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Sample records for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

  1. Applications of Hadamard transform to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Huang; Kaneta, Takashi; Chen, Hung-Ming; Chen, Wen-Xiong; Chang, Hung-Wei; Liu, Ju-Tsung

    2008-08-01

    Successful application of the Hadamard transform (HT) technique to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is described. Novel sample injection devices were developed to achieve multiple sample injections in both GC and LC instruments. Air pressure was controlled by an electromagnetic valve in GC, while a syringe pump and Tee connector were employed for the injection device in LC. Two well-known, abused drugs, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), were employed as model samples. Both of the injection devices permitted precise successive injections, resulting in clearly modulated chromatograms encoded by Hadamard matrices. After inverse Hadamard transformation of the encoded chromatogram, the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of the signals were substantially improved compared with those expected from theoretical values. The S/N ratios were enhanced approximately 10-fold in HT-GC/MS and 6.8 in HT-LC/MS, using the matrices of 1023 and 511, respectively. The HT-GC/MS was successfully applied to the determination of MDMA in the urine sample of a suspect. PMID:18570388

  2. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  3. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  4. Field gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast analysis.

    PubMed

    Makas, Alexei L; Troshkov, Mikhail L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate the original device and procedure for fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of gaseous and liquid samples and to discuss its features and capabilities. The concept was developed in order to expand the range of compounds suitable for GC separation and to reduce the time of analysis. Field GC-MS, consisting of original "concentrator-thermodesorber" (CTD) unit, multiple module GC system and compact magnetic mass spectrometer with powerful two-stage vacuum system and multicollector ion detector, is represented. The whole weight of the device is 90 kg. Power consumption is 250 W. The device and analytical procedures allow high speed screening of toxic substances in air and extracts within 100 s per sample. The examples of applications are described, including fast screening of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in air at low ppt level at the rate 1 sample/min. PMID:14698236

  5. Estimation of brassylic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah, Erica N. Pfarr, Pooja Thapliyal, Nicholas S. Dusek, Kristofer L. Schiele, Christy Gallagher-Lein, and James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to estimate Brassylic Acid (BA) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BA is a product obtained from the oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). BA has various applications for making nylons and high performance polymers. BA is a 13 carbon compound with two carboxylic acid functional groups at the terminal end. BA has a long hydrocarbon chain that makes the molecule less sensitive to some of the characterization techniques. Although BA can be characterized by NMR, both the starting material (EA) and products BA and nonanoic acid (NA) have peaks at similar {delta}, ppm values. Hence it becomes difficult for the quick estimation of BA during its synthesis.

  6. Quantitative analysis of terbutaline by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leferink, J G; Baillie, T A; Lindberg, C

    1984-01-01

    Over the past 6 years, several gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for terbutaline have been developed, each with certain advantages and disadvantages. They all involve monitoring of an ion selected from the mass spectrum of a suitable terbutaline derivative. This technique, often referred to as mass fragmentography or selected ion monitoring, reduces the interference from other drugs and endogenous compounds. Different ionization techniques have been employed to obtain high sensitivity, viz. electron impact and chemical ionization. Typically, the methods can be used to measure terbutaline concentrations down to 0.1-0.3 ng/mL in plasma or serum. Isolation of terbutaline from biological materials is complicated by the low partition of the drug from water to organic solvents. Extraction with a large volume of ethyl acetate, ion pair extraction, or isolation on a cation exchange column have been used. These methods are time consuming, and attempts have therefore been made to modify them. Rapid extraction can be achieved on a disposable reversed-phase octadecylsilyl column with unimpaired sensitivity and selectivity. Preliminary results indicate that negative ion chemical ionization of a fluorine-containing derivative can further increase the sensitivity of the terbutaline assays. PMID:6586484

  7. Determination of hair nicotine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Man, Che Nin; Ismail, Syazwani; Harn, Gam Lay; Lajis, Razak; Awang, Rahmat

    2009-01-15

    Hair nicotine is a known biomarker for monitoring long-term environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and smoking status. In general, hair nicotine assay involves alkaline digestion, extraction and instrumental analysis. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) assay currently developed has shown to be of high throughput with average approximately 100 hair samples being extracted and analyzed per day. This was achieved through simplified extraction procedure and shortened GC analysis time. The extraction was improved by using small volume (0.4 mL) of organic solvent that does not require further evaporation and salting steps prior to GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, the amount of hair utilized in the extraction was very little (5 mg) while the sensitivity and selectivity of the assay is equal, if not better than other established methods. The linearity of the assay (r(2)>0.995), limit of quantitation (0.04 ng/mg hair), within- and between-assays accuracies and precisions (<11.4%) and mean recovery (92.6%) were within the acceptable range. PMID:19109080

  8. AN EPA MANUAL FOR ORGANICS ANALYSIS USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedural manual defines the areas of applicability of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in environmental analysis. The manual includes sample preparation methods specifically adapted to this measurement technique, data processing and interpretation methods, quality cont...

  9. Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell-Baguley, Brittany; Hipp, Rachael E.; Morgan, Neal R.; Morgan, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment in which gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used for latent fingerprint extraction and analysis on glass beads or glass slides is conducted. The results determine that the fingerprint residues are gender dependent.

  10. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  11. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  12. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

  13. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Antonia; Barbas, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic fingerprinting, the main tool in metabolomics, is a non-targeted methodology where all detectable peaks (or signals), including those from unknown analytes, are considered to establish sample classification. After pattern comparison, those signals changing in response to a specific situation under investigation are identified to gain biological insight. For this purpose, gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS) has a drawback in that only volatile compounds or compounds that can be made volatile after derivatization can be analysed, and derivatization often requires extensive sample treatment. However, once the analysis is focused on low molecular weight metabolites, GC-MS is highly efficient, sensitive, and reproducible. Moreover, it is quantitative, and its compound identification capabilities are superior to other separation techniques because GC-MS instruments obtain mass spectra with reproducible fragmentation patterns, which allow for the creation of public databases. This chapter describes well-established protocols for metabolic fingerprinting (i.e. the comprehensive analysis of small molecules) in plasma and urine using GC-MS. Guidelines will also be provided regarding subsequent data pre-treatment, pattern recognition, and marker identification. PMID:21207291

  14. Structural analysis of commercial ceramides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bleton, J; Gaudin, K; Chaminade, P; Goursaud, S; Baillet, A; Tchapla, A

    2001-05-11

    A simple method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to analyse structures of ceramides. Identification of trimethylsilylated ceramides were obtained in short analysis times (derivatization of ceramides in 30 min at room temperature and 20 min gas chromatography mass spectrometry run) even for complex mixtures. For example in ceramide Type III, 18 peaks were observed which represent 27 various structures. The coeluted compounds were ceramides containing the same functional groups and the same carbon number but with a different distribution on the two alkyl chains of the molecule. They were accurately differentiated by mass spectrometry. Therefore, 83 structures of trimethylsilylated ceramides were identified in 11 different commercial mixtures. For 52 structures of these, mass spectral data were not described in the literature, neither full mass spectra nor characteristic fragments. PMID:11403477

  15. [Determination of volatile constituents in guanxin suhe wan by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiu-yan; Wu, Jian-bing; Wang, Su-juan

    2002-07-01

    The volatile constituents of Guanxin Suhe Wan and its ingredient drugs were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two compounds, borneol and benzyl benzoate were determined by selected ion monitoring with methyl salicylate as the internal standard. The recoveries of borneol and benzyl benzoate were 91.7% and 89.7% with the RSDs of 5.6% and 2.3%, respectively. PMID:12541931

  16. Formation of dehydroalanine from mimosine and cysteine: artifacts in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Hu, Zeping; Wiedner, Susan D.; Kim, Jong Seo; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

    2011-08-15

    Trimethylsilyation is a chemical derivatization procedure routinely applied in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics. In this report, through de novo structural elucidation and comparison with authentic standards, we demonstrate that mimosine can be completely converted into dehydroalanine and 3,4-dihydroxypyridine during the trimethylsilyating process. Similarly, dehydroalanine can be formed from derivatization of cysteine. This conversion is a potential interference in GC-MS-based global metabolomics, as well as in analysis of amino acids.

  17. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  18. Isoconversion effective activation energies derived from repetitive injection fast gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robert L.

    2009-10-01

    Evolved gas analysis by using fast temperature programmed gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is described. A small volume gas chromatograph oven is used to permit rapid heating and cooling of a capillary gas chromatography column, resulting in short analysis cycle times. This capability permits automated sampling and analysis of a purge gas effluent stream generated during thermal analysis of a solid sample. Species-specific mass spectral information extracted from successively acquired chromatograms can be used to generate concentration profiles for volatile products produced during sample heating. These species-specific profiles can be used for calculation of isoconversion effective activation energies that are useful for characterizing the thermal reaction processes.

  19. [Analysis of cracking gas compressor fouling by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Fang, Fei; Wei, Tao; Liu, Shuqing; Jiang, Guangshen; Cai, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The fouling from the different sections of the cracked gas compressor in Daqing Petrochemical Corporation was analyzed by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS). All the samples were cracked in RJ-1 tube furnace cracker at the cracking temperature of 500 degrees C, and separated with a 60 m DB-1 capillary column. An electron impact ionization (EI) source was used with the ionizing voltage of 70 eV. The results showed the formation of fouling was closely related with cyclopentadiene which accounted for about 50% of the cracking products. Other components detected were 1-butylene, propylene, methane and n-butane. This Py/GC-MS method can be used as an effective approach to analyze the causes of fouling in the petrochemical plants. PMID:24063202

  20. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of tert. -butyldimethylsilyl derivatives of 2-acetylaminofluorene and metabolites in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Diez Ibanez, M.A.; Chessebeuf-Padieu, M.; Nordmann, P.; Padieu, P.

    1987-09-01

    A new technique for the conversion of 2-acetylaminofluorene and several ring-hydroxylated metabolites to mono- and di-tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives was developed to permit their analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to quantify the metabolism of 2-acetylaminofluorene incubated in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. This new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method allowed the separation, identification and quantitation of seven known metabolites comprising five arylhydroxylated compounds, 2-aminofluorene and N-hydroxy-2-acetylaminofluorene.

  1. Chemical Discrimination in Turbulent Gas Mixtures with MOX Sensors Validated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance. PMID:25325339

  2. Chemical discrimination in turbulent gas mixtures with MOX sensors validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance. PMID:25325339

  3. Development of a simple vent-free interface for capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Chuichi; Takeda, Shihori; Freeman, Robert R; Ohtani, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    A novel and simple interface for capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed using a piece of deactivated stainless-steel tubing. This interface eliminated the need to vent the MS ion source when changing columns. Various chromatographic performance indicators, such as inertness, and thermal and chemical stability, were confirmed to be unaffected by using this interface at an elevated temperature of around 300°C. The new interface should facilitate the characterization of polymeric materials using analytical pyrolysis techniques in which frequent switching is required in the measuring mode, such as evolved gas analysis-MS and flash pyrolysis-GC-MS. PMID:22076334

  4. Urinary metabonomics study in a rat model in response to protein-energy malnutrition by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeming; Li, Min; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhou, Jia; Chang, Yuwei; Li, Xiang; Gao, Peng; Lu, Xin; Li, Yousheng; Xu, Guowang

    2010-11-01

    Systematic studies were performed on the biological perturbations in metabolic phenotype responding to protein-energy malnutrition through global metabolic profiling analysis, in combination with pattern recognition. The malnutrition rat model was established through five weeks of strict diet restriction, and the metabonome data obtained from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were integrated to approximate the comprehensive metabolic signature. Principal component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structure analysis were used for the classification of metabolic phenotypes and discovery of differentiating metabolites. The perturbations in the urine profiles of malnourished rats were marked by higher levels of creatine, threitol, pyroglutamic acid, gluconic acid and kynurenic acid, as well as decreased levels of succinic acid, cis-aconitic acid, citric acid, isocitric acid, threonic acid, trimethylglycine, N-methylnicotinic acid and uric acid. The alterations in these metabolites were associated with perturbations in energy metabolism, carbohydrate, amino acid, and fatty acid metabolism, purine metabolism, cofactor and vitamin metabolism, in response to protein and energy malnutrition. Our findings show the integration of GC-MS and LC-MS techniques for untargeted metabolic profiling analysis was promising for nutriology. PMID:20717558

  5. [Analysis of major components in water based stamp pad inks and their imprints by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Zou, Jixin; Shi, Gaojun; Zhang, Lijuan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) technology and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology were used to qualitatively analyze the major components in water based stamp pad inks including major colorants and volatile components. After the samples were supersonically extracted and then centrifuged, UHPLC-MS was used to separate and identify the major colorants. A ZORBAX Eclipse Plus Phenyl-Hexyl (50 mm x 4.6 mm, 1.8 microm) column and 15 mmol/L ammonium acetate-acetonitrile were utilized for the separation and negative selected ion monitoring mode (SIM) was set for the MS analysis. An HP-INNOWAX (30 m x 0.25 mm, 0.25 microm) column was employed in the GC-MS analysis with the full-scan mode to determine the volatiles. This study demonstrated that the major colorants in the inks and their imprints were Acid Red R, Eosin Y and Pigment Red 112; and the major volatiles were glycerol, 1,2-propanediol, etc. The method is rapid and accurate. It also demonstrates that the method can meet the requirements for imprint determination in material evidence identification. The work provides a reliable tool for the categorization research in the forensic sciences. PMID:21438364

  6. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, J.

    1995-08-23

    The Savannah River Site contains approximately 1500 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are collected. Many of these samples are sent off-site for various analyses, including the determination of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report describes accomplishments that have been made during the past year which will ultimately allow VOC analysis to be performed on-site using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Through the use of the on-site approach, it is expected that there will be a substantial cost savings. This approach will also provide split-sample analysis capability which can serve as a quality control measure for off-site analysis.

  7. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of historical varnishes of ancient Italian lutes and violin.

    PubMed

    Echard, J P; Benoit, C; Peris-Vicente, J; Malecki, V; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Vaiedelich, S

    2007-02-12

    The organic constituents of historical vanishes from two ancient Italian lutes and a Stradivari violin, kept in the Musée de la musique in Paris, have been characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results have been compared with the chromatograms and mass spectra of recent as well as old naturally aged reference materials. The three historical varnishes analyzed have been shown to be oil varnishes, probably mixtures of linseed oil with resins. Identification of diterpenoids and triterpenoids compounds, and of the resins that may have been ingredients of the varnishes, are discussed in this paper. PMID:17386601

  8. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  9. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the chemical characterisation of modern and archaeological figs (Ficus carica).

    PubMed

    Ribechini, Erika; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2011-06-24

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethylsilylation, and analytical pyrolysis using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) for in situ derivatisation followed by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis (Pyrolysis-silylation-GC/MS) were used to investigate the hydrolysable and soluble constituents, and the polymerised macromolecules of an archaeological fig (Ficus carica) recovered in Zaragoza (Spain), as well as of modern figs. The main aim was to study the compositional alterations undergone by the fig tissues in a particular archaeological environment: the fig was in a vessel and covered by a layer of a mixture of orpiment and gypsum. A comparison between the GC/MS results from modern and archaeological figs revealed that degradative reactions took place, leading to the disappearance/depletion of reactive (unsaturated fatty acids) and sensitive compounds (phytosterols and triterpenes). Py-silylation-GC/MS data provided evidence of a significant degradation of the saccharide and lipid components of the fig tissue, which left a residue enriched in polyphenols and polyesters. PMID:21570079

  10. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  11. Metabolomics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: Combined Targeted and Untargeted Profiling.

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics is ideal for identifying and quantitating small-molecule metabolites (<650 Da), including small acids, alcohols, hydroxyl acids, amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, sterols, catecholamines, drugs, and toxins, often using chemical derivatization to make these compounds sufficiently volatile for gas chromatography. This unit shows how GC-MS-based metabolomics allows integration of targeted assays for absolute quantification of specific metabolites with untargeted metabolomics to discover novel compounds. Complemented by database annotations using large spectral libraries and validated standard operating procedures, GC-MS can identify and semiquantify over 200 compounds from human body fluids (e.g., plasma, urine, or stool) per study. Deconvolution software enables detection of more than 300 additional unidentified signals that can be annotated through accurate mass instruments with appropriate data processing workflows, similar to untargeted profiling using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. GC-MS is a mature technology that uses not only classic detectors (quadrupole) but also target mass spectrometers (triple quadrupole) and accurate mass instruments (quadrupole-time of flight). This unit covers sample preparation from mammalian samples, data acquisition, quality control, and data processing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27038389

  12. Composition of ultrathin binary polymer brushes by thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Diego; Sparnacci, Katia; Laus, Michele; Ferrarese Lupi, Federico; Giammaria, Tommaso Jacopo; Seguini, Gabriele; Ceresoli, Monica; Perego, Michele; Gianotti, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, a reliable and rugged thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) method was developed to determine the composition of ultrathin films consisting of binary blends of functional polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) grafted to a silicon wafer. A general methodology will be given to address the composition determination problem for binary or even multicomponent polymer brush systems using the PS/PMMA-based samples as a paradigmatic example. In this respect, several distinct tailor-made materials were developed to ensure reliable calibration and validation stages. The analytical method was tested on unknown samples to follow the composition evolution in PS/PMMA brushes during the grafting reaction. A preferential grafting of the PMMA was revealed in full agreement with its preferential interaction with the SiO2 polar surface. Graphical abstract A reliable and rugged thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) method was developed to determine the composition of ultrathin films consisting of binary blends of functional polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) grafted to a silicon wafer. PMID:26873220

  13. Headspace analysis of engine oil by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Levermore, D M; Josowicz, M; Rees, W S; Janata, J

    2001-03-15

    This study establishes the rationale necessary for determining the time to change engine oil. This is based on identifying gaseous components in new and used automobile lubricants. Key compounds, so-called "signature", are separated and identified qualitatively by coupled gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Volatile antioxidants at zero miles and fuel contaminants at low mileage are observed in the headspace of engine oil. Several oxidative degradation components have been positively identified in the used oil, which include the following: acetaldehyde, acetone, butanal, 2-propanol, acetic acid, 2-hexanol, benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, and 1-pentanol. This study strongly suggests that the status of lubricating oil can be determined by the analysis of the gas phase above the oil. Most importantly, it opens the possibility of performing conditional maintenance of the combustion engine based on information obtained from gas sensors. PMID:11305675

  14. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: Recent evolution and current trends.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Franchina, Flavio A; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    The present contribution is focused on the evolution and current trends of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC × GC-MS), with respect to a review that described this specific methodology published at the beginning of 2008 (Mondello et al., 2008). In fact, since then there has been considerable evolution in the MS field, certainly exceeding that observed in GC × GC. In particular, the present paper will cover the combination of novel MS machines [single quadrupole (Q) and triple quadrupole, isotope ratio, low- and high-resolution time-of-flight (ToF), hybrid (Q-ToF)] to GC × GC systems, and will position comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography within the wider context of separation science. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:524-534, 2016. PMID:25269651

  15. Derivatization of pinacolyl alcohol with phenyldimethylchlorosilane for enhanced detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Albo, Rebecca L F; Valdez, Carlos A; Leif, Roald N; Mulcahy, Heather A; Koester, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    A derivatization procedure for the qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of pinacolyl alcohol (PA) that employs phenyldimethylchlorosilane (PhDMClS) and the promoter N-methylimidazole is described. While PA, underivatized, can be detected using conventional gas chromatographic methods, its polarity and low boiling point make its detection in complex matrices challenging. The silylation procedure described herein generates a PA-derivative exhibiting an increased on-column retention time, thus shifting its GC-MS signal away from commonly encountered, volatile, interfering analytes. Derivatized PA could be distinguished from other PhDMClS-derivatized isomeric alcohols by its unique retention time and mass spectrum. The derivatization was demonstrated to perform well in the GC-MS analysis and identification of PA in samples from Proficiency Tests administered by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). PMID:24481624

  16. Community air monitoring for pesticides-part 2: multiresidue determination of pesticides in air by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Matt; Lee, P

    2014-03-01

    Two multiresidue methods were developed to determine pesticides in air collected in California. Pesticides were trapped using XAD-4 resin and extracted with ethyl acetate. Based on an analytical method from the University of California Davis Trace Analytical Laboratory, pesticides were detected by analyzing the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine chlorothalonil, chlorthal-dimethyl, cycloate, dicloran, dicofol, EPTC, ethalfluralin, iprodione, mefenoxam, metolachlor, PCNB, permethrin, pronamide, simazine, trifluralin, and vinclozolin. A GC with a flame photometric detector was used to determine chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos oxon, diazinon, diazinon oxon, dimethoate, dimethoate oxon, fonophos, fonophos oxon, malathion, malathion oxon, naled, and oxydemeton. Trapping efficiencies ranged from 78 to 92 % for low level (0.5 μg) and 37-104 % for high level (50 and 100 μg) recoveries. Little to no degradation of compounds occurred over 31 days; recoveries ranged from 78 to 113 %. In the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) method, pesticides were detected by analyzing the extract by GC-MS to determine chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, dichlorvos, dicofol, endosulfan 1, endosulfan sulfate, oxyfluorfen, permethrin, propargite, and trifluralin. A liquid chromatograph coupled to a MS was used to determine azinphos-methyl, chloropyrifos oxon, DEF, diazinon, diazinon oxon, dimethoate, dimethoate oxon, diuron, EPTC, malathion, malathion oxon, metolachlor, molinate, norflurazon, oryzalin, phosmet, propanil, simazine and thiobencarb. Trapping efficiencies for compounds determined by the CDFA method ranged from 10 to 113, 22 to 114, and 56 to 132 % for 10, 5, and 2 μg spikes, respectively. Storage tests yielded 70-170 % recovery for up to 28 days. These multiresidue methods represent flexible, sensitive, accurate, and cost-effective ways to determine residues of various pesticides in ambient air. PMID:24370860

  17. Lignans in resin of Araucaria angustifolia by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuichi; Otto, Angelika; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2004-11-01

    Total extract of resin from Araucaria angustifolia was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and 32 lignans were identified. Lignan acetates are present in the resin and consist of four secoisolariciresinol acetates, six lariciresinol acetates, two 7'-hydroxylariciresinol acetates and an isolariciresinol acetate, which have hitherto not been reported in the plant kingdom. Shonanin and 7'-hydroxylariciresinol type lignans are also present in A. angustifolia resin. Lignans containing syringyl moieties, characteristic for angiosperms, occur in the resin and consist of 5-methoxylariciresinol-9-acetate, 5'-methoxylariciresinol-9-acetate, 5-methoxypinoresinol dimethyl ether and 5-methoxypinoresinol. This is noteworthy because syringyl moieties have only been reported for Thuja species (Cupressaceae) among the gymnosperms. The mass spectra of the various lignan trimethylsilyl derivatives are discussed with the interpretations of the fragmentation patterns. PMID:15532064

  18. Pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of polychlorinated biphenyls on sediment

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtrey, K.D.; Wildman, N.J.; Tai, H.

    1983-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are common environmental contaminants which were freely employed for many years in numerous industrial applications but whose use has now been regulated. Many analytical schemes for monitoring these materials in environmental samples have been developed over the last decades, however, PCBs remain difficult analytical subjects. Most protocols rely on a combination of wet chemical pre-analytical isolation and purification whose complexity depends on the sample matrix. The time required for these manipulations may greatly hamper efforts directed towards emergency cleanup of accidental or illicit contamination of the environment. Thus, a clear need exists for methods which will allow rapid analysis of relatively intransigent samples for PCB contamination. Preliminary experiments directed to assessing the use of pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in determining PCB contamination of soils and sediments are reported. In these experiments pyrolytic desorption at 1000/sup 0/C during 10 sec was used to completely replace more lengthy wet chemical manipulations.

  19. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolic Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Epileptic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, Tetsuya; SUMITA, Maho; HORITANI, Yusuke; TAMAI, Reo; TANAKA, Katsuhiro; KOMORI, Masayuki; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy. PMID:24334864

  20. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of nitrosamines in red wine.

    PubMed

    Lona-Ramirez, Fernando J; Gonzalez-Alatorre, Guillermo; Rico-Ramírez, Vicente; Perez-Perez, Ma Cristina I; Castrejón-González, Edgar O

    2016-04-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms) are highly active carcinogens that have been detected in food and beverages. Currently certain studies report their presence in red wine, while others fail to detect their presence. In this study the head space solid phase micro-extraction technique coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was applied to quantify four NAms in different types of red wine. The technique was found to be a simple, precise, fast and environmentally friendly alternative for the quantification of volatile NAms. A factorial analysis was carried out to evaluate the influence of the parameters on the HS-SPME technique. This is the first study that such analysis has been reported and where NAms in red wine have been quantified using HS-SPME-GC-MS. The method was validated by calculating the linearity, limit of detection and quantification. Two of the four NAms analyzed were found to be present in red wine samples. PMID:26593598

  1. [Determination of 10 volatile organic compounds in toys by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lü, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Kang, Suyuan; Bai, Hua; Wang, Chao

    2010-08-01

    A headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 10 residual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in toys. The experimental conditions such as headspace temperature, headspace time and the analytical conditions of GC-MS were optimized. Toy samples were treated at 140 degrees C for 45 min, and then the evolved products were separated on a DB-624 column, determined by MS and quantified by external standard method. The recoveries were from 79% to 106% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were from 0.4% to 5.6%. The linear range was 0.001 - 2.0 microg with a good linear correlation coefficient (r > 0.994 0) and the limits of quantification (LOQ) were less than 0 66 mg/kg. The method is accurate, simple, rapid, and is suitable for the analysis of residual VOCs in various toys. PMID:21261051

  2. Determination of glyphosate, glyphosate metabolites, and glufosinate in human serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Motojyuku, Megumi; Saito, Takeshi; Akieda, Kazuki; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2008-11-15

    This paper describes an assay for the determination of glyphosate (GLYP), glyphosate metabolites [(aminomethyl) phosphonic acid] (AMPA), and glufosinate (GLUF) in human serum. After protein precipitation using acetonitrile and solid-phase extraction, serum samples were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The assay was linear over a concentration range of 3-100.0 microg/ml for GLYP, AMPA, and GLUF. The overall recoveries for the three compounds were >73%. The intra- and inter-day variations were <15%. Precision and accuracy were 6.4-10.6% and 88.2-103.7%, respectively. The validated method was applied to quantify the GLYP and AMPA content in the serum of a GLYP-poisoned patient. In conclusion, the method was successfully applied for the determination of GLYP and its metabolite AMPA in serum obtained from patient of GLYP-poisoning. PMID:18945648

  3. ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXTRACTS BY CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY AND CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative sensitivities of fused-silica capillary column gas chromatography/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FSCC/GC/FT-IR) versus packed-column GC/FT-IR and FSCC/GC/FT-IR versus fused-silica capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (FSCC/GC/MS) were compa...

  4. DETERMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS USING EQUILIBRIUM HEADSPACE ANALYSIS AND CAPILLARY COLUMN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing methods for determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil matrices using the purge and trap technique with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) have several problems, which include preserving sample integrity from collection to analysis and efficient...

  5. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining…

  6. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  7. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  8. ANALYSIS OF TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMBUSTION PROCESS EMISSIONS USING NOVEL MULTIDIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the analysis of trace-level organic combustion process emissions using novel multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) procedures. It outlines the application of the technique through the analyses of various incinerator effluent and produ...

  9. Speciation of subsurface contaminants by cone penetrometry gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshteyn, A.; Smarason, S.; Robbat, A. Jr. )

    1999-07-15

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collectors, the TECP extracts organics from soil without bringing the soil to the surface or into a collection chamber. Results show that polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides, and explosives can be recovered (60--95%) from wet or dry soil, with extraction efficiency compound-specific. The data are in remarkable agreement with closed cell thermal desorption (TD) experiments, where no organics are lost to the environment during heating. ECP GC/MS results also compare favorably with solvent-extracted GC/MS analyses and can be used to delineate the presence and extent of contamination at hazardous waste sites. Data illustrating TECP dependence on probe temperature and soil moisture as well as carrier gas liner velocity and volume (modified Reynolds number) are shown along with sample analysis data from two hazardous waste sites. The total ion and reconstructed ion current chromatograms are shown for PAHs collected by TECP from a coal tar contaminated soil obtained at a manufactured gas plant in Massachusetts. TECP and TD results are within 15% for nonvolatile PAHs and within 50% of the solvent-extracted data.

  10. Isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine for stable isotope analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-09-01

    A method for the isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine is described that allows stable isotope determinations of taurine to be made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The isolation procedure can be applied to 0.1 ml of plasma; the recovery of plasma taurine was 70 to 80%. For gc separation, taurine was converted to its dimethylaminomethylene methyl ester derivative which could not be detected by hydrogen flame ionization, but could be monitored readily by NH/sub 3/ chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The derivatization reaction occurred partially on-column and required optimization of injection conditions. Using stable isotope ratiometry multiple ion detection, (M + 2 + H)/sup +//(M + H)/sup +/ ion ratio of natural abundance taurine was determined with a standard deviation of less than +-0.07% of the ratio. The (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine/taurine mole ratios of standard mixtures could be accurately determined to 0.001. This stable isotope gc-ms method is suitable for studying the plasma kinetics of (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine in infants who are at risk with respect to taurine depletion.

