derive lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions for ethanol manufactured from any combination of molasses and fresh cane juice. We find that ethanol manufactured with only molasses as a feedstock with all other processes and inputs identical to those of the average Brazilian mill has a lifecycle GHG (greenhouse gas) rating of 15.1 gCO2- eq MJ-1, which is significantly lower than the current California-GREET assigned rating of 26.6 gCO2- eq MJ-1. Our model can be applied at any level of granulation from the individual factory to an industry-wide average. We examine some ways in which current sugarcane producers could inaccurately claim this molasses credit. We discuss methods for addressing this in regulation.

  13. Natural gas

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    N/A N/A (None; )

    2003-07-27

    Natural gas is used as a means of power in households. Natural gas has no natural odor, so an odor is added to the gas. This is useful because gas leaks can be detected better and it also reduces the risk of accidents in homes.

  14. Hydrogeology of a coal-seam gas exploration area, southeastern British Columbia, Canada: Part 2. Modeling potential hydrogeological impacts associated with depressurizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, S.; Molson, J.; Abercrombie, H.; Barker, J.

    2000-12-01

    A three-dimensional, finite-element flow model was used to assess the hydrogeological effects of depressurizing coalbeds lying in the Weary Creek exploration block, Elk River valley, southeastern British Columbia, Canada. The simulation results permit, at an early stage, assessment of the environmental and economic implications of how the flow system may respond to depressurization. Estimated reservoir conditions for the coal-seam gas targets lying within the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Mist Mountain Formation indicate that the coalbeds must be depressurized by up to 350 m to attain the critical gas desorption pressure. The simulations suggest that depressurizing has little effect on groundwater flux to the Elk River. Simulated water production for three depressurizing wells operating under steady-state, single-phase flow for initial reservoir conditions of 13 and 16.5 cm3/g is 645 m3/d (4,057 barrels/d) and 355 m3/d (2,233 barrels/d), respectively. Groundwaters collected from monitoring wells have relatively low salinity, ranging from about 250-1,300 mg/L. The groundwater is supersaturated with respect to Ca-Mg-Fe carbonates (calcite, dolomite, and siderite) and Al-bearing silicates, including kaolinite and illite. Dissolved trace-metal concentrations are low; only Fe, Cd, Cr, and Zn exceed Canadian water-quality guidelines for aquatic life. Groundwaters were devoid of the more soluble monocyclic aromatic organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and polycyclic aromatic compounds, including naphthalene.

  15. Gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.C.; Trainer, D.; Wright, H.R.C.

    1984-12-04

    A portable gas analyzer uses a pump to take a gas sample and pump it through a carbon monoxide sensing cell, an oxygen-sensing cell and a methane-sensing pellister. Concentrations of these gases are displayed continuously on LCD displays. The gas analyzer is particularly useful in underground coal mines and offers the possibility of replacing many different gas analyzers with a simple convenient apparatus which gives continuous readings of all the critical gas concentrations.

  16. Large-scale depositional characteristics of the Ulleung Basin and its impact on electrical resistivity and Archie-parameters for gas hydrate saturation estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, Michael; Collett, Timothy S.; Kim, H.-S.; Bahk, J.-J.; Kim, J.-H.; Ryu, B.-J.; Kim, G.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate saturation estimates were obtained from an Archie-analysis of the Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) electrical resistivity logs under consideration of the regional geological framework of sediment deposition in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, of Korea. Porosity was determined from the LWD bulk density log and core-derived values of grain density. In situ measurements of pore-fluid salinity as well as formation temperature define a background trend for pore-fluid resistivity at each drill site. The LWD data were used to define sets of empirical Archie-constants for different depth-intervals of the logged borehole at all sites drilled during the second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2). A clustering of data with distinctly different trend-lines is evident in the cross-plot of porosity and formation factor for all sites drilled during UBGH2. The reason for the clustering is related to the difference between hemipelagic sediments (mostly covering the top ?100 mbsf) and mass-transport deposits (MTD) and/or the occurrence of biogenic opal. For sites located in the north-eastern portion of the Ulleung Basin a set of individual Archie-parameters for a shallow depth interval (hemipelagic) and a deeper MTD zone was achieved. The deeper zone shows typically higher resistivities for the same range of porosities seen in the upper zone, reflecting a shift in sediment properties. The presence of large amounts of biogenic opal (up to and often over 50% as defined by XRD data) was especially observed at Sites UBGH2-2_1 and UBGH2-2_2 (as well as UBGH1-9 from a previous drilling expedition in 2007). The boundary between these two zones can also easily be identified in gamma-ray logs, which also show unusually low readings in the opal-rich interval. Only by incorporating different Archie-parameters for the different zones a reasonable estimate of gas hydrate saturation was achieved that also matches results from other techniques such as pore-fluid freshening, velocity-based calculations, and pressure-core degassing experiments. Seismically, individual boundaries between zones were determined using a grid of regional 2D seismic data. Zoning from the Archie-analysis for sites in the south-western portion of the Ulleung Basin was also observed, but at these sites it is linked to individually stacked MTDs only and does not reflect a mineralogical occurrence of biogenic opal or hemipelagic sedimentation. The individual MTD events represent differently compacted material often associated with a strong decrease in porosity (and increase in density), warranting a separate set of empirical Archie-parameters.

  17. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: A Program Studying Multi-sector Opportunities and Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, S.

    2013-01-01

    In recognition of the major transitions occurring within the U.S. energy economy, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) and Stanford University's Precourt Institute for Energy (PIE) engaged energy system stakeholders from government, industry, academia, and the environmental community in a discussion about the priority issues for a program of rigorous research relating to natural gas. Held December 10-11, 2012 on the Golden, CO campus of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the workshop provided invited experts opportunity to describe the state of current knowledge in defined topic areas, and to suggest analytic priorities for that topic area. Following discussion, all stakeholders then contributed potential research questions for each topic, and then determined priorities through an interactive voting process. This record of proceedings focuses on the outcomes of the discussion.

  18. CF3+ fragmentation by electron impact ionization of perfluoro-propyl-vinyl-ethers, C5F10O, in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hayashi, Toshio; Miyawaki, Yudai; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-04-01

    The gas phase fragmentations of perfluoro-propyl-vinyl ether (PPVE, C5F10O) are studied experimentally. Dominant fragmentations of PPVE are found to be the result of a dissociative ionization reaction, i.e., CF3+ via direct bond cleavage, and C2F3O? and C3F7O? via electron attachment. Regardless of the appearance energy of around 14.5 eV for the dissociative ionization of CF3+, the observed ion efficiency for the CF3+ ion was extremely large the order of 10?20 cm?2, compared with only 10?21 cm?2 for the other channels. PPVE characteristically generated CF3+ as the largest abundant ion are advantageous for use of feedstock gases in plasma etching processes.

  19. Impact of forming gas annealing on the fatigue characteristics of ferroelectric SrBi2Ta2O9 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Yu, Tao; Hu, An; Wu, Di; Li, Ai-Dong; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Ming, Nai-Ben

    2001-10-01

    The metalorganic decomposition-derived SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) ferroelectric thin films were annealed in forming gas (5%H2+95%N2), and their fatigue characteristics were investigated. Although the hysteresis loops of these films had an unacceptable degradation under such a H2-containing reducing atmosphere, no obvious polarization fatigue with electric field cycling could be observed. However, an increase of P*r was observed over the initial period of the fatigue test. It could be viewed as a competition between the increase of P*r due to the leakage current and the decrease of P*r due to switching polarization. H2 played an important role in the increasing in the leakage current of SBT thin films, forming more weak pinning centers of domain walls, and degradation in the fatigue characteristics.

  20. Impact of biochar application on nitrogen nutrition of rice, greenhouse-gas emissions and soil organic carbon dynamics in two paddy soils of China

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zubin; Xu, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Liu, Qi; Zhu, Jianguo; Tu, Cong; Amonette, James E.; Cadisch, Georg; Yong, Jean W.; Hu, Shuijin

    2013-09-01

    Two field microcosm experiments and 15N labeling techniques were used to investigate the first-year effects of biochar addition on rice N nutrition and GHG emissions in an Inceptisol and an Ultisol. Biochar N bioavailability and effect of biochar on fertilizer nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were studied by 15N-enriched wheat biochar (7.8803 atom% 15N) and fertilizer urea (5 atom% 15N) (Experiment I). Corn biochar and corn stalks were applied at 12 Mg ha-1 to study their effects on GHG emissions (Experiment II). Biochar had no significant impact on rice production and less than 2% of the biochar N was available to plants in the first season. Biochar addition increased soil C and N contents and decreased urea NUE.. Seasonal cumulative CH4 emissions with biochar were similar to the controls, but significantly lower than the local practice of straw amendment. Soil emissions of N2O with biochar amendment were similar to the control in the acidic Ultisol, but significantly higher in the slightly alkaline Inceptisol. Carbon-balance calculations found no major losses of biochar-C. Low bio-availability of biochar N did not make a significant impact on rice production or N nutrition during the first year.. Replacement of straw amendments with biochar could decrease CH4 emissions and increase SOC stocks.

  1. Environmental Impact of a Tritium Extraction System Small Pipe Break by the Atmospheric Modelling of Elemental Tritium Gas transport with Flexpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Paloma; Ardao, Jose; Velarde, Marta; Xiberta, Jorge; Sedano, Luis

    2014-05-01

    In the case of a little Tritium-Extraction-System (TES) pipe break (with critical failure of a fuelling line), the tritium source term has not yet been determined in the frame of European Test Blanket Systems, as Design Basis Accident (DBA) but it is expected to be in the order of a few grams. In this critical scenario acute modeling of environmental tritium transport forms (HT and HTO) for the assessment of fusion facilities dosimetric impact appears as of major interest. This paper considers different term releases of tritium-forms to the atmosphere from ITER which has experienced a frequent failure of a fueling line, due the little TES pipe break affecting a Helium-Cooled-Lithium-Lead Test-Blanket-Module. In case of 24.3 g of tritium were released from the broken fuelling-line directly into the gallery found only 0.5 g was released to the environment, assuming a little rupture in the TES piping located in the Port Cell. In this paper we assume a hypothetical daily release of one gram of tritium in HT and HTO forms. The daily failure is taken just in order to evaluate different meteorological scenarios or weather conditions. The FLEXPART working model simulates the tritium forms dispersion and environmental impact out of the complex ITER-tokamak (and its safeguards) of selected environmental patterns both inland and in-sea using ECMWF/FLEXPART model. We explore specific values of this ratio at different levels. We examine the influence of meteorological conditions of the tritium behavior during 48 hours after the release. For this purpose we have FLEXPART version 9.2 numerical weather model which is useful to follow real-time releases of tritium at low levels of the boundary layer to provide an approximation of tritium cloud behavior ranging from 3 to 48 hours.

  2. Comparison of micellar isotherms of benzene determined by headspace gas chromatography and micellar electrokinetic chromatography. Assessment on impact of buffer and solubilization-induced conductivity change.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyuan; Davis, Joe M

    2007-04-13

    The possibility is discussed that micellar isotherms determined by vacancy-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (vacancy-MEKC) differ from isotherms in electrolyte-free surfactants due to thermodynamic effects of buffer. Also discussed is the possibility that they are biased at high solute concentrations by solubilization-induced changes of electrical conductivity. Such bias could invalidate a theory on peak asymmetry of neutral solutes in MEKC that is based on thermodynamic interpretation of the isotherms. To evaluate these possibilities, the nonlinear concave upward isotherm of benzene in a pH 7.0, 0.0060 M sodium phosphate buffer containing 50 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was measured by headspace gas chromatography. Of interest is the finding that benzene is more stable in the surfactant-free buffer than in water. The isotherm was compared to that previously measured by vacancy-MEKC in the same buffer and 10, 30, or 50 mM SDS. No difference was found between the isotherms. However, the isotherm indeed differed from that of benzene in buffer-free 50 mM SDS, which was also determined and agreed favorably with previous results. A partial explanation is given for the independence of the vacancy-MEKC isotherm of solubilization-induced conductivity changes. PMID:17320093

  3. Impact of urbanization on hydrochemical evolution of groundwater and on unsaturated-zone gas composition in the coastal city of Tel Aviv, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberbrand, M.; Rosenthal, E.; Shachnai, E.

