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Sample records for gas chromatography-electron-capture detection

  1. DETERMINATION OF ACRYLAMIDE IN RAT SERUM AND SCIATIC NERVE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTRON-CAPTURE DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified method for the derivatization and analysis of acrylamide as 2-bromopropenamide by gas chromatography/electron capture detection was validated in serum and sciatic nerve from rats. he method was accurate and precise over the concentration range of 2240 to 74700 ppm (w/v...

  2. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T. PMID:3379116

  3. Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christopher R.; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Giordano, Braden C.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can account for instrumentation losses, which makes it ideal for minimizing variability and quantitative trace chemical detection. Gas chromatography with an electron capture detector is an instrumentation configuration sensitive to nitro-energetics, such as TNT and RDX, due to their relatively high electron affinity. However, vapor quantitation of these compounds is difficult without viable vapor standards. Thus, we eliminate the requirement for vapor standards by combining the sensitivity of the instrumentation with a direct liquid deposition protocol to analyze trace explosive vapor samples. PMID:25145416

  4. [Analysis of organochlorine pesticides and pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables by gas chromatography-electron capture detection coupled with solid-phase extraction using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haixiang; Jia, Yanxia; Ding, Mingyu; Sun, Dajiang; Zhao, Mengbin

    2011-05-01

    A multi-residue analytical method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbent was developed. The determination of 6 organochlorine pesticides and 7 pyrethroid pesticides in vegetables (including cucumber, cherry tomato, cabbage, lettuce, purple cabbage, leek, shallot and onion) was carried out by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). The GC-ECD method used two columns (HP-50 and HP-1) and two ECD detectors. The HP-50 column was used for the analysis and the HP-1 column for validation. The clean-up conditions were optimized. The analytes were extracted by acetonitrile, and the extract was cleaned up by the MWCNTs SPE cartridge. The extract was re-dissolved by hexane, eluted with acetone-hexane (7:3, v/v) from the columns. The recoveries were over 70% for the 11 pesticides in the 13 pesticides. The results indicated that the MWCNTs SPE cartridge was efficient for 8 vegetable samples, because it reduced the contamination of the coloring materials to GC-ECD. The experimental results showed the MWCNTs SPE cartridge can adsorb the coloring materials and the eluant was nearly colorless. PMID:21847981

  5. Use of green coating (cork) in solid-phase microextraction for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in water by gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Dias, Adriana Neves; Simão, Vanessa; Merib, Josias; Carasek, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    A novel method for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in water samples with extraction using cork fiber and analysis by gas chromatography with electron capture detector was developed. Also, the procedure to extract these pesticides with DVB/Car/PDMS fiber was optimized. The optimization of the variables involved in the extraction of organochlorine pesticides using the aforementioned fibers was carried out by multivariate design. The optimum extraction conditions were sample temperature 75 °C, extraction time 60 min and sodium chloride concentration 10% for the cork fiber and sample temperature 50 °C and extraction time 60 min (without salt) for the DVB/Car/PDMS fiber. The quantification limits for the two fibers varied between 1.0 and 10.0 ng L(-1). The linear correlation coefficients were >0.98 for both fibers. The method applied with the use of the cork fiber provided recovery values between 60.3 and 112.7 and RSD≤25.5 (n=3). The extraction efficiency values for the cork and DVB/Car/PDMS fibers were similar. The results show that cork is a promising alternative as a coating for SPME. PMID:25618687

  6. Copper clean-up procedure for ultrasonic extraction and analysis of pyrethroid and phenylpyrazole pesticides in sediments by gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Lin, Youjian; Lu, Jian; Wilson, Chris

    2011-08-15

    A rapid ultrasonic extraction method coupled with a heated-copper clean-up procedure for removing interfering constituents was developed for analyzing pyrethroid and phenylpyrazole pesticides in sediments. Incubation of the 60 mL extract with 12 g copper granules at 60 °C for 2h was determined to be the optimal conditions for removing the interfering constituents. Eleven pyrethroid and phenylpyrazole pesticides were spiked into sediment samples to determine the effectiveness of the ultrasonic extraction method. The average recoveries of pyrethroids and phenylpyrazoles in sediment at 4 °C storage on day 0, 1, 7, 14, and 21 ranged from 98.6 to 120.0%, 79.2 to 116.0%, 85.0 to 119.7%, 93.6 to 118.7%, and 92.1 to 118.2%, respectively, with all percent relative standard deviations less than 10% (most <6%). This illustrated the stability of pyrethroids and phenylpyrazoles in sediment during sediment aging at 4 °C. Recoveries of the pesticides ranged from 98.6% to 120.0% for lowest fortification level (2-16 μg kg⁻¹), from 97.8% to 117.9% for middle fortification level (10-80 μg kg⁻¹), and from 94.3% to 118.1% for highest fortification level (20-160 μg kg⁻¹). Relative standard deviations of pesticide recoveries were usually less than 7%. Method detection limits of target pesticides ranged from 0.22 μg kg⁻¹ to 3.72 μg kg⁻¹. Furthermore, field sediment samples collected from four residential lakes during a three-month monitoring period were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of this method. Bifenthrin was detected in all of sediment samples (highest concentration 260.33±41.71 μg kg⁻¹, lowest concentration 5.68±0.38 μg kg⁻¹, and fipronil sulfone was detected at least once in sediment samples collected from three sites with concentrations ranging from 1.73±0.53 to 7.53±0.01 μg kg⁻¹. PMID:21684581

  7. Hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction followed by solid-phase microextraction and in situ derivatization for the determination of chlorophenols by gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Mohammad; Ghani, Milad

    2015-10-30

    A method based on the combination of hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography-electron capture detection was developed for the determination of chlorophenols in water and wastewater samples. Silica microstructures fabricated on the surface of a stainless steel wire were coated by an organic solvent and used as a SPME fiber. The analytes were extracted through a hollow fiber membrane containing n-decane from sample solution to an alkaline aqueous acceptor phase. They were then extracted and in situ derivatized on the SPME fiber using acetic anhydride. Experimental parameters such as the type of extraction solvent, acceptor phase NaOH concentration, donor phase HCl concentration, the amount of derivatizing reagent, salt concentration, stirring rate and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The precision of the method for the analytes at 0.02-30μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 7.1 to 10.2% (as intra-day relative standard deviation) and 6.4 to 9.8% (as inter-day relative standard deviation). The linear dynamic ranges were in the interval of 5-500μgL(-1), 0.05-5μgL(-1), 0.02-1μgL(-1) and 0.001-0.5μgL(-1) for 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol, respectively. The enrichment factors were between 432 and 785. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.0004-1.2μgL(-1). Tap water, well water and wastewater samples were also analyzed to evaluate the method capability for real sample analysis. PMID:26411480

  8. Suitability of magnetic particle immunoassay for the analysis of PBDEs in Hawaiian freshwater fish and crabs in comparison with gas chromatography/electron capture detection-ion trap mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gas chromatograph/electron capture detector-ion trap mass spectrometer (GC/ECD-ITMS) was used for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in freshwater fish and crabs. The samples were also analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). GC/ECD-ITMS results showed...

  9. Determination of acetanilide herbicides in cereal crops using accelerated solvent extraction, solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; Yang, Jun; Shi, Ronghua; Su, Qingde; Yao, Li; Li, Panpan

    2011-07-01

    A method was developed to determine eight acetanilide herbicides from cereal crops based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) analysis. During the ASE process, the effect of four parameters (temperature, static time, static cycles and solvent) on the extraction efficiency was considered and compared with shake-flask extraction method. After extraction with ASE, four SPE tubes (graphitic carbon black/primary secondary amine (GCB/PSA), GCB, Florisil and alumina-N) were assayed for comparison to obtain the best clean-up efficiency. The results show that GCB/PSA cartridge gave the best recoveries and cleanest chromatograms. The analytical process was validated by the analysis of spiked blank samples. Performance characteristics such as linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), precision and recovery were studied. At 0.05 mg/kg spiked level, recoveries and precision values for rice, wheat and maize were 82.3-115.8 and 1.1-13.6%, respectively. For all the herbicides, LOD and LOQ ranged from 0.8 to 1.7 μg/kg and from 2.4 to 5.3 μg/kg, respectively. The proposed analytical methodology was applied for the analysis of the targets in samples; only three herbicides, propyzamid, metolachlor and diflufenican, were detected in two samples. PMID:21656677

  10. An examination of pentafluorobenzoyl derivatization strategies for the analysis of fatty alcohols using gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Ford, David A

    2011-05-15

    Gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/ECNICI-MS) combined with pentafluorobenzoyl derivatization (PFBoyl) is frequently used for the sensitive detection of fatty alcohols (FOH). However, this derivatization technique suffers from a lack of established reaction protocols, time-consuming reactions, and the presence of reagent artifacts or unwanted derivatization by-products which can hinder analyte detection. Here, strategies are presented to reduce the problems associated with PFBoyl-derivatization, including (1) the optimization of reaction conditions (derivatization time and temperature) for a variety of PFBoyl-derivatized FOH, (2) an investigation of microwave-accelerated derivatization (MAD) as a rapid alternative heating mechanism for the PFBoyl-derivatization of FOH, and (3) an analysis of an alternative strategy employing a solvent extraction procedure post-derivatization to reduce the detrimental effects commonly associated with PFBoyl derivatization reagents. The optimal reaction conditions for the PFBoyl-derivatization of FOH were determined to be 60°C for 45 min. The investigation in MAD demonstrated the potential of obtaining comparable PFBoyl-derivatizations to those obtained using traditional heating methods, albeit in a reaction time of 3 min. An examination of several solvents for post-derivatization extraction revealed improved relative response factors in comparison to those obtained without solvent extraction. The best solvents for the PFBoyl-FOH extraction, dichloromethane and tert-butyl methyl ether, were also compared to the no solvent extraction samples with standard response curves and PFBoyl-derivatized FOH in Bligh-Dyer extracted rat plasma. PMID:21094100

  11. Determination of phenolic flame-retardants in human plasma using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-electron-capture mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, C; Janák, K; Lundanes, E; Becher, G

    2001-01-01

    A method for determination of phenolic flame-retardants in human plasma utilizing solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography with electron-capture mass spectrometric detection (GC-ECMS), has been developed. The plasma lipids were decomposed by application of concentrated sulphuric acid directly on the polystyrene-divinylbenzene SPE column. The method has been validated for 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TriBP), pentabromophenol (PeBP), tetrachlorobisphenol-A (TCBP-A) and tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A) in the concentration range 1.2-25, 0.4-40, 4-200 and 4-200 pg g(-1) plasma, respectively. The average absolute recovery of the analytes ranged from 51 to 85%. Tetrabromo-o-cresol and chlorotribromobisphenol-A were found suitable as internal standards, and the average recovery of the analytes relative to the internal standards was in the range 93-107%. The repeatability of the method was in the range 4-30% relative standard deviation. The estimated detection limits of TriBP, PeBP, TCBP-A and TBBP-A were 0.3, 0.4, 3.0 and 0.8 pg g(-1) plasma, respectively. The method has been used for analysis of plasma samples from potentially occupationally exposed human individuals. PMID:11204209

  12. Optimization of the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in human serum using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and reproducible method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) and acidified silica clean-up was developed for the measurement of 12 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), including BDE 209, and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl (BB 153) in human serum. Several solid-phase sorbents (Empore C(18), Isolute Phenyl, Isolute ENV+ and OASIS HLB) were tested and it was found that OASIStrade mark HLB (500 mg) gives the highest absolute recoveries (between 64% and 95%, R.S.D.<17%, n=3) for all tested analytes and internal standards. Removal of co-extracted biogenic materials was performed using a 6 ml disposable cartridge containing (from bottom to top) silica impregnated with sulphuric acid, activated silica and anhydrous sodium sulphate. PBDEs and BB 153 were quantified using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (MS) operated in electron-capture negative ionization mode. The method limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged between 0.2 and 25 pg/ml serum (0.1 and 4 ng/g lipid weight). LOQs were dependent on the analyte levels in procedural blanks which resulted in the highest LOQs for PBDE congeners found in higher concentrations in blanks (e.g. BDE 47, 99 and 209). The use of OASIS HLB SPE cartridge allowed a good method repeatability (within- and between-day precision<12% for all congeners, except for BDE 209<17%, n=3). The method was applied to serum samples from a random Belgian population. The obtained results were within the range of PBDE levels in other non-exposed population from Europe. PMID:16203180

  13. The determination of PCBs in Rocky Flats Type IV waste sludge by gas chromatography/electron capture detection. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, K.J.; Applegate, D.V.; Postlethwait, P.D.; Boparai, A.S.; Reedy, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    Before disposal, radioactive sludge (Type IV) from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) must be evaluated for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) content. The Type IV sludge consists of organic solvents, degreasers, cutting oils, and transuranic (TRU) waste mixed with calcium silicate (MicroCel E{reg_sign} and Oil Dri{reg_sign} to form a grease or paste-like material. For laboratory testing, a nonradioactive simulated Type 17V RFP sludge was prepared at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E). This sludge has a composition similar to that expected from field samples. In an earlier effort, a simplified method was developed for extraction, cleanup of extract, and determination of PCBs in samples of simulated sludge spiked with Aroclors 1254 and 1260. The simplified method has now been used to determine the presence and quantities of other Aroclors in the simulated sludge, namely, Aroclors 10 1 6, 1221, 1232, 1242, and 1248. The accuracy and precision of the data for these Aroclors were found to be similar to the data for sludges spiked with Aroclors 1254 and 1260. Since actual sludges may vary in composition, the method was also verified by analyzing another source of Type IV simulated sludge, prepared by Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W).

  14. Determination of PCBs in Rocky Flats Type IV waste sludge by gas chromatography/electron capture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, K.J.; Applegate, D.V.; Boparai, A.S.; Reedy, G.T.

    1993-12-01

    Type IV Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) radioactive sludge samples must be evaluated for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) content before disposal. The Type IV sludge consists of organic solvents, degreasers, cutting oils, and transuranic (TRU) waste mixed with calcium silicate (MicroCel E{reg_sign}) and Oil Dri{reg_sign} to form a grease or paste-like material. For laboratory studies a nonradioactive simulated Type IV RFP sludge was prepared having a composition similar to that expected from field samples. A simplified method was developed for extraction, purification and analysis of PCBs using samples of simulated sludge spiked with Aroclors 1254 and 1260 (reports provided to Argonne indicated Aroclors 1254 and 1260 as the most likely PCB contaminants in RFP sludge samples). The developed method was compared to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) accepted SW-846 method for analysis of PCBs (Method 8081). The accuracy and precision data were found to be similar for the two methods. The developed method was also tested with samples of simulated sludge spiked with Pu (in solid and solution forms). Reduction of radioactivity in final extract versus in the spike sample ranged from a factor of 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7}.

  15. A Novel Method for Profiling and Quantifying Short- and Medium-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins in Environmental Samples Using Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Negative Ionization High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dan; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui; Tian, Qichang; Huang, Huiting; Qiao, Lin

    2016-07-19

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are complex technical mixtures containing thousands of isomers. Analyzing CPs in environmental matrices is extremely challenging. CPs have broad, unresolved profiles when analyzed by one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC). Comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC) can separate CPs with a high degree of orthogonality. A novel method for simultaneously profiling and quantifying short- and medium-chain CPs, using GC×GC coupled with electron capture negative ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry, was developed. The method allowed 48 CP formula congener groups to be analyzed highly selectively in one injection through accurate mass measurements of the [M - Cl](-) ions in full scan mode. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) for the linear calibration curves for different chlorine contents were 0.982 for short-chain CPs and 0.945 for medium-chain CPs. The method was successfully used to determine CPs in sediment and fish samples. By using this method, with enhanced chromatographic separation and high mass resolution, interferences between CP congeners and other organohalogen compounds, such as toxaphene, are minimized. New compounds, with the formulas C9H14Cl6 and C9H13Cl7, were found in sediment and biological samples for the first time. The method was shown to be a powerful tool for the analysis of CPs in environmental samples. PMID:27183176

  16. Rapid determination of the isomeric truxillines in illicit cocaine via capillary gas chromatography/flame ionization detection and their use and implication in the determination of cocaine origin and trafficking routes.

    PubMed

    Mallette, Jennifer R; Casale, John F

    2014-10-17

    The isomeric truxillines are a group of minor alkaloids present in all illicit cocaine samples. The relative amount of truxillines in cocaine is indicative of the variety of coca used for cocaine processing, and thus, is useful in source determination. Previously, the determination of isomeric truxillines in cocaine was performed with a gas chromatography/electron capture detection method. However, due to the tedious sample preparation as well as the expense and maintenance required of electron capture detectors, the protocol was converted to a gas chromatography/flame-ionization detection method. Ten truxilline isomers (alpha-, beta-, delta-, epsilon-, gamma-, omega, zeta-, peri-, neo-, and epi-) were quantified relative to a structurally related internal standard, 4',4″-dimethyl-α-truxillic acid dimethyl ester. The method was shown to have a linear response from 0.001 to 1.00 mg/mL and a lower detection limit of 0.001 mg/mL. In this method, the truxillines are directly reduced with lithium aluminum hydride and then acylated with heptafluorobutyric anhydride prior to analysis. The analysis of more than 100 cocaine hydrochloride samples is presented and compared to data obtained by the previous methodology. Authentic cocaine samples obtained from the source countries of Colombia, Bolivia, and Peru were also analyzed, and comparative data on more than 23,000 samples analyzed over the past 10 years with the previous methodology is presented. PMID:25219521

  17. Trace analysis of multi-class pesticide residues in Chinese medicinal health wines using gas chromatography with electron capture detection

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Tao; Kong, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qian-Zhen; Ma, Xin-Ping; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    A method is described for multi-residue, high-throughput determination of trace levels of 22 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 5 pyrethroid pesticides (PYPs) in Chinese medicinal (CM) health wines using a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) based extraction method and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Several parameters were optimized to improve preparation and separation time while still maintaining high sensitivity. Validation tests of spiked samples showed good linearities for 27 pesticides (R = 0.9909–0.9996) over wide concentration ranges. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were measured at ng/L levels, 0.06–2 ng/L and 0.2–6 ng/L for OCPs and 0.02–3 ng/L and 0.06–7 ng/L for PYPs, respectively. Inter- and intra-day precision tests showed variations of 0.65–9.89% for OCPs and 0.98–13.99% for PYPs, respectively. Average recoveries were in the range of 47.74–120.31%, with relative standard deviations below 20%. The developed method was then applied to analyze 80 CM wine samples. Beta-BHC (Benzene hexachloride) was the most frequently detected pesticide at concentration levels of 5.67–31.55 mg/L, followed by delta-BHC, trans-chlordane, gamma-BHC, and alpha-BHC. The validated method is simple and economical, with adequate sensitivity for trace levels of multi-class pesticides. It could be adopted by laboratories for this and other types of complex matrices analysis. PMID:26883080

  18. Trace analysis of multi-class pesticide residues in Chinese medicinal health wines using gas chromatography with electron capture detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Tao; Kong, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qian-Zhen; Ma, Xin-Ping; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2016-02-01

    A method is described for multi-residue, high-throughput determination of trace levels of 22 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 5 pyrethroid pesticides (PYPs) in Chinese medicinal (CM) health wines using a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) based extraction method and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Several parameters were optimized to improve preparation and separation time while still maintaining high sensitivity. Validation tests of spiked samples showed good linearities for 27 pesticides (R = 0.9909-0.9996) over wide concentration ranges. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were measured at ng/L levels, 0.06-2 ng/L and 0.2-6 ng/L for OCPs and 0.02-3 ng/L and 0.06-7 ng/L for PYPs, respectively. Inter- and intra-day precision tests showed variations of 0.65-9.89% for OCPs and 0.98-13.99% for PYPs, respectively. Average recoveries were in the range of 47.74-120.31%, with relative standard deviations below 20%. The developed method was then applied to analyze 80 CM wine samples. Beta-BHC (Benzene hexachloride) was the most frequently detected pesticide at concentration levels of 5.67-31.55 mg/L, followed by delta-BHC, trans-chlordane, gamma-BHC, and alpha-BHC. The validated method is simple and economical, with adequate sensitivity for trace levels of multi-class pesticides. It could be adopted by laboratories for this and other types of complex matrices analysis.

  19. Determination of Chlorophenols in Water Samples Using Solid-Phase Extraction Enrichment Procedure and Gas Chromatography Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben Hassine, S; Hammami, B; Touil, S; Driss, M R

    2015-11-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure followed by derivatization and gas chromatography electron capture detection was evaluated for the determination of trace amounts of chlorophenols (CPs) in waters samples. Different parameters affecting extraction efficiency such as, volume of elution solvent, volume and pH of water sample, quantity of sorbent phase were studied and optimized. SPE was carried out on polystyrene-divinylbenzene (Bond Elut ENV) and high recoveries were obtained using 1000 mg of this cartridge for the treatment of 500 mL of acidified water sample. The described method was then tested on spiked tap, mineral, ground and surface water samples. The overall procedure provided limits of detection lower than 20 ng L(-1), recoveries of 70%-106% and an enrichment factor of 500 for the examined CPs in 500 mL water samples. Among the studied compounds, pentachlorophenol was detected in tap water at a concentration level of 0.06 µg L(-1). PMID:26067701

  20. Detection of gas leakage

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M; Brown, Jason

    2015-02-17

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as a device, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), provides a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement. The PPM is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr) using a venturi pump, perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  1. Detection of gas leakage

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven; Brown, Jason

    2012-06-19

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  2. Gas Flow Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, Thomas; Ihlefeld, Curtis; Slack, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This system provides a portable means to detect gas flow through a thin-walled tube without breaking into the tubing system. The flow detection system was specifically designed to detect flow through two parallel branches of a manifold with only one inlet and outlet, and is a means for verifying a space shuttle program requirement that saves time and reduces the risk of flight hardware damage compared to the current means of requirement verification. The prototype Purge Vent and Drain Window Cavity Conditioning System (PVD WCCS) Flow Detection System consists of a heater and a temperature-sensing thermistor attached to a piece of Velcro to be attached to each branch of a WCCS manifold for the duration of the requirement verification test. The heaters and thermistors are connected to a shielded cable and then to an electronics enclosure, which contains the power supplies, relays, and circuit board to provide power, signal conditioning, and control. The electronics enclosure is then connected to a commercial data acquisition box to provide analog to digital conversion as well as digital control. This data acquisition box is then connected to a commercial laptop running a custom application created using National Instruments LabVIEW. The operation of the PVD WCCS Flow Detection System consists of first attaching a heater/thermistor assembly to each of the two branches of one manifold while there is no flow through the manifold. Next, the software application running on the laptop is used to turn on the heaters and to monitor the manifold branch temperatures. When the system has reached thermal equilibrium, the software application s graphical user interface (GUI) will indicate that the branch temperatures are stable. The operator can then physically open the flow control valve to initiate the test flow of gaseous nitrogen (GN2) through the manifold. Next, the software user interface will be monitored for stable temperature indications when the system is again at

  3. Fission gas detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  4. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  5. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  6. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  7. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  8. 33 CFR 127.1203 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limit listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1 or Z-2. (c) Each gas detector required by paragraph (a) or... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas detection. 127.1203 Section...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS...

