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Sample records for gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry

  1. Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

  2. Rapid determination of polysaccharides in BianTi Soft Extract by spectrophotometry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Minxia; Shen, Jie; Yang, Kai; Qian, Songxiang; Feng, Sujuan

    2010-01-01

    A simple approach for the rapid determination of polysaccharides in BianTi Soft Extract using spectrophotometry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. The mixed standard solution composed of D-glucose, D-mannose, galactose and D-xylose in different proportions (1.00: 1.01: 0.12: 0.05) was prepared according to the monosaccharide composition analysis of the polysaccharides by GC-MS. The determination of polysaccharides by UV-Vis spectrophotometer was performed after 35-min color reaction, in which 1 ml 5% phenol and 4 ml sulfate was used. The assay of the method validation has shown that the method was stable, reliable and feasible. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied in the preparation procedure of BianTi Soft Extract, selecting out optimal decoction conditions and suitable decoction container. It suggests that the convenient method could be useful for the quality control of BianTi Soft Extract. Meanwhile, it may be an alternative for polysaccharides determination of other formulations. PMID:20668575

  3. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  4. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  5. Mercury determination in blood by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, S K; Kinter, M; Herold, D A

    1994-01-01

    A stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method using 196Hg as an internal standard is described for determining Hg in blood. In this method, the blood samples are not subjected to any digestion to avoid the loss of Hg. A solution of 0.6M HCl is used to free Hg present in blood from proteins. The pH of the solution is adjusted to 9 using borate buffer and Hg chelated using lithium bis(trifluoroethyl)dithiocarbamate. All isotope ratio measurements are made using an organic mass spectrometer. Overall precision values for the five major Hg isotopes relative to 202Hg are 1.6-2.3% when 10 ng samples of chelated Hg are analyzed. No appreciable memory or carryover effect is observed when two synthetic mixtures differing in 196Hg/202Hg ratios by a factor of 30 are sequentially analyzed. The method is validated by determining Hg in blood samples using isotope dilution GC-MS. PMID:7946912

  6. Thermal degradation of deoxybenzoin polymers studied by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Thermal degradation of deoxybenzoin polymers studied by pyrolysis-gas chromatography Available online 29 March 2008 Keywords: Flame-retardant polymers Thermal degradation Pyrolysis by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The polymers were synthesized

  7. Measuring Deuterium Enrichment of Glucose Hydrogen Atoms by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    We developed a simple and accurate method for determining deuterium enrichment of glucose hydrogen atoms by electron impact gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). First, we prepared 18 derivatives of glucose and ...

  8. Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell-Baguley, Brittany; Hipp, Rachael E.; Morgan, Neal R.; Morgan, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment in which gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used for latent fingerprint extraction and analysis on glass beads or glass slides is conducted. The results determine that the fingerprint residues are gender dependent.

  9. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  10. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

  11. DEVELOPMENTS IN DIRECT THERMAL EXTRACTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FINE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This examines thermal extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE/GC/MS) applied to aerosols collected on filters. Several different TE/GC/MS systems as a group have speciated hundreds of individual organic constituents in ambient fine aerosols. Molecular marker source ap...

  12. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  13. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF GC/MS (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY) DATA ANALYSIS PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectra obtained by fused silica capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/data system (GC/MS/DS) analysis of mixtures of organic chemicals adsorbed on Tenax GC cartridges was subjected to manual and automated interpretative techniques. Synthetic mixtures (85 chemicals ...

  14. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  15. Analysis of radioactive mixed hazardous waste using derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Lerner, B.D.; Bean, R.M.; Grant, K.E.; Lucke, R.B.; Mong, G.M.; Clauss, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Six samples of core segments from Tank 101-SY were analyzed for chelators, chelator fragments, and several carboxylic acids by derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The major components detected were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitroso-iminodiacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and ethylenediaminetriacetic acid. The chelator of highest concentration was ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in all six samples analyzed. Liquid chromatography was used to quantitate low molecular weight acids including oxalic, formic, glycolic, and acetic acids, which are present in the waste as acid salts. From 23 to 61% of the total organic carbon in the samples analyzed was accounted for by these acids.

  16. Comprehensive Urine Drug Screen by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Ramoo, Bheemraj; Funke, Melissa; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Drug screening is an essential component of clinical toxicology laboratory service. Some laboratories use only automated chemistry analyzers for limited screening of drugs of abuse and few other drugs. Other laboratories use a combination of various techniques such as immunoassays, colorimetric tests, and mass spectrometry to provide more detailed comprehensive drug screening. Mass spectrometry, gas or liquid, can screen for hundreds of drugs and is often considered the gold standard for comprehensive drug screening. We describe an efficient and rapid gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for comprehensive drug screening in urine which utilizes a liquid-liquid extraction, sample concentration, and analysis by GC/MS. PMID:26660182

  17. Analysis of the anthraquinones aloe-emodin and aloin by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Murphy, Timothy P

    2004-12-20

    A procedure was developed for the determination of low levels of the anthraquinones aloe-emodin and aloin A (barbalin) in aloe products based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of the trimethyl silyl (TMS) derivatives of these analytes in the presence of Chrysophanol used as internal standard. The method was used to analyze several aloe based commercial products (liquids, gels and solids). Wide variation in the level of these anthraquinones was observed among the different products. The method had a sensitivity of 0.005 ppm of aloe-emodin and 0.05 ppm of aloin. PMID:15531290

  18. Differentiation and characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae strains by pyrolysis-gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, L E; Highsmith, A K; Moran, T F; Reiner, E J

    1981-01-01

    Nine coded duplicate strains of capsular nontypable Klebsiella pneumoniae were analyzed by pyrolysis-gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. All duplicate strains were correctly matched, and individual strains, including seven nontypable strains, were clearly distinguishable from one another. The addition of mass spectrometry to the analysis has aided the process of identification and has provided chemical structural information on K. pneumoniae strains. Application of this technique to the identification of some disease outbreaks or nosocomial problems could be of epidemiological importance, especially when conventional methods do not identify the epidemic strain. PMID:7009639

  19. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  20. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the chemical characterisation of modern and archaeological figs (Ficus carica).

    PubMed

    Ribechini, Erika; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2011-06-24

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethylsilylation, and analytical pyrolysis using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) for in situ derivatisation followed by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis (Pyrolysis-silylation-GC/MS) were used to investigate the hydrolysable and soluble constituents, and the polymerised macromolecules of an archaeological fig (Ficus carica) recovered in Zaragoza (Spain), as well as of modern figs. The main aim was to study the compositional alterations undergone by the fig tissues in a particular archaeological environment: the fig was in a vessel and covered by a layer of a mixture of orpiment and gypsum. A comparison between the GC/MS results from modern and archaeological figs revealed that degradative reactions took place, leading to the disappearance/depletion of reactive (unsaturated fatty acids) and sensitive compounds (phytosterols and triterpenes). Py-silylation-GC/MS data provided evidence of a significant degradation of the saccharide and lipid components of the fig tissue, which left a residue enriched in polyphenols and polyesters. PMID:21570079

  1. Derivatization of pinacolyl alcohol with phenyldimethylchlorosilane for enhanced detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Albo, Rebecca L F; Valdez, Carlos A; Leif, Roald N; Mulcahy, Heather A; Koester, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    A derivatization procedure for the qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of pinacolyl alcohol (PA) that employs phenyldimethylchlorosilane (PhDMClS) and the promoter N-methylimidazole is described. While PA, underivatized, can be detected using conventional gas chromatographic methods, its polarity and low boiling point make its detection in complex matrices challenging. The silylation procedure described herein generates a PA-derivative exhibiting an increased on-column retention time, thus shifting its GC-MS signal away from commonly encountered, volatile, interfering analytes. Derivatized PA could be distinguished from other PhDMClS-derivatized isomeric alcohols by its unique retention time and mass spectrum. The derivatization was demonstrated to perform well in the GC-MS analysis and identification of PA in samples from Proficiency Tests administered by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). PMID:24481624

  2. Community air monitoring for pesticides-part 2: multiresidue determination of pesticides in air by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Matt; Lee, P

    2014-03-01

    Two multiresidue methods were developed to determine pesticides in air collected in California. Pesticides were trapped using XAD-4 resin and extracted with ethyl acetate. Based on an analytical method from the University of California Davis Trace Analytical Laboratory, pesticides were detected by analyzing the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine chlorothalonil, chlorthal-dimethyl, cycloate, dicloran, dicofol, EPTC, ethalfluralin, iprodione, mefenoxam, metolachlor, PCNB, permethrin, pronamide, simazine, trifluralin, and vinclozolin. A GC with a flame photometric detector was used to determine chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos oxon, diazinon, diazinon oxon, dimethoate, dimethoate oxon, fonophos, fonophos oxon, malathion, malathion oxon, naled, and oxydemeton. Trapping efficiencies ranged from 78 to 92 % for low level (0.5 ?g) and 37-104 % for high level (50 and 100 ?g) recoveries. Little to no degradation of compounds occurred over 31 days; recoveries ranged from 78 to 113 %. In the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) method, pesticides were detected by analyzing the extract by GC-MS to determine chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, dichlorvos, dicofol, endosulfan 1, endosulfan sulfate, oxyfluorfen, permethrin, propargite, and trifluralin. A liquid chromatograph coupled to a MS was used to determine azinphos-methyl, chloropyrifos oxon, DEF, diazinon, diazinon oxon, dimethoate, dimethoate oxon, diuron, EPTC, malathion, malathion oxon, metolachlor, molinate, norflurazon, oryzalin, phosmet, propanil, simazine and thiobencarb. Trapping efficiencies for compounds determined by the CDFA method ranged from 10 to 113, 22 to 114, and 56 to 132 % for 10, 5, and 2 ?g spikes, respectively. Storage tests yielded 70-170 % recovery for up to 28 days. These multiresidue methods represent flexible, sensitive, accurate, and cost-effective ways to determine residues of various pesticides in ambient air. PMID:24370860

  3. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of nitrosamines in red wine.

    PubMed

    Lona-Ramirez, Fernando J; Gonzalez-Alatorre, Guillermo; Rico-Ramírez, Vicente; Perez-Perez, Ma Cristina I; Castrejón-González, Edgar O

    2016-04-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms) are highly active carcinogens that have been detected in food and beverages. Currently certain studies report their presence in red wine, while others fail to detect their presence. In this study the head space solid phase micro-extraction technique coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was applied to quantify four NAms in different types of red wine. The technique was found to be a simple, precise, fast and environmentally friendly alternative for the quantification of volatile NAms. A factorial analysis was carried out to evaluate the influence of the parameters on the HS-SPME technique. This is the first study that such analysis has been reported and where NAms in red wine have been quantified using HS-SPME-GC-MS. The method was validated by calculating the linearity, limit of detection and quantification. Two of the four NAms analyzed were found to be present in red wine samples. PMID:26593598

  4. Identification of lipoxygenase-linoleate decomposition products by direct gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    St Angelo, A J; Legendre, M G; Dupuy, H P

    1980-01-01

    Lipoxygenase, prepared from Virginia-type peanuts, was used to catalyze the oxidation of linoleic acid and methyl linoleate to form the C-9 and C-13 hydroperoxides. These reactions were monitored by rapid unconventional direct gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. An aliquot of the enzymatic reaction mixture, without prior extraction or chemical modification, was secured directly into the heated (40-70 C) or nonheated (room temperature) injection system. When the reaction mixture was analyzed at room temperature, only hexanal was found. At elevated temperatures, five major and several minor components were identified. The predominant compounds identified were pentane, hexanal, 2-pentylfuran, trans-2,cis-4-decadienal, and trans-2,trans-4-decadienal. These products originate from decomposition of either the C-9 or C-13 hydroperoxides generated by peanut lipoxygenase. PMID:6767148

  5. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy study of tert-butylarsine stability and purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartram, M. E.; Breiland, W. G.; Bruskas, L. A.; Killeen, K. P.

    2000-06-01

    We have used gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS) to study the decomposition of TBA ( tert-butylarsine, H 2AsC(CH 3) 3) in storage containers at room temperature. Over a four-week period, as much as 1% of the TBA decomposed to arsine and isobutane in a stainless-steel bottle. Several freeze-thaw purification schemes were tested. Use of a liquid-nitrogen bath left a substantial amount of arsine and isobutane in the bottle, while an ice water bath removed all of the arsine but left residual isobutane. Evacuation of the storage container at room temperature removed both arsine and isobutane to below the GCMS detection limits. However, this approach did lead to significant TBA loss. Storing TBA in a Teflon-lined bottle and in a high-surface-to-volume stainless-steel container did not change the decomposition rate measurably, suggesting that stainless-steel surfaces do not promote TBA decomposition.

  6. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining…

  7. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  8. ANALYSIS OF TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMBUSTION PROCESS EMISSIONS USING NOVEL MULTIDIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the analysis of trace-level organic combustion process emissions using novel multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) procedures. It outlines the application of the technique through the analyses of various incinerator effluent and produ...

  9. Determination of hormonal growth promoters in bovine hair: comparison of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for estradiol benzoate and nortestosterone decanoate.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Eleanor; Rambaud, Lauriane; Le Bizec, Bruno; O'Keeffe, Michael

    2009-04-01

    The detection of steroid residues in hair is a powerful strategy to demonstrate long-term administration of these growth promoters in meat production animals. Analysis of the ester form of administered steroids is an unambiguous approach to prove the illegal use of natural hormones. For detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was generally used. However, recent advances in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology have improved the robustness and potential sensitivity of this method. This paper describes development and validation, according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, of LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/MS methods, in two separate laboratories, for determination of steroid esters in bovine hair. Bovine hair samples taken from animals treated with estradiol-3-benzoate and nortestosterone decanoate, as well as from an untreated animal, were used to evaluate the comparability of the results of the two validated methods. The results of the inter-comparison demonstrate that both the LC-MS/MS and the GC-MS/MS methods are fit for purpose and capable of determining steroid esters in hair samples from treated bovine animals. PMID:19286025

  10. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief that this multivariate analysis will enable superior differentiation capabilities. In addition, noise and system artifacts challenge the analysis of GC-MS data collected on lower cost equipment, ubiquitous in commercial laboratories. This research has the potential to affect many areas of analytical chemistry including materials analysis, medical testing, and environmental surveillance. It could also provide a method to measure adsorption parameters for chemical interactions on various surfaces by measuring desorption as a function of temperature for mixtures. We have presented results of a novel method for examining offgas products of a common PDMS material. Our method involves utilizing a stepped TD/GC-MS data acquisition scheme that may be almost totally automated, coupled with multivariate analysis schemes. This method of data generation and analysis can be applied to a number of materials aging and thermal degradation studies.

  11. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Study of tert-Butylarsine Stability and Purification

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, M.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Bruskas, L.A.; Killeen, K.P.

    1999-07-20

    TBA (tert-butylarsine, H{sub 2}AsC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) has been demonstrated to be an effective arsenic precursor for the deposition of compound semiconductors such as GaAs by MOCVD (metal organic chemical vapor deposition). TBA is used as a liquid (bubbler) source in MOCVD and is a less toxic alternative to the more commonly used gaseous arsine (AsH{sub 3}). Materials and device performance using TBA have in many cases equaled or surpassed those using arsine. This includes the first observation of fractional quantum Hall behavior in a two dimensional electron gas structure grown by MOCVD. Despite the beneficial characteristics, the use of TBA in our laboratories has revealed some inconsistent behavior. Small pressure rises have been observed in the TBA bubbler sources when left unused over a period of many days. Measurements of the TBA partial pressure using UV absorption revealed that new absorption peaks could be observed after storage. The features of the absorption profile were insufficient to ascribe to a specific chemical species. Attempts to remove the gaseous impurities with liquid nitrogen freeze-pump-thaw techniques had limited success. Unfortunately, there is no published information on the room temperature decomposition of TBA. In this paper, we present a series of GCMS (gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy) analyses designed to determine the stability of TBA and identify its decomposition products in storage containers. The GCMS is also used to evaluate several methods for in-situ purification of TBA.

  12. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  13. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  14. Determination of Sudan dye residues in eggs by liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    He, Limin; Su, Yijuan; Fang, Binghu; Shen, Xiangguang; Zeng, Zhenling; Liu, Yahong

    2007-06-26

    A sensitive and cheap high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) was developed for the determination of Sudan dyes (I, II, III, and IV) residues in various types of eggs. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a reverse phase C18 column with gradient elution, using a mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid aqueous solution; detector was set at 478 nm for Sudan I and 520 nm for Sudan II, III and IV. The suspected egg samples were derivatized with N,O-bis (trimethylsilyl) trifluoro-acetamide and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in EI. Mass spectra of trimethylsilyl derivatives of the Sudan dyes were built up in EI mode. Recoveries of the Sudan dyes ranged between 79.8 and 95.7% in eggs by HPLC-UV, with all the relative standard deviations of less than 5%. Limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ) were in the range of 4.0-4.8 and 12.3-13.8 microg kg(-1) in eggs, respectively. Identification and confirmation could be validated in the range of 2.0-4.2 microg kg(-1) with the GC-MS method. This method is suitable for routine fast monitoring, screening and confirmation of Sudan dyes residues in eggs, as mandated by regulatory agencies. PMID:17560395

  15. Temperature-programmed retention indices for gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of plant essential oils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen-Xi; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Fang, Hong-Zhuang; Li, Xiao-Ning

    2005-11-25

    A total of 95 volatile compounds from the essential oil in buds of Syringa oblata Lindl (lilac) were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) combined with heuristic evolving latent projections (HELP) and moving subwindow searching (MSS). The identified compounds are mainly aliphatic, terpenes and aromatic compounds. Their temperature-programmed retention indices (PTRIs) on HP-5MS and DB-35MS at three heating rates of 2, 4 and 6 degrees C/min from 80 to 290 degrees C were obtained, which showed that aliphatic compounds give nearly constant PTRIs and PTRIs of terpenoids do not vary much at different heating rates. But PTRIs of aromatic compounds exhibit relatively large temperature dependence. PTRIs vary much more on DB-35MS than those on HP-5MS according to the compound types. In general, differences of PTRIs between the two columns increase from aliphatic compounds to terpenoids to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The PTRIs in different heating rates were used as cross-references in the identification of components in the essential oil. When they were used in analysis of essential oil from flowers of lilac, good results were obtained. These PTRIs would be a part of our PTRI database being constructed on components from plant essential oils. The results also showed that efficiency and reliability were improved greatly when chemometric method and PTRIs were used as assistants of GC-MS in identification of chemical components in plant essential oils. PMID:16289121

  16. [Determination of hormone multi-residues in animal tissues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lin, Weixuan; Dong, Weifeng; Chen, Xi; Tian, Miao; Yu, Ling; Zhao, Jinghong; Yang, Chunguang

    2009-05-01

    A method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the simultaneous determination of nine sex hormone residues, such as hexestrol, diethylstilbestrol, dienestrol, etiocholan-3alpha-ol-17-one, epitestosterone, estrone, estradiol, ethinylestradiol and estriol, in animal tissues was developed. The sex hormones were extracted with acetonitrile, then cleaned-up with a C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) column. The microwave-assisted derivatization of the target components with N,O-bis( trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) (99:1, v/v) using pyridine as solvent was performed, and then the derivatives were analyzed by GC-MS. The limits of detection were 0.1-1 microg/kg for all hormones, and the limits of quantification were 0.2-2 microg/kg. The average recoveries of sex hormones were 68.8%-93.1%. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of inter- and intra-assay were 4.1%-22.3% and 3.1%-17.9%, respectively. The real sample tests showed this method can be used for the sensitive and accurate determination of multi-sex hormones residues in biological samples. PMID:19803132

  17. Urinary Succinylacetone Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongjie; Yu, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Succinylacetone (SA) is used for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with tyrosinemia type I (Tyr I). SA is exclusively elevated in blood and urine of patients with Tyr I. As urinary SA concentration is much higher than blood, SA is usually tested in urine samples. Urinary SA quantitation by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described in this chapter. The urine sample in the amount of 1 ?mol creatinine is used for testing. 3,4,5,6,7-(13)C5-succinylacetone ((13)C5-SA) is used as an internal standard (IS). SA and (13)C5-SA are oximated and extracted from urine with organic solvents, and then derivatized to form trimethylsilane (TMS) derivatives. TMS derivatives of SA and (13)C5-SA are detected and quantified by GC-MS using selective ion monitoring (SIM). The assay is linear from 0.05 to 450 mmol/mol creatinine to cover the broad range of urinary SA concentrations. PMID:26602140

  18. Structural identification of petroleum acids by conversion to hydrocarbons and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Michael J; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-08-18

    Identification of individual petroleum acids ("naphthenic" acids, NA) has proved challenging for decades, due to the extreme complexity of many petroleum acid mixtures. This has hindered detailed understanding of the role of NA in petroleum generation and oil production processes, refinery corrosion, as wood preservatives, and as environmental toxicants. Some recent advances have been made due to improved chromatographic separation of esters of the acids by multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC × GC-MS), but relatively few reference spectra of esters are available for comparison. Here we report a complementary method based on a combination of a modified historical approach of converting NA to the corresponding hydrocarbons, followed by analysis by GC × GC-MS. Many published spectra exist for reference hydrocarbons making comparisons of reference spectra with those of the unknowns, much more feasible. As an example, we report identification of over 30 individual bicyclic naphthenic acids as the bicyclane hydrocarbons. These include both fused and bridged acids possessing methyl, dimethyl, and ethyl alkyl substituents as well as some terpenoid-derived acids. The study provides the most comprehensive analysis of one of the major classes of NA (the bicyclic acids) to date. There is now clear potential for this method to be used for the structural elucidation of other unknown acids (e.g., oil sands acids) and functionalized biomarkers in complex mixtures. PMID:26171636

  19. Study on essential oils from four species of Zhishi with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Citrus fruits are widely used as food and or for medicinal purposes, and they contain a host of active substances that contribute to health. The immature fruits of Citrus sinensis Osbeck and its cultivars (CS), C. junos Sieb. ex Tanaka (CJ), C. aurantium L. and its cultivars (CA) and Poncirus trifoliate Raf. (PT) are the most commonly used medicinal herbs in Traditional Chinese Medicine, called Zhishi. And their mature fruits can be used as food. Results In this study, the essential oils of four different Zhishi species were extracted by steam distillation and detected using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 39 volatiles from the four species were tentatively identified. The limonene was the most abundant amongst the four species. Principal component analysis (PCA) of essential oils showed a clear separation of volatiles among CS, CJ and PT. However, CA could not be separated from these three species. Additionally, the volatiles accounting for the variations among the widely separated species were characterized through their corresponding loading weight. Conclusion Sesquiterpenes were identified as characteristic markers for PT. The content of some monoterpenes could be as taxonomic markers between CS and CJ. This work is of great importance for the evaluation and authentication of Zhishi samples through essential oils. PMID:24708882

  20. Impurity profiling of trinitrotoluene using vacuum-outlet gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brust, Hanneke; Willemse, Sander; Zeng, Tuoyu; van Asten, Arian; Koeberg, Mattijs; van der Heijden, Antoine; Bolck, Annabel; Schoenmakers, Peter

    2014-12-29

    In this work, a reliable and robust vacuum-outlet gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is introduced for the identification and quantification of impurities in trinitrotoluene (TNT). Vacuum-outlet GC-MS allows for short analysis times; the analysis of impurities in TNT was performed in 4min. This study shows that impurity profiling of TNT can be used to investigate relations between TNT samples encountered in forensic casework. A wide variety of TNT samples were analyzed with the developed method. Dinitrobenzene, dinitrotoluene, trinitrotoluene and amino-dinitrotoluene isomers were detected at very low levels (<1wt.%) by applying the MS in selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Limits of detection ranged from 6ng/mL for 2,6-dinitrotoluene to 43ng/mL for 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. Major impurities in TNT were 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,3,4-trinitrotoluene. Impurity profiles based on seven compounds showed to be useful to TNT samples from different sources. Statistical analysis of these impurity profiles using likelihood ratios demonstrated the potential to investigate whether two questioned TNT samples encountered in forensic casework are from the same source. PMID:25488253

  1. Integration of gas chromatography mass spectrometry methods for differentiating ricin preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Wunschel, David S; Melville, Angela M; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Colburn, Heather A; Victry, Kristin D; Antolick, Kathryn C; Wahl, Jon H; Wahl, Karen L

    2012-05-01

    The investigation of crimes involving chemical or biological agents is infrequent, but presents unique analytical challenges. The protein toxin ricin is encountered more frequently than other agents and is found in the seeds of Ricinus communis, commonly known as the castor plant. Typically, the toxin is extracted from castor seeds utilizing a variety of different recipes that result in varying purity of the toxin. Moreover, these various purification steps can also leave or differentially remove a variety of exogenous and endogenous residual components with the toxin that may indicate the type and number of purification steps involved. We have applied three gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based analytical methods to measure the variation in seed carbohydrates and castor oil ricinoleic acid, as well as the presence of solvents used for purification. These methods were applied to the same samples prepared using four previously identified toxin preparation methods, starting from four varieties of castor seeds. The individual data sets for seed carbohydrate profiles, ricinoleic acid, or acetone amount each provided information capable of differentiating different types of toxin preparations across seed types. However, the integration of the data sets using multivariate factor analysis provided a clear distinction of all samples based on the preparation method, independent of the seed source. In particular, the abundance of mannose, arabinose, fucose, ricinoleic acid, and acetone were shown to be important differentiating factors. These complementary tools provide a more confident determination of the method of toxin preparation than would be possible using a single analytical method. PMID:22416271

  2. Determination of phthalate esters in teas and tea infusions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Liping; Ma, Lijuan; Qiao, Yang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-04-15

    Phthalate esters (PAEs), a group of environmental pollutants which are carcinogenic to human body, have been detected in teas. In this work, five PAEs in teas and tea infusions were quantitatively determined by a modified simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After the optimization of SDE, the proposed method afforded a wide range of linearity and high linear regression coefficients with the limits of detection range of 0.24-3.72?g/kg. The average recoveries were 79.83-116.67% for tea samples and 78.22-101.64% for tea infusions with all the relative standard deviations below 20%. The total content of five PAEs in teas was 1.135-3.734mg/kg and the total dissolving ratio of five PAEs from tea to infusion was 19.05-28.07% for the selected tea samples. The risk assessment result of all the selected tea samples demonstrated that the population with the habit of drinking tea won't cause risk to human health. PMID:26675858

  3. The analysis of forensic samples using laser micro-pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Armitage, S; Saywell, S; Roux, C; Lennard, C; Greenwood, P

    2001-09-01

    Laser micropyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is used for the analysis of paint, photocopier toner, and synthetic fiber materials to test the forensic potential of this emerging technology. It uses a laser microprobe to selectively target very small parts of the materials for GC-MS analysis. Whereas the paint and the toner samples were amenable to direct laser pyrolysis, the synthetic fibers proved transparent to the 1064 nm laser radiation. The difficulty with the fibers demonstrates that a specific laser wavelength may not be appropriate for all types of materials. Nevertheless, the fibers were able to be indirectly pyrolyzed by impregnation in a strongly absorbing graphite matrix. A vast array of hydrocarbon pyrolysates was detected from the different materials studied. Unique product distributions were detected from each sample and in sufficient detail to facilitate individual molecular characterization (i.e., molecular fingerprinting). The integrity of the laser data were confirmed by comparison to data obtained from the same samples by the more conventional pyroprobe pyrolysis GC-MS method. The high spatial resolution and selectivity of the laser method may be advantageous for specific forensic applications, however, further work may be required to improve the reproducibility of the data. PMID:11569542

  4. Multi-class method for biomonitoring of hair samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Möder, Monika; Gaudl, Alexander; Alonso, Esteban; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Currently, non-invasive biomonitoring of human exposure to organic pollutants bases upon the analysis mainly of urine and human breast milk. While mostly persistent organic pollutants are the center of interest, the aim of our study was to develop a method for the determination of different chemical classes of emerging pollutants (organophosphorus flame retardants, plastic additives such as phthalates, bisphenol A, insecticides, antimicrobials, preservatives and musk fragrances) in hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The preferred sample preparation included hydrolysis of the hair with trifluoroacetic acid in methanol followed by a liquid-liquid extraction using hexane/ethyl acetate. The validated method is characterized by recoveries higher than 77 % for most analytes, relative standard deviations below 16 % and limits of detection between 2 pg mg(-1) (HHCB) and 292 pg mg(-1) (propylparaben) using 50 mg of dry hair. After respective blank corrections, bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and the musk fragrance HHCB were the predominant compounds determined in all hair samples at concentrations between 32 and 59 ng mg(-1) and 0.8-13 ng mg(-1), respectively. The bactericide triclosan and the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) were detected in selected hair samples at 2 and 0.8 ng mg(-1), respectively. PMID:26427497

  5. Analysis of drugs of abuse in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry: experience and application.

    PubMed

    Karaci?, V; Skender, L

    2000-12-01

    This paper describes quantitative methods for determination of urinary drugs/metabolites. The analysis included indicators of opiate (morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine) and methadone (methadone) consumption, indicator of marihuana/hashish consumption (11-nor-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid), indicators of cocaine consumption (cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and ecgonine methyl ester) and of amphetamines consumption (amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine). The methods included solid-phase extraction of urine, concentration of eluent, derivatisation, and quantitative analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) on a capillary column in the electron impact and selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy were determined for all analytes (limit of detection between 3 and 12 ng/ml, precision < 10%, accuracy > 92%). The accuracy was checked through analysis of standard reference materials and participation in an international quality assessment programme. The methods were used in the analysis of spot urine samples of 60 subjects suspected of drug abuse. Negative findings indicated several disadvantages of urine as a biological sample. PMID:11276966

  6. Characterisation of whiskeys using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, G; James, K J; MacNamara, K; Stack, M A

    2000-10-27

    The application of solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to the detection of flavour volatiles present in Irish and Scottish whiskeys was investigated. A method was developed to characterise these volatiles which included the extraction, identification and quantification of 17 congeners which included fusel alcohols, acetates and esters. The method validation produced the optimum fibre [85 microm poly(acrylate)], extraction time (35 min), sample volume size (3 ml) and desorption time (5 min). The impact of salt on the absorption process was also studied. Characteristic profiles were determined for each whiskey and the flavour congeners were quantified using 4-methyl-2-pentanol as the internal standard. Calibration ranges were determined for each of the congeners with coefficients of linearity ranging from 0.993 (butan-1-ol) to 0.999 (ethyl laurate) and relative standard deviations ranging from 2.5% (2-methylbutan-1-ol) to 21% (furfural) at a concentration of 18.2 mg/l. Detection limits ranged from 0.1 mg/l (ethyl caprate) to 21 mg/l (butan-2-ol). PMID:11093670

  7. Analysis of Tropical Forest Fire Emissions Using in Situ Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry during Sambba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeian, J.; Lewis, A. C.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lee, J. D.; Purvis, R.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical atmospheric profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made over Amazonia using an in situ gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), including isoprene, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and products of biomass burning such as benzene. Measurements were made in the Amazonian (Rondônia and Amazonas) region during September 2012, a period of extensive biomass burning. Data was obtained between 100m and 8500m from the FAAM BAe 146 research aircraft. Isoprene was observed to be constrained overwhelmingly to the boundary layer (height typically ~2500m) with mean boundary layer mixing ratio of ~2 ppbv and a peak of ~5 ppbv at the lowest flight levels of 100 m. First generation isoprene oxidation products, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, were quantified individually rather than as the sum of the pair, which is more commonly found in the literature. Both MACR and MVK were constrained primarily to the boundary layer, however trace quantities could be seen in the free troposphere to a height of 8000 m. Benzene from biomass burning was observed in both boundary layer and free troposphere, with a peak mixing ratio of ~0.8 ppbv at 750 m. This work will present the spatial distribution of isoprene within the boundary as a function of underlying surface type. The vertical profiles of all species are then compared to representative simulations from the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model and conclusions drawn on the success of the model in representing emissions and oxidation chemistry.