    2001-08-01

    The coastal city of Tel Aviv was founded at the beginning of the 20th century. The number of its inhabitants and its water consumption increased rapidly. This study analyses a 15-year record (1934-1948) of pre-industrial development of groundwater chemistry in the urban area. Archive data on concentrations of major ions, dissolved gases (CO 2 and O 2), organic matter, and pH were available for each half-year during the period of 1934-1948. The major factors causing changes in the chemistry of groundwater flowing in three sandy sub-aquifers have been seawater encroachment due to overpumping, and infiltration of effluents from pit-latrine collectors. Influence of these factors decreases with depth. Landward-penetrating seawater passed through clayey coastal sediments, interbedded among sands and calcareous sandstones, and spread into the Kurkar Group aquifer. This has led to exchange of sodium (dominant in seawater) with calcium adsorbed on clay particles, enriching groundwater with calcium. Intensity of cation exchange decreases inland and with depth. Infiltration of pit-latrine effluents has introduced large amounts of ammonium into the unsaturated zone. Its rapid oxidation in unsaturated sediments has caused massive nitrate production, accompanied by pore-water acidification. This process induces dissolution of vadose carbonate, resulting in enrichment of groundwater recharge in calcium. Anthropogenically induced dissolution of calcite in the unsaturated zone has been the major factor for the increase of Ca 2+ concentration in groundwater, accounting for about 80% of this increase. In the interface zone, an additional 20% of calcium has been supplied by cation exchange. Owing to pH increase caused by denitrification in the aquifer, Ca 2+-rich waters supersaturated with calcite could be formed, especially in the capillary fringe of the uppermost sub-aquifer, which could induce calcite precipitation and ultimately lead to the cementation of sandy aquifers. Urban development has caused drastic changes in the gas content in the unsaturated zone and in groundwater. Carbon dioxide was intensively generated by nitrification-denitrification processes, by hydration of urea, to a lesser degree by oxidation of organic matter, and probably by anoxic biodegradation of organics. Between 1934 and 1948, concentrations of CO 2 in unsaturated sediment air rose from 3.2% to 7.6%. In the unsaturated zone, oxygen consumption for oxidation of ammonium and organic matter lowered O 2 concentrations in sediment air to unusually low values of 3.9-12.9%. Nitrification in the urban unsaturated zone could thus serve as a pump, sucking in atmospheric oxygen at a rate of about 0.3-0.5 g m -2 day -1. The extreme concentrations of CO 2 and O 2 in unsaturated sediments have been preserved due to production and consumption of gas under conditions of diminishing areas open to the atmosphere, uncovered by buildings and by roads.

  4. Impact of urbanization on hydrochemical evolution of groundwater and on unsaturated-zone gas composition in the coastal city of Tel Aviv, Israel.

    PubMed

    Zilberbrand, M; Rosenthal, E; Shachnai, E

    2001-08-01

    The coastal city of Tel Aviv was founded at the beginning of the 20th century. The number of its inhabitants and its water consumption increased rapidly. This study analyses a 15-year record (1934-1948) of pre-industrial development of groundwater chemistry in the urban area. Archive data on concentrations of major ions, dissolved gases (CO2 and O2), organic matter, and pH were available for each half-year during the period of 1934-1948. The major factors causing changes in the chemistry of groundwater flowing in three sandy sub-aquifers have been seawater encroachment due to overpumping, and infiltration of effluents from pit-latrine collectors. Influence of these factors decreases with depth. Landward-penetrating seawater passed through clayey coastal sediments, interbedded among sands and calcareous sandstones, and spread into the Kurkar Group aquifer. This has led to exchange of sodium (dominant in seawater) with calcium adsorbed on clay particles, enriching groundwater with calcium. Intensity of cation exchange decreases inland and with depth. Infiltration of pit-latrine effluents has introduced large amounts of ammonium into the unsaturated zone. Its rapid oxidation in unsaturated sediments has caused massive nitrate production, accompanied by pore-water acidification. This process induces dissolution of vadose carbonate, resulting in enrichment of groundwater recharge in calcium. Anthropogenically induced dissolution of calcite in the unsaturated zone has been the major factor for the increase of Ca2+ concentration in groundwater, accounting for about 80% of this increase. In the interface zone, an additional 20% of calcium has been supplied by cation exchange. Owing to pH increase caused by denitrification in the aquifer, Ca(2+)-rich waters supersaturated with calcite could be formed, especially in the capillary fringe of the uppermost sub-aquifer, which could induce calcite precipitation and ultimately lead to the cementation of sandy aquifers. Urban development has caused drastic changes in the gas content in the unsaturated zone and in groundwater. Carbon dioxide was intensively generated by nitrification-denitrification processes, by hydration of urea, to a lesser degree by oxidation of organic matter, and probably by anoxic biodegradation of organics. Between 1934 and 1948, concentrations of CO2 in unsaturated sediment air rose from 3.2% to 7.6%. In the unsaturated zone, oxygen consumption for oxidation of ammonium and organic matter lowered O2 concentrations in sediment air to unusually low values of 3.9-12.9%. Nitrification in the urban unsaturated zone could thus serve as a pump, sucking in atmospheric oxygen at a rate of about 0.3-0.5 g m-2 day-1. The extreme concentrations of CO2 and O2 in unsaturated sediments have been preserved due to production and consumption of gas under conditions of diminishing areas open to the atmosphere, uncovered by buildings and by roads. PMID:11523324

  5. 77 FR 130 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Intercontinental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ...developing the EIS. At present, the BLM has identified the following preliminary issues: Water availability; Impacts from subsidence; Impacts to oil and gas exploration and operation in the project area; Impacts to air quality; and Impacts...

  6. Impact of greenhouse gas metrics on the quantification of agricultural emissions and farm-scale mitigation strategies: a New Zealand case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Andy; Ledgard, Stewart

    2013-06-01

    Agriculture emits a range of greenhouse gases. Greenhouse gas metrics allow emissions of different gases to be reported in a common unit called CO2-equivalent. This enables comparisons of the efficiency of different farms and production systems and of alternative mitigation strategies across all gases. The standard metric is the 100 year global warming potential (GWP), but alternative metrics have been proposed and could result in very different CO2-equivalent emissions, particularly for CH4. While significant effort has been made to reduce uncertainties in emissions estimates of individual gases, little effort has been spent on evaluating the implications of alternative metrics on overall agricultural emissions profiles and mitigation strategies. Here we assess, for a selection of New Zealand dairy farms, the effect of two alternative metrics (100 yr GWP and global temperature change potentials, GTP) on farm-scale emissions and apparent efficiency and cost effectiveness of alternative mitigation strategies. We find that alternative metrics significantly change the balance between CH4 and N2O; in some cases, alternative metrics even determine whether a specific management option would reduce or increase net farm-level emissions or emissions intensity. However, the relative ranking of different farms by profitability or emissions intensity, and the ranking of the most cost-effective mitigation options for each farm, are relatively unaffected by the metric. We conclude that alternative metrics would change the perceived significance of individual gases from agriculture and the overall cost to farmers if a price were applied to agricultural emissions, but the economically most effective response strategies are unaffected by the choice of metric.

  7. The impacts of land-use change from grassland to bioenergy Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) Willow on the crop and ecosystem greenhouse gas balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Zoe M.; Alberti, Giorgio; Dondini, Marta; Smith, Pete; Taylor, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this research is to better understand the greenhouse gas balance of land-use transition to bioenergy cropping systems in a UK context. Given limited land availability, addressing the food-energy-water nexus remains a challenge, and it is imperative that bioenergy crops are sited appropriately and that competition with food crops is minimized. Here we present the results of a years' worth of soil and GHG data for a conversion from ex-set aside grassland to short rotation coppice (SRC) willow for bioenergy on a commercial scale. Initial results indicate that willow was a net sink for CO2 in comparison to grassland which was a net source of CO2. This provides evidence that the GHG balance of transitions to SRC bioenergy crops will potentially result in increased soil carbon. The empirical findings from this study have been combined with modelled estimates for the site to both test and validate the ECOSSE model. Initial comparisons show that the model is able to accurately predict the respiration occurring at the field site, suggesting that it is a valuable approach for up-scaling from point sites such as this to wider geographical areas and for considering future climate scenarios. The modelling output will also provide a user-friendly tool for land owners which will determine the GHG and soil carbon effects of changing land to bioenergy for UK. This work is based on the Ecosystem Land Use Modelling & Soil Carbon GHG Flux Trial (ELUM) project, which was commissioned and funded by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI). This work was also jointly funded by the Carbo Biocrop Project.

  8. Gas vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Walsby, A E

    1994-01-01

    The gas vesicle is a hollow structure made of protein. It usually has the form of a cylindrical tube closed by conical end caps. Gas vesicles occur in five phyla of the Bacteria and two groups of the Archaea, but they are mostly restricted to planktonic microorganisms, in which they provide buoyancy. By regulating their relative gas vesicle content aquatic microbes are able to perform vertical migrations. In slowly growing organisms such movements are made more efficiently than by swimming with flagella. The gas vesicle is impermeable to liquid water, but it is highly permeable to gases and is normally filled with air. It is a rigid structure of low compressibility, but it collapses flat under a certain critical pressure and buoyancy is then lost. Gas vesicles in different organisms vary in width, from 45 to > 200 nm; in accordance with engineering principles the narrower ones are stronger (have higher critical pressures) than wide ones, but they contain less gas space per wall volume and are therefore less efficient at providing buoyancy. A survey of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria reveals that there has been natural selection for gas vesicles of the maximum width permitted by the pressure encountered in the natural environment, which is mainly determined by cell turgor pressure and water depth. Gas vesicle width is genetically determined, perhaps through the amino acid sequence of one of the constituent proteins. Up to 14 genes have been implicated in gas vesicle production, but so far the products of only two have been shown to be present in the gas vesicle: GvpA makes the ribs that form the structure, and GvpC binds to the outside of the ribs and stiffens the structure against collapse. The evolution of the gas vesicle is discussed in relation to the homologies of these proteins. Images PMID:8177173

  9. Hypervelocity impact damage to composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C Tennyson; C Lamontagne

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of hypervelocity impact tests conducted on graphite\\/PEEK laminates. Both flat plate and circular cylinders were tested using aluminum spheres of varying size, travelling at velocities from 2–7km\\/s. The experiments were conducted at several facilities using light gas guns. Normal and oblique angle impacts were investigated to determine the effect of impact angle, particle energy and

  10. Gas lasers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Bloom

    1966-01-01

    A review is given of the present status of gas discharge lasers, with particular attention to developments reported in 1965 and early 1966. Following a brief history, gas lasers are classified by types--neutral atom, ion, and molecular--and a comparison is given of the properties of the various types. A short discussion is given of noise and coherence properties. Detailed descriptions

  11. Create Gas

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-03-22

    Learners mix vinegar and baking soda together in a bottle to create a chemical reaction. The reaction produces a gas, carbon dioxide, which inflates a balloon attached to the mouth of the bottle. This helps learners "see" the gas, which is otherwise invisible.