  11. Stable isotope dilution method for the determination of guanidinoacetic acid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    For more than 30 years, guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), together with other guanidino compounds, has been proposed as an important marker for renal failure, in kidney transplantation, and for renal metabolism, especially for the metabolic activity of the renal proximal tubules. Since the discovery of the first patient with guanidinoacetic acid methyltransferase deficiency in 1994 by Stöckler et al. (Pediatr. Res. 1994; 36: 409), GAA has become of great interest for all laboratories involved in the diagnosis of metabolic diseases. In the literature there are several methods described for the determination of GAA, ranging from ion-exchange chromatography with post-column derivatisation, enzymatic methods, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), to liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS). Here a stable isotope dilution method for quantitative and accurate determination of GAA in urine, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid is described. GAA is converted to the bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine di(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) derivative by stepwise derivatisation with hexafluoroacetylacetone and N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Analysis can be performed using a standard benchtop GC/MS system. For quantitative GAA determination with 1,2-(13)C-GAA as internal standard, selected ion monitoring is performed using m/z 460/462, with m/z 432/433 and 375/376 as qualifiers. PMID:12661026

  12. Issues pertaining to the analysis of buprenorphine and its metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Shan; Lin, Dong-Liang; Yang, Shu-Ching; Wu, Meng-Yan; Liu, Ray H; Su, Lien-Wen; Cheng, Pai-Sheng; Liu, Chiareiy; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2010-03-01

    "Substitution therapy" and the use of buprenorphine (B) as an agent for treating heroin addiction continue to gain acceptance and have recently been implemented in Taiwan. Mature and widely utilized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology can complement the low cost and highly sensitive immunoassay (IA) approach to facilitate the implementation of analytical tasks supporting compliance monitoring and pharmacokinetic/pharmacogenetic studies. Issues critical to GC-MS analysis of B and norbuprenorphine (NB) (free and as glucuronides), including extraction, hydrolysis, derivatization, and quantitation approaches were studied, followed by comparing the resulting data against those derived from IA and two types of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. Commercial solid-phase extraction devices, highly effective for recovering all metabolites, may not be suitable for the analysis of free B and NB; acetyl-derivatization products exhibit the most favorable chromatographic, ion intensity, and cross-contribution characteristics for GC-MS analysis. Evaluation of IA, GC-MS, and LC-MS/MS data obtained in three laboratories has proven the 2-aliquot GC-MS protocol effective for the determination of free B and NB and their glucuronides. PMID:20122691

  13. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  14. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief that

  15. [Determination of soluble organic fraction in diesel exhaust particulates by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guihua; Wang, Junxiao; Huang, Xuezheng; Lu, Jiaxiang; Liu, Na

    2004-07-01

    The soluble organic fractions (SOF) in diesel exhaust particulates have been extracted with ultrasonic separator and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/ MS). The GC/MS conditions were as follows: an HP SE-50 capillary column (30 m x 0.2 mm i. d. x 0.2 microm); temperature programming started at 100 degrees C, holding for 2.0 min, then increased to 160 degrees C at a rate of 4.0 degrees C /min, then to 250 degrees C at 8 degrees C/min, finally, kept at 250 degrees C for 31.75 min; boiling chamber temperature 260 degrees C; helium gas as carrier; chapiter pressure 45 kPa; sample size 1 microL; electron impact energy of mass spectrometer 70 eV; multiplier voltage 1 800 V; mass range 300 - 500 u. The results showed that under exhaust temperature, about 80% of SOF in particulates were normal or isomeric alkanes with carbon numbers from 9 to 28. The rest of the fractions of SOF were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (homologs of indene, fluorene, phenanthrene, naphthalene etc.) and other organic substances. It is demonstrated that most of SOF were from unburned diesel and engine oils. The testing conclusion should be useful in designing and evaluating particulate filters. PMID:15709431

  16. Development of a technique for mercury speciation and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Barshick, C.M.; Britt, P.F.; Vance, M.A.; Duckworth, D.C.

    1997-07-01

    One element of concern to DOE is mercury. Mercury was used extensively at the DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee from 1950 to 1963 in the process of making lithium deuteride, a component of nuclear weapons. Although both the inorganic and organometallic forms of mercury are toxic to humans, the organic compounds are often more toxic. Since the toxicity of mercury is a function of its chemical form, an understanding of the interactions between commercially discharged mercury, naturally occurring mercury, and the environment in which they are present is vital. In this report, the authors have been investigating gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the analysis of both the organometallic and inorganic forms of mercury in the same environmental sample (e.g., solutions, soils, and sludges). Although gas chromatography is the classical technique for analyzing organic molecules, (e.g., organometallic compounds) little has been done on the analysis of inorganic compounds. In a previous publication, the authors described how a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber could be used to sample organomercurials from aqueous samples. An alkylation reaction was then carried out to transform chemically mercury nitrate into dimethylmercury; subsequent GC/MS analysis of this compound permitted quantification of the inorganic constituent. Subsequently, several different alkylation reagents have been synthesized that methylate any inorganic mercury compound to methylmercury iodide. Here, the authors report results on alkylation reaction time and the effect of pH on the population of the product.

  17. Presence of phthalate esters in intravenous solution evaluated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Strac, Ivona Vidić; Pušić, Maja; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2013-03-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer widely used in the production of poly-(vinyl) chloride (PVC) materials. It is a reproductive and developmental toxicant in animals and a suspected endocrine modulator in humans. DEHP is not covalently bound within the PVC molecule, which is why migration into a suitable medium can be expected. Since application of infusion solutions is one of the most common medical treatments, the objective of this study was to determine the migration of phthalates from softened PVC storage bags into infusion solution in different time periods within one year from date of production using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The measured values of DEHP ranged between 0.22 and 14.00 µg l(-1) , but the unexpected presence of other phthalate esters was also detected. It was concluded that values obtained in infusion solutions match the reference data and represent a minor risk for the patient. The presence of other phthalate esters leads to the conclusion that the pharmacopeic requirement for polymer cleanness was not fully met. Since phthalate esters are among the most extensively used industrial chemicals and are widely distributed in the environment, special precautions and further monitoring should be conducted to minimize any possible health risks. PMID:22034089

  18. EIder: A compound identification tool for gas chromatography mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Koo, Imhoi; Kim, Seongho; Shi, Biyun; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Song, Ming; McClain, Craig; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-05-27

    We report software entitled EIder (EI mass spectrum identifier) that provides users with eight literature reported spectrum matching algorithms for compound identification from gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data. EIder calculates retention index according to experimental conditions categorized by column class, column type and data type, where 9 empirical distribution functions of the absolute retention index deviation to its mean value were constructed using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2011 retention index database to improve the accuracy of compound identification. EIder filters compound candidates based on elementary composition and derivatization reagent, and automatically adds the molecular information of the native compound to each derivatized compound using a manually created database. When multiple samples are analyzed together, EIder performs cross-sample alignment and provides an option of using an average mass spectrum for compound identification. Furthermore, a suite of graphical user interfaces are implemented in EIder to allow users to both manually and automatically modify the identification results using experimental information at various analysis stages. Analysis of three types of GC-MS datasets indicates that the developed EIder software can improve the accuracy of compound identification. PMID:27131963

  19. Analysis of volatile compounds of Malaysian Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) honey using gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nurul Syazana, M S; Gan, S H; Halim, A S; Shah, Nurul Syazana Mohamad; Gan, Siew Hua; Sukari, Halim Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The constituents of honey's volatile compounds depend on the nectar source and differ depending on the place of origin. To date, the volatile constituents of Tualang honey have never been investigated. The objective of this study was to analyze the volatile compounds in local Malaysian Tualang honey. A continuous extraction of Tualang honey using five organic solvents was carried out starting from non-polar to polar solvents and the extracted samples were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Overall, 35 volatile compounds were detected. Hydrocarbons constitute 58.5% of the composition of Tualang honey. Other classes of chemical compounds detected included acids, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, terpenes, furans and a miscellaneous group. Methanol yielded the highest number of extracted compounds such as acids and 5-(Hydroxymethyl) furfural (HMF). This is the first study to describe the volatile compounds in Tualang honey. The use of a simple one tube, stepwise, non-thermal liquid-liquid extraction of honey is a advantageous as it prevents sample loss. Further research to test the clinical benefits of these volatile compounds is recommended. PMID:24146441

  20. Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of fragrance allergens in baby bathwater.

    PubMed

    Lamas, J Pablo; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2009-07-01

    A method based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized for the determination of fragrance allergens in water samples. This is the first study devoted to this family of cosmetic ingredients performed by SPME. The influence of parameters such as fibre coating, extraction and desorption temperatures, salting-out effect and sampling mode on the extraction efficiency has been studied by means of a mixed-level factorial design, which allowed the study of the main effects as well as two-factor interactions. Excluding desorption temperature, the other parameters were, in general, very important for the achievement of high response. The final procedure was based on headspace sampling at 100 degrees C, using polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fibres. The method showed good linearity and precision for all compounds, with detection limits ranging from 0.001 to 0.3 ng mL(-1). Reliability was demonstrated through the evaluation of the recoveries in different real water samples, including baby bathwater and swimming pool water. The absence of matrix effects allowed the use of external standard calibration to quantify the target compounds in the samples. The proposed procedure was applied to the determination of allergens in several real samples. All the target compounds were found in the samples, and, in some cases, at quite high concentrations. The presence and the levels of these chemicals in baby bathwater should be a matter of concern. PMID:19458938

  1. [Determination of five representative ultraviolet filters in water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ding, Yiran; Huang, Yun; Zhao, Tingting; Cai, Qian; Luo, Yu; Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yuxia; Pan, Xuejun

    2014-06-01

    A method for the determination of five representative organic UV filters: ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), octocrylene (OC), homosalate (HMS) in water was investigated. The method was ased on derivatization, solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by determination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The variables involved in the derivatization of BP-3 and HMS were optimized, and SPE conditions were studied. For derivatization, 100 microL N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) was used as derivatization reagent and reacted with BP-3 and HMS at 100 degrees C for 100 min. For SPE, the pH value of water sample was adjusted to 3-5. The Oasis HLB cartridges were employed and the solution of ethyl acetate and dichloromethane (1 : 1, v/v) was used as the eluting solvent, and good recoveries of the target compounds were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantification (LOQs) for the five target compounds in water samples were 0.5-1.2 ng/L and 1.4-4.0 ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of spiked water samples were 87.85%-102.34% with good repeatability and reproducibility (RSD < 5%, n = 3) for all the target compounds. Finally, the validated method was applied to analysis the representative UV filters in water samples collected from a wastewater treatment plant in Kunming city of Yunnan province. PMID:25269262

  2. Determination of phthalate esters in teas and tea infusions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Liping; Ma, Lijuan; Qiao, Yang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-04-15

    Phthalate esters (PAEs), a group of environmental pollutants which are carcinogenic to human body, have been detected in teas. In this work, five PAEs in teas and tea infusions were quantitatively determined by a modified simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After the optimization of SDE, the proposed method afforded a wide range of linearity and high linear regression coefficients with the limits of detection range of 0.24-3.72 μg/kg. The average recoveries were 79.83-116.67% for tea samples and 78.22-101.64% for tea infusions with all the relative standard deviations below 20%. The total content of five PAEs in teas was 1.135-3.734 mg/kg and the total dissolving ratio of five PAEs from tea to infusion was 19.05-28.07% for the selected tea samples. The risk assessment result of all the selected tea samples demonstrated that the population with the habit of drinking tea won't cause risk to human health. PMID:26675858

  3. Surface-sampling and analysis of TATP by swabbing and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Romolo, Francesco Saverio; Cassioli, Luigi; Grossi, Silvana; Cinelli, Giuseppe; Russo, Mario Vincenzo

    2013-01-10

    The method of sample recovery for trace detection and identification of explosives plays a critical role in several criminal investigations. After bombing, there can be difficulties in sending big objects to a laboratory for analysis. Traces can also be searched for on large surfaces, on hands of suspects or on surfaces where the explosive was placed during preparatory phases (e.g. places where an IED was assembled, vehicles used for transportation, etc.). In this work, triacetone triperoxide (TATP) was synthesized from commercial precursors following reported methods. Several portions of about 6mg of TATP were then spread on different surfaces (e.g. floors, tables, etc.) or used in handling tests. Three different swabbing systems were used: a commercial swab, pre-wetted with propan-2-ol (isopropanol) and water (7:3), dry paper swabs, and cotton swabs wetted with propan-2-ol. Paper and commercial swabs were also used to sample a metal plate, where a small charge of about 4g of TATP was detonated. Swabs were sealed in small glass jars with screw caps and Parafilm(®) M and sent to the laboratory for analysis. Swabs were extracted and analysed several weeks later by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. All the three systems gave positive results, but wetted swabs collected higher amounts of TATP. The developed procedure showed its suitability for use in real cases, allowing TATP detection in several simulations, including a situation in which people wash their hands after handling the explosive. PMID:23219697

  4. Identification of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mareck, U; Sigmund, G; Opfermann, G; Geyer, H; Thevis, M; Schänzer, W

    2005-01-01

    Letrozole (1-(bis-(4-cyanophenyl)methyl)-1,2,4-triazole) is used therapeutically as a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (Femara) to treat hormone-sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. For doping purposes it may be used to counteract the adverse effects of an extensive abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (gynaecomastia) and to increase the testosterone concentration by stimulation of the testosterone biosynthesis. The use of aromatase inhibitors has been prohibited by IOC/WADA regulations for male and female athletes since September 2001 and January 2005, respectively. Spot urine samples from women suffering from metastatic breast cancer and being treated with letrozole were collected and analysed to develop/optimise the detection system for metabolites of letrozole to allow the identification of athletes who do not comply with the internationally prohibited use of this cancer drug. The assay was based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and the main metabolite of letrozole (bis-4-cyanophenylmethanol) was identified by comparison of its mass spectrum and retention time with that of a bis-4-cyanophenylmethanol reference. The full-scan spectrum, diagnostic ions and a validation of the method for the analysis of bis-4-cyanophenylmethanol are presented. PMID:16299697

  5. Profiling of Serum Metabolites in Canine Lymphoma Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    TAMAI, Reo; FURUYA, Masaru; HATOYA, Shingo; AKIYOSHI, Hideo; YAMAMOTO, Ryohei; KOMORI, Yoshiaki; YOKOI, Shin-ichi; TANI, Kenichiro; HIRANO, Yuji; KOMORI, Masayuki; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Canine lymphoma is a common cancer that has high rates of complete remission with combination chemotherapy. However, the duration of remission varies based on multiple factors, and there is a need to develop a method for early detection of recurrence. In this study, we compared the metabolites profiles in serum from 21 dogs with lymphoma and 13 healthy dogs using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The lymphoma group was separated from the control group in an orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) plot using ions of m/z 100–600, indicating that the metabolites profiles in lymphoma cases differed from those in healthy dogs. The lymphoma group was also separated from the control group on OPLS-DA plot using 29 metabolites identified in all serum samples. Significant differences were found for 16 of these metabolites with higher levels in the lymphoma group for 15 of the metabolites and lower levels for inositol. An OPLS-DA plot showed separation of the lymphoma and healthy groups using these 16 metabolites only. These results indicate that metabolites profile with GC-MS may be a useful tool for detection of potential biomarker and diagnosis of canine lymphoma. PMID:25131950

  6. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  7. Determination of steroidal estrogens in flushed dairy manure wastewater by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Travis A; Graetz, Donald A; Wilkie, Ann C; Szabo, Nancy J; Diaz, Carolyn S

    2006-01-01

    There is a critical need to accurately measure the concentrations of natural steroidal estrogens in flushed dairy manure wastewater (FDMW) to assess any potential risk of waterway contamination resulting from land application. Estrogens are a concern because low concentrations (10-100 ng L-1) in water can adversely affect aquatic vertebrate species such as fish, turtles, and frogs by disrupting the normal function of their endocrine systems. The objective of this study was to develop a sample preparation method that permits the quantification of four natural steroidal estrogens (17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and estriol) in FDMW by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Solid-phase extraction with graphitized carbon black was used for the bulk extraction of estrogens from FDMW and additional sample purification was accomplished with C-18. The sample preparation method allowed estrogens to be detected accurately by GC-MS in FDMW. Spiked recovery experiments indicated that the method is satisfactory for measuring the estrogens of interest in FDMW with average recovery of >90%. As expected in FDMW, characterization of the estrogen profile revealed a large abundance of 17alpha-estradiol relative to 17beta-estradiol and estrone. Estriol was not detected in FDMW. The methodology developed in this research helps provide an analytical foundation for the quantification of steroidal estrogens in FDMW by GC-MS. PMID:16585610

  8. Microscale analysis of amino acids using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ping; Yang, Xiao-Yuan; Hegeman, Adrian D; Gray, William M; Cohen, Jerry D

    2010-08-15

    To conduct studies of stable isotope incorporation and dilution in growing plants, a rapid microscale method for determination of amino acid profiles from minute amounts of plant samples was developed. The method involves solid-phase ion exchange followed by derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The procedure allowed the eluent to be derivatized directly with methyl chloroformate without sample lyophilization or other evaporation procedures. Sample extraction and derivatization required only ca. 30min and quantification of the 19 amino acids eluted from the cation exchange solid-phase extraction step from a single cotyledon (0.4mg fresh weight) or three etiolated 7-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings (0.1mg fresh weight) was easily accomplished in the selected ion monitoring mode. This method was especially useful for monitoring mass isotopic distribution of amino acids as illustrated by Arabidopsis seedlings that had been labeled with deuterium oxide and (15)N salts. Sample preparation was facile, rapid, economical, and the method is easily modified for integration into robotic systems for analysis with large numbers of samples. PMID:20663719

  9. Metabolomic profiling in inner ear fluid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Irino, Yasuhiro; Kitamoto, Junko; Fukuda, Yuriko; Inokuchi, Go; Hasegawa, Shingo; Otsuki, Naoki; Yoshida, Masaru; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2015-10-01

    The composition and homeostasis of inner ear fluids are important in hearing function. The purpose of this study was to perform metabolomic analysis of the inner ear fluid in guinea pig cochlea, which has not been previously reported in literature, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seventy-seven kinds of metabolites were detected in the inner ear fluid. Six metabolites, ascorbic acid, fructose, galactosamine, inositol, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, and meso-erythritol, were significantly more abundant, and nine metabolites, phosphate, valine, glycine, glycerol, ornithine, glucose, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, were less abundant in the inner ear fluid than in plasma. The levels of ten metabolites, 3-hydroxy-butyrate, glycerol, fumaric acid, galactosamine, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, phosphate, meso-erythritol, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and inositol, in the inner ear fluid significantly changed after loud noise exposure. These observations may help to elucidate various clinical conditions of sensorineural hearing loss, including noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:26343935

  10. [Determination of hexabromocyclododecane in coatings by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Xue, Qiuhong; Tao, Lin; Ye, Xiwen; Liang, Shengkang; Li, Yanqiu; Niu, Zengyuan

    2013-08-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in fire proof coatings by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The sample was extracted with dichloromethane and purified through an organic membrane before analysis with GC-MS. The characteristic fragments (m/z 157, 239, 319, 401) and the quantitative ion (m/z 239) were selected. With the optimized conditions, the good linear relationship was obtained between the peak area and the mass concentration of HBCD in the range of 5 to 100 mg/L with the correlation coefficient more than 0. 999. The spiked recoveries in the coatings of acrylic and epoxy resins were 92.9% - 116.3% with the RSDs not more than 8%. The LOD (S/N > or = 3) of HBCD was 30 microg/g, and the LOQ (S/N > or = 10) was 100 microg/g, which were much lower than the international maximum residue limit. The method is simple, quick, accurate and precise, which can meet the requirements of the European Commission Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 and Norway PoHS instruction (Prohibition on Certain Hazardous Substances in Consumer Products) for the determination of HBCD. It is suitable for the analysis of HBCD in fire proof coatings. PMID:24369615

  11. Metabolomic study of aging in mouse plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Chan; Hwang, Yun-Ho; Kim, Youngbae; Joo, Bo Sun; Yee, Sung-Tae; Kim, Cheol Min; Paik, Man-Jeong

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomic analysis of aging was performed in plasma samples of young (8 weeks) and old (72 weeks) mice as ethoxycarbonyl/methoxime/tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). As new approaches, study of altered metabolism from aging was attempted by simultaneous profiling analysis of amino acids (AAs), organic acids (OAs) and fatty acids (FAs) by GC-MS in a single run combined with pattern analysis. As a result, 27 amino acids (AAs), 17 organic acids (OAs) and 24 fatty acids (FAs) were positively screened with large variations in plasma samples. Among altered metabolites, levels of six AAs (proline, methionine, 4-hydroxyproline, pipecolic acid, glutamic acid, α-aminoadipic acid) as neurotransmetters and nutrients, five OAs (2-hydroxybutyric acid, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid, cis-aconitic acid citric acid, isocitric acid) including intermediate metabolites in the TCA cycle, and three n-3 polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) of α-octadecatrienoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid as potential biomarkers were significantly different between young and old groups. Their levels were normalized to the corresponding mean values of the young group and then plotted into star symbol patterns, which were clearly distinct compared with numerical data and readily distinguishable for young and old groups. Thus, the present metabolomic screening and the star pattern recognition method might be useful for understanding the complexity of biochemical events in aging. PMID:27183212

  12. Analysis of endogenous aldehydes in human urine by static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Serrano, María; Gallego, Mercedes; Silva, Manuel

    2016-03-11

    Endogenous aldehydes (EAs) generated during oxidative stress and cell processes are associated with many pathogenic and toxicogenic processes. The aim of this research was to develop a solvent-free and automated analytical method for the determination of EAs in human urine using a static headspace generator sampler coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS). Twelve significant EAs used as markers of different biochemical and physiological processes, namely short- and medium-chain alkanals, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyl aldehydes have been selected as target analytes. Human urine samples (no dilution is required) were derivatized with O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine in alkaline medium (hydrogen carbonate-carbonate buffer, pH 10.3). The HS-GC-MS method developed renders an efficient tool for the sensitive and precise determination of EAs in human urine with limits of detection from 1 to 15ng/L and relative standard deviations, (RSDs) from 6.0 to 7.9%. Average recoveries by enriching urine samples ranged between 92 and 95%. Aldehydes were readily determined at 0.005-50μg/L levels in human urine from healthy subjects, smokers and diabetic adults. PMID:26879451

  13. Determination of Menthol in Plasma and Urine by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Frazee, Clint; Kearns, Gregory; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Menthol, a monoterpene, is a principal component of peppermint oil and is used extensively in consumer products as a flavoring aid. It is also commonly used medicinally as a topical skin coolant; to treat inflammation of the mucous membranes, digestive problems, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); and in preventing spasms during endoscopy and for its spasmolytic effect on the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract. Menthol has a half life of 3-6 h and is rapidly metabolized to menthol glucuronide which is detectable in urine and serum following menthol use. We describe a method for the determination of total menthol in human plasma and urine using liquid/liquid extraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selected ion monitoring mode and menthol-d4 as the internal standard. Controls are prepared with menthol glucuronide and all samples undergo enzymatic hydrolysis for the quantification of total menthol. The method has a linear range of 5-1000 ng/mL, and coefficient of variation <10%. PMID:26660189

  14. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  15. Identification of tartary buckwheat tea aroma compounds with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peiyou; Ma, Tingjun; Wu, Li; Shan, Fang; Ren, Guixing

    2011-08-01

    Tartary buckwheat tea, which is an important and healthy product, has a distinct malty aroma. However, its characteristic aroma compounds have not been elucidated. The aims of present study were identification and quantification of its aroma compounds. The analyses were performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after 3 different isolation techniques. Seventy-seven compounds were identified. Among these compounds, 35 were quantified by available standards. The compounds with a high probability of contribution to the tartary buckwheat tea aroma (OAV ≥ 10) were as follows: 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone, nonanal, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, benzeneacetaldehyde, maltol, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, trimethylpyrazine. Some nutritional and bioactive compounds were also identified in this study, such as linoleic acid, niacin, vanillic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin, butylated hydroxytoluene. Practical Application: Tartary buckwheat, one type of buckwheat, has gained much attention from nutritionists and medical doctors in recent years. It is rich in rutin, quercetin, and other nutrients that are good for health. Tartary buckwheat-based product such as tartary buckwheat tea is an important and popular healthy product in China, Japan,South Korea, European countries as well as in American countries. It has a distinct malty aroma. The present study first identified and quantified of its aroma compounds. The results will draw attention to other researchers in food flavor and buckwheat filed. PMID:22417522

  16. Pharmaceuticals in grocery market fish fillets by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mottaleb, Musavvir Arafat; Stowe, Carly; Johnson, Daniel R; Meziani, Mohammed J; Mottaleb, M Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Occurrences of pharmaceuticals are evident in aquatic organisms. A reproducible gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method using selected ion monitoring (SIM) has been used to determine the anti-histamine diphenhydramine (DPH), anti-anxiety diazepam (DZP), anti-seizure carbamazepine (CZP) drugs and their metabolites in grocery stores fish that were homogenized, extracted, pre-concentrated, cleaned up, and examined. Identifications of the compounds in extracts were obtained by comparing similar mass spectral features and retention properties with standards. Among nine frequently detected drugs, only DPH and DZP were observed and ranged from 0.61 to 6.21 and 1.99 to 16.57 ng/g, respectively, in fourteen fish species. These concentration values were lower than the environmental fish. Mean spike recoveries of analytes exceeded 75% with relative standard deviations (RSD)<10%. The statistically-derived method detection limits (MDLs) for nine compounds ranged from 0.13 to 5.56 ng/g. Average surrogate recoveries were 80-85% with 4-9% RSD. PMID:26213006

  17. Characterisation of whiskeys using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, G; James, K J; MacNamara, K; Stack, M A

    2000-10-27

    The application of solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to the detection of flavour volatiles present in Irish and Scottish whiskeys was investigated. A method was developed to characterise these volatiles which included the extraction, identification and quantification of 17 congeners which included fusel alcohols, acetates and esters. The method validation produced the optimum fibre [85 microm poly(acrylate)], extraction time (35 min), sample volume size (3 ml) and desorption time (5 min). The impact of salt on the absorption process was also studied. Characteristic profiles were determined for each whiskey and the flavour congeners were quantified using 4-methyl-2-pentanol as the internal standard. Calibration ranges were determined for each of the congeners with coefficients of linearity ranging from 0.993 (butan-1-ol) to 0.999 (ethyl laurate) and relative standard deviations ranging from 2.5% (2-methylbutan-1-ol) to 21% (furfural) at a concentration of 18.2 mg/l. Detection limits ranged from 0.1 mg/l (ethyl caprate) to 21 mg/l (butan-2-ol). PMID:11093670

  18. Postmortem interval estimation: a novel approach utilizing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based biochemical profiling.

    PubMed

    Kaszynski, Richard H; Nishiumi, Shin; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Kondo, Takeshi; Takahashi, Motonori; Asano, Migiwa; Ueno, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    While the molecular mechanisms underlying postmortem change have been exhaustively investigated, the establishment of an objective and reliable means for estimating postmortem interval (PMI) remains an elusive feat. In the present study, we exploit low molecular weight metabolites to estimate postmortem interval in mice. After sacrifice, serum and muscle samples were procured from C57BL/6J mice (n = 52) at seven predetermined postmortem intervals (0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h). After extraction and isolation, low molecular weight metabolites were measured via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and examined via semi-quantification studies. Then, PMI prediction models were generated for each of the 175 and 163 metabolites identified in muscle and serum, respectively, using a non-linear least squares curve fitting program. A PMI estimation panel for muscle and serum was then erected which consisted of 17 (9.7%) and 14 (8.5%) of the best PMI biomarkers identified in muscle and serum profiles demonstrating statistically significant correlations between metabolite quantity and PMI. Using a single-blinded assessment, we carried out validation studies on the PMI estimation panels. Mean ± standard deviation for accuracy of muscle and serum PMI prediction panels was -0.27 ± 2.88 and -0.89 ± 2.31 h, respectively. Ultimately, these studies elucidate the utility of metabolomic profiling in PMI estimation and pave the path toward biochemical profiling studies involving human samples. PMID:26931122

  19. Identification and differentiation of methcathinone analogs by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Kenji; Mikuma, Toshiyasu; Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    To overcome a number of challenges involved in analyzing methcathinone (MC) analogues, we performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, including sample preparation, of nine MC analogues - 4-methylmethcathinone, three positional isomers of fluoromethcathinones, 4-methoxymethcathinone, N-ethylcathinone, N,N-dimethylcathinone, buphedrone, and pentedrone. The MC analogues underwent dehydrogenation when the free bases were analyzed using splitless injection. Most of this thermal degradation was prevented using split injection. This indicated that a shorter residence time in the hot injector prevented decomposition. Uniquely, 2-fluoromethcathinone degraded to another product in a process that could not be prevented by the split injection. Replacing the liner with a new, clean one was also effective in preventing thermal degradation. Most of the analytes showed a substantial loss (>30%) when the free base solution in ethyl acetate was evaporated under a nitrogen stream. Adding a small amount of dimethylformamide as a solvent keeper had a noticeable effect, but it did not completely prevent the loss. Three positional isomers of fluoromethcathinones were separated with baseline resolution by heptafluorobutyrylation with a slow column heating rate (8 °C/min) using a non-polar DB-5 ms capillary column. These results will be useful for the forensic analysis of MC analogues in confiscated materials. PMID:23161815

  20. Characterization of ballpoint pen inks by thermal and desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2005-09-01

    The characterization of ink on paper is of importance for dating and comparing questioned ink entries in forensic document examination. Inks are commonly characterized by their colorant profile that is identified by well-established analytical methods. Numerous ink formulations show identical colorant profiles, though. In order to differentiate inks that are not distinguishable by colorant analysis, a method for the characterization of colorless ink ingredients, namely binders, solvents and additives is necessary. In this paper, we propose a technique for the analysis of colorless compounds in ballpoint inks using direct thermal desorption of the ink on paper followed by chemical analysis of the desorbed volatile compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As compared to liquid extraction and subsequent analysis of the extracts, the technique avoids possible contamination risks. Sensitivity is very high due to the enrichment of volatile components by thermal desorption. Even from old samples, the chromatograms obtained by the method enable the determination of binder polymers, solvents and additives. Pure binders as used by ink manufacturers were analyzed for unambiguous assignment of analytical results to specific polymers. To prove the practical applicability, we analyzed 121 ballpoint pens, not all having the same colorant profile, and grouped the pens into resin and solvent categories. PMID:16225233

  1. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  2. Toward automated chromatographic fingerprinting: A non-alignment approach to gas chromatography mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Vestner, Jochen; de Revel, Gilles; Krieger-Weber, Sibylle; Rauhut, Doris; du Toit, Maret; de Villiers, André

    2016-03-10

    In contrast to targeted analysis of volatile compounds, non-targeted approaches take information of known and unknown compounds into account, are inherently more comprehensive and give a more holistic representation of the sample composition. Although several non-targeted approaches have been developed, there's still a demand for automated data processing tools, especially for complex multi-way data such as chromatographic data obtained from multichannel detectors. This work was therefore aimed at developing a data processing procedure for gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data obtained from non-targeted analysis of volatile compounds. The developed approach uses basic matrix manipulation of segmented GC-MS chromatograms and PARAFAC multi-way modelling. The approach takes retention time shifts and peak shape deformations between samples into account and can be done with the freely available N-way toolbox for MATLAB. A demonstration of the new fingerprinting approach is presented using an artificial GC-MS data set and an experimental full-scan GC-MS data set obtained for a set of experimental wines. PMID:26893085

  3. Metabolic Profiling and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Mouse Brain by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buttini, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites are key mediators of cellular functions, and have emerged as important modulators in a variety of diseases. Recent developments in translational biomedicine have highlighted the importance of not looking at just one disease marker or disease inducing molecule, but at populations thereof to gain a global understanding of cellular function in health and disease. The goal of metabolomics is the systematic identification and quantification of metabolite populations. One of the most pressing issues of our times is the understanding of normal and diseased nervous tissue functions. To ensure high quality data, proper sample processing is crucial. Here, we present a method for the extraction of metabolites from brain tissue, their subsequent preparation for non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement, as well as giving some guidelines for processing of raw data. In addition, we present a sensitive screening method for neurotransmitters based on GC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The precise multi-analyte detection and quantification of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters can be used for further studies such as metabolic modeling. Our protocol can be applied to shed light on nervous tissue function in health, as well as neurodegenerative disease mechanisms and the effect of experimental therapeutics at the metabolic level. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584556

  4. Optimization of focused ultrasonic extraction of propellant components determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fryš, Ondřej; Česla, Petr; Bajerová, Petra; Adam, Martin; Ventura, Karel

    2012-09-15

    A method for focused ultrasonic extraction of nitroglycerin, triphenyl amine and acetyl tributyl citrate presented in double-base propellant samples following by the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis was developed. A face-centered central composite design of the experiments and response surface modeling was used for optimization of the time, amplitude and sample amount. The dichloromethane was used as the extractant solvent. The optimal extraction conditions with respect to the maximum yield of the lowest abundant compound triphenyl amine were found at the 20 min extraction time, 35% amplitude of ultrasonic waves and 2.5 g of the propellant sample. The results obtained under optimal conditions were compared with the results achieved with validated Soxhlet extraction method, which is typically used for isolation and pre-concentration of compounds from the samples of explosives. The extraction yields for acetyl tributyl citrate using both extraction methods were comparable; however, the yield of ultrasonic extraction of nitroglycerin and triphenyl amine was lower than using Soxhlet extraction. The possible sources of different extraction yields are estimated and discussed. PMID:22967558

  5. Multi-class method for biomonitoring of hair samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Möder, Monika; Gaudl, Alexander; Alonso, Esteban; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Currently, non-invasive biomonitoring of human exposure to organic pollutants bases upon the analysis mainly of urine and human breast milk. While mostly persistent organic pollutants are the center of interest, the aim of our study was to develop a method for the determination of different chemical classes of emerging pollutants (organophosphorus flame retardants, plastic additives such as phthalates, bisphenol A, insecticides, antimicrobials, preservatives and musk fragrances) in hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The preferred sample preparation included hydrolysis of the hair with trifluoroacetic acid in methanol followed by a liquid-liquid extraction using hexane/ethyl acetate. The validated method is characterized by recoveries higher than 77 % for most analytes, relative standard deviations below 16 % and limits of detection between 2 pg mg(-1) (HHCB) and 292 pg mg(-1) (propylparaben) using 50 mg of dry hair. After respective blank corrections, bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and the musk fragrance HHCB were the predominant compounds determined in all hair samples at concentrations between 32 and 59 ng mg(-1) and 0.8-13 ng mg(-1), respectively. The bactericide triclosan and the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) were detected in selected hair samples at 2 and 0.8 ng mg(-1), respectively. PMID:26427497

  6. Headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of volatile compounds in murici (Byrsonima crassifolia l. Rich).