  8. Metabolomic profiling in inner ear fluid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Irino, Yasuhiro; Kitamoto, Junko; Fukuda, Yuriko; Inokuchi, Go; Hasegawa, Shingo; Otsuki, Naoki; Yoshida, Masaru; Nibu, Ken-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    The composition and homeostasis of inner ear fluids are important in hearing function. The purpose of this study was to perform metabolomic analysis of the inner ear fluid in guinea pig cochlea, which has not been previously reported in literature, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seventy-seven kinds of metabolites were detected in the inner ear fluid. Six metabolites, ascorbic acid, fructose, galactosamine, inositol, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, and meso-erythritol, were significantly more abundant, and nine metabolites, phosphate, valine, glycine, glycerol, ornithine, glucose, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline, were less abundant in the inner ear fluid than in plasma. The levels of ten metabolites, 3-hydroxy-butyrate, glycerol, fumaric acid, galactosamine, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, phosphate, meso-erythritol, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and inositol, in the inner ear fluid significantly changed after loud noise exposure. These observations may help to elucidate various clinical conditions of sensorineural hearing loss, including noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:26343935

  9. Metabolic products in urine of preterm infants characterized via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hu; Li, Sitao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Hong; Liu, Mengxian; Shi, Congcong; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the metabolic products of urine associated with preterm birth, thus providing clinical guidelines for intestinal and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants. Methods: Urine samples of 47 preterm infants and 45 full-term infants were collected and prepared for trimethylsilylation by treatment with urease. The levels of lysine, phenylalanine, histidine, ornithine, fumaric acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactose, stearic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and statistically analyzed. Results: The normalized concentrations of the following metabolites in preterm infant urine samples were significantly lower than that of full-term infant urine samples: lysine (P = 0.003), phenylalanine (P = 0.001), histidine (P = 0.006), ornithine (P = 0.000), fumaric acid (P = 0.002), malic acid (P = 0.006), succinic acid (P = 0.000), lactose (P = 0.000), stearic acid (P = 0.000) and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (P = 0.000). Conclusions: The results of the GC/MS analysis indicated that amino acid, carbohydrate, and fatty acid metabolism defects exist in preterm infants. The use of GC/MS to determine metabolic products in urine samples could be helpful for prospectively evaluating the nutritional status of preterm infants, and therefore providing clinical guidelines on reasonable nutritional support. PMID:26629171

  10. Magnetic solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometrical analysis of sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; NguyenVan, Manh; Wang, Lijia; Cai, Qingyun

    2015-08-01

    Fluorenyl functionalized superparamagnetic core/shell magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, Fe3O4@SiO2@Flu) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The MNPs having an average diameter of 200nm were then used as solid-phase extraction sorbent for the determination of 16 priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples designated by United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The main influencing parameters, including sorbent amount, desorption solvent, sample volume and extraction time were optimized. Analyses were performed on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels. Limit of detection ranging from 0.5 to 4.0ng/L were obtained. The repeatability was investigated by evaluating the intra- and inter-day precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 13.1%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PAHs in water samples with the recoveries in the range of 96.0-106.7%. PMID:26122856

  11. Determination of Menthol in Plasma and Urine by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Frazee, Clint; Kearns, Gregory; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Menthol, a monoterpene, is a principal component of peppermint oil and is used extensively in consumer products as a flavoring aid. It is also commonly used medicinally as a topical skin coolant; to treat inflammation of the mucous membranes, digestive problems, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); and in preventing spasms during endoscopy and for its spasmolytic effect on the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract. Menthol has a half life of 3-6 h and is rapidly metabolized to menthol glucuronide which is detectable in urine and serum following menthol use. We describe a method for the determination of total menthol in human plasma and urine using liquid/liquid extraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selected ion monitoring mode and menthol-d4 as the internal standard. Controls are prepared with menthol glucuronide and all samples undergo enzymatic hydrolysis for the quantification of total menthol. The method has a linear range of 5-1000 ng/mL, and coefficient of variation <10 %. PMID:26660189

  12. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  13. Pharmaceuticals in grocery market fish fillets by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mottaleb, Musavvir Arafat; Stowe, Carly; Johnson, Daniel R; Meziani, Mohammed J; Mottaleb, M Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Occurrences of pharmaceuticals are evident in aquatic organisms. A reproducible gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method using selected ion monitoring (SIM) has been used to determine the anti-histamine diphenhydramine (DPH), anti-anxiety diazepam (DZP), anti-seizure carbamazepine (CZP) drugs and their metabolites in grocery stores fish that were homogenized, extracted, pre-concentrated, cleaned up, and examined. Identifications of the compounds in extracts were obtained by comparing similar mass spectral features and retention properties with standards. Among nine frequently detected drugs, only DPH and DZP were observed and ranged from 0.61 to 6.21 and 1.99 to 16.57 ng/g, respectively, in fourteen fish species. These concentration values were lower than the environmental fish. Mean spike recoveries of analytes exceeded 75% with relative standard deviations (RSD)<10%. The statistically-derived method detection limits (MDLs) for nine compounds ranged from 0.13 to 5.56 ng/g. Average surrogate recoveries were 80-85% with 4-9% RSD. PMID:26213006

  14. Thermal degradation of ?-pyrrolidinopentiophenone during injection in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kuwayama, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-10

    ?-Pyrrolidinopentiophenone (?-PVP) is a popular recreational drug in Japan. This drug easily undergoes thermal decomposition during gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. We evaluated three factors involved in the decomposition, namely the injection method (splitless or split, split ratio), injector temperature, and surface activity on the inlet liner. Splitless injection of ?-PVP using a used deactivated split/splitless liner at an injector temperature of 250 °C caused thermal decomposition. This decomposition was inhibited by split injection. A higher split ratio resulted in greater prevention. Based on the mass spectrum of deuterated ?-PVP, the decomposition product was presumed to be an enamine whose double bond was located in the alkyl chain. Lowering the injection temperature from 250 °C to 200 °C did not prevent decomposition. New glass liners, both deactivated and non-deactivated, were compared. The use of a new deactivated liner minimized thermal decomposition, even for splitless injection, while the non-deactivated liner generated an increase in the amount of the decomposition product. These results showed that the injection method and the surface activity on the inlet liner were involved in the thermal decomposition of ?-PVP. PMID:23890652

  15. Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the art field. 2--The characterization of proteinaceous binders.

    PubMed

    Carbini, M; Stevanato, R; Rovea, M; Traldi, P; Favretto, D

    1996-01-01

    Curie point pyrolysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry has been employed to characterize some proteinaceous media used in the art field as painting binders: milk casein, egg yolk, egg albumin, bone glue, skin glue, rabbit glue and fish glue. A careful analysis of the gas chromatograms so obtained has led to the distinction of the different proteinaceous binders in terms of different chromatographic profiles. Some of the pyrolysis products have been identified by library search. PMID:8759333

  16. Enzymatic isomerization and epimerization of D-erythrose 4-phosphate and its quantitative analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Terada, T; Kohno, T; Hosomi, S; Mizoguchi, T; Uehara, K

    1984-07-16

    An enzyme preparation from beef liver catalyzed the isomerization and epimerization of D-erythrose 4-phosphate to D-erythrulose 4-phosphate and D-threose 4-phosphate. The presence of D-erythrulose 4-phosphate and D-threose 4-phosphate was demonstrated by several analytical methods. After dephosphorylation, the presence of D-erythrulose and D-threose was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography and an enzymatic method depending upon D-erythrulose reductase. The enzymatic products were also identified and simultaneously quantitated by a new procedure using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Each of three tetroses was distinguished by the combination of the reduction with sodium borodeuteride and the determination of relative intensities of the ion pairs m/z 379 and 380 of sugar tetritol trifluoroacetate. By gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, we observed that D-threose 4-phosphate was also converted into D-erythrulose 4-phosphate and D-erythrose 4-phosphate. At the equilibrium, about 90% of the tetrose 4-phosphate existed in the form of D-erythrulose 4-phosphate. On the basis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometric evidence together with gas chromatographic and thin-layer chromatographic patterns, it is suggested that the single enzyme of the beef liver catalyzed both reactions of isomerization and epimerization of aldotetrose 4-phosphate. PMID:6547672

  17. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry computer analysis of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in man and his environment--A multimedia environmental study.

    PubMed

    Barkley, J; Bunch, J; Bursey, J T; Castillo, N; Cooper, S D; Davis, J M; Erickson, M D; Harris, B S; Kirkpatrick, M; Michael, L C; Parks, S P; Pellizzari, E D; Ray, M; Smith, D; Tomer, K B; Wagner, R; Zweidinger, R A

    1980-04-01

    As part of a study to make a comparative analysis of selected halogenated compounds in man and the environmental media, a quantitative gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of the levels of the halogenated compounds found in the breath, blood and urine of an exposed population (Old Love Canal area, Niagara, New York) and their immediate environment (air and water) was undertaken. In addition, levels of halogenated hydrocarbons in air samples taken in the general Buffalo, Niagara Falls area were determined. PMID:7448328

  18. Analysis of 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smokeless tobacco by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Irina; Villalta, Peter W.; Knezevich, Aleksandar; Jensen, Joni; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2009-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco contains 28 known carcinogens and causes precancerous oral lesions and oral and pancreatic cancer. A recent study conducted by our research team identified 8 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in U.S. moist snuff, encouraging further investigations of this group of toxicants and carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products. In this study, we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method that allows simultaneous analysis of 23 various PAH in smokeless tobacco after a simple two-step extraction and purification procedure. The method produced coefficients of variation under 10% for most PAH. The limits of quantitation for different PAH varied between 0.3 ng/g tobacco and 11 ng/g tobacco, starting with a 300-mg sample. The recovery of the stable isotope-labeled internal standards averaged 87%. The method was applied to analysis of 23 moist snuff samples that include various flavors of the most popular U.S. moist snuff brands, as well as 17 samples representing the currently marketed brands of spit-free tobacco pouches, a relatively new type of smokeless tobacco. The sum of all detected PAH in conventional moist snuff averaged 11.6 (± 3.7) µg/g dry weight, 20% of this amount being comprised by carcinogenic PAH. The levels of PAH in new spit-free tobacco products were much lower than those in moist snuff, the sum of all detected PAH averaging 1.3 (±0.28) µg/g dry weight. Our findings render PAH one of the most prevalent groups of carcinogens in smokeless tobacco, along with tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Urgent measures are required from the U.S. tobacco industry to modify manufacturing processes so that the levels of these toxicants and carcinogens in the U.S. moist snuff are greatly reduced. PMID:19860436

  19. Urine Mescaline Screening With a Biochip Array Immunoassay and Quantification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Battal, Dilek; Barnes, Allan J; Castaneto, Marisol S; Martin, Thomas M; Klette, Kevin L; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-12-01

    Mescaline, the primary psychoactive chemical in peyote cactus, has been consumed for thousands of years in ancient religious ceremonies. The US military wanted to determine if mescaline intake was a problem for personnel readiness. Twenty thousand seventeen urine specimens negative for cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, and amphetamines were tested for mescaline with the Randox Drugs of Abuse V (DOA-V) biochip array immunoassay at the manufacturer's recommended cutoff of 6 mcg/L. A sensitive and specific method for mescaline quantification in urine was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with electron impact ionization. Standard curves, using linear least squares regression with 1/x weighting, were linear from 1 to 250 mcg/L with coefficients of determination >0.994. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision was <4.4 coefficient of variation (%CV), with accuracies >90.4%. Mean extraction efficiencies were >92.0% across the linear range. This fully validated method was applied for the confirmation of urinary mescaline in 526 presumptive-positive specimens and 198 randomly selected presumptive-negative specimens at the manufacturer's 6 mcg/L cutoff. No specimen confirmed positive at the GC/MS limit of quantification of 1 mcg/L. Results indicated that during this time frame, there was insufficient mescaline drug use in the military to warrant routine screening in the drug testing program. However, mescaline stability, although assessed, could have contributed to lower prevalence. We also present a validated GC/MS method for mescaline quantification in urine for reliable confirmation of suspected mescaline intake. PMID:25992796

  20. Extraction of pure components from overlapped signals in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Liki?, Vladimir A

    2009-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a widely used analytical technique for the identification and quantification of trace chemicals in complex mixtures. When complex samples are analyzed by GC-MS it is common to observe co-elution of two or more components, resulting in an overlap of signal peaks observed in the total ion chromatogram. In such situations manual signal analysis is often the most reliable means for the extraction of pure component signals; however, a systematic manual analysis over a number of samples is both tedious and prone to error. In the past 30 years a number of computational approaches were proposed to assist in the process of the extraction of pure signals from co-eluting GC-MS components. This includes empirical methods, comparison with library spectra, eigenvalue analysis, regression and others. However, to date no approach has been recognized as best, nor accepted as standard. This situation hampers general GC-MS capabilities, and in particular has implications for the development of robust, high-throughput GC-MS analytical protocols required in metabolic profiling and biomarker discovery. Here we first discuss the nature of GC-MS data, and then review some of the approaches proposed for the extraction of pure signals from co-eluting components. We summarize and classify different approaches to this problem, and examine why so many approaches proposed in the past have failed to live up to their full promise. Finally, we give some thoughts on the future developments in this field, and suggest that the progress in general computing capabilities attained in the past two decades has opened new horizons for tackling this important problem. PMID:19818154

  1. Chemometric profile of root extracts of Rhodiola imbricata Edgew. with hyphenated gas chromatography mass spectrometric technique.

    PubMed

    Tayade, Amol B; Dhar, Priyanka; Kumar, Jatinder; Sharma, Manu; Chauhan, Rajinder S; Chaurasia, Om P; Srivastava, Ravi B

    2013-01-01

    Rhodiola imbricata Edgew. (Rose root or Arctic root or Golden root or Shrolo), belonging to the family Crassulaceae, is an important food crop and medicinal plant in the Indian trans-Himalayan cold desert. Chemometric profile of the n-hexane, chloroform, dichloroethane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and 60% ethanol root extracts of R. imbricata were performed by hyphenated gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique. GC/MS analysis was carried out using Thermo Finnigan PolarisQ Ion Trap GC/MS MS system comprising of an AS2000 liquid autosampler. Interpretation on mass spectrum of GC/MS was done using the NIST/EPA/NIH Mass Spectral Database, with NIST MS search program v.2.0g. Chemometric profile of root extracts revealed the presence of 63 phyto-chemotypes, among them, 1-pentacosanol; stigmast-5-en-3-ol, (3?,24S); 1-teracosanol; 1-henteracontanol; 17-pentatriacontene; 13-tetradecen-1-ol acetate; methyl tri-butyl ammonium chloride; bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate; 7,8-dimethylbenzocyclooctene; ethyl linoleate; 3-methoxy-5-methylphenol; hexadecanoic acid; camphor; 1,3-dimethoxybenzene; thujone; 1,3-benzenediol, 5-pentadecyl; benzenemethanol, 3-hydroxy, 5-methoxy; cholest-4-ene-3,6-dione; dodecanoic acid, 3-hydroxy; octadecane, 1-chloro; ethanone, 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl); ?-tocopherol; ascaridole; campesterol; 1-dotriacontane; heptadecane, 9-hexyl were found to be present in major amount. Eventually, in the present study we have found phytosterols, terpenoids, fatty acids, fatty acid esters, alkyl halides, phenols, alcohols, ethers, alkanes, and alkenes as the major group of phyto-chemotypes in the different root extracts of R. imbricata. All these compounds identified by GC/MS analysis were further investigated for their biological activities and it was found that they possess a diverse range of positive pharmacological actions. In future, isolation of individual phyto-chemotypes and subjecting them to biological activity will definitely prove fruitful results in designing a novel drug. PMID:23326358

  2. Improved method for rapid detection of phthalates in bottled water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otero, Paz; Saha, Sushanta Kumar; Moane, Siobhan; Barron, John; Clancy, Gerard; Murray, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    An improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for simple, rapid and precise quantification of phthalates in drinking water is presented. This method was validated for bis (2-n-butoxyethyl) phthalate (DBEP), bis (2-n-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-butyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dihexyl phthalate (DHP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP) and dinonyl phthalate (DINP). Linearity of 0.9984>r(2)>0.9975 in the range of 0.075-4.8?g/mL for the selected phthalates was obtained. Accuracy values were in the range of 93-114% and RSD% for the analysis of 1.2?g/mL of each phthalate was below 2.3% (n=9). This new method design has significantly improved the detection in terms of rapidity, specificity, repeatability and accuracy compared to available methods. The procedure has been applied to the analyses of three different brands of commercially available bottled mineral water and the corresponding plastic bottles. Phthalates were extracted with dichloromethane and re-constituted in cyclohexane prior to GC-MS analysis. When the validated GC-MS method was applied to the quantification of the selected phthalates in the samples, only DBP (up to 0.0675±0.0018?g/mL) and DEHP (up to 1.6848±0.1631?g/mL) were found. Furthermore, we provide specific data about the concentration of DBP and DEHP in bottled water attributable to migration of phthalates from respective plastic bottles. PMID:26134297

  3. Systematic analysis of glycerol: colourimetric screening and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric confirmation.

    PubMed

    Sardela, Vinícius F; Scalco, Fernanda B; Cavalcante, Karina M; Simoni, Ruth E; Silva, Deyvison R; Pereira, Henrique Marcelo G; de Oliveira, Maria Lúcia L Costa; Aquino Neto, Francisco R

    2015-10-01

    Glycerol is a naturally occurring polyol in the human body, essential for several metabolic processes. It is widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and medical industries and in clinical practice as a plasma volume expander (PVE). Athletes, however, may use glycerol to mask the presence of forbidden substances or to enhance performance, inclusively through hyperhydration achieved by glycerol ingestion with added fluid. These practices are considered doping, and are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Therefore, glycerol was introduced in the prohibited list. Doping through glycerol ingestion can readily be identified by detection of elevated glycerol concentrations in urine. In this paper, a protocol for the fast detection of glycerol in urine is proposed. It consists of a previous visual colourimetric screening, followed by a quantitative/qualitative confirmation analysis by mass spectrometry. The screening procedure involves a reaction in which polyhydric alcohols are oxidized by periodate to formic acid and formaldehyde, which is detected by the addition of a fuchsin solution. For the subsequent qualitative/quantitative confirmation analysis, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based approach with a non-deuterated internal standard and a drying step of only 10 min is proposed. The linear correlation was demonstrated within WADA´s threshold range. The calculated RSD were 2.1% for within-day precision and 2.8% for between-day precision. The uncertainty estimation was calculated, and a value of 2.7% was obtained. The procedure may also be used for the analysis of other polyols in urine, as for example the PVE mannitol. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26112364

  4. Supervised pattern recognition procedures for discrimination of whiskeys from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry congener analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Arjona, Domingo; López-Pérez, Germán; González-Gallero, Víctor; González, A Gustavo

    2006-03-22

    The volatile congener analysis of 52 commercialized whiskeys (24 samples of single malt Scotch whiskey, 18 samples of bourbon whiskey, and 10 samples of Irish whiskey) was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Pattern recognition procedures were applied for discrimination of different whiskey categories. Multivariate data analysis includes linear discriminant analysis (LDA), k nearest neighbors (KNN), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), procrustes discriminant analysis (PDA), and artificial neural networks techniques involving multilayer perceptrons (MLP) and probabilistic neural networks (PNN). Classification rules were validated by considering the number of false positives (FPs) and false negatives (FNs) of each class associated to the prediction set. Artificial neural networks led to the best results because of their intrinsic nonlinear features. Both techniques, MLP and PNN, gave zero FPs and zero FNs for all of the categories. KNN is a nonparametric method that also provides zero FPs and FNs for every class but only when selecting K = 3 neighbors. PDA produced good results also (zero FPs and FNs always) but only by selecting nine principal components for class modeling. LDA shows a lesser classification performance, because of the building of linear frontiers between classes that does not apply in many real situations. LDA led to one FP for bourbons and one FN for scotches. The worse results were obtained with SIMCA, which gave a higher number of FPs (five for both scotches and bourbons) and FNs (six for scotchs and two for bourbons). The possible cause of these findings is the strong influence of class inhomogeneities on the SIMCA performance. It is remarkable that in any case, all of the methodologies lead to zero FPs and FNs for the Irish whiskeys. PMID:16536565

  5. [Simultaneous determination of five hypertoxic rodenticides in serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiqiu; Huang, Xun; Yu, Jingsun

    2015-03-01

    A fast analytical method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was established for the simultaneous determination of tetramine, fluoroacetamide, sodium fluoroacetate, gliftor I and gliftor II in serum. At pH 2.0, sodium fluoroacetate was derivatizated at room temperature for 5 min by using N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine as the derivatization reagent and N, N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as the catalyst. The derivative and other rodenticides were extracted with ethyl acetate and concentrated with nitrogen at 50 °C, then determined by GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, and quantified with matrix-match standard solutions. The analysis was carried out on an ionic liquid chromatographic capillary column (SLB-IL59, 30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.20 µm, maximum temperature 300 °C) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and the five rodenticides were successfully separated in 15 min when temperature programming was used. The results showed that the calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.01-1.0 mg/L, except for fluoroacetamide (0.02-2.0 mg/L) and tetramine (0.02-10 mg/L), with correlation coefficients (R2) greater than 0.995, and the limits of detection (LODs) were 0.001-0.002 mg/L (S/N = 3). The recoveries were 84.0%-110.0% at three different spiked levels, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.9%-7.5% (n = 6). The method is simple, accurate, highly sensitive and suitable for the detection of the five hypertoxic rodenticides in serum for toxicological purposes. PMID:26182477

  6. Pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of kerogens and kerogen precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Meent, D.; Brown, S. C.; Philp, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of kerogens and kerogen precursors isolated from DSDP samples, oil shales and recent algal mats have been examined by Curie point pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study has shown that the three main types of kerogens (marine, terrestrial and mixtures of both) can be characterized using these techniques. The marine (algal) kerogens yield principally aliphatic products and the terrestrial kerogens yield more aromatic and phenolic products with some n-alkanes and n-alkenes. The yields of n-alkanes and n-alkenes increase and phenols decrease with increasing geologic age, however, pyrolysis-GC cannot be used to characterize the influence of short term diagenesis on the kerogen structure.

  7. The detection of nicotine in a Late Mayan period flask by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Zagorevski, Dmitri V; Loughmiller-Newman, Jennifer A

    2012-02-29

    Several ancient Mayan vessels from the Kislak Collection of the US Library of Congress were examined for the presence of alkaloids. One of them, a codex-style flask, bears a text that appears to read yo-'OTOT-ti 'u-MAY, spelling y-otoot 'u-may 'the home of its/his/her tobacco'. Samples extracted from this Late Classic period (600 to 900?AD) container were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) methods. Nicotine was identified as the major component of the extracts. LC/MS analyses also yielded signals due to nicotine mono-oxides. The identities of the compounds were determined by comparison of the chromatographic and/or mass spectral characteristics with those from standards and literature data. High-resolution high mass accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of protonated nicotine and nicotine mono-oxides were measured to verify and to correct previous product ion assignments. These analyses provided positive evidence for nicotine from a Mayan vessel, indicating it as a likely holder of tobacco leafs. The result of this investigation is the first physical evidence of tobacco from a Mayan container, and only the second example where the vessel content recorded in a Mayan hieroglyphic text has been confirmed directly by chromatography/mass spectrometry trace analysis. PMID:22279016

  8. Characterization of human expired breath by solid phase microextraction and analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and differential mobility spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Merrick, William (William F. W.)

    2005-01-01

    Breath analysis has potential to become a new medical diagnostic modality. In this thesis, a method for the analysis of human expired breath was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. It was subsequently ...

  9. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  10. Plasma metabolomic profiling of dairy cows affected with ketosis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ketosis is an important problem for dairy cows` production performance. However, it is still little known about plasma metabolomics details of dairy ketosis. Results A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique was used to investigate plasma metabolic differences in cows that had clinical ketosis (CK, n=22), subclinical ketosis (SK, n=32), or were clinically normal controls (NC, n=22). The endogenous plasma metabolome was measured by chemical derivatization followed by GC/MS, which led to the detection of 267 variables. A two-sample t-test of 30, 32, and 13 metabolites showed statistically significant differences between SK and NC, CK and NC, and CK and SK, respectively. Orthogonal signal correction-partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed that the metabolic patterns of both CK and SK were mostly similar, with the exception of a few differences. The development of CK and SK involved disturbances in many metabolic pathways, mainly including fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway. A diagnostic model arbitrary two groups was constructed using OPLS-DA and receiver–operator characteristic curves (ROC). Multivariate statistical diagnostics yielded the 19 potential biomarkers for SK and NC, 31 for CK and NC, and 8 for CK and SK with area under the curve (AUC) values. Our results showed the potential biomarkers from CK, SK, and NC, including carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, even sitosterol and vitamin E isomers, etc. 2-piperidinecarboxylic acid and cis-9-hexadecenoic acid were closely associated with metabolic perturbations in ketosis as Glc, BHBA and NEFA for dealing with metabolic disturbances of ketosis in clinical practice. However, further research is needed to explain changes of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid, ?-aminobutyric acid, methylmalonic acid, sitosterol and ?-tocopherol in CK and SK, and to reveal differences between CK and SK. Conclusion Our study shows that some new biomarkers of ketosis from plasma may find new metabolic changes to have clinically new utility and significance in diagnosis, prognosis, and prevention of ketosis in the future. PMID:24070026

  11. Detecting Organic Compounds in Martian Soil Analogues Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of the 1976 Viking missions was to determine whether organic compounds, possibly of biological origin, were present in the Martian surface soils. The Viking gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) instruments found no evidence for any organic compounds of Martian origin above a few parts per billion in the upper 10 cm of surface soil [l], suggesting the absence of a widely distributed Martian biota. However, Benner et d. have suggested that significant amounts of non-volatile organic compounds, possibly including oxidation products of bioorganic molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS [2]. Moreover, other key organic compounds important to biology, such as amino acids and nucleobases, would also likely have been missed by the Viking GCMS as these compounds require chemical derivatization to be stable in a GC column [3]. Recent pyrolysis experiments with a Mars soil analogue that had been innoculated with Escherichia coli bacteria have shown that amino acid decomposition products (amines) and nucleobases are among the most abundant products generated after pyrolysis of the bacterial cells [4,5]. At the part per billion level (Viking GCMS detection limit), these pyrolysis products generated from several million bacterial cells per gram of Martian soil would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments [4]. Analytical protocols are under development for upcoming in situ lander opportunities to target several important biological compounds including amino acids and nucleobases. For example, extraction and chemical derivatization techniques [3] are being adapted for space flight use to transform reactive or fragile molecules that would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments, into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by GCMS. Recent experiments carried out at NASA Goddard have shown that using this derivatization technique all of the targeted compounds mentioned above can be separated on a GC column and detected by MS at sub-picomole (< 10(exp -l2 mole) levels. With these methods, the detection limit for amino acids, carboxylic acids and nucleobases is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than the Viking GCMS instruments for these compounds. Preliminary results using this analytical technique on a variety of Martian soil analogues will be presented.