  12. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

  13. Heating and vaporization during hypervelocity particle impact

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Eichhorn

    1978-01-01

    Temperatures of the vapour produced during hypervelocity particle impacts are estimated from measurements of the spectra of impact light flashes. Temperatures between 2500 and 5000 K, depending on the impact velocity, were calculated. Measurements of the light flash intensity as a function of residual gas pressure in the target chamber are shown. From the increase of the light intensity with

  14. Qualitative analysis of seized synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones by gas chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Seongshin; Arroyo-Mora, Luis E; Almirall, José R

    2015-02-01

    Designer drugs are analogues or derivatives of illicit drugs with a modification of their chemical structure in order to circumvent current legislation for controlled substances. Designer drugs of abuse have increased dramatically in popularity all over the world for the past couple of years. Currently, the qualitative seized-drug analysis is mainly performed by gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) in which most of these emerging designer drug derivatives are extensively fragmented not presenting a molecular ion in their mass spectra. The absence of molecular ion and/or similar fragmentation pattern among these derivatives may cause the equivocal identification of unknown seized-substances. In this study, the qualitative identification of 34 designer drugs, mainly synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones, were performed by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques, including electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) only focusing on qualitative seized-drug analysis, not from the toxicological point of view. The implementation of CI source facilitates the determination of molecular mass and the identification of seized designer drugs. Developed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode may increase sensitivity and selectivity in the analysis of seized designer drugs. In addition, CI mass spectra and MRM mass spectra of these designer drug derivatives can be used as a potential supplemental database along with EI mass spectral database. PMID:24827678

  15. 77 FR 75646 - Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Soldotna, AK; Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ...Impact Statement for the Shadura Natural Gas Development Project AGENCY: Fish...Statement (EIS) for the Shadura Natural Gas Development Project is available...alternatives for accessing the subsurface natural gas estate owned by Cook Inlet...

  16. Gas lasers.

    PubMed

    Bloom, A L

    1966-10-01

    A review is given of the present status of gas discharge lasers, with particular attention to developments reported in 1965 and early 1966. Following a brief history, gas lasers are classified by types-neutral atom, ion, and molecular-and a comparison is given of the properties of the various types. A short discussion is given of noise and coherence properties. Detailed descriptions are given of three recent developments of particular interest-the CO(2) laser, the argon-ion laser, and pulsed self-terminating lasers. Finally, brief mention is made of the most important present applications of gas lasers. PMID:20057585

  17. The cooling process in gas quenching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Lior

    2004-01-01

    Gas quenching is a relatively new process with several important advantages, such as minimal environmental impact, clean products, and ability to control the cooling locally and temporally for best product properties. To meet the high cooling rates required for quenching, the cooling gas must flow at very high velocities, and such flows are highly turbulent and separated. Consequently, there is

  18. China's synthetic natural gas revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi-Jen; Jackson, Robert B.

    2013-10-01

    China has recently pushed for investments in large-scale coal-fuelled synthetic natural gas plants. The associated carbon emissions, water needs and wider environmental impacts are, however, mostly neglected and could lock the country into an unsustainable development path.

  19. Fueling up with natural gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Stodolsky; D. J. Santini

    1993-01-01

    A careful analysis is needed of the energy efficiency of the fuel cycle (the efficiency of the conversion from resource extraction to final use by consumers) and the environmental impact of natural gas fuels. This information can help policy makers decide which fuels could be used to displace imported oil, maintain air quality, and be the basis of a new

  20. Comparison of four approaches for estimating soil-atmosphere trace gas fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurements of trace gas fluxes are critical in estimating the impact of agricultural management practices on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. Our objectives were to compare several approaches to estimate gas fluxes and to select a proper model for each gas. Gas samples were collected on 48 ...

  1. Enhancing impact: visualization of an integrated impact assessment strategy.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Gary R; Bouchard, Michel A; de Sa, Isabel Marques; Paris, Isabelle; Balge, Zachary; Williams, Dane; Singer, Burton H; Winkler, Mirko S; Utzinger, Jürg

    2012-05-01

    The environmental impact assessment process is over 40 years old and has dramatically expanded. Topics, such as social, health and human rights impact are now included. The main body of an impact analysis is generally hundreds of pages long and supported by countless technical appendices. For large, oil/gas, mining and water resources projects both the volume and technical sophistication of the reports has far exceeded the processing ability of host communities. Instead of informing and empowering, the reports are abstruse and overwhelming. Reinvention is required. The development of a visual integrated impact assessment strategy that utilizes remote sensing and spatial analyses is described. PMID:22639133

  2. Gas - flatulence

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to digest, such as fiber. Sometimes, adding more fiber into your diet can cause temporary gas. Your body may adjust ... your diet changed recently? Have you increased the fiber in your diet? How fast do you eat, chew, and swallow? ...

  3. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The M200 originated in the 1970's under an Ames Research Center/Stanford University contract to develop a small, lightweight gas analyzer for Viking Landers. Although the unit was not used on the spacecraft, it was further developed by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Three researchers from the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. (MTI) to commercialize the analyzer. The original version (Micromonitor 500) was introduced in 1982, and the M200 in 1988. The M200, a more advanced version, features dual gas chromatograph which separate a gaseous mixture into components and measure concentrations of each gas. It is useful for monitoring gas leaks, chemical spills, etc. Many analyses are completed in less than 30 seconds, and a wide range of mixtures can be analyzed.

  4. Analytical approach to determine ticlopidine in post-mortem blood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Barroso; E. Gallardo; C. Margalho; P. Monsanto; D. N. Vieira

    2006-01-01

    A new and sensitive method to determine ticlopidine in whole human blood using proadifen as the internal standard (IS) is described. The analyte and IS were extracted by solid-phase extraction using Oasis® HLB cartridges, and the extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-electron impact ionisation–mass spectrometry (GC\\/EI–MS). Calibration curves were established daily in spiked blood samples using a non-linear calibration model,

  5. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant staphylococci to oregano essential oil, carvacrol and thymol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonia Nostro; Anna R Blanco; Maria A Cannatelli; Vincenzo Enea; Guido Flamini; Ivano Morelli; Andrea Sudano Roccaro; Vittorio Alonzo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MSS, MRS) to oregano essential oil, carvacrol and thymol. The commercial aerial parts of Origanum vulgare L. were hydrodistilled and the essential oil analysed by gas- chromatography\\/electron impact mass spectrometry. The inhibition efficacy of this essence and its major components was assayed against 26 MSS

  6. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid composition of three Chinese medicinal herbs, Eupatorium cannabinum, E. japonicum and Crotalaria assamica.

    PubMed

    Edgar, J A; Lin, H J; Kumana, C R; Ng, M M

    1992-01-01

    The pyrrolizidine alkaloid composition of three Chinese herbs, "pei lan", "cheng gan cao" and "zi xiao rong," identified respectively as Eupatorium cannabinum, Eupatorium japonicum (Compositae) and Crotalaria assamica (Leguminosae), were studied by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry. Viridiflorine, cynaustraline, amabiline, supinine, echinatine, rinderine and isomers of these alkaloids were found in the Eupatorium species. Monocrotaline was the only pyrrolizidine alkaloid detected in the Crotalaria species. PMID:1471612

  7. Gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    There is a definite need for the US government to provide leadership for research in gas hydrates and to coordinate its activities with academia, industry, private groups, federal agencies, and their foreign counterparts. In response to this need, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center implemented a gas hydrates R and D program. Understanding the resource will be achieved through: assessment of current technology; characterization of gas hydrate geology and reservoir engineering; and development of diagnostic tools and methods. Research to date has focused on geology. As work progressed, areas where gas hydrates are likely to occur were identified, and specific high potential areas were targeted for future detailed investigation. Initial research activities involved the development of the Geologic Analysis System (GAS); which will provide, through approximately 30 software packages, the capability to manipulate and correlate several types of geologic and petroleum data into maps, graphics, and reports. Preliminary mapping of hydrate prospects for the Alaskan North Slope is underway. Geological research includes physical system characterization which focuses on creating synthetic methane hydrates and developing synthetic hydrate cores using tetrahydrofuran, consolidated rock cores, frost base mixtures, water/ice base mixtures, and water base mixtures. Laboratory work produced measurements of the sonic velocity and electrical resistivity of these synthetic hydrates. During 1983, a sample from a natural hydrate core recovered from the Pacific coast of Guatemala was tested for these properties by METC. More recently, a natural hydrate sample from the Gulf of Mexico was also acquired and testing of this sample is currently underway. In addition to the development of GAS, modeling and systems analysis work focused on the development of conceptual gas hydrate production models. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Gas Hydrates: It's A Gas!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students will investigate the occurrence of gas hydrates on the ocean floor. They will discover the importance of carbon, where carbon is stored on Earth, and that the largest reservoir of carbon is gas hydrates. Students will discover that Earth's climate changes, and how the greenhouse effect works. They will also learn about the potential of hydrates as a major new energy resource and explore the conditions under which hydrates form.

  9. Study of limestone particle impact attrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhongxiang Chen; C. Jim Lim; John R. Grace

    2007-01-01

    Impact attrition of limestone particles was investigated at temperatures from 25 to 580?C and 1atm pressure. Impacts changed the particle size distribution and mean particle diameter significantly for conveying gas velocities of 20–100m\\/s. With increasing temperature less attrition occurred due to a decrease in particle impact velocity and an increase in the threshold particle impact velocity. The activation energy for

  10. APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdollah Esmaeili

    Nanotechnology is poised to impact dramatically on all sectors of industry. Nanotechnology could be used to enhance the possibilities of developing conventional and stranded gas resources. Nanotechnology can be used to improve the drilling process and oil and gas production by making it easier to separate oil and gas in the reservoir. Nanotechnology can make the industry considerably greener. There

  11. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  12. Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph, a system which separates a gaseous mixture into its components and measures the concentration of the individual gases, was designed for the Viking Lander. The technology was further developed under National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and funded by Ames Research Center/Stanford as a toxic gas leak detection device. Three researchers on the project later formed Microsensor Technology, Inc. to commercialize the product. It is a battery-powered system consisting of a sensing wand connected to a computerized analyzer. Marketed as the Michromonitor 500, it has a wide range of applications.

  13. Atmospheric effects on oblique impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and theoretical calculations often use vertical impact angles (90 deg) in order to avoid the complicating effect of asymmetry. Nevertheless, oblique impacts represent the most likely starting condition for planetary cratering. Changing both impact angles and atmospheric pressure not only allows testing previous results for vertical impacts but also reveals phenomena whose signatures would otherwise be masked in the planetary cratering record. The laboratory studies were performed for investigating impact cratering processes. Impact angles can be increased from 0 to 90 deg in 15 deg increments while maintaining a flat target surface. Different atmospheres (nitrogen, argon, and helium) characterized the effects of both gas density and Mach number. Targets varied according to purpose. Because of the complexities in atmosphere-impactor-ejecta interactions, no single combination allows direct simulation of a planetary-scale (10-100 km) event. Nevertheless, fundamental processes and observed phenomena allow formulating first-order models at such broad scales.

  14. Coal and Gas Industries in Australia a. Overview of Australian coal and gas industries

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    . Resources, market, and utilization of coal and gas c. Coal seam gas industry in Queensland d. Carbon capture and storage in Australia e. Safety, environmental and social impact of mining in Australia f. Site visit b. Solar photovoltaic system and photo-catalysis · Energy Storage a. Energy storage R & D at UQ b

  15. Gas lasers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A K Nath

    1988-01-01

    The important gas lasers which find wide applications in material processing are the CO2 laser, the argon-ion laser and the excimer lasers. This paper briefly describes the basic concepts and the technology of\\u000a these lasers.

  16. Got Gas?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Discovery Centre

    1999-01-01

    Create gas with a glass of water, some wire, conductors and a battery! You will be separating water (H2O) into oxygen and hydrogen. This hands-on experiment explores the process of electrolysis, and shows how graphite in a pencil works as an electrical conductor.