  9. Structure elucidation of an artifact discharging from rubber-based vial closures by means of gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Thomas; Vetter, Walter

    2006-12-01

    The use of vial closures equipped with butyl rubber septa may lead to sample contamination by rubber additives discharging from the septum material. In this study, the structure elucidation of an artifact causing intense signals in gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS) and gas chromatographic analyses with electron capture detection is described. Tentative identification of the leached compound was achieved by employing tandem mass spectrometric techniques both in electron capture negative ion and in electron ionization modes. The artifact could thus be characterized as 2-benzothiazolyl-N,N-dimethyl dithiocarbamate, which is a known vulcanization accelerator for rubber. It is conceivable that the identified compound or related substances are also used in other applications. Therefore, two food-related matrixes were investigated for a possible migration of this compound into foods. During these analyses, the tentatively identified rubber additive was detected in an aqueous extract of a rubber seal ring for canning jars. GC/ECNI-MS provided better sensitivity and selectivity than GC/EI-MS for the determination of the rubber additive and other mercaptobenzothiazole-derived substances. PMID:17134153

  10. Rapid determination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its main metabolites in aqueous samples by one-step microwave-assisted headspace controlled-temperature liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Vinoth Kumar, Ponnusamy; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2011-03-01

    A rapid and sensitive analytical method for the determination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its main metabolites in environmental aqueous samples has been developed using one-step microwave-assisted headspace controlled-temperature liquid-phase micro-extraction (MA-HS-CT-LPME) technique coupled with gas chromatography-electron-capture detection (GC-ECD). In this study, the one-step extraction of DDT and its main metabolites was achieved by using microwave heating to accelerate the evaporation of analytes into the controlled-temperature headspace to form a cloudy mist vapor zone for LPME sampling. Parameters influencing extraction efficiency were thoroughly optimized, and the best extraction for DDT and its main metabolites from 10-mL aqueous sample at pH 6.0 was achieved by using 1-octanol (4-μL) as the LPME solvent, sampling at 34°C for 6.5 min under 249W of microwave irradiation. Under optimum conditions, excellent linear relationship was obtained in the range of 0.05-1.0 μg/L for 1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p'-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), 0.1-2.0 μg/L for o,p'-DDT, 0.15-3.0 μg/L for 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p'-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDD) and p,p'-DDT, with detection limits of 20 ng/L for p,p'-DDE, and 30 ng/L for o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT. Precision was in the range of 3.2-11.3% RSD. The proposed method was validated with environmental water samples. The spiked recovery was between 95.5% and 101.3% for agricultural-field water, between 94% and 99.7% for sea water and between 93.5% and 98% for river water. Thus the established method has been proved to be a simple, rapid, sensitive, inexpensive and eco-friendly procedure for the determination of DDT and its main metabolites in environmental water samples. PMID:21251695

  11. System and method for detecting gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Oscar Ken; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Miller, Jacob Andrew

    2010-03-16

    A system to detect a presence of a specific gas in a mixture of gaseous byproducts comprising moisture vapor is disclosed. The system includes an electrochemical cell, a transport to deliver the mixture of gaseous byproducts from the electrochemical cell, a gas sensor in fluid communication with the transport, the sensor responsive to a presence of the specific gas to generate a signal corresponding to a concentration of the specific gas, and a membrane to prevent transmission of liquid moisture, the membrane disposed between the transport and the gas sensor.

  12. Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2012-09-04

    A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

  13. Microwave Radar Detection of Gas Pipeline Leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Kanareykin, D. B.; Asanov, V.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    We are developing a microwave radar sensing and imaging system to detect and locate gas leaks in natural gas pipelines. The underlying detection principle is radar backscattering from the index-of-refraction inhomogeneities introduced by the dispersion of methane in air. An essential first step in the development effort is modeling to estimate the radar cross section. This paper describes the modeling results and the experimental efforts underway to validate the model. For the case of leaks from small holes in a pressurized gas pipeline, we modeled the gas dynamics of the leak jet to determine the plume geometry and the variation of methane concentration in air as a function of distance from the leak source. From the static and dynamic changes in the index of refraction in the turbulent plume, the radar backscatter cross sections were calculated. The results show that the radar cross sections of the leak plumes should be detectable by special-purpose radars.

  14. Detection of hydrogen chloride gas in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Launch vehicle effluent (LVE) monitoring is part of NASA's overall tropospheric and stratospheric environmental program. Following nine techniques are evaluated and developed in report: bubbler method, pH measurements, indicator tubes, microcoulometers, modified condensation nuclei counter, dual-isotope absorption, gas-filter correlation, chemiluminescent nitric oxide detection, chemiluminescent luminol-oxidation detection.

  15. Semiconducting polymers for gas detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, N. R.; Sheratte, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    Conjugated polyenes, and polyesters containing phthalocyanine in their backbone, were synthesized. These polymers were characterized by chemical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, spectral analysis, and X-ray diffraction studies for crystallinity, as well as for their film-forming capability and gas/polymer interactions. Most of the polymers were relatively insensitive to water vapor up to 50 percent relative humidity, but the polyester/phthalocyanine (iron) polymer was relatively insensitive up to 100 percent RH. On the other hand, poly(p-dimethylaminophenylacetylene) was too conductive at 100 percent RH. Of the gases tested, the only ones that gave any evidence of interacting with the polymers were SO2, NOx, HCN and NH3. Poly(imidazole)/thiophene responded to each of these gases at all relative humidities, while the other polymers gave varying response, depending upon the RH. Thus, since most of these gases were electron-accepting, the electron-donating character of poly(imidazole)/thiophene substantiates the concept of electronegativity being the operating principle for interaction effects. Of the six polymers prepared, poly(imidazole)/thiophene first showed a very good response to smoldering cotton, but it later became nonresponsive; presumably due to oxidation effects.

  16. Air Monitoring for Hazardous Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Adams, Frederick W.; Naylor, Guy; Haskell, William; Floyd, David; Curley, Charles; Follistein, Duke W.

    2004-01-01

    The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab (HGDL) at Kennedy Space Center is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and quantify various hazardous gases. Traditionally these systems are designed for leak detection of the cryogenic gases used for the propulsion of the Shuttle and other vehicles. Mass spectrometers are the basis of these systems, which provide excellent quantitation, sensitivity, selectivity, response times and detection limits. A Table lists common gases monitored for aerospace applications. The first five gases, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are historically the focus of the HGDL.

  17. Permanent gas analysis using gas chromatography with vacuum ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ling; Smuts, Jonathan; Walsh, Phillip; Fan, Hui; Hildenbrand, Zacariah; Wong, Derek; Wetz, David; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of complex mixtures of permanent gases consisting of low molecular weight hydrocarbons, inert gases, and toxic species plays an increasingly important role in today's economy. A new gas chromatography detector based on vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectroscopy (GC-VUV), which simultaneously collects full scan (115-240 nm) VUV and UV absorption of eluting analytes, was applied to analyze mixtures of permanent gases. Sample mixtures ranged from off-gassing of decomposing Li-ion and Li-metal batteries to natural gas samples and water samples taken from private wells in close proximity to unconventional natural gas extraction. Gas chromatography separations were performed with a porous layer open tubular column. Components such as C1-C5 linear and branched hydrocarbons, water, oxygen, and nitrogen were separated and detected in natural gas and the headspace of natural gas-contaminated water samples. Of interest for the transport of lithium batteries were the detection of flammable and toxic gases, such as methane, ethylene, chloromethane, dimethyl ether, 1,3-butadiene, CS2, and methylproprionate, among others. Featured is the capability for deconvolution of co-eluting signals from different analytes. PMID:25724098

  18. Application of the standard addition method for the determination of acrylamide in heat-processed starchy foods by gas chromatography with electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yonghong; Li, Genrong; Duan, Yunpeng; Chen, Shiqi; Zhang, Chun; Li, Yanfei

    2008-08-15

    A gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) using the standard addition method was developed for the determination of acrylamide in heat-processed foods. The method entails extraction of acrylamide with water, filtration, defatting with n-hexane, derivatization with hydrobromic acid and saturated bromine-water, and liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The sample pretreatment required no SPE clean-up and concentration steps prior to injection. The final extract was analyzed by GC-ECD. The chromatographic analysis was performed on polar columns, e.g. Supelcowax-10 capillary column, and good retention and peak response of the analyte were achieved under the optimal conditions. The qualification of the analyte was by identifying the peak with same retention time as standard compound 2,3-DBPA and confirmed by GC-MS. GC-MS analysis confirmed that 2,3-DBPA was converted to 2-BPA nearly completely on the polar capillary column, whether or not treated with triethylamine. A four-point standard addition protocol was used to quantify acrylamide in food samples. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.6μg/kg on the basis of ECD technique. Validation and quantification results demonstrated that the method should be regarded as a low-cost, convenient, and reliable alternative for conventional investigation of acrylamide. PMID:26050006

  19. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2012-12-25

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO2 nanocrystals doped with In2O3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  20. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2014-07-15

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals doped with In.sub.2O.sub.3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  1. Infrared hyperspectral imaging sensor for gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    2000-11-01

    A small light weight man portable imaging spectrometer has many applications; gas leak detection, flare analysis, threat warning, chemical agent detection, just to name a few. With support from the US Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a small man portable hyperspectral imaging sensor with an embedded DSP processor for real time processing that is capable of remotely imaging various targets such as gas plums, flames and camouflaged targets. Based upon their spectral signature the species and concentration of gases can be determined. This system has been field tested at numerous places including White Mountain, CA, Edwards AFB, and Vandenberg AFB. Recently evaluation of the system for gas detection has been performed. This paper presents these results. The system uses a conventional infrared camera fitted with a diffractive optic that images as well as disperses the incident radiation to form spectral images that are collected in band sequential mode. Because the diffractive optic performs both imaging and spectral filtering, the lens system consists of only a single element that is small, light weight and robust, thus allowing man portability. The number of spectral bands are programmable such that only those bands of interest need to be collected. The system is entirely passive, therefore, easily used in a covert operation. Currently Pacific Advanced Technology is working on the next generation of this camera system that will have both an embedded processor as well as an embedded digital signal processor in a small hand held camera configuration. This will allow the implementation of signal and image processing algorithms for gas detection and identification in real time. This paper presents field test data on gas detection and identification as well as discuss the signal and image processing used to enhance the gas visibility. Flow rates as low as 0.01 cubic feet per minute have been imaged with this system.

  2. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  3. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-05-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  4. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  5. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... through 154.1015. (k) Each flammable gas detection system must have enough flame arrestors for all gas... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... through 154.1015. (k) Each flammable gas detection system must have enough flame arrestors for all gas... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... through 154.1015. (k) Each flammable gas detection system must have enough flame arrestors for all gas... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... through 154.1015. (k) Each flammable gas detection system must have enough flame arrestors for all gas... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... through 154.1015. (k) Each flammable gas detection system must have enough flame arrestors for all gas... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a...

  10. Preparation of porous aromatic framework/ionic liquid hybrid composite coated solid-phase microextraction fibers and their application in the determination of organochlorine pesticides combined with GC-ECD detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingxue; Chen, Gang; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Weihong; Jia, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    A novel hybrid material incorporating porous aromatic frameworks and an ionic liquid, 1-(triethoxy silyl)propyl-3-aminopropyl imidazole hexafluorophosphate, was prepared as solid-phase microextraction coating and employed for the extraction of organochlorine pesticides. Combining the advantages of porous aromatic frameworks and an ionic liquid, the fiber exhibited a high adsorption capacity for organochlorine pesticides. Under optimized experimental conditions, enhancement factors of 247-1696 were obtained with good linearity in the range of 1-500 μg L(-1). The detection limits and quantification limits were determined to be in the range of 0.11-0.29 μg L(-1) and 0.35-0.93 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviations for six replicates of organochlorine pesticides were in the range of 4.4%-7.2% and 5.7%-10.1% for one fiber and fiber-to-fiber, respectively. By coupling with a gas chromatography-electron capture detector, the novel fiber was successfully used for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in juice and milk samples with recoveries of 76.1%-121.3%. PMID:26579991

  11. Air Monitoring for Hazardous Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Naylor, Guy; Haskell, William; Floyd, David; Curley, Charles; Griffin, Timothy P.; Adams, Frederick; Follistein, Duke

    2003-01-01

    The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and quantify various hazardous gases. Traditionally these systems are designed for leak detection of the cryogenic gases used for the propulsion of the Shuttle and other vehicles. Mass spectrometers are the basis of these systems, which provide excellent quantitation, sensitivity, selectivity, response and limits of detection. Unfortunately, these systems are large, heavy and expensive. This feature limits the ability to perform gas analysis in certain applications. Smaller and lighter mass spectrometer systems could be used in many more applications primarily due to the portability of the system. Such applications would include air analysis in confined spaces, in-situ environmental analysis and emergency response. In general, system cost is lowered as size is reduced. With a low cost air analysis system, several systems could be utilized for monitoring large areas. These networked systems could be deployed at job-sites for worker safety, throughout a community for pollution warnings, or dispersed in a battlefield for early warning of chemical or biological threats. Presented will be information on the first prototype of this type of system. Included will be field trial data, with this prototype performing air analysis autonomously from an aircraft.

  12. A photoacoustic spectrometer for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, E. M.; Bezerra, E.; Scalabrin, A.

    2005-06-01

    A high-resolution external laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been developed for trace gas detection with absorption transitions in coincidence with CO2 laser emission lines (9,2-10,9 μm: 920-1086 cm-1). The CO2 laser operates in 90 CW lines with power of up to 15 W. A PC-controlled step motor can tune the laser lines. The resonance frequency of first longitudinal mode of the photoacoustic cell is at 1600 Hz. The cell Q-factor and cell constant are measured close to 50 and 28 mVcmW-1, respectively. The spectrometer has been tested in preliminary studies to analyze the absorption transitions of ozone (O_3). The ethylene (C_2H_4) from papaya fruit is also investigated using N2 as carrier gas at a constant flow rate.

  13. Sensor array for toxic gas detection

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Zaromb, Solomon; Penrose, William R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting and identifying a hazardous component in air or other gas including an array of small sensors which upon exposure to the gas from a pattern of electrical responses, a source of standard response patterns characteristic of various components, and microprocessor means for comparing the sensor-formed response pattern with one or more standard patterns to thereby identify the component on a display. The number of responses may be increased beyond the number of sensors by changing the operating voltage, temperature or other condition associated with one or more sensors to provide a plurality of responses from each of one or more of the sensors. In one embodiment, the instrument is capable of identifying anyone of over 50-100 hazardous components.

  14. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  15. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  16. 49 CFR 192.736 - Compressor stations: Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressor stations: Gas detection. 192.736... TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.736 Compressor stations: Gas detection. (a) Not later than September 16, 1996, each compressor building in...

  17. Time reversal technique for gas leakage detection.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A O; Polovinka, Yu A

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic remote sensing of subsea gas leakage traditionally uses sonars as active acoustic sensors and hydrophones picking up the sound generated by a leak as passive sensors. When gas leaks occur underwater, bubbles are produced and emit sound at frequencies intimately related to their sizes. The experimental implementation of an acoustic time-reversal mirror (TRM) is now well established in underwater acoustics. In the basic TRM experiment, a probe source emits a pulse that is received on an array of sensors, time reversed, and re-emitted. After time reversal, the resulting field focuses back at the probe position. In this study, a method for enhancing operation of the passive receiving system has been proposed by using it in the regime of TRM. Two factors, the local character of the acoustic emission signal caused by the leakage and a resonant nature of the bubble radiation at their birth, make particularly effective scattering with the conjugate wave (CW). Analytical calculations are performed for the scattering of CW wave on a single bubble when CW is formed by bubble birthing wail received on an array, time reversed, and re-emitted. The quality of leakage detection depends on the spatio-temporal distribution of ambient noise. PMID:25920866

  18. Development of a sample preparation method for the analysis of current-use pesticides in sediment using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongli; Weston, Donald P; Ding, Yuping; Lydy, Michael J

    2010-02-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been implicated as the cause of sediment toxicity to Hyalella azteca in both agricultural and urban areas of California; however, for a subset of these toxic sediments (approximately 30%), the cause of toxicity remains unidentified. This article describes the analytical method development for seven additional pesticides that are being examined to determine if they might play a role in the unexplained toxicity. A pressurized liquid extraction method was optimized to simultaneously extract diazinon, methyl parathion, oxyfluorfen, dicofol, fenpropathrin, pyraclostrobin, and indoxacarb from sediment, and the extracts were cleaned using a two-step solid-phase extraction procedure. The final extract was analyzed for the target pesticides by gas chromatography/nitrogen-phosphorus detector (GC/NPD), and gas chromatography/electron capture detector (GC/ECD), after sulfur was removed by shaking with copper and cold crystallization. Three sediments were used as reference matrices to assess method accuracy and precision. Method detection limits were 0.23-1.8 ng/g dry sediment using seven replicates of sediment spiked at 1.0 ng/g dry sediment. Recoveries ranged from 61.6 to 118% with relative standard deviations of 2.1-17% when spiked at 5.0 and 50 ng/g dry sediment. The three reference sediments, spiked with 50 ng/g dry weight of the pesticide mixture, were aged for 0.25, 1, 4, 7, and 14 days. Recoveries of the pesticides in the sediments generally decreased with increased aging time, but the magnitude of the decline was pesticide and sediment dependent. The developed method was applied to field-collected sediments from the Central Valley of California. PMID:19798461

  19. Quartz crystals detect gas contaminants during vacuum chamber evacuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.

    1967-01-01

    Piezoelectric quartz crystals detect condensable gas contaminants backstreaming into a vacuum chamber when a pump is evacuating the chamber. One crystal acts as a thermometer, the other detects mass change. They are energized by electronic equipment which records frequency changes.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography/atomic emission detector (GC/AED) system has been evaluated for its applicability to environmental analysis. Detection limits, elemental response factors, and regression analysis data were determined for 58 semivolatile environmental contaminants. Detection l...

  1. Towards aerial natural gas leak detection system based on TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuyang; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    Pipeline leakage is a complex scenario for sensing system due to the traditional high cost, low efficient and labor intensive detection scheme. TDLAS has been widely accepted as industrial trace gas detection method and, thanks to its high accuracy and reasonable size, it has the potential to meet pipeline gas leakage detection requirements if it combines with the aerial platform. Based on literature study, this paper discussed the possibility of applying aerial TDLAS principle in pipeline gas leak detection and the key technical foundation of implementing it. Such system is able to result in a high efficiency and accuracy measurement which will provide sufficient data in time for the pipeline leakage detection.

  2. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  3. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  4. Flammable Gas Detection for the D-Zero Gas System

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, L.D.; Foglesong, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-11

    The use of flammable gas and high voltage in detector systems is common in many experiments at Fermilab. To mitigate the hazards associated with these systems, Fermilab Engineering Standard SD-45B (Ref. 1) was adopted. Since this note is meant to be a guide and not a mandatory standard, each experiment is reviewed for compliance with SD-45B by the flammable gas safety subcommittee. Currently, there are only two types of flammable gas in use, ethane (Appendix A) and methane (Appendix B). The worst flammable-gas case is C2H6 (ethane), which has an estimated flow rate that is 73% of the CH4 (methane) flow but a heat of combustion (in kcal/g-mole) that is 173% of that of methane. In the worst case, if ethane were to spew through its restricting orifice into its gas line at 0 psig and then through a catastrophic leak into Room 215 (TRD) or Room 511 (CDC/FDCNTX), the time that would be required to build up a greater than Class 1 inventory (0.4kg H2 equivalent) would be 5.2 hours (Ref. 2). Therefore a worst-case flammable gas leak would have to go undetected for over 5 hours in order to transform a either mixing room to an environment with a Risk Class greater than Class 1. The mixing systems, gas lines, and detectors themselves will be thoroughly leak checked prior to active service. All vessels that are part of the mixing systems will be protected from overpressure by safety valves vented outside the building. Both the input and output of all detector volumes are protected from overpressure in the same way. The volume immediately outside the central tracking detectors is continuously purged by nitrogen from boiloff from the main nitrogen dewar at the site. However, if flammable gas were to build up in the mixing rooms or particular detector areas, no matter how unlikely, flammable gas detectors that are part of the interlock chain of each gas mixing system will shut down the appropriate system. This includes shutting off the output of flammable gas manifolds within the

  5. Detecting Changes of a Distant Gas Source with an Array of MOX Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pashami, Sepideh; Lilienthal, Achim J.; Trincavelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of detecting changes in the activity of a distant gas source from the response of an array of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system. The main challenge is the turbulent nature of gas dispersion and the response dynamics of the sensors. We propose a change point detection approach and evaluate it on individual gas sensors in an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, or mixture ratio. We also introduce an efficient sensor selection algorithm and evaluate the change point detection approach with the selected sensor array subsets. PMID:23443385

  6. Natural Gas Hydrates: Occurrence, Distribution, and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, Charles K.; Dillon, William P.

    We publish this volume at a time when there is a growing interest in gas hydrates and major expansion in international research efforts. The first recognition of natural gas hydrate on land in Arctic conditions was in the mid-1960s (by I. Makogon) and in the seabed environment only in the early 1970s, after natural seafloor gas hydrate was drilled on the Blake Ridge during Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 11. Initial scientific investigations were slow to develop because the study of natural gas hydrates is unusually challenging. Gas hydrate exists in nature in conditions of temperature and pressure where human beings cannot survive, and if gas hydrate is transported from its region of stability to normal Earth-surface conditions, it dissociates. Thus, in contrast to most minerals, we cannot depend on drilled samples to provide accurate estimates of the amount of gas hydrate present. Even the heat and changes in chemistry (methane saturation, salinity, etc.) introduced by the drilling process affect the gas hydrate, independent of the changes brought about by moving a sample to the surface. Gas hydrate has been identified in nature generally by inference from indirect evidence in drilling data or by using remotely sensed indications, mostly from seismic data. Obviously, the established techniques ofgeologic analysis, which require direct observation and sampling, do not apply to gas hydrate studies, and controversy has surrounded many interpretations. Pressure/temperature conditions appropriate for the existence of gas hydrate occur over the greater part of the shallow subsurface of the Earth beneath the ocean at water depths exceeding about 500 m (shallower beneath colder Arctic seas) and on land beneath high-latitude permafrost. Gas hydrate actually will be present in such conditions, however, only where methane is present at high concentrations. In the Arctic, these methane concentrations are often associated with petroleum deposits, whereas at continental margins

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR ANALYSIS OF PESTICIDE SAMPLES BY GC/ECD (BCO-L-24.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the methods used for detection and quantification by gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC/ECD) of pesticides in a variety of matrices, including air, house dust, soil, handwipes, and surface wipes. Other SOP's detail the extract...