  12. Authentication of Organically and Conventionally Grown Basils by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Chemical Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengfang; Chen, Pei; Yu, Liangli; Harrington, Peter de B.

    2013-01-01

    Basil plants cultivated by organic and conventional farming practices were accurately classified by pattern recognition of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) data. A novel extraction procedure was devised to extract characteristic compounds from ground basil powders. Two in-house fuzzy classifiers, i.e., the fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) and the fuzzy optimal associative memory (FOAM) for the first time, were used to build classification models. Two crisp classifiers, i.e., soft independent modeling by class analogy (SIMCA) and the partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used as control methods. Prior to data processing, baseline correction and retention time alignment were performed. Classifiers were built with the two-way data sets, the total ion chromatogram representation of data sets, and the total mass spectrum representation of data sets, separately. Bootstrapped Latin partition (BLP) was used as an unbiased evaluation of the classifiers. By using two-way data sets, average classification rates with FuRES, FOAM, SIMCA, and PLS-DA were 100 ± 0%, 94.4 ± 0.4%, 93.3 ± 0.4%, and 100 ± 0%, respectively, for 100 independent evaluations. The established classifiers were used to classify a new validation set collected 2.5 months later with no parametric changes except that the training set and validation set were individually mean-centered. For the new two-way validation set, classification rates with FuRES, FOAM, SIMCA, and PLS-DA were 100%, 83%, 97%, and 100%, respectively. Thereby, the GC/MS analysis was demonstrated as a viable approach for organic basil authentication. It is the first time that a FOAM has been applied to classification. A novel baseline correction method was used also for the first time. The FuRES and the FOAM are demonstrated as powerful tools for modeling and classifying GC/MS data of complex samples and the data pretreatments are demonstrated to be useful to improve the performance of classifiers. PMID:23398171

  13. The use of stable isotopes and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the identification of steroid metabolites in the equine

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, E.; Dumasia, M.C.; Teale, P.; Smith, S.J.; Cox, J.; Marshall, D.; Gower, D.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry has been used successfully in the elucidation of structures of urinary steroid metabolites in the horse and in the identification of metabolites isolated from in vivo perfusion and in vitro incubation studies using equine tissue preparations. Deuterium-labeled steroids, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta-diol have been synthesized by base-catalyzed isotope exchange methods and the products characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. (16,16(-2)H2)Dehydroepiandrosterone (plus radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone) was perfused into a testicular artery of a pony stallion and was shown to be metabolized into 2H2-labeled testosterone, 4-androstenedione, isomers of 5-androstene-3,17-diol, 19-hydroxytestosterone, and 19-hydroxy-4-androstenedione. In further studies, equine testicular minces have been incubated with 2H2-labeled and radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone and 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. The metabolites, whose identity was confirmed by stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proved the interconversion of the two substrates, as well as formation of testosterone and 4-androstenedione. The aromatization of dehydroepiandrosterone was also confirmed, together with the formation of an isomer of 5(10)-estrene-3,17-diol from both substrates showing 19-demethylation without concomitant aromatization. In studies of the feto-placental unit, the allantochorion was shown to aromatize (2H5)testosterone to (2H4)estradiol, the loss of one 2H from the substrate being consistent with aromatization of the A ring. The formation of 6-hydroxyestradiol was also confirmed in this study. The same technique has been valuable in determining the structure of two metabolites of nandrolone isolated from horse urine.

  14. Application of capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry/computer techniques to synoptic survey of organic material in bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Pereira, W.E.; Johnson, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A bed sediment sample taken from an area impacted by heavy industrial activity was analyzed for organic compounds of environmental significance. Extraction was effected on a Soxhlet apparatus using a freeze-dried sample. The Soxhlet extract was fractionated by silica gel micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic compounds was accomplished by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. More than 50 compounds were identified; these include saturated hydrocarbons, olefins, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as aldehydes and ketones. The role of bed sediments as a source or sink for organic pollutants is discussed. ?? 1981.

  15. Sensitive determination of fluoride in biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Myung; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2014-12-10

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method was developed in this study in order to determine fluoride in plasma and urine after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene. 2-Fluoronaphthalene was chosen as the internal standard. The derivatization of fluoride was performed in the biological sample and the best reaction conditions (10.0 mg mL(-1) of 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, 1.0 mg mL(-1) of 15-crown-5-ether as a phase transfer catalyst, pH of 7.0, reaction temperature of 70°C, and heating time of 70 min) were established. The organic derivative was extracted with dichloromethane and then measured by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Under the established condition, the detection limits were 11 ?g L(-1) and 7 ?g L(-1) by using 0.2 mL of plasma or urine, respectively. The accuracy was in a range of 100.8-107.6%, and the precision of the assay was less than 4.3% in plasma or urine. Fluoride was detected in a concentration range of 0.12-0.53 mg L(-1) in six urine samples after intake of natural mineral water containing 0.7 mg L(-1) of fluoride. PMID:25441893

  16. Characterization of organic matter in total suspended particles by thermodesorption and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinping; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Shexia, Ma; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2009-01-01

    The organic matter in tropospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric physical and chemical processes. The bulk of organic matter, representing a significant proportion of the total suspended particulate (TSP) mass, is bound to polymeric material whose structure and properties are largely unknown. Here we used thermodesorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Td-GC/MS) to study organic compounds of low molecular mass and pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) to characterize the chemical structure of macromolecules in TSP samples collected in different seasons from different sites in Guangzhou. n-Alkanes, fatty acids and nitriles were the predominant compounds in the thermodesorption products, whereas aromatics, fatty acids, nitriles and n-alkanes/alkenes were the major compounds in the pyrolysates. The results indicated that aromatics were main units in macromolecules. The fatty acids and nitriles formed from carboxylic ammonium salts were detected in both thermodesorption products and pyrolysates at a certain concentration, indicating the importance of these compounds in TSP formation. The TSP source mainly determined the occurrence of compounds in samples from urban, suburban and forest sites, whereas the TSP source and formation process maybe controlled the seasonal variation in compounds detected. High levels of nitriles in summer samples from suburban and forest sites coincide with the release of ammonium from the land and of fatty acids from vegetation at these sites. PMID:20131595

  17. Quantitative determination of dimethyl fumarate in silica gel by solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ultrasound-assisted extraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bocchini, Paola; Pinelli, Francesca; Pozzi, Romina; Ghetti, Federica; Galletti, Guido C

    2015-06-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a chemical compound which has been added to silica gel bags used for preserving leather products during shipment. DMF has recently been singled out due to its ability to induce a number of medical problems in people which touch products contaminated by it. Its use as a biocide has been recently made illegal in Europe. Two different extraction techniques, namely ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME), both coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were applied to the quantitative determination of DMF in silica gel. Linearity of the methods, reproducibility and detection limits were determined. The two methods were applied to the quantification of DMF in thirty-four silica gel samples used as anti-mould agents in different leather products sold in Italy, and the obtained results were statistically compared. PMID:25939646

  18. [Multi-residue determination of 289 pesticides in garlic by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Su, Jianfeng; Lu, Shengyu; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jinxing; Liang, Zhen; Liu, Jianjun

    2011-07-01

    A new idea of solvent transfer technique was developed and applied to determine 283 pesticide residues in garlic by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (method I), and the other method using normal phase silica/selective elution technique was applied to determine 6 pesticide residues with strongly polar in garlic by gas chromatography (method II). For the method I, the residues were extracted from homogenized tissue with acetonitrile-water, separated with liquid-liquid partition; the clear supernatant was purified by solvent transfer technique and solid phase extraction (Envi-18 and LC-NH2 columns), then was analyzed by GC-MS. For the method II, the residues were extracted from homogenized tissue using ethyl acetate and sodium sulfate assisted by ultrasonication. The supernatant was purified by solid phase extraction (primary secondary amine (PSA) powder and LC-Si column) prior to GC analysis. The determination was performed by using selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode in GC-MS method and flame photometric detector (FPD) in GC method, then external standard method was used in the quantification. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limits for the two methods (S/N > or = 10) of pesticides were 0.01-0.05 mg/kg, the recoveries carried out by the addition of standards of 0.01-0.20 mg/kg were 52%-163%, among which the recoveries for 88% pesticides were between 70% and 120%; the recoveries of the method II were 70%-111%; while the relative standard deviations were 2.4%-18% and 3.2%-9.3%, respectively. The model of solvent transfer technique and the sensitivity improvement of GC-MS was also studied. The methods are easy, fast, more sensitive, and can meet the requirement of the multiresidual analysis in garlic. PMID:22097791

  19. Analysis of odour compounds from scented consumer products using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Jennifer; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga

    2016-01-21

    Scented consumer products are being bought in increasing amounts and gaining more popularity. There is, however, relatively little information available about their ingredients, emissions and allergenic potential. Frequently, a mixture of different fragrance substances and not solely an individual substance contributes to the overall desired smell. The aim of this study was to investigate the odorous volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in consumer products containing fragrances. Over 44 products were selected: various scented candles, printing products with different scent types and other products types particularly meant to be used indoors. Measurements were carried out in a desiccator. Air samples were collected on thermal desorption tubes to determine the released fragrance substances by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) was used to obtain sensory data and to ensure no important odorant was overlooked. Using both methods it was possible to distinguish between odour active and inactive compounds and subsequently to identify almost 300 different odorants across all scented products. Besides the advantage of differentiation, as the human nose is a very sensitive detector, GC-O was found to be a useful tool for detecting traces and chosen target compounds. One focus in this study lay on the 26 EU-regulated fragrance allergens to prove their relevance in scented consumer goods. In total, 18 of them were identified, with at least one substance being present in almost every product. Benzyl alcohol, cinnamaldehyde, citronellol, eugenol, linalool and limonene were the prevalently detected allergens. Particularly linalool and limonene were observed in over 50% of the products. In addition, eugenol appeared to be one of the most frequently detected compounds in trace-level concentrations in the candle emissions. PMID:26724768

  20. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of biological particulates collected during recent space shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. L.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Biological particulates collected on air filters during shuttle missions (STS-40 and STS-42) were identified using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). A method was developed for identifying the atmospheric particles and their sources through the analysis of standard materials and the selection of "marker" compounds specific to the particle type. Pyrolysis spectra of biological standards were compared with those of airborne particles collected during two space shuttle missions; marker compounds present in the shuttle particle spectra were matched with those of the standards to identify the source of particles. Particles of 0,5--1-mm diameter and weighing as little as 40 micrograms could be identified using this technique. The Py-GC/MS method identified rat food and soilless plant-growth media as two sources of particles collected from the shuttle atmosphere during flight.

  1. The identification of synthetic organic pigments in modern paints and modern paintings using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Joanna; Singer, Brian W; Perry, Justin J; Bacon, Anne

    2011-05-01

    A collection of more than 70 synthetic organic pigments were analysed using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). We report on the analysis of diketo-pyrrolo-pyrrole, isoindolinone and perylene pigments which are classes not previously reported as being analysed by this technique. We also report on a number of azo pigments (2-naphthol, naphthol AS, arylide, diarylide, benzimidazolone and disazo condensation pigments) and phthalocyanine pigments, the Py-GC-MS analysis of which has not been previously reported. The members of each class were found to fragment in a consistent way and the pyrolysis products are reported. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of paints used by the artist Francis Bacon (1909-1992), to simultaneously identify synthetic organic pigments and synthetic binding media in two samples of paint taken from Bacon's studio and micro-samples taken from three of his paintings and one painting attributed to him. PMID:21416165

  2. Determination of some volatile compounds in alcoholic beverage by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Feher, I.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The volatile composition of alcoholic beverage was studied by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME) method and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Some volatile compounds, such as alcohols, esters, terpenes and other are mainly responsible for the flavor of fortified wines and their amounts specify the quality of the alcoholic beverages. From this perspective it is interesting to develop a rapid, selective and sensitive analytical method suitable for simultaneous quantification of the main molecules being responsible for the organoleptic characteristic of alcoholic beverages. Vermouth fortified drink was analyzed in order to characterize the volatile profile. Using the HS-SPME/GC-MS a number of twenty-six volatile compounds from a commercial market alcoholic beverage were identified. The most abundant compounds were m-thymol, o-thymol and eugenol, alongside of the ethyl ester compounds.

  3. Characterization by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of diterpenoid resinous materials in Roman-age amphorae from northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakoudi, Evagelia A; Mitkidou, Sofia A; Urem-Kotsou, Dushka; Kotsakis, Kostas; Stephanidou-Stephanatou, Julia; Stratis, John A

    2011-01-01

    A combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry approach has been used for the characterization of two lumps of resin and 17 adsorbed residues on Roman-age vessels, mainly amphorae, from northern Greece. The data show that a diterpenic resin from plants of the Pinacae family is the main component of the tarry material associated with the analyzed archaeological samples. The identification and mass spectrometric fragmentation of several characteristic diterpenoid biomarkers is discussed. The abundance of secondary products identified in the archaeological samples suggests that the oxidative degradation of abietic acid and dehydroabietic acid to aromatic products was the main pathway. Of particular interest is the presence of characteristic saturated abietane hydrocarbons in one sample, which indicate that a reductive process also occurred on a small scale. The overall similarity in the composition of the residues suggests the common use of pine tar as a waterproofing and sealing agent at different sites in northern Greece during the Roman period. PMID:22274948

  4. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy: Reliable techniques for analysis of Parthenium mediated vermicompost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajiv, P.; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Venckatesh, Rajendran

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy have been carried out to investigate the chemical composition of Parthenium mediated vermicompost. Four different concentrations of Parthenium and cow dung mixtures were vermicomposted using the earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae). FT-IR spectra reveal the absence of Parthenin toxin (sesquiterpene lactone) and phenols in vermicompost which was obtained from high concentration of cow dung mixed treatments. GC-MS analysis shows no phenolic compounds and predominant level of intermediate metabolites such as 4,8,12,16-Tetramethylheptadecan-4-olide (7.61%), 2-Pentadecanone, 6,10,14-trimethyl- (5.29%) and Methyl 16-methyl-heptadecanoate (4.69%) during the vermicomposting process. Spectral results indicated that Parthenin toxin and phenols can be eradicated via vermicomposting if mixed with appropriate quantity of cow dung.

  5. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy: reliable techniques for analysis of Parthenium mediated vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Rajiv, P; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Venckatesh, Rajendran

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy have been carried out to investigate the chemical composition of Parthenium mediated vermicompost. Four different concentrations of Parthenium and cow dung mixtures were vermicomposted using the earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae). FT-IR spectra reveal the absence of Parthenin toxin (sesquiterpene lactone) and phenols in vermicompost which was obtained from high concentration of cow dung mixed treatments. GC-MS analysis shows no phenolic compounds and predominant level of intermediate metabolites such as 4,8,12,16-Tetramethylheptadecan-4-olide (7.61%), 2-Pentadecanone, 6,10,14-trimethyl- (5.29%) and Methyl 16-methyl-heptadecanoate (4.69%) during the vermicomposting process. Spectral results indicated that Parthenin toxin and phenols can be eradicated via vermicomposting if mixed with appropriate quantity of cow dung. PMID:23998948

  6. Biocatalytic Lactone Generation in Genetically Engineered Escherichia coli and Identification of Products by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slawson, Chad; Stewart, Jon; Potter, Robert

    2001-11-01

    Genetically altered Escherichia coli are used as biocatalysts to produce optically pure lactones from a variety of cyclic ketones as a biotechnology experiment for a biochemistry laboratory. The genetically engineered E. coli bacteria express large amounts of the enzyme cyclohexanone monooxygenase and are therefor capable of converting a variety of ketones into optically pure lactones. Separation by organic extraction and analysis by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy allows for the direct identification of products. Yield calculations and evaluation of the cost effectiveness of various substrates give students an opportunity to make recommendations and model industrial decision-making. Evaluation of the synthetic process for its environmental impact allows students to consider problems of cost versus environmental concerns. Use of bacterial biocatalysts offers chemistry students an opportunity to work with microorganisms and directly see the utility of genetically altered bacteria for synthetic chemistry.

  7. [Rapid determination of alkaloids in tobacco using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with full scan-selected ion monitoring mode].

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoxing; Yang, Shihua; Hou, Ying; Zeng, Xiaoying; Wu, Yi; Xu, Guowang

    2008-05-01

    Simultaneous full scan-selected ion monitoring mode (Scan-SIM) is a new improvement method of data acquisition of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A method of determing alkaloids in tobacco was established by GC-MS with Scan-SIM. Nicotine, nornicotine, anabasine and anatabine were determined with scan mode, and myosmine, nicotyrine, 2,3'-bipyridyl and cotinine were determined with SIM mode. The average recoveries of alkaloids ranged from 94.8% to 98.8%, and the relative standard deviations were less than 6.0% (n = 5). Therefore, it is a simple, rapid, accurate method. Tobacco samples picked in different years were determined using this method, and the results were satisfactory. PMID:18724666

  8. Negative ion chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of low-dosed and/or polar drugs in plasma.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Hans H; Kraemer, Thomas; Kratzsch, Carsten; Peters, Frank T; Weber, Armin A

    2002-02-01

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, doping control, and therapeutic drug monitoring, specific and sensitive detection and precise quantification of xenobiotics in biosamples are great challenges. Today, mass spectrometry techniques, coupled with gas chromatography or liquid chromatography, are the most powerful methods in analytic toxicology. The pros and cons of electron ionization (EI) and negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (APCI-LC-MS) are described for determination of the low-dosed benzodiazepine flunitrazepam and its 7-amino and its nor-metabolite in plasma. In addition, application of NICI-GC-MS is described for sensitive chiral determination of amphetamine derivatives in plasma and application of APCI-LC-MS for screening, library-assisted identification, and validated quantification of oral antidiabetics and for validated quantification of the neuroleptic risperidone and its 9-hydroxy metabolite. These examples show that NICI-GC-MS and LC-MS are powerful tools for determination of low-dosed and/or rather polar drugs or poisons, thus becoming indispensable supplements to classic EI-GC-MS in clinical and forensic toxicology as well as in doping control. PMID:11805732

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Bisphenol A Leached from Household Plastics by Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bettie Obi; Burke, Fernanda M.; Harrison, Rebecca; Burdette, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of trace levels of bisphenol A (BPA) leached out of household plastics using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is reported here. BPA is an endocrine-disrupting compound used in the industrial manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles and epoxy resin can liners. This experiment…

  10. DETERMINATION OF A BOUND MUSK XYLENE METABOLITE IN CARP HEMOGLOBIN AS A BIOMARKER OF EXPOSURE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY USING SELECTED ION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Musk xylene (MX) is widely used as a fragrance ingredient in commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (AMX) metabolite was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Detection of AMX occur...

  11. METHOD 530 DETERMINATION OF SELECT SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ MASS SPECTROMETRY (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1.1. This is a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the determination of selected semivolatile organic compounds in drinking waters. Accuracy and precision data have been generated in reagent water, and in finished ground and surface waters for the compounds li...

  12. Thermal Extraction–Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry with Heart-Cutting for Nitrogen Heterocyclics in Biomass Burning Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction-two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE-GC-MS) method (with heart-cutting) is developed for quantitatively assessing nitrogen (N-bearing organic species (e.g., pyrrole, pyridine, nitriles, and amines) in aerosols emitted from agricultural fir...

  13. Lipid fatty acid profile analyses in liver and serum in rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids (FA) are essential components of lipids and exhibit important biological functions. The analyses of FAs are routinely carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, after multi-step sample preparation. In this study, several key experimental factors were carefully examined, validat...

  14. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction–thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction -thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (SBSE -TD -GCMS). M...

  15. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and…

  16. AUTOMATED GEL-PERMEATION SYSTEM FOR REMOVAL OF LIPIDS IN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF FATTY TISSUES FOR XENOBIOTIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interference of natural lipids in gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of xenobiotic chemicals in fatty tissue can be substantially reduced using gel-permeation chromatographic removal of the lipids. This paper presents an inexpensive controller which can be used wi...

  17. Quantitation of diethylene glycol and its metabolites by gas chromatography mass spectrometry or ion chromatography mass spectrometry in rat and human biological samples.

    PubMed

    Perala, Adam W; Filary, Mark J; Bartels, Michael J; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2014-05-01

    The misuse of the commonly used chemical diethylene glycol (DEG) has lead to many poisonings worldwide. Methods were developed for analysis of DEG and its potential metabolites; ethylene glycol, glycolic acid, oxalic acid, diglycolic acid and hydroxyethoxy acetic acid in human urine, serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples, collected following a DEG-associated poisoning in the Republic of Panama during 2006. In addition, methods were developed for rat blood, urine, kidney and liver tissue to support toxicokinetic analysis during the conduct of DEG acute toxicity studies in the rat. Sample analysis was conducted using two techniques; ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity and negative ion electrospray ionization with MS detection or with gas chromatography using electron impact ionization or methane negative chemical ionization with MS detection. Stable-isotope-labeled analogs of each analyte were employed as quantitative internal standards in the assays. PMID:24668490

  18. Chemotaxonomic differentiation of legionellae by detection and characterization of aminodideoxyhexoses and other unique sugars using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fox, A; Rogers, J C; Fox, K F; Schnitzer, G; Morgan, S L; Brown, A; Aono, R

    1990-03-01

    Legionellae have been differentiated previously by analyzing their carbohydrate contents by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. In the present study, total ion mode gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to detect a number of unusual sugars, including one that is structurally related to O-methyldideoxyheptoses. Increased sensitivity and selectivity for carbohydrate detection was achieved by selected ion-monitoring GC-MS. Two of the uncommon sugars previously discovered in the legionellae (X1 and X2) were identified as quinovosamine and fucosamine, respectively. Legionella pneumophila contained rhamnose and quinovosamine but not the quinovosamine isomer fucosamine. Tatlockia micdadei and Legionella maceachernii contained large amounts of rhamnose, fucose, and fucosamine but not quinovosamine. These two species were the only legionellae studied that contained another unusual sugar that is referred to as X3, pending determination of its structure. Fluoribacter dumoffi, Fluoribacter bozemanae, and Legionella anisa were varied in their carbohydrate contents, both within and between species, but could be distinguished from L. pneumophila and the T. micdadei and L. maceachernii group. Fluoribacter gormanii was unique among the legionellae in that it lacked both quinovosamine and fucosamine. Legionella jordanis contained other unusual carbohydrates in addition to quinovosamine. GC-MS may have wide application in the differentiation of bacterial species. PMID:2324276

  19. Method Development for the Determination of Fluorotelomer Alcohols in Soils by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) have been widely studied as precursors to perfluorocarboxylates, e.g. 8:2 FTOH degrades to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). This presentation describes an analytical method for the extraction and analysis of 6:2, 8:2, and 10:2 FTOHs. Gas chromatograph...

  20. PRECOLUMN SAMPLE ENRICHMENT DEVICE FOR ANALYSIS OF AMBIENT VOLATILE ORGANICS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC/MS) identification of air pollutants generally requires a preconcentration step to provide sufficient sample for analysis. Cryogenic trapping is often used to enrich the sample since nitrogen and oxygen are not condensed. It does, howeve...

  1. SPECIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS BY CONE PENETROMETRY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R826184)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chroma tography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collec...

  2. Persistent Organic Pollutant Determination in Killer Whale Scat Samples: Optimization of a Gas Chromatography/Mass

    E-print Network

    Wasser, Samuel

    Persistent Organic Pollutant Determination in Killer Whale Scat Samples: Optimization of a Gas), and hexachlorocyclobenzene, in killer whale scat (fecal) samples. Archival scat samples, ini- tially collected, lyophilized samples collected from Southern Resident killer whales. Scat samples from 22 adult whales also had known

  3. Performance and optimization of a combustion interface for isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, M. P.; Studley, S. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions and systems for on-line combustion of effluents from capillary gas chromatographic columns and for removal of water vapor from product streams were tested. Organic carbon in gas chromatographic peaks 15 s wide and containing up to 30 nanomoles of carbon was quantitatively converted to CO2 by tubular combustion reactors, 200 x 0.5 mm, packed with CuO or NiO. No auxiliary source of O2 was required because oxygen was supplied by metal oxides. Spontaneous degradation of CuO limited the life of CuO reactors at T > 850 degrees C. Since NiO does not spontaneously degrade, its use might be favored, but Ni-bound carbon phases form and lead to inaccurate isotopic results at T < 1050 degrees C if gas-phase O2 is not added. For all compounds tested except CH4, equivalent isotopic results are provided by CuO at 850 degrees C, NiO + O2 (gas-phase mole fraction, 10(-3)) at 1050 degrees C and NiO at 1150 degrees C. The combustion interface did not contribute additional analytical uncertainty, thus observed standard deviations of 13C/12C ratios were within a factor of 2 of shot-noise limits. For combustion and isotopic analyses of CH4, in which quantitative combustion required T approximately 950 degrees C, NiO-based systems are preferred, and precision is approximately 2 times lower than that observed for other analytes. Water must be removed from the gas stream transmitted to the mass spectrometer or else protonation of CO2 will lead to inaccuracy in isotopic analyses. Although thresholds for this effect vary between mass spectrometers, differential permeation of H2O through Nafion tubing was effective in both cases tested, but the required length of the Nafion membrane was 4 times greater for the more sensitive mass spectrometer.

  4. Comparison of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and immunoassay techniques on concentrations of atrazine in storm runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydy, M.J.; Carter, D.S.; Crawford, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were used to measure concentrations of dissolved atrazine in 149 surface-water samples. Samples were collected during May 1992-September 1993 near the mouth of the White River (Indiana) and in two small tributaries of the river. GC/MS was performed on a Hewlett- Packard 5971A with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring of filtered water samples extracted by C-18 solid phase extraction: ELISA was performed with a magnetic-particle-based assay with photometric analysis. ELISA results compared reasonably well to GC/MS measurements at concentrations below the Maximum Contaminant Level for drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (3.0 ??g/L), but a systematic negative bias was observed at higher concentrations. When higher concentration samples were diluted into the linear range of calibration, the relation improved. A slight positive bias was seen in all of the ELISA data compared to the GC/MS results, and the bias could be partially explained by correcting the ELISA data for cross reactivity with other triazine herbicides. The highest concentrations of atrazine were found during the first major runoff event after the atrazine was applied. Concentrations decreased throughout the rest of the sampling period even though large runoff events occurred during this time, indicating that most atrazine loading to surface waters in the study area occurs within a few weeks after application.