  17. [Determination of 28 organochlorine and synthetic pyrethroid pesticides in greasy wool using accelerated solvent extraction technique and gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuanmu; Huang, Shaotang; Yu, Xuejun; Gu, Xiaojun; Qiu, Yajun; Zhan, Jia; Chen, Shubing; He, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jun; Wang, Shijie; Li, Yaping; Li, Zhongbang

    2008-09-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of 28 organochlorine and synthetic pyrethroid pesticides in greasy wool was developed by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) coupled with gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). The organochlorine and synthetic pyrethroid pesticides in greasy wool were extracted with acetonitrile saturated with n-hexane at 80 degrees C, 10.34 MPa by ASE. The extract was pretreated by a series of procedures such as freezing-lipid filtration, concentration and purification by solid-phase extraction prior to the determination with GC-ECD. The linear ranges were 0.005-1.0 mg/L for 16 organochlorines, 0.02-4.0 mg/L for flumethrin and 0.01-2.0 mg/L for the others. There were good linear relationships between the peak area and concentration in the linear ranges. The average recoveries of 28 organochlorine and synthetic pyrethroid pesticides were 67.2%-107.7%, and the relative standard deviations were 2.6%-29.0%. The method is simple, sensitive and suitable for preliminary screening of organochlorine and synthetic pyrethroid pesticides in greasy wool. PMID:19160757

  18. It's a Gas, Gas, Yeah

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    William C. Robertson, Ph.D.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter delves deeper into air pressure, or to be more correct, the pressure exerted by any gas. The most important part of this chapter is a scientific model for how gases behave, which will be used to explain previous activities pertaining to air pressure, in addition to a bunch of new, exciting activities.

  19. Dam Impacts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    While the creation of a dam provides many benefits, it can have negative impacts on local ecosystems. Students learn about the major environmental impacts of dams and the engineering solutions used to address them.

  20. Environmental impact of energy distribution using hydrogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ham-Hisa Uchida; S. Kato; M. Suga

    2001-01-01

    As an example of estimating the environmental impact of hydrogen energy, we have estimated the emission of CO2 from the energy system using hydrogen. For the analyses, electric power and natural gas (city gas) systems are compared. For longer period of utilization the hydrogen system may result in the less emission, while new facility construction may be necessary. Estimation results

  1. Remote sensing of gas emissions on natural gas flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, Rainer; Wilkinson, Rob; Heland, Jörg; Schäfer, Klaus

    1998-07-01

    Emissions from operational natural gas flares are examined by a remote sensing technique using a commercial moderate-resolution Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer. The thermal radiation emitted by the post-combustion gas is analysed to determine plume temperatures and concentrations of 0963-9659/7/4/020/img5 and 0963-9659/7/4/020/img6. The multicomponent air pollution software (MAPS) is applied which is based on radiative transfer line-by-line calculations and least-squares fit procedures. Emission rates and combustion efficiencies are calculated which indicate that the local environmental impact of methane emissions from natural gas flares is small, while significant amounts of carbon dioxide are released.

  2. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-print Network

    Sherrill, David

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety ................................................................................................................... 14 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 3 13. GAS MONITORING RESPONSIBILITY

  3. Economic Impact of the American Clean Energy

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Economic Impact of the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 on the West Virginia Economy ........................................................................................................................ 1 American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines the impact of the American Clean Energy

  4. Life cycle water consumption for shale gas and conventional natural gas.

    PubMed

    Clark, Corrie E; Horner, Robert M; Harto, Christopher B

    2013-10-15

    Shale gas production represents a large potential source of natural gas for the nation. The scale and rapid growth in shale gas development underscore the need to better understand its environmental implications, including water consumption. This study estimates the water consumed over the life cycle of conventional and shale gas production, accounting for the different stages of production and for flowback water reuse (in the case of shale gas). This study finds that shale gas consumes more water over its life cycle (13-37 L/GJ) than conventional natural gas consumes (9.3-9.6 L/GJ). However, when used as a transportation fuel, shale gas consumes significantly less water than other transportation fuels. When used for electricity generation, the combustion of shale gas adds incrementally to the overall water consumption compared to conventional natural gas. The impact of fuel production, however, is small relative to that of power plant operations. The type of power plant where the natural gas is utilized is far more important than the source of the natural gas. PMID:24004382

  5. Surface heat transfer due to particle impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Chen, M.M.; Chao, B.T. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering)

    1989-08-01

    In a fluidized bed of high gas velocities, particle impact on an immersed surface is an important mechanism for heat transfer. The heat exchange between an impacting spherical particle and surface is analyzed by considering (1) the heat conduction through the time varying contact area during the period when the particle is in contact with the surface, and (2) the heat conduction through the surrounding gas during the period when the particle is approaching and rebounding from the surface. For the solid conduction problem, an analytical solution is obtained for small Fourier numbers, and a correction factor is computed numerically to be used for large Fourier numbers. For the gas conduction problem, a solution is obtained by combining three analytical solutions each valid in a certain region of the gas domain. Since heat transfer due to the impact of a stream of falling particles was also measured with a simple experimental set up. 53 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Influence of gas properties in drop splashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josserand, Christophe; Jian, Zhen; Popinet, Stephane; Ray, Pascal; Zaleski, Stephane; FCIH Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    We study numerically the influence of the surrounding gas in the drop impact dynamics. We observe that when super-hydrophobic boundary conditions are taken, splashing is always present, that we explain through a lubrication argument. On the other hand, when partial wetting is allowed, a splashing/spreading transition is observed. This transition is strongly influenced by the viscosity ratio but shows also a slight dependence with the gas pressure in qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  7. Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues

    E-print Network

    Watkins, G.

    NATURAL GAS REGULATORY roLICY: CURRENT ISSUES G. GAIL WATKINS Railroad Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased.... Federal Regulation a. Self-implementing transportation b. Service obligation c. Pipeline capacity brokering d. Non-regulated and partially regulated sales e. FERC Order No. 500 f. Rate treatments impacts 2. State Regulation a...

  8. COMBUSTION MODIFICATION CONTROLS FOR STATIONARY GAS TURBINE. VOLUME I: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives an environmental assessment of combustion modification techniques for stationary gas turbines, with respect to NOx control effectiveness, operational impact, thermal efficiency impact, control costs, and effect on emissions of pollutants other than NOx....

  9. Gas Hydrates: It's a Gas

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students will discover the importance of carbon, where carbon is stored on Earth, and that the largest reservoir of carbon is in the form of gas hydrates where methane and other hydrocarbon gases are trapped in a lattice of water molecules in deep sea sediments. Students will learn how climate change is related to the greenhouse effect. They will also learn about the potential of hydrates as a major new energy resource, and explore the conditions under which hydrates form. In addition, students will understand the use of acoustics for mapping the sea floor and sub-sea floor.

  10. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  11. Modified gas gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Potvin, M.J.

    1990-12-11

    This paper discusses a method of testing the reliability of a gas meter presenting an input end, an output end, and a gas flow detecting mechanism between the ends. It comprises providing a conduit having a gas inlet and a gas outlet end; operably coupling the gas inlet end of the conduit; manipulating the valve means to a first flow condition; thereafter changing the level of gas flow; and inspecting the gas meter flow.

  12. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  13. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  14. Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, C.

    1996-07-01

    Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

  15. Anesthesia and gas exchange in tracheal surgery.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Klaus; Männle, Clemens

    2014-02-01

    Tracheobronchial surgery constitutes a challenge to the anesthetist because it involves the anatomic structures dedicated to bulk gas transport. Common approaches to airway management and gas exchange for extrathoracic and intrathoracic airway surgery are reviewed, with due regard to less common methods thought crucial for specific procedures. Tracheal surgery, beyond sharing the airways, requires sharing with the surgeon ideas on preoperative assessment, on the impact on gas exchange of induction across compromised airways, and of emergence from anesthesia with airways altered by surgical repair. Mutual understanding is essential to prevent, rapidly identify, and correct imminent loss of airway viability. PMID:24295656

  16. What you need to know about environmental impact statements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. H. Willis; W. M. Henebry

    1976-01-01

    Environmental Research and Technology, Inc., offers practical information on environmental-impact statements and the associated regulatory practices that confront gas-processing management when seeking federal approval for expansion, modernization, and new construction projects. The report defines the impact statement and its relation to project approvals, describes the company's role in assessing the project's environmental impact, presents guidelines for environmental planning, and discusses

  17. Deep Impact: Observations from a Worldwide Earth-Based Campaign

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. J. Meech; N. Ageorges; M. F. A'Hearn; C. Arpigny; A. Ates; J. Aycock; S. Bagnulo; J. Bailey; R. Barber; L. Barrera; R. Barrena; J. M. Bauer; M. J. S. Belton; F. Bensch; B. Bhattacharya; N. Biver; G. Blake; D. Bockelée-Morvan; H. Boehnhardt; B. P. Bonev; T. Bonev; M. W. Buie; M. G. Burton; H. M. Butner; R. Cabanac; R. Campbell; H. Campins; M. T. Capria; T. Carroll; F. Chaffee; S. B. Charnley; R. Cleis; A. Coates; A. Cochran; P. Colom; A. Conrad; I. M. Coulson; J. Crovisier; J. deBuizer; R. Dekany; J. de Léon; N. Dello Russo; A. Delsanti; M. DiSanti; J. Drummond; L. Dundon; P. B. Etzel; T. L. Farnham; P. Feldman; Y. R. Fernández; M. D. Filipovic; S. Fisher; A. Fitzsimmons; D. Fong; R. Fugate; H. Fujiwara; T. Fujiyoshi; R. Furusho; T. Fuse; E. Gibb; O. Groussin; S. Gulkis; M. Gurwell; E. Hadamcik; O. Hainaut; D. Harker; D. Harrington; M. Harwit; S. Hasegawa; C. W. Hergenrother; P. Hirst; K. Hodapp; M. Honda; E. S. Howell; D. Hutsemékers; D. Iono; W.-H. Ip; W. Jackson; E. Jehin; Z. J. Jiang; G. H. Jones; P. A. Jones; T. Kadono; U. W. Kamath; H. U. Käufl; T. Kasuga; H. Kawakita; M. S. Kelley; F. Kerber; M. Kidger; D. Kinoshita; M. Knight; L. Lara; S. M. Larson; S. Lederer; C.-F. Lee; A. C. Levasseur-Regourd; J. Y. Li; Q.-S. Li; J. Licandro; Z.-Y. Lin; C. M. Lisse; G. LoCurto; A. J. Lovell; S. C. Lowry; J. Lyke; D. Lynch; J. Ma; K. Magee-Sauer; G. Maheswar; J. Manfroid; O. Marco; P. Martin; G. Melnick; S. Miller; T. Miyata; G. H. Moriarty-Schieven; N. Moskovitz; B. E. A. Mueller; M. J. Mumma; S. Muneer; D. A. Neufeld; T. Ootsubo; D. Osip; S. K. Pandea; E. Pantin; R. Paterno-Mahler; B. Patten; B. E. Penprase; A. Peck; G. Petitpas; N. Pinilla-Alonso; J. Pittichova; E. Pompei; T. P. Prabhu; C. Qi; R. Rao; H. Rauer; H. Reitsema; S. D. Rodgers; P. Rodriguez; R. Ruane; G. Ruch; W. Rujopakarn; D. K. Sahu; S. Sako; I. Sakon; N. Samarasinha; J. M. Sarkissian; I. Saviane; M. Schirmer; P. Schultz; R. Schulz; P. Seitzer; T. Sekiguchi; F. Selman; M. Serra-Ricart; R. Sharp; R. L. Snell; C. Snodgrass; T. Stallard; G. Stecklein; C. Sterken; J. A. Stüwe; S. Sugita; M. Sumner; N. Suntzeff; R. Swaters; S. Takakuwa; N. Takato; J. Thomas-Osip; E. Thompson; A. T. Tokunaga; G. P. Tozzi; H. Tran; M. Troy; C. Trujillo; J. Van Cleve; R. Vasundhara; R. Vazquez; F. Vilas; G. Villanueva; K. von Braun; P. Vora; R. J. Wainscoat; K. Walsh; J. Watanabe; H. A. Weaver; W. Weaver; M. Weiler; P. R. Weissman; W. F. Welsh; D. Wilner; S. Wolk; M. Womack; D. Wooden; L. M. Woodney; C. Woodward; Z.-Y. Wu; J.-H. Wu; T. Yamashita; B. Yang; Y.-B. Yang; S. Yokogawa; A. C. Zook; A. Zauderer; X. Zhao; X. Zhou; J.-M. Zucconi