  8. Improvements in NDIR gas detection within the same optical chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Silva-Lopez, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) is a well known technique for gas concentration monitoring. Lead salt photoconductors and thermopile detectors are typically used. Together with gas filter correlation (GFC) they are the basis for a reference standard in environmental gas monitoring like carbon monoxide determination and other gas species. To increase gas sensitivity, a multi-pass optical cavity is often used. In this contribution we propose a new optical design that allows for auto-reference multiple gas detection. It basically consists of an array of White's cell multi-pass camera that allows multiple channels with independent lengths inside the same volume. We explore its performance for carbon monoxide detection and based on recent commercial developments in infrared detector and emitter technologies.

  9. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

  10. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  11. Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1998-05-26

    The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

  12. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... must be set at or below the threshold limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for the cargo carried. ... detector; (iii) If the vessel carries cargo that is heavier than the atmosphere of the space, each...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... must be set at or below the threshold limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for the cargo carried. ... detector; (iii) If the vessel carries cargo that is heavier than the atmosphere of the space, each...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... tubes with their open ends in the upper part of the space. (c) A vessel that carries methyl bromide or... paragraph (j). (e) Each alarm under § 154.1350(e) on a vessel that carries methyl bromide or sulfur...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... tubes with their open ends in the upper part of the space. (c) A vessel that carries methyl bromide or... paragraph (j). (e) Each alarm under § 154.1350(e) on a vessel that carries methyl bromide or sulfur...

  16. 46 CFR 154.1345 - Gas detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... limit value listed in 29 CFR 1910.1000 for that cargo; and (2) Fixed gas sampling tubes in each hold... tubes with their open ends in the upper part of the space. (c) A vessel that carries methyl bromide or... paragraph (j). (e) Each alarm under § 154.1350(e) on a vessel that carries methyl bromide or sulfur...

  17. In-fiber modal interferometer for high sensitivity gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Jin, Wei

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a gas sensor based on mode interference in a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber. Gas absorption of a pump laser beam induces phase modulation of a propagating probe beam, which is detected by use of an in-fiber modal interferometer. An estimated detection limit of ~2 ppm acetylene (~7x10-5 in terms of noise equivalent absorbance or NEA) is achieved with 30-cm-long HC-PBF operating at the near infrared wavelength. This NEA is ~22 times better than state-of-the-art HC-PBF gas sensors based on direct absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    During this quarter, work began on the regional structural and geologic analysis of the greater Green River basin (GGRB) in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. The ultimate objective of the regional analysis is to apply the techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project to sweet-spot delineation in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-type Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of the GGRB. The primary goal of this work is to partition and high-grade the greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Cretaceous tight gas play. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998 consisted of three tasks: (1) Acquire necessary data and develop base map of study area; (2) Process data for analysis; and (3) Initiate structural study. The first task and second tasks were completed during this reporting period. The third task was initiated and work continues.

  19. Detection system for a gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, John M.; Small, Gerald J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam.

  20. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.

    1995-05-01

    Exploration strategies are needed to identify subtle basement features critical to locating fractured regions in advance of drilling in tight gas reservoirs. The Piceance Basin served as a demonstration site for an analysis utilizing aeromagnetic surveys, remote sensing, Landsat Thematic Mapper, and Side Looking Airborne Radar imagery for the basin and surrounding areas. Spatially detailed aeromagnetic maps were used to to interpret zones of basement structure.

  1. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-30

    In March, work continued on characterizing probabilities for determining natural fracturing associated with the GGRB for the Upper Cretaceous tight gas plays. Structural complexity, based on potential field data and remote sensing data was completed. A resource estimate for the Frontier and Mesa Verde play was also completed. Further, work was also conducted to determine threshold economics for the play based on limited current production in the plays in the Wamsutter Ridge area. These analyses culminated in a presentation at FETC on 24 March 1999 where quantified natural fracture domains, mapped on a partition basis, which establish ''sweet spot'' probability for natural fracturing, were reviewed. That presentation is reproduced here as Appendix 1. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1999--March 31, 1999 comprised five tasks: (1) Evaluation of the GGRB partitions for structural complexity that can be associated with natural fractures, (2) Continued resource analysis of the balance of the partitions to determine areas with higher relative gas richness, (3) Gas field studies, (4) Threshold resource economics to determine which partitions would be the most prospective, and (5) Examination of the area around the Table Rock 4H well.

  2. Detection of gas leaks in the subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandehari, Masoud; Khalil, Gamal; Kimura, Fletcher

    2005-05-01

    Leaking valves, connections and distribution pipelines are significant sources of fugitive gas and volatile chemical emissions in chemical manufacturing, gas production, transmission, and oil refineries. A gas leak detection method has been developed based on continuous monitoring of the oxygen concentration surrounding a natural gas pipeline. The method utilizes optical fibers coated with an oxygen permeable polymeric film containing a luminescent sensor molecule. When the specialty fiber is illuminated by a light source that excites the luminophor, the functional cladding compound has the ability to detect and quantify leaks by measuring small changes in oxygen concentrations in the surrounding environment. Key features of the technology include long-term performance based on well understood platinum porphyrin chemistry, in addition to the capability of distributed sensing using fiber optic evanescent field spectroscopy. Results of leak detection in various environments namely atmospheric conditions, dry sand as well as saturated sand is reported, along with test results on long term system performance.

  3. Research on airborne infrared leakage detection of natural gas pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Dongjie; Xu, Bin; Xu, Xu; Wang, Hongchao; Yu, Dongliang; Tian, Shengjie

    2011-12-01

    An airborne laser remote sensing technology is proposed to detect natural gas pipeline leakage in helicopter which carrying a detector, and the detector can detect a high spatial resolution of trace of methane on the ground. The principle of the airborne laser remote sensing system is based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The system consists of an optical unit containing the laser, camera, helicopter mount, electronic unit with DGPS antenna, a notebook computer and a pilot monitor. And the system is mounted on a helicopter. The principle and the architecture of the airborne laser remote sensing system are presented. Field test experiments are carried out on West-East Natural Gas Pipeline of China, and the results show that airborne detection method is suitable for detecting gas leak of pipeline on plain, desert, hills but unfit for the area with large altitude diversification.

  4. Early detection of combustible gas leaks using open path infrared (IR) gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Edward; Baliga, Shankar

    2012-06-01

    Open path IR gas detectors are a mainstay in the oil and gas industry. They are used in a variety of instances to identify gas accumulations or monitor gas cloud migrations. In offshore installations, open path optical gas detectors are used to monitor drilling and production operations, crude oil separation, compression, and exhaust and ventilation systems. Because they can monitor a perimeter or fence line, they are ideally suited for detecting gas in open facilities, where point gas detectors would be difficult or expensive to deploy. Despite their widespread use, open path optical gas detectors are rarely employed to detect low level concentrations of combustible gases. Standard models are typically set to alarm at 50% LEL-m (50% LEL extended over one meter), providing sufficiently early warning when gas accumulations occur. Nevertheless, in cases in which a combustible gas is diluted quickly, such as ventilation exhaust ducting, it may be necessary to set the detector to alarm at the lowest predictable level. Further, interest in low level infrared gas detection has been growing as gases such as CH4 and CO2 are greenhouse gases. The present paper describes a mid-wave infrared (MWIR) open path system designed to detect combustible and carbon dioxide gas leaks in the parts-per-million-meter (ppm-m or mg/cm2). The detector has been installed in offshore platforms and large onshore facilities to detect a variety of flammable gases and vapors. Advantages and limitations of the system are presented. False alarm immunity and resilience to atmospheric interferences are also discussed.

  5. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  6. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and

  7. Compressive hyperspectral sensor for LWIR gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas A.; McMackin, Lenore; Bridge, Bob; Baraniuk, Richard

    2012-06-01

    Focal plane arrays with associated electronics and cooling are a substantial portion of the cost, complexity, size, weight, and power requirements of Long-Wave IR (LWIR) imagers. Hyperspectral LWIR imagers add significant data volume burden as they collect a high-resolution spectrum at each pixel. We report here on a LWIR Hyperspectral Sensor that applies Compressive Sensing (CS) in order to achieve benefits in these areas. The sensor applies single-pixel detection technology demonstrated by Rice University. The single-pixel approach uses a Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) to reflect and multiplex the light from a random assortment of pixels onto the detector. This is repeated for a number of measurements much less than the total number of scene pixels. We have extended this architecture to hyperspectral LWIR sensing by inserting a Fabry-Perot spectrometer in the optical path. This compressive hyperspectral imager collects all three dimensions on a single detection element, greatly reducing the size, weight and power requirements of the system relative to traditional approaches, while also reducing data volume. The CS architecture also supports innovative adaptive approaches to sensing, as the DMD device allows control over the selection of spatial scene pixels to be multiplexed on the detector. We are applying this advantage to the detection of plume gases, by adaptively locating and concentrating target energy. A key challenge in this system is the diffraction loss produce by the DMD in the LWIR. We report the results of testing DMD operation in the LWIR, as well as system spatial and spectral performance.

  8. Wide-band gas leak imaging detection system using UFPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei-qi; Li, Jia-kun; Dun, Xiong; Jin, Minglei; Wang, Xia

    2014-11-01

    The leakage of toxic or hazardous gases not only pollutes the environment, but also threatens people's lives and property safety. Many countries attach great importance to the rapid and effective gas leak detection technology and instrument development. However, the gas leak imaging detection systems currently existing are generally limited to a narrow-band in Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) or Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) cooled focal plane imaging, which is difficult to detect the common kinds of the leaking gases. Besides the costly cooled focal plane array is utilized, the application promotion is severely limited. To address this issue, a wide-band gas leak IR imaging detection system using Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) detector is proposed, which is composed of wide-band IR optical lens, sub-band filters and switching device, wide-band UFPA detector, video processing and system control circuit. A wide-band (3µm~12µm) UFPA detector is obtained by replacing the protection window and optimizing the structural parameters of the detector. A large relative aperture (F#=0.75) wide-band (3μm~12μm) multispectral IR lens is developed by using the focus compensation method, which combining the thickness of the narrow-band filters. The gas leak IR image quality and the detection sensitivity are improved by using the IR image Non-Uniformity Correction (NUC) technology and Digital Detail Enhancement (DDE) technology. The wide-band gas leak IR imaging detection system using UFPA detector takes full advantage of the wide-band (MWIR&LWIR) response characteristic of the UFPA detector and the digital image processing technology to provide the resulting gas leak video easy to be observed for the human eyes. Many kinds of gases, which are not visible to the naked eyes, can be sensitively detected and visualized. The designed system has many commendable advantages, such as scanning a wide range simultaneously, locating the leaking source quickly, visualizing the gas

  9. Imaging spectrometer for fugitive gas leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-12-01

    Under contract to the U.S. Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive infrared imaging spectrometer that can perform remote imaging and spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of smoke stack emissions and fugitive leaks. To date remote continuous emission monitoring (CEM) systems have not been approved by the EPA, however, they are under consideration. If the remote sensing technology is available with the sensitivity to monitor emission at the required levels and man portable it can reduce the cost and improve the reliability of performing such measurements. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) believes that it currently has this technology available to industry. This paper will present results from a field test where gas vapors during a refueling process were imaged and identified. In addition images of propane from a leaking stove will be presented. We at PAT have developed a real time image processing board that enhances the signal to noise ratio of low contrast gases and makes them easily viewable using the Image Multispectral Sensing (IMSS) imaging spectrometer. The IMSS imaging spectrometer is the size of a camcorder. Currently the data is stored in a Notebook computer thus allowing the system to be easily carried into power plants to look for fugitive leaks. In the future the IMSS will have an embedded processor and DSP and will be able to transfer data over an Ethernet link.

  10. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way. PMID:22512213

  11. Methods for gas detection using stationary hyperspectral imaging sensors

    DOEpatents

    Conger, James L.; Henderson, John R.

    2012-04-24

    According to one embodiment, a method comprises producing a first hyperspectral imaging (HSI) data cube of a location at a first time using data from a HSI sensor; producing a second HSI data cube of the same location at a second time using data from the HSI sensor; subtracting on a pixel-by-pixel basis the second HSI data cube from the first HSI data cube to produce a raw difference cube; calibrating the raw difference cube to produce a calibrated raw difference cube; selecting at least one desired spectral band based on a gas of interest; producing a detection image based on the at least one selected spectral band and the calibrated raw difference cube; examining the detection image to determine presence of the gas of interest; and outputting a result of the examination. Other methods, systems, and computer program products for detecting the presence of a gas are also described.

  12. Surface Ionization Gas Detection at SnO2 Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkow, A.; Oberhüttinger, C.; Habauzit, A.; Kessler, M.; Göbel, J.; Müller, G.

    2009-05-01

    In surface ionization (SI) gas detection adsorbed analyte molecules are converted into ionic species at a heated solid surface and extracted into free space by an oppositely biased counter electrode. In the present work we consider the formation of positive and negative analyte gas ions at SnO2 surfaces. We find that SI leads to positive ion formation only, with the SI efficiency scaling with the ionization energy of the analyte gas molecules. Aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with amine functional groups exhibit particularly high SI efficiencies.

  13. Predicting detection probabilities for gas mixtures over HSI backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Tardiff, Mark F.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Chilton, Lawrence

    2009-12-29

    Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal image data acquired by airborne detectors is an area of ongoing research. This contribution investigates the relative detectability of gas mixtures over different backgrounds and a range of plume temperatures that are warmer and cooler than the ground. The focus of this analysis to support mission planning. When the mission is intended to collect evidence of particular chemicals, the analysis presented is this report can be used to determine conditions under which useful data can be acquired. Initial analyses can be used to determine whether LWIR is useful for the anticipated gas, temperature, and background combination.

  14. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-12-01

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  15. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-10-31

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  16. Energy requirements for methods improving gas detection by modulating physical properties of resistive gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawka, M.; Kotarski, M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important disadvantage of resistive gas sensors is their limited gas selectivity. Therefore, various methods modulating their physical properties are used to improve gas detection. These methods are usually limited to temperature modulation or UV light irradiation for the layers exhibiting photocatalytic effect. These methods cause increased energy consumption. In our study we consider how much energy has to be supplied to utilize such methods and what kind of additional information can be gathered. We present experimental results of selected resistive gas sensors, including commercial and prototype constructions, and practical solutions of modulating their physical properties.

  17. Detection of chlorinated methanes by tin oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Son, Y C; Shaw, B R; Creasy, K E; Suib, S L

    2001-08-01

    Tin oxide thin films prepared by thermal oxidation of Sn films were used for the detection of chlorinated methanes (CH2Cl2, CHCl3 and CCl4). This resulted in better chemical selectivity, sensitivity, response speed and detection limit than seen with previous detectors. The temperature dependence of the sensing of 1% CCl4 gas was studied and the best sensing behavior was observed at 300 degrees C. The films showed different chemical selectivity in both speed and direction of sensing response to each gas and were stable for more than 3 weeks under operating conditions. The films showed rapid gas sensing (<40 s to reach 90% of full response) and low detection limits (< 4 ppm CCl4). The role of oxygen in the detection of chlorinated methanes and in resistance changes without chlorinated methanes was also studied. The changes at the surface of the film after gas sensing were examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. PMID:11534610

  18. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Joseph L.; McCarthy, John F.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  19. Summary of gas release events detected by hydrogen monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    1999-05-18

    This paper summarizes the results of monitoring tank headspace for flammable gas release events. In over 40 tank years of monitoring the largest detected release in a single-shell tank is 2.4 cubic meters of Hydrogen. In the double-shell tanks the largest release is 19.3 cubic meters except in SY-101 pre mixer pump installation condition.

  20. Hyperspectral trace gas detection using the wavelet packet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Mark Z.; Resmini, Ronald G.; Gomez, Richard B.

    2008-04-01

    A method for trace gas detection in hyperspectral data is demonstrated using the wavelet packet transform. This new method, the Wavelet Packet Subspace (WPS), applies the wavelet packet transform and selects a best basis for pattern matching. The wavelet packet transform is an extension of the wavelet transform, which fully decomposes a signal into a library of wavelet packet bases. Application of the wavelet packet transform to hyperspectral data for the detection of trace gases takes advantage of the ability of the wavelet transform to locate spectral features in both scale and location. By analyzing the wavelet packet tree of specific gas, nodes of the tree are selected which represent an orthogonal best basis. The best basis represents the significant spectral features of that gas. This is then used to identify pixels in the scene using existing matching algorithms such as spectral angle or matched filter. Using data from the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager (AHI), this method is compared to traditional matched filter detection methods. Initial results demonstrate a promising wavelet packet subspace technique for hyperspectral trace gas detection applications.

  1. Pattern Recognition for Selective Odor Detection with Gas Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Seok; Kim, Jae Hun; Kim, Chulki; Byun, Young Tae; Kim, Hyung Seok; Lee, Taikjin

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new pattern recognition approach for enhancing the selectivity of gas sensor arrays for clustering intelligent odor detection. The aim of this approach was to accurately classify an odor using pattern recognition in order to enhance the selectivity of gas sensor arrays. This was achieved using an odor monitoring system with a newly developed neural-genetic classification algorithm (NGCA). The system shows the enhancement in the sensitivity of the detected gas. Experiments showed that the proposed NGCA delivered better performance than the previous genetic algorithm (GA) and artificial neural networks (ANN) methods. We also used PCA for data visualization. Our proposed system can enhance the reproducibility, reliability, and selectivity of odor sensor output, so it is expected to be applicable to diverse environmental problems including air pollution, and monitor the air quality of clean-air required buildings such as a kindergartens and hospitals. PMID:23443378

  2. Pattern recognition for selective odor detection with gas sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Seok; Kim, Jae Hun; Kim, Chulki; Byun, Young Tae; Kim, Hyung Seok; Lee, Taikjin

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new pattern recognition approach for enhancing the selectivity of gas sensor arrays for clustering intelligent odor detection. The aim of this approach was to accurately classify an odor using pattern recognition in order to enhance the selectivity of gas sensor arrays. This was achieved using an odor monitoring system with a newly developed neural-genetic classification algorithm (NGCA). The system shows the enhancement in the sensitivity of the detected gas. Experiments showed that the proposed NGCA delivered better performance than the previous genetic algorithm (GA) and artificial neural networks (ANN) methods. We also used PCA for data visualization. Our proposed system can enhance the reproducibility, reliability, and selectivity of odor sensor output, so it is expected to be applicable to diverse environmental problems including air pollution, and monitor the air quality of clean-air required buildings such as a kindergartens and hospitals. PMID:23443378

  3. Circumnuclear molecular gas in M87 detected with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahakis, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    We present the detection of circumnuclear molecular gas residing within 100 pc of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the galaxy M87 (3C 274), using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to image the gas on spatial scales from 100 to 10 pc. The proximity of M87, the archetypical giant elliptical radio galaxy at the centre of the Virgo galaxy cluster, presents a unique opportunity to investigate in detail the circumnuclear molecular gas revealed first by single-dish observations and recently imaged for the first time with ALMA (Vlahakis et al., in prep). ALMA's unique long baseline capability now allows us to make the first detailed investigation of the properties of the interstellar medium around the galaxy's SMBH on scales down to 10 pc (0.1 arcsec). Here, we present results of ALMA Band 3 CO J=1-0 observations obtained at different angular resolutions. With this data we are able to trace the bulk of the molecular gas as well as the continuum emission, providing the deepest and highest spatial resolution images yet of the molecular gas content of this giant elliptical galaxy. The highest resolution data allow us to unambiguously resolve the molecular gas structures for the first time and investigate, in unprecedented detail, the nature and origin of molecular gas that resides within the sphere of influence of the SMBH.

  4. Detection and Appraisal of Gas Hydrates: Indian Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, K.

    2009-04-01

    Gas hydrates, found in shallow sediments of permafrost and outer continental margins, are crystalline form of methane and water. The carbon within global gas hydrates is estimated two times the carbon contained in world-wide fossil fuels. It is also predicted that 15% recovery of gas hydrates can meet the global energy requirement for the next 200 years. Several parameters like bathymetry, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, rate of sedimentation and total organic carbon content indicate very good prospect of gas hydrates in the vast offshore regions of India. Methane stored in the form of gas hydrates within the Indian exclusive economic zone is estimated to be few hundred times the country's conventional gas reserve. India produces less than one-third of her oil requirement and gas hydrates provide great hopes as a viable source of energy in the 21st century. Thus identification and quantitative assessment of gas hydrates are very important. By scrutiny and reanalysis of available surface seismic data, signatures of gas hydrates have been found out in the Kerala-Konkan and Saurashtra basins in the western margin, and Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman regions in the eastern margin of India by mapping the bottom simulating reflector or BSR based on its characteristic features. In fact, the coring and drilling in 2006 by the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program have established the ground truth in the eastern margin. It has become all the more important now to identify further prospective regions with or without BSR; demarcate the lateral/areal extent of gas hydrate-bearing sediments and evaluate their resource potential in both margins of India. We have developed various approaches based on seismic traveltime tomography; waveform inversion; amplitude versus offset (AVO) modeling; AVO attributes; seismic attributes and rock physics modeling for the detection, delineation and quantification of gas-hydrates. The blanking, reflection strength, instantaneous

  5. Low-Cost Resonant Cavity Raman Gas Probe for Multi-Gas Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, J.; Haugholt, K. H.; Ferber, A.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Tschudi, J.

    2014-12-01

    Raman based gas sensing can be attractive in several industrial applications, due to its multi-gas sensing capabilities and its ability to detect O_2 and N_2. In this article, we have built a Raman gas probe, based on low-cost components, which has shown an estimated detection limit of 0.5 % for 30 second measurements of N_2 and O_2. While this detection limit is higher than that of commercially available equipment, our estimated component cost is approximately one tenth of the price of commercially available equipment. The use of a resonant Fabry-Pérot cavity increases the scattered signal, and hence the sensitivity, by a factor of 50. The cavity is kept in resonance using a piezo-actuated mirror and a photodiode in a feedback loop. The system described in this article was made with minimum-cost components to demonstrate the low-cost principle. However, it is possible to decrease the detection limit using a higher-powered (but still low-cost) laser and improving the collection optics. By applying these improvements, the detection limit and estimated measurement precision will be sufficient for e.g. the monitoring of input gases in combustion processes, such as e.g. (bio-)gas power plants. In these processes, knowledge about gas compositions with 0.1 % (absolute) precision can help regulate and optimize process conditions. The system has the potential to provide a low-cost, industrial Raman sensor that is optimized for specific gas-detection applications.

  6. Detection of circumstellar gas associated with GG Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrutskie, M. F.; Snell, R. L.; Strom, K. M.; Strom, S. E.; Edwards, S.; Fukui, Y.; Mizuno, A.; Hayashi, M.; Ohashi, N.