  5. Determination of Sucrose in Honey with Derivatization/Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas-Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijing; Geppert, Helmut; Fischer, Thomas; Wieprecht, Wolfgang; Möller, Detlev

    2015-10-01

    A new method for the determination of sucrose in honey with derivatization solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (D-SPME-GC/MS) was developed. The method incorporates a sample derivatization with acetic anhydride using N-methylimidazole as the catalyst and the subsequent enrichment of the analyte in a Polyacrylate-SPME fiber. Results show that 100 µL N-methylimidazole and 800 µL acetic anhydride were sufficient to complete the acetylation for sucrose in 100 µL aqueous sample at room temperature. For SPME, an enrichment time of 30 min was sufficient. SPME was performed by immersing the fiber into the solution with additional vibration. Then, the analyte was desorbed for 5 min at 280°C in the GC/MS injection port with splitless mode. The present method exhibits good linearity at a concentration range of 0.3-8% of sucrose in honey with excellent regression (R = 0.9993). The method has been successfully applied to the control of sucrose adulteration in honey. PMID:25911451

  6. Plasma metabolite profiling and chemometric analyses of lung cancer along with three controls through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Mazhar, Shumaila; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Rizi, Nadeem; Atta-ur-Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has been the most common death causing cancer in the world for several decades. This study is focused on the metabolite profiling of plasma from lung cancer (LC) patients with three control groups including healthy non-smoker (NS), smokers (S) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (COPD) samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to identify the comparative and distinguishing metabolite pattern for lung cancer. Metabolites obtained were identified through National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral (Wiley registry) and Fiehn Retention Time Lock (RTL) libraries. Mass Profiler Professional (MPP) Software was used for the alignment and for all the statistical analysis. 32 out of 1,877 aligned metabolites were significantly distinguished among three controls and lung cancer using p-value ? 0.001. Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA) model was generated using statistically significant metabolites which on external validation provide high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (78.6%). Elevated level of fatty acids, glucose and acids were observed in lung cancer in comparison with control groups apparently due to enhanced glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis and acidosis, indicating the metabolic signature for lung cancer. PMID:25712604

  7. Plasma Metabolite Profiling and Chemometric Analyses of Lung Cancer along with Three Controls through Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Mazhar, Shumaila; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Rizi, Nadeem; Atta-ur-Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has been the most common death causing cancer in the world for several decades. This study is focused on the metabolite profiling of plasma from lung cancer (LC) patients with three control groups including healthy non-smoker (NS), smokers (S) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (COPD) samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to identify the comparative and distinguishing metabolite pattern for lung cancer. Metabolites obtained were identified through National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral (Wiley registry) and Fiehn Retention Time Lock (RTL) libraries. Mass Profiler Professional (MPP) Software was used for the alignment and for all the statistical analysis. 32 out of 1,877 aligned metabolites were significantly distinguished among three controls and lung cancer using p-value ? 0.001. Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA) model was generated using statistically significant metabolites which on external validation provide high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (78.6%). Elevated level of fatty acids, glucose and acids were observed in lung cancer in comparison with control groups apparently due to enhanced glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis and acidosis, indicating the metabolic signature for lung cancer. PMID:25712604

  8. Determination of residual pharmaceuticals in edible animal tissues by continuous solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Abdelmonaim; Souhail, Badredine; Ballesteros, Evaristo

    2011-05-15

    A sensitive, reliable method using continuous solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of twenty pharmaceuticals including antibacterials, anti-epileptics, antiseptics, ?-blockers, lipid regulators, hormones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories at trace levels in edible animal tissues. The procedure involves deproteination and delipidation of samples by precipitation/centrifugation/filtration, followed by sample enrichment and cleanup by continuous solid-phase extraction. The proposed method was validated with quite good analytical results including low limits of detections (0.4-2.7 ng kg(-1) for 2g of sample) and good linearity (r(2)>0.995) throughout the studied concentration ranges. In addition, the method is quite accurate (recoveries ranged from 92 to 101%) and precise (within-day and between-day RSD values were less than 7%), which allows the determination of residual pharmaceuticals in tissues from agricultural farm and fish hatchery animals (pig, veal, lamb and chicken muscle, kidney and liver; and salmon, sea bass and sole flesh). The analytes most frequently found in the studied samples were the hormones estrone and 17?-estradiol, and the antibacterials florfenicol and pyrimethamine. PMID:21482288

  9. Metabolite profiling of sucrose effect on the metabolism of Melissa officinalis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooah; Shin, Min Hye; Hossain, Md Aktar; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Hojoung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2011-04-01

    The effect of sugar on plant metabolism, which is known to be similar to hormone-like signaling, was metabolomically studied using Melissa officinalis (lemon balm). The metabolite profiles of M. officinalis treated with sucrose were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). A total of 64 metabolites from various chemical classes including alcohols, amines, amino acids, fatty acids, inorganic acids, organic acids, phosphates, and sugars were identified by GC-MS. Three groups treated with different sucrose concentrations were clearly separated by PCA of their metabolite profiles, indicating changes in the levels of many metabolites depending on the sucrose concentration. Metabolite profiling revealed that treatment with a higher sucrose level caused an increase in the levels of metabolites such as sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar phosphates, which are related to the glycolytic pathway of M. officinalis. Furthermore, proline and succinic acid, which are associated with the proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway, the shikimic acid pathway, and the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, also increased with increasing sucrose concentration. Therefore, these metabolic changes induced by sucrose ultimately led to the increased production of flavonoids such as caffeic acid via the biosynthetic pathway of phenylpropanoids. This study demonstrated that the abundance changes in some primary and secondary metabolites were somewhat interlocked with each other in response to sucrose. PMID:21301821

  10. Characterization of the volatile profile of thistle honey using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, F; Mangia, A; Mattarozzi, M; Musci, M

    2011-12-01

    In this study, a headspace solid-phase microextraction method was developed for the characterization of the volatile fraction of thistle honey and compared with a dynamic headspace extraction method. A DVB/CAR/PDMS fibre was used. The effects of extraction time, equilibration time and salt addition on extraction yield were evaluated. The volatile fraction of seven Italian thistle honey samples was extracted under the optimized conditions and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Characterization of the volatile profile was performed in terms of nature and relative amount of the extracted compounds. A total of 40 compounds, belonging to different chemical classes, were identified. The relative amounts of 16 compounds found in all the analyzed thistle honeys, i.e. nonanal, furfural, decanal, 3,6-dimethyl-2,3,3a,4,5,7a-hexahydrobenzofuran, benzaldehyde, ?-linalool, lilac aldehyde (isomer IV), hotrienol, phenylacetaldehyde, 4-oxoisophorone, benzyl alcohol, 2-phenylethanol, a not identified compound, octanoic acid, nonanoic acid and methyl anthranilate, were calculated and submitted to statistical analysis, in order to define for each compound a typical range. On the basis of the obtained data, a characteristic set of values was defined for thistle honey volatile fingerprint. The developed model proved to be effective in recognizing the botanical origin of thistle honey. PMID:25212333

  11. Simultaneous determination of 76 micropollutants in water samples by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Ramírez, N; Gómez, V; Pocurull, E; Borrull, F

    2013-11-15

    This study focuses on the development of an analytical method based on headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the simultaneous determination of 76 micropollutants in water samples. The selected micropollutants include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (e.g. chlorobenzenes, chloroalkanes), endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) (e.g. bisphenol A and tributyl phosphate), odour compounds (e.g. limonene, phenol), fragrance allergens (e.g. geraniol, eugenol) and some pesticides (e.g. heptachlor, terbutryn). The experimental conditions affecting their extraction, such as the type of fibre, temperature and time of extraction, sample volume and ionic strength of the samples were optimized using HS-SPME. The method showed good linear range, reproducibility between days, repeatability and low detection limits (at ng L(-1) levels). The validated method has been applied to determine the target organic micropollutants in aqueous samples from different experimental research units of surface water, sea water, waste water and those effluents of advance membrane treatments. The optimized method showed good performance in the different types of samples studied. The analysis revealed the presence of several micropollutants at concentrations between 20 and 5000 ?g L(-1), such as ethylbenzene, o-xylene, p-isopropilbenzene, D-limonene, citral and isoeugenol, due to the fact that these species are commonly used in domestic and industrial applications. PMID:24148498

  12. Innovative microwave-assisted oximation and silylation procedures for metabolomic analysis of plasma samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhanying; Lin, Zebin; Liu, Yue; Tan, Guangguo; Lou, Ziyang; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng; Fan, Guorong; Zhang, Junping; Zhang, Liming

    2012-09-01

    Analysis of plasma metabolomic samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry always requires comprehensive pretreatment including oximation and silylation. Although heating block (HB) is a commonly used method, it is time consuming. This study describes an extremely time-effective microwave-assisted (MA) oximation and silylation approach for metabolomic study of plasma samples. The Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize the MA conditions by means of oximation at 65 W for 100 s and then silylation through 180 s incubation with 230 W microwave irradiation. The results showed that microwave irradiation decreased the sample preparation time from approximately 180 min to 5 min without loss of information for the metabolites in plasma samples. Both the HB method and the developed MA method were applied in plasma metabolomic study of sulfur mustard intoxication. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to globally understand the metabolic changes, and multi-criteria assessment was used to select the most significant and reliable variables as potential biomarkers. The data obtained by the MA method were in good correlation with the HB method. Compared with HB method, the newly developed MA oximation and silylation of plasma metabolome samples was more efficient and time-effective and may prove to be an attractive alternative for high-throughput sample preparation in plasma metabolomics. PMID:22841665

  13. Headspace-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for determination of sulphur mustard and related compounds in soil.

    PubMed

    Røen, Bent T; Unneberg, Erik; Tørnes, John Aa; Lundanes, Elsa

    2010-04-01

    Methods for trace determination of sulphur mustard (HD) and some related cyclic sulphur compounds in soil samples have been developed using headspace-trap in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Two quite different types of soil were employed in the method optimisation (sandy loam and silty clay loam). Prior to analysis, water saturated with sodium chloride was added to the samples, at a water to soil ratio of 1:1. A detection limit of 3 ng/g was achieved for HD, while the cyclic sulphur compounds 1,4-thioxane, 1,3-dithiolane and 1,4-dithiane could be detected at 0.2-0.7 ng/g. The methods were validated in the concentration range from the limit of quantification (LOQ) to hundred times LOQ. The within assay precision at fifty times LOQ was 6.9-7.3% relative standard deviation (RSD) for determination of the cyclic sulphur compounds, and 15% RSD for determination of HD. Recoveries were in the range of 43-60% from the two soil types. As the technique requires very little sample preparation, the total time for sample handling and analysis was less than 1h. The technique was successfully employed for the determination of cyclic sulphur compounds in a sediment sample from an old dumping site for chemical munitions, known to contain HD degradation products. PMID:20189185

  14. Determination of Volatile Compounds in Four Commercial Samples of Japanese Green Algae Using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings. PMID:24592162

  15. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum using combined solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ngoc A; Mourão, Marta; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Walters, Elisabetta; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Kolk, Arend H J

    2015-04-01

    Recently, thermally-assisted hydrolysis and methylation followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) in combination with chemometrics has been used to develop a 20-compound model for fast differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) from Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in bacterial cultures. This model provided better than 95% accuracy. In our current work a hexane/methanol/water extraction followed by a solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up procedure was developed for use before THM-GC-MS, to make the test suitable for the identification of mycobacteria in sputum. The 20 biomarker model had to be adapted since many compounds were also found in the sputum of non-tuberculosis patients. An algorithm was established based on tuberculostearic acid, hexacosanoic acid and mycoserosates. The detection limit of the method was approximately 1×10(4) bacteria/mL sputum. Sputum specimens from 32 patients from South Africa who were suspected of having tuberculosis were blindly tested using the new method. Eight of the nine culture-positive sputum specimens were detected by the new SPE-THM-GC-MS method, resulting in a sensitivity of 89%. The specimen that was missed by the new method was also microscopy negative. The specificity of the test was 100%; all 23 microscopy- and culture-negative specimens were correctly identified as negative by SPE-THM-GC-MS. PMID:25728368

  16. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ulva fasciata (Green Seaweed) Extract and Evaluation of Its Cytoprotective and Antigenotoxic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rodeiro, Idania; Olguín, Sitlali; Santes, Rebeca; Herrera, José A.; Pérez, Carlos L.; Mangas, Raisa; Hernández, Yasnay; Fernández, Gisselle; Hernández, Ivones; Hernández-Ojeda, Sandra; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Valencia-Olvera, Ana; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological properties of Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract were examined. Five components were identified in one fraction prepared from the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and palmitic acid and its ethyl ester accounted for 76% of the total identified components. Furthermore, we assessed the extract's antioxidant properties by using the DPPH, ABTS, and lipid peroxidation assays and found that the extract had a moderate scavenging effect. In an experiment involving preexposition and coexposition of the extract (1–500?µg/mL) and benzo[a]pyrene (BP), the extract was found to be nontoxic to C9 cells in culture and to inhibit the cytotoxicity induced by BP. As BP is biotransformed by CYP1A and CYP2B subfamilies, we explored the possible interaction of the extract with these enzymes. The extract (25–50?µg/mL) inhibited CYP1A1 activity in rat liver microsomes. Analysis of the inhibition kinetics revealed a mixed-type inhibitory effect on CYP1A1 supersome. The effects of the extract on BP-induced DNA damage and hepatic CYP activity in mice were also investigated. Micronuclei induction by BP and liver CYP1A1/2 activities significantly decreased in animals treated with the extract. The results suggest that Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract inhibits BP bioactivation and it may be a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:26612994

  17. Simultaneous Determination of Tramadol and Its Metabolite in Human Urine by the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bilal; Erdem, Ali Fuat

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive and efficient method was developed for determination of tramadol and its metabolite (O-desmethyltramadol) in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Tramadol, O-desmethyltramadol and medazepam (internal standard) were extracted from human urine with a mixture of ethylacetate and diethylether mixture (1 : 1, v/v) at basic pH with liquid-liquid extraction. The calibration curves were linear (r = 0.99) over tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 ng/mL and 7.5 to 300 ng/mL, respectively. The method had an accuracy of >95% and intra- and interday precision (relative standard deviation %) of ?4.93 and ?4.62% for tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol, respectively. The extraction recoveries were found to be 94.1 ± 2.91 and 96.3 ± 3.46% for tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol, respectively. The limit of quantification using 0.5 mL human urine was 10 ng/mL for tramadol and 7.5 ng/mL for O-desmethyltramadol. After oral administration of 100 mg of tramadol hydrochloride to a patient, the urinary excretion was monitored during 24 h. About 15% of the dose was excreted as unchanged tramadol. PMID:25616987

  18. Multiplexed dual first-dimension comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with contra-directional thermal modulation.

    PubMed

    Savareear, Benjamin; Jacobs, Matthew R; Shellie, Robert A

    2014-10-24

    A multiplexed dual-primary column comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry approach (2GC×GC-MS) is introduced. The approach splits injected samples into two first-dimension columns with different stationary phases, and recombines the two streams into one second-dimension column that terminates at a single detector. The approach produces two two-dimensional chromatograms for each injection, and is made possible by using a dual-stage modulator operated in contra-directional modulation mode. The dual two-dimensional chromatograms produced by this single detector system provide complementary information due to selectivity differences between the three separation columns used in the column ensemble. An aged Australian tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) essential oil was analyzed to demonstrate the 2GC×GC-MS approach. The number of compounds separated by each of the GC×GC separations in the 2GC×GC experiment is comparable to conventional GC×GC experiments with matching column configurations. Robust peak assignment was possible for this sample based on the combination of MS library matches and multiple linear retention index searching. Forty-nine components (22 unique) were identified using a non-polar×mid-polar column combination and 34 components (7 unique) were positively identified using a polar×mid-polar column combination. Twenty-seven peak assignments were corroborated by positive identification in both of the multiplexed separations. PMID:25249490

  19. Quantitative ester analysis in cachaca and distilled spirits by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Eduardo S P; Cardoso, Daniel R; Franco, Douglas W

    2008-07-23

    An analytical procedure for the separation and quantification of ethyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl lactate, ethyl octanoate, ethyl nonanoate, ethyl decanoate, isoamyl octanoate, and ethyl laurate in cachaca, rum, and whisky by direct injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed. The analytical method is simple, selective, and appropriated for the determination of esters in distilled spirits. The limit of detection ranged from 29 (ethyl hexanoate) to 530 (ethyl acetate) microg L(-1), whereas the standard deviation for repeatability was between 0.774% (ethyl hexanoate) and 5.05% (isoamyl octanoate). Relative standard deviation values for accuracy vary from 90.3 to 98.5% for ethyl butyrate and ethyl acetate, respectively. Ethyl acetate was shown to be the major ester in cachaca (median content of 22.6 mg 100 mL(-1) anhydrous alcohol), followed by ethyl lactate (median content of 8.32 mg 100 mL(-1) anhydrous alcohol). Cachaca produced in copper and hybrid alembic present a higher content of ethyl acetate and ethyl lactate than those produced in a stainless-steel column, whereas cachaca produced by distillation in a stainless-steel column present a higher content of ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate, and ethyl laurate. As expected, ethyl acetate is the major ester in whiskey and rum, followed by ethyl lactate for samples of rum. Nevertheless, whiskey samples exhibit ethyl lactate at contents lower or at the same order of magnitude of the fatty esters. PMID:18570431

  20. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based study on serum metabolomics in rats chronically poisoned with hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingjie; Zhang, Meiling; Huang, Xueli; Ma, Jianshe; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide poisoning is a common occupational hazard, whose mortality and incidence rates are first and second, respectively, among occupational poisoning incidents in China. The main target organs of its toxicity are in the central nervous system and respiratory system. However, there are currently no specific direct tests that can be used to diagnose poisoned patients. In this study, we developed a serum metabonomic method using orthogonal partial least squares-discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA), based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to evaluate the effect of chronic poisoning by hydrogen sulfide in rats. The OPLS-DA data demonstrated that the model group (n = 60) differed significantly from the control group (n = 30), suggesting that the metabolic profiles of the two groups are markedly different. Alterations in the levels of some metabolites such as citrate, galactose, lactate, mannose, inositol, urea, phosphate, alanine and valine were detected by OPLS-DA analysis. We observed changes in metabolic pathways including lipid metabolism, energy metabolism and amino metabolism in the model group. Our results indicate that GC/MS-based metabonomic methods may provide novel detection means for chronic hydrogen sulfide poisoning. PMID:25882152

  1. Rapid determination of nineteen chlorophenols in wood, paper, cardboard, fruits, and fruit juices by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diserens, J M

    2001-01-01

    Although the use of pentachlorophenol (PCP) is prohibited in most countries, it is still widely found in the wood of pallets, containers, crates and in cardboard, paper, etc. Such material may contain not only PCP but other chlorophenols as well. Wooden crates and cardboard boxes are often used to store and transport fresh fruits. Consequently, chlorophenols present in the wood may contaminate the stored fruits by migration. To ascertain that packaging, storage material, and fruit raw materials are free from chlorophenol residues, we developed a rapid and sensitive method for the detection of 19 chlorophenols by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The test portions are directly extracted and acetylated in a solution of sodium carbonate in the presence of acetic anhydride and hexane. The hexane layer is analyzed, without further purification, by GC/MS in the selective-ion monitoring mode. The method allows the analysis of >40 samples/day with detection limits of <20 microg/kg for chlorophenols in wood, cardboard, and paper, and <2 microg/kg for chlorophenols in fruits. Typical recoveries of all chlorophenols were 94% from paper, 115% from cardboard, 51% from wood (depending on the size of the chips or shavings), and 93% from fruit puree. PMID:11417649

  2. Determination of volatile compounds in four commercial samples of Japanese green algae using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Baldermann, Susanne; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings. PMID:24592162

  3. Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomic Approach for Optimization and Toxicity Evaluation of Earthworm Sub-Lethal Responses to Carbofuran

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Prem Narain

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding mechanism of toxicity, the development of biomarkers (biochemicals that vary significantly with exposure to chemicals) for pesticides and environmental contaminants exposure is still a challenging task. Carbofuran is one of the most commonly used pesticides in agriculture and said to be most toxic carbamate pesticide. It is necessary to identify the biochemicals that can vary significantly after carbofuran exposure on earthworms which will help to assess the soil ecotoxicity. Initially, we have optimized the extraction conditions which are suitable for high-throughput gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics for the tissue of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma. Upon evaluation of five different extraction solvent systems, 80% methanol was found to have good extraction efficiency based on the yields of metabolites, multivariate analysis, total number of peaks and reproducibility of metabolites. Later the toxicity evaluation was performed to characterize the tissue specific metabolomic perturbation of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma after exposure to carbofuran at three different concentration levels (0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg of soil). Seventeen metabolites, contributing to the best classification performance of highest dose dependent carbofuran exposed earthworms from healthy controls were identified. This study suggests that GC-MS based metabolomic approach was precise and sensitive to measure the earthworm responses to carbofuran exposure in soil, and can be used as a promising tool for environmental eco-toxicological studies. PMID:24324663

  4. Dual dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of phenylpropenes in oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ju; Li, Jih-Heng; Feng, Chia-Hsien

    2015-09-01

    A novel, simple and quick sample preparation method was developed and used for pre-concentration and extraction of six phenylpropenes, including anethole, estragole, eugenol, methyl eugenol, safrole and myristicin, from oil samples by dual dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for determination and separation of compounds. Several experimental parameters affecting extraction efficiency were evaluated and optimized, including forward-extractant type and volume, surfactant type and concentration, water volume, and back-extractant type and volume. For all analytes (10-1000ng/mL), the limits of detection (S/N?3) ranged from 1.0 to 3.0ng/mL; the limits of quantification (S/N?10) ranged from 2.5 to 10.0ng/mL; and enrichment factors ranged from 3.2 to 37.1 times. Within-run and between-run relative standard deviations (n=6) were less than 2.61% and less than 4.33%, respectively. Linearity was excellent with determination coefficients (r(2)) above 0.9977. The experiments showed that the proposed method is a simple, effective, and environmentally friendly method of analyzing phenylpropenes in oil samples. PMID:26253833

  5. Stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for quantification of thymoquinone in black cumin seed oil.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Ajinwo, Okiemute Rosa; Li, Wen-Wu

    2014-06-18

    Black cumin seed (Nigella sativa L.) is a widely used spice and herb, where thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone) is the major bioactive compound. Here, a stable isotope dilution (SID) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique was developed for the quantification of thymoquinone. A doubly deuterated thymoquinone ([(2)H2]-thymoquinone) was synthesized for the first time with more than 93% deuteration degree shown by mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). This compound was used as an internal standard for the quantification of thymoquinone using a SID GC-MS method. The validation experiment showed a recovery rate of 99.1 ± 1.1% relative standard deviation (RSD). Standard addition and external calibration methods have also been used to quantify thymoquinone, which cross-validated the developed stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA). In comparison to external calibration and standard addition methods, the SIDA method is robust and accurate. The concentration of thymoquinone in five marketed black cumin seed oils ranged between 3.34 and 10.8 mg/mL by use of SID GC-MS. PMID:24871868

  6. [Development of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the metabolomic study of rice (Oryza sativa L.) grain].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Wang, Shuangyuan; Chang, Yuwei; Zhao, Yanni; Lu, Xin; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang

    2012-10-01

    An analytical strategy for the metabolic profiling of rice grain was developed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For the purpose of obtaining abundant metabolite information, sample preparation step prior to instrumental analysis is necessary to be optimized. D-optimal experimental design was applied to optimize the extraction solvent. Four solvents, including water, methanol, isopropanol and acetonitrile, and their combinations were evaluated for the extraction efficiency using multivariate statistical analysis (partial least square regression). The count of resolved peaks and the sum of peak areas were taken as the evaluation indexes. Methanol/water (80:20, v/v) mixture was highly efficient for rice metabolites and was selected as the suitable solvent formulation. Then, the analytical characteristics of the method were measured. More than 90% of the metabolites had satisfactory precisions, reproducibilities and stabilities (relative standard deviations (RSDs) < 30%). Most of the detected metabolites (about 88.0% of total peak area) showed good linear responses. With the optimized analytical protocol, 315 metabolites were detected in rice and 86 of which were structurally identified by searching in the NIST 08/Wiley standard mass spectral library, covering carbohydrates, amino acids, organic acids, steroids and so on which showed a broad coverage of metabolite data. The established method is expected to be useful for the metabolomic studies of rice. PMID:23383493

  7. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Based Study on Urine Metabolomics in Rats Chronically Poisoned with Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingjie; Zhang, Meiling; Sun, Fa; Ma, Jianshe; Hu, Lufeng; Yang, Xuezhi; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GS-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to explore the metabolic variability in urine of chronically hydrogen sulfide- (H2S-) poisoned rats relative to control ones. The changes in endogenous metabolites were studied by partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) and independent-samples t-test. The metabolic patterns of H2S-poisoned group are separated from the control, suggesting that the metabolic profiles of H2S-poisoned rats were markedly different from the controls. Moreover, compared to the control group, the level of alanine, d-ribose, tetradecanoic acid, L-aspartic acid, pentanedioic acid, cholesterol, acetate, and oleic acid in rat urine of the poisoning group decreased, while the level of glycine, d-mannose, arabinofuranose, and propanoic acid increased. These metabolites are related to amino acid metabolism as well as energy and lipid metabolism in vivo. Studying metabolomics using GC-MS allows for a comprehensive overview of the metabolism of the living body. This technique can be employed to decipher the mechanism of chronic H2S poisoning, thus promoting the use of metabolomics in clinical toxicology. PMID:25954748

  8. Hollow-fiber liquid phase microextraction for lignin pyrolysis acids in aerosol samples and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Murtaza; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2012-08-01

    A method based on three-phase hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction was developed and successfully applied to aerosols for the analysis of lignin pyrolysis acids such as syringic acid, vanillic acid and p-salicylic acid. Important parameters related to extraction process like organic solvent for membrane phase, tri-n-octylphosphine (TOPO) oxide contents in organic solvent, stirring speed, extraction time etc. were optimized. 6-Undecanone with 15% TOPO contents (w/v) was found a suitable solvent for organic liquid membrane, 900 rpm was the optimum stirring speed and time of 4h was found optimum extraction time. Donor phase pH was 1.3 while acceptor phase pH was adjusted to 9.5. The optimized extraction method was used for the extraction of real aerosol samples. Analytes were derivatized using BSTFA containing 1% trimethylsilyl chloride and gas chromatography mass spectrometry was used for analysis. Very low limits of detection in the range 0.2-1.0 ng L(-1) were found, corresponding to 10-50 pg m(-3) of analytes in aerosols. Extraction efficiency obtained ranged 60.3-71.7% and enrichment factors ranged 3015-3585 times. The optimized method was successfully applied to aerosol samples and all of the selected analytes were detected in the analyzed samples. PMID:22749581

  9. Identification and quantitative analysis of beta-sitosterol oxides in vegetable oils by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Julien-David, Diane; Miesch, Michel; Geoffroy, Philippe; Raul, Francis; Roussi, Stamatiki; Aoudé-Werner, Dalal; Marchioni, Eric

    2005-12-01

    As vegetable oils and phytosterol-enriched spreads are marketed for frying food or cooking purposes, temperature is one of the most important factors leading to the formation of phytosterol oxides in food matrix. A methodology based on saponification, organic solvent extraction, solid-phase extraction (SPE), followed by mass spectrometric identification and quantitation of beta-sitosterol oxides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode was developed and characterized. Relative response factors of six beta-sitosterol oxides, including 7alpha-hydroxy, 7beta-hydroxy, 5,6alpha-epoxy, 5,6beta-epoxy, 7-keto, and 5alpha,6beta-dihydroxysitosterol, were calculated against authentic standards of 19-hydroxycholesterol or cholestanol. Linear calibration data, limit of detection, and sample recoveries during analytical process. Recoveries of these oxidation compounds in spiked samples ranged from 88 to 115%, while relative standard derivation (R.S.D.) values were below 10% in most cases. The analytical method was applied to quantify beta-sitosterol oxides formed in thermal-oxidized vegetable oils which were heated at different temperatures and for varying time periods. Sitosterol oxidation is strikingly higher in sunflower oil relative to olive oil under all conditions of temperature and heating time. PMID:16038955

  10. [Characterization of pyrolysis of waste printed circuit boards by high-resolution pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Huang, Hong; Xia, Zhengbin; Chen, Huanqin

    2008-07-01

    Thermal degradation of pyrolysis of waste circuit boards was investigated by high-resolution pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PyGC-MS) and thermogravimetry (TG). In helium atmosphere, the products of FR-4 waste printed circuit board were pyrolyzed at 350, 450, 550, 650, and 750 degrees degrees C, separately, and the pyrolysis products were identified by online MS. The results indicated that the pyrolysis products of the FR-4 waste circuit board were three kinds of substances, such as the low boiling point products, phenol, bisphenol and their related products. Moreover, under 300 degrees degrees C, only observed less pyrolysis products. As the increase of pyrolysis temperature, the relative content of the low boiling point products increased. In the range of 450-650 degrees degrees C, the qualitative analysis and character were similar, and the relative contents of phenol and bisphenol were higher. The influence of pyrolysis temperature on pyrolyzate yields was studied. On the basis of the pyrolyzate profile and the dependence of pyrolyzate yields on pyrolysis temperature, the thermal degradation mechanism of brominated epoxy resin was proposed. PMID:18959254

  11. Determination of metaldehyde in human serum by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Morita, Seiji; Motojyuku, Megumi; Akieda, Kazuki; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2008-11-15