    2005-01-01

    On 4 July 2005, many observatories around the world and in space observed the collision of Deep Impact with comet 9P\\/Tempel 1 or its aftermath. This was an unprecedented coordinated observational campaign. These data show that (i) there was new material after impact that was compositionally different from that seen before impact; (ii) the ratio of dust mass to gas

  18. Drop Impactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Spengler; Narayan R. Gokhale

    1973-01-01

    Recent attempts to understand the development of intense precipitation has led several investigators to speculate about the role of drop impactions. Working with a large vertical wind tunnel, investigations were carried out on the interactions of millimeter size drops. On the basis of these studies it is concluded that drop impactions produce a rapid increase in the number of precipitation

  19. The role of interstitial gas in determining the impact response of granular beds This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    (http://iopscience.iop.org/0295-5075/93/2/28008) Download details: IP Address: 128 sphere into a fine-grained granular bed. Using high- speed X-ray radiography we track both the motion) this interaction can drastically change the impact dynamics. In particular, in (a)Current address: Center for Soft

  20. Development of a multi-residue method for the determination of organic micropollutants in water, sediment and mussels using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Avila, Juan; Fernandez-Sanjuan, María; Vicente, Joana; Lacorte, Silvia

    2011-09-23

    This study describes the development of a multiresidue method based on gas chromatography-electron ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) for the detection of sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), five phthalate esters (PEs), seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), six alkylphenols (APs), three organochlorined pesticides and their isomers or degradation products (OCPs) and bisphenol A in seawater, river water, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, sediments and mussels. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used for the extraction of target analytes in aqueous samples, and ultrasound assisted extraction for solid samples. GC-EI-MS/MS acquisition conditions in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) using two transitions per compound were optimized. In this way, quantification and unequivocal identification of organic micropollutants were performed in compliance with the Decision 2002/657/EC. Good linearity responses with coefficients of determination higher than 0.99 were obtained. Methodological detection limits (MDLs) in seawater ranged from 0.1 to 6 ng L(-1); in river water from 0.1 to 4.8 ng L(-1); in WWTP effluents from 1 to 75 ng L(-1); in sediments from 1 to 150 ng g(-1) and in mussels from 1 to 125 ng g(-1). MDLs and recovery yields were compared with other published methods and similarities or even improvements were achieved. The optimized method was applied to analyze five samples from each matrix collected in coastal areas, showing its potential use for marine pollution monitoring. PMID:21824622

  1. Gas Kick Mechanistic Model 

    E-print Network

    Zubairy, Raheel

    2014-04-18

    Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

  2. How is Order 636 affecting the gas producing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This paper is an interview with an energy representative for a major gas-producing company regarding the impact of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636. This legislation was suppose to streamline the interstate transportation of natural gas unhindered by local distribution company (LCD) interference. Many times these LCD's owned a portion of the necessary pipeline route used to transport natural gas, and as a result, had a priority on purchasing pipeline gas whenever they needed. This could, in turn, result in a depletion of contract gas which was in-route to a specified contract market. Such interferences caused problems with the contract markets, but could boost the net profits to natural gas companies who had excess gas that could be sold in-route to other markets. This paper addresses both the pro's and cons' of this new regulation on both the pipeline and gas producing companies.

  3. Gas Turbine Emissions 

    E-print Network

    Frederick, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    GAS TURBINE EMISSIONS JESSE D. FREDERICK Sr. Environmental Engineer Destec Energy Houston, Texas ABSTRACT Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities...

  4. Natural Gas: Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2008)

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    This special report Web-based product presents a chronology of some of the key federal legislative and regulatory actions that have helped shape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives from 1978 to October 2008. Separate reports provide brief descriptions of specific legislation, regulations, or policies, and their impacts on the natural gas market.

  5. An integrated study of nutrient leaching and greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient leaching and greenhouse gas emission are two of the primary environmental impacts of crop production. These processes have been studied at great length separately, but few integrated studies of leaching and greenhouse gas emission have been conducted. We measured nutrient leaching and green...

  6. COMMERCIAL UTILITY FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the current status of commercial flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes applied to coal-fired utility boilers in the U.S. Major objectives of the work were to examine the impacts of the 1979 New Source Performance Standards on FGD system design and operati...

  7. Low emissions combustor development for an industrial gas turbine to utilize LCV fuel gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. Kelsall; M. A. Smith; M. F. Cannon

    1994-01-01

    Advanced coal-based power generation systems such as the British Coal Topping Cycle offer the potential for high-efficiency electricity generation with minimum environmental impact. An important component of the Topping cycle program is the gas turbine, for which development of a combustion system to burn low calorific value coal derived fuel gas, at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,260 C (2,300

  8. Contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds to the carcinogenic impact of flue gas condensate from coal-fired residential furnaces evaluated by implantation into the rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmer, G.; Brune, H.; Deutsch-Wenzel, R.; Dettbarn, G.; Misfeld, J.

    1987-05-01

    For identification of the substances chiefly responsible for the carcinogenic action of the emission condensate from coal-fired residential furnaces, the implantation method was used as a carcinogen-specific bioassay for comparison of the carcinogenic effect of various fractions with that of a total sample of flue gas condensate tested in 2 or 3 different doses. After implantation into the lungs of Osborne-Mendel rats, the condensate from coal-fired residential furnaces, a fraction containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and thiaarenes (sulfur-containing polycyclic aromatic compounds (S-PACs)) with 4-7 rings, as well as fraction containing more polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and PAHs with higher molecular weight, induced lung carcinomas and sarcomas. According to probit analysis, the fraction containing PAHs plus S-PACs with 4-7 rings accounted for about 68.2% of the total carcinogenicity of flue gas condensate, whereas the fraction containing more polar PACs and higher PAHs accounted for about 54.6%. All other fractions, such as nonaromatic compounds and PACs with 2 and 3 rings, constituting about 70% of the weight of the total condensate, seemed not to be carcinogenic. Only 1.4% of the total carcinogenicity of the flue gas condensate was found to be attributable to the amount of benzo(a)pyrene (CAS: 50-32-8) present in the condensate (1.14 mg/g condensate). The contribution of more than 100% of both active fractions to the total carcinogenicity (68.2 and 54.6%) may suggest an interrelation of the fractions.

  9. Impact of N{sub 2} and forming gas plasma exposure on the growth and interfacial characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Xiaoye; Dong, Hong; Brennan, Barry; Azacatl, Angelica; Kim, Jiyoung; Wallace, Robert M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-11-25

    The interface and atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the annealed, N{sub 2} plasma and forming gas (N{sub 2}:H{sub 2}) exposed Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N surface was studied using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. Exposure of the Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N surface to the plasma treatments is able to remove spurious carbon, and readily facilitate uniform ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nucleation.

  10. Mobile Measurements of Gas and Particle Emissions from Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Goetz, J. D.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Fortner, E.; Wormhoudt, J.; Knighton, W. B.; Herndon, S.; Kolb, C. E.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Production of natural gas in the Marcellus shale is increasing rapidly due to the vast quantities of natural gas stored in the formation. Transient and long-term activities have associated emissions to the atmosphere of methane, volatile organic compounds, NOx, particulates and other species from gas production and transport infrastructure. In the summer of 2012, a team of researchers from Drexel University and Aerodyne Research deployed the Aerodyne mobile laboratory (AML) and measured in-situ concentrations of gas-phase and aerosol chemical components in the main gas producing regions of Pennsylvania, with the overall goal of understanding the impacts to regional ozone and particulate matter (PM) concentrations. State-of-the-art instruments including quantum cascade laser systems, proton transfer mass spectrometry, tunable diode lasers and a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer, were used quantify concentrations of pollutants of interest. Chemical species measured include methane, ethane, NO, NO2, CO, CO2, SO2, and many volatile organic compounds, and aerosol size and chemical composition. Tracer-release techniques were employed to link sources with emissions and to quantify emission rates from gas facilities, in order to understand the regional burden of these chemical species from oil and gas development in the Marcellus. Measurements were conducted in two regions of Pennsylvania: the NE region that is predominantly dry gas (95% + methane), and the SW region where wet gas (containing greater than 5% higher hydrocarbons) is found. Regional scale measurements of current levels of air pollutants will be shown and will put into context how further development of the gas resource in one of the largest natural gas fields in the world impacts air quality in a region upwind of the highly urbanized east coast corridor.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Pipeline Deformation Caused by Rockfall Impact

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zheng; Han, Chuanjun

    2014-01-01

    Rockfall impact is one of the fatal hazards in pipeline transportation of oil and gas. The deformation of oil and gas pipeline caused by rockfall impact was investigated using the finite element method in this paper. Pipeline deformations under radial impact, longitudinal inclined impact, transverse inclined impact, and lateral eccentric impact of spherical and cube rockfalls were discussed, respectively. The effects of impact angle and eccentricity on the plastic strain of pipeline were analyzed. The results show that the crater depth on pipeline caused by spherical rockfall impact is deeper than by cube rockfall impact with the same volume. In the inclined impact condition, the maximum plastic strain of crater caused by spherical rockfall impact appears when incidence angle ? is 45°. The pipeline is prone to rupture under the cube rockfall impact when ? is small. The plastic strain distribution of impact crater is more uneven with the increasing of impact angle. In the eccentric impact condition, plastic strain zone of pipeline decreases with the increasing of eccentricity k. PMID:24959599

  12. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  13. Gas-flow restrictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastien, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    Gas flow restrictor is described, consisting of predetermined length and size of capillary tubing to control flow rate of carrier gas into gas chromatograph of flow rate of sample gas into mass spectrometer inlet system. Length and inner diameter of capillary tubing was estimated with mathematical expressions for viscous flow.

  14. The rare gas excimers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. McCusker

    In this chapter three types of excimer lasers will be discussed. These are the pure noble gas excimers, the rare gas oxides and the diatomic halogens. The closely related rare gas halide systems are examined in Chap. 4. The historical development of the noble gas excimer laser systems has already been discussed in Chap. 1, while the details of the

  15. Mallik Gas Hydrate Sample

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sample of gas hydrates collected from Mallik, Canada. Gas hydrates are naturally-occurring “ice-like” combinations of natural gas and water that have the potential to provide an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions....

  16. Gas Hydrates Burning

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    An image of gas hydrates burning. Gas hydrates are naturally-occurring “ice-like” combinations of natural gas and water that have the potential to provide an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions....

  17. Nano-high-performance liquid chromatography–electron ionization mass spectrometry approach for environmental analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Achille Cappiello; Giorgio Famiglini; Filippo Mangani; Pierangela Palma; Antonella Siviero

    2003-01-01

    We describe a method, based on a new nano-HPLC gradient generator coupled to a modified direct electron ionization (EI) LC–MS interface, for the analysis of several compounds of environmental interest. The gradient generator was installed on a conventional HPLC system and the nano-flow rate was achieved using a double splitter. Reproducible gradients of different shapes (i.e. linear, convex, concave) can

  18. Economic impact

    SciTech Connect

    Technology Transfer Department

    2001-06-01

    In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.

  19. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  20. Fuel Interchangeability Considerations for Gas Turbine Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, D.H.