    PubMed

    Alves, G L; Franco, M R B

    2003-01-24

    Northern and Northeastern Brazil have a natural diversity of fruits, many of which are considered exotic, presenting different flavors and aromas. The enormous diversity of fruits represents a promising area for research on aromas. There is also a great potential for the manufacture of juices, desserts or other processed products. Murici is a typical fruit from these regions presenting a different flavor, reminiscent of that of cheese. This fruit is consumed mainly as juice, ice cream or as liquor, greatly appreciated by the local population. Headspace volatile compounds of three lots of the fruit from Ceará (Fortaleza) were collected by suction on Porapak Q for 2 h and desorbed with 300 microl of acetone. The isolated volatile compounds were separated by high resolution GC. Forty-six volatile compounds were detected, of which 41 were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Kovats indices. The most abundant compounds were ethanol (28.3%) and ethyl hexanoate (25.1%). Butanoic acid (5.1%), hexanoic acid (5.1%) and methyl butyrate (2.8%) were also detected in the headspace of the fruit and confirm its unusual cheese aroma. PMID:12580497

  7. The use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry to demonstrate progesterone treatment in bovines.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Geert; Mangelinckx, Sven; Courtheyn, Dirk; De Kimpe, Norbert; Matthijs, Bert; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Currently, no analytical method is available to demonstrate progesterone administration in biological samples collected in rearing animals, and therefore, tracking the abuse of this popular growth promoter is arduous. In this study, a method is presented to reveal progesterone (PG) treatment on the basis of carbon isotope measurement of 5β-pregnane-3α, 20α-diol (BAA-PD), a major PG metabolite excreted in bovine urine, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS). 5-Androstene-3β,17α-diol (AEdiol) is used as endogenous reference compound. Intermediate precisions (n=11) of 0.56‰ and 0.68‰ have been determined for AEdiol and BAA-PD, respectively. The analytical method was used for the very first time to successfully differentiate urine samples collected in treated and untreated animals. PMID:27157423

  8. PRECISION AND ACCURACY IN THE DETERMINATION OF ORGANICS IN WATER BY FUSED SILICA CAPILLARY COLUMN GAS CHROMOTOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY AND PACKED COLUMN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two general methods for the identification and measurement of organic compounds in water are compared. One method employs packed column chromatography and the other fused silica capillary column chromatography. The two gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods use diff...

  9. Identification of New Metabolites of Bacterial Transformation of Indole by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SPG transformed indole completely in the presence of an additional carbon source. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde as biotransformation products. This is the first report of the formation of indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde from indole by any bacterium. PMID:25548566

  10. Identification of n-Decane Oxidation Products in Corynebacterium Cultures by Combined Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bacchin, Paolo; Robertiello, Andrea; Viglia, Aurelio

    1974-01-01

    The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique was employed to characterize n-decane oxidation products of Corynebacterium strains 7E1C and 269 (SNAM Progetti collection) after 73 h of incubation at 35 C. Corynebacterium 7E1C accumulated consistent amounts of esters of long chain acids with long chain alcohols, mainly decyldecanoate as well as products with mono- and diterminal carboxylic functions. Corynebacterium 269 yielded 1-decanol and 1-10 decanediol as principal oxidation products. PMID:4441062

  11. Metabolomic Analysis of Gingival Crevicular Fluid Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Miho; Nozaki, Takenori; Aoki, Jun; Bamba, Takeshi; Jensen, Kirk R; Murakami, Shinya; Toyoda, Michisato

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most prevalent threats to oral health as the most common cause of tooth loss. In order to perform effective treatment, a clinical test that detect sites where disease activity is high and predicts periodontal tissue destruction is strongly desired, however, it is still difficult to prognose the periodontal tissue breakdown on the basis of conventional methods. The aim of this study is to examine the usefulness of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which could eventually be used for on-site analysis of metabolites in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in order to objectively diagnose periodontitis at a molecular level. GCF samples were collected from two diseased sites (one site with a moderate pocket and another site with a deep pocket) from each patient and from clinically healthy sites of volunteers. Nineteen metabolites were identified using GC/MS. Total ion current chromatograms showed broad differences in metabolite peak patterns between GCF samples obtained from healthy sites, moderate-pocket sites, and deep-pocket sites. The intensity difference of some metabolites was significant at sites with deep pockets compared to healthy sites. Additionally, metabolite intensities at moderate-pocket sites showed an intermediate profile between the severely diseased sites and healthy sites, which suggested that periodontitis progression could be observed with a changing metabolite profile. Principal component analysis confirmed these observations by clearly delineating healthy sites and sites with deep pockets. These results suggest that metabolomic analysis of GCF could be useful for prediction and diagnosis of periodontal disease in a single visit from a patient and provides the groundwork for establishing a new, on-site diagnostic method for periodontitis. PMID:27446770

  12. Determination of organoarsenic warfare agents in sediment samples from Skagerrak by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tørnes, John Aasulf; Opstad, Aase Mari; Johnsen, Bjørn Arne

    2006-03-01

    In 1945 the Norwegian authorities gave permission to scuttle ships loaded with captured chemical ammunition on board in an area approximately 14x4 km in size, 25 nautical miles south-east of Arendal. An investigation was carried out in 2002 to inspect four wrecks by using a remote-operated vehicle with video cameras. The Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (Forsvarets forskningsinstitutt, FFI) carried out the project on behalf of the Norwegian Pollution Control Authority (SFT). Sediment samples were collected at eight positions around each wreck. One of the wrecks was broken up into several smaller parts. Here sediments were collected at one additional position close to one of the parts. From each position, at least two sediment cores were taken up to the surface. One of the cores from each position was sliced into three parts that were immediately frozen. The other whole cores were frozen on board the ship and transported back to the laboratory in a freezer. In total, sediment samples from 33 different locations were collected and analysed for organoarsenic warfare agents and some of their decomposition products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after derivatisation with 1-propanethiol. Most of the identified organoarsenic compounds found in the sediment samples are parts of the arsine oil mixture produced by Germany during World War II. The compounds were found both close to the wreck and at a somewhat longer distance from the wrecks. The highest concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected close to a bomb seen on the seabed. The organoarsenic warfare agents adamsite or lewisite were not found in any of the samples. Lewisite is not reported to have been produced during World War II, but was nevertheless looked for in the samples. PMID:15993928

  13. Analysis of 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smokeless tobacco by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Irina; Villalta, Peter W.; Knezevich, Aleksandar; Jensen, Joni; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2009-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco contains 28 known carcinogens and causes precancerous oral lesions and oral and pancreatic cancer. A recent study conducted by our research team identified 8 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in U.S. moist snuff, encouraging further investigations of this group of toxicants and carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products. In this study, we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method that allows simultaneous analysis of 23 various PAH in smokeless tobacco after a simple two-step extraction and purification procedure. The method produced coefficients of variation under 10% for most PAH. The limits of quantitation for different PAH varied between 0.3 ng/g tobacco and 11 ng/g tobacco, starting with a 300-mg sample. The recovery of the stable isotope-labeled internal standards averaged 87%. The method was applied to analysis of 23 moist snuff samples that include various flavors of the most popular U.S. moist snuff brands, as well as 17 samples representing the currently marketed brands of spit-free tobacco pouches, a relatively new type of smokeless tobacco. The sum of all detected PAH in conventional moist snuff averaged 11.6 (± 3.7) µg/g dry weight, 20% of this amount being comprised by carcinogenic PAH. The levels of PAH in new spit-free tobacco products were much lower than those in moist snuff, the sum of all detected PAH averaging 1.3 (±0.28) µg/g dry weight. Our findings render PAH one of the most prevalent groups of carcinogens in smokeless tobacco, along with tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Urgent measures are required from the U.S. tobacco industry to modify manufacturing processes so that the levels of these toxicants and carcinogens in the U.S. moist snuff are greatly reduced. PMID:19860436

  14. Nitrate Reduction in a Groundwater Microcosm Determined by 15N Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Göran; Annadotter, Heléne

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO3−-N liter−1. Traces of 15NO3− were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day−1. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of 15N2, 15N2O, 15NH4+, and 15N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO3− and NH4+ were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g−1 day−1. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N2, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO3− was reduced to NH4+. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month. PMID:16348048

  15. Evaluation of plasma enzyme activities using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based steroid signatures.

    PubMed

    Ha, Young Wan; Moon, Ju-Yeon; Jung, Hyun-Jin; Chung, Bong Chul; Choi, Man Ho

    2009-12-15

    The simultaneous quantification of 65 plasma steroids, including 22 androgens, 15 estrogens, 15 corticoids and 13 progestins, was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The extraction efficiency of the catechol estrogens was improved by the addition of l-ascorbic acid in several steps. All steroids, as their trimethylsilyl derivatives, were well separated with good peak shapes within a 50min run. The devised method provided good linearity (correlation coefficient, r(2)>0.993), while the limit of quantification ranged from 0.2 to 2.0ngmL(-1). The precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) were 2.0-12.4% and 93.5-109.2%, respectively. The metabolic changes were evaluated by applying this method to plasma samples obtained from 26 healthy male subjects grouped according to the pre- and post-administration of dutasteride, which inhibits 5alpha-reductase isoenzyme types 1 and 2. The levels of three plasma steroids, such as dihydrotestosterone, 5alpha-androstanedione and allotetrahydrocortisol, were decreased significantly after drug administration, while the levels of testosterone and 5beta-androstane-3beta,17alpha-diol were increased. In addition, the ratios of the steroid precursors and their metabolites, which represent the activities of the related enzymes, were z-score transformed for visualization in heat maps generated using supervised hierarchical clustering analysis. These results validated the data transformation because 5alpha-reductase is an indicator for the biological actions of dutasteride. GC-MS base quantitative visualization might be found in the integration with the mining biomarkers in drug evaluations and hormone-dependent diseases. PMID:19939750

  16. Determination of Synthetic Cathinones in Urine Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Techniques.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei-Yin; Ko, Ya-Chun; Lin, Mei-Chih; Wang, Po-Yu; Chen, Yu-Pen; Chiueh, Lih-Ching; Shih, Daniel Yang-Chih; Chou, Hsiu-Kuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the abuse of synthetic cathinones has increased considerably. This study proposes a method, based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), to analyze and quantify six synthetic cathinones in urine samples: mephedrone (4-MMC), methylone (bk-MDMA), butylone, ethylone, pentylone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In our procedure, the urine samples undergo solid-phase extraction (SPE) and derivatization prior to injection into the GC-MS device. Separation is performed using a HP-5MS capillary column. The use of selective ion monitoring (SIM mode) makes it is good sensitivity in this method, and the entire analysis process is within 18 min. In addition, the proposed method maintains linearity in the calibration curve from 50 to 2,000 ng/mL (r(2) > 0.995). The limit of detection of this method is 5 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (20 ng/mL); the limit of quantification is 20 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (50 ng/mL). In testing, the extraction performance of SPE was between 82.34 and 104.46%. Precision and accuracy results were satisfactory <15%. The proposed method was applied to six real urine samples, one of which was found to contain 4-MMC and bk-MDMA. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method in the identification of synthetic cathinones in urine, with regard to the limits of detection and quantification. This method is highly repeatable and accurate. PMID:26410364

  17. Cannabichromene and tetrahydrocannabinol determination in mouse blood and brain by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    DeLong, Gerald T; Wolf, Carl E; Poklis, Alphonse; Lichtman, Aron

    2011-09-01

    Cannabichromene (CBC) is a phytocannabinoid, the second most abundant cannabinoid quantitatively in marijuana. CBC has been shown to produce antinociception and anti-inflammatory effects in rodents. This method is validated for the measurement of THC and CBC simultaneously after extraction from mouse blood or brain. Whole brain harvested from mice was homogenized 2:1 (v/w) with normal saline. Fifty nanograms of THC-d₃ was added to 0.5 mL of heparinized mouse blood, brain homogenate, and THC and CBC fortified blood or brain calibrators, then equilibrated overnight at 5 °C. Two milliliters of "ice cold" acetonitrile was added drop-wise while the sample was vortex mixed, and then the sample was centrifuged and stored overnight at -30 °C. The cannabinoids were extracted from the acetonitrile layer with 2 mL of 0.2 N NaOH and 4 mL of hexane/ethyl acetate (9:1). The solvent was isolated and evaporated to dryness. Trimethylsilyl derivatives were prepared and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Linearity in blood and brain of THC and CBC was 2-10,000 ng/mL (ng/g). THC and CBC recovery ranged from 56 to 78% in blood and brain. Precision was demonstrated at 100 ng/mL and 1000 ng/mL with CVs < 15%. The validated method allows for blood and brain concentrations of cannabinoids to be quantificated and correlated with pharmacological effects produced in mice. PMID:21871159

  18. Urine Mescaline Screening With a Biochip Array Immunoassay and Quantification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Battal, Dilek; Barnes, Allan J; Castaneto, Marisol S; Martin, Thomas M; Klette, Kevin L; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-12-01

    Mescaline, the primary psychoactive chemical in peyote cactus, has been consumed for thousands of years in ancient religious ceremonies. The US military wanted to determine if mescaline intake was a problem for personnel readiness. Twenty thousand seventeen urine specimens negative for cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, and amphetamines were tested for mescaline with the Randox Drugs of Abuse V (DOA-V) biochip array immunoassay at the manufacturer's recommended cutoff of 6 mcg/L. A sensitive and specific method for mescaline quantification in urine was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with electron impact ionization. Standard curves, using linear least squares regression with 1/x weighting, were linear from 1 to 250 mcg/L with coefficients of determination >0.994. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision was <4.4 coefficient of variation (%CV), with accuracies >90.4%. Mean extraction efficiencies were >92.0% across the linear range. This fully validated method was applied for the confirmation of urinary mescaline in 526 presumptive-positive specimens and 198 randomly selected presumptive-negative specimens at the manufacturer's 6 mcg/L cutoff. No specimen confirmed positive at the GC/MS limit of quantification of 1 mcg/L. Results indicated that during this time frame, there was insufficient mescaline drug use in the military to warrant routine screening in the drug testing program. However, mescaline stability, although assessed, could have contributed to lower prevalence. We also present a validated GC/MS method for mescaline quantification in urine for reliable confirmation of suspected mescaline intake. PMID:25992796

  19. Age determination of ballpoint pen ink by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2008-07-01

    Two main approaches can be used for determining the age of an ink: indirect dating and direct dating. Indirect dating is based on the chemical analysis of an ink followed by comparison with known samples in a reference collection. The collection should contain information about the inks including the market introduction dates. This approach may allow for an anachronism to be detected. The second concept is based on measuring ink components that change with age. The analysis of solvents in ballpoint inks may be a useful parameter for determining the age of ink on paper. In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that thermal desorption of ink directly from paper, followed by chemical analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), is a promising procedure for characterizing ink-binder resins and solvents. Preliminary tests showed that monitoring the evaporation of ink solvent from ink on paper is not a suitable method for ink dating. Thermal analysis of ink on paper in two steps revealed that fresh ink releases a relative amount of solvent at a certain low temperature in a defined period of time, which decreases as the ink ages. As a consequence, this relative amount of solvent released at a certain low temperature, and its decrease with time, can be used to estimate ink age. This age-dependent parameter was studied in 85 different inks ranging in age from 1 week to 1.5 years. It was found that some inks showed a significant decrease of this parameter up to an age of several months, and that the aging process can be monitored within this period. For other inks, however, the age-dependent parameter decreases relatively fast, e.g., within a few days, to a constant level, which can be too fast for casework. Based on these results, a general procedure for assessing the age of ballpoint pen inks on paper was developed. PMID:18503526

  20. Supervised pattern recognition procedures for discrimination of whiskeys from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry congener analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Arjona, Domingo; López-Pérez, Germán; González-Gallero, Víctor; González, A Gustavo

    2006-03-22

    The volatile congener analysis of 52 commercialized whiskeys (24 samples of single malt Scotch whiskey, 18 samples of bourbon whiskey, and 10 samples of Irish whiskey) was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Pattern recognition procedures were applied for discrimination of different whiskey categories. Multivariate data analysis includes linear discriminant analysis (LDA), k nearest neighbors (KNN), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), procrustes discriminant analysis (PDA), and artificial neural networks techniques involving multilayer perceptrons (MLP) and probabilistic neural networks (PNN). Classification rules were validated by considering the number of false positives (FPs) and false negatives (FNs) of each class associated to the prediction set. Artificial neural networks led to the best results because of their intrinsic nonlinear features. Both techniques, MLP and PNN, gave zero FPs and zero FNs for all of the categories. KNN is a nonparametric method that also provides zero FPs and FNs for every class but only when selecting K = 3 neighbors. PDA produced good results also (zero FPs and FNs always) but only by selecting nine principal components for class modeling. LDA shows a lesser classification performance, because of the building of linear frontiers between classes that does not apply in many real situations. LDA led to one FP for bourbons and one FN for scotches. The worse results were obtained with SIMCA, which gave a higher number of FPs (five for both scotches and bourbons) and FNs (six for scotchs and two for bourbons). The possible cause of these findings is the strong influence of class inhomogeneities on the SIMCA performance. It is remarkable that in any case, all of the methodologies lead to zero FPs and FNs for the Irish whiskeys. PMID:16536565

  1. Metabolomic Analysis of Gingival Crevicular Fluid Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Miho; Nozaki, Takenori; Aoki, Jun; Bamba, Takeshi; Jensen, Kirk R.; Murakami, Shinya; Toyoda, Michisato

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most prevalent threats to oral health as the most common cause of tooth loss. In order to perform effective treatment, a clinical test that detect sites where disease activity is high and predicts periodontal tissue destruction is strongly desired, however, it is still difficult to prognose the periodontal tissue breakdown on the basis of conventional methods. The aim of this study is to examine the usefulness of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which could eventually be used for on-site analysis of metabolites in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in order to objectively diagnose periodontitis at a molecular level. GCF samples were collected from two diseased sites (one site with a moderate pocket and another site with a deep pocket) from each patient and from clinically healthy sites of volunteers. Nineteen metabolites were identified using GC/MS. Total ion current chromatograms showed broad differences in metabolite peak patterns between GCF samples obtained from healthy sites, moderate-pocket sites, and deep-pocket sites. The intensity difference of some metabolites was significant at sites with deep pockets compared to healthy sites. Additionally, metabolite intensities at moderate-pocket sites showed an intermediate profile between the severely diseased sites and healthy sites, which suggested that periodontitis progression could be observed with a changing metabolite profile. Principal component analysis confirmed these observations by clearly delineating healthy sites and sites with deep pockets. These results suggest that metabolomic analysis of GCF could be useful for prediction and diagnosis of periodontal disease in a single visit from a patient and provides the groundwork for establishing a new, on-site diagnostic method for periodontitis. PMID:27446770

  2. Triple sorbent thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry determination of vapor phase organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.Y.; Skeen, J.T.; Dindal, A.B.; Higgins, C.E.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    A thermal desorption/ps chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) has been evaluated for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vapor phase samples using Carbosieve S-III/Carbotrap/Carotrap C triple sorbent traps (TST) similar to those available from a commercial source. The analysis was carried out with a Hewlett-Packard 5985A or 5995 GC/MS system with a modified injector to adapt an inhouse manufactured short-path desorber for transferring desorbate directly onto a cryofocusing loop for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Vapor phase standards generated from twenty six compounds were used for method validation, including alkanes, alkyl alcohols, alkyl ketones, and alkyl nitrites, a group of representative compounds that have previously been identified in a target airborne matrix. The method was validated based on the satisfactory results in terms of reproducibility, recovery rate, stability, and linearity. A relative, standard deviation of 0.55 to 24.3 % was obtained for the entire TD process (generation of gas phase standards, spiking the standards on and desorbing from TST) over a concentration range of 20 to 500 ng/trap. Linear correlation coefficients for the calibration curves as determined ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 and limits of detection ranged from 3 to 76 ng. For a majority of standards, recoveries of greater than 90% were observed. For three selected standards spiked on TSTS, minimal loss (10 to 22%) was observed after storing the spiked in, a 4{degree}C refrigerator for 29 days. The only chromatographable artifact observed was a 5% conversion of isopropanol to acetone. The validated method been successfully applied, to the determination of VOCs collected from various emission sources in a diversified concentration range.

  3. Improved method for rapid detection of phthalates in bottled water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otero, Paz; Saha, Sushanta Kumar; Moane, Siobhan; Barron, John; Clancy, Gerard; Murray, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    An improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for simple, rapid and precise quantification of phthalates in drinking water is presented. This method was validated for bis (2-n-butoxyethyl) phthalate (DBEP), bis (2-n-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-butyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dihexyl phthalate (DHP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP) and dinonyl phthalate (DINP). Linearity of 0.9984>r(2)>0.9975 in the range of 0.075-4.8μg/mL for the selected phthalates was obtained. Accuracy values were in the range of 93-114% and RSD% for the analysis of 1.2μg/mL of each phthalate was below 2.3% (n=9). This new method design has significantly improved the detection in terms of rapidity, specificity, repeatability and accuracy compared to available methods. The procedure has been applied to the analyses of three different brands of commercially available bottled mineral water and the corresponding plastic bottles. Phthalates were extracted with dichloromethane and re-constituted in cyclohexane prior to GC-MS analysis. When the validated GC-MS method was applied to the quantification of the selected phthalates in the samples, only DBP (up to 0.0675±0.0018μg/mL) and DEHP (up to 1.6848±0.1631μg/mL) were found. Furthermore, we provide specific data about the concentration of DBP and DEHP in bottled water attributable to migration of phthalates from respective plastic bottles. PMID:26134297

  4. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of clobenzorex.

    PubMed

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S

    1999-01-01

    Drugs metabolized to amphetamine or methamphetamine are potentially significant concerns in the interpretation of amphetamine-positive urine drug-testing results. One of these compounds, clobenzorex, is an anorectic drug that is available in many countries. Clobenzorex (2-chlorobenzylamphetamine) is metabolized to amphetamine by the body and excreted in the urine. Following administration, the parent compound was detectable for a shorter time than the metabolite amphetamine, which could be detected for days. Because of the potential complication posed to the interpretation of amphetamin-positive drug tests following administration of this drug, the viability of a current amphetamine procedure using liquid-liquid extraction and conversion to the heptafluorobutyryl derivative followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was evaluated for identification and quantitation of clobenzorex. Qualitative identification of the drug was relatively straightforward. Quantitative analysis proved to be a far more challenging process. Several compounds were evaluated for use as the internal standard in this method, including methamphetamine-d11, fenfluramine, benzphetamine, and diphenylamine. Results using these compounds proved to be less than satisfactory because of poor reproducibility of the quantitative values. Because of its similar chromatographic properties to the parent drug, the compound 3-chlorobenzylamphetamine (3-Cl-clobenzorex) was evaluated in this study as the internal standard for the quantitation of clobenzorex. Precision studies showed 3-Cl-clobenzorex to produce accurate and reliable quantitative results (within-run relative standard deviations [RSDs] < 6.1%, between-run RSDs < 6.0%). The limits of detection and quantitation for this assay were determined to be 1 ng/mL for clobenzorex. PMID:10595847

  5. The detection of nicotine in a Late Mayan period flask by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Zagorevski, Dmitri V; Loughmiller-Newman, Jennifer A

    2012-02-29

    Several ancient Mayan vessels from the Kislak Collection of the US Library of Congress were examined for the presence of alkaloids. One of them, a codex-style flask, bears a text that appears to read yo-'OTOT-ti 'u-MAY, spelling y-otoot 'u-may 'the home of its/his/her tobacco'. Samples extracted from this Late Classic period (600 to 900 AD) container were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) methods. Nicotine was identified as the major component of the extracts. LC/MS analyses also yielded signals due to nicotine mono-oxides. The identities of the compounds were determined by comparison of the chromatographic and/or mass spectral characteristics with those from standards and literature data. High-resolution high mass accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of protonated nicotine and nicotine mono-oxides were measured to verify and to correct previous product ion assignments. These analyses provided positive evidence for nicotine from a Mayan vessel, indicating it as a likely holder of tobacco leafs. The result of this investigation is the first physical evidence of tobacco from a Mayan container, and only the second example where the vessel content recorded in a Mayan hieroglyphic text has been confirmed directly by chromatography/mass spectrometry trace analysis. PMID:22279016

  6. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  7. Determination of carboxylic acids in oil samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.

    1981-03-01

    A combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method for measuring carboxylic acids in oil samples without first going through solvent extraction and group separation is reported. The carboxylic acids in oils are directly derivatized to their corresponding methyl esters via anion formation in tetramethylammonium hydroxide/methanol/methyl iodide/n-butyl acetate solutions prior to GC/MS analysis using a glass wall coated capillary column. The reaction is mild, selective, and rapid. It can usually be carried out at room temperature and completed in 10 to 15 min. Multiple ion detection techniques (MID) can be readily used to further resolve methyl esters from other compounds if necessary.

  8. Pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of kerogens and kerogen precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Meent, D.; Brown, S. C.; Philp, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of kerogens and kerogen precursors isolated from DSDP samples, oil shales and recent algal mats have been examined by Curie point pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study has shown that the three main types of kerogens (marine, terrestrial and mixtures of both) can be characterized using these techniques. The marine (algal) kerogens yield principally aliphatic products and the terrestrial kerogens yield more aromatic and phenolic products with some n-alkanes and n-alkenes. The yields of n-alkanes and n-alkenes increase and phenols decrease with increasing geologic age, however, pyrolysis-GC cannot be used to characterize the influence of short term diagenesis on the kerogen structure.