    A rapid headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) method has been developed for the determination of metaldehyde in human serum samples. Metaldehyde is extensively used as a molluscicide for the control of slugs and snails, and cases of metaldehyde poisoning have been reported. Metaldehyde was headspace-extracted on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber at 70 degrees C for 25 min, desorbed, and analyzed rapidly by GC-MS. The method was validated for limit of detection (LOD), linearity, precision, and recovery. Although the recovery of the sample was very low, the method itself was rapid with a low detection limit of 0.25 microg/ml, R.S.D. value 12.6%, and linearity range 0.5-25.0 microg/ml (r(2)=0.999). The results demonstrated that the SPME-GC-MS method for the analysis of metaldehyde is simple, rapid, solvent-free, and does not require any pre-analysis conversions. PMID:18945651

  12. Filtration efficiency validation of glass wool during thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis of fine atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Ding, Kun; Meng, Hu; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-01

    Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS) technique has been widely used for analysis of semi-violate organic compounds on atmospheric aerosol. To prevent GC column from being damaged by fine solid particles during thermal desorption process, glass wool as filter mat is indispensible. However, the filtration efficiency has never been validated. In this paper, the most penetrating particle size and the minimum packing thickness of glass wool were calculated based on classical filtration theory. According to the calculation results, packing parameters of glass wool were optimized experimentally using silica particles. It is demonstrated that glass wool with a packing thickness of 30 mm, solidity of 0.039 can effectively block these fine solid particles from penetrating at normal thermal desorption conditions (T=300°C, u=0.4-4 cm/s). Finally, the filtration efficiency of glass wool was further confirmed with real PM2.5 samples. Under the validated filtration condition, TD-GC-MS was applied for the analysis of non-polar organic compounds on real PM2.5 samples, and very good results were obtained. PMID:25578046

  13. Quantification of dimethindene in plasma by gas chromatography-mass fragmentography using ammonia chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Kauert, G; Herrle, I; Wermeille, M

    1993-08-11

    A gas chromatographic-mass fragmentographic method using ammonia chemical ionization for the determination of dimethindene in human plasma is described. The drug was isolated from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction with hexane-2-methylbutanol. Plasma components were separated on a capillary column coated with chemically bonded methyl silicone. For detection of dimethindene, its quasi-molecular ion (M + H+) was mass fragmentographically monitored after chemical ionization with ammonia as reagent gas. Dimethindene was quantified using methaqualone as the internal standard: the quantification limit in plasma was 0.2 ng/ml, the within-run precision was 8.0% and the inter-run precision 5.6%. The plasma concentration-time profile was established after a single dose of 4 mg of dimethindene with an average maximum concentration of 5.5 ng/ml, detectable up to 48 h post application. PMID:8408399

  14. A phytochemical study of the quinolizidine alkaloids from Genista tenera by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martins, Alice; Wink, Michael; Tei, Andreas; Brum-Bousquet, Michèle; Tillequin, François; Rauter, Amélia-Pilar

    2005-01-01

    Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry has been used to analyse the alkaloids present in the aerial parts of Genista tenera. Anagyrine, cytisine, N-formylcytisine, N-methylcytisine and lupanine were the major compounds, the last two alkaloids being known for their hypoglycaemic activity. Dehydrocytisine, 5,6-dehydrolupanine, rhombifoline, aphylline and thermopsine were the minor alkaloids. The characterisation of the constituents was based on comparison of their Kovats retention indexes and electron impact-mass spectrometric data recorded on-line with those of reference compounds and literature data. PMID:16042152

  15. The analysis of illicit methaqualone containing preparations by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Grové, Alida A; Rohwer, Egmont R; Laurens, Johannes B; Vorster, Barend C

    2006-03-01

    A validated gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for quantitative analysis of methaqualone (MTQ) in illicit preparations is reported. The method proved to have a coefficient of variation of below 5%. Four batches of seized tablets, two pairs with similar imprints, were analyzed. It was found that the average MTQ concentration in all four batches of tablets differed significantly (p = 0.01) rendering it impossible to conclude that, on the basis of MTQ concentration alone, the batches with a similar logo originated from the same manufacturer or manufacturing batch. Conversely, it can be said that in this case, the four batches originated from either different clandestine laboratories or manufacturing batches. PMID:16566774

  16. Nitrogen isotopic analyses by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Amino acids containing natural-abundance levels of 15N were derivatized and analyzed isotopically using a technique in which individual compounds are separated by gas chromatography, combusted on-line, and the product stream sent directly to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For samples of N2 gas, standard deviations of ratio measurement were better than 0.1% (Units for delta are parts per thousand or per million (%).) for samples larger than 400 pmol and better than 0.5% for samples larger than 25 pmol (0.1% 15N is equivalent to 0.00004 atom % 15N). Results duplicated those of conventional, batchwise analyses to within 0.05%. For combustion of organic compounds yielding CO2/N2 ratios between 14 and 28, in particular for N-acetyl n-propyl derivatives of amino acids, delta values were within 0.25% of results obtained using conventional techniques and standard deviations were better than 0.35%. Pooled data for measurements of all amino acids produced an accuracy and precision of 0.04 and 0.23%, respectively, when 2 nmol of each amino acid was injected on column and 20% of the stream of combustion products was delivered to the mass spectrometer.

  17. Integration of Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Methods for Differentiating Ricin Preparation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Melville, Angela M.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Colburn, Heather A.; Victry, Kristin D.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-05-17

    The investigation of crimes involving chemical or biological agents is infrequent, but presents unique analytical challenges. The protein toxin ricin is encountered more frequently than other agents and is found in the seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis. Typically, the toxin is extracted from castor seeds utilizing a variety of different recipes that result in varying purity of the toxin. Moreover, these various purification steps can also leave or differentially remove a variety of exogenous and endogenous residual components with the toxin that may indicate the type and number of purification steps involved. We have applied three gas chromatographic - mass spectrometric (GC-MS) based analytical methods to measure the variation in seed carbohydrates and castor oil ricinoleic acid as well as the presence of solvents used for purification. These methods were applied to the same samples prepared using four previously identified toxin preparation methods starting from four varieties of castor seeds. The individual data sets for seed carbohydrate profiles, ricinoleic acid or acetone amount each provided information capable of differentiating different types of toxin preparations across seed types. However, the integration of the data sets using multivariate factor analysis provided a clear distinction of all samples based on the preparation method and independent of the seed source. In particular the abundance of mannose, arabinose, fucose, ricinoleic acid and acetone were shown to be important differentiating factors. These complementary tools provide a more confident determination of the method of toxin preparation.

  18. Determination of synthetic musk compounds in sewage biosolids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Osemwengie, Lantis I

    2006-09-01

    A review of sewage sludge regulations and land application practices by the United States National Research Council (2002) recommended development of improved analytical techniques to adequately identify and quantify new chemical contaminants, such as synthetic musk compounds in Class A sewage sludge (i.e., biosolids). This prompted the development of a rugged analytical method using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to detect this group of organic pollutants in biosolids. In this paper, the term "biosolids" is used interchangeably with "sewage sludge", which is defined in the regulations and used in the statue (Clean Water Act). Samples of Class A biosolids obtained from sewage treatment plants in Los Angeles, California, the City of Las Vegas, Nevada, and also in the form of a commercial fertilizer, were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction technique, subjected to gel permeation chromatography clean-up, and analyzed by GC/MS using the selected ion monitoring mode. The method developed has the potential to detect synthetic musk compounds in complex matrices, may provide accurate data useful in human health and environmental risk assessment, and may be useful in determining the efficacy of municipal sewage treatment plants for removing synthetic musk compounds. PMID:16951749

  19. [Determination of endogenous agmatine in rat plasma by isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongli; Lin, Ying; Xiong, Zhili; Xie, Jianwei

    2014-07-01

    A method for the determination of endogenous agmatine in rat plasma was developed by isotope dilution-gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). The plasma samples were analyzed after protein precipitation, evaporation, derivatization by hexafluoroacetone (HFAA), and clean-up on a Florisil SPE column. The GC-MS analysis utilized stable isotope d8-agmatine as internal standard. The samples after treatme were tested by negative chemical ionization with selected ion monitoring (SIM) which was set at m/z 492 (molecular ion of agmatine) and m/z 500 (molecular ion of internal standard). The limit of detection (LOD) of agmatine standard solution was 0.005 7 ng/mL. The calibration curve of the agmatine spiked in rat plasma showed a good linear relationship at the range of 1.14-57.0 ng/mL (r = 0.997). The recoveries of agmatine spiked in rat plasma ranged from 92.3% to 109.8%. Inter-day and intra-day precisions were less than 15%. The average concentration level of agmatine in rat plasma was (22 +/- 9) ng/mL, and there was no significant difference between male and female SD rats (p > 0.05). The method is high sensitive and specific, and can be used for the determination of endogenous agmatine in plasma. It provides a strong support for the subsequent research of agmatine. PMID:25255573

  20. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  1. Simultaneous chiral separation of methylamphetamine and common precursors using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Drake, Samantha J; Morrison, Calum; Smith, Frank

    2011-09-01

    Methylamphetamine, ephedrine, and pseudoephedrine were derivatized using trifluoroacetic anhydride and enantiomers of each were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) fitted with a ?-cyclodextrin (Chiraldex™ G-PN) chiral column. A temperature-programmed method was developed and optimized and the results compared with those obtained using a previously published isothermal GC method applied to GC/MS analysis. Trifluoroacetylated 3-(trifluoromethyl)phenethylamine hydrochloride was used as an internal standard, and mass fragmentation patterns are proposed for all derivatives analyzed. Qualitative validation of the optimized chromatographic conditions was completed in accordance with the guidelines published by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). Under conditions of repeatability and reproducibility, the method gave relative retention times with a relative standard deviation of less than 0.02% for all six analytes of interest. This surpasses the UNODC's acceptance criteria of 2% for validation of qualitative precision. Ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are common precursors in the clandestine manufacture of methylamphetamine. Seizures of illicit methylamphetamine therefore often contain mixtures of these optically active compounds. The simultaneous enantioseparation of these compounds to produce a profile would provide valuable information to law enforcement agencies regarding the provenance of a methylamphetamine seizure. PMID:21780193

  2. Determination of plasma mexiletine levels with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and selected-ion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Minnigh, M B; Alvin, J D; Zemaitis, M A

    1994-12-01

    Mexiletine, 1-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)-2-aminopropane (Mexitil), is an orally effective agent useful in the treatment of serious ventricular arrhythmias. This paper describes a gas chromatographic-mass spectrophotometric assay with selected-ion monitoring for the measurement of plasma or serum mexiletine levels. The drug and internal standard (p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester) were extracted from plasma into ethyl acetate-hexane-methanol (60:40:1, v/v). After separation and evaporation of the organic phase, the drug and internal standard were derivatized to their pentafluoropropyl derivatives prior to analysis. The reproducibility of the daily standard curve yielded mean inter- and intra-day coefficients of variability from 0.7 to 11.0%. The coefficients of variability for control plasma samples (0.5 and 1.0 micrograms/ml) ranged from 2.6 to 5.0% and the accuracy of the assay was 106 +/- 6 and 100 +/- 5% for the low and high level controls respectively. The limit of quantitation for the assay was 0.1 micrograms/ml. No interfering peaks were detected in any patient samples. This method can be used as a primary analytical method to measure mexiletine plasma levels or can serve as a convenient back-up method to HPLC procedures when contaminating peaks coelute with mexiletine. PMID:7894684

  3. Improved sensitivity gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of parabens in waters using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure for the introduction of ionic liquid samples in gas chromatography (GC) is proposed. This procedure, based on microvial insert thermal desorption, allows the direct analysis of the compounds preconcentrated by ionic liquid based liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-LLME) using the combination of a thermal desorption unit (TDU) and a programmed temperature vaporization injector (PTV). Two different IL-LLME methodologies, one based on the formation of a microdroplet emulsion by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other through ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) were studied and evaluated. IL-DLLME proved advantageous and consequently, it was adopted for preconcentration purposes. This easy to apply approach was used for the determination of five parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and isobutyl paraben) in swimming pool waters, after in situ acetylation. The optimized conditions of TDU/PTV allowed the analytes contained in 20µL of the enriched IL to be transferred to the capillary column. Quantification of the samples was carried out against aqueous standards, and quantification limits of between 4.3 and 8.1ngL(-1) were obtained, depending on the compound. Concentrations of between 9 and 47ngL(-1) for some analytes were obtained in the analysis of ten samples. PMID:26695305

  4. Methods of analysis-Determination of pesticides in sediment using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; McWayne, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of 119 pesticides in environmental sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in support of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The pesticides included in this method were chosen through prior prioritization. Herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides along with degradates are included in this method and span a variety of chemical classes including, but not limited to, chloroacetanilides, organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, triazines, and triazoles. Sediment samples are extracted by using an accelerated solvent extraction system (ASE®, and the compounds of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences (including sulfur) by passing the extracts through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) along with the use of either stacked graphitized carbon and alumina solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges or packed Florisil®. Chromatographic separation, detection, and quantification of the pesticides from the sediment-sample extracts are done by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 micrograms per kilogram (?g/kg) dry weight ranged from 75 to 102 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 3 to 13 percent. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), ranged from 0.6 to 3.4 ?g/kg dry weight.

  5. Determination of Selected Phthalates by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in Personal Perfumes.

    PubMed

    Orecchio, Santino; Indelicato, Roberta; Barreca, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    A simple and fast method is proposed to analyze commercial personal perfumes. Our method includes measurement of phthalates, known to be major sources of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDC), which originate from the less volatile fraction of perfumes. The quantification of phthalates were carried out directly with no sample preparation required on 30 samples of commercial products using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a detector. The total concentrations of 15 investigated compounds ranged from 17 to 9650 mg/L with an average of 2643 mg/L. The highest total concentration was found in cologne. Diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were detected in appreciable concentrations. Further, it was found that the composition of counterfeit samples varied widely from that of authentic products. The composition of old products was different from that of recent perfumes, which contain less harmful chemicals, attributed to the ban on some phthalates in Europe due their toxicity. It should be noted that older and contaminated products are not equivalent to authentic products when considering quality, safety, and probably effectiveness. Older and nonapproved perfumes contain chemicals that are not allowed for commercial use and may contain toxic impurities. PMID:26262443

  6. Structural determination of nerve agent markers using gas chromatography mass spectrometry after derivatization with 3-pyridyldiazomethane.

    PubMed

    Nyholm, Jenny Rattfelt; Gustafsson, Tomas; Östin, Anders

    2013-07-01

    Nerve agents are a class of organophosphorous chemicals that are prohibited under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Their degradation products, phosphonic acids, are analyzed as markers of nerve agent contamination and use. Because the phosphonic acids are non-volatile and very polar, their identification by GC-MS requires a derivatization step prior to analysis. Standard derivatization methods for gas-chromatography electron-impact mass-spectrometry analysis give very similar spectra for many alkyl phosphonic acid isomers, which complicates the identification process. We present a new reagent, 3-pyridyldiazomethane, for preparing picolinyl ester derivatives of alkyl methylphosphonic acids facilitating the determination of their structure by enhancing predictable fragmentation of the O-alkyl chain. This fragmentation is directed by the nitrogen nucleus of the pyridyl moiety that abstracts hydrogen from the O-alkyl chain, inducing radical cleavage of the carbon-carbon bonds and thereby causing extensive fragmentation that can be used for detailed structure elucidation of the O-alkyl moiety. The separability of related isomers was tested by comparing the spectra of the picolinyl esters formed from twelve hexyl methylphosphonic acid isomers. Spectral library matches and principal component analysis showed that the picolinyl esters were more effectively separated than the corresponding trimethylsilyl derivatives used in the standard operating procedures. The suggested method will improve the unambiguous structural determination process for phosphonic acids. PMID:23832937

  7. Determination of the Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Toasted Bread Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rashdan, Amal; Helaleh, Murad I. H.; Nisar, A.; Ibtisam, A.; Al-Ballam, Zainab

    2010-01-01

    Concentration of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in eighteen baked bread samples using gas oven toasting were evaluated in this study. Samples were classified into the following categories: (1) bread baked from white wheat flour, (2) bread baked from brown wheat flour, and (3) sandwich bread baked from white wheat flour. Analysis was performed by GC-MS after Soxhlet extraction of the sample and clean up of the extract. The levels of B[a]P was not detected in ten of eighteen samples. In the rest of the samples, B[a]P are varied from 2.83 to 16.54 ?g/kg. B[a]A, CHR, B[b]FA, B[k] FA, IP, DB[a,h]A, and B[ghi]P concentrations were found to be less than 10.0 ?g/kg. However, B[a]P are not detected in original white and brown wheat flour. The total PAHs were varied in the range 1.06–44.24 ?g/kg and 3.08–278.66 ?g/kg for H-PAH and L-PAH, respectively. Reproducibility and repeatability of the proposed method was calculated and presented in terms of recovery and relative standard deviations (RSD, %). Recoveries were varied from 72.46% to 99.06% with RSD ± 0.28–15.01% and from 82.39% to 95.01% with RSD ±1.91–13.01% for repeatability and reproducibility, respectively. Different commercialized samples of toasted bread were collected and analyzed. PMID:20862370

  8. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based component profiling and quality prediction for Japanese sake.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Natsuki; Isogai, Atsuko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-10-01

    Sake is a Japanese traditional alcoholic beverage, which is produced by simultaneous saccharification and alcohol fermentation of polished and steamed rice by Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. About 300 compounds have been identified in sake, and the contribution of individual components to the sake flavor has been examined at the same time. However, only a few compounds could explain the characteristics alone and most of the attributes still remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the component profile and the attributes of sake. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based non-targeted analysis was employed to obtain the low molecular weight component profile of Japanese sake including both nonvolatile and volatile compounds. Sake attributes and overall quality were assessed by analytical descriptive sensory test and the prediction model of the sensory score from the component profile was constructed by means of orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) regression analysis. Our results showed that 12 sake attributes [ginjo-ka (aroma of premium ginjo sake), grassy/aldehydic odor, sweet aroma/caramel/burnt odor, sulfury odor, sour taste, umami, bitter taste, body, amakara (dryness), aftertaste, pungent/smoothness and appearance] and overall quality were accurately explained by component profiles. In addition, we were able to select statistically significant components according to variable importance on projection (VIP). Our methodology clarified the correlation between sake attribute and 200 low molecular components and presented the importance of each component thus, providing new insights to the flavor study of sake. PMID:25060729

  9. What experimental factors influence the accuracy of retention projections in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael B; Barnes, Brian B; Boswell, Paul G

    2014-12-19

    Programmed-temperature gas chromatographic (GC) retention information is difficult to share because it depends on so many experimental factors that vary among laboratories. Though linear retention indexing cannot properly account for experimental differences, retention times can be accurately calculated, or "projected", from shared isothermal retention vs. temperature (T) relationships, but only if the temperature program and hold-up time vs. T profile produced by a GC is known with great precision. The effort required to measure these profiles were previously impractical, but we recently showed that they can be easily back-calculated from the programmed-temperature retention times of a set of 25 n-alkanes using open-source software at www.retentionprediction.org/gc. In a multi-lab study, the approach was shown to account for both intentional and unintentional differences in the temperature programs, flow rates, and inlet pressures produced by the GCs. Here, we tested 16 other experimental factors and found that only 5 could reduce accuracy in retention projections: injection history, exposure to very high levels of oxygen at high temperature, a very low transfer line temperature, an overloaded column, and a very short column (?15m). We find that the retention projection methodology acts as a hybrid of conventional retention projection and retention indexing, drawing on the advantages of both; it properly accounts for a wide range of experimental conditions while accommodating the effects of experimental factors not properly taken into account in the calculations. Finally, we developed a four-step protocol to efficiently troubleshoot a GC system after it is found to be yielding inaccurate retention projections. PMID:25482038

  10. Determination of gaseous carbonyl compounds by their pentafluorophenyl hydrazones with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Feng, Yan Li; Xie, Chun Juan; Huang, Juan; Yu, Jian Zhen; Feng, Jia Liang; Sheng, Guo Ying; Fu, Jia Mo; Wu, Ming Hong

    2009-03-01

    A sensitive and reliable method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 20 airborne carbonyl compounds in the C(1)-C(10) range. The carbonyls were collected onto solid sorbent coated with pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH), followed by solvent extraction and gas chromatographic (GC)/mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of the PFPH derivatives. The sorbent is packed into two separate sections in a glass sampling tube. The two-section design allows convenient checking of collection efficiency and breakthrough. The sampling tube, with a coating amount of 971 nmol PFPH per 100 mg Tenax TA and operated at a sampling flow rate of 80 mL min(-1), collects the 20 carbonyls with efficiencies above 95%. Hexane extracts the collected carbonyls in their PFPH derivatives in the sampling tube with better than 95% extraction efficiency. It is necessary to let the sampling tube sit at ambient temperature for 3 days before solvent extraction to ensure complete derivatization of the carbonyls. The limits of detection (LODs) of the tested carbonyls are in the range of 3.7-11.6 ng per sample. The method has been field-tested both in ambient environment and in an indoor environment from burning mosquito-repellent incense. Eighteen carbonyls were detected in the ambient air samples with the exception of o-tolualdehyde and m-tolualdehyde, while all the 20 target carbonyls were found in the incense smoke. Compare field test with classical DNPH-HPLC/UV method, good agreement exited between the two methods for lower molecular carbonyls but PFPH method is found to be a better analytical method for determination of high molecular weight carbonyls. PMID:19200483

  11. Analysis of chemical profiles of insect adhesion secretions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Manuela; Gerhardt, Heike; Schmitt, Christian; Betz, Oliver; Albert, Klaus; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the chemical analysis of molecular profiles of tarsal secretions of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Forsskål, 1775) by gas chromatography hyphenated with quadrupol mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy. Special focus of this study was to elaborate on sampling methods which enable selective microscale extraction of insect secretions in a spatially controlled manner, in particular tarsal adhesive secretions and secretions located on cuticle surfaces at the tibia. Various solvent sampling procedures and contact solid-phase microextraction (SPME) methods were compared in terms of comprehensiveness and extraction efficiencies as measured by signal intensities in GC-MS. Solvent sampling with water as extraction solvent gave access to the elucidation of chemical profiles of polar compound classes such as amino acids and carbohydrates, but is extremely tedious. Contact SPME on the other hand can be regarded as a simplified and more elegant alternative, in particular for the lipophilic compound fraction. Many proteinogenic amino acids and ornithine as well as carbohydrate monomers arabinose, xylose, glucose, and galactose were detected in tarsal secretions after acid hydrolysis of aqueous extracts. Qualitatively similar but quantitatively significantly different molecular profiles were found for the lipid fraction which contained mainly n-alkanes and internally branched monomethyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethyl-alkanes in the C23-C49 range as well as long chain fatty acids and aldehydes. Especially, hydrocarbons with >C40 carbon numbers have previously been rarely reported for insect secretions. The results suggest that the investigated insect secretions are complex emulsions which allow the attachment of tarsi on various otherwise incompatible materials of smooth and rough surfaces. The solid consistence of the established alkanes at ambient temperatures might contribute to a semi-solid consistence of the adhesive, amalgamating partly opposing functions such as slip resistance, tarsal release, desiccation resistance, and mechanical compliance. The methods developed can be extended to other similar applications of studying compositions of insect secretions of other species. PMID:25479867

  12. Development and Application of Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Bound Trinitrotoluene Residues in Soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, J.M.; Mckay, A.J.; Derito, C.; Watanabe, C.; Thorn, K.A.; Madsen, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    TNT (trinitrotoluene) is a contaminant of global environmental significance, yet determining its environmental fate has posed longstanding challenges. To date, only differential extraction-based approaches have been able to determine the presence of covalently bound, reduced forms of TNT in field soils. Here, we employed thermal elution, pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to distinguish between covalently bound and noncovalently bound reduced forms of TNT in soil. Model soil organic matter-based matrixes were used to develop an assay in which noncovalently bound (monomeric) aminodinitrotoluene (ADNT) and diaminonitrotoluene (DANT) were desorbed from the matrix and analyzed at a lower temperature than covalently bound forms of these same compounds. A thermal desorption technique, evolved gas analysis, was initially employed to differentiate between covalently bound and added 15N-labeled monomeric compounds. A refined thermal elution procedure, termed "double-shot analysis" (DSA), allowed a sample to be sequentially analyzed in two phases. In phase 1, all of an added 15N-labeled monomeric contaminant was eluted from the sample at relatively low temperature. In phase 2 during high-temperature pyrolysis, the remaining covalently bound contaminants were detected. DSA analysis of soil from the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant (LAAP; ???5000 ppm TNT) revealed the presence of DANT, ADNT, and TNT. After scrutinizing the DSA data and comparing them to results from solvent-extracted and base/acid-hydrolyzed LAAP soil, we concluded that the TNT was a noncovalently bound "carryover" from phase 1. Thus, the pyrolysis-GC/MS technique successfully defined covalently bound pools of ADNT and DANT in the field soil sample.