    1993-01-01

    Double-peaked (C-12)O (1-0) emission centered on the young T Tauri star GG Tau possesses a line profile which may be modeled on the assumption that CO emission arises in an extended circumstellar disk. While bounds on the observed gas mass can be estimated on this basis, it is suggested that a large amount of mass could lie within a small and optically thick region, escaping detection due to beam-dilution effects. In addition, CO may no longer accurately trace the gas mass due to its dissociation, or freezing into grains, or due to the locking-up of carbon into more complex molecules.

  7. Neutron detection by scintillation of noble-gas excimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Jacob Collin

    Neutron detection is a technique essential to homeland security, nuclear reactor instrumentation, neutron diffraction science, oil-well logging, particle physics and radiation safety. The current shortage of helium-3, the neutron absorber used in most gas-filled proportional counters, has created a strong incentive to develop alternate methods of neutron detection. Excimer-based neutron detection (END) provides an alternative with many attractive properties. Like proportional counters, END relies on the conversion of a neutron into energetic charged particles, through an exothermic capture reaction with a neutron absorbing nucleus (10B, 6Li, 3He). As charged particles from these reactions lose energy in a surrounding gas, they cause electron excitation and ionization. Whereas most gas-filled detectors collect ionized charge to form a signal, END depends on the formation of diatomic noble-gas excimers (Ar*2, Kr*2,Xe* 2) . Upon decaying, excimers emit far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons, which may be collected by a photomultiplier tube or other photon detector. This phenomenon provides a means of neutron detection with a number of advantages over traditional methods. This thesis investigates excimer scintillation yield from the heavy noble gases following the boron-neutron capture reaction in 10B thin-film targets. Additionally, the thesis examines noble-gas excimer lifetimes with relationship to gas type and gas pressure. Experimental data were collected both at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, and on a newly developed neutron beamline at the Maryland University Training Reactor. The components of the experiment were calibrated at NIST and the University of Maryland, using FUV synchrotron radiation, neutron imaging, and foil activation techniques, among others. Computer modeling was employed to simulate charged-particle transport and excimer photon emission within the experimental apparatus. The observed excimer

  8. Fuel leak detection apparatus for gas cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Burnette, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus is disclosed for detecting nuclear fuel leaks within nuclear power system reactors, such as high temperature gas cooled reactors. The apparatus includes a probe assembly that is inserted into the high temperature reactor coolant gaseous stream. The probe has an aperture adapted to communicate gaseous fluid between its inside and outside surfaces and also contains an inner tube for sampling gaseous fluid present near the aperture. A high pressure supply of noncontaminated gas is provided to selectively balance the pressure of the stream being sampled to prevent gas from entering the probe through the aperture. The apparatus includes valves that are operable to cause various directional flows and pressures, which valves are located outside of the reactor walls to permit maintenance work and the like to be performed without shutting down the reactor.

  9. Development of trace gas detection instrumentation. [using the heterodyne principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Breadboard hardware was constructed to demonstrate detection of a gaseous species by the heterodyne principle. The characteristics of the component parts were investigated and preliminary measurements were made to establish the sensitivity and selectivity of the method for gas analysis of CO, CO2, and N2O. A prototype heterodyne gas analyzer was designed, built, and brought into operational condition. Performance parameters of the prototype analyzer were investigated and its sensitivity to CO2 measured. Further development was undertaken for both the optical bench and the electronic processor components. A three-gas prototype analyzer, capable of measuring the gases CO, CO2, and CH4 was also constructed and tested. Detailed descriptions of the work and results are presented.

  10. Liquid metal-to-gas leak-detection instruments. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, E.; Witherspoon, J.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    It is desirable for liquid-metal-cooled reactors that small liquid metal-to-gas leaks be reliably detected. Testing has been performed on a number of detection systems to evaluate their sensitivity, response time, and performance characteristics. This testing has been scheduled in three phases. The first phase was aimed at screening out the least suitable detectors and optimizing the performance of the most promising. In the second phase, candidates were tested in a 1500 ft/sup 3/ walk-in type enclosure in which leaks were simulated on 24-in. and 3-in. piping. In the third phase of testing, selected type detectors were tested in the 1500-ft/sup 3/ enclosure with Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) pipe insulation configurations and detector tubing configuration with cell gas recirculation simulated. Endurance testing of detection equipment was also performed as part of this effort. Test results have been shown that aerosol-type detectors will reliably detect leaks as small as a few grams per hour when sampling pipe insulation annuli.

  11. Sulfur gas geochemical detection of hydrothermal systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a system of exploration using sulfur gases was capable of detecting convecting hydrothermal systems. Three surveying techniques were used at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA in Utah. These were (a) a sniffing technique, capable of instantaneous determinations of sulfur gas concentration, (b) an accumulator technique, capable of integrating the sulfur gas emanations over a 30 day interval, and (c) a method of analyzing the soils for vaporous sulfur compounds. Because of limitations in the sniffer technique, only a limited amount of surveying was done with this method. The accumulator and soil sampling techniques were conducted on a 1000 foot grid at Roosevelt Hot Springs, and each sample site was visited three times during the spring of 1980. Thus, three soil samples and two accumulator samples were collected at each site. The results are shown as averages of three soil and two accumulator determinations of sulfur gas concentrations at each site. Soil surveys and accumulator surveys were conducted at two additional KGRA's which were chosen based on the state of knowledge of these hydrothermal systems and upon their differences from Roosevelt Hot Springs in an effort to show that the exploration methods would be effective in detecting geothermal reservoirs in general. The results at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah show that each of the three surveying methods was capable of detecting sulfur gas anomalies which can be interpreted to be related to the source at depth, based on resistivity mapping of that source, and also correlatable with major structural features of the area which are thought to be controlling the geometry of the geothermal reservoir. The results of the surveys at Roosevelt did not indicate that either the soil sampling technique or the accumulator technique was superior to the other.

  12. Naturally fractured tight gas - gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, June 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, J.M.; Ortoleva, P.; Payne, D.; Sibo, W.

    1996-11-15

    This document contains the status report for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas-Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project for the contract period 9/30/93 to 3/31/97. Data from seismic surveys are analyzed for structural imaging of reflector units. The data were stacked using the new, improved statics and normal moveout velocities. The 3-D basin modeling effort is continuing with code development. The main activities of this quarter were analysis of fluid pressure data, improved sedimentary history, lithologic unit geometry reconstruction algorithm and computer module, and further improvement, verification, and debugging of the basin stress and multi-phase reaction transport module.

  13. Sensitive gas chromatographic detection of acetaldehyde and acetone using a reduction gas detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Dean; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a newly available mercuric oxide Reduction Gas Detector (RGD-2) to subpicomole and larger quantities of acetaldehyde and acetone is tested. The RGD-2 is found to be capable of subpicomole detection for these carbonyls and is more sensitive than an FID (Flame Ionization Detector) by an order of magnitude. Operating parameters can be further optimized to make the RGD-2 some 20-40 times more sensitive than an FID. The detector is linear over a wide range and is easily adapted to a conventional gas chromatograph (GC). Such a GC-RGD-2 system should be suitable for atmospheric carbonyl measurements in clean as well as polluted environments.

  14. ULTRASENSITIVE HIGH-TEMPERATURE SELECTIVE GAS DETECTION USING PIEZOELECTRIC MICROCANTILEVERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Y. Shih; Tejas Patil; Qiang Zhao; Yi-Shi Chiu; Wei-Heng Shih

    2004-03-05

    We have obtained very promising results in the Phase I study. Specifically, for temperature effects, we have established that piezoelectric cantilever sensors could retain their resonance peak strength at high temperatures, i.e., the Q values of the resonance peaks remained above 10 even when the temperature was very close to the Curie temperature. This confirms that a piezoelectric cantilever sensor can be used as a sensor up to its Curie temperature. Furthermore, we have shown that the mass detection sensitivity remained unchanged at different temperatures. For selective gas detection, we have demonstrated selective NH{sub 3} detection using piezoelectric cantilever sensors coated with mesoporous SiO{sub 2}. For high-temperature sensor materials development, we have achieved highly oriented Sr-doped lead titanate thin films that possessed superior dielectric and ferroelectric properties. Such highly oriented films can be microfabricated into high-performance piezoelectric microcantilever sensors that can be used up to 490 C. We have accomplished the goal of Phase I study in exploring the various aspects of a high-temperature gas sensor. We propose to continue the study in Phase II to develop a sensor that is suitable for high-temperature applications using piezoelectrics with a high Curie temperature and by controlling the effects of temperature. The lead titanate based thin film developed in Phase I is good for applications up to 490 C. In phase II, we will develop lithium niobate thin film based cantilevers for applications up to 1000 C.

  15. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-04-01

    The West Virginia University natural gas transmission line leak detection research is only considering using readily available 1/2 inch pipeline access ports for the detection of leak generated signals. The main problem with leak signals is the low signal to noise ratio. One of the acoustic signals associated with gas escaping through a leak is only temporary and is in the form of a rarefaction wave originating when the leak is formed. Due to pipeline friction, over distance such a step function transitions to a ramp function. The ability to identify a leak by pipeline monitoring and signal processing depends a great deal on the quality and signal to noise ratio of the characteristics of the detectors used. Combinations of sensing devices are being used for the WVU sensor package and are contained in a removable sensor housing. The four sensors currently installed are a 1/2 inch 3 Hz-40 Khz microphone, an audible range moving coil sensor, a piezo-electric pressure transducer, and the WVU designed floating 3 inch diameter diaphragm to detect flow transient induced pressure ramp type signals. The WVU diaphragm sensor, which is currently under development, uses the same diaphragm principle as a high quality capacitance type microphone, but utilizes aerodynamic signal amplification. This type of amplification only amplifies the ramp-signal itself, not the random pipeline noise.

  16. Detection of gas atoms via vibration of graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Behrouz; Wang, Quan; Duan, Wen Hui

    2011-06-01

    The application of single-layered graphene sheets as mass sensors in detection of noble gases via a vibration analysis of graphenes is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. An index based on frequency shifts of the graphenes attached by the distinct noble gas atoms is defined and examined to measure the sensitivity of the sensors. The dependence of number and location of gas atoms, size of graphene sheets, and type of restrained boundary of the sheets on the sensitivity is particularly studied. The simulation results indicate the resolution of a mass sensor made of a square graphene sheet with a size of 10 nm can achieve an order of 10 femtograms and the mass sensitivity can be enhanced with a decrease in sizes of graphenes.

  17. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-19

    This DOE-funded research into seismic detection of natural fractures is one of six projects within the DOE`s Detection and Analysis of Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs Program, a multidisciplinary research initiative to develop technology for prediction, detection, and mapping of naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The demonstration of successful seismic techniques to locate subsurface zones of high fracture density and to guide drilling orientation for enhanced fracture permeability will enable better returns on investments in the development of the vast gas reserves held in tight formations beneath the Rocky Mountains. The seismic techniques used in this project were designed to capture the azimuthal anisotropy within the seismic response. This seismic anisotropy is the result of the symmetry in the rock fabric created by aligned fractures and/or unequal horizontal stresses. These results may be compared and related to other lines of evidence to provide cross-validation. The authors undertook investigations along the following lines: Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in three-dimensional, P-wave seismic data; Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in a nine-component (P- and S-sources, three-component receivers) vertical seismic profile; Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in three-dimensional, P-to-S converted wave seismic data (P-wave source, three-component receivers); and Description of geological and reservoir-engineering data that corroborate the anisotropy: natural fractures observed at the target level and at the surface, estimation of the maximum horizontal stress in situ, and examination of the flow characteristics of the reservoir.

  18. Wireless gas detection with a smartphone via rf communication.

    PubMed

    Azzarelli, Joseph M; Mirica, Katherine A; Ravnsbæk, Jens B; Swager, Timothy M

    2014-12-23

    Chemical sensing is of critical importance to human health, safety, and security, yet it is not broadly implemented because existing sensors often require trained personnel, expensive and bulky equipment, and have large power requirements. This study reports the development of a smartphone-based sensing strategy that employs chemiresponsive nanomaterials integrated into the circuitry of commercial near-field communication tags to achieve non-line-of-sight, portable, and inexpensive detection and discrimination of gas-phase chemicals (e.g., ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, cyclohexanone, and water) at part-per-thousand and part-per-million concentrations. PMID:25489066

  19. Wireless gas detection with a smartphone via rf communication

    PubMed Central

    Azzarelli, Joseph M.; Mirica, Katherine A.; Ravnsbæk, Jens B.; Swager, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical sensing is of critical importance to human health, safety, and security, yet it is not broadly implemented because existing sensors often require trained personnel, expensive and bulky equipment, and have large power requirements. This study reports the development of a smartphone-based sensing strategy that employs chemiresponsive nanomaterials integrated into the circuitry of commercial near-field communication tags to achieve non-line-of-sight, portable, and inexpensive detection and discrimination of gas-phase chemicals (e.g., ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, cyclohexanone, and water) at part-per-thousand and part-per-million concentrations. PMID:25489066

  20. Atypical Applications for Gas-coupled Laser Acoustic Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, J. N.; Kunapareddy, P.

    2014-06-01

    Gas-coupled laser acoustic detection (GCLAD) was primarily developed to sense laser-generated ultrasound in composite materials. In a typical setup, a laser beam is directed parallel to the material surface. Radiated ultrasound waves deflect or displace the probe beam resulting from changes in the air's index of refraction. A position-sensitive photodetector senses the beam movement, and produces a signal proportional to the ultrasound wave. In this paper, we discuss three applications of GCLAD that take advantage of the unique detection characteristics. Directivity patterns of ultrasound amplitude in water demonstrate the use of GCLAD as a directional hydrophone. We also demonstrate the sensing of waveforms from a gelatin. The gelatin mimics ultrasound propagation through skin tissues. Lastly, we show how GCLAD can be used as a line receiver for continuous laser generation of ultrasound. CLGU may enable ultrasound scanning at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than current methods.

  1. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2016-06-28

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  2. High Altitude Aerial Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Richard T. Wainner; Mickey B. Frish; B. David Green; Matthew C. Laderer; Mark G. Allen; Joseph R. Morency

    2006-12-31

    The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective and power-efficient advanced standoff sensing technology able to detect and quantify, from a high-altitude (> 10,000 ft) aircraft, natural gas leaking from a high-pressure pipeline. The advanced technology is based on an enhanced version of the Remote Methane Leak Detector (RMLD) platform developed previously by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI). The RMLD combines a telecommunications-style diode laser, fiber-optic components, and low-cost DSP electronics with the well-understood principles of Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (WMS), to indicate the presence of natural gas located between the operator and a topographic target. The transceiver transmits a laser beam onto a topographic target and receives some of the laser light reflected by the target. The controller processes the received light signal to deduce the amount of methane in the laser's path. For use in the airborne platform, we modified three aspects of the RMLD, by: (1) inserting an Erbium-doped optical fiber laser amplifier to increase the transmitted laser power from 10 mW to 5W; (2) increasing the optical receiver diameter from 10 cm to 25 cm; and (3) altering the laser wavelength from 1653 nm to 1618 nm. The modified RMLD system provides a path-integrated methane concentration sensitivity {approx}5000 ppm-m, sufficient to detect the presence of a leak from a high capacity transmission line while discriminating against attenuation by ambient methane. In ground-based simulations of the aerial leak detection scenario, we demonstrated the ability to measure methane leaks within the laser beam path when it illuminates a topographic target 2000 m away. We also demonstrated simulated leak detection from ranges of 200 m using the 25 cm optical receiver without the fiber amplifier.

  3. Trace gas monitoring with infrared laser-based detection schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, M. W.; Bartlome, R.; Marinov, D.; Rey, J. M.; Vogler, D. E.; Wächter, H.

    2008-02-01

    The success of laser-based trace gas sensing techniques crucially depends on the availability and performance of tunable laser sources combined with appropriate detection schemes. Besides near-infrared diode lasers, continuously tunable midinfrared quantum cascade lasers and nonlinear optical laser sources are preferentially employed today. Detection schemes are based on sensitive absorption measurements and comprise direct absorption in multi-pass cells as well as photoacoustic and cavity ringdown techniques in various configurations. We illustrate the performance of several systems implemented in our laboratory. These include time-resolved multicomponent traffic emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser photoacoustic system, a diode-laser based cavity ringdown device for measurements of impurities in industrial process control, isotope ratio measurements with a difference frequency (DFG) laser source combined with balanced path length detection, detection of methylamines for breath analysis with both a near-IR diode laser and a DFG source, and finally, acetone measurements with a heatable multipass cell intended for vapor phase studies on doping agents in urine samples.

  4. Comparing Natural Gas Leakage Detection Technologies Using an Open-Source "Virtual Gas Field" Simulator.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Chandler E; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Brandt, Adam R

    2016-04-19

    We present a tool for modeling the performance of methane leak detection and repair programs that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of detection technologies and proposed mitigation policies. The tool uses a two-state Markov model to simulate the evolution of methane leakage from an artificial natural gas field. Leaks are created stochastically, drawing from the current understanding of the frequency and size distributions at production facilities. Various leak detection and repair programs can be simulated to determine the rate at which each would identify and repair leaks. Integrating the methane leakage over time enables a meaningful comparison between technologies, using both economic and environmental metrics. We simulate four existing or proposed detection technologies: flame ionization detection, manual infrared camera, automated infrared drone, and distributed detectors. Comparing these four technologies, we found that over 80% of simulated leakage could be mitigated with a positive net present value, although the maximum benefit is realized by selectively targeting larger leaks. Our results show that low-cost leak detection programs can rely on high-cost technology, as long as it is applied in a way that allows for rapid detection of large leaks. Any strategy to reduce leakage should require a careful consideration of the differences between low-cost technologies and low-cost programs. PMID:27007771

  5. Hydrocarbon gas detection with microelectromechanical Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannila, Rami; Tuohiniemi, Mikko; Mäkynen, Jussi; Näkki, Ismo; Antila, Jarkko

    2013-05-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed microelectromechanical (MEMS) Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) for hydrocarbon measurements. Fabry-Perot interferometer is a structure where is two highly reflective surfaces separated by a tunable air gap. The MEMS FPI is a monolithic device, i.e. it is made entirely on one substrate in a batch process, without assembling separate pieces together. The gap is adjusted by moving the upper mirror with electrostatic force, so there are no actual moving parts. The manufactured MEMS FPIs have been characterized. The tuning wavelength range of the MEMS FPI is 2.8-3.5 μm and its spectral resolution is 50-60 nm. VTT has designed and manufactured a handheld size demonstrator device based on the technology presented in this abstract. This device demonstrates gas detecting by measuring cigarette lighter gas and various plastic materials transmission spectra. The demonstrator contains light source, gas cell, MEMS FPI, detector and control electronics. It is connected to a laptop by USB connection, additional power supply or connection is not needed.

  6. Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J.

    2007-05-01

    The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETL’s Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

  7. Detection of atmospheric trace gas species by DOAS gas-analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2014-11-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) gas-analyzer was successfully tested. A high pressure 150-W Xe arc lamp was employed as a light source This system consisted of a coaxial telescope, a spectrometer, an analyzer and retroreflector. In order to record the spectra, a monochrometer with a grating and photodiode array was adopted. Gas analyzer spectral data bank includes more than 30 moleculas absorbed in UV spectral region. The measured absorption spectra were evaluated by using a least-squares fit to determine the average mixing ratio of each species in the atmosphere. A number of air pollutants concentrations: SO2, NO2, O3, etc were trace measured. Minimally detected concentration on pathlength 400 m is the unit of ppb at the time of accumulation of 2 min. The results of the field test measurements of pollutants in Tomsk are presented.

  8. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrocarbon detection in aeronautical applications is important for reasons of safety and emissions control. The use of silicon carbide as a semiconductor in a metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structure opens opportunities to measure hydrogen and hydrocarbons in high temperature environments beyond the capabilities of silicon-based devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the response and stability of Pd-SiC Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range from 100 to 400 C. The effect of heat treating on the diode properties as measured at 100 C is explored. Subsequent operation at 400 C demonstrates the diodes' sensitivity to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. It is concluded that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures but further studies are necessary to determine the diodes' long term stability.

  9. Digital array gas radiometer (DAGR): a sensitive and reliable trace gas detection concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, Larry L.; McHugh, Martin J.; Marshall, B. T.; Thompson, Earl

    2009-05-01

    The Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) concept is based on traditional and reliable Gas Filter Correlation Radiometry (GFCR) for remote trace gas detection and monitoring. GFCR sensors have been successful in many infrared remote sensing applications. Historically however, solar backscatter measurements have not been as successful because instrument designs have been susceptible to natural variations in surface albedo, which induce clutter and degrade the sensitivity. DAGR overcomes this limitation with several key innovations. First, a pupil imaging system scrambles the received light, removing nearly all spatial clutter and permitting a small calibration source to be easily inserted. Then, by using focal plane arrays rather than single detectors to collect the light, dramatic advances in dynamic range can be achieved. Finally, when used with the calibration source, data processing approaches can further mitigate detector non-uniformity effects. DAGR sensors can be made as small as digital cameras and are well suited for downlooking detection of gases in the boundary layer, where solar backscatter measurements are needed to overcome the lack of thermal contrast in the IR. Easily integrated into a satellite platform, a space-based DAGR would provide near-global sensing of climatically important species such as such as CO, CH4, and N2O. Aircraft and UAV measurements with a DAGR could be used to monitor agricultural and industrial emissions. Ground-based or portable DAGRs could augment early warning systems for chemical weapons or toxic materials. Finally, planetary science applications include detection and mapping of biomarkers such as CH4 in the Martian atmosphere.

  10. Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meola, C.; Carlomagno, G. M.; di Foggia, M.; Natale, O.

    2008-06-01

    A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in fact, the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and may cause difficulties in successive manufacturing. Therefore, it is important to have a non-destructive technique that must be capable of detecting tiny ceramic fragments in a fast and easy way. In this perspective, the suitability of infrared thermography was investigated within cooperation between the University of Naples and the Europea Microfusioni Aerospaziali S.p.A. (EMA). Several blades of three different types were inspected revealing that in many cases infrared thermography can discover small ceramic fragments which were missed by X-ray inspection. In addition, infrared thermography allows gaining of information about other types of anomalies (e.g., surface defects) during the same testing step (by eventually changing the test parameters) and then saving time and money. The obtained results look promising in view of introducing infrared thermography among industrial instrumentation as an alternative to, or integrated with, the most currently utilized non-destructive techniques.

  11. a Mini Multi-Gas Detection System Based on Infrared Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Xie; Qiulin, Tan

    2006-12-01

    To counter the problems of gas accidents in coal mines, family safety resulted from using gas, a new infrared detection system with integration and miniaturization has been developed. The infrared detection optics principle used in developing this system is mainly analyzed. The idea that multi gas detection is introduced and guided through analyzing single gas detection is got across. Through researching the design of cell structure, the cell with integration and miniaturization has been devised. The way of data transmission on Controller Area Network (CAN) bus is explained. By taking Single-Chip Microcomputer (SCM) as intelligence handling, the functional block diagram of gas detection system is designed with its hardware and software system analyzed and devised. This system designed has reached the technology requirement of lower power consumption, mini-volume, big measure range, and able to realize multi-gas detection.