  9. Headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry characterization of propolis volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Federica; Prencipe, Francesco Pio; Benvenuti, Stefania

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a novel and efficient method based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was developed for the analysis of propolis volatile compounds. The HS-SPME procedure, whose experimental parameters were properly optimized, was carried out using a 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber. The GC-MS analyses were performed on a HP-5 MS cross-linked 5% diphenyl-95% dimethyl polysiloxane capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm I.D., 1.00 μm film thickness), under programmed-temperature elution. Ninety-nine constituents were identified using this technique in the samples of raw propolis collected from different Italian regions. The main compounds detected include benzoic acid (0.87-30.13%) and its esters, such as benzyl benzoate (0.16-13.05%), benzyl salicylate (0.34-1.90%) and benzyl cinnamate (0.34-3.20%). Vanillin was detected in most of the samples analyzed in this study (0.07-5.44%). Another relevant class of volatile constituents is represented by sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, such as δ-cadinene (1.29-13.31%), γ-cadinene (1.36-8.85%) and α-muurolene (0.78-6.59%), and oxygenated sesquiterpenes, such as β-eudesmol (2.33-12.83%), T-cadinol (2.73-9.95%) and α-cadinol (4.84-9.74%). Regarding monoterpene hydrocarbons, they were found to be present at low level in the samples analyzed in this study, with the exception of one sample from Southern Italy, where α-pinene was the most abundant constituent (13.19%). The results obtained by HS-SPME-GC-MS were also compared with those of hydrodistillation (HD) coupled with GC-MS. The HS-SPME-GC-MS method developed in this study allowed us to determine the chemical fingerprint of propolis volatile constituents, thus providing a new and reliable tool for the complete characterization of this biologically active apiary product. PMID:23807002

  10. Direct quantitative determination of cyanamide by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Kamo, Tsunashi; Nakajima, Eri; Kato, Kenji; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2005-12-01

    Cyanamide is a multifunctional agrochemical used, for example, as a pesticide, herbicide, and fertilizer. Recent research has revealed that cyanamide is a natural product biosynthesized in a leguminous plant, hairy vetch (Vicia villosa). In the present study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with a capillary column for amines was used for direct quantitative determination of cyanamide. Quantitative signals for ((14)N(2))cyanamide, ((15)N(2))cyanamide (internal standard for stable isotope dilution method), and m-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (internal standard for correcting errors in GC-MS analysis) were recorded as peak areas on mass chromatograms at m/z 42 (A(42)), 44 (A(44)), and 171 (A(IS)), respectively. Total cyanamide content, ((14)N(2))cyanamide plus ((15)N(2))cyanamide, was determined as a function of (A(42)+A(44))/A(IS). Contents of ((14)N(2))cyanamide and ((15)N(2))cyanamide were then calculated by multiplying the total cyanamide content by A(42)/(A(42)+A(44)) and A(44)/(A(42)+A(44)), respectively. The limit of detection for the total cyanamide content by the GC-MS analysis was around 1ng. The molar ratio of ((14)N(2))cyanamide to ((15)N(2))cyanamide in the injected sample was equal to the observed A(42)/A(44) value in the range from 0.1 to 5. It was, therefore, possible to use the stable isotope dilution method to quantify the natural cyanamide content in samples; i.e., the natural cyanamide content was derived by subtracting the A(42)/A(44) ratio of the internal standard from the A(42)/A(44) ratio of sample spiked with internal standard, and then multiplying the resulting difference by the amount of added ((15)N(2))cyanamide (SID-GC-MS method). This method successfully gave a reasonable value for the natural cyanamide content in hairy vetch, concurring with the value obtained by a conventional method in which cyanamide was derivatized to a photometrically active compound 4-cyanimido-1,2-naphthoquinone and analyzed with reversed

  11. Plasma metabolomic profiling of dairy cows affected with ketosis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ketosis is an important problem for dairy cows` production performance. However, it is still little known about plasma metabolomics details of dairy ketosis. Results A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique was used to investigate plasma metabolic differences in cows that had clinical ketosis (CK, n=22), subclinical ketosis (SK, n=32), or were clinically normal controls (NC, n=22). The endogenous plasma metabolome was measured by chemical derivatization followed by GC/MS, which led to the detection of 267 variables. A two-sample t-test of 30, 32, and 13 metabolites showed statistically significant differences between SK and NC, CK and NC, and CK and SK, respectively. Orthogonal signal correction-partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed that the metabolic patterns of both CK and SK were mostly similar, with the exception of a few differences. The development of CK and SK involved disturbances in many metabolic pathways, mainly including fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway. A diagnostic model arbitrary two groups was constructed using OPLS-DA and receiver–operator characteristic curves (ROC). Multivariate statistical diagnostics yielded the 19 potential biomarkers for SK and NC, 31 for CK and NC, and 8 for CK and SK with area under the curve (AUC) values. Our results showed the potential biomarkers from CK, SK, and NC, including carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, even sitosterol and vitamin E isomers, etc. 2-piperidinecarboxylic acid and cis-9-hexadecenoic acid were closely associated with metabolic perturbations in ketosis as Glc, BHBA and NEFA for dealing with metabolic disturbances of ketosis in clinical practice. However, further research is needed to explain changes of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid, α-aminobutyric acid, methylmalonic acid, sitosterol and α-tocopherol in CK and SK, and to reveal differences

  12. Detecting Organic Compounds in Martian Soil Analogues Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of the 1976 Viking missions was to determine whether organic compounds, possibly of biological origin, were present in the Martian surface soils. The Viking gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) instruments found no evidence for any organic compounds of Martian origin above a few parts per billion in the upper 10 cm of surface soil [l], suggesting the absence of a widely distributed Martian biota. However, Benner et d. have suggested that significant amounts of non-volatile organic compounds, possibly including oxidation products of bioorganic molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS [2]. Moreover, other key organic compounds important to biology, such as amino acids and nucleobases, would also likely have been missed by the Viking GCMS as these compounds require chemical derivatization to be stable in a GC column [3]. Recent pyrolysis experiments with a Mars soil analogue that had been innoculated with Escherichia coli bacteria have shown that amino acid decomposition products (amines) and nucleobases are among the most abundant products generated after pyrolysis of the bacterial cells [4,5]. At the part per billion level (Viking GCMS detection limit), these pyrolysis products generated from several million bacterial cells per gram of Martian soil would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments [4]. Analytical protocols are under development for upcoming in situ lander opportunities to target several important biological compounds including amino acids and nucleobases. For example, extraction and chemical derivatization techniques [3] are being adapted for space flight use to transform reactive or fragile molecules that would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments, into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by GCMS. Recent experiments carried out at NASA Goddard have shown that using this derivatization technique all of the targeted compounds

  13. The use of stable isotopes and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the identification of steroid metabolites in the equine.

    PubMed

    Houghton, E; Dumasia, M C; Teale, P; Smith, S J; Cox, J; Marshall, D; Gower, D B

    1990-10-01

    Stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry has been used successfully in the elucidation of structures of urinary steroid metabolites in the horse and in the identification of metabolites isolated from in vivo perfusion and in vitro incubation studies using equine tissue preparations. Deuterium-labeled steroids, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta-diol have been synthesized by base-catalyzed isotope exchange methods and the products characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. [16,16(-2)H2]Dehydroepiandrosterone (plus radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone) was perfused into a testicular artery of a pony stallion and was shown to be metabolized into 2H2-labeled testosterone, 4-androstenedione, isomers of 5-androstene-3,17-diol, 19-hydroxytestosterone, and 19-hydroxy-4-androstenedione. In further studies, equine testicular minces have been incubated with 2H2-labeled and radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone and 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. The metabolites, whose identity was confirmed by stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proved the interconversion of the two substrates, as well as formation of testosterone and 4-androstenedione. The aromatization of dehydroepiandrosterone was also confirmed, together with the formation of an isomer of 5(10)-estrene-3,17-diol from both substrates showing 19-demethylation without concomitant aromatization. In studies of the feto-placental unit, the allantochorion was shown to aromatize [2H5]testosterone to [2H4]estradiol, the loss of one 2H from the substrate being consistent with aromatization of the A ring. The formation of 6-hydroxyestradiol was also confirmed in this study. The same technique has been valuable in determining the structure of two metabolites of nandrolone isolated from horse urine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2149219

  14. The use of stable isotopes and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the identification of steroid metabolites in the equine

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, E.; Dumasia, M.C.; Teale, P.; Smith, S.J.; Cox, J.; Marshall, D.; Gower, D.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry has been used successfully in the elucidation of structures of urinary steroid metabolites in the horse and in the identification of metabolites isolated from in vivo perfusion and in vitro incubation studies using equine tissue preparations. Deuterium-labeled steroids, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta-diol have been synthesized by base-catalyzed isotope exchange methods and the products characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. (16,16(-2)H2)Dehydroepiandrosterone (plus radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone) was perfused into a testicular artery of a pony stallion and was shown to be metabolized into 2H2-labeled testosterone, 4-androstenedione, isomers of 5-androstene-3,17-diol, 19-hydroxytestosterone, and 19-hydroxy-4-androstenedione. In further studies, equine testicular minces have been incubated with 2H2-labeled and radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone and 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. The metabolites, whose identity was confirmed by stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proved the interconversion of the two substrates, as well as formation of testosterone and 4-androstenedione. The aromatization of dehydroepiandrosterone was also confirmed, together with the formation of an isomer of 5(10)-estrene-3,17-diol from both substrates showing 19-demethylation without concomitant aromatization. In studies of the feto-placental unit, the allantochorion was shown to aromatize (2H5)testosterone to (2H4)estradiol, the loss of one 2H from the substrate being consistent with aromatization of the A ring. The formation of 6-hydroxyestradiol was also confirmed in this study. The same technique has been valuable in determining the structure of two metabolites of nandrolone isolated from horse urine.

  15. [Differentiation of ballpoint pen inks by thermodesorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2004-01-01

    Differentiation and classification of ink entries with dated samples of a reference collection are important aspects in the examination of questioned documents. Classification of writing inks is presently achieved by analysis of dyes and colorants contained in the ink. This technique has its limitations in newly developed ink formulations with identical dye composition but differing in their solvents and binder resins. This paper introduces a method for the determination of solvents and binder resins of an ink sample directly from paper without sample preparation. This aim is accomplished by thermodesorption of the sample followed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The method was tested on numerous samples of ballpoint pen inks, which were subsequently grouped into several solvent and resin subgroups. A case study shows the applicability of the newly developed method. PMID:15666970

  16. The composition of volatile components in olivines from Yakutian kimberlites of various ages: Evidence from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomilenko, A. A.; Bul'bak, T. A.; Khomenko, M. O.; Kuzmin, D. V.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2016-06-01

    The composition of volatiles from fluid and melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from Yakutian kimberlite pipes of various ages (Olivinovaya, Malokuonapskaya, and Udachnaya-East) were studied for the first time by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. It was shown that hydrocarbons and their derivatives, as well as nitrogen-, halogen-, and sulfur-bearing compounds, played a significant role in the mineral formation. The proportion of hydrocarbons and their derivatives in the composition of mantle fluids could reach 99%, including up to 4.9% of chlorineand fluorine-bearing compounds.

  17. Application of capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry/computer techniques to synoptic survey of organic material in bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Pereira, W.E.; Johnson, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A bed sediment sample taken from an area impacted by heavy industrial activity was analyzed for organic compounds of environmental significance. Extraction was effected on a Soxhlet apparatus using a freeze-dried sample. The Soxhlet extract was fractionated by silica gel micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic compounds was accomplished by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. More than 50 compounds were identified; these include saturated hydrocarbons, olefins, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as aldehydes and ketones. The role of bed sediments as a source or sink for organic pollutants is discussed. ?? 1981.

  18. Quantitative confirmation of dimetridazole and ipronidazole in swine feed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with multiple ion detection.

    PubMed

    Morris, W J; Nandrea, G J; Roybal, J E; Munns, R K; Shimoda, W; Skinner, H R

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from 4 types of swine feed containing 0.11 ppm each of dimetridazole (DMZ) and ipronidazole (IPR) were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using multiple ion detection (MID) techniques. We demonstrate in this paper that the quantitative results obtained by capillary GC/MS with MID are comparable for both compounds to results obtained by liquid chromatography and have a lower coefficient of variation for DMZ. Moreover, consistency in the ion ratios (5 ions in DMZ and 6 ions in IPR) permits identification of these compounds by electron ionization MS. PMID:3624166

  19. Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to determine phthalate and organophosphate esters from air samples.

    PubMed

    Aragón, M; Borrull, F; Marcé, R M

    2013-08-16

    A method based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed to determine four organophosphate esters, seven phthalate esters, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate in the gas phase from harbour and urban air samples. The method involves the sampling of 1.5L of air in a Tenax TA sorbent tube followed by thermal desorption (using a Tenax TA cryogenic trap) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The repeatability of the method expressed as %RSD (n=3) is less than 15% and the MQLs are between 0.007μgm(-3) (DMP, TBP, BBP, TPP and DnOP) and 6.7μgm(-3) (DEHP). The method was successfully applied in two areas (urban and harbour) testing two and three points in each one, respectively. Some of these compounds were found in both urban and harbour samples. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant compound found in both areas at concentration levels between 6.7μgm(-3) and 136.4μgm(-3). This study demonstrates that thermal desorption is an efficient method for the determination of these semi-volatile compounds in the gas phase fraction of air samples. PMID:23859797

  20. Flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using ≈4mLmin(-1) gas flows.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of the herein described research was focused on performing satisfactory flow modulation (FM), in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), using an MS-compatible second-dimension gas flow of approx. 4mLmin(-1). The FM model used was based on that initially proposed by Seeley et al. [3]. The use of limited gas flows was enabled through fine tuning of the FM parameters, in particular the duration of the re-injection (or flushing) process. Specifically, the application of a long re-injection period (i.e., 700ms) enabled efficient accumulation-loop flushing with gas flows of about 4mLmin(-1). It was possible to apply such extended re-injection periods by using different restrictor lengths in the connections linking the modulator to the auxiliary pressure source. FM GC×GC-MS applications were performed on a mixture containing C9-10 alkanes, and on a sample of essential oil. GC×GC-MS sensitivity was compared with that attained by using conventional GC-MS analysis, in essential oil applications. It was observed that signal intensities were, in general, considerably higher in the FM GC×GC-MS experiments. PMID:26968229

  1. Potential of needle trap microextraction-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for measurement of atmospheric volatile compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijó Barreira, Luís Miguel; Xue, Yu; Duporté, Geoffroy; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Hartonen, Kari; Jussila, Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a key role in atmospheric chemistry and physics. They participate in photochemical reactions in the atmosphere, which have direct implications on climate through, e.g. aerosol particle formation. Forests are important sources of VOCs, and the limited resources and infrastructures often found in many remote environments call for the development of portable devices. In this research, the potential of needle trap microextraction and portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the study of VOCs at forest site was evaluated. Measurements were performed in summer and autumn 2014 at the Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations (SMEAR II) in Hyytiälä, Finland. During the first part of the campaign (summer) the applicability of the developed method was tested for the determination of monoterpenes, pinonaldehyde, aldehydes, amines and anthropogenic compounds. The temporal variation of aerosol precursors was determined, and evaluated against temperature and aerosol number concentration data. The most abundant monoterpenes, pinonaldehyde and aldehydes were successfully measured, their relative amounts being lower during days when particle number concentration was higher. Ethylbenzene, p- and m-xylene were also found when wind direction was from cities with substantial anthropogenic activity. An accumulation of VOCs in the snow cover was observed in the autumn campaign. Results demonstrated the successful applicability of needle trap microextraction and portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the rapid in situ determination of organic gaseous compounds in the atmosphere.

  2. Hydrogenation Reactions during Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Polymer Samples Using Hydrogen Carrier Gas.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Freeman, Robert R; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime

    2016-05-17

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of polymer samples is studied focusing on the effect of hydrogen (H2) carrier gas on chromatographic and spectral data. The pyrograms and the related mass spectra of high density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene, and polystyrene (PS) serve to illustrate the differences between the species formed in H2 and the helium environment. Differences in the pyrograms and the spectra are generally thought to be a result of the hydrogenation reaction of the pyrolyzates. From the peak intensity changes in the pyrograms of HDPE and PS, hydrogenation of unsaturated pyrolyzates is concluded to occur when the pyrolysis is done in H2. Moreover, additional hydrogenation of the pyrolyzates occurs in the electron ionization source of a MS detector when H2 is used as a carrier gas. Finally, the applicability of mass spectral libraries to characterize pyrograms obtained in H2 is illustrated using 24 polymers. The effect of the hydrogenation reaction on the library search results is found to be negligible for most polymer samples with polar and nonpolar monomer units. PMID:27125864

  3. Analysis of Tropical Forest Fire Emissions Using in Situ Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry during Sambba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeian, J.; Lewis, A. C.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lee, J. D.; Purvis, R.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical atmospheric profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made over Amazonia using an in situ gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), including isoprene, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and products of biomass burning such as benzene. Measurements were made in the Amazonian (Rondônia and Amazonas) region during September 2012, a period of extensive biomass burning. Data was obtained between 100m and 8500m from the FAAM BAe 146 research aircraft. Isoprene was observed to be constrained overwhelmingly to the boundary layer (height typically ~2500m) with mean boundary layer mixing ratio of ~2 ppbv and a peak of ~5 ppbv at the lowest flight levels of 100 m. First generation isoprene oxidation products, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, were quantified individually rather than as the sum of the pair, which is more commonly found in the literature. Both MACR and MVK were constrained primarily to the boundary layer, however trace quantities could be seen in the free troposphere to a height of 8000 m. Benzene from biomass burning was observed in both boundary layer and free troposphere, with a peak mixing ratio of ~0.8 ppbv at 750 m. This work will present the spatial distribution of isoprene within the boundary as a function of underlying surface type. The vertical profiles of all species are then compared to representative simulations from the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model and conclusions drawn on the success of the model in representing emissions and oxidation chemistry.

  4. Sensitive determination of fluoride in biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Myung; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2014-12-10

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method was developed in this study in order to determine fluoride in plasma and urine after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene. 2-Fluoronaphthalene was chosen as the internal standard. The derivatization of fluoride was performed in the biological sample and the best reaction conditions (10.0 mg mL(-1) of 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, 1.0 mg mL(-1) of 15-crown-5-ether as a phase transfer catalyst, pH of 7.0, reaction temperature of 70°C, and heating time of 70 min) were established. The organic derivative was extracted with dichloromethane and then measured by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Under the established condition, the detection limits were 11 μg L(-1) and 7 μg L(-1) by using 0.2 mL of plasma or urine, respectively. The accuracy was in a range of 100.8-107.6%, and the precision of the assay was less than 4.3% in plasma or urine. Fluoride was detected in a concentration range of 0.12-0.53 mg L(-1) in six urine samples after intake of natural mineral water containing 0.7 mg L(-1) of fluoride. PMID:25441893

  5. Quantitative determination of dimethyl fumarate in silica gel by solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ultrasound-assisted extraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bocchini, Paola; Pinelli, Francesca; Pozzi, Romina; Ghetti, Federica; Galletti, Guido C

    2015-06-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a chemical compound which has been added to silica gel bags used for preserving leather products during shipment. DMF has recently been singled out due to its ability to induce a number of medical problems in people which touch products contaminated by it. Its use as a biocide has been recently made illegal in Europe. Two different extraction techniques, namely ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME), both coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were applied to the quantitative determination of DMF in silica gel. Linearity of the methods, reproducibility and detection limits were determined. The two methods were applied to the quantification of DMF in thirty-four silica gel samples used as anti-mould agents in different leather products sold in Italy, and the obtained results were statistically compared. PMID:25939646

  6. Simultaneous determination of psychotropic phenylalkylamine derivatives in human hair by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Jung, Kyu Sung; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Jae Il; In, Moon Kyo

    2007-01-01

    A gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of thirteen psychotropic phenylalkylamine derivatives (amphetamine; AP, phentermine; PT, methamphamine; MA, cathinone; Khat, methcathinone; MCAT, fenfluramine; FFA, desmethylselegiline; DSEL, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine; MDA, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA, 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine; MDEA, norketamine; NKT, mescaline; MES, 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine; 2CB) in human hair. Hair samples (20 mg) were washed with distilled water and acetone, cut into small fragments (<1 mm), and incubated in 0.25 M methanolic HCl under ultrasonication at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The resulting solutions were evaporated to dryness, derivatized using trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) at 70 degrees C for 30 min, and analyzed by GC/MS. The linear ranges were 0.02-25.0 ng/mg for AP, PT, Khat, FFA, DSEL, MDMA, and 2CB; 0.05-25.0 ng/mg for MA, MCAT, and MES; 0.05-12.5 ng/mg for MDA; and 0.1-25.0 ng/mg for MDEA and NKT, with good correlation coefficients (r(2) > 0.9985). The intra-day, inter-day, and inter-person precisions were within 12.7%, 14.8%, and 16.8%, respectively. The intra-day, inter-day, and inter-person accuracies were between -10.7 and 13.4%, -12.7 and 11.6%, and -15.3 and 11.9%, respectively. The limits of quantifications (LOQs) for each compound were lower than 0.08 ng/mg. The recoveries were in the range of 76.7-95.6%. The method proved to be suitable for the simultaneous qualification and quantification of phenylalkylamine derivatives in hair specimens. PMID:17474080

  7. SPECIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS BY CONE PENETROMETRY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R826184)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chroma tography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collec...

  8. Unexpected dimerization of isoprene in a gas chromatography inlet. A study by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Yannick; Gardrat, Christian; Berthelot, Karine; Grau, Etienne; De Jeso, Bernard; Ouardad, Samira; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-02-28

    During analysis of pure isoprene by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using a programmed temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet, the presence of several isoprene dimers was detected in the total ion chromatograms (TICs). This study intends to determine the part of the instrument where dimerization occurs and the relative importance of the dimer amounts under different experimental conditions. The reference thermal dimerization of isoprene gives four six-membered cyclic dimers and two eight-membered ones. In all samples containing different amounts of freshly distilled isoprene, only peaks corresponding to the former appeared in TICs. For the same temperature, their amounts increase as the concentration of injected isoprene increases. The main products are diprene (from 80 to 100%) of the total dimers and dipentene (from 1 to 14%). The sum of the two other dimers is never higher than 6%. In conclusion, isomeric dimers are produced through a dimerization in the inlet. No dimerization of isoprene occurs in the mass spectrometer source. Then care is needed when analyzing terpenic compounds in the presence of isoprene by GC-MS because structures, retention times and mass spectra of diprene and dipentene are close. PMID:24485537

  9. Determination of some volatile compounds in alcoholic beverage by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Feher, I.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The volatile composition of alcoholic beverage was studied by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME) method and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Some volatile compounds, such as alcohols, esters, terpenes and other are mainly responsible for the flavor of fortified wines and their amounts specify the quality of the alcoholic beverages. From this perspective it is interesting to develop a rapid, selective and sensitive analytical method suitable for simultaneous quantification of the main molecules being responsible for the organoleptic characteristic of alcoholic beverages. Vermouth fortified drink was analyzed in order to characterize the volatile profile. Using the HS-SPME/GC-MS a number of twenty-six volatile compounds from a commercial market alcoholic beverage were identified. The most abundant compounds were m-thymol, o-thymol and eugenol, alongside of the ethyl ester compounds.

  10. Simultaneous determination of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.Q.

    1989-03-01

    A multiresidue method was developed for the simultaneous determination of low parts per billion (ppb) concentrations of the herbicides alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Known amounts of /sup 15/N,/sup 13/C-alachlor and /sup 2/H/sub 5/-atrazine were added to each sample as internal standards. The samples were then prepared by a solid phase extraction with no further cleanup. A high resolution GC/low resolution MS system with data acquisition in selected ion monitoring mode was used to quantitate herbicides in the extract. The limit of detection was 0.05 ppb for water and 0.5 ppb for soil. Accuracy greater than 80% and precision better than 4% was demonstrated with spiked samples.

  11. Volatile constituents of Murraya koenigii fresh leaves using headspace solid phase microextraction--gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sukkaew, Sayamol; Pripdeevech, Patcharee; Thongpoon, Chalermporn; Machan, Theeraphan; Wongchuphan, Rattana

    2014-12-01

    The volatile components of Murraya koenigii fresh leaves, collected from Surat Thani province, Thailand were studied by using headspace (HS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The four fibers employed to extract the volatiles were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB), carboxane-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene-carboxane (PDMS-DVB-CAR). The volatile constituents of M. koenigii fresh leaves were also extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. Fifty-one compounds were identified by these fibers. Five major compounds, γ-terpinene, β-caryophyllene, β-phellandrene, a-selinene and a-pinene, were detected in all fibers. The PDMS-DVB-CAR fiber was considered as the best for trapping key volatiles of M. koenigii fresh leaves. PMID:25632485

  12. Measurement uncertainty for the determination of amphetamines in urine by liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Franco de Oliveira, Sarah Carobini Werner de Souza Eller; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of amphetamines in urine samples by means of liquid-phase microextraction was validated, including calculation of measurement uncertainty. After extraction in the three-phase mode, acceptor phase was withdrawn from the fiber and the residue was derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride. The method showed to be very simple, rapid and it required a significantly low amount of organic solvent for extraction. The limits of detection were 10 and 20μg/L for amphetamine and methamphetamine, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the specified range (20μg/L to 1400μg/L; r(2)>0.99). The method showed to be both precise and accurate and a relative combined uncertainty of 2% was calculated. In order of importance, the factors which were more determinant for the calculation of method uncertainty were: analyte concentration, sample volume, trueness and method precision. PMID:26836147

  13. Identification and quantitation of glycosidically bound aroma compounds in three tobacco types by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Xiang, Zhangmin; Pan, Wenjie; Zhao, Huina; Ren, Zhu; Lei, Bo; Geng, Zhaoliang

    2013-10-11

    Glycosidically bound aroma compounds in three different types of tobacco were investigated. After isolation of extracts obtained by Amberlite XAD-2 adsorption and ethyl acetate elution, glycosides were analyzed after enzymatic hydrolysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or directly after trifluoroacetylated (TFA) derivatization by GC-MS in electron ionization (EI) and negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode. In total 21 bound aglycones were identified by β-glucosidase hydrolysis. These aglycones mainly consisted of C13-norisoprenoids, aromatic components and sesquiterpenoids. Additionally, with the aid of enzymatic hydrolysis, 15 β-d-glucopyranosides and 1 β-d-rutinoside were tentatively identified by TFA derivatization. TFA method was validated by repeatability and successfully employed to analyze different types of tobacco. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on identified glycoside variables to visualize the difference between the tobacco types and the relationship between the glycoside variables and the tobacco types was established. PMID:24011421

  14. Disposable pipette extraction for the analysis of pesticides in fruit and vegetables using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hongxia; Brewer, William E; Garris, Sherry T; Morgan, Stephen L

    2010-03-19

    Organochlorine, organophosphate pesticides and fungicides in fruits and vegetables were analyzed using disposable pipette extraction (DPX) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selective ion monitoring (GC/MS-SIM). The intrinsic rapid mixing capabilities of DPX result in fast and efficient extractions, and eluates are concentrated by using minimal elution solvent volumes rather than solvent evaporation methods. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with reversed phase mechanisms (DPX-RP), and the limits of detection (LOD) were determined to be lower than 0.1 microg/mL for all targeted pesticides in carrot and orange sample matrices. Coefficients of determination (r(2)) were greater than 0.995 for most studied pesticides. DPX-RP exhibited recoveries between 72 and 116% for nonpolar and slightly polar pesticides (logP>2) with most of the recoveries over 88%. Only very polar pesticides (e.g., acephate, mathamidophos) were not extracted well using DPX-RP. PMID:20144461

  15. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of biological particulates collected during recent space shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. L.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Biological particulates collected on air filters during shuttle missions (STS-40 and STS-42) were identified using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). A method was developed for identifying the atmospheric particles and their sources through the analysis of standard materials and the selection of "marker" compounds specific to the particle type. Pyrolysis spectra of biological standards were compared with those of airborne particles collected during two space shuttle missions; marker compounds present in the shuttle particle spectra were matched with those of the standards to identify the source of particles. Particles of 0,5--1-mm diameter and weighing as little as 40 micrograms could be identified using this technique. The Py-GC/MS method identified rat food and soilless plant-growth media as two sources of particles collected from the shuttle atmosphere during flight.

  16. The identification of synthetic organic pigments in modern paints and modern paintings using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Joanna; Singer, Brian W; Perry, Justin J; Bacon, Anne

    2011-05-01

    A collection of more than 70 synthetic organic pigments were analysed using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). We report on the analysis of diketo-pyrrolo-pyrrole, isoindolinone and perylene pigments which are classes not previously reported as being analysed by this technique. We also report on a number of azo pigments (2-naphthol, naphthol AS, arylide, diarylide, benzimidazolone and disazo condensation pigments) and phthalocyanine pigments, the Py-GC-MS analysis of which has not been previously reported. The members of each class were found to fragment in a consistent way and the pyrolysis products are reported. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of paints used by the artist Francis Bacon (1909-1992), to simultaneously identify synthetic organic pigments and synthetic binding media in two samples of paint taken from Bacon's studio and micro-samples taken from three of his paintings and one painting attributed to him. PMID:21416165

  17. Measuring the Composition and Stable-Isotope Labeling of Algal Biomass Carbohydrates via Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Brian O; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a method to measure carbohydrate composition and stable-isotope labeling in algal biomass using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The method consists of two-stage hydrochloric acid hydrolysis, followed by chemical derivatization of the released monomer sugars and quantification by GC/MS. Fully (13)C-labeled sugars are used as internal standards for composition analysis. This convenient, reliable, and accurate single-platform workflow offers advantages over existing methods and opens new opportunities to study carbohydrate metabolism of algae under autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions using metabolic flux analysis and isotopic tracers such as (2)H2O and (13)C-glucose. PMID:27042946

  18. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach for the characterization of goat milk compared with cow milk.

    PubMed

    Scano, Paola; Murgia, Antonio; Pirisi, Filippo M; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    In this work, the polar metabolite pool of commercial caprine milk was studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical data analysis. Experimental data were compared with those of cow milk and the discriminant analysis correctly classified milk. By the same means, differences due to heat treatments (UHT or pasteurization) on milk samples were also investigated. Results of the 2 discriminant analyses were combined, with the aim of finding the discriminant metabolites unique for each class and shared by 2 classes. Valine and glycine were specific to goat milk, talose and malic acid to cow milk, and hydroxyglutaric acid to pasteurized samples. Glucose and fructose were shared by cow milk and UHT-treated samples, whereas ribose was shared by pasteurized and goat milk. Other discriminant variables were not attributed to specific metabolites. Furthermore, with the aim to reduce food fraud, the issue of adulteration of caprine milk by addition of cheaper bovine milk has been also addressed. To this goal, mixtures of goat and cow milk were prepared by adding the latter in a range from 0 to 100% (vol/vol) and studied by multivariate regression analysis. The error in the level of cow milk detectable was approximately 5%. These overall results demonstrated that, through the combined approach of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical data analysis, we were able to discriminate between milk typologies on the basis of their polar metabolite profiles and to propose a new analytical method to easily discover food fraud and to protect goat milk uniqueness. The use of appropriate visualization tools improved the interpretation of multivariate model results. PMID:25108860

  19. Analysis of odour compounds from scented consumer products using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Jennifer; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga

    2016-01-21

    Scented consumer products are being bought in increasing amounts and gaining more popularity. There is, however, relatively little information available about their ingredients, emissions and allergenic potential. Frequently, a mixture of different fragrance substances and not solely an individual substance contributes to the overall desired smell. The aim of this study was to investigate the odorous volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in consumer products containing fragrances. Over 44 products were selected: various scented candles, printing products with different scent types and other products types particularly meant to be used indoors. Measurements were carried out in a desiccator. Air samples were collected on thermal desorption tubes to determine the released fragrance substances by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) was used to obtain sensory data and to ensure no important odorant was overlooked. Using both methods it was possible to distinguish between odour active and inactive compounds and subsequently to identify almost 300 different odorants across all scented products. Besides the advantage of differentiation, as the human nose is a very sensitive detector, GC-O was found to be a useful tool for detecting traces and chosen target compounds. One focus in this study lay on the 26 EU-regulated fragrance allergens to prove their relevance in scented consumer goods. In total, 18 of them were identified, with at least one substance being present in almost every product. Benzyl alcohol, cinnamaldehyde, citronellol, eugenol, linalool and limonene were the prevalently detected allergens. Particularly linalool and limonene were observed in over 50% of the products. In addition, eugenol appeared to be one of the most frequently detected compounds in trace-level concentrations in the candle emissions. PMID:26724768

  20. Lipid fatty acid profile analyses in liver and serum in rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids (FA) are essential components of lipids and exhibit important biological functions. The analyses of FAs are routinely carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, after multi-step sample preparation. In this study, several key experimental factors were carefully examined, validat...