  13. Full evaporation dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for uniform enrichment of odor compounds in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    A method for analysis of a wide range of odor compounds in aqueous samples at sub-ng mL?¹ to ?g mL?¹ levels was developed by full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compared to conventional DHS and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), FEDHS provides more uniform enrichment over the entire polarity range for odor compounds in aqueous samples. FEDHS at 80°C using 3 L of purge gas allows complete vaporization of 100 ?L of an aqueous sample, and trapping and drying it in an adsorbent packed tube, while providing high recoveries (85-103%) of the 18 model odor compounds (water solubility at 25°C: log0.54-5.65 mg L?¹, vapor pressure at 25°C: 0.011-3.2 mm Hg) and leaving most of the low volatile matrix behind. The FEDHS-GC-MS method showed good linearity (r²>0.9909) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.21-5.2 ng mL?¹) for the model compounds even with the scan mode in the conventional MS. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analyses of key odor compounds including hydrophilic and less volatile characteristics in beverages (whiskey and green tea). In a single malt whiskey sample, phenolic compounds including vanillin could be determined in the range of 0.92-5.1 ?g mL?¹ (RSD<7.4%, n=6). For a Japanese green tea sample, 48 compounds including 19 potent odorants were positively identified from only 100 ?L of sample. Heat-induced artifact formation for potent odorants was also examined and the proposed method does not affect the additional formation of thermally generated compounds. Eighteen compounds including 12 potent odorants (e.g. coumarin, furaneol, indole, maltol, and pyrazine congeners) were determined in the range of 0.21-110 ng mL?¹ (RSD<10%, n=6). PMID:22542289

  14. Quantitative analysis of arbutin and hydroquinone in strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L., Ericaceae) leaves by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jurica, Karlo; Kara?onji, Irena Br?i?; Šegan, Sandra; Opsenica, Dušanka Milojkovi?; Kremer, Dario

    2015-09-01

    The phenolic glycoside arbutin and its metabolite with uroantiseptic activity hydroquinone occur naturally in the leaves of various medicinal plants and spices. In this study, an extraction procedure coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to determine arbutin and hydroquinone content in strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L., Ericaceae) leaves. The method showed good linearity (R2>0.9987) in the tested concentration range (0.5-200 ?g mL(-1)), as well as good precision (RSD<5%), analytical recovery (96.2-98.0%), and sensitivity (limit of detection=0.009 and 0.004 ?g mL(-1) for arbutin and hydroquinone, respectively). The results obtained by the validated GC-MS method corresponded well to those obtained by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The proposed method was then applied for determining arbutin and hydroquinone content in methanolic leaf extracts. The amount of arbutin in the leaves collected on the island of Kolo?ep (6.82 mg g(-1) dry weight) was found to be higher (tpaired=43.57, tc=2.92) in comparison to the amount of arbutin in the leaves collected on the island of Mali Lošinj (2.75 mg g(-1) dry weight). Hydroquinone was not detected in any of the samples. The analytical features of the proposed GC-MS method demonstrated that arbutin and hydroquinone could be determined alternatively by gas chromatography. Due to its wide concentration range, the method could also be suitable for arbutin and hydroquinone analysis in leaves of other plant families (Rosaceae, Lamiaceae, etc.). PMID:26444340

  15. Analysis of pharmaceutical and other organic wastewater compounds in filtered and unfiltered water samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Phillips, Patrick; Smith, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effects of exposure of stream biota to complex mixtures of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds associated with wastewater requires the development of additional analytical capabilities for these compounds in water samples. Two gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analytical methods used at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to analyze organic compounds associated with wastewater were adapted to include additional pharmaceutical and other organic compounds beginning in 2009. This report includes a description of method performance for 42 additional compounds for the filtered-water method (hereafter referred to as the filtered method) and 46 additional compounds for the unfiltered-water method (hereafter referred to as the unfiltered method). The method performance for the filtered method described in this report has been published for seven of these compounds; however, the addition of several other compounds to the filtered method and the addition of the compounds to the unfiltered method resulted in the need to document method performance for both of the modified methods. Most of these added compounds are pharmaceuticals or pharmaceutical degradates, although two nonpharmaceutical compounds are included in each method. The main pharmaceutical compound classes added to the two modified methods include muscle relaxants, opiates, analgesics, and sedatives. These types of compounds were added to the original filtered and unfiltered methods largely in response to the tentative identification of a wide range of pharmaceutical and other organic compounds in samples collected from wastewater-treatment plants. Filtered water samples are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Unfiltered samples are extracted by using continuous liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. The compounds of interest for filtered and unfiltered sample types were determined by use of the capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The performance of each method was assessed by using data on recoveries of compounds in fortified surface-water, wastewater, and reagent-water samples. These experiments (referred to as spike experiments) consist of fortifying (or spiking) samples with known amounts of target analytes. Surface-water-spike experiments were performed by using samples obtained from a stream in Colorado (unfiltered method) and a stream in New York (filtered method). Wastewater spike experiments for both the filtered and unfiltered methods were performed by using a treated wastewater obtained from a single wastewater treatment plant in New York. Surface water and wastewater spike experiments were fortified at both low and high concentrations and termed low- and high-level spikes, respectively. Reagent water spikes were assessed in three ways: (1) set spikes, (2) a low-concentration fortification experiment, and (3) a high-concentration fortification experiment. Set spike samples have been determined since 2009, and consist of analysis of fortified reagent water for target compounds included for each group of 10 to18 environmental samples analyzed at the NWQL. The low-concentration and high-concentration reagent spike experiments, by contrast, represent a one-time assessment of method performance. For each spike experiment, mean recoveries ranging from 60 to 130 percent indicate low bias, and relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than ( Of the compounds included in the filtered method, 21 had mean recoveries ranging from 63 to 129 percent for the low-level and high-level surface-water spikes, and had low ()132 percent]. For wastewater spikes, 24 of the compounds included in the filtered method had recoveries ranging from 61 to 130 percent for the low-level and high-level spikes. RSDs were 130 percent) or variable recoveries (RSDs >30 percent) for low-level wastewater spikes, or low recoveries ( Of the compounds included in the unfiltered method, 17 had mean spike recoveries ranging from 74

  16. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assessment of amines in Port wine and grape juice after fast chloroformate extraction/derivatization.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Faria, M A; Fernandes, J O

    2011-08-24

    A simple, reliable, and sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantification of volatile and nonvolatile biogenic amines in Port wines and grape juices was developed and evaluated. The method was based on a previously reported two-phase derivatization procedure with isobutyl chloroformate in a toluene medium, which provides a quantitative reaction in 10 min. Following the derivatization step, the excess of reagent was eliminated by treatment with alkaline methanol. The derivatization procedure was performed directly on 1 mL of sample, avoiding any fastidious and time-consuming cleanup extraction steps. The method allows the simultaneous quantification of 22 amines, which can be found in wines: methylamine, dimethylamine, ethylamine, diethylamine, propylamine, isopropylamine, butylamine, isobutylamine, amylamine, isoamylamine, 2-methylbutylamine, hexylamine, pyrrolidine, piperidine, morpholine, 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine, cadaverine, 1,6-diaminohexane, 2-phenylethylamine, histamine, and tyramine. Because of the fact that histamine and tyramine derivatives are degraded during the isobutyl chloroformate elimination step, the corresponding determination was made after removal of the excess of derivatizing reagent by evaporating an aliquot of the toluene layer obtained after the reaction. The presented method showed excellent analytical characteristics in what linearity, recovery, repeatability, and limit of detections were respected. It was used to assess the concentration of biogenic amines in juice grapes and Tawny and Vintage Port wines with different aging times. On the whole, the total content of amines in Port wines was low. Most of the amines found in wines have their origin in the raw material used for their elaboration, so the Port winemaking process is not prone to the production of this kind of compounds. Total biogenic amine contents have shown a decrease with the aging of both types of Port wines. PMID:21732693

  17. Estimation of D-Arabinose by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as Surrogate for Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    De, Prithwiraj; Amin, Anita G; Valli, Eloise; Perkins, Mark D; McNeil, Michael; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2015-01-01

    Globally, tuberculosis is slowly declining each year and it is estimated that 37 million lives were saved between 2000 and 2013 through effective diagnosis and treatment. Currently, diagnosis relies on demonstration of the bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), in clinical specimens by serial sputum microscopy, culture and molecular testing. Commercial immunoassay lateral flow kits developed to detect Mtb lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine as a marker of active TB exhibit poor sensitivity, especially in immunocompetent individuals, perhaps due to low abundance of the analyte. Our present study was designed to develop methods to validate the presence of LAM in a quantitative fashion in human urine samples obtained from culture-confirmed TB patients. Herein we describe, a consolidated approach for isolating LAM from the urine and quantifying D-arabinose as a proxy for LAM, using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 298 urine samples obtained from a repository were rigorously analyzed and shown to contain varying amounts of LAM-equivalent ranging between ~10-40 ng/mL. To further substantiate that D-arabinose detected in the samples originated from LAM, tuberculostearic acid, the unique 10-methyloctadecanoic acid present at the phosphatidylinositol end of LAM was also analyzed in a set of samples and found to be present confirming that the D-arabinose was indeed derived from LAM. Among the 144 samples from culture-negative TB suspects, 30 showed presence of D-arabinose suggesting another source of the analyte, such as disseminated TB or from non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. Our work validates that LAM is present in the urine samples of culture-positive patients in small but readily detectable amounts. The study further substantiates LAM in urine as a powerful biomarker for active tuberculosis. PMID:26633829

  18. Cerumen of Australian stingless bees ( Tetragonula carbonaria): gas chromatography-mass spectrometry fingerprints and potential anti-inflammatory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, Flavia Carmelina; Brooks, Peter Richard; Wallace, Helen Margaret; Russell, Fraser Donald

    2011-04-01

    Cerumen, or propolis, is a mixture of plant resins enriched with bee secretions. In Australia, stingless bees are important pollinators that use cerumen for nest construction and possibly for colony's health. While extensive research attests to the therapeutic properties of honeybee ( Apis mellifera) propolis, the biological and medicinal properties of Australian stingless bee cerumen are largely unknown. In this study, the chemical and biological properties of polar extracts of cerumen from Tetragonula carbonaria in South East Queensland, Australia were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and in vitro 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) cell-free assays. Extracts were tested against comparative (commercial tincture of A. mellifera propolis) and positive controls (Trolox and gallic acid). Distinct GC-MS fingerprints of a mixed diterpenic profile typical of native bee cerumen were obtained with pimaric acid (6.31 ± 0.97%, w/w), isopimaric acid (12.23 ± 3.03%, w/w), and gallic acid (5.79 ± 0.81%, w/w) tentatively identified as useful chemical markers. Characteristic flavonoids and prenylated phenolics found in honeybee propolis were absent. Cerumen extracts from T. carbonaria inhibited activity of 5-LOX, an enzyme known to catalyse production of proinflammatory mediators (IC50 19.97 ± 2.67 ?g/ml, mean ± SEM, n = 4). Extracts had similar potency to Trolox (IC50 12.78 ± 1.82 ?g/ml), but were less potent than honeybee propolis (IC50 5.90 ± 0.62 ?g/ml) or gallic acid (IC50 5.62 ± 0.35 ?g/ml, P < 0.001). These findings warrant further investigation of the ecological and medicinal properties of this stingless bee cerumen, which may herald a commercial potential for the Australian beekeeping industry.

  19. A simple and reliable procedure for the determination of psychoactive drugs in oral fluid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, Mitona; Pichini, Simona; Civit, Ester; Santamariña, Elena; Perez, Katherine; de la Torre, Rafael

    2007-06-28

    A simple and reliable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for identifying and quantifying psychoactive drugs in oral fluid is described. Substances under investigation were: psychostimulant drugs (amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxiamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine, phentermine), cocaine and metabolites (benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, and ecgonine methyl esther), cannabinoids (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabinol and cannabidiol), opiates (6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine and codeine), hypnotics (flurazepam, flunitrazepam, dipotassium chlorazepate, alprazolam, diazepam and oxazepam), antidepressant drugs (amitryptiline, paroxetine and sertraline), antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol, chlorpromazine and fluphenazine) chlormethiazole, loratidine, hydroxyzine, diphenhydramine, valproic acid and gabapentin. After the addition of deuterated analogues of morphine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, (+/-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and clonazepam as internal standards, all the compounds were simultaneously extracted from oral fluid by solid-phase extraction procedure. Acid compounds were eluted with acetone while basic and neutral compounds with dichloromethane:isopropanol:ammonium (80:20:2, v/v/v). Chromatography was performed on a methylsilicone capillary column and analytes, derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, were determined in the selected-ion-monitoring (SIM) mode. Mean recovery ranged between 44.5 and 97.7 % and quantification limit between 0.9 and 44.2 ng/ml oral fluid for the different analytes. The developed analytical methodology was applied to investigate the presence of psychoactive drugs in oral fluid from injured individuals attending the emergency room (MACIUS project). PMID:17395417

  20. Estimation of D-Arabinose by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as Surrogate for Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan in Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    De, Prithwiraj; Amin, Anita G.; Valli, Eloise; Perkins, Mark D.; McNeil, Michael; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2015-01-01

    Globally, tuberculosis is slowly declining each year and it is estimated that 37 million lives were saved between 2000 and 2013 through effective diagnosis and treatment. Currently, diagnosis relies on demonstration of the bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), in clinical specimens by serial sputum microscopy, culture and molecular testing. Commercial immunoassay lateral flow kits developed to detect Mtb lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine as a marker of active TB exhibit poor sensitivity, especially in immunocompetent individuals, perhaps due to low abundance of the analyte. Our present study was designed to develop methods to validate the presence of LAM in a quantitative fashion in human urine samples obtained from culture-confirmed TB patients. Herein we describe, a consolidated approach for isolating LAM from the urine and quantifying D-arabinose as a proxy for LAM, using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 298 urine samples obtained from a repository were rigorously analyzed and shown to contain varying amounts of LAM-equivalent ranging between ~10–40 ng/mL. To further substantiate that D-arabinose detected in the samples originated from LAM, tuberculostearic acid, the unique 10-methyloctadecanoic acid present at the phosphatidylinositol end of LAM was also analyzed in a set of samples and found to be present confirming that the D-arabinose was indeed derived from LAM. Among the 144 samples from culture-negative TB suspects, 30 showed presence of D-arabinose suggesting another source of the analyte, such as disseminated TB or from non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. Our work validates that LAM is present in the urine samples of culture-positive patients in small but readily detectable amounts. The study further substantiates LAM in urine as a powerful biomarker for active tuberculosis. PMID:26633829

  1. Serum level of 19-hydroxyandrostenedione during pregnancy and at delivery determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Osawa, Y.; Ohnishi, S.; Yarborough, C.; Ohigashi, S.; Kosaki, T.; Hashino, M.; Yanaihara, T.; Nakayama, T. )

    1990-04-01

    19-Hydroxyandrostenedione (19-OHA) is secreted from the adrenal glands in men and women and also from the placenta during pregnancy. It has been found to cause hypertension in animal models. We have synthesized (7,7-2H2)-19-OHA with high deuterium content and, together with (7,7-2H2)A and (9,11-2H2)estrone (E1), have developed a quantitative assay of serum level 19-OHA, A, and E1 using the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-mass fragmentography method to monitor individual subjects throughout pregnancy. The labeled 19-OHA, used as internal standard, showed only 6.73% of unlabeled compound. Recovery of standard 19-OHA, A, and E1 (5,000 pg each) added to male plasma was 97.4 +/- 2.3%, 96.3 +/- 2.1%, and 100.1 +/- 4.1% (mean +/- SD), respectively; the intraassay coefficient of variation was 2.1%, 3.5%, and 3.8%, respectively. Ten pregnant subjects without complications and 10 pregnant subjects near term with hypertension were selected (with informed consent). The 19-OHA and E1 serum concentrations of maternal venous blood from uncomplicated pregnancies increased significantly as gestation progressed (19-OHA: first trimester, 225 +/- 72; second trimester, 656 +/- 325; third trimester, 1,518 +/- 544 pg/ml), reaching the highest level at delivery (19-OHA: 1,735 +/- 684 pg/ml). Whereas a positive correlation was found between the level of 19-OHA and E1, no apparent change of the A level was observed during pregnancy. Levels of the three steroid hormones in pregnancy complicated by hypertension in the second and third trimester were not found to be significantly different from those of normal pregnancy (19-OHA of hypertensive subjects: second trimester, 762 +/- 349; third trimester, 1,473 +/- 491 pg/ml).

  2. Analytic validation of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for quantification of six amino acids in canine serum samples.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rosana; Grützner, Niels; Berghoff, Nora; Lidbury, Jonathan A; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2015-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analytically validate a gas concentration of chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for measurement of 6 amino acids in canine serum samples and to assess the stability of each amino acid after sample storage. SAMPLES Surplus serum from 80 canine samples submitted to the Gastrointestinal Laboratory at Texas A&M University and serum samples from 12 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES GC-MS was validated to determine precision, reproducibility, limit of detection, and percentage recovery of known added concentrations of 6 amino acids in surplus serum samples. Amino acid concentrations in serum samples from healthy dogs were measured before (baseline) and after storage in various conditions. RESULTS Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation (10 replicates involving 12 pooled serum samples) were 13.4% and 16.6% for glycine, 9.3% and 12.4% for glutamic acid, 5.1% and 6.3% for methionine, 14.0% and 15.1% for tryptophan, 6.2% and 11.0% for tyrosine, and 7.4% and 12.4% for lysine, respectively. Observed-to-expected concentration ratios in dilutional parallelism tests (6 replicates involving 6 pooled serum samples) were 79.5% to 111.5% for glycine, 80.9% to 123.0% for glutamic acid, 77.8% to 111.0% for methionine, 85.2% to 98.0% for tryptophan, 79.4% to 115.0% for tyrosine, and 79.4% to 110.0% for lysine. No amino acid concentration changed significantly from baseline after serum sample storage at -80°C for ? 7 days. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE GC-MS measurement of concentration of 6 amino acids in canine serum samples yielded precise, accurate, and reproducible results. Sample storage at -80°C for 1 week had no effect on GC-MS results. PMID:26618725

  3. Development of a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determining personal care products in air.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Borrull, Francesc

    2010-06-25

    This study describes the development of a new analytical method for determining 14 personal care products (PCPs) - nine synthetic musks, four parabens and one insect repellent - in air samples. The method is based on active sampling on sorbent tubes and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and is rapid, sensitive and drastically reduces the risk of sample contamination. Three kinds of tubes and traps were tested, those filled with Tenax TA being the most suitable for this study. Method validation showed good repeatability and reproducibility, low detection limits (between 0.03 ng m(-3) for DPMI and 12.5 ng m(-3) for propyl paraben) and good linearity for all compounds. Stability during storage indicated that samples must be kept refrigerated at 4 degrees C and analysed within 1 week of collection. The applicability of the technique to real samples was tested in different indoor and outdoor atmospheres. The total PCP values for indoor air ranged from 135 ng m(-3) in a pharmacy to 2838 ng m(-3) in a hairdresser's, whereas the values for outdoor air ranged from 14 ng m(-3) for a suburban environment to 26 ng m(-3) for an urban environment. In general, the most abundant synthetic musks were galaxolide (5.9-1256 ng m(-3)), musk xylene (1.6-766 ng m(-3)) and tonalide (1.1-138 ng m(-3)). Methyl and ethyl paraben (2.4-313 ng m(-3) and 1.8-117 ng m(-3), respectively) were the most abundant parabens. Although thermal desorption methods have been widely used for determining volatile organic compounds, they are rarely used with semi-volatile compounds. This study thus demonstrates that the thermal desorption method performs well with semi-volatile compounds and, for the first time, that it can be used for determining PCPs. PMID:20483421

  4. Determination of alkylamines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Jia, W. T.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkylamines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkylamines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkylamines in aerosol particles. Alkylamines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg (or 0.02-0.04 ng m-3). For the IC approach, a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkylamines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkylamines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng (or 0.9-6.4 ng m-3), and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkylamines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  5. Determination of alkyl amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkyl amines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkyl amines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkyl amines in aerosol particles. Alkyl amines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg. For the IC approach, a solid phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkyl amines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkyl amines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkyl amines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  6. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the free fatty acids in serum obtained from patients with Alzheimer's disease1.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yu; Chen, Xiaobei; Liu, Liyan; Xie, Wei; Wu, Yue; Wu, Qunhong; Wang, Decai

    2015-08-17

    As the worldwide elderly population has grown, the incidence and prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has steadily increased. The differential lifelong exposure of populations to dietary fatty acids has raised concerns about the potential links between cognitive impairments and nutrition. However, few studies have addressed the levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) in AD patient serum. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to determine the levels of 15 serum FFAs in 31 AD patients and 33 healthy controls. The optimized methodology entailed the formation of methyl esters using 10% v/v H2SO4/CH3OH at 62°C for 2 hours. The linear range was 0.55-300 ?g/mL, the range of recovery was 85.1-104.3%, and the detection limit was 0.03-0.08 ?g/mL. Several FFAs in the AD patient significantly decreased when compared to the control, including three saturated fatty acids (C14:0, C16:0, and C18:0) and six unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1, C18:1, C18:2, ?-C18:3, C20:2, and C22:6). The serum level of C18:3 was significantly higher in the AD patients. The FFA profiles of the AD patients differed significantly from those of controls. The method effectively determined the FFA levels and could facilitate future studies regarding the relationship between AD and the metabolism of FFAs. PMID:26405996

  7. Identification of microorganisms based on headspace analysis of volatile organic compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boots, A W; Smolinska, A; van Berkel, J J B N; Fijten, R R R; Stobberingh, E E; Boumans, M L L; Moonen, E J; Wouters, E F M; Dallinga, J W; Van Schooten, F J

    2014-06-01

    The identification of specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by microorganisms may assist in developing a fast and accurate methodology for the determination of pulmonary bacterial infections in exhaled air. As a first step, pulmonary bacteria were cultured and their headspace analyzed for the total amount of excreted VOCs to select those compounds which are exclusively associated with specific microorganisms. Development of a rapid, noninvasive methodology for identification of bacterial species may improve diagnostics and antibiotic therapy, ultimately leading to controlling the antibiotic resistance problem. Two hundred bacterial headspace samples from four different microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to detect a wide array of VOCs. Statistical analysis of these volatiles enabled the characterization of specific VOC profiles indicative for each microorganism. Differences in VOC abundance between the bacterial types were determined using ANalysis of VAriance-principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA). These differences were visualized with PCA. Cross validation was applied to validate the results. We identified a large number of different compounds in the various headspaces, thus demonstrating a highly significant difference in VOC occurrence of bacterial cultures compared to the medium and between the cultures themselves. Additionally, a separation between a methicillin-resistant and a methicillin-sensitive isolate of S. aureus could be made due to significant differences between compounds. ANOVA-PCA analysis showed that 25 VOCs were differently profiled across the various microorganisms, whereas a PCA score plot enabled the visualization of these clear differences between the bacterial types. We demonstrated that identification of the studied microorganisms, including an antibiotic susceptible and resistant S. aureus substrain, is possible based on a selected number of compounds measured in the headspace of these cultures. These in vitro results may translate into a breath analysis approach that has the potential to be used as a diagnostic tool in medical microbiology. PMID:24737039

  8. Screening for petrochemical contamination in seafood by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bencsath, F Aladar; Benner, Ronald A; Abraham, Ann; Wang, Yuesong; El Said, Kathleen R; Jester, Edward L E; Plakas, Steven M

    2015-05-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS) method is described, to screen seafood for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with petrochemical taint. VOCs are extracted from the headspace of heated sample homogenates by adsorption onto a SPME fiber and desorbed for analysis by GC-MS. Targeted compounds are determined semi-quantitatively using representative calibration standards for the various classes (alkanes, alkylbenzenes, indanes/tetralins, and naphthalenes) of VOCs analyzed. Sample preparation is minimal, and the analyses are rapid and automated with a capacity of 50 samples per day. The method was optimized in terms of headspace temperature, sample heating time, extraction time, and desorption time using oyster samples fortified with target compounds. Calibrations for hydrocarbon components were linear in the range of 8.3-167 ng/g; the limit of detection ranged between 0.05 and 0.21 ng/g, and the limit of quantitation between 0.16 and 0.69 ng/g. Good precision (RSD < 10 % at 16.7 ng/g for individual VOCs) and accuracy (recovery range 89-118 % at 25 ng/g) were obtained in oyster, crab, shrimp, and finfish matrices. The trueness of the method was demonstrated by quantifying VOCs at 1-2-ppb levels in oyster fortified with certified reference material NIST SRM 1491a. Following single laboratory validation, the method was employed for the determination of VOCs in seafood exposed to oil contaminated seawater and for the determination of background VOC levels in seafood species from the Gulf of Mexico and local food stores. The method as described can be used to supplement human sensory testing for petrochemical taint in seafood. PMID:25796529

  9. Determination of parts-per-billion concentrations of dioxane in water and soil by purge and trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or charcoal tube enrichment gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, P.S.; Mauer, T.; Wagner, M.; Chase, S.; Giles, B.

    1987-08-01

    Two methods for the determination of 1,4-dioxane in water have been studied. The first method is a heated purge and trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system following salting out with sodium sulfate. The second method is an adsorption on coconut-shell charcoal and solvent desorption with carbon disulfide/methanol followed by analysis of the desorbate by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The first method is also successful for the determination of 1,4-dioxane in solids and sediments. The second method is shown to be successful for 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, and butoxyethanol in water. The two methods are compared by analyzing 15 samples by both methods and achieving similar results.

  10. Bicyclic naphthenic acids in oil sands process water: identification by comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Michael J; West, Charles E; Scarlett, Alan G; Jones, David; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-01-23

    Although bicyclic acids have been reported to be the major naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) and a well-accepted screening assay indicated that some bicyclics were the most acutely toxic acids tested, none have yet been identified. Here we show by comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), that >100 C8-15 bicyclic acids are typically present in OSPW. Synthesis or purchase allowed us to establish the GC×GC retention times of methyl esters of numerous of these and the mass spectra and published spectra of some additional types, allowed us to identify bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane, bicyclo[3.2.1]octane, bicyclo[4.3.0]nonane, bicyclo[3.3.1]nonane and bicyclo[4.4.0]decane acids in OSPW and a bicyclo[2.2.2]octane acid in a commercial acid mixture. The retention positions of authentic bicyclo[3.3.0]octane and bicyclo[4.2.0]octane carboxylic acid methyl esters and published retention indices, showed these were also possibilities, as were bicyclo[3.1.1]heptane acids. Bicyclo[5.3.0]decane and cyclopentylcyclopentane carboxylic acids were ruled out in the samples analysed, on the basis that the corresponding alkanes eluted well after bicyclo[4.4.0]decane (latest eluting acids). Bicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, bicyclo[3.2.2]nonane, bicyclo[3.3.2]decane, bicyclo[4.2.2]decane and spiro[4.5]decane carboxylic acids could not be ruled out or in, as no authentic compounds or literature data were available. Mass spectra of the methyl esters of the higher bicyclic C12-15 acids suggested that many were simply analogues of the acids identified above, with longer alkanoate chains and/or alkyl substituents. Our hypothesis is that these acids represent the biotransformation products of the initially somewhat more bio-resistant bicyclanes of petroleum. Although remediation studies suggest that many bicyclic acids can be relatively quickly removed from suitably treated OSPW, examination by GC×GC-MS may show which isomers are affected most. Knowledge of the structures will allow the toxicity of any residual isomers to be calculated and measured. PMID:25553910

  11. Determination of nine hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water by precolumn derivatization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Boqu; Zhang, Ruirui; Liu, Pengyan; Zhang, Yajing; Zhang, Yanna; Bai, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), acting as emerging endocrine disruptors, have aroused more and more concern recently. Produced from natural source or metabolism of PBDEs, OH-PBDEs are more toxic than their parent compounds. However, few analytical methods are available for sensitive determination of these compounds especially in water. In this study, a method of determination of nine OH-PBDEs in lake, reservoir, river and sewage treatment plant effluent was established using N,O-bis (trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as derivatization reagent combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Optimal extraction solvent and derivatization factors such as the amount of BSTFA, time, temperature and dissolution solvent were determined experimentally. After extracted by hexane-dichloromethane (1:1, v/v), extracts were evaporated to almost dry, then BSTFA was added to the residue and heated at 90°C for 30min. The remains were dried under a stream of nitrogen and redissolved in hexane. The solution was separated in DB-35MS column, then determined by GC-MS in selected ion mode and full scan monitoring mode, and quantified by external standard method. The working curves were obtained using sample matrix in order to eliminate the matrix interference. Linear range was from 0.02?gL(-1) to 30?gL(-1). Limits of detection and quantification ranged from 0.0039?gL(-1) to 0.0220?gL(-1) and 0.0130?gL(-1) to 0.0733?gL(-1), respectively. Two different spiked levels were measured with 5 parallel tests for each level. The results indicated that the relative standard deviations were less than 14.08%. The method has been applied to lake water, reservoir water, river water and sewage treatment plant effluent. Five OH-PBDEs including 2'-OH-BDE3, 3'-OH-BDE7, 2'-OH-BDE28, 4'-OH-BDE17 and 5'-OH-BDE99 were detected in all the samples collected in Baoding, China. This method is simple, high sensitive, and suitable for simultaneous determination of nine OH-PBDEs in different environmental water. PMID:26454789

  12. Pressurized liquid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fragrance allergens, musks, phthalates and preservatives in baby wipes.

    PubMed

    Celeiro, Maria; Lamas, J Pablo; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Baby wipes and wet toilet paper are specific hygiene care daily products used on newborn and children skin. These products may contain complexes mixtures of harmful chemicals. A method based on pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of sixty-five chemical compounds (fragrance allergens, preservatives, musks, and phthalates) in wipes and wet toilet paper for children. These compounds are legislated in Europe according Regulation EC No 1223/2009, being twelve of them banned for their use in cosmetics, and one of them, 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC), is banned in products intended for children under 3 years. Also, propyl-, and butylparaben will be prohibited in leave-on cosmetic products designed for application on the nappy area of children under 3 years from April 2015. PLE is a fast, simple, easily automated technique, which permits to integrate a clean-up step during the extraction process reducing analysis time and stages. The proposed PLE-based procedure was optimized on real non-spiked baby wipe samples by means of experimental design to study the influence on extraction of parameters such as extraction solvent, temperature, extraction time, and sorbent type. Under the selected conditions, the method was validated showing satisfactory linearity, and intra-day, and inter-day precision. Recoveries were between 80-115% for most of the compounds with relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 15%. Finally, twenty real samples were analyzed. Thirty-six of the target analytes were detected, highlighting the presence of phenoxyethanol in all analyzed samples at high concentration levels (up to 0.8%, 800?gg(-1)). Methyl paraben (MeP), and ethyl paraben (EtP) were found in 40-50% of the samples, and the recently banned isobutyl paraben (iBuP) and isopropyl paraben (iPrP), were detected in one and seven samples, respectively, at concentrations between 0.093 and 247?gg(-1). In the case of phthalates, the forbidden phthalates dibutyl phtalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) were also found in thirteen samples at low levels. All the samples contained fragrance allergens in many cases at high levels (up to 2400?gg(-1)) and three musks were detected in the samples. Excluding the banned compounds, all samples complied with the concentration limits established by the European Regulation although 25% of them did not fulfill the labeling requirements for fragrance allergens. PMID:25662066

  13. Titan's Organic Aerosols : Molecular Composition And Structure Inferred From Systematic Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisson, Marietta; Szopa, Cyril; Buch, Arnaud; Carrasco, Nathalie; Gautier, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In spite of numerous studies carried out to characterize the chemical composition of laboratory analogues of Titan aerosols (tholins), their molecular composition as well as their structuration are still little known. If Pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Pyr-GCMS) has been used for years to give clues about this composition, the highly disparate results obtained show that they can be attributed to the analytical conditions used, to differences in the nature of the analogues studied, or both. In order to have a better description of Titan's tholins molecular composition, we led a systematic analysis of these materials by pyr-GCMS, exploring the analytical parameters to estimate the biases this technique can induce. With this aim, we used the PAMPRE experiment, a capacitively coupled RF cold plasma reactor (Szopa et al. 2006), to synthetize tholins with 2%, 5% and 10% of CH4 in N2. The three samples were systematically pyrolyzed in the temperature range 200-600°C with a 100°C step. The evolved gases were then injected into a GC-MS device for molecular identification. This systematic pyr-GC-MS analysis had two major objectives: (i) optimizing all the analytical parameters for the detection of a wide range of compounds and thus a characterization of the tholins composition as comprehensive as possible, and (ii) highlighting the role of the CH4 ratio on the tholins molecular structure. About a hundred of molecules have been identified in the pyrolysis products. Although an identical major pattern of nitriles and ethylene appears clearly for the three samples, some discriminant signatures were highlighted. The samples mainly differ by the number of released compounds. The results show especially an increase in the hydrocarbonaceous chains when the CH4 ratio increases. At the opposite, the formation of poly-nitrogenous compounds seems to be easier for lower CH4 ratios. We also performed a semi-quantitative study on the best represented chemical family in our chromatograms - namely nitriles: the existence of a relation between the quantity of a released compound and its molecular mass is consistent with the quantification of nitriles in the PAMPRE gas phase done by Gautier et al., 2011. Moreover, numerous species are present both in tholins and in the gas phase. That allowed us to make out potential precursors of the solid organic particles. From all these results, we conclude that the optimal pyrolysis temperature for a GC-MS analysis of our tholins is 600°C. This temperature choice results from the best compromise between the number of released compounds, the quality of the signal and the appearance of pyrolysis artefacts. Lastly, thanks to a review of pyr-GCMS studies carried out on Titan tholins since the first work of Khare et al. (1981), we compared all the previous analyses between them and with our own results in order to better understand the differences. References B. N. Khare et al., Icarus, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 290-297, Nov. 1981. C. Szopa et al., Planet. Space Sci., vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 394-404, Apr. 2006. T. Gautier et al., Icarus, vol. 213, no. 2, pp. 625-635, Jun. 2011.