  12. Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer (GCR) for Trace Gas Detection in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Melroy, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Here, we present a miniaturized and simplified version of this instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR instrument has been achieved by implementing a lightweight, 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fiber (hollow waveguide) for the gas correlation cell. Based on a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 gas correlation instrument, replacement of the 10 meter mUltipass cell with hollow waveguide of equivalent pathlength reduces the cell mass from approx 150 kg to approx 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately I meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). This modular instrument technique can be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance.

  13. Improved low concentration gas detection system based on intracavity fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Liu, Kun; Jia, Dagong; Xu, Tianhua; Liu, Tiegen; Peng, Gangding; Jing, Wencai; Zhang, Yimo

    2011-02-01

    The improvement of a low concentration gas detection system based on the intracavity fiber laser is proposed in this paper. The sensitivity of the system is deduced based on Lambert-Beer law. The optimized system was established with the gas cell made elaborately. In order to apply the wavelength sweeping technique, the fiber Bragg grating reflector was substituted by the wavelength independent Faraday rotation reflector. The sensitivity of the system for acetylene detection is reduced to less than 100 ppm by using the average of three absorption spectra. The acetylene detection coefficients of variation with different concentrations are measured. The gas measurement system is validated to detect low concentration gas effectively.

  14. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  15. Numerical investigation of coal seam gas detection using airborne electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, Mohamed

    The use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) techniques has been mostly utilized in the mining industry. The various AEM systems enable fast data acquisition to detect zones of interest in exploration and in some cases are used to delineate targets on a production scale. For coal seam gas (CSG) reservoirs, reservoir thickness and the resistivity contrast present a new challenge to the present AEM systems in terms of detectability. Our research question began with the idea of using AEM methods in the detection of thin reservoirs. CSG reservoirs resemble thin reservoirs that have been and are currently being produced. In this thesis we present the results of a feasibility analysis of AEM study on coal seam reservoirs using synthetic models. The aim of the study is to contribute and bridge the gap of the scientific literature on AEM systems in settings such as CSG exploration. In the models we have chosen to simulate both in 1-D and 3-D, the CSG target resistivity was varied from a resistive to a conductive target (4 ohm.m, 150 ohm.m, and 667 ohm.m) to compare the different responses while the target thickness was fixed to resemble a stack of coal seams at that interval. Due to the differences in 1-D and 3-D modelling, we also examine the differences resulting from each modelling set up. The results of the 1-D forward modeling served as a first order understanding of the detection depths by AEM for CSG reservoirs. Three CSG reservoir horizontally layered earth model scenarios were examined, half-space, conductive/resistive and resistive/conductive. The response behavior for each of the three scenarios differs with the differing target resistivities. The 1-D modeling in both the halfspace and conductive/resistive models shows detection at depths beyond 300 m for three cases of target resistivity outlined above. After the 300-m depth, the response falls below the assumed noise floor level of 5% response difference. However, when a resistive layer overlies a conductive host

  16. Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

  17. 46 CFR 154.709 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment. 154.709 Section 154.709 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.709 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection...

  18. 46 CFR 154.709 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment. 154.709 Section 154.709 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.709 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection...

  19. 46 CFR 154.709 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment. 154.709 Section 154.709 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.709 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection...

  20. 46 CFR 154.709 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment. 154.709 Section 154.709 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.709 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection...

  1. 46 CFR 154.709 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment. 154.709 Section 154.709 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.709 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection...

  2. Field tests of probes for detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, Michael S.; Kane, Russell D.; Meidinger, Brian

    2005-01-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. Results and interpretation will be reported from four different field tests. Flange and flush-mount probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different orientations at a natural gas plant. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions in a gas transmission pipeline. The environments consisted of 2 different levels of humidified natural gas/organic/water mixtures removed from natural gas, and the environments at the 6 and 12 o'clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

  3. Thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Conventional multi-component gas analysis is based either on laser spectroscopy, laser and photoacoustic absorption at specific wavelengths, or on gas chromatography by separating the components of a gas mixture primarily due to boiling point (or vapor pressure) differences. This paper will present a new gas molecular mass detection method based on thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection by fiber Bragg grating-based gas sensors. Such a nanomaterial and fiber Bragg grating integrated sensing device has been designed to be operated either at high-energy level (highly thermal strained status) or at low-energy level (low thermal strained status). Thermal energy absorption of gas molecular trigs the sensing device transition from high-thermal-energy status to low-thermal- energy status. Experiment has shown that thermal energy variation due to gas molecular thermal energy absorption is dependent upon the gas molecular mass, and can be detected by fiber Bragg resonant wavelength shift with a linear function from 17 kg/kmol to 32 kg/kmol and a sensitivity of 0.025 kg/kmol for a 5 micron-thick nano-trampoline structure and fiber Bragg grating integrated gas sensing device. The laboratory and field validation data have further demonstrated its fast response characteristics and reliability to be online gas analysis instrument for measuring effective gas molecular mass from single-component gas, binary-component gas mixture, and multi-gas mixture. The potential industrial applications include fouling and surge control for gas charge centrifugal compressor ethylene production, gas purity for hydrogen-cooled generator, gasification for syngas production, gasoline/diesel and natural gas fuel quality monitoring for consumer market.

  4. Evaluation of Gas Chromatography/Mini-IMS to Detect VOCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Reese, Eric; Peters, Randy; James, John T.; Billica, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Toxicology Laboratory at Johnson Space Center (JSC) has pioneered the use of gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (GC/IMS) for measuring target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) aboard spacecraft. Graseby Dynamics, under contract to NASA/Wyle, has built several volatile organic analyzers (VOA) based on GC/IMS. Foremost among these have been the volatile organic analyzer-risk mitigation unit and the two flight VOA units for International Space Station (ISS). The development and evaluation of these instruments has been chronicled through presentations at the International Conference on Ion Mobility Spectrometry over the past three years. As the flight VOA from Graseby is prepared for operation on ISS at JSC, it is time to begin evaluations of technologies for the next generation VOA, Although the desired instrument characteristics for the next generation unit are the same as the current unit, the requirements are much more stringent. As NASA looks toward future missions beyond Earth environs, a premium will be placed upon small, light, reliable, autonomous hardware. It is with these visions in mind that the JSC Toxicology Laboratory began a search for the next generation VOA. One technology that is a candidate for the next generation VOA is GC/IMS. The recent miniaturization of IMS technology permits it to compete with other, inherently small, technologies such as chip-sized sensor arrays. This paper will discuss the lessons learned from the VOA experience and how that has shaped the design of a potential second generation VOA based upon GC/IMS technology. Data will be presented from preliminary evaluations of GC technology and the mini-IMS when exposed to VOCs likely to be detected aboard spacecraft. Results from the evaluation of an integrated GC/mini-IMS system will be shown if available.

  5. Detection of gas hydrate sediments using prestack seismic AVA inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ru-Wei; Li, Hong-Qi; Zhang, Bao-Jin; Huang, Han-Dong; Wen, Peng-Fei

    2015-09-01

    Bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) in seismic profile always indicate the bottom of gas hydrate stability zone, but is difficult to determine the distribution and features of gas hydrate sediments (GHS). In this study, based on AVA forward modeling and angle-domain common-image gathers we use prestack AVA parameters consistency inversion in predicting gas hydrate sediments in the Shenhu area at northern slope of South China Sea, and obtain the vertical and lateral features and saturation of GHS.

  6. Methane leaks from oil and gas fields detected from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Julia

    2014-11-01

    A few years ago, while poring over satellite images of the Earth at night, scientists spotted the bright glow of natural gas flares burning in the oil and gas fields that have fueled America's recent energy boom. Now they have spotted something else from space: large plumes of fugitive methane gas liberated from these formations by unconventional extraction methods like horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing.

  7. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well. PMID:25144442

  8. SOIL-GAS MEASUREMENT FOR DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE ORGANIC CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lockheed Gas Analysis System (LGAS) grab-sampling method and the PETREX Static Surface Trapping Pyrolysis/Mass Spectrometry (SST-Py/MS) passive sampling technique for soil-gas measurement have been field tested at the Pittman Lateral near Henderson, Nevada. This site has unco...

  9. Portable instrument and method for detecting reduced sulfur compounds in a gas

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, J.S.; Kelly, T.J.; Tanner, R.L.

    1983-06-01

    A portable real time instrument for detecting concentrations in the part per billion range of reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas. Ozonized air or oxygen and reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas stream react to produce chemiluminescence in a reaction chamber and the emitted light is filtered and observed by a photomultiplier to detect reduced sulfur compounds. Selective response to individual sulfur compounds is achieved by varying reaction chamber temperature and ozone and sample gas flows, and by the use of either air or oxygen as the ozone source gas.

  10. Gas hydrate detection and mapping on the US east coast

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Dillon, W.P.

    1993-12-31

    Project objectives are to identify and map gas hydrate accumulations on the US eastern continental margin using remote sensing (seismic profiling) techniques and to relate these concentrations to the geological factors that-control them. In order to test the remote sensing methods, gas hydrate-cemented sediments will be tested in the laboratory and an effort will be made to perform similar physical tests on natural hydrate-cemented sediments from the study area. Gas hydrate potentially may represent a future major resource of energy. Furthermore, it may influence climate change because it forms a large reservoir for methane, which is a very effective greenhouse gas; its breakdown probably is a controlling factor for sea-floor landslides; and its presence has significant effect on the acoustic velocity of sea-floor sediments.

  11. Fibre optic systems for gas detection principals, progress and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Gas sensing is evolving into an important application contributing particularly to environmental and safety monitoring. Fibre optic sensing will have an important role to play as the need for gas measurements increase. This paper seeks to overview of the optical techniques which are compatible with fibre optic technology and present a limited snapshot of the applications. Fibre optic techniques offer intrinsic safety, reliability and very long interrogation distances over the fibre link together with prospects for highly multiplexed and distributed systems. There are two basic approaches for fibre sensing targeted at gas measurements. The first involves some intermediate compound in contact with the end of the fibre (or deposited along the fibre) whose optical properties change with the presence of the gas of interest, usually measured spectroscopically. The second involves direct absorption spectroscopy typically in the near infrared. Former techniques are invariably responsive to a number of gas species and are usually difficult to calibrate accurately. The latter techniques are highly gas specific and can be accurately calibrated. However both approaches have their application sectors depending upon particular measurement requirements. The paper presents a brief overview of the principles of both these techniques and analyses some of their applications.

  12. Sensing Mechanisms for Carbon Nanotube Based NH3 Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ning; Zhang, Qing; Chow, Chee L.; Tan, Ooi K.; Marzari, Nicola N.

    2009-03-31

    There has been an argument on carbon nanotube (CNT) based gas detectors with a field-effect transistor (FET) geometry: do the response signals result from charge transfer between adsorbed gas molecules and the CNT channel and/or from the gas species induced Schottky barrier modulation at the CNT/metal contacts? To differentiate the sensing mechanisms, we employed three CNTFET structures, i.e., (1) the entire CNT channel and CNT/electrode contacts are accessible to NH3 gas; (2) the CNT/electrode contacts are passivated with a Si3N4 thin film, leaving the CNT channel open to the gas and, in contrast, (3) the CNT channel is covered with the film, while the contacts are open to the gas. We suggest that the Schottky barrier modulation at the contacts is the dominant mechanism from room temperature to 150°C. At higher temperatures, the charge transfer process contributes to the response signals. There is a clear evidence that the adsorption of NH3 on the CNT channel is facilitated by environmental oxygen.

  13. A gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method for helium detection in postmortem blood and tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Schaff, Jason E; Karas, Roman P; Marinetti, Laureen

    2012-03-01

    In cases of death by inert gas asphyxiation, it can be difficult to obtain toxicological evidence supporting assignment of a cause of death. Because of its low mass and high diffusivity, and its common use as a carrier gas, helium presents a particular challenge in this respect. We describe a rapid and simple gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method to qualitatively screen a variety of postmortem biological specimens for the presence of helium. Application of this method is demonstrated with three case examples, encompassing an array of different biological matrices. PMID:22337780

  14. Near infrared spectroscopy for fibre based gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, George; Johnstone, Walter; Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian

    2010-04-01

    Gas sensing systems based on fibre optic linked near infra red absorption cells are potentially a flexible and effective tool for monitoring accumulations of hazardous and noxious gases in enclosed areas such as tunnels and mines. Additionally the same baseline technology is readily modified to measure concentrations of hydrocarbon fuels - notably but not exclusively methane, and monitoring emissions of greenhouse gases. Furthermore the system can be readily implemented to provide intrinsically safe monitoring over extensive areas at up to ~250 points from a single interrogation unit. In this paper we review our work on fibre coupled gas sensing systems. We outline the basic principles through which repeatable and accurate self calibrating gas measurements may be realised, including the recover of detailed line shapes for non contact temperature and / or pressure measurements in addition to concentration assessments in harsh environments. We also outline our experience in using these systems in extensive networks operating under inhospitable conditions over extended periods extending to several years.

  15. Photoacoustic spectrometry for trace gas analysis and leak detection using different cell geometries.

    PubMed

    Gondal, M A; Dastageer, A; Shwehdi, M H

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer with high selectivity and sensitivity has been developed for trace gas analysis and for the detection of gas leak at part per trillion by volume (pptV) level. This PA system comprises of a resonant photoacoustic cell, a pulsed line tunable CO(2) laser as an excitation source and a sensitive electret microphone as a photoacoustic detector with an option to trigger the safety alarm system for early warning of gas leaks. In this work, three resonant PA cells with various geometries have been developed at our laboratory for the detection of photoacoustic signal using pulsed laser system and their comparative performance have been studied. As a special application of this PA system, the detection of sulfur hexa fluoride (SF(6)) gas using these three cells has been carried out for optimizing the sensitivity. Besides this, our PA system can very well be applied for pollution monitoring and detection of hazardous gases in a noisy environment. PMID:18969274

  16. Three-gas detection system with IR optical sensor based on NDIR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiulin; Tang, Licheng; Yang, Mingliang; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a three-gas detection system with a environmental parameter compensation method is proposed based on Non-dispersive infra-red (NDIR) technique, which can be applied to detect multi-gas (methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide). In this system, an IR source and four single-channel pyroelectric sensors are integrated in the miniature optical gas chamber successfully. Inner wall of the chamber coated with Au film is designed as paraboloids. The infrared light is reflected twice before reaching to detectors, thus increasing optical path. Besides, a compensation method is presented to overcome the influence in variation of environment (ambient temperature, humidity and pressure), thus leading to improve the accuracy in gas detection. Experimental results demonstrated that detection ranges are 0-50,000 ppm for CH4, 0-44,500 ppm for CO, 0-48,000 ppm for CO2 and the accuracy is ±0.05%.

  17. Systems and methods for detecting a flame in a fuel nozzle of a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Storey, James Michael; Lipinski, John; Mestroni, Julio Enrique; Williamson, David Lee; Marshall, Jason Randolph; Krull, Anthony

    2013-05-07

    A system may detect a flame about a fuel nozzle of a gas turbine. The gas turbine may have a compressor and a combustor. The system may include a first pressure sensor, a second pressure sensor, and a transducer. The first pressure sensor may detect a first pressure upstream of the fuel nozzle. The second pressure sensor may detect a second pressure downstream of the fuel nozzle. The transducer may be operable to detect a pressure difference between the first pressure sensor and the second pressure sensor.

  18. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    John L. LOTH; GARY J. MORRIS; GEORGE M. PALMER; RICHARD GUILER

    2004-01-05

    The power point presentation for the Natural Gas Technologies II Conference held on February 8-11, 2004 in Phoenix AZ, published the presentations made at the conference, therefore required all presenters to submit their presentation prior to November 2003. However in the remainder of year, significant new test data became available which were incorporated in the actual presentation made at the Natural Gas Technologies II Conference. The 6th progress report presents the updated actual slide show used during the paper presentation by Richard Guiler.

  19. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  20. On-chip mid-infrared gas detection using chalcogenide glass waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Lin, P.; Singh, V.; Kimerling, L.; Hu, J.; Richardson, K.; Agarwal, A.; Tan, D. T. H.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an on-chip sensor for room-temperature detection of methane gas using a broadband spiral chalcogenide glass waveguide coupled with off-chip laser and detector. The waveguide is fabricated using UV lithography patterning and lift-off after thermal evaporation. We measure the intensity change due to the presence and concentration of methane gas in the mid-infrared (MIR) range. This work provides an approach for broadband planar MIR gas sensing.

  1. First results of ground-based LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Yu, Chun-chao; Wang, Hai-yang; Fu, Yan-peng; Liao, Ning-fang; Su, Jun-hong

    2014-11-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented. The LWIR hyperspectral imaging by using the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy, and the results of outdoor ether gas detection, verify the features of LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote sensing and technical approach. It provides a new technical means for ground-based gas remote sensing.

  2. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inexpensive imaging Instrument to quickly locate leaks of methane and other greenhouse and VOC gases would reduce the cost and effort expended by industry to comply with EPA regulations. In Phase I, of this WBIR program, a new gas leak visualization camera was demonstrated...

  3. Gas and flame detection and identification using uncooled MWIR imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, Rodrigo; Vergara, Germán.; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Fernández, Carlos; Villamayor, Víctor; Gómez, Luis; González-Camino, María.; Baldasano, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Gas detectors are nowadays widely spread for safety purposes in industrial facilities. They are categorized by the type of gas they detect: combustible and/or toxic. Whereas electrochemical sensors have limited lifetime and maintenance issues, infrared sensors are reliable and free of maintenance devices used for detecting a wide variety of VOCs and inflammable gases such as hydrocarbon vapors. They usually work via a system of transmitters (light sources) which power is interfered when a gas is present in the optical path. A spectral analysis of this optical interference allows the gas detection and identification. Optical flame detectors are sensors intended to sight and respond to the presence of a flame, faster than a smoke detector or a heat detector would do. Many of these systems operate in the infrared band in order to detect the heat radiation, most of the times by comparison of three specific wavelength bands. Most of the present infrared gas and optical flame detectors traditionally make use of MWIR single point sensors rather than imaging sensors; this is mainly due to the lack of affordable imaging sensing technologies in this band of the infrared spectrum. However, the appearance of uncooled imaging MWIR sensors made of VPD PbSe, with spectral detection range from 1 to 5 microns, opens the possibility to incorporate these sensors into gas and flame detection systems to allow area monitoring.

  4. Fiber-Optic Based Compact Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim A.

    1995-01-01

    A propellant leak detection system based on Raman scattering principles is introduced. The proposed system is flexible and versatile as the result of the use of optical fibers. It is shown that multiple species can be monitored simultaneously. In this paper oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen are detected and monitored. The current detection sensitivity for both hydrogen and carbon monoxide is 1% partial pressure at ambient conditions. The sensitivity for oxygen and nitrogen is 0.5% partial pressure. The response time to changes in species concentration is three minutes. This system can be used to monitor multiple species at several locations.

  5. Evaluating Gas-Phase Transport And Detection Of Noble Gas Signals From Underground Nuclear Explosions Using Chemical Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, C. R.; Hunter, S. L.; Sun, Y.; Wagoner, J. L.; Ruddle, D.; Anderson, G.; Felske, D.; Myers, K.; Zucca, J. J.; Emer, D. F.; Townsend, M.; Drellack, S.; Chipman, V.; Snelson, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) involved detonating 1 kiloton of chemical explosive in a subsurface cavity which also contained bottles of tracer gases (ref 1). That experiment provided an improved understanding of transport processes relevant to the detection of noble gas signals at the surface emanating from a clandestine underground nuclear explosion (UNE). As an alternative to performing large chemical detonations to simulate gas transport from UNEs, we have developed a test bed for subsurface gas transport, sampling and detection studies using a former UNE cavity. The test bed site allows for the opportunity to evaluate pathways to the surface created by the UNE as well as possible transport mechanisms including barometric pumping and cavity pressurization (ref 2). With the test bed we have monitored long-term chemical tracers as well as newly injected tracers. In order to perform high temporal resolution tracer gas monitoring, we have also developed a Subsurface Gas Smart Sampler (SGSS) which has application during an actual On Site Inspection (OSI) and is available for deployment in OSI field exercises planned for 2014. Deployment of five SGSS at the remote test bed has provided unparalleled detail concerning relationships involving tracer gas transport to the surface, barometric fluctuations and temporal variations in the natural radon concentration. We anticipate that the results of our tracer experiments will continue to support the development of improved noble gas detection technology for both OSI and International Monitoring System applications. 1. C.R. Carrigan et al., 1996, Nature, 382, p. 528. 2. Y. Sun and C.R. Carrigan, 2012, Pure Appl. Geophys., DOI 10.1007/s00024-012-0514-4.

  6. Semiconducting Metal Oxide Based Sensors for Selective Gas Pollutant Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Sofian M.; El-Kadri, Oussama M.; Abu-Yousef, Imad A.; Kanan, Marsha C.

    2009-01-01

    A review of some papers published in the last fifty years that focus on the semiconducting metal oxide (SMO) based sensors for the selective and sensitive detection of various environmental pollutants is presented. PMID:22408500

  7. Instrumental Analysis in Environmental Chemistry - Gas Phase Detection Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedman, Donald H.; Meyers, Philip A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses advances made in chemical analysis instrumentation used in environmental monitoring. This first of two articles is concerned with analytical instrumentation in which detection and dispersion depend ultimately on the properties of gaseous molecules. (JR)

  8. Detecting gas hydrate behavior in crude oil using NMR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuqiang; House, Waylon; Chapman, Walter G

    2006-04-01

    Because of the associated experimental difficulties, natural gas hydrate behavior in black oil is poorly understood despite its grave importance in deep-water flow assurance. Since the hydrate cannot be visually observed in black oil, traditional methods often rely on gas pressure changes to monitor hydrate formation and dissociation. Because gases have to diffuse through the liquid phase for hydrate behavior to create pressure responses, the complication of gas mass transfer is involved and hydrate behavior is only indirectly observed. This pressure monitoring technique encounters difficulties when the oil phase is too viscous, the amount of water is too small, or the gas phase is absent. In this work we employ proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to observe directly the liquid-to-solid conversion of the water component in black oil emulsions. The technique relies on two facts. The first, well-known, is that water becomes essentially invisible to liquid state NMR as it becomes immobile, as in hydrate or ice formation. The second, our recent finding, is that in high magnetic fields of sufficient homogeneity, it is possible to distinguish water from black oil spectrally by their chemical shifts. By following changes in the area of the water peak, the process of hydrate conversion can be measured, and, at lower temperatures, the formation of ice. Taking only seconds to accomplish, this measurement is nearly direct in contrast to conventional techniques that measure the pressure changes of the whole system and assume these changes represent formation or dissociation of hydrates - rather than simply changes in solubility. This new technique clearly can provide accurate hydrate thermodynamic data in black oils. Because the technique measures the total mobile water with rapidity, extensions should prove valuable in studying the dynamics of phase transitions in emulsions. PMID:16570953

  9. Limit of detection of 15{sub N} by gas-chromatography atomic emission detection: Optimization using an experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Deruaz, D.; Bannier, A.; Pionchon, C.