  1. METHOD 530 DETERMINATION OF SELECT SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ MASS SPECTROMETRY (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1.1. This is a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the determination of selected semivolatile organic compounds in drinking waters. Accuracy and precision data have been generated in reagent water, and in finished ground and surface waters for the compounds li...

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Bisphenol A Leached from Household Plastics by Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bettie Obi; Burke, Fernanda M.; Harrison, Rebecca; Burdette, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of trace levels of bisphenol A (BPA) leached out of household plastics using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is reported here. BPA is an endocrine-disrupting compound used in the industrial manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles and epoxy resin can liners. This experiment…

  3. DETERMINATION OF A BOUND MUSK XYLENE METABOLITE IN CARP HEMOGLOBIN AS A BIOMARKER OF EXPOSURE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY USING SELECTED ION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Musk xylene (MX) is widely used as a fragrance ingredient in commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (AMX) metabolite was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Detection of AMX occur...

  4. Analysis of Whiskey by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Upper Division Analytical Chemistry Experiment Guided by Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janel E.; Zimmerman, Laura B.; Gardner, Michael A.; Lowe, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of whiskey samples prepared by a green microextraction technique, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), before analysis by a qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, is described as a laboratory experiment for an upper division instrumental methods of analysis laboratory course. Here, aroma compounds in…

  5. Odor and odorous chemical emissions from dairy and swine facilities: Part 5-Simultaneous chemical and sensory analysis with Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry - Olfactometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O) for air samples collected at barn exhaust fans were used for quantification and ranking of odor impact of target odorous gases. Fifteen target odorous VOCs (odorants) were selected. Air sampl...

  6. Enantioselective gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of methylsulfonyl PCBs with application to arctic marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, K; Letcher, R; Sandau, C; Duffe, J; Norstrom, R; Haglund, P; Bidleman, T

    1998-09-15

    Four different commercially available cyclodextrin (CD) capillary gas chromatography (GC) columns were tested for the enantioselective separation of nine environmentally persistent atropisomeric 3- and 4-methylsulfonyl PCBs (MeSO2-CBs). The selected columns contained cyclodextrins with various cavity diameters (beta- or gamma-CD), which were methylated and/or tert-butyldimethylsilylated (TBDMS) in the 2,3,6-O-positions. The beta-CD column with TBDMS substituents in all of the 2,3,6-O-positions was by far the most selective column for the MeSO2-CBs tested. Enantiomers of congeners with 3-MeSO2 substitution were more easily separated than those with 4-MeSO2 substitution. The separation also seemed to be enhanced for congeners with the chlorine atoms on the non-MeSO2-containing ring and clustered on one side of the same ring. The 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-O-TBDMS-beta-CD was found to give somewhat better selectivity than the corresponding gamma-CD, in comparison between the two columns, which were identical in all other respects. Enantioselective analysis of arctic ringed seal (Phoca hispida) and polar bear (Ursus maritimus) adipose tissue revealed a strong dominance of certain enantiomers. For example, the enantiomer ratio (ER) of 3-MeSO2-CB149 was 0.32 and < 0.1 in ringed seal blubber and polar bear fat, respectively. These low ER values are indicative of highly enantioselective formation, enantioselective metabolism, enantioselective transport across cell membranes, or a combination of the three in both species. Comparable results for the enantiomeric analysis of MeSO2-CBs in biotic tissue extracts were obtained using two highly selective mass spectrometric techniques, ion trap mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and electron capture negative ion low-resolution mass spectrometry. PMID:9751025

  7. Impact of Pharmaceutical Impurities in Ecstasy Tablets: Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Study.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Amir; Hatamie, Amir; Saferpour, Tahere; Khajeamiri, Alireza; Safa, Tahere; Buazar, Foad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a simple and reliable method by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the fast and regular identification of 3, 4-MDMA impurities in ecstasy tablets. In so doing, 8 samples of impurities were extracted by diethyl ether under alkaline condition and then analyzed by GC-MS. The results revealed high MDMA levels ranging from 37.6% to 57.7%. The GC-MS method showed that unambiguous identification can be achieved for MDMA from 3, 4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), Amphetamine (AM), methamphetamine (MA) and ketamine (Keta) compounds, respectively. The experimental results indicated the acceptable time window without interfering peaks. It is found that GC-MS was provided a suitable and rapid identification approach for MDMA (Ecstacy) tablets, particularly in the Forensic labs. Consequently, the intense MDMA levels would support the police to develop a simple quantification of impurity in Ecstasy tablets. PMID:27610162

  8. Impact of Pharmaceutical Impurities in Ecstasy Tablets: Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Amir; Hatamie, Amir; Saferpour, Tahere; Khajeamiri, Alireza; Safa, Tahere; Buazar, Foad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a simple and reliable method by gas chromatograph–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was developed for the fast and regular identification of 3, 4-MDMA impurities in ecstasy tablets. In so doing, 8 samples of impurities were extracted by diethyl ether under alkaline condition and then analyzed by GC–MS. The results revealed high MDMA levels ranging from 37.6% to 57.7%. The GC-MS method showed that unambiguous identification can be achieved for MDMA from 3, 4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), Amphetamine (AM), methamphetamine (MA) and ketamine (Keta) compounds, respectively. The experimental results indicated the acceptable time window without interfering peaks. It is found that GC-MS was provided a suitable and rapid identification approach for MDMA (Ecstacy) tablets, particularly in the Forensic labs. Consequently, the intense MDMA levels would support the police to develop a simple quantification of impurity in Ecstasy tablets. PMID:27610162

  9. Analysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in foods by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, E; Santos, F J; Puignou, L; Galceran, M T

    2006-11-24

    A new, simple and selective method for the analysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in foods by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is proposed. Several derivatising procedures based on the formation of an HMF silylated derivative using different reagents were studied. Among the derivatising reagents examined, N,O-bis-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) provided the best derivatisation yield. Sample clean-up was also optimised, using either liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane or solid-phase extraction (SPE) with several commercially available cartridges, and the best results were obtained using ENV+ cartridges. Quality parameters such as day-to-day and run-to-run precision (RSD<10%), linearity (between 25 and 700 ng g(-1)) and detection limit (6 ng g(-1)) were established. This method was successfully applied to the analysis of HMF content in several Spanish food samples from a local market, such as jam, honey, orange juice and bakery products. PMID:17010355

  10. Isomeric differentiation of chloroanilines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with tosylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhu, Guohua; Chen, Mengmeng; Liu, Jinsong; Jiang, Kezhi

    2016-01-01

    p-Chloroaniline is one of the banned aromatic amines in azo dyes, but it is very difficult to distinguish it from its isomers due to their identical retention time in chromatography and similar mass spectra. In this work, derivatization of the isomeric chloroanilines was carried out to yield the corresponding N-tosyl chloroanilines, which were completely separated by gas chromatography and also possessed clearly different electron ionization mass spectra. Thus, the three isomers could be differentiated and determined at the same time. Density functional theory calculation results indicated that the effect of the substituent pattern in electron ionization mass spectrometry is mainly due to the difference in the stability of the product ion (P2) at m/z 126, originating from the loss of tosyl radical from the precursor ion. PMID:27553734

  11. Buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine determination in mice plasma and brain by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiadmi, Fouad; Schlatter, Joël

    2014-01-01

    A gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for quantification of buprenorphine (BUP) and norbuprenorphine (NBUP) in brain and plasma samples from mice was developed and validated. Analytes were extracted from the brain or plasma by solid phase extraction and quantified within 20 minutes. Calibration was achieved by linear regression with a 1/x weighting factor and d4-buprenorphine internal standard. All products were linear from 1 to 2000 ng/mL with a correlation of determination >0.99. Assay accuracy and precision of back-calculated standards were within ±10%. The lower limit of quantification for both BUP and NBUP from the brain and plasma was 1 ng/mL. This sensitive and specific method can be used for the investigation of BUP mechanism of action and clinical profile. PMID:24653644

  12. Different headspace solid phase microextraction--gas chromatography/mass spectrometry approaches to haloanisoles analysis in wine.

    PubMed

    Jeleń, Henryk H; Dziadas, Mariusz; Majcher, Małgorzata

    2013-10-25

    Three approaches in determination of six haloanisoles (2,4,6-trichloroanisole, 2,3,4-trichloroanisole, 2,3,6-trichloroanisole, tetrachloroanisole, pentachloroanisole and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole) in wine were compared. Comprehensive gas chromatography - time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToF-MS) was described for the first time for this application and compared to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) using triple quadrupole instrument. These techniques were compared with "standard" analytical approach using GC-MS(SIM). SPME method was developed and used for all separation methods (DVB/PDMS fiber, 70 °C, 30%NaCl, 20 min extraction). Extraction dependence on matrix was discussed using model wines with different ethanol contents (8%, 12%, and 18%) as well as water and different wines (dry white, dry red and sweet liqueur), with the lowest sensitivities obtained for highest ethanol contents in model wine and for liqueur wine. Limits of detection for GC×GC-ToF-MS method were 0.09-2.92 ng/L depending on the examined compound and matrix (compared to 0.1-13.3 ng/L obtained using GC/MS(SIM)). For GC-MS/MS method lower detection limits were achieved than for the GC×GC method (0.01-0.1 ng/L), however comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry provides full spectral information on analyzed compounds. Both methods had limits of detection far below odor thresholds of haloanisoles in wine, good linearity up to 2000 ng/L tested and good precision, what makes them suitable for analysis of these compounds in low ppt levels. PMID:23932370

  13. Analysis of volatile compounds emitted by filamentous fungi using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roze, Ludmila V; Beaudry, Randolph M; Linz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) analytical approach that identifies and analyzes volatile compounds in the headspace above a live fungal culture. This approach is a sensitive, solvent-free, robust technique; most importantly from a practical standpoint, this approach is noninvasive and requires minimal sample handling. Aliquots of liquid fungal cultures are placed into vials equipped with inert septa and equilibrated at a constant temperature, and headspace gases are sampled using an SPME fiber inserted through the septum into the headspace above the fungal culture for a standardized period of time. The outer polymer coating of a fused silica fiber absorbs volatiles from the headspace; the volatiles are then desorbed in the hot GC inlet and chromatographed in the usual manner. The separated compounds are subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. All steps in volatile profiling of a single sample from volatile sorption on a fiber to obtaining a list of volatiles can take as little as 15 min or can be extended to several hours if longer sorption is required for compounds present at very low levels and/or have low rates of diffusion. PMID:23065613

  14. Quantitation of ethyl glucuronide in serum & urine by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priyamvada; Bharat, Venkatesh; Murthy, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Alcohol misuse has now become a serious public health problem and early intervention is important in minimizing the harm. Biochemical markers of recent and high levels of alcohol consumption can play an important role in providing feedback regarding the health consequences of alcohol misuse. Existing markers are not sensitive to recent consumption and in detecting early relapse. Ethyl glucuronide (EtG), a phase-II metabolite of ethanol is a promising marker of recent alcohol use and can be detected in body fluids. In this study an analytical technique for quantitation of EtG in body fluids using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric detection (MS) was developed and validated. Methods: De-proteinization of serum and urine samples was done with perchloric acid and hydrochloric acid, respectively. Serum samples were passed through phospholipids removal cartridges for further clean up. EtG was isolated using amino propyl solid phase extraction columns. Chromatographic separation was achieved by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Results: Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 50 and 150 ng/ml for urine and 80 and 210 ng/ml for serum, respectively. Signal to noise ratio was 3:1, mean absolute recovery was 80-85 per cent. Significant correlation was obtained between breath alcohol and serum EtG levels (r=0.853) and urine EtG and time since last abuse (r = -0.903) in clinical samples. Interpretation & conclusions: In the absence of other standardized techniques to quantitate EtG in biological samples, this GC-MS method was found to have high throughput and was sensitive and specific. PMID:25857498

  15. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry characterisation of the anti-Listeria components of Garcinia kola seeds.

    PubMed

    Penduka, D; Basson, K A; Mayekiso, B; Buwa, L; Okoh, I A

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption chromatography was used to separate the bioactive constituents of the crude n-hexane extract of Garcinia kola seeds. The silica gel 60 column fractions were eluted using the solvent combination of benzene: ethanol : ammonium hydroxide (BEA) in the ratio combination of 36 : 4 : 0.4 v/v. The fractions were tested for anti-Listeria activities by determining their MIC50, MIC90 or MIC against 4 Listeria isolates. The fractions were labelled BEA1 to BEA5 and 3 out of the 5 fractions eluted were active against the test Listeria species with MIC's ranging from MIC 0.57 mg/mL to MIC50 0.625 mg/mL. The most active fractions, BEA2 and BEA3, were subjected to gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify their composition. Fraction BEA2 constituted of 18 compounds mostly sterols and the BEA3 fraction contained 27 compounds with the most abundant compounds being fatty acids derivatives. The BEA2 fraction's interactions with antibiotics proved to be 100% synergistic with ciprofloxacin and ampicillin whilst it exhibited 50% additivity and 50% synergism with penicillin G. However, all the interactions of the BEA2 fraction with each of the conventional antibiotics used were synergistic against the human listeriosis causative bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:25757343

  16. Sediment matrix effects in analysis of pyrethroid insecticides using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongli; You, Jing; Lydy, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, we developed a gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry method for analyzing nine pyrethroid insecticides in sediment after accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction cleanup. The operation was optimized, and negative chemical ionization was selected to improve analytical selectivity. The sediment matrix effects on qualification were evaluated, and matrix-matched standard solutions, along with the internal standard calibration, were used to reduce the matrix-induced chromatographic response enhancement. The method detection limits were 0.68 to 1.43 microg/kg dry weight (dw), and recoveries were 70.3 to 143.3%, 61.1 to 169.7%, and 65.7 to 118.8%, with relative SDs of 4.2% to 32.1%, 4.9 to 23.6%, and 1.5 to 23.3% at the spiked levels of 1.0, 5.0 and 20 microg/kg dw, respectively. The method was also validated by measuring pyrethroids in field-contaminated sediment samples collected in central California and southern Illinois. PMID:20340013

  17. Vinegar Metabolomics: An Explorative Study of Commercial Balsamic Vinegars Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pinu, Farhana R; de Carvalho-Silva, Samuel; Trovatti Uetanabaro, Ana Paula; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2016-01-01

    Balsamic vinegar is a popular food condiment produced from cooked grape must by two successive fermentation (anaerobic and aerobic) processes. Although many studies have been performed to determine the composition of major metabolites, including sugars and aroma compounds, no study has been undertaken yet to characterize the comprehensive metabolite composition of balsamic vinegars. Here, we present the first metabolomics study of commercial balsamic vinegars by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The combination of three GC-MS methods allowed us to detect >1500 features in vinegar samples, of which 123 metabolites were accurately identified, including 25 amino acids, 26 carboxylic acids, 13 sugars and sugar alcohols, four fatty acids, one vitamin, one tripeptide and over 47 aroma compounds. Moreover, we identified for the first time in vinegar five volatile metabolites: acetin, 2-methylpyrazine, 2-acetyl-1-pyroline, 4-anisidine and 1,3-diacetoxypropane. Therefore, we demonstrated the capability of metabolomics for detecting and identifying large number of metabolites and some of them could be used to distinguish vinegar samples based on their origin and potentially quality. PMID:27455339

  18. Isotopic exchange during derivatization of platelet activating factor for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, P.E.; Gaskell, S.J.; Weintraub, S.T.; Pinckard, R.N. )

    1991-04-01

    One approach to the quantitative analysis of platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine; also referred to as AGEPC, alkyl glyceryl ether phosphocholine) is hydrolytic removal of the phosphocholine group and conversion to an electron-capturing derivative for gas chromatography-negative ion mass spectrometry. (2H3)Acetyl-AGEPC has been commonly employed as an internal standard. When 1-hexadecyl-2-(2H3)acetyl glycerol (obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of (2H3)-C16:0 AGEPC) is treated with pentafluorobenzoyl chloride at 120 degrees C, the resulting 3-pentafluorobenzoate derivative shows extensive loss of the deuterium label. This exchange is evidently acid-catalyzed since derivatization of 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl glycerol under the same conditions in the presence of a trace of 2HCl results in the incorporation of up to three deuterium atoms. Isotope exchange can be avoided if the reaction is carried out at low temperature in the presence of base. Direct derivatization of (2H3)-C16:0 AGEPC by treatment with pentafluorobenzoyl chloride or heptafluorobutyric anhydride also results in loss of the deuterium label. The use of (13C2)-C16:0 AGEPC as an internal standard is recommended for rigorous quantitative analysis.

  19. High-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for skin surface lipids profiling[S

    PubMed Central

    Michael-Jubeli, Rime; Bleton, Jean; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2011-01-01

    Skin surface lipids (SSLs) arising from both sebaceous glands and skin removal form a complex lipid mixture composed of free fatty acids and neutral lipids. High-temperature gas chromatography coupled with electron impact or chemical ionization mass spectrometry was used to achieve a simple analytical protocol, without prior separation in classes and without prior cleavage of lipid molecules, in order to obtain simultaneously i) a qualitative characterization of the individual SSLs and ii) a quantitative evaluation of lipid classes. The method was first optimized with SSLs collected from the forehead of a volunteer. More than 200 compounds were identified in the same run. These compounds have been classified in five lipid classes: free fatty acids, hydrocarbons, waxes, sterols, and glycerides. The advantage to this method was it provided structural information on intact compounds, which is new for cholesteryl esters and glycerides, and to obtain detailed fingerprints of the major SSLs. These fingerprints were used to compare the SSL compositions from different body areas. The squalene/cholesterol ratio was used to determine the balance between sebaceous secretion and skin removal. This method could be of general interest in fields where complex lipid mixtures are involved. PMID:20952798

  20. Methods of analysis-Determination of pesticides in sediment using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; McWayne, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of 119 pesticides in environmental sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in support of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The pesticides included in this method were chosen through prior prioritization. Herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides along with degradates are included in this method and span a variety of chemical classes including, but not limited to, chloroacetanilides, organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, triazines, and triazoles. Sediment samples are extracted by using an accelerated solvent extraction system (ASE®, and the compounds of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences (including sulfur) by passing the extracts through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) along with the use of either stacked graphitized carbon and alumina solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges or packed Florisil®. Chromatographic separation, detection, and quantification of the pesticides from the sediment-sample extracts are done by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 micrograms per kilogram (μg/kg) dry weight ranged from 75 to 102 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 3 to 13 percent. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), ranged from 0.6 to 3.4 μg/kg dry weight.

  1. Determination of Selected Phthalates by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in Personal Perfumes.

    PubMed

    Orecchio, Santino; Indelicato, Roberta; Barreca, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    A simple and fast method is proposed to analyze commercial personal perfumes. Our method includes measurement of phthalates, known to be major sources of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDC), which originate from the less volatile fraction of perfumes. The quantification of phthalates were carried out directly with no sample preparation required on 30 samples of commercial products using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a detector. The total concentrations of 15 investigated compounds ranged from 17 to 9650 mg/L with an average of 2643 mg/L. The highest total concentration was found in cologne. Diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were detected in appreciable concentrations. Further, it was found that the composition of counterfeit samples varied widely from that of authentic products. The composition of old products was different from that of recent perfumes, which contain less harmful chemicals, attributed to the ban on some phthalates in Europe due their toxicity. It should be noted that older and contaminated products are not equivalent to authentic products when considering quality, safety, and probably effectiveness. Older and nonapproved perfumes contain chemicals that are not allowed for commercial use and may contain toxic impurities. PMID:26262443

  2. Characterisation of varnishes used in violins by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiavari, Giuseppe; Montalbani, Simona; Otero, Vanessa

    2008-12-01

    The correct characterisation and a detailed knowledge of the materials originally used in violin varnishes, like natural resins, is crucial for the conservation in museums and for a suitable restoration technique. The study presented here reports on the potential of pyrolysis (Py) coupled with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS) for the identification of chemical markers of each resin; this technique is very sensitive and selective, it needs a small quantity of sample and does not require chemical treatments. To improve the chromatographic behaviour of polar compounds the derivatising agent tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in combination with pyrolysis has been used, in the so-called TMAH thermochemolysis or thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM), or more simply pyrolysis-methylation. The natural resins studied were colophony, sandarac, manila copal, elemi, amber and benzoin, mainly composed of terpenic compounds, with the exception of the latter, composed of aromatic compounds. Many compounds were identified; in particular, methyl esters of resinous acids that, individually or in a group, can be used as chemical markers. However, through this technique it was not possible to distinguish between the sandarac and manila copal resins because their chromatographic behaviour is very similar. Finally, the procedure applied has been employed in the characterisation of original varnish samples. PMID:18973195

  3. Capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of volatile and semi-volatile compounds of Salvia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Valeria; Chiliment, Silvia; Oprea, Eliza

    2004-02-20

    The essential oil and infusion of Salvia officinalis leaves have been widely applied in traditional medicine since ancient times and nowadays subjected to extensive research of their antibacterial, antiviral and cytotoxic properties. This paper shows chemical composition data of S. officinalis leaves essential oil isolated by steam distillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus. Also, the paper presents the chemical content of volatile and semi-volatile compounds of S. officinalis leaves infusion. The volatile and semi-volatile compounds of S. officinalis leaves infusion were isolated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid-liquid extraction with hexane and dichloromethane. SPE was carried out on 500 mg octadecylsilane (C18) cartridges and elution with dichloromethane. Liquid-liquid extraction was performed with hexane and dichloromethane. The essential oil in dichloromethane and infusion extracts in hexane and dichloromethane were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The quantitative results obtained by solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction showed that SPE on C18 performed the highest recovery of the volatile compounds from infusion sample. PMID:14971492

  4. Characterization of aroma compounds of Chinese famous liquors by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and flash GC electronic-nose.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Yu, Dan; Niu, Yunwei; Chen, Feng; Song, Shiqing; Zhu, Jiancai; Zhu, Guangyong

    2014-01-15

    Aroma composition of five Chinese premium famous liquors with different origins and liquor flavor types was characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and flash gas chromatographic electronic nose system. Eighty-six aroma compounds were identified, including 5 acids, 34 esters, 10 alcohols, 9 aldehydes, 4 ketones, 4 phenols, and 10 nitrous and sulfuric compounds. To investigate possible correlation between aroma compounds identified by GC-MS and sensory attributes, multivariate ANOVA-PLSR (APLSR) was performed. It turned out that there were 30 volatile composition, ethyl acetate, ethyl propanoate, ethyl 2-methyl butanoate, ethyl 3-methyl butanoate, ethyl lactate, ethyl benzenacetate, 3-methylbutyl acetate, hexyl acetate, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-heptanol, phenylethyl alcohol, acetaldehyde, 1,1-diethoxy-3-methyl butane, furfural, benzaldehyde, 5-methyl-2-furanal, 2-octanone, 2-n-butyl furan, dimethyl trisulfied and 2,6-dimethyl pyrazine, ethyl nonanoate, isopentyl hexanoate, octanoic acid, ethyl 5-methyl hexanoate, 2-phenylethyl acetate,ethyl oleate, propyl hexanoate, butanoic acid and phenol, ethyl benzenepropanoate, which showed good coordination with Chinese liquor characteristics. The multivariate structure of this electronic nose responses was then processed by principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). According to the obtained results, GC-MS and electronic nose can be used for the differentiation of the liquor origins and flavor types. PMID:24333641

  5. High Sensitivity Quantitative Lipidomics Analysis of Fatty Acids in Biological Samples by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Oswald; Armando, Aaron M.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically considered to be simple membrane components serving as structural elements and energy storing entities, fatty acids are now increasingly recognized as potent signaling molecules involved in many metabolic processes. Quantitative determination of fatty acids and exploration of fatty acid profiles have become common place in lipid analysis. We present here a reliable and sensitive method for comprehensive analysis of free fatty acids and fatty acid composition of complex lipids in biological material. The separation and quantitation of fatty acids is achieved by capillary gas chromatography. The analytical method uses pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization and negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chromatographic procedure provides base line separation between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths as well as between most positional isomers. Fatty acids are extracted in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards for high quantitation accuracy. Mass spectrometer conditions are optimized for broad detection capacity and sensitivity capable of measuring trace amounts of fatty acids in complex biological samples. PMID:21787881

  6. [Determination of alditols in wine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after acetate derivatization].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongbin; Xiong, Zhiyu; Yu, Yang; Wan, Rong; Li, Ping; Shen, Bo

    2013-08-01

    The acetate derivatization of alditols for determining alditol level in wine by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been developed. The wine sample was mixed with pyridine and centrifuged at 5,000 r/min at the temperature of 4 degrees C for 10 min. After filtration with organic phase membrane, the supernatant was derivatized with acetic anhydride, and then dehydrated with anhydrous sodium sulfate. The GC separation was performed on a DB-5MS capillary column. The alditols were determined by MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode and quantified by external standard method. The calibration curves showed good linearities in the range of 0.019 - 1.25 mg/L except for lactitol (0.039 - 2.50 mg/L) with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. The limits of quantification (S/N= 10) of erythritol, xylitol, D-mannitol, sorbitol, galactitol and lactitol were 0.17, 0.29, 0.43, 0.46, 0.47 and 2.88 mg/L respectively. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) were 0.05, 0.08, 0.13, 0.14, 0.14 and 1.38 mg/L respectively. The recoveries of alditols spiked in the wine at two levels of 40 mg/L and 80 mg/L were ranged from 80.15% to 108.75% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.16% - 6.97%. The sensitivity, accuracy and precision of the method can meet the technical standard. The method can be applied to the rapid determination of alditols in wine. PMID:24369614

  7. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based component profiling and quality prediction for Japanese sake.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Natsuki; Isogai, Atsuko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-10-01

    Sake is a Japanese traditional alcoholic beverage, which is produced by simultaneous saccharification and alcohol fermentation of polished and steamed rice by Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. About 300 compounds have been identified in sake, and the contribution of individual components to the sake flavor has been examined at the same time. However, only a few compounds could explain the characteristics alone and most of the attributes still remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the component profile and the attributes of sake. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based non-targeted analysis was employed to obtain the low molecular weight component profile of Japanese sake including both nonvolatile and volatile compounds. Sake attributes and overall quality were assessed by analytical descriptive sensory test and the prediction model of the sensory score from the component profile was constructed by means of orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) regression analysis. Our results showed that 12 sake attributes [ginjo-ka (aroma of premium ginjo sake), grassy/aldehydic odor, sweet aroma/caramel/burnt odor, sulfury odor, sour taste, umami, bitter taste, body, amakara (dryness), aftertaste, pungent/smoothness and appearance] and overall quality were accurately explained by component profiles. In addition, we were able to select statistically significant components according to variable importance on projection (VIP). Our methodology clarified the correlation between sake attribute and 200 low molecular components and presented the importance of each component thus, providing new insights to the flavor study of sake. PMID:25060729

  8. Quantitative analysis of urinary glycerol levels for doping control purposes using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Guddat, Sven; Flenker, Ulrich; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    The administration of glycerol to endurance athletes results in an increased fluid retention and improved performance, particularly under hot and humid conditions. Consequently, glycerol is considered relevant for sports drug testing and methods for its detection in urine specimens are required. A major issue in this regard is the natural occurrence of trace amounts of glycerol in human urine, which necessitates a quantitative analysis and the determination of normal urinary glycerol levels under various sporting conditions. A quantitative method was established using a gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry-based approach that was validated with regard to lower limit of detection (0.3 microg mL(-1)), lower limit of quantification (0.9 microg mL(-1)), specificity, linearity (1.0-98.0 microg mL(-1)), intraday and interday precision (<20% at 2.4, 24.1 and 48.2 microg mL(-1)) as well as accuracy (92-110%). Sample aliquots of 20 microL were enriched with five-fold deuterated glycerol, dried and derivatised using N-methyl-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) before analysis. The established method was applied to a total of 1039 doping control samples covering various sport disciplines (349 endurance samples, 286 strength sport samples, 325 game sport samples and 79 other samples) in- and out-of-competition, which provided quantitative information about the glycerol content commonly observed in elite athletes' urine samples. About 85% of all specimens yielded glycerol concentrations < 20.0 microg mL(-1) and few reached values up to 132.6 microg mL(-1). One further sample, however, was found to contain 2690 microg mL(-1), which might indicate the misuse of glycerol, but no threshold for urinary glycerol concentrations has been established yet due to the lack of substantial data. Based on the results obtained from the studied reference population, a threshold for glycerol levels in urine set at 200 microg mL(-1) is suggested, which provides a tool to

  9. Evaluation of beer deterioration by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/multivariate analysis: a rapid tool for assessing beer composition.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João A; Barros, António S; Carvalho, Beatriz; Brandão, Tiago; Gil, Ana M; Ferreira, António C Silva

    2011-02-18

    Beer stability is a major concern for the brewing industry, as beer characteristics may be subject to significant changes during storage. This paper describes a novel non-targeted methodology for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to accelerated aging (induced by thermal treatment: 18 days at 45 °C), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in tandem with multivariate analysis (GC-MS/MVA). Optimization of the chromatographic run was performed, achieving a threefold reduction of the chromatographic time. Although losing optimum resolution, rapid GC runs showed similar chromatographic profiles and semi-quantitative ability to characterize volatile compounds. To evaluate the variations on the global volatile signature (chromatographic profile and m/z pattern of fragmentation in each scan) of beer during thermal deterioration, a non-supervised multivariate analysis method, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), was applied to the GC-MS data. This methodology allowed not only the rapid identification of the degree of deterioration affecting beer, but also the identification of specific compounds of relevance to the thermal deterioration process of beer, both well established markers such as 5-hydroxymethylfufural (5-HMF), furfural and diethyl succinate, as well as other compounds, to our knowledge, newly correlated to beer aging. PMID:21227435

  10. Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for residual solvent assessment in seized cocaine and heroin.