    2007-10-01

    In recent years domestic natural gas has experienced a considerable growth in demand particularly in the power generation industry. However, the desire for energy security, lower fuel costs and a reduction in carbon emissions has produced an increase in demand for alternative fuel sources. Current strategies for reducing the environmental impact of natural gas combustion in gas turbine engines used for power generation experience such hurdles as flashback, lean blow-off and combustion dynamics. These issues will continue as turbines are presented with coal syngas, gasified coal, biomass, LNG and high hydrogen content fuels. As it may be impractical to physically test a given turbine on all of the possible fuel blends it may experience over its life cycle, the need to predict fuel interchangeability becomes imperative. This study considers a number of historical parameters typically used to determine fuel interchangeability. Also addressed is the need for improved reaction mechanisms capable of accurately modeling the combustion of natural gas alternatives.

  1. Potential Flue Gas Impurities in Carbon Dioxide Streams Separated from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joo-Youp Lee; Tim C. Keener; Y. Jeffery Yang; Prabhakar Sharma; Tjalfe Poulsen; Prasad Kalluri; Steven Hoff; Dwaine Bundy; Minda Nelson; Brian Zelle; Larry Jacobson; Albert Heber; Jiqin Ni; Yuanhui Zhang; Jacek Koziel; David Beasley; Robert Joumard; Juhani Laurikko; Tuan Han; Savas Geivanidis; Zissis Samaras; Tama´s tei; Philippe Devaux; Jean-Marc Andre´; Ste´phanie Lacour; Erwin Cornelis; Victor Chang; Lynn Hildemann; Cheng-hisn Chang; Sheng-Wei Wang; Xiaogang Tang; Zhi-Hua Fan; Xiangmei Wu; Paul Lioy; Panos Georgopoulos; Augustine Quek; Rajasekhar Balasubramanian; Yi-Chi Chen; Lu-Yen Chen; Fu-Tien Jeng

    2009-01-01

    For geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This study estimated the flue gas impurities to be included in the CO2 stream separated from a CO2 control

  2. Operational, technological and economic drivers for convergence of the electric power and gas industries

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, H.R.

    1997-05-01

    The economically recoverable natural gas resource base continues to grow as a result of exploration and production technology advances, and improvements in gas storage and delivery. As a result, the convergence of the electric power and gas industries and the parallel development of distributed generation will benefit consumers and minimize environmental impacts cost-effectively.

  3. Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts

    E-print Network

    Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

    2008-01-01

    This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn stover, and switchgrass. A life-cycle assessment approach ...

  4. Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?

    E-print Network

    Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton Jr; Fracking; Water-quality stressor; Ecological risk assessment Introduction The world's energy marketplace) operations targeting shale gas (and oil) formations, coupled with mounting health, environme

  5. Human Impact

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Collection of nine classroom activities that focus on human impact on the environment. Topics include: oil spills; oil consumption; oil tanker size; greenhouse effect; salt water incursion; ozone hole and its affect on the food web; and zebra mussels. Each activity provides list of materials needed, background information, and procedure.

  6. Impact Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stronge, W. J.

    2004-03-01

    Impact mechanics is concerned with the reaction forces that develop during a collision and the dynamic response of structures to these reaction forces. The subject has a wide range of engineering applications, from designing sports equipment to improving the crashworthiness of automobiles. This book develops several different methodologies for analysing collisions between structures. These range from rigid body theory for structures that are stiff and compact, to vibration and wave analyses for flexible structures. The emphasis is on low-speed impact where damage is local to the small region of contact between the colliding bodies. The analytical methods presented give results that are more robust or less sensitive to initial conditions than have been achieved hitherto. As a text, Impact Mechanics builds upon foundation courses in dynamics and strength of materials. It includes numerous industrially relevant examples and end-of-chapter homework problems drawn from industry and sports. Practising engineers will also find the methods presented in this book useful in calculating the response of a mechanical system to impact.

  7. A Mathematical Model of Coupled Gas Flow and Coal Deformation with Gas Diffusion and Klinkenberg Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingquan; Cheng, Yuanping; Zhou, Hongxing; Guo, Pinkun; An, Fenghua; Chen, Haidong

    2015-05-01

    The influence of gas diffusion behavior on gas flow and permeability evolution in coal seams is evaluated in this paper. Coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs differ from conventional porous media and fractured gas reservoirs due to certain unique features, which lead to two distinct gas pressures: one in fractures and the other in the coal matrix. The latter pressure, also known as the sorption pressure, will be used in calculating sorption-based volume changes. The effective stress laws for single-porosity media is not suitable for CBM reservoirs, and the effective stress laws for multi-porosity media need to be applied. The realization of the above two points is based on the study of the two-phase state of gas migration (involving Fickian diffusion and Darcy flow) in a coal seam. Then, a general porosity and permeability model based on the P-M model is proposed to fit this phenomenon. Moreover, the Klinkenberg effect has been taken into account and set as a reference object. Finally, a coupled gas flow and coal deformation model is proposed and solved by using a finite element method. The numerical results indicate that the effects of gas diffusion behavior and Klinkenberg behavior can have a critical influence on the gas pressure, residual gas content, and permeability evolution during the entire methane degasification period, and the impacts of the two effects are of the same order of magnitude. Without considering the gas diffusion effect, the gas pressure and residual gas content will be underestimated, and the permeability will be overestimated.

  8. Impressive Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Impressive Impact (QTVR)

    This stunning image features the heat shield impact site of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. This is an approximately true-color mosaic of panoramic camera images taken through the camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

    The mosaic was acquired on Opportunity's sol 330 (Dec. 28, 2004), shortly after Opportunity arrived to investigate the site where its heat shield hit the ground south of 'Endurance Crater' on Jan. 24, 2004. On the left, the main heat shield piece is inverted and reveals its metallic insulation layer, glinting in the sunlight. The main piece stands about 1 meter tall (about 3.3 feet) and about 13 meters (about 43 feet) from the rover.

    The other large, flat piece of debris near the center of the image is about 14 meters (about 46 feet) away. The circular feature on the right side of the image is the crater made by the heat shield's impact. It is about 2.8 meters (9.2 feet) in diameter but only about 5 to 10 centimeters (about 2 to 4 inches) deep. The crater is about 6 meters (about 20 feet) from Opportunity in this view. Smaller fragments and debris can be seen all around the impact site.

    The impact excavated a large amount of reddish subsurface material. Darker materials cover part of the crater's flat floor and have formed a streak or jet of material pointing toward the two largest heat shield fragments.

  9. Cd{sup 2+}/NH{sub 3}-treatment of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2}: Impact on the properties of ZnO layers deposited by the ion layer gas reaction method

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.; Bloeck, U.; Muffler, H.-J.; Lux-Steiner, M. C.; Fischer, Ch.-H.; Giersig, M.; Niesen, T.P.; Karg, F. [Hahn-Meitner Institut Berlin, Solarenergieforschung SE2, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (CAESAR), Nanoparticle Technology, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Shell Solar GmbH, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2}- (''CIGSSe'') based solar cells with a ZnO layer deposited by the ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) method yield superior efficiencies (15.0%) than the references with a chemical bath-deposited CdS buffer (14.1%). However, this high performance is only reached if the absorber is pretreated in a Cd{sup 2+}- and aqueous ammonia-containing bath prior to the ILGAR-ZnO deposition. The photovoltaic as well as the dark device parameters are strongly influenced by this treatment. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as x-ray diffraction measurements reveal a different morphology and structure of ILGAR-ZnO layers on top of Cd{sup 2+}/NH{sub 3}-treated and on as-deposited absorbers, indicating a considerably modified absorber surface. By energy dispersive x-ray analysis in the TEM, Cd could only be identified at the ILGAR-ZnO/Cd{sup 2+}/NH{sub 3}-treated-CIGSSe interface of the respective cross sections, if the absorber was treated in a bath with an atypically high Cd{sup 2+}-concentration. In this case a Cd-containing thin layer between ZnO and CIGSSe was observed in TEM images.

  10. Utah coalbed gas exploration poised for growth

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1996-08-05

    Coalbed methane production in eastern Utah is growing despite a relaxed pace of exploratory drilling. Leasing has been active the past 2 years, but a delay in issuance of a federal environmental impact statement could retard drilling. Only 19 new wells began producing coalbed gas during 1995, but gas production increased from existing wells as dewatering progressed. The US Bureau of Land Management will allow limited exploration but no field development on federal lands until the EIS is completed, possibly as early as this month. The paper discusses production of coalbed methane in Utah.

  11. Review of impact experiments on the critical ionization velocity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Brenning

    1982-01-01

    Experiments in which a highly ionized plasma impacts on a neutral gas cloud are reviewed. Critical ionization velocity interaction is observed only when the magnetic field, and the neutral gas density, are above certain limits. The values of these limits, however, differ between the experiments. The extrapolation of the laboratory results to space applications is discussed.

  12. Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy technologies identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but a recent report by Berkeley Lab evaluates one such benefit in detail: by displacing gas-fired electricity generation, RE reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE. The Berkeley Lab report summarizes recent modeling studies that have evaluated the impact of RE deployment on gas prices, reviews the reasonableness of the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model.

  13. Flood Impacts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Flooding causes more deaths and damage than any other hydro meteorological phenomena. The Weather Service provides statistics on flood-related impacts: flood fatalities by year from present to 1903; flood damage, including kinds and value of damage, annually from present to l903. Other features include: reports of current flood watches and warnings, outlooks for impending flooding, hydrologic conditions, and links to climate information and Weather Service offices.

  14. Young Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    27 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small, relatively young impact crater in the Xanthe Terra region of Mars. Boulders can be seen in the crater ejecta deposit.

    Location near: 2.3oN, 57.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  15. Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, M.; Haas, M.; Pepper, W.; Rose, J.

    1993-12-31

    Recent dramatic changes in natural gas markets have significant implications for the scope and direction of DOE`s upstream as well as downstream natural gas R&D. Open access transportation changes the way gas is bought and sold. The end of the gas deliverability surplus requires increased reserve development above recent levels. Increased gas demand for power generation and other new uses changes the overall demand picture in terms of volumes, locations and seasonality. DOE`s Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that its R&D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced gas. Potential R&D projects are to be evaluated using a full fuel cycle, benefit-cost approach to estimate likely market impact as well as technical success. To assure R&D projects are evaluated on a comparable basis, METC has undertaken the development of a comprehensive natural gas technology evaluation framework. Existing energy systems models lack the level of detail required to estimate the impact of specific upstream natural gas technologies across the known range of geological settings and likely market conditions. Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM) research during FY 1993 developed and implemented this comprehensive, consistent natural gas system evaluation framework. Rather than a isolated research activity, however, GSAM represents the integration of many prior and ongoing natural gas research efforts. When complete, it will incorporate the most current resource base description, reservoir modeling, technology characterization and other geologic and engineering aspects developed through recent METC and industry gas R&D programs.

  16. Fiber optic gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  17. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  18. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  19. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  20. Fuel gas from biodigestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, R. C.; Wolverton, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    Biodigestion apparatus produces fuel gas (primarily methane) for domestic consumption, by anaerobic bacterial digestion of organic matter such as aquatic vegetation. System includes 3,786-1 cylindrical container, mechanical agitator, and simple safe gas collector for short term storage.

  1. Natural Gas Flare

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A natural gas flare. Sometimes, often due to lack of transportation or storage capacity, natural gas that is co-produced with oil will be burned in a flare. This wellpad is in the Tuscaloosa Marine Shale....

  2. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  3. High Power Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelig, W.

    1984-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the trends in the development of high power gas lasers for industrial applications. The properties of laser media, problems of beam quality, and short wavelength performance of high power gas lasers are considered.