  14. Chapter 3. Determination of semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Burbank, Teresa L.; Olson, Mary C.; Iverson, Jana L.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 38 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semivolatile organic compounds in solid samples is described. Samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from the solid sample twice at 13,800 kilopascals; first at 120 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (50:50, volume-to-volume ratio), and then the sample is extracted at 200 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio). The compounds are isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing divinylbenzene-vinylpyrrolidone copolymer resin. The cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted from the SPE material using a dichloromethane/diethyl ether mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio) and passed through a sodium sulfate/Florisil SPE cartridge to remove residual water and to further clean up the extract. The concentrated extract is solvent exchanged into ethyl acetate and the solvent volume reduced to 0.5 milliliter. Internal standard compounds are added prior to analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Comparisons of PAH data for 28 sediment samples extracted by Soxhlet and the accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) method described in this report produced similar results. Extraction of PAH compounds from standard reference material using this method also compared favorably with Soxhlet extraction. The recoveries of PAHs less than molecular weight 202 (pyrene or fluoranthene) are higher by up to 20 percent using this ASE method, whereas the recoveries of PAHs greater than or equal to molecular weight 202 are equivalent. This ASE method of sample extraction of solids has advantages over conventional Soxhlet extraction by increasing automation of the extraction process, reducing extraction time, and using less solvent. Extract cleanup also is greatly simplified because SPE replaces commonly used gel permeation chromatography. The performance of the method (as expressed by mean recoveries and mean precision) was determined using Ottawa sand, a commercially available topsoil, and an environmental stream sediment, fortified at 1.5 and 15 micrograms per compound. Recoveries of PAH and semivolatile compounds in Ottawa sand samples fortified at 1.5 micrograms averaged 88 percent ? 9.4 percent relative standard deviation, and calculated initial method detection limits per compound averaged 14 micrograms per kilogram, assuming a 25-gram sample size. The recovery for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene is less than 60 percent; thus, the concentration of this compound will always be reported as estimated with the E remark code. The analysis of 25 alkylated PAH homolog groups also can be determined with this method with extra data analysis and review, but because of the lack of authentic reference standard compounds, these results are considered to be semiquantitative. The PAH homolog groups are quantitated using the response factor of a parent PAH method compound, if available. Precision data for the alkylated PAH homologs detected in a marine sediment standard reference material (SRM 1944) also are presented to document and demonstrate method capability.

  15. Determination of the chemical composition of titan4s aerosols analogues using pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Carrasco, N.

    2013-12-01

    The in situ chemical characterization of Titan's aerosols with the ACP-GCMS (Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyze-Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer) experiments onboard the Cassini-Huygens mission showed that the aerosols heated at 600°C were releasing two main gaseous compounds: NH3 and HCN. To better understand the process of production of these species at high temperature, and their relationship to the solid aerosol composition, it is possible to mimic in laboratory the Titan's atmosphere chemistry to produce analogues of Titan's aerosols (tholins), chemical and physical properties of which can be studied with laboratory instrumentation. In the present work, we studied the thermal decomposition of tholins produced with the PAMPRE cold plasma experiment[1]. For this study, pyrolysis at various temperatures, coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Pyr-GCMS), has been used in order to understand the origin and formation mechanism of the NH3 and HCN compounds. With this aim, two samples were produced using different initial CH4/N2 gaseous mixtures with different concentration ratios: (5:95) and (10:90). Pyr-GCMS was applied to characterize their chemical composition and molecule structure. In order to study the evolution of chemical compounds released as a function of temperature, the final pyrolysis temperature has been set from 100°C to 900°C with a 100°C step increment. The results show that the major compounds released are similar for the two different studied samples. They include hydrocarbon compounds, nitriles, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, and some pyrrole isomers. Moreover, whatever the final temperature is, acetonitrile is the most abundant compound released by the samples. At 100°C only water contribution can be detected. Then the number of compounds released increases with the temperature up to 600°C. With the temperature increase the nature of the gaseous species detected does not change significantly. Pyrrole was not detected until the temperature exceeds 600°C for (5:95) sample and 400°C for (10:90) sample. Benzene has also been detected at 800°C for the (5:95) sample and 700°C for (10:90) sample. In the same way, toluene has been detected for the (10:90) sample at 700°C but it has not been detected for the (5:95) sample. This could indicate that carbon percentage is directly related to the benzene and toluene production. HCN and NH3 as the major compounds detected in the ACP instrument were also found in our results. It confirms that the aerosol analogues produced in PAMPRE set-up are among the most similar to Titan's aerosols, as found in [2]. [1] C. Szopa, G. Cernogora, L. Boufendi, et al. : PAMPRE: A dusty plasma experiment for Titan's tholins production and study, Planetary and Space Science, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 394-404, 2006. [2] P. Coll, R. Navarro-González, C. Szopa, et al. : Can laboratory tholins mimic the chemistry producing Titan's aerosols? A review in light of ACP experimental results, Planetary and Space Science, vol. 77, pp. 91-103, 2013.

  16. Identification of volatile organic compounds emitted by a naturally aged book using solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lattuati-Derieux, Agnès; Bonnassies-Termes, Sylvette; Lavédrine, Bertrand

    2004-02-13

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been applied to the analysis of volatile organic compounds emitted from a naturally aged groundwood pulp paper originating from an old book in order to access the products produced through the decomposition reactions occurring in paper upon ageing. Two different extraction methods were developed and compared: headspace SPME and contact SPME. The influence of few extraction parameters were tested in order to define the best extraction conditions. An optimised non-destructive contact SPME method was elaborated and allowed the characterisation of more than 50 individual constituents. PMID:14870711

  17. Plant- versus microbial signature in densimetric fractions of mediterranean forest soils: a study by thermochemolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovira, Pere; Grasset, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Plant- versus microbial signature in densimetric fractions of mediterranean forest soils: a study by thermochemolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry The ageing of a given organic substrate decomposing in soil is strongly dependant of its microbial utilization and transformation (reworking) by the soil microflora. How far a given substrate or soil fraction has gone in this evolution is usually measured by means of molecular signatures, ratios between organic compounds which enlighten us about the origin and/or the degree of microbial reworking of a specific group of compounds: lipids, proteins, lignin, carbohydrates, etc. Owing to the biochemical heterogeneity of decomposing substrates it is unlikely that the degree of microbial reworking can be approached with a single signature. Applying a couple of them is much better, but obtaining a wide collection of molecular signatures can be time consuming. Here, instead of applying specific methods to obtain a collection of specific signatures, we apply TMAH-thermochemolysis to obtain a panoramic view of the biochemical composition of a series of densimetric fractions of soils. From the compounds identified after TMAH-thermochemolysis, a collection of indicators was obtained: (a) ratio between short and long-chained linear alkanoic acids; (b) ratio between branched and long-chained linear alkanoic acids; (c) ratio between C16 and total alpha-omega-alkanedioic acids; (d) ratio microbial to plant-derived 1-methoxyalkanes; (e) ratio syringyl to total lignin-derived phenolic compounds; (f) vanillic acid to vanillin ratio; (g) fucose/glucose ratio; and (h) xylose/glucose ratio. From these indicators a single numerical value is distilled, allowing to order a couple of densimetric fractions of soil organic matter according to its degree of microbial reworking. This approach was applied to the comparison of a couple of densimetric fractions of soil organic matter of three organic H horizons from mediterranean forest soils. Fractions were obtained by a sequential extraction with sodium polytungstate (NaPT) at density 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0, after ultrasonic disintegration of the sample. Before ultrasonic treatment, a previous extraction was done with NaPT d = 1.6, to isolate the free light fraction. Results were overall consistent in the sense that occluded fractions of density <1.8, and particularly those of density < 1.6, appear as the most microbially evolved. The free light fraction was overall the most fresh-, least evolved fraction. The dense fraction (d > 2.0), made of organomineral complexes with fine silt plus clay, was overall fresh and poorly microbially reworked. Our future work will be the application of this approach to the study of complete soil profiles and soil fractions, thus allowing to obtain a panoramic view of the stabilization of soil organic matter at different depths.

  18. Characterization of odor-active compounds of various cherry wines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-olfactometry and their correlation with sensory attributes.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yunwei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xiao, Zuobing; Song, Shiqing; Eric, Karangwa; Jia, Chengsheng; Yu, Haiyan; Zhu, Jiancai

    2011-08-01

    To characterize the aroma of cherry wine, five samples were analyzed by quantitative descriptive sensory analysis, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). The aroma of cherry wines was described by 6 sensory terms as fruity, sour, woody, fermentation, cameral and floral. Fifty-one odor-active (OA) compounds were detected by GC-O and quantified by GC-MS, and 45 of them were identified. Twenty-nine OA compounds having more than 50% detection frequency were selected as specific compounds correlated to sensory attributes by partial least squares regression (PLSR). The correlation result showed ethyl 2-methyl propionate, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl butyrate, ethyl pentanoate, 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl hexanoate, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, ethyl lactate, 1-hexanol, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, ethyl hydroxyacetate, acetic acid, furfural, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, benzaldehyde, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, guaiacol, beta-citronellol, hexanoic acid, 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol, 2-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-one, ethyl cinnamate, 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol were typical OA compounds, which covaried with characteristic aroma of cherry wines. PMID:21727038

  19. Characterisation of the aroma profiles of different honeys and corresponding flowers using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Seisonen, Sirli; Kivima, Evelin; Vene, Kristel

    2015-02-15

    The aroma profiles of thirteen different honey samples from four botanical origins: heather (Calluna vulgaris), raspberry (Rubus idaeus), rape (Brassica napus), alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and the blossoms of the four corresponding flowers were investigated to find odour-active compounds exclusively representing specific honeys based on odour-active compounds from the blossoms. Gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas-chromatography-olfactometry were used to determine and identify the odour-active compounds. Data was analysed using agglomerative hierarchical clustering and correspondence analysis. Honeys from the same botanical origin clustered together; however, none of the identified compounds were exclusive to a particular honey/blossom combination. Heather honey had the flavour profile most different to the others. Isophorone and 2-methylbutyric acid were found only in heather honeys. Heather honey was characterised by having more "sweet" and "candy-like" notes, raspberry honeys had more "green" notes, while alder buckthorn had more "honey" and "floral" notes. PMID:25236195

  20. Identification of the position and the stereochemistry of the double bond in monounsaturated fatty acid methyl esters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of dimethyl disulfide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Scribe, P.; Guezennec, J.; Dagaut, J.; Pepe, C.; Saliot, A.

    1988-05-01

    A single-step derivatization procedure using dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) is described for monounsaturated fatty acid esters (MUFAME). The analysis of DMDS adducts by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is detailed: The mass spectra (electron impact 70 eV) show molecular ions (M/sup +/) and give key fragments that permit determination of the position of the original double bond. Alkylthiolation of Z- and E-MUFAME as a specific antiaddition leads, respectively, to the threo and erythro adducts. The two isomers are well-separated by gas chromatography, permitting precise stereochemistry of the initial double bond. Nevertheless, for a complex environmental mixture of MUFAME, the stereochemical identification is restricted to the linear series. This procedure is suitable for the analysis of trace compounds at the nanogram level such as encountered in the natural environment. An application is presented for the analysis of planktonic and bacterially derived fatty acids in recent marine sediments.

  1. Carbon isotope ratio analysis of organic moieties from fossil mummified wood: establishing optimum conditions for off-line pyrolysis extraction using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Poole, Imogen; van Bergen, Pim F

    2002-01-01

    Mummified fossil wood was studied using off-line pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to reveal detailed insights into the pyrolysis conditions that are needed to obtain simultaneously sufficient amounts of both cellulose and lignin markers for stable carbon isotope analyses. The off-line pyrolysis was applied at a range of temperatures (200, 250 and 300 degrees C) and times (1 and 2 h) to determine the optimum temperature and time that yielded the highest quantity of true markers for lignin and cellulose. Increasing the time from 1 to 2 h had no effect whereas increasing the temperature led to large differences. The products released during the low-temperature pyrolysis were mostly related to thermally labile moieties. Only at 300 degrees C were sufficient amounts of products released that represent true cellulose and lignin building blocks and which could be studied using gas chromatography/combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. PMID:12362390

  2. A salting out-acetonitrile homogeneous extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of thirteen N-nitrosamines in skin care cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hao; Guo, Xindong; Xian, Yanping; Luo, Haiying; Wang, Bin; Wu, Yuluan

    2015-11-27

    A sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was established for the simultaneous determination of thirteen N-nitrosamines (NAs) in skin care cosmetics. The cosmetics samples were firstly dispersed by water and subsequently extracted and purified using salting out-acetonitrile homogeneous extraction method. Finally, the extracting solution was concentrated by slow nitrogen gas blowing. All of the samples were separated by INNOWAX capillary chromatographic column, and detected by selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and quantified by isotope internal standard method. The method was validated for linearity and range, accuracy, precision and sensitivity. Under the optimized condition, the calibration curves were linear over the selected concentration ranges of 2-500?g/L for all the thirteen analytes, with calculated coefficients of determination (R(2)) of greater than 0.996. The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantitation (LOQs) of the method were 3-15?g/kg and 10-50?g/kg, respectively. Recoveries were calculated at three levels of concentration spiked in two kinds of cosmetics (skin care cream and water). The values were found between 93.8% and 121.0% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values of 2.5-7.2% for intra-day precision (n=6) and 3.3-6.7% for inter-day precision (n=5). The method was successfully applied to analyze twenty-two cosmetics samples and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was detected in one sample with the concentration of 207?g/kg. PMID:26518490

  3. Coordinating fingerprint determination of solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemometric methods for quality control of oxidized tallow.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Hayat, Khizar; Xiao, Zuobing; Niu, Yunwei; Eric, Karangwa

    2013-02-22

    Based on optimized solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) and chemometric methods, simple, reliable and reproducible methods were described for the first time for developing a chromatographic fingerprint of oxidized tallow. Eight optimal oxidized tallow samples were used to establish the chromatographic fingerprint. Spectral correlative chromatogram was adopted to identify 33 "common components". The validation of fingerprint analysis was performed based on the relative retention time, the relative peak area of common peaks, sample stability and similarity analysis. The correlation coefficient of similarity of eight optimal oxidized tallow samples was more than 0.962, which showed that samples from different batches were consistent to some extent in spite of slightly different chemical indexes. Through principal component analysis (PCA), 14 constituents were further screened out to be the main chemical markers, which could be applied to more accurate quantitative discrimination and quality control of oxidized tallow. PMID:23332870

  4. Direct chemical-analysis of uv laser-ablation products of organic polymers by using selective ion monitoring mode in gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yirang; Lee, H.W.; Fountain, S.T.; Lubman, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Trace quantities of laser ablated organic polymers were analyzed by using commercial capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; the instrument was modified so that the laser ablation products could be introduced into the capillary column directly and the constituents of each peak in the chromatogram were identified by using a mass spectrometer. The present study takes advantage of the selective ion monitoring mode for significantly improving the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer as a detector, which is critical in analyzing the trace quantities and confirming the presence or absence of the species of interest in laser ablated polymers. The initial composition of the laser ablated polymers was obtained by using an electron impact reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the possible structure of the fragments observed in the spectra was proposed based on the structure of the polymers.

  5. Determination of testosterone in plasma from men by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, with high-resolution selected-ion monitoring and metastable peak monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Finlay, E.M.; Gaskell, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    Highly specific methods are described for determining testosterone in plasma or serum from men. Extract fractions obtained by selective isolation procedures are converted to tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) oximes/TBDMS ethers or methyl oximes/TBDMS ethers and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the high-resolution selected-ion monitoring or metastable peak-monitoring modes. (2H3)Testosterone and unlabeled 17-epitestosterone are used as the respective internal standards. When we applied the two procedures to analysis of samples of pooled plasma and serum used for external quality assessment of routine assays, the results agreed well. Interlaboratory values for mean concentrations obtained by routine immunoassays (y) consistently exceeded values obtained by our technique (x), although the values closely correlated (r . 0.997; y . 1.008x + 0.564 nmol/L).

  6. Preparation of durable graphene-bonded titanium fibers for efficient microextraction of phthalates from aqueous matrices and analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo-Tao; Li, Hai-Fang; Zheng, Xiaoxia; Teng, Yanguo; Liu, Yan; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2014-11-28

    A solid-phase microextraction fiber (SPME) was synthesized for pre-concentration of 15 phthalates from aqueous samples. Graphene oxide was immobilized on Ti wire with titanol groups using a cross-linking agent and subsequently reduced to yield a folded and wrinkled graphene coating. This graphene-Ti fiber demonstrated durable mechanical robustness and enhanced stability for more than 200 extraction cycles due to the Ti substrate and chemical bond. The extraction efficiencies reached highest when the graphene layers were four and their performances were superior to commercial SPME fibers. The prepared fiber was used for pre-concentration of phthalates from aqueous samples by direct immersion extraction and thermal desorption for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The method was utilized for the simultaneous analysis of 15 phthalates with satisfactory recoveries in the range of 82.8-97.8% for bottled water and 73.3-102.0% for intravenous drips in plastic packaging. PMID:25454125

  7. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles and Identification of Capping Agent Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karthick, V; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Govindaraju, K; Sinha, Sweta; Singaravelu, G

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using leaf extract of Syzygium jambolanum and capping agent has been explored. The synthesized AuNPs have been characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. The AuNPs show intense surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 528 nm and were found to be spherical and hexagonal in shape with particle size ranging from 20-30 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the surface morphology of synthesized AuNPs. The capping ligand has been evaluated using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. PMID:26369012

  8. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of products from on-line pyrolysis/silylation of plant gums used as binding media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiantore, Oscar; Riedo, Chiara; Scalarone, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    Plant gums are complex polysaccharides used in the field of cultural heritage especially as binding media. Classification of polysaccharides may be achieved on the basis of monosaccharides composition after cleavage of glycosidic bond. Characterization of plant gums in works of art is complicated by the necessity of to use a method minimally invasive and requiring a small mount of sample. Pyrolisys is an useful method to obtain polysaccharides decomposition and generally pyrolysis products can be identified by the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This paper describes a method where two plant gums, arabic and tragacanth, were pyrolized in presence of silylating agents (HMDS e BSTFA alone and with TMCS as catalyst) using an on-line Py-GC/MS apparatus. Some characteristic trimethylsilyl derivatives of monosaccharides were identified on the basis of mass spectra. The presence of characteristic pyrolysis products of sugars allows to distinguish the two gums.

  9. Determination of volatile organic contaminants in bulk oils (edible, injectable, and other internal medicinal) by purge-and-trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.W.

    1994-05-01

    Purge-and-trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is evaluated for the quantitation of part-per-billion levels of volatile organic contaminants in bulk vegetable oils. Results using 2 purge techniques (direct purging of the heated oil and purging after dispersing the oil on an aluminum oxide powder) and 2 quantitative methods (standard curve and deuterium-labeled internal standard addition) are reported. Twenty volatile compounds and 8 vegetable oils were investigated. Recovery data and estimated detection limits for each compound are reported for each purge technique. Generally acceptable recoveries (70-130% for more than 90% of the analyte spikes) and acceptable detection levels (approximately 4-10 ppb) were obtained for all compounds using either the external standard curve of the deuterium-isotope-labeled internal standard. The use of a dispersant (such as alumina) for sample purging resulted in poor recoveries of the highly volatile contaminants. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. A quasi non-destructive approach for amber geological provenance assessment based on head space solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, I D; Aresta, A; Truic?, G I; Radu, G L; Palmisano, F; Sabbatini, L

    2014-02-01

    Head space (HS) solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to analyze the volatile fraction of ambers of different geological origin. In particular, Romanian (romanite) and Baltic (succinite) amber samples were studied. Both types of amber have nearly similar bulk chemical compositions and could probably reflect only some differences of paleobiological and/or diagenetic origin. The present study shows that amber head space fingerprint, obtained by SPME/GC-MS, can provide a simple and quasi non-destructive method capable of romanite/succinite differentiation. Among the numerous compounds present in the head space, a number of few informative variables could be selected that were able to differentiate the ambers as demonstrated by Principal Component and Cluster Analysis. PMID:24401437

  11. Metabolomic profiling of human follicular fluid from patients with repeated failure of in vitro fertilization using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lan; Zhao, Xiaoming; Sun, Yun; Hong, Yan; Gao, Yuping; Hu, Shuanggang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics method to compare the metabolites in the follicular fluid (FF) from patients with in vitro fertilization (IVF) and repeated IVF failure (RIF). Methods: A prospective study was employed in Center for Reprodutive Medcine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai, China, between January and October 2010. FF samples were collected from 13 patients with RIF and 15 patients who achieved pregnancy after the first IVF cycle. Results: Partial least squares (PLS) discriminant analysis of the PCA data revealed that the samples were scattered into two different regions. FF from the two groups differed with respect to 20 metabolites. FF from RIF group showed elevated levels of several amino acids (valine, threonine, isoleucine, cysteine, serine, proline, alanine, phenylalanine, lysine, methionine and ornithine), and reduced levels of dicarboxylic acids, cholesterol and some organic acids. Conclusions: The studies corroborated successful determination of the levels of metabolite in the FF. PMID:25400819

  12. Chemical-sensory characterization of dairy manure odor using headspace solid-phase microextraction and multidimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Laor, Yael; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Ravid, Uzi

    2008-09-01

    Livestock operations are associated with emissions of odor, gases, and particulate matter. The majority of previous livestock odor studies focused on swine operations whereas relatively few relate to dairy cattle. Identifying the compounds responsible for the primary odor impact is a demanding analytical challenge because many critical odor components are frequently present at very low concentrations within a complex matrix of numerous insignificant volatiles. The objective of this study was to describe a chemical-sensory profile of dairy manure odor using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (MDGC-MS-O). Two analytical approaches were used: (1) HS-SPME time-series extractions (from seconds up to 20 hr) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O) analyses, and (2) relatively short HS-SPME extractions (30 min) followed by MDGC-MS-O analyses on selected chromatogram heart-cuts. Dairy manure was collected at research dairy farms in the United States and Israel. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) resolved from multiple analyses included sulfur-containing compounds, volatile fatty acids, ketones, esters, and phenol/indole derivatives. A total of 86 potential odorants were identified. Of them, 17 compounds were detected by the human nose only. A greater number of VOCs and odorous compounds were detected, as well as higher mass loading, on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers observed for longer extractions with SPME. However, besides sulfur-containing compounds, other selected compounds showed no apparent competition and displacement on the SPME fiber. The use of MDGC-MS-O increased chromatographic resolution even at relatively short extractions and revealed 22 additional odorants in one of the regions of the chromatogram. The two analytical approaches were found to be parallel to some extent whereas MDGC-MS-O can also be considered as a complementary approach by resolving more detailed chemical-sensory odor profiles. PMID:18817111

  13. Triclosan and methyl-triclosan monitoring study in the northeast of Spain using a magnetic particle enzyme immunoassay and confirmatory analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantiani, Lina; Farré, Marinella; Asperger, Danijela; Rubio, Fernando; González, Susana; López de Alda, Maria J.; Petrovi?, Mira; Shelver, Weilin L.; Barceló, Damià

    2008-10-01

    SummaryFor the first time, the occurrence of triclosan and its metabolite methyl-triclosan was investigated in a typical Mediterranean area using a two-step methodology based on screening using a magnetic particle immunoassay (IA) and confirmatory analysis by solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In this study, 95 environmental samples were analyzed. A commercial immunoassay was assessed for use in the different types of water selected for this study. A large monitoring study was performed on the influent and the effluent of eight wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), water samples from Ebro and Llobregat rivers, and drinking water. All wastewater samples tested in this study (influents and effluents) showed the presence of triclosan, with concentrations for raw influents being high (10 ?g/L as average value). The percentages of triclosan removal for the WWTPs were evaluated (30-70%) along the different treatment processes showing that the best removal rates were obtained by the processes equipped with membrane bioreactors (MBRs). However, important concentrations of triclosan were detected even after treatment by MBRs. The presence of this biocide was confirmed in 50% of the river samples analyzed. Twenty two drinking water samples from the Barcelona city area were investigated, and in this case no triclosan was detected. Due to its properties and the widespread usage of triclosan, there is a need for monitoring and controlling the amounts present in wastewater effluents, river water, drinking water catchments areas, and drinking water. To this end, we present a feasible methodology using a magnetic particle-based immunoassay as a screening, followed by confirmatory analysis using solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-MS).

  14. Fast determination of octinoxate and oxybenzone uv filters in swimming pool waters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Y?lmazcan, Ö; Kanakaki, C; Izgi, B; Rosenberg, E

    2015-07-01

    A fast gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of the potential endocrine disrupters octinoxate and oxybenzone in swimming pool water samples based on the solvent-free solid-phase microextraction technique. The low-pressure gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method used for the fast identification of UV filter substances was compared to a conventional method in terms of sensitivity and speed. The fast method proposed resulted in 2 min runs, leading to an eightfold decrease in the total analysis time and a sevenfold improvement in detection limits. The main parameters affecting the solid-phase microextraction process were also studied in detail and the optimized conditions were as follows: fiber coating, polyacrylate; extraction mode, direct immersion; extraction temperature, 25°C; sample volume, 5 mL; extraction time 45 min; pH 6.5. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-25 ?g/L with correlation coefficients in the range 0.990-0.999. The limits of detection were 0.17-0.29 ?g/L, and the recoveries were 80-83%. Combined method uncertainty was assessed and found to be less than 7% for both analytes for concentrations equal to or higher than 5 ?g/L. Pool water samples were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. Neither octinoxate nor oxybenzone were detected in the swimming pool water samples at concentrations above the respective limits of detection. PMID:25931007

  15. Simultaneous determination of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in animal tissues by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Chen, D; Yu, G; Yu, H; Pan, Y; Wang, Y; Huang, L; Yuan, Z

    2011-02-01

    A new multi-dimensional analytical method using gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-NPD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for qualitative and quantitative measurement of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in food animal tissues. This method is based on a new extraction procedure using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The analytes were extracted by phosphate buffer with trichloroacetic acid deproteinization and clean-up by C?? solid-phase extraction (SPE) adding dodecanesulfonic acid sodium salt as an ion-pair reagent. The eluted fraction was evaporated and derivatised with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) for GC-NPD analysis and GC-MS confirmation. Parameters for extraction pressure, temperature and cycle of ASE, clean-up, derivatisation and analysis procedure were optimised. The method was validated in muscle, kidney and liver of swine, bovine with a low concentration (limit of quantification) of 16.4 and 21.4 µg kg?¹ for these two analytes using GC-NPD. For GC-MS, the limits of quantification were 4.1 and 5.6 µg kg?¹, respectively. Spiked recoveries from levels of 20 to 200 µg kg?¹ were found to be between 73% and 99% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 17% in GC-NPD. For GC-MS, levels from 5 to 20 µg kg?¹ had between 70% and 93% with an RSD of less than 21%. This rapid and reliable method can be used for the characterisation and quantification of residues of lincomycin and spectinomycin in animal tissues. PMID:21240824

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in diesel exhaust using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with programmed temperature vaporization and large volume injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira de Souza, Carolina; Corrêa, Sergio Machado

    2015-02-01

    Diesel engines are significant sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAHs) in urban atmospheres. These compounds are widely known for their carcinogenic potential and mutagenic properties. In this study, a method was developed for the analysis of 16 priorities PAHs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with programmable temperature vaporizer large volume injection (PTV-LVI), which allowed to be obtained detection limits below 2.0 ng mL-1. This method was evaluated in samples from stratified particulate matter and gas phase from the emissions of diesel vehicle employing diesel commercial S10 (sulfur 10 mg L-1) and B5 (biodiesel 5% v/v). A sampling system that does not employ exhaust products dilution was used to evaluate the PAHs gas-particle partition. Six PAHs were identified in extracts and gas-phase PAHs took percentage of 80% in the total PAHs emissions. The sampling system without dilution not caused a strong nucleation/condensation of the most volatile PAHs. PAHs size-particle distribution was found in higher levels in the accumulation mode.