    PubMed

    Cabarcos, Pamela; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Álvarez-Freire, Iván; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2016-09-01

    A simple sample pre-treatment method based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized and validated for the assessment of 15 residual solvents (2-propanol, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, acetone, ethyl acetate, benzene, hexane, methylcyclohexane, methylcyclopentane, m-xylene, propyl acetate, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, dichloromethane, and ethylbenzene) in seized illicit cocaine and heroin. DMSO and DMF as sample diluents were found to offer the best residual solvent transference to the head space for further adsorption onto the SPME fiber, and the developed method therefore showed high sensitivity and analytical recovery. Variables affecting SPME were fully evaluated by applying an experimental design approach. Best conditions were found when using an equilibration time of 5 min at 70 °C and headspace sampling of residual solvents at the same temperature for 15 min. Method validation, performed within the requirements of international guidelines, showed excellent sensitivity, as well as intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The proposed methodology was applied to 96 cocaine samples and 14 heroin samples seized in Galicia (northwestern Spain) within 2013 and 2014. PMID:27405875

  11. Development of a Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method for the Quantification of Glucaric Acid Derivatives in Beverage Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Ana Paula; Fields, Christine C.; Simpson, John V.

    2014-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method using the standard addition methodology was developed for the determination of glucuronolactone (GL) and glucuronic acid (DGuA) in four beverages categorized as detoxification, recovery, or energy drinks. The method features a precolumn derivatization step with a combination of BSTFA (N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide) and TMCS (trimethylchlorosilane) to silylate the analytes. The sample pretreatment required no extraction, filtration, or reduction step prior to the injection. The quantification of the analytes was performed using a five-point standard addition protocol. The proposed method presented excellent intraday precision (%RSD < 10) and linearity for GL calibration curves (correlation coefficients > 0.995) and acceptable linearity for DGuA calibration curves (correlation coefficients > 0.97). The estimated limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for GL ranged from 0.006 ppm to 0.14 ppm, and 0.02 ppm to 0.47 ppm, respectively. The estimated LOD and LOQ for DGuA determination ranged, respectively, from 0.06 ppm to 1.1 ppm and 0.2 ppm to 3.8 ppm. The results demonstrated that the method should be regarded as a reliable alternative to the simultaneous determination of GL and DGuA. PMID:25024704

  12. Development of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantification of glucaric Acid derivatives in beverage substrates.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ana Paula; Fields, Christine C; Simpson, John V

    2014-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method using the standard addition methodology was developed for the determination of glucuronolactone (GL) and glucuronic acid (DGuA) in four beverages categorized as detoxification, recovery, or energy drinks. The method features a precolumn derivatization step with a combination of BSTFA (N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide) and TMCS (trimethylchlorosilane) to silylate the analytes. The sample pretreatment required no extraction, filtration, or reduction step prior to the injection. The quantification of the analytes was performed using a five-point standard addition protocol. The proposed method presented excellent intraday precision (%RSD < 10) and linearity for GL calibration curves (correlation coefficients > 0.995) and acceptable linearity for DGuA calibration curves (correlation coefficients > 0.97). The estimated limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for GL ranged from 0.006 ppm to 0.14 ppm, and 0.02 ppm to 0.47 ppm, respectively. The estimated LOD and LOQ for DGuA determination ranged, respectively, from 0.06 ppm to 1.1 ppm and 0.2 ppm to 3.8 ppm. The results demonstrated that the method should be regarded as a reliable alternative to the simultaneous determination of GL and DGuA. PMID:25024704

  13. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ulva fasciata (Green Seaweed) Extract and Evaluation of Its Cytoprotective and Antigenotoxic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rodeiro, Idania; Olguín, Sitlali; Santes, Rebeca; Herrera, José A.; Pérez, Carlos L.; Mangas, Raisa; Hernández, Yasnay; Fernández, Gisselle; Hernández, Ivones; Hernández-Ojeda, Sandra; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Valencia-Olvera, Ana; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological properties of Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract were examined. Five components were identified in one fraction prepared from the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and palmitic acid and its ethyl ester accounted for 76% of the total identified components. Furthermore, we assessed the extract's antioxidant properties by using the DPPH, ABTS, and lipid peroxidation assays and found that the extract had a moderate scavenging effect. In an experiment involving preexposition and coexposition of the extract (1–500 µg/mL) and benzo[a]pyrene (BP), the extract was found to be nontoxic to C9 cells in culture and to inhibit the cytotoxicity induced by BP. As BP is biotransformed by CYP1A and CYP2B subfamilies, we explored the possible interaction of the extract with these enzymes. The extract (25–50 µg/mL) inhibited CYP1A1 activity in rat liver microsomes. Analysis of the inhibition kinetics revealed a mixed-type inhibitory effect on CYP1A1 supersome. The effects of the extract on BP-induced DNA damage and hepatic CYP activity in mice were also investigated. Micronuclei induction by BP and liver CYP1A1/2 activities significantly decreased in animals treated with the extract. The results suggest that Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract inhibits BP bioactivation and it may be a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:26612994

  14. Volatile composition of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Pinho, P Guedes; Gonçalves, Rui F; Valentão, Patrícia; Pereira, David M; Seabra, Rosa M; Andrade, Paula B; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2009-04-01

    A total of 88 volatile and semi-volatile components were formally or tentatively identified in flowers, leaves and stems of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (cv. Little Bright Eye), by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and by dichloromethane extraction, combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). These include some diterpenic compounds (manool and manoyl oxides), a sesquiterpen (alpha-bisabolol), and some pyridine, pyrazine, indol and carotenoid derivatives. Applying multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and agglomerative hierarchic cluster analysis) to the HS-SPME-GC-MS data, it was possible to characterize each part of the vegetal material using a relative small number of compounds. Hence, flowers were richer in terpenic molecules (including limonene), alpha-bisabolol, methyljasmonate, cis-jasmone, 2-phenylethanol, phenylacetaldehyde, trans-2-octenal, benzylic alcohol and 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine. Leaves can be characterized by the methyl and propyl esters of fatty acids, mono- and disaturated, trans-phytol, carotenoid derivative compounds, hydrofarnesylacetone, methylanthranilate, manool and epi-manool oxide, while stems have high levels of volatile aldehydes, such as hexanal, octanal, cis-2-nonenal, cis-2-decenal, cis, trans-2,6-nonadienal, trans, trans-2,4-decadienal and cis, trans-2,4-decadienal. Dichloromethane extraction allowed also the identification of some alkaloid-like compounds that were not detected by HS-SPME. PMID:19186019

  15. [Determination of nine triazole pesticides in environmental waters using solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    You, Minghua; Sun, Guangda; Chen, Meng; Yuan, Dongxing

    2008-11-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 9 triazole pesticides in environmental water using C18 cartridge for the extraction and enrichment, NH2 cartridge for the clean-up and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the detection. The linear range of calibration curves for the 9 target pesticides was between 0.025 mg/L and 0.500 mg/L. The detection limits were in the range of 0.002 - 0.009 microg/L. The 9 target pesticides were measured in river water and sea water at 0.025 microg/L and 0.100 microg/L spiking levels, recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSD, n = 3) were 68.4% - 113.9% and 1.6% - 6.9% for river water and 70.3% - 115.2% and 0.8% - 8.2% for sea water, respectively. The method is simple, sensitive, selective and suitable for the qualification of pesticide multiresidue analysis. It has been successfully applied to the survey of 9 triazole pesticide residues in Jiulong River Estuary, Fujian. PMID:19253548

  16. Simultaneous determination of 76 micropollutants in water samples by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Ramírez, N; Gómez, V; Pocurull, E; Borrull, F

    2013-11-15

    This study focuses on the development of an analytical method based on headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the simultaneous determination of 76 micropollutants in water samples. The selected micropollutants include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (e.g. chlorobenzenes, chloroalkanes), endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) (e.g. bisphenol A and tributyl phosphate), odour compounds (e.g. limonene, phenol), fragrance allergens (e.g. geraniol, eugenol) and some pesticides (e.g. heptachlor, terbutryn). The experimental conditions affecting their extraction, such as the type of fibre, temperature and time of extraction, sample volume and ionic strength of the samples were optimized using HS-SPME. The method showed good linear range, reproducibility between days, repeatability and low detection limits (at ng L(-1) levels). The validated method has been applied to determine the target organic micropollutants in aqueous samples from different experimental research units of surface water, sea water, waste water and those effluents of advance membrane treatments. The optimized method showed good performance in the different types of samples studied. The analysis revealed the presence of several micropollutants at concentrations between 20 and 5000 μg L(-1), such as ethylbenzene, o-xylene, p-isopropilbenzene, D-limonene, citral and isoeugenol, due to the fact that these species are commonly used in domestic and industrial applications. PMID:24148498

  17. Exploration of the serum metabolite signature in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Chen, Jiao; Hu, Changfeng; Xie, Zhijun; Li, Haichang; Wei, Shuangshuang; Wang, Dawei; Wen, Chengping; Xu, Guowang

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with complicated pathogeny. There could be obvious alterations of metabolism in the patients with RA and the discovery of metabolic signature may be helpful for the accurate diagnosis of RA. In order to explore the distinctive metabolic patterns in RA patients, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was employed. Serum samples from 33 RA patients and 32 healthy controls were collected and analyzed. Acquired metabolic data were assessed by the principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and the data analysis results showed RA patients and healthy controls have very different metabolic profiles. Variable importance for project values (VIP) and Student's t-test were combined to screen the significant metabolic changes caused by RA. Serums from RA patients were featured by decreased levels of amino acids and glucose, increased levels of fatty acids and cholesterol, which were primarily associated with glycolytic pathway, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism, and other related pathways including TCA cycle and the urea cycle. These preliminary results suggest that GC-MS based metabolic profiling study appears to be a useful tool in the exploration of the metabolic signature of RA, and the revealed disease-associated metabolic perturbations could help to elucidate the pathogenesis of RA and provide a probable aid for the accurate diagnosis of RA. PMID:26879423

  18. Unknown exposures: gaps in basic characterization addressed with person-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip A; Roe, Marc T A; Sadowski, Charles; Lee, Edgar D

    2011-03-01

    A newly developed person-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system was used to analyze several solvent standards, contact cement, paint thinner, and polychlorinated biphenyl samples. Passive solid phase microextraction sampling and fast chromatography with a resistively heated low thermal mass GC column were used. Results (combined sampling and analysis) were obtained in <2 min for solvent, contact cement, and paint thinner samples, and in <13 min for the polychlorinated biphenyl sample. Mass spectra produced by the small toroidal ion trap detector used were similar to those produced with heavily used transmission quadrupole mass spectrometers for polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, simple alkanes, and cycloalknes, while mass spectra for benzene and the ketone compounds analyzed showed evidence for ion/molecule reactions in the ion trap. For one of the contact cement samples analyzed, no evidence was found to indicate the presence of n-hexane, although the relevant material safety data sheet listed this ingredient. Specific chemical constituents corresponding to a potentially wide range of petroleum distillate compounds were identifiable from GC-MS analyses. The possibility for an improved basic characterization step in the exposure assessment process exists with the availability of fast, person-portable GC-MS, although work is needed to further refine this tool and understand the best ways it may be used. PMID:21318921

  19. Analysis of Trace Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (QACs) in Vegetables Using Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lei; Wang, Xiong-Ke; Li, Yan-Wen; Huang, Xian-Pei; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Li, Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui

    2015-08-01

    A reliable, sensitive, and cost-effective method was developed for determining three quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) including dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, and didodecyldimethylammonium chloride in various vegetables using ultrasonic-assisted extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The variety and acidity of extraction solvents, extraction times, and cleanup efficiency of sorbents were estimated to obtain an optimized procedure for extraction of the QACs in nine vegetable matrices. Excellent linearities (R(2) > 0.992) were obtained for the analytes in the nine matrices. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.7-6.0 and 2.3-20.0 μg/kg (dry weight, dw) in various matrices, respectively. The recoveries in the nine matrices ranged from 70.5% to 108.0% with relative standard deviations below 18.0%. The developed method was applied to determine the QACs in 27 vegetable samples collected from Guangzhou in southern China, showing very high detection frequency with a concentration of 23-180 μg/kg (dw). PMID:26165915

  20. Simultaneous Determination of 10 Photoinitiators in Milk by Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyan; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Yajing; Chen, Yanjie

    2016-05-01

    Photoinitiators (PIs) are widely used in food packaging materials, can migrate easily from packaging materials to food, and cause food contamination. It is essential to establish a method of determining PIs residues in food. A new method for simultaneously determining 10 kinds of PIs in milk has been established by using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) combined with a simple method of protein precipitation as the pretreatment approach and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as the detecting technique. The limits of detection for 10 PIs in different milks were between 0.05 and 1.4 μg/L (skimmed milk), between 0.07 and 2.2 μg/L (semi-skimmed milk), between 0.11 and 4.4 μg/L (whole milk), respectively. The recoveries were from 71.5% to 133.5%, and the relative standard deviations were less than 15%. Twelve kinds of packed milk with different brands and fat contents were determined using this method. PMID:27010861

  1. Determining the levels of volatile organic pollutants in urban air using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Nicoara, Simona; Tonidandel, Loris; Traldi, Pietro; Watson, Jonathan; Morgan, Geraint; Popa, Ovidiu

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the application of a method based on coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, using an isotopically labelled internal standard for the quantitative analysis of benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and o-, m-, p-xylenes (X). Their atmospheric concentrations were determined based on short-term sampling, in different sites of Cluj-Napoca, a highly populated urban centre in N-W Romania, with numerous and diversified road vehicles with internal combustion engines. The method is relatively inexpensive and simple and shows good precision and linearity in the ranges of 7-60 mug/m(3) (B), 13-90 mug/m(3) (T), 7-50 mug/m(3) (E), 10-70 mug/m(3) (X-m,p), and 20-130 mug/m(3) (X-o). The limits of quantitation/detection of the method LOQ/LOD are of 10/5 mug/m(3) (Xo), 5/3 mug/m(3) (B, E, X-m,p), and of 3/1 mug/m(3) (T), respectively. PMID:20168976

  2. [Determination of bisphenol A from toys and food contact materials by derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Yanyan; Gao, Jianguo; Zhang, Huiling; Zheng, Lisha; Chen, Jing

    2012-10-01

    A method was developed for the determination of bisphenol A (BPA) in toys and food contact materials. The BPA was extracted with Soxhlet extraction method from the sample and reacted with acetic anhydride. The final product was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). To achieve the optimum derivatization performance, the derivatization time and dosage of derivatization reagent etc. were investigated. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the final product was stable and the peak shape was good. The linearity of the derivative was good in the range of 0.05 to 50 mg/L with the correlation coefficient (r2) above 0.999. The recoveries ranged from 80% to 93% at the spiked levels of 0.05, 1.00, 10.00 mg/kg with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 3.7%. The limit of detection (S/N = 3) was 10 microg/kg. The method is accurate and has high recovery. The method is suitable for the inspection of bisphenol A in toys and food contact materials. PMID:23383489

  3. Analytical Approaches Based on Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to Study Organic Materials in Artworks and Archaeological Objects.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Ribechini, Erika; Modugno, Francesca; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2016-02-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), after appropriate wet chemical sample pre-treatments or pyrolysis, is one of the most commonly adopted analytical techniques in the study of organic materials from cultural heritage objects. Organic materials in archaeological contexts, in classical art objects, or in modern and contemporary works of art may be the same or belong to the same classes, but can also vary considerably, often presenting different ageing pathways and chemical environments. This paper provides an overview of the literature published in the last 10 years on the research based on the use of GC/MS for the analysis of organic materials in artworks and archaeological objects. The latest progresses in advancing analytical approaches, characterising materials and understanding their degradation, and developing methods for monitoring their stability are discussed. Case studies from the literature are presented to examine how the choice of the working conditions and the analytical approaches is driven by the analytical and technical question to be answered, as well as the nature of the object from which the samples are collected. PMID:27572989

  4. Acute toxicity of plant essential oils to scarab larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and their analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Christopher M; Reding, Michael E; Oliver, Jason B; Moyseenko, James J; Youssef, Nadeer; Krause, Charles R

    2013-02-01

    Larvae of scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) are important contaminant and root-herbivore pests of ornamental crops. To develop alternatives to conventional insecticides, 24 plant-based essential oils were tested for their acute toxicity against third instars of the Japanese beetle Popillia japonica Newman, European chafer Rhizotrogus majalis (Razoumowsky), oriental beetle Anomala orientalis (Waterhouse), and northern masked chafer Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. Diluted solutions were topically applied to the thorax, which allowed for calculating LD50 and LD90 values associated with 1 d after treatment. A wide range in acute toxicity was observed across all four scarab species. Of the 24 oils tested, allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamon leaf, clove, garlic, and red thyme oils exhibited toxicity to all four species. Allyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic oil tested against the European chafer, and among the most toxic against the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, and northern masked chafer. Red thyme was also comparatively toxic to the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer. Interspecific variability in susceptibility to the essential oils was documented, with 12, 11, 8, and 6 of the 24 essential oils being toxic to the oriental beetle, Japanese beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer, respectively. Analysis of the active oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a diverse array of compounds, mostly consisting of mono- and sesquiterpenes. These results will aid in identifying active oils and their constituents for optimizing the development of plant essential oil mixtures for use against scarab larvae. PMID:23448028

  5. A simple and sensitive method for the determination of propofol in human solid tissues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hikiji, Wakako; Kudo, Keiko; Usumoto, Yosuke; Tsuji, Akiko; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2010-09-01

    Propofol is a widely used intravenous agent for induction and maintenance of anesthesia and for sedation in intensive care patients, but it is also associated with abuse and dependency. A simple and sensitive method for the determination of propofol in human whole blood, brain, liver, and adipose tissue by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selected-ion monitoring mode is described. Propofol was extracted from 0.2-mL or 0.2-g sample size by a single-step basic extraction procedure using 100 microL heptane with thymol (50 ng) as an internal standard. The calibration curves of the specimens were linear in the concentration range of 10-5000 ng/mL or ng/g, and the limit of detection was 2.5 ng/mL in blood, 5.0 ng/g in brain and liver, and 10 ng/g in adipose tissue. Absolute recovery of propofol was determined in three samples and averaged over 95% for blood and brain, 66% for liver, and 51% for adipose tissue. Within-day and between-day precision was measured in five samples each at 50 and 500 ng/mL or ng/g in all specimens and was determined to be less than 10%. The developed propofol method was applied to a forensic autopsy case where a suspected propofol misinjection occurred eight days prior to death, and the tissue analysis was vital to the case. PMID:20822676

  6. Analysis of the volatile components emitted from cut tobacco processing by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry thermal desorption system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Sha, Yunfei; Wu, Da; Liu, Baizhan; Chen, Chaoying; Fang, Dingye

    2012-11-15

    A sensitive and reliable method was developed for the determination of volatile components emitted from cut tobacco processing using thermal desorption (TD) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the work, to obtain the optimal sorbent, three commercial sorbents were compared in terms of adsorption efficiency. The carbotrap 349 was found to have the best performance. The desorption conditions were also studied. Validation of the TD-GC-MS method showed good sensibility, linearity and precision. Limits of detection ranges were from 0.20 to 3.6 ng. Calibration curves were obtained by plotting peak area versus concentration and the correlation coefficients relating to linearity were at least 0.9984. The analysis was reproducible, with relative standard deviation (n=8) within 6.5%. The target compound breakthrough examination showed no significant losses when about 1500 ng standards were prepared. In order to evaluate the performance of the analytical method in the volatile constituents of cut tobacco, samples were taken in industrial areas of cut tobacco processing. Recoveries ranged from 85.1% to 110% for all the compounds and good precision had been reached (RSD<13.3). The results proved that TD-GC-MS was a simple, rapid and accurate method for the analysis of volatile compounds emitted from cut tobacco drying step. PMID:23158312

  7. Distinguishing chinese star anise from Japanese star anise using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Kite, Geoffrey C; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2009-07-01

    The volatile compounds from the pericarps of Illicium anisatum L., Illicium brevistylum A.C.Sm., Illicium griffithii Hook.f. & Thomson, Illicium henryi Diels, Illicium lanceolatum A.C.Sm., Illicium majus Hook.f. & Thomson, Illicium micranthum Dunn, and Illicium verum Hook.f. were examined by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). The volatiles desorbed from the pericarps of I. verum (Chinese star anise), the species traded for culinary purposes, were generally characterized by a high proportion of (E)-anethole (57.6-77.1%) and the presence of foeniculin; the latter was otherwise only detected in the pericarps of I. lanceolatum. In the pericarps of all other species analyzed, the percentage composition of (E)-anethole was comparatively lower (

  8. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. PMID:26493981

  9. Essential oil composition of sachalinmint from Norway detected by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Rohloff, Jens

    2002-03-13

    The essential oil of leaves and flowers of sachalinmint [Mentha sachalinensis (Briq.) Kudô] grown in Norway (Trondheim) has been studied by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS). The essential oil content increased linearly in acropetal direction from 1.08% (0-20 cm plant height) to 1.75% (60-80 cm; young leaves and flowers). The steam-distilled samples showed a minor complex matrix with a very high menthol and a much lower menthone content (87.89 and 4.05%, respectively). From testing of HS-SPME unequilibrated exposure times ranging from 10 s to 5 min, an extraction time of 30 s was found to be sufficient to detect both low- and high-eluting compounds. Comparison of HS-SPME and steam-distilled samples established that the same tendencies of increasing menthol/menthone content in the basipetal/acropetal direction could be detected by both analysis methods. With regard to the extraction efficiency, HS-SPME gave additional detailed information about less important terpenic compounds. PMID:11879034

  10. Metabolomic investigation of porcine muscle and fatty tissue after Clenbuterol treatment using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanglei; Fu, Yuhua; Han, Xiaosong; Li, Xinyun; Li, Changchun

    2016-07-22

    Clenbuterol is a β-adrenergic agonist used as additive to increase the muscle mass of meat-producing animals. Previous studies were limited to evaluations of animal growth performance and determination of the residues. Several studies have focused on urine samples. Little information about the underlying molecular mechanisms that can explain Clenbuterol metabolism and promote energy repartition in animal muscle and fatty tissue is available. Therefore, this research aims to detect the metabolite variations in muscle and fatty tissue acquired from Chinese pigs fed with Clenbuterol using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Ten two-month old Enshi black pigs were fed under the same condition; five of which were fed with basic ration containing Clenbuterol for one month, whereas the other five pigs were fed only with basic ration. Muscle and fatty tissue were subjected to metabolomics analysis using GC/MS. Differences in metabolomic profiles between the two groups were characterized by multivariate statistical analysis. The muscle samples showed that 15 metabolites were significantly different in the Clenbuterol-treated group compared with the control group; 13 potential biomarkers were found in the fatty tissue. Most of the metabolites were associated with fatty acid metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Glycerol, phenylalanine, and leucine were the common metabolites between the muscle and fatty tissue. These metabolites may provide a new clue that contributes to the understanding of the energy reassignment induced by Clenbuterol. PMID:27320379

  11. Determination of Panthenol, Cholecalciferol and Tocopherol in Cosmetic Products by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in SIM Mode.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H J; Lee, M H; Ro, K W; Hur, C W; Kim, J W

    1999-02-01

    A novel simple method to detect vitamins in cosmetic products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed. Three vitamins (panthenol, cholecalciferol and tocopherol) were used for this study. Vitamins were prepared by dissolving in tetrahydrofuran (ThF), and silylated with bis-trimethylsilyltri-fluoroacetamide- trichloromethylsilane (BSTFA). Silylated vitamins were separated on a fused-silica capillary column coated with DB-5. The identification of each vitamin was accomplished by retention time and mass spectrum library search with a computer, and the quantitation was made in the selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode of GC-MS. SIM mode had given sensitivity to determine 50 pg of panthenol, 285 pg of cholecalciferol and 130 pg of tocopherol. Linearity was maintained over the range 0.005-0.20% for each vitamin. Each cosmetic product (i.e. hair tonic and lotion) was found to contain amounts of the vitamins. This method was sensitive and gave 77.5-99.9% recovery of each vitamin from these cosmetic products. From these results, we concluded that silylation with BSTFA followed by GC-MS analysis allows the simple, convenient and exact determination of panthenol, cholecalciferol and tocopherol. PMID:18505529

  12. Automated storage of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data in a relational database to facilitate compound screening and identification.

    PubMed

    Staeb, J A; Epema, O J; van Duijn, P; Steevens, J; Klap, V A; Freriks, I L

    2002-10-18

    This paper describes a database containing massspectra from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC-MS) measurements as a tool for easy screening for multiple compounds. In this way additional compounds can be reported from the same run together with routine pesticide monitoring with little effort. The relevant analytical data from the GC-MS measurements are transferred automatically to a database. Search algorithms in the database, containing the US EPA and Dutch NEN GC-MS identification criteria as standard settings, are used to identify compounds in the data. Screening of samples analysed in our laboratory show the ubiquitous presence of--up until now in monitoring largely overlooked--compounds in surface waters in The Netherlands. Most frequently found compounds include TAED (complexing agent), 2-methyl quinoline (industrial solvent), atrazin and desethylatrazin (pesticide and degradation product), caffeine (human consumption), surfinol-104 (anti foaming agent), HHCB (Galaxolide) and AHTN (Tonalide; fragrances). The database can also be used to quickly search a large number of datafiles for rare contaminants. This way, some interesting compounds such as pentoxifilin (a pharmaceutical) and Irgarol 1051 (an antifouling compound) were found. PMID:12458939

  13. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ulva fasciata (Green Seaweed) Extract and Evaluation of Its Cytoprotective and Antigenotoxic Effects.

    PubMed

    Rodeiro, Idania; Olguín, Sitlali; Santes, Rebeca; Herrera, José A; Pérez, Carlos L; Mangas, Raisa; Hernández, Yasnay; Fernández, Gisselle; Hernández, Ivones; Hernández-Ojeda, Sandra; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Valencia-Olvera, Ana; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological properties of Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract were examined. Five components were identified in one fraction prepared from the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and palmitic acid and its ethyl ester accounted for 76% of the total identified components. Furthermore, we assessed the extract's antioxidant properties by using the DPPH, ABTS, and lipid peroxidation assays and found that the extract had a moderate scavenging effect. In an experiment involving preexposition and coexposition of the extract (1-500 µg/mL) and benzo[a]pyrene (BP), the extract was found to be nontoxic to C9 cells in culture and to inhibit the cytotoxicity induced by BP. As BP is biotransformed by CYP1A and CYP2B subfamilies, we explored the possible interaction of the extract with these enzymes. The extract (25-50 µg/mL) inhibited CYP1A1 activity in rat liver microsomes. Analysis of the inhibition kinetics revealed a mixed-type inhibitory effect on CYP1A1 supersome. The effects of the extract on BP-induced DNA damage and hepatic CYP activity in mice were also investigated. Micronuclei induction by BP and liver CYP1A1/2 activities significantly decreased in animals treated with the extract. The results suggest that Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract inhibits BP bioactivation and it may be a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:26612994

  14. Simultaneous enantioselective determination of amphetamine and congeners in hair specimens by negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martins, Liliane; Yegles, Michel; Chung, Heesun; Wennig, Robert

    2005-10-15

    Enantioselective quantification of amphetamine (AM), methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) enantiomers in hair using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. Hair specimens were digested with 1M sodium hydroxide at 100 degrees C for 30 min and extracted by a solid phase procedure using Cleanscreen ZSDAU020. Extracted analytes were derivatised with (S)-heptafluorobutyrylprolyl chloride and the resulting diastereoisomers were quantified by GC-MS operating in the negative chemical ionization mode. Extraction yields were between 73.0 and 97.9%. Limits of detection varied in the range of 2.1-45.9 pg/mg hair, whereas the lowest limits of quantification varied between 4.3 and 91.8 pg/mg hair. Intra- and inter-assay precision and respective accuracy were acceptable. The enantiomeric ratios (R versus S) of AM, MA, MDA, MDMA and MDEA were determined in hair from suspected amphetamine abusers. Only MA and AM enantiomers were detectable in this collective and the quantification data showed in most cases higher concentrations of (R)-MA and (R)-AM than those of the corresponding (S)-enantiomers. PMID:16154523

  15. Evaluation of a sunscreen photoprotective effect by ascorbic acid assessment in human dermis using microdialysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Nathalie; Mac-Mary, Sophie; Muret, Patrice; Makki, Safwat; Aubin, Francois; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Heusèle, Catherine; S, Schnebert; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation causes adverse effects like sunburn, photosensitivity reactions or immunologic suppression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the photo-protective outcome of a sunscreen cream (SPF8) by the determination of erythema indexes and the assessment of ascorbic acid and its metabolites in human dermis. These substances were used as markers of oxidative effect. Eight healthy female subjects were enrolled in this study. Two abdominal areas were exposed to solar simulated irradiation with three minimal erythema dose, one with SPF8 application and the other site without SPF8 application. Two other areas were used as control, one without SPF8 application and the other site after SPF8 application. Ascorbic acid and its metabolites (dehydroascorbic acid, threonic acid, oxalic acid and xylose) were collected from human dermis by microdialysis and assessed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Irradiated site without sunscreen application had significantly demonstrated lower dermis ascorbic acid concentrations and a higher erythema index than the three other sites (P < 0.05). Threonic acid, oxalic acid and xylose dermis concentrations were significantly higher in site III than in the control site I (P < 0.05). The protected-irradiated site did not show erythema formation and there was stability of ascorbic acid dermis concentrations with non-variation in its metabolites. The assessment of ascorbic acid and its metabolites in human dermis could be an efficient tool to demonstrate the oxidative process and consequently to control the efficiency of sunscreen creams against undesirable UV effects. PMID:15740589

  16. Implementation of an Environmental Focus in an Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum by the Addition of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atterholt, Cynthia; Butcher, David J.; Bacon, J. Roger; Kwochka, William R.; Woosley, Royce

    2000-12-01

    The Department Chemistry and Physics at Western Carolina University has added an environmental focus to its curriculum, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was identified as an essential tool in environmental analysis. GC-MS is used in undergraduate chemistry courses in: (i) the identification of synthesized compounds and natural products, (ii) monitoring compounds and their degradation in the environment, and (iii) analytical method development. In Organic Chemistry, the GC-MS is used to characterize natural products and the products of an environmentally benign chemical synthesis. In Environmental Chemistry, the GC-MS is used to identify compounds of environmental interest, such as pesticides in soil samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water, and hydrocarbons in gasoline samples. In Instrumental Analysis I, students characterize numerous compounds in cigarette smoke using GC-MS. In Instrumental Analysis II, students are presented with an analytical chemistry problem for which they research protocols, collect samples, and perform the analyses. The GC-MS has been used to identify volatile compounds in a number of complex mixtures. Also, research in chemistry is a significant part of our curriculum, and numerous undergraduate students have used the GC-MS in their research. The addition of GC-MS has enhanced many of our undergraduate laboratory courses and student-led research projects.