    1995-08-01

    This paper deals with the optimal conditions for the detection of {sup 15}N determined using a four-factor experimental design from [2{sup 13}C,-1,3 {sup 15}N] caffeine measured with an atomic emission detector (AED) coupled to gas chromatography (GC). Owing to the capability of a photodiodes array, AED can simultaneously detect several elements using their specific emission lines within a wavelength range of 50 nm. So, the emissions of {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N are simultaneously detected at 420.17 nm and 421.46 nm respectively. Four independent experimental factors were tested (1) helium flow rate (plasma gas); (2) methane pressure (reactant gas); (3) oxygen pressure; (4) hydrogen pressure. It has been shown that these four gases had a significant influence on the analytical response of {sup 15}N. The linearity of the detection was determined using {sup 15}N amounts ranging from 1.52 pg to 19 ng under the optimal conditions obtained from the experimental design. The limit of detection was studied using different methods. The limits of detection of {sup 15}N was 1.9 pg/s according to the IUPAC method (International-Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry). The method proposed by Quimby and Sullivan gave a value of 2.3 pg/s and that of Oppenheimer gave a limit of 29 pg/s. For each determination, and internal standard: 1-isobutyl-3.7 dimethylxanthine was used. The results clearly demonstrate that GC AED is sensitive and selective enough to detect and measure {sup 15}N-labelled molecules after gas chromatographic separation.

  10. Temperature and pressure measurement based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with gas absorption linewidth detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yunxia; Liu, Tiegen; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ranran

    2014-11-01

    A gas temperature and pressure measurement method based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) detecting linewidth of gas absorption line was proposed in this paper. Combined with Lambert-Beer Law and ideal gas law, the relationship between temperature, pressure and gas linewidth with Lorentzian line shape was investigated in theory. Taking carbon monoxide (CO) at 1567.32 nm for example, the linewidths of gas absorption line in different temperatures and pressures were obtained by simulation. The relationship between the linewidth of second harmonic and temperature, pressure with the coefficient 0.025 pm/K and 0.0645 pm/kPa respectively. According to the relationship of simulation results and detected linewidth, the undefined temperature and pressure of CO gas were measured. The gas temperature and pressure measurement based on linewidth detection, avoiding the influence of laser intensity, is an effective temperature and pressure measurement method. This method also has the ability to detect temperature and pressure of other gases with Lorentzian line shape.

  11. False-alarm characterization in hyperspectral gas-detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPietro, Robert S.; Truslow, Eric; Manolakis, Dimitris G.; Golowich, Steven E.; Lockwood, Ronald B.

    2012-09-01

    Chemical cloud detection using long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral-imaging sensors has many civilian and military applications, including chemical warfare threat mitigation, environmental monitoring, and emergency response. Current capabilities are limited by variation in background clutter as opposed to the physics of photon detection, and this makes the statistical characterization of clutter and clutter-induced false alarms essential to the design of practical systems. In this exploratory work, we use hyperspectral data collected both on the ground and in the air to spectrally and spatially characterize false alarms. Focusing on two widely-used detectors, the matched filter (MF) and the adaptive cosine estimator (ACE), we compare empirical false-alarm rates to their theoretical counterparts - detector output under Gaussian, t and t-mixture distributed data - and show that these models often underestimate false-alarm rates. Next, we threshold real detection maps and show that true detections and false alarms often exhibit very different spatial behavior. To exploit this difference and understand how spatial processing affects performance, the spatial behavior of false alarms must be understood. We take a first step in this direction by showing that, although the behavior may `look' quite random, it is not well captured by the complete-spatial-randomness model. Finally, we describe how our findings impact the design of real detection systems.

  12. Detecting gas seeps in Arctic water areas using remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.; Kuznetsova, T. V.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the specific features of remote registration of sources of natural hydrocarbon gas seeps in Arctic water areas to substantiate the possibility of aerospace monitoring of shelf zones prospective for hydrocarbons. The main characteristics of degassing sources and their manifestations at the surface and in the water column have been determined. The areas of the Arctic shelf with potential natural gas shows that can be detected through remote sensing have been identified. We analyze promising aerospace methods for the registration of gas shows in the sea and give examples of hydrocarbon gas seeps observed from space.

  13. Neutron detection with noble gas scintillation: a review of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Coplan, Michael; Miller, Eric C.; Thompson, Alan K.; Kowler, Alex; Vest, Rob; Yue, Andrew; Koeth, Tim; Al-Sheikhly, Mohammad; Clark, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Thermal neutron detection is of vital importance to many disciplines, including neutron scattering, workplace monitoring, and homeland protection. We survey recent results from our collaboration which couple low-pressure noble gas scintillation with novel approaches to neutron absorbing materials and geometries to achieve potentially advantageous detector concepts. Noble gas scintillators were used for neutron detection as early as the late 1950's. Modern use of noble gas scintillation includes liquid and solid forms of argon and xenon in the dark matter and neutron physics experiments and commercially available high pressure applications have achieved high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. Little attention has been paid to the overlap between low pressure noble gas scintillation and thermal neutron detection, for which there are many potential benefits.

  14. Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Michael A.; Sirinakis, George

    2011-01-04

    A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

  15. A solenoid failure detection system for cold gas attitude control jet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    The development of a solenoid valve failure detection system is described. The technique requires the addition of a radioactive gas to the propellant of a cold gas jet attitude control system. Solenoid failure is detected with an avalanche radiation detector located in the jet nozzle which senses the radiation emitted by the leaking radioactive gas. Measurements of carbon monoxide leakage rates through a Mariner type solenoid valve are presented as a function of gas activity and detector configuration. A cylindrical avalanche detector with a factor of 40 improvement in leak sensitivity is proposed for flight systems because it allows the quantity of radioactive gas that must be added to the propellant to be reduced to a practical level.

  16. Gas detection mechanism for single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony; Dube, Isha; Fedorov, Georgy; Paranjape, Makarand; Barbara, Paola; Georgetown/RRC Kurchatov Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    We study field-effect transistors fabricated with carbon nanotube (CNT) networks to determine whether the gas sensing mechanism is due to molecules adsorbed on the nanotubes, or changes at the interface between the nanotubes and the contacts. Our previous work showed that in devices made with isolated CNT, the response to nitrogen dioxide was mainly due to the contact interfaces. Here, we focus on CNT networks and use SU-8 layers patterned with e-beam lithography to passivate the contact interfaces, while leaving the network exposed. We look to investigate possible differences in sensing mechanism for devices made with isolated tubes versus networks. Work funded by NSF, DMR 1008242.

  17. Gas detection for alternate-fuel vehicle facilities.

    PubMed

    Ferree, Steve

    2003-05-01

    Alternative fuel vehicles' safety is driven by local, state, and federal regulations in which fleet owners in key metropolitan [table: see text] areas convert much of their fleet to cleaner-burning fuels. Various alternative fuels are available to meet this requirement, each with its own advantages and requirements. This conversion to alternative fuels leads to special requirements for safety monitoring in the maintenance facilities and refueling stations. A comprehensive gas and flame monitoring system needs to meet the needs of both the user and the local fire marshal. PMID:12754860

  18. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infrared (IR) imaging is the best method for detecting leaks of pollutant gases, but current technology based on cooled IR imagers is far too expensive ($75,000 to $150,000) for everyday field use by those who need it to meet regulatory limits—electric and petrochemical ...

  19. Detection of unknown gas-phase chemical plumes in hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, James; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2013-05-01

    Gas-phase chemical plumes exhibit, particularly in the infrared, distinctive emission signatures as a function of wavelength. Hyperspectral imagery can exploit this distinctiveness to detect specific chemicals, even at low concentrations, using matched filters that are tailored both the the specific structure of the chemical signature and to the statistics of the background clutter. But what if the chemical species is unknown? One can apply matched filters to a long list of candidate chemicals (or chemical mixtures), or one can treat the problem as one of anomaly detection. In this case, however, the anomalous signals of interest are not completely unknown. Gas spectra are generically sparse (absorbing or emitting at only a few wavelengths), and this property can be exploited to enhance the sensitivity of anomaly detection algorithms. This paper investigates the utility of sparse signal anomaly detection for the problem of finding plumes of gas with unknown chemistry in hyperspectral imagery.

  20. Incorporating spatial information into gas plume detection in hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Cameron S.

    Detection of chemical plumes in hyperpsectral data is a problem having solutions that focus on spectral information. These solutions neglect the presence of the spatial information in the scene. The spatial information is exploited in this work by assignment of prior probabilities to neighborhood configurations of signal presence or absence. These probabilities are leveraged in a total probability approach to testing for signal presence in a pixel of interest. The two new algorithms developed are named spatial information detection enhancement (SIDE) and bolt--on SIDE (B--SIDE). The results are explored in comparison to the clutter matched filter (CMF), a standard spectral technique, and to several supervised machine learning techniques. The results show a great improvement of SIDE over these other techniques, in some cases showing the poorest performance of the SIDE filter being much better than the CMF at its best.

  1. Detection of gas plumes in cluttered environments using long-wave infrared hyperspectral sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadwater, Joshua B.; Spisz, Thomas S.; Carr, Alison K.

    2008-04-01

    Long-wave infrared hyperspectral sensors provide the ability to detect gas plumes at stand-off distances. A number of detection algorithms have been developed for such applications, but in situations where the gas is released in a complex background and is at air temperature, these detectors can generate a considerable amount of false alarms. To make matters more difficult, the gas tends to have non-uniform concentrations throughout the plume making it spatially similar to the false alarms. Simple post-processing using median filters can remove a number of the false alarms, but at the cost of removing a significant amount of the gas plume as well. We approach the problem using an adaptive subpixel detector and morphological processing techniques. The adaptive subpixel detection algorithm is able to detect the gas plume against the complex background. We then use morphological processing techniques to isolate the gas plume while simultaneously rejecting nearly all false alarms. Results will be demonstrated on a set of ground-based long-wave infrared hyperspectral image sequences.

  2. Fiber optic TDLAS-based multi-gas remote detection system for mine goaf fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yubin; Li, Yanfang; Shang, Ying; Zhang, Tingting; Song, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chang; Liu, Tongyu

    2010-10-01

    Spontaneous combustion in coal goaf area is one of major disasters in coal mines. Detection technology based on signature Gas is the primary means of spontaneous combustion forecasting of coal goaf area. A real-time remote fire gas detection system is proposed based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technology, to achieve valid test of signature gas (CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2 and C2H4). The System uses the wavelength, respectively 1.567um, 1.608um, 1.653um, 1.530um, 1.623um near-infrared band fiber-coupled distributed feedback laser (DFB) as the light source, Combined wavelength modulation spectroscopy and harmonic detection technique, developed a fiber-coupled white-type long-path gas absorption cell, to achieve high sensitivity detection of gas concentration. The system achieved a remote on-line monitoring of multi-component gas concentration,to meet the fire forecast need for Coal goaf area. There are obvious advantages Compared with the existing beam tube monitoring system in coal mine.

  3. [Study on high accuracy detection of multi-component gas in oil-immerse power transformer].

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Qi-Feng; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Gang

    2013-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of low accuracy and mutual interference in multi-component gas detection, a kind of multi-component gas detection network with high accuracy was designed. A semiconductor laser with narrow bandwidth was utilized as light source and a novel long-path gas cell was also used in this system. By taking the single sine signal to modulate the spectrum of laser and using space division multiplexing (SDM) and time division multiplexing (TDM) technique, the detection of multi-component gas was achieved. The experiments indicate that the linearity relevance coefficient is 0. 99 and the measurement relative error is less than 4%. The system dynamic response time is less than 15 s, by filling a volume of multi-component gas into the gas cell gradually. The system has advantages of high accuracy and quick response, which can be used in the fault gas on-line monitoring for power transformers in real time. PMID:24611396

  4. [A Detection Technique for Gas Concentration Based on the Spectral Line Shape Function].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mo; Yang, Bing-chu; Tao, Shao-hua

    2015-04-01

    The methods that can rapidly and precisely measure concentrations of various gases have extensive applications in the fields such as air quality analysis, environmental pollution detection, and so on. The gas detection method based on the tunable laser absorption spectroscopy is considered a promising technique. For the infrared spectrum detection techniques, the line shape function of an absorption spectrum of a gas is an important parameter in qualitative and quantitative analysis of a gas. Specifically, how to obtain the line shape function of an absorption spectrum of a gas quickly and accurately is a key problem in the gas detection fields. In this paper we analyzed several existing line shape functions and proposed a method to calculate precisely the line shape function of a gas, and investigated the relation between the gas concentration and the peak value of a line shape function. Then we experimentally measured the absorption spectra of an acetylene gas in the wavelength range of 1,515-1,545 nm with a tunable laser source and a built-in spectrometer. With Lambert-Beer law we calculated the peak values of the line shape function of the gas at the given frequencies, and obtained a fitting curve for the line shape function in the whole waveband by using a computer program. Comparing the measured results with the calculated results of the Voigt function, we found that there was a deviation-between the experimental results and the calculated results. And we found that the measured concentration of the acetylene gas by using the fitting curve of the line shape function was more accurate and compatible with the actual situation. Hence, the empirical formula for the line shape function obtained from the experimental results would be more suitable for the concentration measurement of a gas. As the fitting curve for the line shape function of the acetylene gas has been deduced from the experiment, the corresponding peak values of the spectral lines can be

  5. Chemoresistive Gas Sensors for the Detection of Colorectal Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Malagù, Cesare; Fabbri, Barbara; Gherardi, Sandro; Giberti, Alessio; Guidi, Vincenzo; Landini, Nicolò; Zonta, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous medical studies show that tumor growth is accompanied by protein changes that may lead to the peroxidation of the cell membrane with consequent emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by breath or intestinal gases that should be seen as biomarkers for colorectal cancer (CRC). The analysis of VOCs represents a non-invasive and potentially inexpensive preliminary screening technique. An array of chemoresistive gas sensors based on screen-printed metal oxide semiconducting films has been selected to discriminate gases of oncological interest, e.g., 1-iodononane and benzene, widely assumed to be biomarkers of colorectal cancer, from those of interference in the gut, such as methane and nitric oxide. PMID:25313496

  6. Multiple headspace extraction for gas detection in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Müller, D; Fühl, M; Pinkwart, K; Baltes, N

    2014-10-16

    In this study multiple headspace extraction was used for the first time to measure the saturation concentration of carbon monoxide and oxygen in various ionic liquids (ILs). Many processes in ILs involve the reaction of gases so that the reactant solubility is not a mere characteristical parameter, but understanding the solubility of gases in ILs is required for assessing the feasibility of possible applications. Multiple headspace extraction has proofed to be a powerful tool to obtain solubilities in good accordance with literature data. The measured saturation concentration for carbon monoxide and oxygen in ILs based on rarely researched tetracyanoborates and other anions was in the range of 1.5-6.5mmol/L. The great advantage of multiple headspace extraction is that it is a nonexpensive method that can be realised in most analytical laboratories by combination of a simple gas chromatograph and an eligible headspace injector. PMID:25458524

  7. Metal-oxide Nanowires for Toxic Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Devineni, D. P.; Stormo, S.; Kempf, W.; Schenkel, J.; Behanan, R.; Lea, Alan S.; Galipeau, David W.

    2007-01-02

    The feasibility of using Electric field enhanced oxidation (EFEO) to fabricate metal-oxide nanowires for sensing toxic gases was investigated. The effects of fabrication parameters such as film thickness, ambient relative humidity, atomic force microscope (AFM) tip bias voltage, force, scan speed and number of scans on the growth of nanowires were determined. The chemical composition of indium-oxide nanowires was verified using Auger electron spectroscopy. It was found that oxygen to indium ration was 1.69, 1.72, 1.71 and 1.84 at depths of 0, 1.3, 2.5, and 3.8 nm, which was near the 1.5:1 expected for stoichiometric indium-oxide film. Future work will include characterizing the electrical and gas sensing properties of the metal-oxide nanowires.

  8. Numerical evidence of gas hydrate detection by means of electroseismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyserman, Fabio I.; Gauzellino, Patricia M.; Santos, Juan E.

    2012-11-01

    This work presents numerical evidence that methane hydrate-bearing sediments located below permafrost can be detected using electroseismics as a prospecting tool. The numerically solved equations are the ones developed by Pride; we modified them by using an extended Biot formulation to appropriately deal with a composite (rock-ice/rock-methane hydrate) solid matrix. We modeled the subsurface as a two dimensional medium, and we used electromagnetic sources to give rise to the so called SHTE and PSVTM modes. The obtained results show that the seismic response is sensitive to the methane hydrate concentration.

  9. Electrochemical noise sensors for detection of localized and general corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Russell, James H.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    2002-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory funded a Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability program directed at increasing and enhancing research and development activities in topics such as remote leak detection, pipe inspection, and repair technologies and materials. The Albany Research Center (ARC), U.S. Department of Energy was funded to study the use of electrochemical noise sensors for detection of localized and general corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines. As part of this, ARC entered into a collaborative effort with the corrosion sensor industry to demonstrate the capabilities of commercially available remote corrosion sensors for use with the Nation's Gas Transmission Pipeline Infrastructure needs. The goal of the research was to develop an emerging corrosion sensor technology into a monitor for the type and degree of corrosion occurring at key locations in gas transmission pipelines.

  10. Electron capture gas chromatographic detection of acethylmethylcarbinol produced by neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Morse, C D; Brooks, J B; Kellogg, D S

    1976-01-01

    Acetylmethylcarbinol (acetoin) production by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other Neisseria species was established by gas-liquid chromatography and by mass spectrometric data. Sixty-nine isolates of Neisseria were tested by incubating them in a chemically defined fluid medium. The medium was extracted with organic solvents and derivatized with heptafluorobutryic anhydride for gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Cultures of 58 of the same strains were tested with the conventional Voges-Proskauer reagents, and results were compared with those of gas-liquid chromatography. When glucose was used as an energy source, N. gonorrhoeae, some N. meningitidis, and N. lactamica produced enough acetoin in 16 h to be detectable by either method, whereas other Neisseria species produce amounts detectable only by gas chromatography. The conventional acetylmethylcarbinol test with the chemically defined medium and maltose as an energy source might be used to develop methods that would differentiate certain members of the genus, including the pathogenic species. PMID:815266

  11. Granular gas of ellipsoids: analytical collision detection implemented on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Lind, P. G.; Maza, D.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present a hybrid GPU-CPU implementation of an accurate discrete element model for a system of ellipsoids. The ellipsoids have three translational degrees of freedom, their rotational motion being described through quaternions and the contact interaction between two ellipsoids is described by a force which accounts for the elastic and dissipative interactions. Further we combine the exact derivation of contact points between ellipsoids (Wang et al. in Computing 72(1-2):235-246, 2004) with the advantages of the GPU-NVIDIA parallelization strategy (Owens et al. in Comput Graph Forum 26:80-113, 2007). This novelty makes the analytical algorithm computationally feasible when dealing with several thousands of particles. As a benchmark, we simulate a granular gas of frictionless ellipsoids identifying a classical homogeneous cooling state for ellipsoids. For low dissipative systems, the behavior of the granular temperature indicates that the cooling dynamics is governed by the elongation of the ellipsoids and the restitution coefficient. Our outcomes comply with the statistical mechanical laws and the results are in agreement with previous findings for hard ellipsoids (Bereolos et al. in J Chem Phys 99:6087, 1993; Villemot and Talbot in Granul Matter 14:91-97, 2012). Additionally, new insight is provided namely suggesting that the mean field description of the cooling dynamics of elongated particles is conditioned by the particle shape and the degree of energy equipartition.

  12. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  13. System for detecting and estimating concentrations of gas or liquid analytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L. (Inventor); Jan, Darrell L. (Inventor); Jewell, April D. (Inventor); Kisor, Adam (Inventor); Manatt, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Manfreda, Allison M. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Shevade, Abhijit V. (Inventor); Taylor, Charles (Inventor); Tran, Tuan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor system for detecting and estimating concentrations of various gas or liquid analytes. In an embodiment, the resistances of a set of sensors are measured to provide a set of responses over time where the resistances are indicative of gas or liquid sorption, depending upon the sensors. A concentration vector for the analytes is estimated by satisfying a criterion of goodness using the set of responses. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  14. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This document contains the quarterly report dated January 1-March 31, 1997 for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project. Topics covered in this report include AVOA modeling using paraxial ray tracing, AVOA modeling for gas- and water-filled fractures, 3-D and 3-C processing, and technology transfer material. Several presentations from a Geophysical Applications Workshop workbook, workshop schedule, and list of workshop attendees are also included.

  15. An integrated knowledge system for the Space Shuttle hazardous gas detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Bangasser, Carl; Fensky, Connie; Cegielski, Eric; Overbey, Glenn

    1993-01-01

    A computer-based integrated Knowledge-Based System, the Intelligent Hypertext Manual (IHM), was developed for the Space Shuttle Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The IHM stores HGDS related knowledge and presents it in an interactive and intuitive manner. This manual is a combination of hypertext and an expert system which store experts' knowledge and experience in hazardous gas detection and analysis. The IHM's purpose is to provide HGDS personnel with the capabilities of: locating applicable documentation related to procedures, constraints, and previous fault histories; assisting in the training of personnel; enhancing the interpretation of real time data; and recognizing and identifying possible faults in the Space Shuttle sub-systems related to hazardous gas detection.

  16. An integrated knowledge system for the Space Shuttle hazardous gas detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Bangasser, Carl; Fensky, Connie; Cegielski, Eric; Overbey, Glenn

    1993-10-01

    A computer-based integrated Knowledge-Based System, the Intelligent Hypertext Manual (IHM), was developed for the Space Shuttle Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The IHM stores HGDS related knowledge and presents it in an interactive and intuitive manner. This manual is a combination of hypertext and an expert system which store experts' knowledge and experience in hazardous gas detection and analysis. The IHM's purpose is to provide HGDS personnel with the capabilities of: locating applicable documentation related to procedures, constraints, and previous fault histories; assisting in the training of personnel; enhancing the interpretation of real time data; and recognizing and identifying possible faults in the Space Shuttle sub-systems related to hazardous gas detection.

  17. Fluorometric, water-based sensors for the detection of nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP.

    PubMed

    Wild, Andreas; Winter, Andreas; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2012-01-25

    Water-based Zn(II) bisterpyridine systems were used as fluorometric sensors for the detection of the nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP. Analyte concentrations in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-6) M are detectable in solution. The utilization of a test stripe additionally allows the detection of organophosphonates from the gas phase. PMID:22158657

  18. A Hazardous Gas Detection System for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L. - Y.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Knight, D.