  4. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  5. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  6. Overview of gas distribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a concise overview of the nature of a natural gas distribution utility. To this end, gas distribution'' is defined, then the functions performed while distributing natural gas are discussed. Topics presented include: franchise; planning (layouts, load estimation, sizing, system supply points, and storage considerations); design (codes\\/standards, materials, corrosion mitigation considerations, valves and

  7. Gas scrubber system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Gore; D. J. Cole

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a gas scrubber system. It comprises: a work area containing air to be cleaned; a gas scrubber member mounted adjacent to the work area, and having an inlet communicating with and receiving air from the work area, the gas scrubber member further having an outlet located downstream from the inlet; a source of liquid communicating with the

  8. MUNICIPAL LANDFILL GAS CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    New regulations relative to air emissions from municipal landfills may require the installation of gas collection systems at landfills. As landfill gas (LFG) is collected, water and other vapors in the gas condense in the system or are purposely removed in the normal treatment of...

  9. LATTICE GAS SUPERFLUID

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEFFREY YEPEZ

    A quantum computer, with controlled decoherence, constructed out of a lattice based array of qubits undergoing a particular local and unitary evolution is eectively a bose condensate. Presented is a coupled lattice gas system, a quantum lattice gas and a classical lattice gas in mutual contact through \\\\external\\

  10. Treatment of Gas

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alcohol may impair intestinal digestion so that more food is available for gas production. Certain proteins may enhance the odor of gas. ... your diet (time of day and description of foods eaten and drinks ingested, and ... increased gas production or what may effect odor. Doctors may tell ...

  11. Gas discharge lasers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. E. Novik

    1982-01-01

    Gas discharge lasers are discussed with reference to the theoretical principles underlying their operation, costruction and design, performance characteristics, fabrication, and applications. The types of gas discharge lasers considered include lasers operating at atomic and molecular transitions, ion lasers, and pulsed gas discharge lasers. Particular attention is given to the most widely used types of lasers, such as He-Ne, argon-ion,

  12. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  13. Natural Gas Annual 1996

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    _Natural Gas Annual_ provides information on the "supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States." It contains State level data for production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price of natural gas. Historical data at the national level are available from the 1930's.

  14. Gas lift system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bobo

    1987-01-01

    A gas lift method for lifting fluid from a borehole to the surface is described comprising the steps of: mixing at the surface a pressurized injection gas with a pressurized injection liquid without any foaming substance to form a gas-liquid pressurized non-foam mixture at a predetermined pressure less than the pressure at the bottom of the borehole, introducing the pressurized

  15. GASCAP: Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model documentation, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model (GASCAP) has been developed by EIA to provide a historical analysis of the monthly productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead and a projection of monthly capacity for 2 years into the future. The impact of drilling, oil and gas price assumptions, and demand on gas productive capacity are examined. Both gas-well gas and oil-well gas are included. Oil-well gas productive capacity is estimated separately and then combined with the gas-well gas productive capacity. This documentation report provides a general overview of the GASCAP Model, describes the underlying data base, provides technical descriptions of the component models, diagrams the system and subsystem flow, describes the equations, and provides definitions and sources of all variables used in the system. This documentation report is provided to enable users of EIA projections generated by GASCAP to understand the underlying procedures used and to replicate the models and solutions. This report should be of particular interest to those in the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas.

  16. Preparing for the Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    On July 4, 2005, the NASA Deep Impact spacecraft will visit Comet 9P/Tempel 1. It will launch a 360 kg impactor that should produce a crater on the surface of the comet and a plume of gas and dust. This experiment will be the first opportunity to study the crust and the interior of a comet. As the material inside the comet's nucleus is pristine, it will reveal new information on the early phases of the Solar System. It will also provide scientists with new insight on crater physics, and thereby give a better understanding on the crater record on comets and other bodies in the Solar System. The scientific outcome of the experiment depends crucially on pre-impact and follow-up observations. Before the impact, it is indeed necessary to accumulate a significant amount of data so as to fully characterise the comet, in terms of size, albedo (reflectivity), rotation period, etc. It is also essential to have a good baseline of observations before the impact to unambiguously discriminate the effects of the impact from the natural activity of the comet. Due to the currently limited understanding of the structure of these dirty snowballs - which is a rather precise definition of a comet - it is indeed far from clear what the effect of the impact will be. Although the most likely model predicts the ejection of a plume and a football stadium sized crater, other model predictions vary between the comet simply swallowing the impactor (with barely any visible effect) to the eventual break-up of the nucleus. As part of a very large international collaboration, two teams of astronomers have used ESO's telescopes over several months to do pre-impact monitoring, taking images and spectra of the comet both in the visible and mid-infrared wavebands. These teams make observations typically once per month, using either the 3.6m or the 3.5m NTT telescopes at La Silla. ESO PR Photo 17/05 shows the latest of these monitoring images. Obtained during the night of May 4 to 5 with the EMMI instrument on the New Technology Telescope (NTT), it shows the comet, 100 million kilometres away from Earth. The coma extends more than 30 thousand kilometres from the comet nucleus, which is a 5 km diameter snowball hidden in the central bright core of the coma. Getting Ready ESO will also actively participate in the post-impact observations. As soon as Comet 9P/Tempel 1 is visible after the impact from Chile, and for a whole week thereafter, all major ESO telescopes - i.e. the four Unit Telescopes of the Very Large Telescope Array at Paranal, as well as the 3.6m, 3.5m NTT and the 2.2m ESO/MPG telescopes at La Silla - will be observing Comet 9P/Tempel 1, in a coordinated fashion and in very close collaboration with the space mission' scientific team. Among all observatories, the ESO La Silla Paranal Observatory will thus provide the best coverage of this one of its kind event. The series of observations will provide unique clues to several questions related to comets. One will study in detail the chemical composition of the gas in the comet's coma, looking for fresh material from the nucleus' interior ejected during the impact. The careful study of this pristine material will provide important clues to trace the origins of comets, and so, on the formation of the solar system. The other series of observations will focus on the dust and boulders that should be released during the impact, thereby characterising the structure and composition of the nucleus. Astronomers should then finally know what these "dirty snowballs" are really made of. First images by ESO telescopes will be obtained shortly after midnight - European time - on the night of July 4 to 5 and will be directly made available to the media. A media conference centre will also be installed at ESO Garching, Germany, with direct links to ESO's observatories, on July 4 and 5. An invitation for the media will be issued in due time. A dedicated web site, http://deepimpact.eso.org, will provide up-to-date information on the observing programmes, on the impact and on the live coverage of the observati

  17. Repeatability and uncertainty analyses of light gas gun test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Cooper, David

    1994-01-01

    All large spacecraft are susceptible to high-speed impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbiting space debris which can damage flight-critical systems and in turn lead to catastrophic failure. One way to obtain information on the response of a structure to a meteoroid impact or an orbital debris impact is to simulate the impact conditions of interest in the laboratory and analyze the resulting damage to a target structure. As part of the Phase B and C/D development activities for the Space Station Freedom, 950 impact tests were performed using the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) light gas gun from 1985-1991. This paper presents the results of impact phenomena repeatability and data uncertainty studies performed using the information obtained from those tests. The results of these studies can be used to assess the utility of individual current and future NASA/MSFC impact test results in the design of long-duration spacecraft.

  18. Blade erosion in automotive gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Metwally, M.; Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics

    1995-01-01

    In this work, a study has been conducted to predict blade erosion and surface deterioration of the free power turbine of an automotive gas turbine engine. The blade material erosion model is based on three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations in the three-dimensional turbine flow field. The particle rebound characteristics after surface impacts were determined from experimental measurements of restitution ratios for blade material samples in a particulate flow tunnel. The trajectories provide the spatial distribution of the particle impact parameters over the blade surface. A semi-empirical erosion model, derived from erosion tests of material samples at different particulate flow conditions, is used in the prediction of blade surface erosion based on the trajectory impact data. The results are presented for the three-dimensional particle trajectories through the turbine blade passages, the particle impact locations, blade surface erosion pattern, and the associated erosion parameters. These parameters include impact velocity, impact angle, and impact frequency. the data can be used for life prediction and performance deterioration of the automotive engine under investigation.

  19. Multiscale development of a fission gas thermal conductivity model: Coupling atomic, meso and continuum level simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, Michael R.; Millett, Paul C.; Nerikar, Pankaj; Du, Shiyu; Andersson, David; Stanek, Christopher R.; Gaston, Derek; Andrs, David; Williamson, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact the fuel performance, causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity and fission gas release. However, typical empirical models of fuel properties treat each of these effects separately and uncoupled. Here, we couple a fission gas release model to a model of the impact of fission gas on the fuel thermal conductivity. To quantify the specific impact of grain boundary (GB) bubbles on the thermal conductivity, we use atomistic and mesoscale simulations. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were employed to determine the GB thermal resistance. These values were then used in mesoscale heat conduction simulations to develop a mechanistic expression for the effective GB thermal resistance of a GB containing gas bubbles, as a function of the percentage of the GB covered by fission gas. The coupled fission gas release and thermal conductivity model was implemented in Idaho National Laboratory's BISON fuel performance code to model the behavior of a 10-pellet LWR fuel rodlet, showing how the fission gas impacts the UO2 thermal conductivity. Furthermore, additional BISON simulations were conducted to demonstrate the impact of average grain size on both the fuel thermal conductivity and the fission gas release.

  20. Some consequences of meteoroid impacts on Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Fechtig, H.; Gruen, E.; Goertz, C. K.

    1983-09-01

    It is noted in the present discussion of high velocity interplanetary meteoroid impacts on the rings of Saturn that the neutral gas emitted by impact vaporization may be substantially responsible for the observed neutral ring atmosphere. The predicted neutral gas injection rate and the gas temperature are compatible with previous measurements. Heavy ejecta particles produce a particulate ring halo whose calculated physical properties make it appear identical with the tenuous particle population discussed by Baum and Kreidl (1982). An estimation of the erosion of Saturn's ring particles, the resulting mass balance, and regolith formation, provides constraints on surface properties and optical albedo.

  1. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the physical processes of impact cratering on planetary surfaces and atmospheres as well as collisions of finite-size self-gravitating objects is vitally important to planetary science. The observation has often been made that craters are the most ubiquitous landform on the solid planets and the satellites. The density of craters is used to date surfaces on planets and satellites. For large ringed basin craters (e.g. Chicxulub), the issue of identification of exactly what 'diameter' transient crater is associated with this structure is exemplified by the arguments of Sharpton et al. (1993) versus those of Hildebrand et al. (1995). The size of a transient crater, such as the K/T extinction crater at Yucatan, Mexico, which is thought to be the source of SO,-induced sulfuric acid aerosol that globally acidified surface waters as the result of massive vaporization of CASO, in the target rock, is addressed by our present project. The impact process excavates samples of planetary interiors. The degree to which this occurs (e.g. how deeply does excavation occur for a given crater diameter) has been of interest, both with regard to exposing mantle rocks in crater floors, as well as launching samples into space which become part of the terrestrial meteorite collection (e.g. lunar meteorites, SNC's from Mars). Only in the case of the Earth can we test calculations in the laboratory and field. Previous calculations predict, independent of diameter, that the depth of excavation, normalized by crater diameter, is d(sub ex)/D = 0.085 (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1993). For Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) fragments impacting Jupiter, predicted excavation depths of different gas-rich layers in the atmosphere, were much larger. The trajectory and fate of highly shocked material from a large impact on the Earth, such as the K/T bolide is of interest. Melosh et al. (1990) proposed that the condensed material from the impact upon reentering the Earth's atmosphere induced. radiative heating, and producing global firestorms. The observed reentry splash of the SL-9 impact-induced plumes that reimpact Jupiter (Boslough et al., 1994) supported Melosh's K/T model. The fate of early primitive planetary atmospheres during the latter stages of planetary accretion, resulting from impactors in the 100 to 103 km diameter require modeling, e.g. Newman et al. (1997). Ahrens (1990; 1993) and Chen and Ahrens (1997) found that upon delivery of most of the impact energy to the solid planet, very large ground motions arise, which couple sufficient kinetic energy to the atmosphere to cause substantial atmospheric escape. The trade-off of this model with that of Cameron (1997) who suggests that atmospheric blow-off occurs as a result of the massive impact-induced heating of the atmosphere and Pepin (1997) who uses this heating event to model differential hydrodynamic loss of lighter atmospheric gases, requires further research.