  17. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Raman imaging measurement of squalene content and distribution in human hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Chen, Guoqiang; Ji, Chengdong; Hoptroff, Michael; Jones, Andrew; Collins, Luisa Z; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the measurement of the squalene content from root to tip, in both Chinese black virgin and bleached hair. Deuterated squalene was used as the internal standard. For quantification, selective ion monitoring (SIM) at m/z 410.0 and 347.0 were monitored for squalene and deuterated squalene, respectively. Different methods for the extraction of squalene from ex vivo human hair were compared including organic solvent extraction and acid/alkali hydrolysis. The best extraction efficiency was obtained by using a mixed solvent consisting of chloroform:methanol = 2:1 (v:v). The linear range of squalene ran from 1.0 to 50.0 μg mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.10 μg mL(-1) (corresponding to 0.005 mg g(-1) in human hair), which enabled quantification of squalene in human hair at very low level. The recovery of squalene was 96.4 ± 1.46% (n = 3). Using the above-mentioned mixed solvent extraction, squalene content in human hair was successfully quantified from root to tip. Meanwhile, a Raman imaging method was developed to visualize the squalene distribution in Chinese white virgin hair from cuticle to medulla. PMID:26825344

  18. Monitoring human exposure to ethylene oxide by the determination of hemoglobin adducts using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, P.B.; Bailey, E.; Gorf, S.M.; Toernqvist, M.O.; Osterman-Golkar, S.; Kautiainen, A.; Lewis-Enright, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Globin samples from ethylene oxide-exposed workers and non-exposed referrents were analyzed by two methods: (i) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of Nt-(2-hydroxyethyl)histidine as its methyl ester heptafluorobutyryl derivative, after hydrolysis of the protein and isolation of the alkylated amino acid by ion exchange chromatography. The internal standard, Nt-(2-hydroxy-d4-ethyl)histidine, was added to the protein before hydrolysis. (ii) Determination of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine after derivatization of the protein by a modified Edman procedure, extraction and g.c.-m.s. determination of alkylated N-terminal valine in the form of its pentafluorophenylthiohydantoin derivative. The internal standard used was in this case a globin with a known content of hydroxy-d4-ethylated amino acids. The two methods gave consistent results, especially at high levels of alkylated products. The average content of hydroxyethylhistidine was 0.6 nmol/g higher than the content of hydroxyethylvaline. Higher levels of background alkylation (of unknown origin) were recorded with the histidine method as compared with the valine method, suggesting that the latter assay should show greater sensitivity for low level ethylene oxide exposure monitoring.

  19. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Constituent Oil from Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (Agaricomycetes), from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ohiri, Reginald Chibueze; Bassey, Essien Eka

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of constituent oil from dried Ganoderma lucidum was carried out. Fresh G. lucidum obtained from its natural environment was thoroughly washed with distilled water and air-dried for 2 weeks and the component oils were extracted and analyzed. Four predominant components identified were pentadecanoic acid, 14-methyl-ester (retention time [RT] = 19.752 minutes; percentage total = 25.489), 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (Z,Z)- (RT = 21.629 minutes and 21.663 minutes; percentage total = 25.054), n-hexadecanoic acid (RT = 20.153 minutes; percentage total = 24.275), and 9-octadecenoic acid (Z)-, methyl ester (RT = 21.297 minutes; percentage total = 13.027). The two minor oils identified were 9,12-octadecadienoic acid, methyl ester, (E,E)- and octadecanoic acid, methyl ester (RT = 21.246 minutes and 21.503 minutes; percentage total = 7.057 and 5.097, respectively). PMID:27481303

  20. Determination of volatile compounds in four commercial samples of Japanese green algae using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Baldermann, Susanne; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings. PMID:24592162

  1. Rapid determination of polysaccharides in BianTi Soft Extract by spectrophotometry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minxia; Shen, Jie; Yang, Kai; Qian, Songxiang; Feng, Sujuan

    2010-04-01

    A simple approach for the rapid determination of polysaccharides in BianTi Soft Extract using spectrophotometry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. The mixed standard solution composed of D-glucose, D-mannose, galactose and D-xylose in different proportions (1.00: 1.01: 0.12: 0.05) was prepared according to the monosaccharide composition analysis of the polysaccharides by GC-MS. The determination of polysaccharides by UV-Vis spectrophotometer was performed after 35-min color reaction, in which 1 ml 5% phenol and 4 ml sulfate was used. The assay of the method validation has shown that the method was stable, reliable and feasible. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied in the preparation procedure of BianTi Soft Extract, selecting out optimal decoction conditions and suitable decoction container. It suggests that the convenient method could be useful for the quality control of BianTi Soft Extract. Meanwhile, it may be an alternative for polysaccharides determination of other formulations. PMID:20668575

  2. New pilot for validation of automated analyses of organics by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS): application to space researches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Robert; Buch, Arnaud; Chazalnoel, Pascale; Geffroy, Claude; David, Marc

    The search for complex organic molecules in extraterrestrial environments, including important biomolecules such as amino acids and carboxylic acids, will require after an extraction a derivatization step to transform these organic compounds into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Current and future space missions, such as Mars Science Laboratory (MSL 2011, will include such derivatization method and thus a dedicated laboratory pilot is needed to validate protocols before launch of the probes. A new in situ generic Derivatization-Pyrolysis Unit (DPU) is presented. Derivatization is carried out in a 4 mL reactor placed on a GCMS injector for automated derivatization as well as for pre- and post treatment of the sample. The DPU unit is evaluated in terms of its technical features. The performances are illustrated with applications including conventional and in situ derivatization for using terrestrial Mars analog materials enriched by a 5 nmol amino acids solution. The DPU allows the analysis of a wide range of molecules to be detected and can be adapted to samples from any solid spatial object such as Mars, asteroids and comets. This pilot is a good basis for the validation of future generations of instruments, such as the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) of the Exomars 2018 mission, dedicated to the search for organics in spatial environments.

  3. Effect of piperine on pharmacokinetics of sodium valproate in plasma samples of rats using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Bushra; Pillai, K. K.; Tamboli, E. T.; Ahmad, Sayeed

    2015-01-01

    Piperine (PIP) is used as anticonvulsant in traditional Chinese medicine. Co-administration of low-dose sodium valproate with PIP has been regarded to have potential anticonvulsant activity. Aim: This study was intended to investigate the effect of PIP on the pharmacokinetics of sodium valproate (SVP) in the plasma samples of rats using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Materials and Methods: The plasma samples obtained after oral administration of SVP, 150 mg/kg and SVP, 150 mg/kg + PIP, and 5 mg/kg to male Wistar rats were used to quantify the concentrations in plasma using GC-MS method. Results: A simple and accurate method developed in-house was applied for the analysis of plasma samples of Wistar rats after oral administration of SVP and PIP + sodium valproate, respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters reported 14.8-fold increase in plasma concentration (maximum observed concentration in the concentration-time profile), 4.6-fold increase in area under the curve and slightly prolonged time to reach that concentration (1 h) of SVP in presence of PIP. Conclusion: The study reaffirms the bioenhancing effect of PIP suggesting possibility of dose reduction of SVP while co-adminstering with PIP. PMID:26681892

  4. Development and Applications of Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Emergency Responders, the Military, and Law-Enforcement Organizations.

    PubMed

    Leary, Pauline E; Dobson, Gareth S; Reffner, John A

    2016-05-01

    Portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) systems are being deployed for field use, and are designed with this goal in mind. Performance characteristics of instruments that are successful in the field are different from those of equivalent technologies that are successful in a laboratory setting. These field-portable systems are extending the capabilities of the field user, providing investigative leads and confirmatory identifications in real time. Many different types of users benefit from the availability of this technology including emergency responders, the military, and law-enforcement organizations. This manuscript describes performance characteristics that are important for field-portable instruments, especially field-portable GC-MS systems, and demonstrates the value of this equipment to the disciplines of explosives investigations, fire investigations, and counterfeit-drug detection. This paper describes the current state of portable GC-MS technology, including a review of the development of portable GC-MS, as well as a demonstration of the value of this capability using different examples. PMID:27006020

  5. Rapid determination of nineteen chlorophenols in wood, paper, cardboard, fruits, and fruit juices by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diserens, J M

    2001-01-01

    Although the use of pentachlorophenol (PCP) is prohibited in most countries, it is still widely found in the wood of pallets, containers, crates and in cardboard, paper, etc. Such material may contain not only PCP but other chlorophenols as well. Wooden crates and cardboard boxes are often used to store and transport fresh fruits. Consequently, chlorophenols present in the wood may contaminate the stored fruits by migration. To ascertain that packaging, storage material, and fruit raw materials are free from chlorophenol residues, we developed a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of 19 chlorophenols by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The test portions are directly extracted and acetylated in a solution of sodium carbonate in the presence of acetic anhydride and hexane. The hexane layer is analyzed, without further purification, by GC/MS in the selective-ion monitoring mode. The method allows the analysis of >40 samples/day with detection limits of <20 microg/kg for chlorophenols in wood, cardboard, and paper, and <2 microg/kg for chlorophenols in fruits. Typical recoveries of all chlorophenols were 94% from paper, 115% from cardboard, 51% from wood (depending on the size of the chips or shavings), and 93% from fruit puree. PMID:11417649

  6. Metabolite profiling of sucrose effect on the metabolism of Melissa officinalis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooah; Shin, Min Hye; Hossain, Md Aktar; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Hojoung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2011-04-01

    The effect of sugar on plant metabolism, which is known to be similar to hormone-like signaling, was metabolomically studied using Melissa officinalis (lemon balm). The metabolite profiles of M. officinalis treated with sucrose were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). A total of 64 metabolites from various chemical classes including alcohols, amines, amino acids, fatty acids, inorganic acids, organic acids, phosphates, and sugars were identified by GC-MS. Three groups treated with different sucrose concentrations were clearly separated by PCA of their metabolite profiles, indicating changes in the levels of many metabolites depending on the sucrose concentration. Metabolite profiling revealed that treatment with a higher sucrose level caused an increase in the levels of metabolites such as sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar phosphates, which are related to the glycolytic pathway of M. officinalis. Furthermore, proline and succinic acid, which are associated with the proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway, the shikimic acid pathway, and the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, also increased with increasing sucrose concentration. Therefore, these metabolic changes induced by sucrose ultimately led to the increased production of flavonoids such as caffeic acid via the biosynthetic pathway of phenylpropanoids. This study demonstrated that the abundance changes in some primary and secondary metabolites were somewhat interlocked with each other in response to sucrose. PMID:21301821

  7. Evaluation of volatile compounds in different types of ghee using direct injection with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wadodkar, Uday R; Punjrath, Jagjit S; Shah, Amrish C

    2002-02-01

    Desi ghee (DG) was prepared from fermented cream followed by heat clarification (desi method) in the laboratory and butter oil (BO) was prepared from fresh butter by melting and centrifugation. Fresh samples of three brands of industrial ghee (IG-1, IG-2, IG-3) were collected from the local market. Volatile compounds of desi and industrial ghee and butter oil were isolated and concentrated using direct injection and cryofocussing techniques; separation and identification was by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS). A maximum of 36 compounds were detected in desi ghee whereas compounds detected in three industrial ghee samples varied from 22-29. The lowest number of compounds (16) was detected in butter oil. Of the identified compounds, maltol, 5-hydroxymethyl furfuraldehyde, dihydrodihydroxypyranone, 1,3-butanediol and 1-octanol were identified only in desi ghee volatiles. The concentration of acetic acid was found to be remarkably higher in desi ghee volatiles than in industrial ghee. Also the levels of identified fatty acids, methyl ketones, aldehydes, lactones and alcohols were high in desi ghee volatiles compared with industrial ghee and butter oil. In total, 62 compounds were detected, which included 6 aldehydes, 12 ketones, 8 each of fatty acids, alcohols and lactones, 4 each of esters and hydrocarbons or other compounds, and 12 compounds remained unidentified. PMID:12047107

  8. Detection of phthalate esters in seawater by stir bar sorptive extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Si, Qingqing; Li, Fengmin; Gao, Chenchen; Wang, Cong; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Jian

    2016-07-15

    We developed the stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method to detect 15 kinds of PAEs in seawater. The stir bars (20mm in length and 1mm in film thickness) coated with 150μL of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were found to demonstrate the optimal extraction of PAEs. The optimal conditions were as follows: extraction time of 2h, extraction temperature of 25°C, sodium chloride of 5%, methanol of 10%, analytical time of 50min, and methanol-acetonitrile (4:1) as the solvent. SBSE-GC-MS revealed that under the set temperature, the chromatographic peaks of all 15 PAEs can appear with complete separation. The detection limit ranged from 0.07μg/L to 5.71μg/L, whereas the limit of quantification ranged from 0.023μg/L to 193μg/L, and the correlation coefficients between the chromatographic peak area and concentration of the PAEs were greater than 0.92. PMID:27157609

  9. Rapid Determination of Clenbuterol in Pork by Direct Immersion Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Diru; Wu, Susu; Xu, Jianqiao; Jiang, Ruifen; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-02-01

    Direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for rapid analysis of clenbuterol in pork for the first time. In this work, a low-cost homemade 44 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fiber was employed to extract clenbuterol in pork. After extraction, derivatization was performed by suspending the fiber in the headspace of the 2 mL sample vial saturated with a vapor of 100 µL hexamethyldisilazane. Lastly, the fiber was directly introduced to GC-MS for analysis. All parameters that influenced absorption (extraction time), derivatization (derivatization reagent, time and temperature) and desorption (desorption time) were optimized. Under optimized conditions, the method offered a wide linear range (10-1000 ng g(-1)) and a low detection limit (3.6 ng g(-1)). Finally, the method was successfully applied in the analysis of pork from the market, and recoveries of the method for spiked pork were 97.4-105.7%. Compared with the traditional solvent extraction method, the proposed method was much cheaper and fast. PMID:26306572

  10. Quantitative ester analysis in cachaca and distilled spirits by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Eduardo S P; Cardoso, Daniel R; Franco, Douglas W

    2008-07-23

    An analytical procedure for the separation and quantification of ethyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl lactate, ethyl octanoate, ethyl nonanoate, ethyl decanoate, isoamyl octanoate, and ethyl laurate in cachaca, rum, and whisky by direct injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed. The analytical method is simple, selective, and appropriated for the determination of esters in distilled spirits. The limit of detection ranged from 29 (ethyl hexanoate) to 530 (ethyl acetate) microg L(-1), whereas the standard deviation for repeatability was between 0.774% (ethyl hexanoate) and 5.05% (isoamyl octanoate). Relative standard deviation values for accuracy vary from 90.3 to 98.5% for ethyl butyrate and ethyl acetate, respectively. Ethyl acetate was shown to be the major ester in cachaca (median content of 22.6 mg 100 mL(-1) anhydrous alcohol), followed by ethyl lactate (median content of 8.32 mg 100 mL(-1) anhydrous alcohol). Cachaca produced in copper and hybrid alembic present a higher content of ethyl acetate and ethyl lactate than those produced in a stainless-steel column, whereas cachaca produced by distillation in a stainless-steel column present a higher content of ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate, and ethyl laurate. As expected, ethyl acetate is the major ester in whiskey and rum, followed by ethyl lactate for samples of rum. Nevertheless, whiskey samples exhibit ethyl lactate at contents lower or at the same order of magnitude of the fatty esters. PMID:18570431

  11. Analysis of ammonium nitrate headspace by on-fiber solid phase microextraction derivatization with gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Adam L; Andrews, Benjamin; Hammond, Mark; Collins, Greg E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2016-01-15

    A novel analytical method has been developed for the quantitation of trace levels of ammonia in the headspace of ammonium nitrate (AN) using derivatized solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Ammonia is difficult to detect via direct injection into a GC-MS because of its low molecular weight and extreme polarity. To circumvent this issue, ammonia was derivatized directly onto a SPME fiber by the reaction of butyl chloroformate coated fibers with the ammonia to form butyl carbamate. A derivatized externally sampled internal standard (dESIS) method based upon the reactivity of diethylamine with unreacted butyl chloroformate on the SPME fiber to form butyl diethylcarbamate was established for the reproducible quantification of ammonia concentration. Both of these compounds are easily detectable and separable via GC-MS. The optimized method was then used to quantitate the vapor concentration of ammonia in the headspace of two commonly used improvised explosive device (IED) materials, ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate aluminum powder (Ammonal), as well as identify the presence of additional fuel components within the headspace. PMID:26718189

  12. Characterization of organic fouling in reverse osmosis membranes by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Gómez, V; Pocurull, E; Borrull, F

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption of organic substances on reverse osmosis (RO) membrane surfaces may form an organic film on the membrane, known as organic fouling, and cause flow-rate loss. This problem is mostly unavoidable as no pretreatment method exists for perfect removal of possible foulants, including organic compounds resulting from undesirable bioactivity. Understanding the characteristics of fouling layers is an essential step towards overall improvement of RO membrane operations. In this study, the organic fouling in RO membranes treating the effluent of a secondary treatment from an urban wastewater treatment plant was characterized. Headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been used for the first time, to provide valuable information of organic fouling. Different polarity SPME fibers were tested for this purpose. In addition, the characterization of the organic fouling obtained by HS-SPME was compared with the results obtained by extraction using several organic solvents. The results indicated that more compound families can be identified by HS-SPME than by organic solvent extraction. Moreover, complementary organic analyses were done for better understanding of the organic fouling in RO membranes, such as total organic carbon and loss on ignition. PMID:25607678

  13. Simultaneous determination of cannabidiol, cannabinol, and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Suh, Sung Ill; In, Moon Kyo; Paeng, Ki-Jung; Chung, Bong Chul

    2005-09-01

    An analytical method was developed for evaluating the cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) level in human hair using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Hair samples (50 mg) were washed with isopropyl alcohol and cut into small fragments (< 1 mm). After adding a deuterated internal standard, the hair samples were incubated in 1.0 M NaOH for 10 min at 95 degrees C. The analytes from the resulting hydrolyzed samples were extracted using a mixture of n-hexane-ethyl acetate (75:25, v/v). The extracts were then evaporated, derivatized, and injected into the GC-MS. The recovery ranges of CBD, CBN, and delta9-THC at three concentration levels were 37.9-94.5% with good correlation coefficients (r2 >0.9989). The intra-day precision and accuracy ranged from -9.4% to 17.7%, and the inter-day precision and accuracy ranged from -15.5% to 14.5%, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) for CBD, CBN, and delta9-THC were 0.005, 0.002, and 0.006 ng/mg, respectively. The applicability of this method of analyzing the hair samples from cannabis abusers was demonstrated. PMID:16212242

  14. Coupled two-step microextraction devices with derivatizations to identify hydroxycarbonyls in rain samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2006-06-23

    Coupling a two-step liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine/bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (PFBHA)/(BSTFA) derivatization was developed to detect hydroxycarbonyls in rainwater samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). LPME provides a fast and inexpensive pre-concentration, and miniaturized extraction to analyze the target compounds rainwater samples. Derivatization techniques offer a clear method to identify target compounds. The hydroxycarbonyls were determined using two-step derivatizations. Dynamic-LPME was applied in the first derivatization, and head-space single drop derivatization was employed in the second reaction. The LODs varied from 0.023 to 4.75 microg/l. The calibration curves were linear for at least two orders of magnitude with R2>or=0.994. The precision was within 6.5-12%, and the relative recoveries in rainwater were more than 89% (the amount added ranged from 0.3 to 15 microg/l). A field sample was found to contain 2.54 microg/l of hydroxyacetone and 0.110 microg/l of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone. Hydroxyacetone was also detected in one of the tested samples at a concentration of 2.39 microg/l. PMID:16643930

  15. Analysis for chloroanisoles and chlorophenols in cork by stir bar sorptive extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Callejon, R M; Troncoso, A M; Morales, M L

    2007-03-30

    A complete methodology for the determination of chloroanisoles and chlorophenols in cork material is proposed. The determination is accomplished by means of a previous liquid-solid extraction followed by stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Two different liquid-solid extraction experiments were conducted and eight compounds considered (2,6-dichloroanisole, 2,4-dichloroanisole, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, pentachloroanisole and pentachlorophenol). From the results obtained we can conclude that high volume extraction extending extraction time up to 24h is the best choice if we have to release compounds from the inner surfaces of cork stoppers. Recovery percentages ranged from 51% for pentachloroanisole to 81% for 2,4-dichloroanisole. This method allows the determination of an array of compounds involved in cork taint at very low levels from 1.2ng g(-1) for 2,4,6-tricholoroanisole to 23.03ng g(-1) for 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol. PMID:19071569

  16. Static headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids in canned vegetables.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes

    2016-07-01

    Canned vegetables appear to be a possible exposure pathway for hazardous disinfection by-products due to the use of sanitizers and treated water by the canning industry in the preparation of these foods. This work reports on two static headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for the simultaneous determination of 10 trihalomethanes (THMs) and 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs) in both solid and liquid phases of the canned vegetables. Both methods carry out the whole process (including the leaching of target analytes from the vegetable), derivatization of HAAs and volatilization of THMs and HAA esters, in a single step within a static headspace unit. The methods proposed provide an efficient and simple tool for the determination of regulated disinfection by-products in canned vegetables. Average limits of detection for THMs and HAAs were 0.19 and 0.45μg/kg, respectively, in the solid phase of canned vegetables, and 0.05 and 0.09μg/L, respectively, in the liquid phase. Satisfactory recoveries (90-99%) and precision, calculated as relative standard deviations (RSD≤10%), were obtained in both phases of canned vegetables. The methods proposed were applied for the analysis of frequently-used canned vegetables and confirmed the presence of up to 3 THMs and 5 HAAs at microgram per kilogram or liter levels in both phases of the samples. PMID:27268517

  17. Determination of organoarsenicals in the environment by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Szostek, B.; Aldstadt, J. H.; Environmental Research

    1998-05-22

    The development of a method for the analysis of organoarsenic compounds that combines dithiol derivatization with solid-phase microextraction (SPME) sample preparation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. Optimization focused on a SPME-GC-MS procedure for determination of 2-chlorovinylarsonous acid (CVAA), the primary decomposition product of the chemical warfare agent known as Lewisite. Two other organoarsenic compounds of environmental interest, dimethylarsinic acid and phenylarsonic acid, were also studied. A series of dithiol compounds was examined for derivatization of the arsenicals, and the best results were obtained either with 1,3-propanedithiol or 1,2-ethanedithiol. The derivatization procedure, fiber type, and extraction time were optimized. For CVAA, calibration curves were linear over three orders of magnitude and limits-of-detection were <6x10{sup -9} M in solution, the latter a more than 400x improvement compared to conventional solvent extraction GC-MS methods. A precision of <10% R.S.D. was typical for the SPME-GC-MS procedure. The method was applied to a series of water samples and soil/sediment extracts, as well as to aged soil samples that had been contaminated with Lewisite.

  18. Pilot for Validation of Online Pretreatments for Analyses of Organics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: Application to Space Research.

    PubMed

    David, M; Musadji, N-Y; Labanowski, J; Sternberg, R; Geffroy-Rodier, C

    2016-05-17

    The search for complex organic molecules in extraterrestrial environments, including important biomolecules such as amino and fatty acids, will require a space compatible sample handling system to enable their detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For the future Mars exploratory mission Exomars 2018 aimed at organic molecules detection, a dedicated laboratory pilot, called Device for Pretreatment of Sample (DPS), reproducing representative space operating conditions has been developed. After its optimization, it aimed at validating under development protocols and interpreting forthcoming in situ resulting data. The DPS, dedicated to organic compounds' analysis, is discussed in terms of its technical features. The derivatization is carried out on a 50-100 mg mineral sample in a 4 mL reactor coupled with a GC-MS injector to simulate on line in situ derivatization-volatilization-transfer steps. Three derivatization reactions have been carried out with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) as silylating reagent, N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal (DMF-DMA) and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) as methylating agents. The performances are illustrated by comparison of conventional and in situ silylation, developed for space research applications, using terrestrial mineral matrix and Mars analog materials enriched with 25 nmol of each targeted organic molecule. The work presented in this rationale has established that the use of derivatization reactions widens the scope of targeted molecules but also clearly points out mineral matrix effect. Decreasing mineral influence on pretreatment will be the next scientific challenge in in situ analysis. PMID:27108566

  19. Novel ethyl-derivatization approach for the determination of fluoride by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pagliano, Enea; Meija, Juris; Ding, Jianfu; Sturgeon, Ralph E; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Mester, Zoltán

    2013-01-15

    We report a novel derivatization chemistry for determination of fluoride based on the batch reaction of fluoride ions with triethyloxonium tetrachloroferrate(III) in a closed vessel to yield fluoroethane. Gaseous fluoroethane was readily separated from the matrix, sampled from the headspace, and determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method was validated using rainwater certified reference material (IRMM CA408) and subsequently applied to the determination of fluoride in various matrixes, including tap water, seawater, and urine. An instrumental limit of detection of 3.2 μg/L with a linear range up to 50 mg/L was achieved. The proposed derivatization is a one-step reaction, requires no organic solvents, and is safe, as the derivatizing agent is nonvolatile. Determination of fluoride is affected by common fluoride-complexing agents, such as Al(III) and Fe(III). The effect of large amounts of these interferences was studied, and the adverse effect of these ions was eliminated by use of the method of standard additions. PMID:23215254

  20. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Based Study on Urine Metabolomics in Rats Chronically Poisoned with Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingjie; Zhang, Meiling; Sun, Fa; Ma, Jianshe; Hu, Lufeng; Yang, Xuezhi; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GS-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to explore the metabolic variability in urine of chronically hydrogen sulfide- (H2S-) poisoned rats relative to control ones. The changes in endogenous metabolites were studied by partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) and independent-samples t-test. The metabolic patterns of H2S-poisoned group are separated from the control, suggesting that the metabolic profiles of H2S-poisoned rats were markedly different from the controls. Moreover, compared to the control group, the level of alanine, d-ribose, tetradecanoic acid, L-aspartic acid, pentanedioic acid, cholesterol, acetate, and oleic acid in rat urine of the poisoning group decreased, while the level of glycine, d-mannose, arabinofuranose, and propanoic acid increased. These metabolites are related to amino acid metabolism as well as energy and lipid metabolism in vivo. Studying metabolomics using GC-MS allows for a comprehensive overview of the metabolism of the living body. This technique can be employed to decipher the mechanism of chronic H2S poisoning, thus promoting the use of metabolomics in clinical toxicology. PMID:25954748

  1. Rapid Determination of Dichlofluanid Residues in Vegetables Using Dispersive-SPE Sample Preparation Combined with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue; Cao, Shurui; Li, Xianliang; Xi, Cunxian; Ding, Xiaowen; Xu, Fen; Hu, Jiangtao; Chen, Zhiqiong

    2016-05-01

    A method for rapid determination of dichlofluanid residue in vegetables using dispersive solid-phase extraction (dispersive-SPE) sample preparation combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. Samples were extracted with actone-ethyl acetate (1:1, V/V), and then detected by GC-MS with an external standard method after being purified by optimized primary secondary amine, graphitized carbon black and anhydrous magnesium sulphate (MgSO4). It turned out that dichlofluanid showed a good linearity (y= 2.7E+ 5x- 2710.5) over the range of 0.02-2.00 mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The limit of detection was 0.13 μg/kg (S/N = 3) and the limit of quantification was 0.43 µg/kg (S/N = 10). The recoveries of the dichlofluanid were in the range of 73.3-106.7, 83.3-116.7 and 83.3∼106.7% with the spiked levels of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg, and the relative standard deviations were in the range of 4.1-22.3%. Compared with the reported literature, the method is more simple, rapid, sensitive, reliable and can be applied to many vegetables. PMID:26921896

  2. Determination of dimethyl trisulfide in rabbit blood using stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manandhar, Erica; Maslamani, Nujud; Petrikovics, Ilona; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2016-08-26

    Cyanide poisoning by accidental or intentional exposure poses a severe health risk. The current Food and Drug Administration approved antidotes for cyanide poisoning can be effective, but each suffers from specific major limitations concerning large effective dosage, delayed onset of action, or dependence on enzymes generally confined to specific organs. Dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), a sulfur donor that detoxifies cyanide by converting it into thiocyanate (a relatively nontoxic cyanide metabolite), is a promising next generation cyanide antidote. Although a validated analytical method to analyze DMTS from any matrix is not currently available, one will be vital for the approval of DMTS as a therapeutic agent against cyanide poisoning. Hence, a stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the analysis of DMTS from rabbit whole blood. Following acid denaturation of blood, DMTS was extracted into a polydimethylsiloxane-coated stir bar. The DMTS was then thermally desorbed from the stir bar and analyzed by GC-MS. The limit of detection of DMTS using this method was 0.06μM with dynamic range from 0.5-100μM. For quality control standards, the precision, as measured by percent relative standard deviation, was below 10%, and the accuracy was within 15% of the nominal concentration. The method described here will allow further investigations of DMTS as a promising antidote for cyanide poisoning. PMID:27477518

  3. Development of Sensitive and Specific Analysis of Vildagliptin in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Uçaktürk, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and fully validated for the determination of vildagliptin (VIL) in pharmaceutical formulation. Prior to GC-MS analysis, VIL was efficiently derivatized with MSTFA/NH4I/β-mercaptoethanol at 60°C for 30 min. The obtained O-TMS derivative of VIL was detected by selected ion monitoring mode using the diagnostic ions m/z 223 and 252. Nandrolone was chosen as internal standard. The GC-MS method was fully validated by the following validation parameters: limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, stability, robustness, and ruggedness. LOD and LOQ were found to be 1.5 and 3.5 ng mL−1, respectively. The GC-MS method is linear in the range of 3.5–300 ng mL−1. The intra- and interday precision values were less than ≤3.62%. The intra- and interday accuracy values were found in the range of −0.26–2.06%. Finally, the GC-MS method was successfully applied to determine VIL in pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:26682085

  4. Mass spectral studies on vinylic degradation products of sulfur mustards under gas chromatography/mass spectrometry conditions.