    1998-01-01

    The detection of explosive conditions in aerospace propulsion applications is important for safety and economic reasons. Microfabricated hydrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbon sensors as well as the accompanying hardware and software are being developed for a range of aerospace safety applications. The development of these sensors is being done using MEMS (Micro ElectroMechanical Systems) based technology and SiC-based semiconductor technology. The hardware and software allows control and interrogation of each sensor head and reduces accompanying cabling through multiplexing. These systems are being applied on the X-33 and on an upcoming STS-95 Shuttle mission. A number of commercial applications are also being pursued. It is concluded that this MEMS-based technology has significant potential to reduce costs and increase safety in a variety of aerospace applications.

  19. A Hazardous Gas Detection System for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L.-Y.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Knight, D.

    1998-01-01

    The detection of explosive conditions in aerospace propulsion applications is important for safety and economic reasons. Microfabricated hydrogen, oxygen, and hydrocarbon sensors as well as the accompanying hardware and software are being, developed for a range of aerospace safety applications. The development of these sensors is being done using MEMS (Micro ElectroMechanical Systems) based technology and SiC-based semiconductor technology. The hardware and software allows control and interrocation of each sensor head and reduces accompanying cabling through multiplexing. These systems are being, applied on the X-33 and on an upcoming STS-95 Shuttle mission. A number of commercial applications are also being pursued. It is concluded that this MEMS-based technology has significant potential to reduce costs and increase safety in a variety of aerospace applications.

  20. Detection of Molecular Gas in Void Galaxies : Implications for Star Formation in Isolated Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, M.; Saito, T.; Iono, D.; Honey, M.; Ramya, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present the detection of molecular gas from galaxies located in nearby voids using the CO(1-0) line emission as a tracer. The observations were performed using the 45 m single dish radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory. Void galaxies lie in the most underdense parts of our universe and a significant fraction of them are gas rich, late-type spiral galaxies. Although isolated, they have ongoing star formation but appear to be slowly evolving compared to galaxies in denser environments. Not much is known about their star formation properties or cold gas content. In this study, we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively high IRAS fluxes or Hα line luminosities, both of which signify ongoing star formation. All five galaxies appear to be isolated and two lie within the Bootes void. We detected CO(1-0) emission from four of the five galaxies in our sample and their molecular gas masses lie between 108 and 109 M⊙. We conducted follow-up Hα imaging observations of three detected galaxies using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope and determined their star formation rates (SFRs) from their Hα fluxes. The SFR varies from 0.2 to 1 M⊙ yr-1 which is similar to that observed in local galaxies. Our study indicates that although void galaxies reside in underdense regions, their disks contain molecular gas and have SFRs similar to galaxies in denser environments. We discuss the implications of our results.

  1. Sensor Array Devices Utilizing Nano-structured Metal-oxides for Hazardous Gas Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andio, Mark A.

    Methane and carbon monoxide are two hazardous gases which require continuous monitoring by gas sensors in underground coal mines for explosion prevention and toxicity, respectively. This work explored implementing miniaturized gas sensors in this area to simultaneously detect both gases for benefits of increased portability and reduced power consumption of the chemiresistive gas sensor device. The focus of this research was to understand how the particle size, morphology, and microstructure of the metaloxide film affected the gas sensor performance to the two gases of interest on miniaturized gas sensor devices in the form of microhotplate platforms. This was done through three main research studies. The first was conducted by growing SnO2 nanowires from SnO 2 particles using an Au-catalyst. Growth conditions including temperature, time, and oxygen partial pressure were explored to determine the formation aspects of the SnO2 nanowires. Gas sensor studies were completed that provided evidence that the SnO2 nanowires increased detection to a fixed concentration of carbon monoxide compared to SnO2 particles without nano-structure formation. A second research study was performed to compare the gas sensor performance of SnO2 nanoparticles, hierarchical particles, and micron-size particles. The nanoparticles were developed into an ink and deposited via ink-jet printing on the microhotplate substrates to control the microstructure of the metal-oxide film. By preventing agglomeration of the nanoparticle film, the SnO2 nanoparticles displayed similar gas sensor performance to methane and carbon monoxide as the hierarchical particles. Both nano-structures had much higher gas sensor response than the micron-size particles which confirms the surface area of the metal-oxide film is critical for reaction of the analyte gas at the surface. The last research study presented in the dissertation describes an oxide nanoparticle array developed for detecting methane and carbon

  2. Development of fault section detecting system for gas insulated transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, E.; Uchida, K.; Koshilishi, M.; Mitsui, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Nakamura, K.; Itaka, K.; Hara, T.; Yoda, T.

    1986-01-01

    A fault section detecting system using optical magnetic field sensors developed for gas insulated transmission lines (GIL) is reported. A bismuth silicon oxide (Bi/sub 12/SiO/sub 20/, or BSO) single crystal was adopted for the optical magnetic field sensor. A method of mounting the sensors to GIL which enables the sensors to detect the conductor current from outside the enclosure was developed. With the developed fault detector, faults occurring inside a section of GIL between sensors are detected by discriminating the phases of conductor currents detected by the sensors. The system was confirmed to have sufficient performance for application to commerical GILS.

  3. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  4. TREFEX: Trend Estimation and Change Detection in the Response of MOX Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pashami, Sepideh; Lilienthal, Achim J.; Schaffernicht, Erik; Trincavelli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Many applications of metal oxide gas sensors can benefit from reliable algorithms to detect significant changes in the sensor response. Significant changes indicate a change in the emission modality of a distant gas source and occur due to a sudden change of concentration or exposure to a different compound. As a consequence of turbulent gas transport and the relatively slow response and recovery times of metal oxide sensors, their response in open sampling configuration exhibits strong fluctuations that interfere with the changes of interest. In this paper we introduce TREFEX, a novel change point detection algorithm, especially designed for metal oxide gas sensors in an open sampling system. TREFEX models the response of MOX sensors as a piecewise exponential signal and considers the junctions between consecutive exponentials as change points. We formulate non-linear trend filtering and change point detection as a parameter-free convex optimization problem for single sensors and sensor arrays. We evaluate the performance of the TREFEX algorithm experimentally for different metal oxide sensors and several gas emission profiles. A comparison with the previously proposed GLR method shows a clearly superior performance of the TREFEX algorithm both in detection performance and in estimating the change time. PMID:23736853

  5. Assembly of polythiophenes on responsive polymer microgels for the highly selective detection of ammonia gas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chang, Aiping; Peng, Yahui; Li, Zezhou; Yu, Xiang; Hong, Kunlun; Zhou, Shuiqin; Wu, Weitai

    2016-04-05

    For this study, a class of smart composite materials based on the assembly of conjugated polymers on responsive polymer microgels has been prepared. We have chosen poly(3-((2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)methyl)-thiophene) as the model conjugated polymer and an ammonia-responsive microgel of phenoxazinium-functionalized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-propargyl acrylate) as the model template. Under this design, the composite materials can combine the electrical conductivity of the conjugated polymers and the ammonia recognisability of the ammonia-responsive polymer microgels; the cooperation of these properties allows the reversible control of electrical conductivity by ammonia gas. Those composite materials can not only adapt to ammonia gas, but also convert changes in the concentrationmore » of ammonia into conductance, allowing the electrical detection of ammonia gas with high selectivity. This makes the composite materials different from the conductive polymer platforms reported previously, which may also respond to non-ammonia gases and the response induced by non-ammonia gases is close to that induced by ammonia gas. Using these composite materials as sensing materials for the electrical detection of ammonia gas, the detection limit can reach as low as 1.1 ppb. Finally, these features enable their use for the electrical detection of ammonia in breath.« less

  6. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report describes progress in the following five projects: (1) Geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin; (2) Regional stratigraphic studies, Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, southern Piceance Basin, Colorado; (3) Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins--Foundation for a new approach to exploration and resource assessments of continuous type deposits; (4) Delineation of Piceance Basin basement structures using multiple source data--Implications for fractured reservoir exploration; and (5) Gas and water-saturated conditions in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado--Implications for fractured reservoir detection in a gas-centered coal basin.

  7. Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-06-24

    A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

  8. Surface Ionization Gas Detection at SnO{sub 2} Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krenkow, A.; Oberhuettinger, C.; Habauzit, A.; Kessler, M.; Goebel, J.; Mueller, G.

    2009-05-23

    In surface ionization (SI) gas detection adsorbed analyte molecules are converted into ionic species at a heated solid surface and extracted into free space by an oppositely biased counter electrode. In the present work we consider the formation of positive and negative analyte gas ions at SnO{sub 2} surfaces. We find that SI leads to positive ion formation only, with the SI efficiency scaling with the ionization energy of the analyte gas molecules. Aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with amine functional groups exhibit particularly high SI efficiencies.

  9. Detection of individual atoms in helium buffer gas and observation of their real-time motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, C. L.; Prodan, J. V.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; She, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Single atoms are detected and their motion measured for the first time to our knowledge by the fluorescence photon-burst method in the presence of large quantities of buffer gas. A single-clipped digital correlator records the photon burst in real time and displays the atom's transit time across the laser beam. A comparison is made of the special requirements for single-atom detection in vacuum and in a buffer gas. Finally, the probability distribution of the bursts from many atoms is measured. It further proves that the bursts observed on resonance are due to single atoms and not simply to noise fluctuations.

  10. Development of an intelligent hypertext manual for the space shuttle hazardous gas detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Bangasser, Carl; Fensky, Connie

    A computer-based Integrated Knowledge System (IKS), the Intelligent Hypertext Manual (IHM), is being developed for the Space Shuttle Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). The IHM stores all HGDS related knowledge and presents them in an interactive and intuitive manner. The IHM's purpose is to provide HGDS personnel with the capabilities of: enhancing the interpretation of real time data; recognizing and identifying possible faults in the Space Shuttle sub-system related to hazardous gas detections; locating applicable documentation related to procedures, constraints, and previous fault histories; and assisting in the training of personnel.

  11. Development of an intelligent hypertext manual for the space shuttle hazardous gas detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Bangasser, Carl; Fensky, Connie

    1992-01-01

    A computer-based Integrated Knowledge System (IKS), the Intelligent Hypertext Manual (IHM), is being developed for the Space Shuttle Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). The IHM stores all HGDS related knowledge and presents them in an interactive and intuitive manner. The IHM's purpose is to provide HGDS personnel with the capabilities of: enhancing the interpretation of real time data; recognizing and identifying possible faults in the Space Shuttle sub-system related to hazardous gas detections; locating applicable documentation related to procedures, constraints, and previous fault histories; and assisting in the training of personnel.

  12. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f2 than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f2, we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10-5 h-1 = - 0.11 yr-1 from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10-2 h-1 using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.)

  13. A micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for detection of hydrogen and atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Chul; Yoon, Seung-Il; Lee, Chung-il; Kim, Yong-Jun; Song, Soonho

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the fabrication and performance of a micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for an effective and inexpensive gas analysis system. The proposed micro-thermoelectric gas sensor was fabricated by using a surface micromachining technique. The sensing mechanism, consisting of thermoelectric material and a novel metal catalyst, was fabricated on the highly thermally resistive layer for reduced heat transfer to the substrate allowing for a simple fabrication process. The micro-thermoelectric gas sensor detects target gas species by measuring the reaction heat of the catalytic reaction between the target gas and a novel metal catalyst using Cu-Bi thermopiles. The catalytic reaction occurs only on the hot junction of the sensing thermopile where the metal catalyst is deposited. In order to reduce the external thermal noise, a difference between the output voltage of the sensing and the reference thermopiles was measured by using a differential amplifier. The response of the fabricated sensor was linear to temperature difference. The fabricated sensor can be used to detect various concentrations of hydrogen and atomic oxygen, where the output voltage linearly increased with the gas concentration. PMID:19173043

  14. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances.

    PubMed

    Gillis, K A; Moldover, M R; Mehl, J B

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f(2) than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f(2), we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10(-5) h(-1) = - 0.11 yr(-1) from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10(-2) h(-1) using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.). PMID:27250456

  15. Fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis of status self-validating gas sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-sheng; Xu, Yong-hui; Yang, Jing-li; Shi, Zhen; Jiang, Shou-da; Wang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The traditional gas sensor array has been viewed as a simple apparatus for information acquisition in chemosensory systems. Gas sensor arrays frequently undergo impairments in the form of sensor failures that cause significant deterioration of the performance of previously trained pattern recognition models. Reliability monitoring of gas sensor arrays is a challenging and critical issue in the chemosensory system. Because of its importance, we design and implement a status self-validating gas sensor array prototype to enhance the reliability of its measurements. A novel fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis (FDID) strategy is presented in this paper. The principal component analysis-based multivariate statistical process monitoring model can effectively perform fault detection by using the squared prediction error statistic and can locate the faulty sensor in the gas sensor array by using the variables contribution plot. The signal features of gas sensor arrays for different fault modes are extracted by using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) coupled with sample entropy (SampEn). The EEMD is applied to adaptively decompose the original gas sensor signals into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual. The SampEn values of each IMF and the residual are calculated to reveal the multi-scale intrinsic characteristics of the faulty sensor signals. Sparse representation-based classification is introduced to identify the sensor fault type for the purpose of diagnosing deterioration in the gas sensor array. The performance of the proposed strategy is compared with other different diagnostic approaches, and it is fully evaluated in a real status self-validating gas sensor array experimental system. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed strategy provides an excellent solution to the FDID of status self-validating gas sensor arrays.

  16. Fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis of status self-validating gas sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Sheng; Xu, Yong-Hui; Yang, Jing-Li; Shi, Zhen; Jiang, Shou-da; Wang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The traditional gas sensor array has been viewed as a simple apparatus for information acquisition in chemosensory systems. Gas sensor arrays frequently undergo impairments in the form of sensor failures that cause significant deterioration of the performance of previously trained pattern recognition models. Reliability monitoring of gas sensor arrays is a challenging and critical issue in the chemosensory system. Because of its importance, we design and implement a status self-validating gas sensor array prototype to enhance the reliability of its measurements. A novel fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis (FDID) strategy is presented in this paper. The principal component analysis-based multivariate statistical process monitoring model can effectively perform fault detection by using the squared prediction error statistic and can locate the faulty sensor in the gas sensor array by using the variables contribution plot. The signal features of gas sensor arrays for different fault modes are extracted by using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) coupled with sample entropy (SampEn). The EEMD is applied to adaptively decompose the original gas sensor signals into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual. The SampEn values of each IMF and the residual are calculated to reveal the multi-scale intrinsic characteristics of the faulty sensor signals. Sparse representation-based classification is introduced to identify the sensor fault type for the purpose of diagnosing deterioration in the gas sensor array. The performance of the proposed strategy is compared with other different diagnostic approaches, and it is fully evaluated in a real status self-validating gas sensor array experimental system. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed strategy provides an excellent solution to the FDID of status self-validating gas sensor arrays. PMID:27131696

  17. [Carbon monoxide gas detection system based on mid-infrared spectral absorption technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Lin; Dong, Ming; Song, Nan; Song, Fang; Zheng, Chuan-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2014-10-01

    Based on infrared spectral absorption technique, a carbon monoxide (CO) detection system was developed using the fundamental absorption band at the wavelength of 4.6 μm of CO molecule and adopting pulse-modulated wideband incandescence and dual-channel detector. The detection system consists of pulse-modulated wideband incandescence, open ellipsoid light-collec- tor gas-cell, dual-channel detector, main-control and signal-processing module. By optimizing open ellipsoid light-collector gas- cell, the optical path of the gas absorption reaches 40 cm, and the amplitude of the electrical signal from the detector is 2 to 3 times larger than the original signal. Therefore, by using the ellipsoidal condenser, the signal-to-noise ratio of the system will be to some extent increased to improve performance of the system. With the prepared standard CO gas sample, sensing characteris- tics on CO gas were investigated. Experimental results reveal that, the limit of detection (LOD) is about 10 ppm; the relative er- ror at the LOD point is less than 14%, and that is less than 7. 8% within the low concentration range of 20~180 ppm; the maxi- mum absolute error of 50 min long-term measurement concentration on the 0 ppm gas sample is about 3 ppm, and the standard deviation is as small as 0. 18 ppm. Compared with the CO detection systems utilizing quantum cascaded lasers (QCLs) and dis- tributed feedback lasers (DFBLs), the proposed sensor shows potential applications in CO detection under the circumstances of coal-mine and environmental protection, by virtue of high performance-cost ratio, simple optical-path structure, etc. PMID:25739235

  18. A tracer method for quantifying contamination of building supply air: reentrainment of laboratory hood exhausts.

    PubMed

    Barnett, J L; Richard, M L; Rose, V E

    1983-08-01

    A method is described for quantifying the reentrainment of exhaust air contaminants into a building's fresh-air supply system. The method relies on the "tracer" gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which Is detected by infrared (IR) absorption analysis. This method of analysis differs from the conventional gas chromatography, electron capture detection method due to the MIRAN-1 A's portability, direct-reading capabilities, ease of operation and modest cost. Specific instrument settings for the MIRAN-1 A are given such that detection of SF6 will be optimized without interference. Calculations for quantifying reentrainment are presented and discussed for the "worst case" reentrainment observed. PMID:6624644

  19. Gas chromatographic identification of Clostridium difficile and detection of cytotoxin from a modified selective medium.

    PubMed Central

    Levett, P N; Phillips, K D

    1985-01-01

    A modification of an existing selective medium for Clostridium difficile is described. Inclusion in the medium of DL nor-leucine and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid enables identification of C difficile to be made directly from primary isolation plates by gas chromatographic detection of caproic acid and p-cresol. Plugs of agar withdrawn from the selective medium also allow the detection of cytotoxin production in vitro. PMID:3968212

  20. EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

    2005-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

  1. The Variance Analysis for Seismic Attributes in Oil-and-Gas detection at the Midlle of Tarim Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Jingyi, F.

    2011-12-01

    seismic attributes of reflection data is important for oil-and-gas detection. It turns to be a new technique to identify oil and/or gas reservoirs with the information brought by seismic waves. Local changes and variances would be detected in the seismic waves at and around the area with oil or/and gas, which could be used to issue oil and gas reservoirs and provide basement for geophysical evaluation on hydrocarbon traps. The method has been tested in the middle of Tarim Basin, and the analysis of seismic attributes and its relationship with oil and gas reservoirs seems to have cast a new light for detecting hydrocarbon traps. Before exploring and drilling for oil and gas, data accessing and data mining, especially for the seismic attribute data, are suggested to be done for hydrocarbon detection and trap evaluation, in order to avoid risk and improve efficiency in oil-and-gas exploration.

  2. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Research continued on methods to detect naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. This report contains a seismic survey map, and reports on efforts towards a source test to select the source parameters for a 37 square mile compressional wave 3-D seismic survey. Considerations of the source tests are discussed.

  3. Novel technology for flame and gas detection in the petrochemical industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Yechiel; Jacobson, Esther

    1999-01-01

    A reliable and high performance novel method of flame and gas optical spectral analysis was developed to meet the specific flame and gas detection of the petrochemical industry. Petrochemical industries, especially the offshore and unmanned areas in onshore refineries, pose a major safety hazard with respect to potential explosions and fire events. Unwanted fuel spills or fugitive flammable vapor clouds, migrating along congested pipe lines and hot production areas may cause upon ignition significant loss or damage. To help prevents events like the catastrophic fire that destroyed the offshore oil platform Piper Alpha in July 1988, a reliable and fast gas and flame detection system can be used to trigger effective risk management actions. The present paper describes a patented method of Triple Optical Spectral Analysis employed for the detection of various gases in the air according to their unique 'spectral finger print' absorption characteristics of radiation, as well as for analysis of emission and absorption radiation from combustion processes for flame detection purpose. The method has been applied in the development of unique gas and flame monitoring system designed for 'high risk - harsh/extreme weather conditions continuous operation'. These systems have been recently installed on several offshore platforms and oil rigs as well as on 'floating production Storage and Offloading' - FPSO vessels. The systems advantages and limitations as well as several installations and test data are presented. Various atmospheric conditions as well as false alarm stimulus are discussed.

  4. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1 - March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The objective is to determine methods for detection and mapping of naturally fractured systems for economic production of natural gas from fractured reservoirs. This report contains: 3D P-wave alternate processing; down hole 3C geophone analysis; fracture pattern analysis of the Fort Union and Wind River Basin; 3D-3C seismic processing; and technology transfer.

  5. Use of intelligent pigs to detect stress corrosion cracking in gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Culbertson, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    To ensure the integrity and serviceability of gas pipelines, operators periodically utilize intelligent pigging. This inspection technique has proven to be a cost effective approach for determining the condition of operating pipelines. Recent advancements in intelligent pigging technology are now aiding the pipeline industry in the detection of stress corrosion cracking.

  6. Flight Testing of an Advanced Airborne Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn Lenz; Raymond T. Lines; Darryl Murdock; Jeffrey Owen; Steven Stearns; Michael Stoogenke

    2005-10-01

    ITT Industries Space Systems Division (Space Systems) has developed an airborne natural gas leak detection system designed to detect, image, quantify, and precisely locate leaks from natural gas transmission pipelines. This system is called the Airborne Natural Gas Emission Lidar (ANGEL) system. The ANGEL system uses a highly sensitive differential absorption Lidar technology to remotely detect pipeline leaks. The ANGEL System is operated from a fixed wing aircraft and includes automatic scanning, pointing system, and pilot guidance systems. During a pipeline inspection, the ANGEL system aircraft flies at an elevation of 1000 feet above the ground at speeds of between 100 and 150 mph. Under this contract with DOE/NETL, Space Systems was funded to integrate the ANGEL sensor into a test aircraft and conduct a series of flight tests over a variety of test targets including simulated natural gas pipeline leaks. Following early tests in upstate New York in the summer of 2004, the ANGEL system was deployed to Casper, Wyoming to participate in a set of DOE-sponsored field tests at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). At RMOTC the Space Systems team completed integration of the system and flew an operational system for the first time. The ANGEL system flew 2 missions/day for the duration for the 5-day test. Over the course of the week the ANGEL System detected leaks ranging from 100 to 5,000 scfh.

  7. Spectroscopic observations of low-lying gas clouds: sensitivity of detection by method of covariance matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolis, Jack S.; Liu, Karen Y.; Moynihan, Philip I.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of spectroscopic detection of low-lying gas clouds by an arbitrary spectrometer may be determined by simulating the observation using a high spectral resolution radiative transfer code. The instrumental characteristics may be superimposed on the simulation and the accuracy of the retrieval of the desired parameters may be estimated by use of the covariance matrix.