  2. Asteroid Impact

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Adventure Engineering,

    Through this earth science curricular unit, student teams are presented with the scenario that an asteroid will impact the Earth. In response, their challenge is to design the location and size of underground caverns to shelter the people from an uninhabitable Earth for one year. Driven by this adventure scenario, student teams 1) explore general and geological maps of their fictional state called Alabraska, 2) determine the area of their classroom to help determine the necessary cavern size, 3) learn about map scales, 4) test rocks, 5) identify important and not-so-important rock properties for underground caverns, and 6) choose a final location and size.

  3. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Im, Kwan H. (Lisle, IL); Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1985-01-01

    A process and apparatus for removing sulfur oxide from combustion gas to form Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and for reducing the harmful effects of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 on auxiliary heat exchangers in which a sodium compound is injected into the hot combustion gas forming liquid Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 in a gas-gas reaction and the resultant gas containing Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is cooled to below about 1150.degree. K. to form particles of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 prior to contact with at least one heat exchanger with the cooling being provided by the recycling of combustion gas from a cooled zone downstream from the introduction of the cooling gas.

  4. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  5. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

  6. Odorant loss in natural gas distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, E.A.; Pai, P.G.; Carducci, M.I. (Lab. Services, Dept. of Engineering Activity, Michigan Consolidated Gas Co., MI (US))

    1991-04-01

    The loss of odorant compounds (odor fading) was studied using flow reactors which simulated the typical operating conditions of a gas distribution system. A unique method was developed to simulate rust on the inside surface of the pipeline. The study indicated that odorant loss can be impacted by the following operating parameters: Pressure; Temperature; Velocity; Iron oxide compounds; Thickness of iron oxide layer in pipe.

  7. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Christian; Stadel, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    We studied the basic numerical aspects of giant impacts using Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH), which has been used in most of the prior studies conducted in this area (e.g., Benz, Canup). Our main goal was to modify the massive parallel, multi-stepping code GASOLINE widely used in cosmological simulations so that it can properly simulate the behavior of condensed materials such as granite or iron using the Tillotson equation of state. GASOLINE has been used to simulate hundreds of millions of particles for ideal gas physics so that using several millions of particles in condensed material simulations seems possible. In order to focus our attention of the numerical aspects of the problem we neglected the internal structure of the protoplanets and modelled them as homogenous (isothermal) granite spheres. For the energy balance we only considered PdV work and shock heating of the material during the impact (neglected cooling of the material). Starting at a low resolution of 2048 particles for the target and the impactor we run several simulations for different impact parameters and impact velocities and successfully reproduced the main features of the pioneering work of Benz from 1986. The impact sends a shock wave through both bodies heating the target and disrupting the remaining impactor. As in prior simulations material is ejected from the collision. How much, and whether it leaves the system or survives in an orbit for a longer time, depends on the initial conditions but also on resolution. Increasing the resolution (to 1.2x10? particles) results in both a much clearer shock wave and deformation of the bodies during the impact and a more compact and detailed "arm" like structure of the ejected material. Currently we are investigating some numerical issues we encountered and are implementing differentiated models, making one step closer to more realistic protoplanets in such giant impact simulations.

  8. Liquid/Gas Vortex Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid/gas separator vents gas from tank of liquid that contains gas randomly distributed in bubbles. Centrifugal force separates liquid and gas, forcing liquid out of vortex tube through venturi tube. Gas vented through exhaust port. When liquid detected in vent tube, exhaust port closed, and liquid/gas mixture in vent tube drawn back into tank through venturi.

  9. Impact Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This 24 minute planetarium show teaches about meteors, meteorites, asteroids, and comets. The show was created for fulldome theaters, but is also available on DVD to be shown in flat version for TVs and computer monitors, and can be freely viewed online. It shows the effects of the Chixulub and Tungusta events, plus the Pallasite impact that resulted in the Brenham meteorite fall, and describes ways that asteroid hunters seek new objects in the solar system, and how ground penetrating radar is used to find meteorites that have survived to the Earth's surface. Narrated by astronaut Tom Jones, it also discusses ways that humans might try to deflect an asteroid or comet that is on a collision course with Earth. The show was created for informal science venues (digital planetariums); it is also useful as supplemental material for middle school science. Impact Earth is available for free if presented directly from the Space Update site (widescreen or fisheye views linked from YouTube). Otherwise, a DVD of the show can be purchased for $10.

  10. Deep Impact

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Comets have fascinated humans for hundreds of years, and most recently with the idea of creating a "deep impact" upon a comet in order to study the interior composition and makeup of these bodies. With this scientific mission in mind, a team of researchers (including participants from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of Maryland) will send an impactor spacecraft into the Comet Tempel 1 on July 4th, 2005. The data collected from this fascinating experiment will help answer many questions about comets, and should be of interest to research scientists and the general public alike. The site itself contains quite a few helpful sections, including one dedicated to explaining the science behind studying comets. A technology section offers detailed explanations behind much of the flight system, the launch vehicle, and the various instruments on board. The gallery section has some nice animations that show how the mission will encounter and impact Comet Tempel 1. Overall, this is very engaging and well thought out site that explains this mission in jargon-free language.

  11. Robustness of trans-European gas networks.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Rui; Buzna, Lubos; Bono, Flavio; Gutiérrez, Eugenio; Just, Wolfram; Arrowsmith, David

    2009-07-01

    Here, we uncover the load and fault-tolerant backbones of the trans-European gas pipeline network. Combining topological data with information on intercountry flows, we estimate the global load of the network and its tolerance to failures. To do this, we apply two complementary methods generalized from the betweenness centrality and the maximum flow. We find that the gas pipeline network has grown to satisfy a dual purpose. On one hand, the major pipelines are crossed by a large number of shortest paths thereby increasing the efficiency of the network; on the other hand, a nonoperational pipeline causes only a minimal impact on network capacity, implying that the network is error tolerant. These findings suggest that the trans-European gas pipeline network is robust, i.e., error tolerant to failures of high load links. PMID:19658773

  12. Seismic imaging of gas hydrate reservoir heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun-Wei

    Natural gas hydrate, a type of inclusion compound or clathrate, are composed of gas molecules trapped within a cage of water molecules. The presence of gas hydrate has been confirmed by core samples recovered from boreholes. Interests in the distribution of natural gas hydrate stem from its potential as a future energy source, geohazard to drilling activities and their possible impact on climate change. However the current geophysical investigations of gas hydrate reservoirs are still too limited to fully resolve the location and the total amount of gas hydrate due to its complex nature of distribution. The goal of this thesis is twofold, i.e., to model (1) the heterogeneous gas hydrate reservoirs and (2) seismic wave propagation in the presence of heterogeneities in order to address the fundamental questions: where are the location and occurrence of gas hydrate and how much is stored in the sediments. Seismic scattering studies predict that certain heterogeneity scales and velocity contrasts will generate strong scattering and wave mode conversion. Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) techniques can be used to calibrate seismic characterization of gas hydrate expressions on surface seismograms. To further explore the potential of VSP in detecting the heterogeneities, a wave equation based approach for P- and S-wave separation is developed. Tests on synthetic data as well as applications to field data suggest alternative acquisition geometries for VSP to enable wave mode separation. A new reservoir modeling technique based on random medium theory is developed to construct heterogeneous multi-variable models that mimic heterogeneities of hydrate-bearing sediments at the level of detail provided by borehole logging data. Using this new technique, I modeled the density, and P- and S-wave velocities in combination with a modified Biot-Gassmann theory and provided a first order estimate of the in situ volume of gas hydrate near the Mallik 5L-38 borehole. Our results suggest a range of 528 to 768x10 6 m3/km2 of natural gas trapped within hydrate, nearly an order of magnitude lower than earlier estimates which excluded effects of small-scale heterogeneities. Further, the petrophysical models are combined with a 3-D Finite Difference method to study seismic attenuation. Thus a framework is built to further tune the models of gas hydrate reservoirs with constraints from well logs other disciplinary data.

  13. Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-09-30

    This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

  14. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  15. Methodology for estimating volumes of flared and vented natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, T.R.; Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The common perception in the United States that natural gas produced with oil is a valuable commodity probably dates from the 1940's. Before that time, most operators regarded natural gas associated with or dissolved in oil as a nuisance. Indeed, most associated/dissolved natural gas produced in the United States before World War II probably was flared or vented to the atmosphere. This situation has changed in the United States, where flaring and venting have decreased dramatically in recent years, in part because of environmental concerns, but also because of the changing view of the value of natural gas. The idea that gas is a nuisance is beginning to change almost everywhere, as markets for gas have developed in Europe, Japan, and elsewhere, and as operators have increasingly utilized or reinjected associated-dissolved gas in their oil-production activities. Nevertheless, in some areas natural gas continues to be flared or vented to the atmosphere. Gas flares in Russia, the Niger Delta, and the Middle East are some of the brightest lights on the nighttime Earth. As we increasingly consider the global availability and utility of natural gas, and the environmental impacts of the consumption of carbon-based fuels, it is important to know how much gas has been flared or vented, how much gas is currently being flared or vented, and the distribution of flaring or venting through time. Unfortunately, estimates of the volumes of flared and vented gas are generally not available. Despite the inconsistency and inavailability of data, the extrapolation method outlined provides a reliable technique for estimating amounts of natural gas flared and vented through time. 36 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Numerical simulation of neutral gas release experiments in the ionosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Okuda; Edgar Y. Choueiri

    1994-01-01

    A two-and-one-half-dimensional electrostatic particle simulation model has been developed to study neutral gas release experiments into the ionosphere. The electrons are assumed guiding center particles, while the full dynamics of the ions (with real masses) are followed in time and space. Ionization processes of the neutral gas by charge exchange and electron impact are included by means of the Monte

  17. Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    This report responds to an August 2011 request from the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE\\/FE) for an analysis of "the impact of increased domestic natural gas demand, as exports." Appendix A provides a copy of the DOE\\/FE request letter. Specifically, DOE\\/FE asked the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to assess how specified scenarios of increased natural gas exports could affect domestic energy markets, focusing on consumption, production, and prices.

  18. The regional environmental impact of biomass production

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a broad overview of the potential environmental impacts of biomass energy from energy crops. The subject is complex because the environmental impact of using biomass for energy must be considered in the context of alternative energy options while the environmental impact of producing biomass from energy crops must be considered in the context of the alternative land-uses. Using biomass-derived energy can reduce greenhouse gas emissions or increase them; growing biomass energy crops can enhance soil fertility or degrade it. Without knowing the context of the biomass energy, one can say little about its specific environmental impacts. The primary focus of this paper is an evaluation of the environmental impacts of growing energy crops. I present an approach for quantitatively evaluating the potential environmental impact of growing energy crops at a regional scale that accounts for the environmental and economic context of the crops. However, to set the stage for this discussion, I begin by comparing the environmental advantages and disadvantages of biomass-derived energy relative to other energy alternatives such as coal, hydropower, nuclear power, oil/gasoline, natural gas and photovoltaics.

  19. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  20. Smokeless flare gas burner

    SciTech Connect

    Bozai, M.Z.

    1987-02-17

    A flare gas burner is described for combustible waste gas comprising: a waste gas delivery pipe; deflector means disposed externally about the upper end of the waste gas delivery pipe the deflector means approximating the shape of a half Venturi with the throat uppermost; an annular manifold disposed on the exterior of the lower end of the deflector means; means for supporting the deflector in fixed spaced apart relationship with the upper end of the waste gas delivery pipe; means for supplying high pressure motive fluid to the manifold; and means for discharging the motive fluid from the manifold into the passage defined by the interior of the deflector means and the exterior of the waste gas delivery pipe.