    PubMed

    Sai Sachin, L; Karthikraj, R; Kalyan Kumar, K; Sony, T; Prasada Raju, N; Prabhakar, S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustards are a class of vesicant chemical warfare agents that rapidly degrade in environmental samples. The most feasible degradation products of sulfur mustards are chloroethyl vinylic compounds and divinylic compounds, which are formed by the elimination of one and two HCl molecules from sulfur mustards, respectively. The detection and characterization of these degradation products in environmental samples are an important proof for the verification of sulfur mustard usage. In this study, we synthesized a set of sulfur mustard degradation products, i.e., divinylic compounds (1-7) and chloroethyl vinylic compounds (8-14), and characterized using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) under electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) (methane) conditions. The EI mass spectra of the studied compounds mainly included the fragment ions that resulted from homolytic cleavages with or without hydrogen migrations. The divinylic compounds (1-7) showed [M-SH](+) ions, whereas the chloroethylvinyl compounds (8-14) showed [M-Cl](+) and [M-CH2CH2Cl](+) ions. Methane/CI mass spectra showed [M+H](+) ions and provided molecular weight information. The GC retention index (RI) values were also calculated for the studied compounds. The EI and CI mass spectral data together with RI values are extremely useful for off-site analysis for the verification of the chemical weapons convention and also to participate in official Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons proficiency tests. PMID:26764309

  5. Comparison of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and immunoassay techniques on concentrations of atrazine in storm runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydy, M.J.; Carter, D.S.; Crawford, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were used to measure concentrations of dissolved atrazine in 149 surface-water samples. Samples were collected during May 1992-September 1993 near the mouth of the White River (Indiana) and in two small tributaries of the river. GC/MS was performed on a Hewlett- Packard 5971A with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring of filtered water samples extracted by C-18 solid phase extraction: ELISA was performed with a magnetic-particle-based assay with photometric analysis. ELISA results compared reasonably well to GC/MS measurements at concentrations below the Maximum Contaminant Level for drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (3.0 ??g/L), but a systematic negative bias was observed at higher concentrations. When higher concentration samples were diluted into the linear range of calibration, the relation improved. A slight positive bias was seen in all of the ELISA data compared to the GC/MS results, and the bias could be partially explained by correcting the ELISA data for cross reactivity with other triazine herbicides. The highest concentrations of atrazine were found during the first major runoff event after the atrazine was applied. Concentrations decreased throughout the rest of the sampling period even though large runoff events occurred during this time, indicating that most atrazine loading to surface waters in the study area occurs within a few weeks after application.

  6. Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomic Approach for Optimization and Toxicity Evaluation of Earthworm Sub-Lethal Responses to Carbofuran

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Prem Narain

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding mechanism of toxicity, the development of biomarkers (biochemicals that vary significantly with exposure to chemicals) for pesticides and environmental contaminants exposure is still a challenging task. Carbofuran is one of the most commonly used pesticides in agriculture and said to be most toxic carbamate pesticide. It is necessary to identify the biochemicals that can vary significantly after carbofuran exposure on earthworms which will help to assess the soil ecotoxicity. Initially, we have optimized the extraction conditions which are suitable for high-throughput gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics for the tissue of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma. Upon evaluation of five different extraction solvent systems, 80% methanol was found to have good extraction efficiency based on the yields of metabolites, multivariate analysis, total number of peaks and reproducibility of metabolites. Later the toxicity evaluation was performed to characterize the tissue specific metabolomic perturbation of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma after exposure to carbofuran at three different concentration levels (0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg of soil). Seventeen metabolites, contributing to the best classification performance of highest dose dependent carbofuran exposed earthworms from healthy controls were identified. This study suggests that GC-MS based metabolomic approach was precise and sensitive to measure the earthworm responses to carbofuran exposure in soil, and can be used as a promising tool for environmental eco-toxicological studies. PMID:24324663

  7. Screening and determination of benzodiazepines in whole blood using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Maeno, Y; Iwasa, M; Matoba, R; Nagao, M

    2000-09-11

    Benzodiazepines are one of the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of a wide spectrum of clinical disorders. They are used as anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, hypnotics or muscle relaxants with different duration of action. In this paper, a simple and sensitive method for the determination of benzodiazepines in whole blood using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is described. The drugs spiked in whole blood were extracted with an Oasis HLB solid-phase extraction cartridge (Waters), which contains a copolymer designed to have a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance. GC/MS analysis was performed using a Shimadzu QP-5000 equipped with a BPX5 capillary column (15 mx0.32 mm I.D., film thickness 0.25 microm, SGE). Nineteen benzodiazepines and two thienodiazepines were well separated from each other on their SIM chromatograms and also on the TIC with the exception of oxazolam to cloxazolam separation. The blank extract from whole blood gave no peaks that interfered with all benzodiazepines and thienodiazepines on the chromatogram. The calibration curves for selected benzodiazepines with fludiazepam as an internal standard showed excellent linearity over the concentration range 5-500 ng/ml blood with a correlation coefficients of >0.995. The detection limits ranged from 0.2 to 20 ng/ml blood. The method is simple and sensitive for the determination of benzodiazepines in whole blood and seems to be useful in the practice of forensic science. PMID:10978650

  8. Measurement of rimantadine in plasma by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with a deuterium-labeled internal standard

    SciTech Connect

    Herold, D.A.; Anonick, P.K.; Kinter, M.; Hayden, F.G.

    1988-08-01

    Rimantadine is a synthetic antiviral agent used in prophylaxis and in treating the early stages of uncomplicated influenza A illness. We describe a stable isotope-dilution assay involving capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We used 200 ng of d3-rimantadine, added to 1 mL of plasma, as the internal standard. The rimantadine was extracted from the plasma with a Bond-Elut CN column, the column was washed with water, and the rimantadine was eluted with methanol, dried, and treated to form the t-butyldimethylsilyl derivative. The mass spectrometer was operated in the selected ion monitoring mode. Ions at m/z 236 and m/z 239 were monitored, corresponding to the loss of C4H9 from the rimantadine derivative and d3-rimantadine, respectively. Within-run precision (CVs) ranged from 8.9% at 29 micrograms/L to 3.2% at 1666 micrograms/L. Corresponding data for between-run precision were 5.4% and 1.7%. Treated volunteers (n = 86) provided plasma samples with a concentration range of 153 to 1127 micrograms/L. This simplified method allows rapid, precise assay of rimantadine in plasma.

  9. Analysis of endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals and personal care products in sewage sludge by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Wu, Laosheng

    2012-01-30

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been acknowledged as emerging pollutants due to widespread contamination in environment. A rapid and reliable analytical method, based on ultrasonic extraction, clean up on Envi-carb cartridge, derivatized with N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was developed for determination of 4 EDCs (bisphenol A, estrone, nonylphenol and octylphenol) and 10 PPCPs (acetylsalicylic acid, carbamazepine, clofibric acid, diclofenac, gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, paracetamol and triclosan) in sewage sludge. Mean recoveries of the target analytes, at different spike levels (40, 300 and 2000 ng/g), ranged from 57.9% to 103.1%. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 1.3-9.5% at different spiked levels. The limit of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 4.7 to 39 ng/g. The method was applied to sewage sludge samples from sewage treatment plants (STPs) in southern California. High concentrations of PPCPs and EDCs were found in sewage sludge, ranging from 1502 to 5327 ng/g dry weight. Appropriate disposal of sewage sludge was required to avoid secondary contamination. PMID:22284489

  10. Alternative method for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    García-Villalba, Rocio; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; García-Conesa, Maria T; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Carlos Espín, Juan; Larrosa, Mar

    2012-08-01

    Short-chain fatty acids are the major end products of bacterial metabolism in the large bowel. They derive mostly from the bacterial breakdown of carbohydrates and are known to have positive health benefits. Due to the biological relevance of these compounds it is important to develop efficient, cheap, fast, and sensitive analytical methods that enable the identification and quantification of the short-chain fatty acids in a large number of biological samples. In this study, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples. These volatile compounds were extracted with ethyl acetate and 4-methyl valeric acid was used as an internal standard. No further cleanup, concentration, and derivatization steps were needed and the extract was directly injected onto the column. Recoveries ranged between 65 and 105%, and no matrix effects were observed. The proposed method has wide linear ranges, good inter- and intraday variability values (below 2.6 and 5.6%, respectively) and limits of detection between 0.49 μM (0.29 μg/g) and 4.31 μM (3.8 μg/g). The applicability of this analytical method was successfully tested in faecal samples from rats and humans. PMID:22865755

  11. Alternative method for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    García-Villalba, Rocio; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; García-Conesa, Maria T; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos; Larrosa, Mar

    2012-06-01

    Short-chain fatty acids are the major end products of bacterial metabolism in the large bowel. They derive mostly from the bacterial breakdown of carbohydrates and are known to have positive health benefits. Due to the biological relevance of these compounds it is important to develop efficient, cheap, fast, and sensitive analytical methods that enable the identification and quantification of the short-chain fatty acids in a large number of biological samples. In this study, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples. These volatile compounds were extracted with ethyl acetate and 4-methyl valeric acid was used as an internal standard. No further cleanup, concentration, and derivatization steps were needed and the extract was directly injected onto the column. Recoveries ranged between 65 and 105%, and no matrix effects were observed. The proposed method has wide linear ranges, good inter- and intraday variability values (below 2.6 and 5.6%, respectively) and limits of detection between 0.49 μM (0.29 μg/g) and 4.31 μM (3.8 μg/g). The applicability of this analytical method was successfully tested in faecal samples from rats and humans. PMID:22674825

  12. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum: A validation study using solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Marta P B; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Dang, Ngoc A; Walters, Elisabetta; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Kolk, Arend H J

    2016-02-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem, especially in developing countries. Correct identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection is extremely important for providing appropriate treatment and care to patients. Here we describe a solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method (SPE-THM-GC-MS) for the detection of five biomarkers for M. tuberculosis. The method for classification is developed and validated through the analysis of 112 sputum samples from patients suspected of having TB. Twenty of twenty-five MTB culture-positive sputum samples were correctly classified as positive by our improved SPE-THM-GC-MS method. Eighty-five of eighty-seven MTB culture-negative samples were also negative by SPE-THM-GC-MS. The overall sensitivity of the new SPE-THM-GC-MS method is 80% (20/25) and the specificity is 98% (85/87) compared with culture. The method proved to be reliable and, although complex in principle, easy to operate due to the high degree of automation. PMID:26807702

  13. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum using combined solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ngoc A; Mourão, Marta; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Walters, Elisabetta; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Kolk, Arend H J

    2015-04-01

    Recently, thermally-assisted hydrolysis and methylation followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) in combination with chemometrics has been used to develop a 20-compound model for fast differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) from Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in bacterial cultures. This model provided better than 95% accuracy. In our current work a hexane/methanol/water extraction followed by a solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up procedure was developed for use before THM-GC-MS, to make the test suitable for the identification of mycobacteria in sputum. The 20 biomarker model had to be adapted since many compounds were also found in the sputum of non-tuberculosis patients. An algorithm was established based on tuberculostearic acid, hexacosanoic acid and mycoserosates. The detection limit of the method was approximately 1×10(4) bacteria/mL sputum. Sputum specimens from 32 patients from South Africa who were suspected of having tuberculosis were blindly tested using the new method. Eight of the nine culture-positive sputum specimens were detected by the new SPE-THM-GC-MS method, resulting in a sensitivity of 89%. The specimen that was missed by the new method was also microscopy negative. The specificity of the test was 100%; all 23 microscopy- and culture-negative specimens were correctly identified as negative by SPE-THM-GC-MS. PMID:25728368

  14. Characterization of livestock odors using steel plates, solid-phase microextraction, and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Bulliner, Edward A; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Wright, Donald

    2006-10-01

    Livestock operations are associated with emissions of odor, gases, and particulate matter (PM). Livestock odor characterization is one of the most challenging analytical tasks. This is because odor-causing gases are often present at very low concentrations in a complex matrix of less important or irrelevant gases. The objective of this project was to develop a set of characteristic reference odors from a swine barn in Iowa and, in the process, identify compounds causing characteristic swine odor. Odor samples were collected using a novel sampling methodology consisting of clean steel plates exposed inside and around the swine barn for < or =1 week. Steel plates were then transported to the laboratory and stored in clean jars. Headspace solid-phase microextraction was used to extract characteristic odorants collected on the plates. All of the analyses were conducted on a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry system where the human nose is used as a detector simultaneously with chemical analysis via mass spectrometry. Multidimensional chromatography was used to isolate and identify chemicals with high-characteristic swine odor. The effects of sampling time, distance from a source, and the presence of PM on the abundance of specific gases, odor intensity, and odor character were tested. Steel plates were effectively able to collect key volatile compounds and odorants. The abundance of specific gases and odor was amplified when plates collected PM. The results of this research indicate that PM is major carrier of odor and several key swine odorants. Three odor panelists were consistent in identifying p-cresol as closely resembling characteristic swine odor, as well as attributing to p-cresol the largest odor response out of the samples. Further research is warranted to determine how the control of PM emissions from swine housing could affect odor emissions. PMID:17063862

  15. Method Development for the Determination of Fluorotelomer Alcohols in Soils by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) have been widely studied as precursors to perfluorocarboxylates, e.g. 8:2 FTOH degrades to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). This presentation describes an analytical method for the extraction and analysis of 6:2, 8:2, and 10:2 FTOHs. Gas chromatograph...

  16. Performance and optimization of a combustion interface for isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Merritt, D A; Freeman, K H; Ricci, M P; Studley, S A; Hayes, J M

    1995-07-15

    Conditions and systems for on-line combustion of effluents from capillary gas chromatographic columns and for removal of water vapor from product streams were tested. Organic carbon in gas chromatographic peaks 15 s wide and containing up to 30 nanomoles of carbon was quantitatively converted to CO2 by tubular combustion reactors, 200 x 0.5 mm, packed with CuO or NiO. No auxiliary source of O2 was required because oxygen was supplied by metal oxides. Spontaneous degradation of CuO limited the life of CuO reactors at T > 850 degrees C. Since NiO does not spontaneously degrade, its use might be favored, but Ni-bound carbon phases form and lead to inaccurate isotopic results at T < 1050 degrees C if gas-phase O2 is not added. For all compounds tested except CH4, equivalent isotopic results are provided by CuO at 850 degrees C, NiO + O2 (gas-phase mole fraction, 10(-3)) at 1050 degrees C and NiO at 1150 degrees C. The combustion interface did not contribute additional analytical uncertainty, thus observed standard deviations of 13C/12C ratios were within a factor of 2 of shot-noise limits. For combustion and isotopic analyses of CH4, in which quantitative combustion required T approximately 950 degrees C, NiO-based systems are preferred, and precision is approximately 2 times lower than that observed for other analytes. Water must be removed from the gas stream transmitted to the mass spectrometer or else protonation of CO2 will lead to inaccuracy in isotopic analyses. Although thresholds for this effect vary between mass spectrometers, differential permeation of H2O through Nafion tubing was effective in both cases tested, but the required length of the Nafion membrane was 4 times greater for the more sensitive mass spectrometer. PMID:11536720

  17. Performance and optimization of a combustion interface for isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, M. P.; Studley, S. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions and systems for on-line combustion of effluents from capillary gas chromatographic columns and for removal of water vapor from product streams were tested. Organic carbon in gas chromatographic peaks 15 s wide and containing up to 30 nanomoles of carbon was quantitatively converted to CO2 by tubular combustion reactors, 200 x 0.5 mm, packed with CuO or NiO. No auxiliary source of O2 was required because oxygen was supplied by metal oxides. Spontaneous degradation of CuO limited the life of CuO reactors at T > 850 degrees C. Since NiO does not spontaneously degrade, its use might be favored, but Ni-bound carbon phases form and lead to inaccurate isotopic results at T < 1050 degrees C if gas-phase O2 is not added. For all compounds tested except CH4, equivalent isotopic results are provided by CuO at 850 degrees C, NiO + O2 (gas-phase mole fraction, 10(-3)) at 1050 degrees C and NiO at 1150 degrees C. The combustion interface did not contribute additional analytical uncertainty, thus observed standard deviations of 13C/12C ratios were within a factor of 2 of shot-noise limits. For combustion and isotopic analyses of CH4, in which quantitative combustion required T approximately 950 degrees C, NiO-based systems are preferred, and precision is approximately 2 times lower than that observed for other analytes. Water must be removed from the gas stream transmitted to the mass spectrometer or else protonation of CO2 will lead to inaccuracy in isotopic analyses. Although thresholds for this effect vary between mass spectrometers, differential permeation of H2O through Nafion tubing was effective in both cases tested, but the required length of the Nafion membrane was 4 times greater for the more sensitive mass spectrometer.

  18. [Determination of pentachlorophenol residues in textiles and leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Mou, J; Chen, M; Zou, M

    1999-07-01

    A method for determination of pentachlorophenol residues in textiles and leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed. The pentachlorophenol residues in samples was acidified with sulphuric acid solution (6 mol/L) and extracted with n-hexane. After the n-hexane layer was washed with sodium sulphate solution (20 g/L)until it was clear, determination was made by means of a gas chromatograph equipped with MSD, using external standard method. A DB-17 fused silica capillary column (30 m x 0.25 mm i.d.; 0.25 micron film thickness) was employed in the analysis, The column temperature program included a 2 min isothermal period at 50 degrees C, temperature increased at a rate of 30 degrees C/min to 220 degrees C, and hold for 1 min; temperature increased of at a rate 6 degrees C/min to 260 degrees C, and hold for 1 min. Mass spectra were obtained by electron impact at 70 eV and the determination was made by means of SIM mode, selected monitoring ion (m/z) was 264 amu. The detection limit was 0.02 mg/kg. The average recovery was from 86.7% to 93.1% and CV (n = 10) is from 4.1% to 5.9%. This method was already used to determine the mass concentration of pentachlorophenol residues in raw cotton, towel, shirt, leather gloves, leather watchguard. The method is simple, rapid and accurate. PMID:12552858

  19. Quantitative analysis of arbutin and hydroquinone in strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L., Ericaceae) leaves by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jurica, Karlo; Karačonji, Irena Brčić; Šegan, Sandra; Opsenica, Dušanka Milojković; Kremer, Dario

    2015-09-01

    The phenolic glycoside arbutin and its metabolite with uroantiseptic activity hydroquinone occur naturally in the leaves of various medicinal plants and spices. In this study, an extraction procedure coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to determine arbutin and hydroquinone content in strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L., Ericaceae) leaves. The method showed good linearity (R2>0.9987) in the tested concentration range (0.5-200 μg mL(-1)), as well as good precision (RSD<5%), analytical recovery (96.2-98.0%), and sensitivity (limit of detection=0.009 and 0.004 μg mL(-1) for arbutin and hydroquinone, respectively). The results obtained by the validated GC-MS method corresponded well to those obtained by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The proposed method was then applied for determining arbutin and hydroquinone content in methanolic leaf extracts. The amount of arbutin in the leaves collected on the island of Koločep (6.82 mg g(-1) dry weight) was found to be higher (tpaired=43.57, tc=2.92) in comparison to the amount of arbutin in the leaves collected on the island of Mali Lošinj (2.75 mg g(-1) dry weight). Hydroquinone was not detected in any of the samples. The analytical features of the proposed GC-MS method demonstrated that arbutin and hydroquinone could be determined alternatively by gas chromatography. Due to its wide concentration range, the method could also be suitable for arbutin and hydroquinone analysis in leaves of other plant families (Rosaceae, Lamiaceae, etc.). PMID:26444340

  20. Development and Application of Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Bound Trinitrotoluene Residues in Soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, J.M.; Mckay, A.J.; Derito, C.; Watanabe, C.; Thorn, K.A.; Madsen, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    TNT (trinitrotoluene) is a contaminant of global environmental significance, yet determining its environmental fate has posed longstanding challenges. To date, only differential extraction-based approaches have been able to determine the presence of covalently bound, reduced forms of TNT in field soils. Here, we employed thermal elution, pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to distinguish between covalently bound and noncovalently bound reduced forms of TNT in soil. Model soil organic matter-based matrixes were used to develop an assay in which noncovalently bound (monomeric) aminodinitrotoluene (ADNT) and diaminonitrotoluene (DANT) were desorbed from the matrix and analyzed at a lower temperature than covalently bound forms of these same compounds. A thermal desorption technique, evolved gas analysis, was initially employed to differentiate between covalently bound and added 15N-labeled monomeric compounds. A refined thermal elution procedure, termed "double-shot analysis" (DSA), allowed a sample to be sequentially analyzed in two phases. In phase 1, all of an added 15N-labeled monomeric contaminant was eluted from the sample at relatively low temperature. In phase 2 during high-temperature pyrolysis, the remaining covalently bound contaminants were detected. DSA analysis of soil from the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant (LAAP; ???5000 ppm TNT) revealed the presence of DANT, ADNT, and TNT. After scrutinizing the DSA data and comparing them to results from solvent-extracted and base/acid-hydrolyzed LAAP soil, we concluded that the TNT was a noncovalently bound "carryover" from phase 1. Thus, the pyrolysis-GC/MS technique successfully defined covalently bound pools of ADNT and DANT in the field soil sample.

  1. Assessment of the degradation of polyurethane foams after artificial and natural ageing by using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lattuati-Derieux, A; Thao-Heu, S; Lavédrine, B

    2011-07-15

    Polyurethane foams are widely present in museum collections either as part of the artefacts, or as a material for their conservation. Unfortunately many of PU foam artefacts are in poor condition and often exhibit specific conservation issues. Their fast thermal and photochemical degradations have been the aim of previous researches. It is now accepted that hydrolysis predominates for polyester-based polyurethane PU(ES) whereas oxidation is the principal cause of degradation for polyether-based polyurethane PU(ET) variety. Only a few studies have been devoted to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by polyurethanes and, to our knowledge, none were performed on polyurethane foams by using headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME). The objective of the work described here is to assess the impact of some environmental factors (humidity, temperature and daylight) on the degradation of PU foams by evaluating their volatile fractions. We investigated morphological changes, polymerized fractions and volatile fractions of (i) one modern produced PU(ES) foam and one modern PU(ET) foam artificially aged in different conditions as well as (ii) four naturally aged foams collected from various daily life objects and selected for the representativeness of their analytical data. Characterization procedure used was based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) and non-invasive headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). In this paper, the formation of alcohol and acid raw products for PU(ES) and glycol derivatives for PU(ET) during natural and artificial ageing is confirmed. These main products can be considered as degradation markers for PU foams. Results show that artificial and natural ageing provide similar analytical results, and confirm that the dominant degradation paths for PU(ES) and for PU(ET) are

  2. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry computer analysis of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in man and his environment--A multimedia environmental study.

    PubMed

    Barkley, J; Bunch, J; Bursey, J T; Castillo, N; Cooper, S D; Davis, J M; Erickson, M D; Harris, B S; Kirkpatrick, M; Michael, L C; Parks, S P; Pellizzari, E D; Ray, M; Smith, D; Tomer, K B; Wagner, R; Zweidinger, R A

    1980-04-01

    As part of a study to make a comparative analysis of selected halogenated compounds in man and the environmental media, a quantitative gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of the levels of the halogenated compounds found in the breath, blood and urine of an exposed population (Old Love Canal area, Niagara, New York) and their immediate environment (air and water) was undertaken. In addition, levels of halogenated hydrocarbons in air samples taken in the general Buffalo, Niagara Falls area were determined. PMID:7448328

  3. The analysis of illicit methaqualone containing preparations by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Grové, Alida A; Rohwer, Egmont R; Laurens, Johannes B; Vorster, Barend C

    2006-03-01

    A validated gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for quantitative analysis of methaqualone (MTQ) in illicit preparations is reported. The method proved to have a coefficient of variation of below 5%. Four batches of seized tablets, two pairs with similar imprints, were analyzed. It was found that the average MTQ concentration in all four batches of tablets differed significantly (p = 0.01) rendering it impossible to conclude that, on the basis of MTQ concentration alone, the batches with a similar logo originated from the same manufacturer or manufacturing batch. Conversely, it can be said that in this case, the four batches originated from either different clandestine laboratories or manufacturing batches. PMID:16566774

  4. Nitrogen isotopic analyses by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Amino acids containing natural-abundance levels of 15N were derivatized and analyzed isotopically using a technique in which individual compounds are separated by gas chromatography, combusted on-line, and the product stream sent directly to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For samples of N2 gas, standard deviations of ratio measurement were better than 0.1% (Units for delta are parts per thousand or per million (%).) for samples larger than 400 pmol and better than 0.5% for samples larger than 25 pmol (0.1% 15N is equivalent to 0.00004 atom % 15N). Results duplicated those of conventional, batchwise analyses to within 0.05%. For combustion of organic compounds yielding CO2/N2 ratios between 14 and 28, in particular for N-acetyl n-propyl derivatives of amino acids, delta values were within 0.25% of results obtained using conventional techniques and standard deviations were better than 0.35%. Pooled data for measurements of all amino acids produced an accuracy and precision of 0.04 and 0.23%, respectively, when 2 nmol of each amino acid was injected on column and 20% of the stream of combustion products was delivered to the mass spectrometer.

  5. [The analysis of caramel colors. 1. Differentiation of classes of caramel coloring agents with Curie-point pyrolysis-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hardt, R; Baltes, W

    1987-10-01

    After an introduction on the production, classification, legislative regulations, toxicology, and analysis of caramel colours, a report is given on the examination of these colourings by Curie-point pyrolysis-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This method enables the differentiation between the four classes of caramel colours on the basis of the most concentrated of more than 100 identified pyrolysis products, which requires small quantities of substance (100 micrograms) and short periods of time (1 h). PMID:3424998

  6. Determination of residual styrene monomer in polystyrene granules by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garrigós, M C; Marín, M L; Cantó, A; Sánchez, A

    2004-12-24

    Polystyrene is widely used in formulations intended for children use. The main problem with this plastic is the residual styrene, which can migrate from the product, and therefore, be in contact with children. The acute toxicity of styrene is well known, raising the need of an efficient and fast method of analysis for this compound. Several extraction methods have been evaluated and compared for the determination of residual styrene monomer in polystyrene granules used in toys: supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), Soxhlet extraction, headspace emission and dissolution-precipitation. The analyte was subsequently detected by gas chromatography (GC) with MS detection. The results indicated that the most efficient method was dissolution-precipitation giving even higher extraction efficiency than SFE. For validating the method, PS samples spiked with known quantities of styrene at three concentration levels were prepared to calculate the extraction recovery. The founded validation data proved the suitability of the proposed method. PMID:15641364

  7. Determination of dithiocarbamates and milneb residues in foods by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Munetomo; Noda, Satoko; Kosugi, Masaki; Ishiduka, Noriko; Mizukoshi, Kazushi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Nemoto, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    A highly sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed for dithiocarbamates (DTCs) and milneb in foods. DTCs and milneb were extracted from foods with cysteine-EDTA solution as sodium salts, and methylated with methyl iodide. Methyl derivatives of DTCs and milneb were cleaned up on a neutral alumina mini column and determined by GC-MS. The mean recoveries of DTCs and milneb were in the range of 72-120%, except for methiram. The quantification limits were 0.01 mg/kg (as CS(2)) in foods except tea (0.1 mg/kg as CS(2)). The developed method was applied to 10 compounds (4 dimethyldithiocarbamates, 3 ethylenebisdithiocarbamates, polycarbamates, propineb and milneb). PMID:21071904

  8. Determination of 112 halogenated pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Gregory E

    2005-01-01

    A procedure for the analysis of 112 halogenated pesticides that do not contain phosphorus has been developed. The procedure uses gas chromatography with a mass selective detector (GC-MSD), electron impact ionization, and selected-ion monitoring. This GC-MSD procedure provided lower limits of quantitation and provided increased confirmational data compared to the traditional element-selective GC procedures that are commonly used for the detection of this class of pesticides. These analytical improvements were demonstrated by the 25 pesticides that were detected at < or =50 ng/g levels in a variety of fruit and vegetable matrixes using this procedure that were missed by the traditional element selective GC procedures. Validation of the procedure was performed using 20 representative target pesticides with an acetone extraction and a solid-phase extraction cleanup. These target pesticides were used to demonstrate repeatability and linearity of the chromatographic response and recovery from fruit and vegetable matrixes. PMID:16385996

  9. Improved sensitivity gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of parabens in waters using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure for the introduction of ionic liquid samples in gas chromatography (GC) is proposed. This procedure, based on microvial insert thermal desorption, allows the direct analysis of the compounds preconcentrated by ionic liquid based liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-LLME) using the combination of a thermal desorption unit (TDU) and a programmed temperature vaporization injector (PTV). Two different IL-LLME methodologies, one based on the formation of a microdroplet emulsion by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other through ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) were studied and evaluated. IL-DLLME proved advantageous and consequently, it was adopted for preconcentration purposes. This easy to apply approach was used for the determination of five parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and isobutyl paraben) in swimming pool waters, after in situ acetylation. The optimized conditions of TDU/PTV allowed the analytes contained in 20 µL of the enriched IL to be transferred to the capillary column. Quantification of the samples was carried out against aqueous standards, and quantification limits of between 4.3 and 8.1 ng L(-1) were obtained, depending on the compound. Concentrations of between 9 and 47 ng L(-1) for some analytes were obtained in the analysis of ten samples. PMID:26695305

  10. Potential biomarkers of smoked fentanyl utilizing pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Rona K; Bell, Suzanne C; Kraner, James C; Callery, Patrick S

    2009-10-01

    Fentanyl is a potent opioid analgesic that is increasingly becoming a choice drug of abuse. Fentanyl transdermal patches (FTPs) are easily obtained and consumed by smoking the reservoir gel and/or the whole patch. This allows for an increased bioavailability when inhaled. A method using analytical pyrolysis was developed to identify possible biomarkers associated with smoked fentanyl and FTPs. Pyrolysis was carried out under anaerobic and aerobic conditions using helium and air coupled to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. The presence of a trap enhanced recovery and afforded a positive identification of pyrolytic products. Anaerobic and aerobic pyrolysis of fentanyl and FTPs consistently yielded propionanilide as the major pyrolytic product along with pyridine and previously reported metabolites (norfentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl). Analysis of fentanyl resulted in chlorine-containing compounds, presumably formed from the HCl salt of fentanyl. Analysis of FTPs showed significant polymeric and hydrocarbon compounds and products likely derived from the gel matrix. Fentanyl in the FTPs was in the citrate salt form; therefore, the chlorine-containing pyrolytic products obtained with the neat drug were not observed. Based on this application, it may be possible to identify what salt form of the drug was smoked based on pyrolytic products and to target distinguishing metabolic products for future research. PMID:19874647