  8. Single ZnO Nanowire-Based Gas Sensors to Detect Low Concentrations of Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Cardoza-Contreras, Marlene N; Romo-Herrera, José M; Ríos, Luis A; García-Gutiérrez, R; Zepeda, T A; Contreras, Oscar E

    2015-01-01

    Low concentrations of hazardous gases are difficult to detect with common gas sensors. Using semiconductor nanostructures as a sensor element is an alternative. Single ZnO nanowire gas sensor devices were fabricated by manipulation and connection of a single nanowire into a four-electrode aluminum probe in situ in a dual-beam scanning electron microscope-focused ion beam with a manipulator and a gas injection system in/column. The electrical response of the manufactured devices shows response times up to 29 s for a 121 ppm of H₂ pulse, with a variation in the nanowire resistance appreciable at room temperature and at 373.15 K of approximately 8% and 14% respectively, showing that ZnO nanowires are good candidates to detect low concentrations of H₂. PMID:26690158

  9. Self-heated silicon nanowires for high performance hydrogen gas detection.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Yun, Jeonghoon; Moon, Dong-Il; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Park, Inkyu

    2015-03-01

    Self-heated silicon nanowire sensors for high-performance, ultralow-power hydrogen detection have been developed. A top-down nanofabrication method based on well-established semiconductor manufacturing technology was utilized to fabricate silicon nanowires in wafer scale with high reproducibility and excellent compatibility with electronic readout circuits. Decoration of palladium nanoparticles onto the silicon nanowires enables sensitive and selective detection of hydrogen gas at room temperature. Self-heating of silicon nanowire sensors allows us to enhance response and recovery performances to hydrogen gas, and to reduce the influence of interfering gases such as water vapor and carbon monoxide. A short-pulsed heating during recovery was found to be effective for additional reduction of operation power as well as recovery characteristics. This self-heated silicon nanowire gas sensor will be suitable for ultralow-power applications such as mobile telecommunication devices and wireless sensing nodes. PMID:25670503

  10. Self-heated silicon nanowires for high performance hydrogen gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Yun, Jeonghoon; Moon, Dong-Il; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Park, Inkyu

    2015-03-01

    Self-heated silicon nanowire sensors for high-performance, ultralow-power hydrogen detection have been developed. A top-down nanofabrication method based on well-established semiconductor manufacturing technology was utilized to fabricate silicon nanowires in wafer scale with high reproducibility and excellent compatibility with electronic readout circuits. Decoration of palladium nanoparticles onto the silicon nanowires enables sensitive and selective detection of hydrogen gas at room temperature. Self-heating of silicon nanowire sensors allows us to enhance response and recovery performances to hydrogen gas, and to reduce the influence of interfering gases such as water vapor and carbon monoxide. A short-pulsed heating during recovery was found to be effective for additional reduction of operation power as well as recovery characteristics. This self-heated silicon nanowire gas sensor will be suitable for ultralow-power applications such as mobile telecommunication devices and wireless sensing nodes.

  11. Single ZnO Nanowire-Based Gas Sensors to Detect Low Concentrations of Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Cardoza-Contreras, Marlene N.; Romo-Herrera, José M.; Ríos, Luis A.; García-Gutiérrez, R.; Zepeda, T. A.; Contreras, Oscar E.

    2015-01-01

    Low concentrations of hazardous gases are difficult to detect with common gas sensors. Using semiconductor nanostructures as a sensor element is an alternative. Single ZnO nanowire gas sensor devices were fabricated by manipulation and connection of a single nanowire into a four-electrode aluminum probe in situ in a dual-beam scanning electron microscope-focused ion beam with a manipulator and a gas injection system in/column. The electrical response of the manufactured devices shows response times up to 29 s for a 121 ppm of H2 pulse, with a variation in the nanowire resistance appreciable at room temperature and at 373.15 K of approximately 8% and 14% respectively, showing that ZnO nanowires are good candidates to detect low concentrations of H2. PMID:26690158

  12. On the detectability of trace chemical species in the martian atmosphere using gas correlation filter radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, J. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Calcutt, S. B.; Wilson, E. L.

    2015-11-01

    The martian atmosphere is host to many trace gases including water (H2O) and its isotopologues, methane (CH4) and potentially sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and further organic compounds, which would serve as indirect tracers of geological, chemical and biological processes on Mars. With exception of the recent detection of CH4 by Curiosity, previous detections of these species have been unsuccessful or considered tentative due to the low concentrations of these species in the atmosphere (∼10-9 partial pressures), limited spectral resolving power and/or signal-to-noise and the challenge of discriminating between telluric and martian features when observing from the Earth. In this study, we present radiative transfer simulations of an alternative method for detection of trace gas species - the gas correlation radiometry method. Two potential observing scenarios were explored where a gas correlation filter radiometer (GCFR) instrument: (1) performs nadir and/or limb sounding of the martian atmosphere in the thermal infrared (200-2000 cm-1 from an orbiting spacecraft or (2) performs solar occultation measurements in the near-infrared (2000-5000 cm-1) from a lander on the martian surface. In both scenarios, simulations of a narrowband filter radiometer (without gas correlation) were also generated to serve as a comparison. From a spacecraft, we find that a gas correlation filter radiometer, in comparison to a filter radiometer (FR), offers a greater discrimination between temperature and dust, a greater discrimination between H2O and HDO, and would allow detection of N2O and CH3OH at concentrations of ∼10 ppbv and ∼2 ppbv, respectively, which are lower than previously-derived upper limits. However, the lowest retrievable concentration of SO2 (approximately 2 ppbv) is comparable with previous upper limits and CH4 is only detectable at concentrations of approximately 10 ppbv, which is an order of magnitude higher than the concentration recently measured

  13. A probe for in situ, remote, detection of defects in buried plastic natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Spenik, J.L.; Condon, C.M.; Monazam, E.R.; Fincham, W.L.

    2007-12-18

    Several techniques are available to determine the integrity of in situ metal pipeline but very little is available in the literature to determine the integrity of plastic pipelines. Since the decade of the 1970s much of the newly installed gas distribution and transmission lines in the United States are fabricated from polyethylene or other plastic. A probe has been developed to determine the in situ integrity of plastic natural gas pipelines that can be installed on a traversing mechanism (pig) to detect abnormalities in the walls of the plastic natural gas pipeline from the interior. This probe has its own internal power source and can be deployed into existing natural gas supply lines. Utilizing the capacitance parameter, the probe inspects the pipe for flaws and records the data internally which can be retrieved later for analysis.

  14. Good odorant practices ensure safer operations. [Natural gas odorant detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Oudman, P. )

    1993-12-01

    Regulations in Canada and the US require that combustible gas used as a fuel be odorized at such a level that a concentration in air of one-fifth the lower explosive limit the gas can be readily detected and recognized by a person with a normal sense of smell. These regulations do not specify how the odorant level should be determined. However, since the requirement is related to smell, the level should be determined by an olfactory method. There are two odorant monitoring methods commonly used by gas companies, the olfactory (odorometer) and the instrumentation (gas chromatograph) methods. The instrument method provides only quantitative results, which somehow must be related to an olfactory response. This paper discusses these methods.

  15. Effect of Background Emissivity on Gas Detection in Thermal Hyperspectral Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Chilton, Lawrence K.; Metoyer, Candace N.

    2008-10-02

    Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temper- ature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based radiance model, which describes at-sensor observed radiance. The background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures are isolated, and their effects on net chemical signal are described. This analysis shows that the plume’s physical state, emission or absorption, is directly dependent on the background emissivity. It then describes what conditions on the background emissivity have inhibiting effects on the net chemical signal. These claims are illustrated by analyzing synthetic hyperspectral imaging data with the Adaptive Matched Filter using four chemicals and three distinct background emissivities. Two chemicals (Carbontetrachloride and Tetraflourosilane) in the analysis had a very strong relationship with the background emissivities: they exhibited absorbance over a small range of wavenumbers and the background emissivities showed a consistent ordering at these wavenumbers. Analysis of simulated hyperspectral images containing these chemicals showed complete agreement with the analysis of the physics-based model that described when the background emissivities would have inhibiting effects on gas detection. The other chemicals considered (Ammonia and Tributylphosphate) exhibited very complex absorbance structure across the longwave infrared spectrum. Analysis of images containing these chemicals revealed that the the analysis of the physics-based model did not hold completely for these complex chemicals but did suggest that gas detection was dominated by their dominant absorbance features. These results provide some explanation of the effect of the background emissivity on gas detection and a more general exploration of gas absorbance/background emissivity variability and their effects on

  16. Demonstration of neutron detection utilizing open cell foam and noble gas scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, C. M. Miller, E. C.; Coplan, M.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Yue, A. T.; Kowler, A. L.; Koeth, T.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Clark, Charles W.

    2015-03-02

    We present results demonstrating neutron detection via a closely spaced converter structure coupled to low pressure noble gas scintillation instrumented by a single photo-multiplier tube (PMT). The converter is dispersed throughout the gas volume using a reticulated vitreous carbon foam coated with boron carbide (B{sub 4}C). A calibrated cold neutron beam is used to measure the neutron detection properties, using a thin film of enriched {sup 10}B as a reference standard. Monte Carlo computations of the ion energy deposition are discussed, including treatment of the foam random network. Results from this study indicate that the foam shadows a significant portion of the scintillation light from the PMT. The high scintillation yield of Xe appears to overcome the light loss, facilitating neutron detection and presenting interesting opportunities for neutron detector design.

  17. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  18. Greenhouse Gas Molecule CO2 Detection Using a Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducer.

    PubMed

    Barauskas, Dovydas; Pelenis, Donatas; Virzonis, Darius; Baltrus, John P; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    We manufactured and tested a capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (CMUT)-based sensor for CO2 detection at environmentally relevant concentrations using polyethylenimine as a CO2 binding material. The assembly of a sensing chip was 10 × 20 mm, and up to 5 gases can potentially be detected simultaneously using a masking technique and different sensing materials. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.033 CO2 vol % while the limit of quantification was calculated to be 0.102%. The sensor exhibited a linear response between 0.06% and 0.30% CO2 while concentrations close to those in flue gas can also be measured using dilution with inert gas. PMID:27321769

  19. Detectability of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere using gas correlation filter radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, J.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Wilson, E.; Calcutt, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of radiative transfer simulations of a gas correlation filter radiometer (GCFR) in the detection of trace species in the Martian atmosphere. We investigated two scenarios: 1) nadir and/or limb sounding from a Mars orbiter in the thermal infrared, 2) solar occultation measurements in the near-infrared from the Martian surface. In both scenarios, a GCFR would allow detection of trace gases at a lower concentration than that detectable by a conventional filter radiometer. In nadir/limb sounding, we find that CH4, SO2, N2O, C2H2 and CH3OH are detectable at concentrations lower than previously-derived upper limits. From solar occultation measurements, we find that CH4, SO2, C2H2, C2H6 are detectable at concentrations lower than previously-derived upper limits but only in low dust conditions.

  20. Generalized average of signals (GAS) - a new method for denoising and phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, J.; Kolinsky, P.; Strunc, J.; Valenta, J.

    2007-12-01

    A novel method called Generalized Average of Signals (GAS) was developed and tested during the last two years (Málek et al., in press). This method is designed for processing of seismograms from dense seismic arrays and is convenient mainly for denoising and weak phase detection. The main idea of the GAS method is based on non-linear stacking of seismograms in frequency domain, which considerably improves signal-to-noise ratio of coherent seismograms. Several synthetic tests of the GAS method are presented and the results are compared with the PWS method of Schimell and Paulssen (1997). Moreover, examples of application on real data are presented. These examples were chosen to show a broad applicability of the method in experiments of different scales. The first one shows identification of S-waves on seismograms from shallow seismic. The second one concerns identification of converted waves from local earthquakes registered at the WEBNET local network in western Bohemia. Finally, the third one depicts identification of PKIKP onsets on seismograms of teleseismic earthquakes. Schimmel, M., Paulssen H. (1997): Noise reduction and detection of weak, coherent signals through phase- weighted stacks. Geophys. J. Int. 130, 497-505. Málek J., Kolínský P., Strunc J. and Valenta J. (2007): Generalized average of signals (GAS) - a new method for detection of very weak waves in seismograms. Acta Geodyn. et Geomater., in press.

  1. Use of nonlocal helium microplasma for gas impurities detection by the collisional electron spectroscopy method

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly A.; Stefanova, Margarita S.; Pramatarov, Petko M.

    2015-10-15

    The collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, which lays the ground for a new field for analytical detection of gas impurities at high pressures, has been verified. The CES method enables the identification of gas impurities in the collisional mode of electron movement, where the advantages of nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are fulfilled. Important features of dc negative glow microplasma and probe method for plasma diagnostics are applied. A new microplasma gas analyzer design is proposed. Admixtures of 0.2% Ar, 0.6% Kr, 0.1% N{sub 2}, and 0.05% CO{sub 2} are used as examples of atomic and molecular impurities to prove the possibility for detecting and identifying their presence in high pressure He plasma (50–250 Torr). The identification of the particles under analysis is made from the measurements of the high energy part of the EEDF, where maxima appear, resulting from the characteristic electrons released in Penning reactions of He metastable atoms with impurity particles. Considerable progress in the development of a novel miniature gas analyzer for chemical sensing in gas phase environments has been made.

  2. Use of nonlocal helium microplasma for gas impurities detection by the collisional electron spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly A.; Stefanova, Margarita S.; Pramatarov, Petko M.

    2015-10-01

    The collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, which lays the ground for a new field for analytical detection of gas impurities at high pressures, has been verified. The CES method enables the identification of gas impurities in the collisional mode of electron movement, where the advantages of nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are fulfilled. Important features of dc negative glow microplasma and probe method for plasma diagnostics are applied. A new microplasma gas analyzer design is proposed. Admixtures of 0.2% Ar, 0.6% Kr, 0.1% N2, and 0.05% CO2 are used as examples of atomic and molecular impurities to prove the possibility for detecting and identifying their presence in high pressure He plasma (50-250 Torr). The identification of the particles under analysis is made from the measurements of the high energy part of the EEDF, where maxima appear, resulting from the characteristic electrons released in Penning reactions of He metastable atoms with impurity particles. Considerable progress in the development of a novel miniature gas analyzer for chemical sensing in gas phase environments has been made.

  3. An integrated GPS-FID system for airborne gas detection of pipeline right-of-ways

    SciTech Connect

    Gehue, H.L.; Sommer, P.

    1996-12-31

    Pipeline integrity, safety and environmental concerns are of prime importance in the Canadian natural gas industry. Terramatic Technology Inc. (TTI) has developed an integrated GPS/FID gas detection system known as TTI-AirTrac{trademark} for use in airborne gas detection (AGD) along pipeline right-of-ways. The Flame Ionization Detector (FID), which has traditionally been used to monitor air quality for gas plants and refineries, has been integrated with the Global Positioning System (GPS) via a 486 DX2-50 computer and specialized open architecture data acquisition software. The purpose of this technology marriage is to be able to continuously monitor air quality during airborne pipeline inspection. Event tagging from visual surveillance is used to determine an explanation of any delta line deviations (DLD). These deviations are an indication of hydrocarbon gases present in the plume that the aircraft has passed through. The role of the GPS system is to provide mapping information and coordinate data for ground inspections. The ground based inspection using a handheld multi gas detector will confirm whether or not a leak exists.

  4. Comparison of three lychee cultivar odor profiles using gas chromatography-olfactometry and gas chromatography-sulfur detection.

    PubMed

    Mahattanatawee, Kanjana; Perez-Cacho, Pilar Ruiz; Davenport, Thomas; Rouseff, Russell

    2007-03-01

    Odor volatiles in three major lychee cultivars (Mauritius, Brewster, and Hak Ip) were examined using gas chromatography-olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection. Fifty-nine odor-active compounds were observed including 11 peaks, which were associated with sulfur detector responses. Eight sulfur volatiles were identified as follows: hydrogen sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, diethyl disulfide, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, 2-methyl thiazole, 2,4-dithiopentane, dimethyl trisulfide, and methional. Mauritius contained 25% and Brewster contained 81% as much total sulfur volatiles as Hak Ip. Cultivars were evaluated using eight odor attributes: floral, honey, green/woody, tropical fruit, peach/apricot, citrus, cabbage, and garlic. Major odor differences in cabbage and garlic attributes correlated with cultivar sulfur volatile composition. The 24 odor volatiles common to all three cultivars were acetaldehyde, ethanol, ethyl-3-methylbutanoate, diethyl disulfide, 2-methyl thiazole, 1-octen-3-one, cis-rose oxide, hexanol, dimethyl trisulfide, alpha-thujone, methional, 2-ethyl hexanol, citronellal, (E)-2-nonenal, linalool, octanol, (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal, menthol, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, (E,E)-2,4-nonadienal, beta-damascenone, 2-phenylethanol, beta-ionone, and 4-vinyl-guaiacol. PMID:17266328

  5. Tunnel-field-effect-transistor based gas-sensor: Introducing gas detection with a quantum-mechanical transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Deblina; Gossner, Harald; Hansch, Walter; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2013-01-01

    A gas-sensor based on tunnel-field-effect-transistor (TFET) is proposed that leverages the unique current injection mechanism in the form of quantum-mechanical band-to-band tunneling to achieve substantially improved performance compared to conventional metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs) for detection of gas species under ambient conditions. While nonlocal phonon-assisted tunneling model is used for detailed device simulations, in order to provide better physical insights, analytical formula for sensitivity is derived for both metal as well as organic conducting polymer based sensing elements. Analytical derivations are also presented for capturing the effects of temperature on sensor performance. Combining the developed analytical and numerical models, intricate properties of the sensor such as gate bias dependence of sensitivity, relationship between the required work-function modulation and subthreshold swing, counter-intuitive increase in threshold voltage for MOSFETs and reduction in tunneling probability for TFETs with temperature are explained. It is shown that TFET gas-sensors can not only lead to more than 10 000× increase in sensitivity but also provide design flexibility and immunity against screening of work-function modulation through non-specific gases as well as ensure stable operation under temperature variations.

  6. Diamond Film Gas Sensors for Leak Detection of Semiconductor Doping Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kazushi; Yokota, Yoshihiro; Tachibana, Takeshi; Miyata, Koichi; Kobashi, Koji; Fukunaga, Tetsuya; Takada, Tadashi

    2000-01-01

    Gas sensors for leak detection of toxic semiconductor doping gases such as PH3, B2H6, and AsH3 were fabricated using diamond films. The sensors have a double-layered structure composed of undoped and B-doped polycrystalline diamond layers with Pt electrodes. The relative changes in the resistance of the sensors were typically 10-20% for 0.2 ppm PH3 in air, and the highest value was over 100%. It was concluded that the diamond film gas sensors fabricated in the present work would be practically applicable as compact solid-state sensors with an advantage over the conventional aqueous electrolyte sensors.

  7. Gas detection and migration in geological media: lessons learned from the Roselend Natural Laboratory (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pili, E.; Guillon, S.; Agrinier, P.; Sabroux, J.; Adler, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Roselend Natural Laboratory (French Alps) is a unique facility for studying gas transport in the subsurface and across the geosphere-atmosphere interface. At 55 m depth, a sealed cavity allows for gas release experiments across fractured porous rocks in the unsaturated zone. While many parameters controlling the state of the geological system are known, analogous gas-tracer experiments were conducted at the field-scale with SF6 and 3He. Water infiltration, permeability and the concentrations of many gases, naturally occurring or injected, are recorded via long-term and high-resolution monitoring. The fracture network is characterized thanks to extensive drilling, logging and modeling. These experiments are used to determine the physical and chemical processes that would control the noble gas source term after an underground nuclear explosion in the framework of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and to develop and validate the corresponding numerical models. The Roselend Natural Laboratory also provides a test bed for sampling protocols and instrument developments. Detection of gases relevant to CTBT issues requires that their baseline concentration is understood. Experiments and subsequent modeling demonstrated that baselines are a highly dynamical process resulting from gas sources, sinks and modulation by barometric pressure and water movements. Gas migration from underground cavities occurs as early venting through fractures due to advection driven by gas overpressure. It is associated with very large dilution which requires very low detection limits. Late-time seepage occurs through fractured porous media thanks to barometric pumping, which is only efficient for a narrow window of parameter values. Full calculation for real fractured porous media is now available.

  8. Detection of chlorinated pesticides on the surface of fungus using ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliff, B.; Weibel, D. E.; Lockyer, N. P.; Jungnickel, H.; Stephens, G.; Vickerman, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Chlorinated organic compounds are commonly used as pesticides (e.g. Lindane or DDT); unfortunately these compounds have the ability to be concentrated in aquatic and terrestrial food chains causing environmental problems due to their toxicity. Therefore there is a need for their removal using wastewater treatment plants. It is known that these pollutants adsorb on to the surface of the fungi Rhizopus arrizus from a water solution. However the actual mode of biosorption is unknown. We aim to investigate this interaction further using time-of-flight (ToF)-SIMS. Samples of fungus were grown in aqueous solutions containing Lindane then freeze-dried, the presence of Lindane was independently quantified by a gas chromatography-electron capture detector technique. The samples were then subjected to ToF-SIMS analysis. Evidence for Lindane was seen on the surface of the fungus, however it became apparent that the Lindane was too volatile for such an analysis. This rapid deterioration of signal is preventing a more in depth study of the interaction between Lindane and R. arrhizus. However it is anticipated that by utilising a frozen-hydrated sample preparation technique, of a type currently being developed at UMIST, that these challenges would be overcome.

  9. The importance of background in the detection and identification of gas plumes using emissive infrared hyperspectral sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Herbert J.; Jellison, Gerard P.; Miller, David P.; Salvaggio, Carl; Miller, Craig J.

    2003-09-01

    Using a Fourier transform infrared field spectrometer, spectral infrared radiance measurements were made of several generated gas plumes against both a uniform sky and terrestrial background. Background temperature, spectral complexity, and physical homogeneity each influenced the success of emissive infrared spectral sensing technology in detecting and identifying the presence of a gas plume and its component constituents. As expected, high temperature contrast and uniform backgrounds provided the best conditions for detectibility and diagnostic identification. This report will summarize some of SITAC's findings concerning plume detectability, including the importance of plume cooling, plumes in emission and absorption, the effects of optical thickness, and the effects of condensing plumes on gas detection.

  10. Detection of gas leaks along pipelines by spectrally tuned infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Werner; Hierl, Thomas; Scheuerpflug, H.; Schirl, U.; Schulz, Max J.

    1998-12-01

    We present a novel method developed for the localization of leaks along natural gas pipelines. Methane distributions in the atmosphere around the leaky pipeline are detected and visualized by spectrally tuned IR imaging. In contrast to conventional techniques which utilize laser radiation sources or scanning, we irradiate the overall region under investigation by 1 kW halogen lamps. The scene background is subtracted by a real-time computer evaluation of the image. The methane gas emitted from the leak creates a flickering cloud in the image which is easily recognized. Methane concentrations as low as 0.03 percent by volume are visible. The method was successfully tested under realistic conditions on a buried pipeline by a natural gas provider.