  17. Identification of Bound Nitro Musk-Protein Adduct in Fish Liver By Gas Chromatography-Mass Sectrometry: Biotransformation, Dose-Response and Toxicokinetics of Nitro Musk Metabolites Protein Adducts in Trout Liver as Biomarker of Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ubiquitous occurrences of synthetic nitro musks are evident in the literature. The In vivo analysis of musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) - protein adducts in trout liver have been performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selected ion monitoring (GC-SIM-MS). Bio...

  18. A METHOD FOR AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF 10 ML WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING ACIDIC, BASIC, AND NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILE COMPOUNDS LISTED IN USEPA METHOD 8270 BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented showing the progress made towards the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the single run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of acid, base and neutral compounds...

  19. ON-SITE SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION AND LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF ULTRA-TRACE SYNTHETIC MUSKS IN MUNICIPAL SEWAGE EFFLUENT USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY IN THE FULL-SCAN MODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fragrance materials such as synthetic musks in aqueous samples, are normally determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode to provide maximum sensitivity after liquid-liquid extraction of I -L samples. Full-scan mass spectra are requ...

  20. ON SITE SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION AND LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF ULTRA-TRACE SYNTHETIC MUSKS IN MUNICIPAL SEWAGE EFFLUENT USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY. FULL-SCAN MODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fragrance materials such as synthetic musks in aqueous samples, are normally determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode to provide maximum sensitivity after liquid-liquid extraction of I -L samples. Full-scan mass spectra are requ...

  1. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM CHARCOAL BADGES BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY (RTI/ACS-AP-209-112)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This protocol provides guidelines for determining volatile organic hydrocarbons (VOCs) in air samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This method is for the analysis of VOCs in air by GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring mode (SIM). Charcoal badge samplers are ex...

  2. Sample preparation for analyzing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in sediment by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Y.L.; Kong, Ada; Chiu, Yue-On )

    1993-12-01

    A sample preparation technique was developed to isolate and separate two classes of combustion-produced pollutants: three- to six-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F), from sediment samples for interference-free analyses by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The method involves soxhlet extraction with methylene chloride, sulfur removal with activated copper powder, gel filtration chromatography with Sephadex LH-20, polarity separation of PAH and PCDD/F with prepacked silica gel solid-phase extraction columns, and isolation of PCDD/F from polychlorinated biphenyls with microalumina columns. Stringent procedural controls were established to achieve clean isolations and recoveries of 70% or better for each step in the method. The prepared sample extracts were analyzed by capillary GC and GC/MS. Electron impact ionization was used for PAH, and negative chemical ionization with methane as a reagent gas was used for PCDD/F. Reproducible results were obtained. The method is sample and has the advantage of conserving sample consumption since two classes of compounds can be analyzed from the same sample. This can be critical in sediment core analyses were sample size is usually limited. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Identification of odorants in frankincense (Boswellia sacra Flueck.) by aroma extract dilution analysis and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Johannes; Buettner, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Frankincense has been known, traded and used throughout the ages for its exceptional aroma properties, and is still commonly used in both secular and religious settings to convey a pleasant odor. Surprisingly, the odoriferous principle(s) underlying its unique odor profile have never been published. In this study, resin samples of Boswellia sacra Flueck. from both Somalia and Oman were investigated by aroma extract dilution analysis. In a comprehensive, odor-activity guided approach both chemo-analytical and human-sensory parameters were used to identify odor active constituents of the volatile fraction of B. sacra. Among the key odorants found were ?-pinene, ?-myrcene, linalool, p-cresol and two unidentified sesquiterpenoids. Overall, a total of 23 odorants were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-olfactometry and heart-cut two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry. The majority of the identified odorant compounds were oxygenated monoterpenes, along with some relevant mono- and sesquiterpenes and only one diterpenoid substance. Several of these compounds were reported here for the first time as odorous constituents in B. sacra. Identifying bioactive compounds might support a better understanding with regard to the potential benefits of frankincense, for example in aromatherapy or ecclesial settings. PMID:25468535

  4. Pathway of diethyl phthalate photolysis in sea-water determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compound-specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuewei; Feng, Lijuan; Li, Xianguo

    2013-01-01

    The degradation mechanism of diethyl phthalate (DEP) in natural seawater under UV irradiation was investigated using a combination of intermediates detection and determination of stable carbon isotopic fractionation. Typical intermediates identified with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP) and phthalic anhydride. Stable carbon isotope signature was determined by gas chromatography coupled with isotope ratio mass spectrometry through a combustion interface (GC-C-IRMS). A profound (13)C enrichment, with a ?(13)C isotope shift of 12.3±0.3‰ (f=0.09) in residual DEP molecule, was clearly an indicator to its photolysis. The reactive position isotope enrichment factor (?(reactive position)) and apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIE) were -35.25±2.26‰ and 1.075, respectively, indicating that the initial reaction step was cleavage of a CO bond in DEP photolysis. Based on these observations, a degradation pathway was proposed. First, a CO bond in DEP molecule was broken to form MEP. Then, MEP was further degraded to phthalic anhydride. Our work demonstrates that compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA), when combined with intermediates analysis, is a reliable measure to deduce the mechanism of DEP photolysis. This approach might be extended as a reference for mechanism investigation in complicated environment systems. PMID:22883110

  5. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  6. Contribution of oxidized tallow to aroma characteristics of beeflike process flavour assessed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and partial least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xiao, Zuobing; Niu, Yunwei; Hayat, Khizar; Eric, Karangwa

    2012-09-01

    Flavour profiles of seven beeflike process flavours (BFs) including non-oxidized or oxidized tallow were comparatively analysed by electronic nose, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and descriptive sensory analysis to characterize the headspace of BFs. Analysis of volatiles by GC-MS indicated that the effect of oxidized tallow with moderate oxidization level on Maillard reaction was more prominent than that of others, which potentially could result in an optimal meat flavour with strong, harmony and species-specific characteristics detected by sensory analysis. In addition, electronic nose data confirmed the accuracy of the GC-MS and sensory analysis results. Correlation analysis of the electronic nose measurements, sensory evaluation and characteristic compounds through Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) further explained that moderate oxidized tallow with peroxide value (PV) of 87.67-160 mequiv./kg, the p-anisidine value (p-AV) of 30.57-50, and the acid value (AV) of 1.8-2.2 mg KOH/g tallow was a desirable precursor for imparting aroma characteristics of beef flavour. PMID:22858364

  7. Determination of dissolved-phase pesticides in surface water from the Yakima River basin, Washington, using the Goulden large-sample extractor and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, G.D.; Gates, P.M.; Foreman, W.T.; McKenzie, S.W.; Rinella, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of pesticides in the dissolved phase of surface water samples from the Yakima River basin, WA, were determined using preconcentration in the Goulden large-sample extractor (GLSE) and gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Sample volumes ranging from 10 to 120 L were processed with the GLSE, and the results from the large-sample analyses were compared to those derived from 1-L continuous liquid-liquid extractions. Few of the 40 target pesticides were detected in 1-L samples, whereas large-sample preconcentration in the GLSE provided detectable levels for many of the target pesticides. The number of pesticides detected in GLSE processed samples was usually directly proportional to sample volume, although the measured concentrations of the pesticides were generally lower at the larger sample volumes for the same water source. The GLSE can be used to provide lower detection levels relative to conventional liquid-liquid extraction in GC/MS analysis of pesticides in samples of surface water. ?? 1993 American Chemical Society.

  8. Determination of atrazine and its major degradation products in soil pore water by solid-phase extraction, chemical derivatization, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a method for the determination of atrazine, desethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, didealkylatrazine, and hydroxyatrazine from soil pore waters by use of solid-phase extractionfollowed by chemical derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The analytes are isolated from the pore-water matrix byextraction onto a graphitized carbon-black cartridge. The cartridge is dried under vacuum, and adsorbed analytes are removed by elution with ethyl acetate followed by dichloromethane/methanol (7:3, volume/volume). Water is removed from the ethyl acetate fraction on an anhydrous sodium sulfate column. The combined fractions are solvent exchanged into acetonitrile, evaporated by use of a nitrogen stream, and derivatized by use of N- methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)- trifluoroacetamide. The derivatized extracts are analyzed by capillary-column gaschromatography/electron-impact mass spectrometry in the scan mode. Estimated method detection limits range from 0.03 to 0.07 micrograms per liter. The mean recoveries of all analytes and surrogates determined at 0.74 to 0.82 micrograms per liter in reagent water in soil pore water were 94 percent and 98 percent, respectively. The mean recoveries of all analytes and surrogates determined at 7.4 to 8.2 micrograms per liter in reagent water and in soil pore water were 96 percent and 97 percent,respectively. Recoveries were 90 percent or higher, regardless of analyte concentration or matrix composition, for all compounds excepthydroxyatrazine, whose recoveries were slightly lower (77 percent) at the low concentration.

  9. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Whole Water by Continuous Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 69 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on aquatic organisms in wastewater. This method also is useful for evaluating the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are indicators of wastewater or have endocrine-disrupting potential. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Wastewater compounds in whole-water samples were extracted using continuous liquid-liquid extractors and methylene chloride solvent, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 0.5 microgram per liter averaged 72 percent ? 8 percent relative standard deviation. The concentration of 21 compounds is always reported as estimated because method recovery was less than 60 percent, variability was greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation, or standard reference compounds were prepared from technical mixtures. Initial method detection limits averaged 0.18 microgram per liter. Samples were preserved by adding 60 grams of sodium chloride and stored at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory established a sample holding-time limit prior to sample extraction of 14 days from the date of collection.

  10. Headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of volatile compounds in different varieties of African star apple fruit (Chrysophillum albidum).

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Ola; Khatib, Alfi; Juhari, Hanisah; Patiram, Parveen; Lasekan, Seye

    2013-12-01

    The volatile compounds in four selected African star apple fruit (Chrysophyllum albidum) varieties were isolated and identified using the headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 59 compounds were identified. Application of the aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) to the aroma distillates from the fruits revealed 45 odour-active compounds in the flavour dilution (FD) factor range of 4-128. Among them, the highest odour activities (FD factors) were determined for methylhexanoate, acetophenone and ethyl dodecanoate. Moreover, aroma lipophilicity appears to reflect molecular conformation. Further analysis of the similarities and differences between the fruit varieties in terms of the key odourants by the application of PLS-DA and PLS-regression coefficient showed strong positive correlation between the very sweet/sweet varieties and 10 key odourants. The odourants included ethyl acetate, acetyl methyl carbinol, methylhexanoate, sabinene, p-cymene, methylbenzoate, ethylbenzoate, geraniol, cis-?-bergomotene, acetophenone, and ethyl dodecanoate. PMID:23870932

  11. Analysis of gamma-irradiated melon, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della W M; Wong, Yiu Chung; Yao, Wai Yin

    2006-09-20

    Seeds of melon (Citrullus lanatus var. sp.), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), and sunflower (Heliantus annus) were gamma-irradiated at 1, 3, 5, and 10 kGy and analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) according to EN1787:2000 and EN1785:2003, respectively. Distinguishable triplet signals due to the presence of induced cellulose radicals were found at 2.0010-2.0047 g in the EPR spectra. The gamma-irradiated radiolytic markers of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (2-TCB) were identified in all irradiated seed samples. Both the free radicals and the alkylcyclobutanones were found to increase with irradiation dose. In general, linear relationships between the amount of radicals and irradiation dosage could be established. Studies at an ambient temperature (20-25 degrees C) in a humidity-controlled environment showed a complete disappearance of the cellulosic peaks for irradiated samples upon 60 days of storage. Such instability behavior was considered to render the usefulness of using EPR alone in the determination of irradiated seed samples. On the other hand, 2-DCB and 2-TCB were also found to decompose rapidly (>85% loss after 120 days of storage), but the radiolytic markers remained quantifiable after 120 days of postirradiation storage. These results suggest that GC-MS is a versatile and complimentary technique for the confirmation of irradiation treatment to seeds. PMID:16968077

  12. Development and validation of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry procedure for confirmation of para-toluenesulfonamide in edible fish fillet tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Idowu, O.R.; Kijak, P.J.; Meinertz, J.R.; Schmidt, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    Chloramine-T is a disinfectant being developed as a treatment for bacterial gill disease in cultured fish. As part of the drug approval process, a method is required for the confirmation of chloramine-T residues in edible fish tissue. The marker residue that will be used to determine the depletion of chloramine-T residues from the edible tissue of treated fish is para-toluenesulfonamide (p-TSA), a metabolite of chloramine-T. The development and validation of a procedure for the confirmation of p-TSA is described. Homogenized fish tissue is dried by mixing with anhydrous sodium sulfate, and the mixture is extracted with methylene chloride. The extract is passed through a silica gel solid-phase extraction column, from which p-TSA is subsequently eluted with acetonitrile. The acetonitrile extract is evaporated, and the oily residue is dissolved in hexane. The hexane solution is shaken with fresh acetonitrile. The acetonitrile solution is evaporated and the residue is redissolved in dilute potassium hydroxide solution. The aqueous solution is extracted with methylene chloride to further remove more of the fat co-extractive. The aqueous solution is reacted with pentafluorobenzyl bromide in presence of tetrabutylammonium hydrogensulfate. The resulting di-(pentafluorobenzyl) derivative of p-TSA is analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. This method permits the confirmation of p-TSA in edible fish tissue at 20 ppb.

  13. Graphene oxide-based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with in situ derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of acidic pharmaceuticals in water.

    PubMed

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-12-24

    A fast and low-cost sample preparation method of graphene based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis, was developed. The procedure involves an initial extraction with water-immiscible organic solvent, followed by a rapid clean-up using amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide as sorbent. Simple and fast one-step in situ derivatization using trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide was subsequently applied on acidic pharmaceuticals serving as model analytes, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ketoprofen and diclofenac, before GC-MS analysis. Extraction parameters affecting the derivatization and extraction efficiency such as volume of derivatization agent, effect of desorption solvent, effect of pH and effect of ionic strength were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method demonstrated good limits of detection ranging from 1 to 16ngL(-1), linearity (from 0.01 to 50 and 0.05 to 50?gL(-1), depending on the analytes) and satisfactory repeatability of extractions (relative standard deviations, below 13%, n=3). PMID:26684593

  14. Analysis of dextromethorphan and dextrorphan in decomposed skeletal tissues by microwave assisted extraction, microplate solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (MAE-MPSPE-GCMS).

    PubMed

    Fraser, Candice D; Cornthwaite, Heather M; Watterson, James H

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of decomposed skeletal tissues for dextromethorphan (DXM) and dextrorphan (DXT) using microwave assisted extraction (MAE), microplate solid-phase extraction (MPSPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. Rats (n?=?3) received 100?mg/kg DXM (i.p.) and were euthanized by CO2 asphyxiation roughly 20?min post-dose. Remains decomposed to skeleton outdoors and vertebral bones were recovered, cleaned, and pulverized. Pulverized bone underwent MAE using methanol as an extraction solvent in a closed microwave system, followed by MPSPE and GC-MS. Analyte stability under MAE conditions was assessed and found to be stable for at least 60?min irradiation time. The majority (>90%) of each analyte was recovered after 15?min. The MPSPE-GCMS method was fit to a quadratic response (R(2) ?>?0.99), over the concentration range 10-10 000?ng?mL(-1) , with coefficients of variation <20% in triplicate analysis. The MPSPE-GCMS method displayed a limit of detection of 10?ng?mL(-1) for both analytes. Following MAE for 60?min (80?°C, 1200?W), MPSPE-GCMS analysis of vertebral bone of DXM-exposed rats detected both analytes in all samples (DXM: 0.9-1.5?µg?g(-1) ; DXT: 0.5-1.8?µg?g(-1) ). PMID:25487525

  15. [Determination of 33 pesticides in tea by accelerated solvent extraction-gel permeation and solid-phase extraction purification-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Bizhn; Song, Weihua; Xie, Lipin; Shao, Tiefen

    2008-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of 33 pesticide residues in tea, including organophosphorous, organochlorine and pyrethroid pesticides. The target analytes were extracted with the solution of acetone/dichloromethane (1:1, v/v) using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and then purified using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) to eliminate most of the coextracts, such as pigments, lipids and waxes. They were further purified using Carb-NH2 and Florisil solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges prior to the identification using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The quantitative analysis was performed with flame photometric detector (FPD) for organophosphorous pesticides and electron capture detector (ECD) for organochlorine and pyrethroid pesticides. At the spiked level of 0.05 mg/kg, the recoveries for most pesticides were between 70%-120%; the relative standard deviations were less than 20%; the limits of detection varied from 0.005 to 0.05 mg/kg (defined in terms of 10 times of the baseline noise). This method is precise, sensitive and highly efficient in extraction. After routine applications, the results indicated that this method is suitable for the determination of pesticide residues in the tea for export. PMID:18438019

  16. Development of sample clean up methods for the analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methyl mycocerosate biomarkers in sputum extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nicoara, Simona C; Turner, Nicholas W; Minnikin, David E; Lee, Oona Y-C; O'Sullivan, Denise M; McNerney, Ruth; Mutetwa, Reggie; Corbett, Liz E; Morgan, Geraint H

    2015-04-01

    A proof of principle gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method is presented, in combination with clean up assays, aiming to improve the analysis of methyl mycocerosate tuberculosis biomarkers from sputum. Methyl mycocerosates are generated from the transesterification of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs), extracted in petroleum ether from sputum of tuberculosis suspect patients. When a high matrix background is present in the sputum extracts, the identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to the methyl derivatives of PDIMs analytes may be hindered by the closely eluting methyl ether of cholesterol, usually an abundant matrix constituent frequently present in sputum samples. The purification procedures involving solid phase extraction (SPE) based methods with both commercial Isolute-Florisil cartridges, and purpose designed molecularly imprinted polymeric materials (MIPs), resulted in cleaner chromatograms, while the mycocerosates are still present. The clean-up performed on solutions of PDIMs and cholesterol standards in petroleum ether show that, depending on the solvent mix and on the type of SPE used, the recovery of PDIMs is between 64 and 70%, whilst most of the cholesterol is removed from the system. When applied to petroleum ether extracts from representative sputum samples, the clean-up procedures resulted in recoveries of 36-68% for PDIMs, allowing some superior detection of the target analytes. PMID:25728371

  17. In situ derivatization reaction and determination of ibuprofen in water samples using headspace generation-programmed temperature vaporization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez Pavón, José Luis; Casas Ferreira, Ana María; Fernández Laespada, María Esther; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2009-09-25

    The aim of the present work is to propose a method for the determination of ibuprofen, as a typical representative of pharmaceutical compounds, in aqueous samples. To do so, an in situ derivatization reaction in aqueous medium was employed in the vial of a headspace sampler (HS), after which instrumental measurements were made with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). As the injection system we propose a programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) where, in solvent vent mode, better results can be obtained than with the conventional split and splitless injection modes. Since the derivatization reaction takes place in the HS vial, after the mixing of reagents and the sealing of the vial, the whole process takes place on-line, with no need for intermediate steps. The simplicity and speed of the method--analysis throughput: 10.5 min--together with the limit of detection obtained (0.23 microg/L), bearing in mind that no preconcentration step or later clean-up step are required, make this a good method for the analysis of ibuprofen in aqueous samples of urban waste water. PMID:19700164

  18. Compensation for matrix effects in the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of 186 pesticides in tea matrices using analyte protectants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chen, Xi; Fan, Chunlin; Pang, Guofang

    2012-11-30

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analytical method was developed for simultaneously determining 186 pesticides in tea matrices using analyte protectants to counteract the matrix-induced effect. The matrix effects were evaluated for green, oolong and black tea, representing unfermented, partially fermented and completely fermented teas respectively and depending on the type of tea, 72%, 94% and 94% of the pesticides presented strong response enhancement effect. Several analyte protectants as well as certain combinations of these protectants were evaluated to check their compensation effects. A mixture of triglycerol and d-ribonic acid-?-lactone (both at 2mg/mL in the injected samples) was found to be the most effective in improving the chromatographic behavior of the 186 pesticides. More than 96% of the 186 pesticides achieved recoveries within the range of 70-120% when using the selected mixture of analyte protectants. The simple addition of analyte protectants offers a more convenient solution to overcome matrix effects, results in less active sites compared to matrix-matched standardization and can be an effective approach to compensate for matrix effects in the GC-MS analysis of pesticide residues. PMID:23102633

  19. Simultaneous determination of trace sterols in complicated biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with extraction using ?-sitosterol magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer beads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Tan, Wei; Hu, Yuling; Li, Gongke

    2011-07-15

    In this paper, an efficient and sensitive analytical method for the simultaneous determination of three trace sterols including ergosterol, stigmasterol and ?-sitosterol in complicated biological samples was developed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled with extraction using novel ?-sitosterol magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (mag-MIP) beads. Physical tests suggested that ?-sitosterol mag-MIP beads prepared by a rapid microwave synthesis method possessed the porous morphology, narrow size distribution, stable chemical and thermal property. Due to the greatly enlarging surface area and the strong recognition to the target molecules, ?-sitosterol mag-MIP beads have a higher enrichment factor for ?-sitosterol (?20-fold) and the higher selectivity for ?-sitosterol and its analogs than that of ?-sitosterol magnetic nonimprinted polymer (mag-NIP) beads. Under the optimum analytical conditions, all the target compounds achieved good chromatographic separation and sensitive detection without matrix interference. It was interesting that three target sterols were actually found in mushroom samples, and stigmasterol and ?-sitosterol were actually found in serum and watermelon samples. The recoveries of spiked sample tests were in range of 71.6-88.2% with RSDs of 2.4-10.0% (n=3). This method is reliable and applicable for the simultaneous determination of trace sterols in real biological samples based on the ?-sitosterol mag-MIP bead extraction. PMID:21632061

  20. Study of solvent sublation for concentration of trace phthalate esters in plastic beverage packaging and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lin; Bi, Pengyu; Li, Xiaochen; Wei, Yun

    2015-06-15

    A novel trace analytical method based on solvent sublation (SS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the trace determination of twenty-two phthalate esters (PAEs) from plastic beverage packaging. In the solvent sublation section, the effects of solution pH, NaCl concentration, nitrogen flow rate, and sublation time on the sublation efficiency were investigated in detail, and the optimal conditions were obtained. The trace PAEs migrated from plastic beverage packaging to food simulants were separated and concentrated by solvent sublation, and then the trace target compounds in the concentrated solution were analyzed by GC-MS. According to the European Union Regulation, the food simulants including distilled water for the normal beverages and acetic acid solution (3%) for the acetic beverage of yogurt were prepared for migration tests. The trace analysis method showed good linearity, low limits of detection (LODs) of 1.6-183.5 ng/L, and satisfied recoveries (67.3-113.7%). PMID:25660867

  1. Determination of endocrine-disrupting phenols, acidic pharmaceuticals, and personal-care products in sewage by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hing-Biu; Peart, Thomas E; Svoboda, M Lewina

    2005-11-11

    The occurrence, fate, and effects of phenols with endocrine-disrupting properties as well as some pharmaceuticals and personal-care products in the environment have frequently been discussed in recent literature. In many cases, these compounds were determined by using individual methods which can be time-consuming if results for multiple parameters are required. Using a solid-phase extraction procedure with an anion exchanger in this work, we have developed and optimized a multi-residue method for the extraction of 21 phenols and acids in sewage influent and effluent. The phenols and acids were then selectively eluted in separate fractions and were converted into pentafluoropropionyl (PFP) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatives, respectively, for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination. When applied to the sewage samples under study, the results for nonylphenol, bisphenol A (BPA), triclosan (TCS), 17ss-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), salicylic acid, ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, and a few other acidic drugs were consistent with those determined previously by individual methods. Using the same procedure, we also report, for the first time, the occurrence of 2-phenylphenol and parabens in those sewage samples. PMID:16257298

  2. Quantification of 11-Carboxy-Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in Meconium Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Davis, Brehon; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Maternal substance abuse is an ongoing concern and detecting drug use during pregnancy is an important component of neonatal care when drug abuse is suspected. Meconium is the preferred specimen for drug testing because it is easier to collect than neonatal urine and it provides a much broader time frame of drug exposure. We describe a method for quantifying 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in meconium. After adding a labeled internal standard (THC-COOH D9) and acetonitrile, samples are sonicated to release both free and conjugated THC-COOH. The acetonitrile/aqueous layer is removed and mixed with a strong base to hydrolyze the conjugated THC-COOH. The samples are then extracted with an organic solvent mixture as part of a sample "cleanup." The organic solvent layer is discarded and the remaining aqueous sample is acidified. Following extraction with a second organic mixture, the organic layer is removed and concentrated to dryness. The resulting residue is converted to a trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. PMID:26660178

  3. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples by large volume injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using the through oven transfer adsorption desorption interface.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Álvaro; Toledano, Rosa M; Vázquez, Ana; Villén, Jesús; Cortés, José M

    2015-07-01

    A new procedure for the determination of 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples by large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS) using the Through Oven Transfer Adsorption Desorption (TOTAD) interface with nitrogen for solvent elimination is developed and validated. Up to 75mL of aqueous samples were injected to be sure that good solvent elimination were achieved, although 500µL were sufficient to achieve the required sensitivity.The performance of the developed method can be considered good: the relative standard deviation (RSD), (n=3) was lower than 13.8% for all the target analytes, the concentration of each PAH being 0.25?gL(-1), the limit of detection and limit of quantitation ranged from 21.5 to 211.0?ng?L(-1) and from 71.7 to 703.3ngL(-1) respectively, and the correlation coefficients (R(2)) were all higher than 0.9764 in the 1-16?gL(-1) range. PMID:25882400

  4. Lipid fatty acid profile analyses in liver and serum in rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianli; Tong, Yudong; Shankar, Kartik; Baumgardner, January N; Kang, Jie; Badeaux, Jamie; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin J J

    2011-01-26

    Fatty acids (FAs) are essential components of lipids and exhibit important biological functions. The analyses of FAs are routinely carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after multistep sample preparation. In this study, several key experimental factors were carefully examined, validated, and optimized to analyze free fatty acid (FFA) and FA profiles of triglycerides and phospholipids in serum or tissue samples. These factors included (1) methylation/transesterification reagents, (2) validation of internal standards, and (3) final step concentration of FA methyl esters. This new method was utilized to analyze FFAs and the FA profiles of triglycerides and phospholipids in the serum and liver from a recently established rat model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In this model, rats were fed a 220 kcal kg (-3/4) day (-1) diet containing either 5 or 70% corn oil for 21 days using total enteral nutrition. FA compositions of the serum and liver were found to shift from a pattern dominated by saturated and monounsaturated FAs (C16:0/18:1) to one dominated by polyunsaturated C18:2 derived from dietary linoleic acid. Alteration of FA composition in liver after overfeeding of high polyunsaturated fat diets may contribute to the progression of pathological changes from steatosis to inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis observed in NASH. PMID:21162572

  5. Diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency by urinary metabolite ratios using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis: Reference values for neonates and infants.

    PubMed

    Kamrath, Clemens; Hartmann, Michaela F; Boettcher, Claudia; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Wudy, Stefan A

    2016-02-01

    One major issue of newborn screening programs for 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD) is the high rate of false-positive results, especially in preterm neonates. Urinary steroid metabolite analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is suitable as a confirmatory diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to analyze retrospectively diagnostic metabolite ratios in neonates and infants with and without 21OHD using GC-MS with emphasis on glucocorticoid metabolism, and to develop reference values for the steroid metabolite ratios for the diagnosis of 21OHD. We retrospectively analyzed urinary steroid hormone metabolites determined by GC-MS of 95 untreated neonates and infants with 21OHD (1-148 days), and 261 neonates and infants (100 preterms) without 21OHD (0-217 days). Metabolites of 17?-hydroxyprogesterone showed specificities below 98%, whereas the 21-deoxycortisol metabolite pregnanetriolone clearly separated 21OHD from non-21OHD subjects. The best diagnostic ratio for 21OHD was pregnanetriolone to 6?-hydroxy-tetrahydrocortisone. The lowest value of this ratio in the 21OHD group (0.47) was at least eight times higher than the highest values in the non-21OHD group (0.055). We have given appropriate reference values for steroid metabolite ratios in the largest 21OHD cohort so far described. Consideration of glucocorticoid metabolism, especially the use of typical neonatal 6?-hydroxylates metabolites, leads to improvement of diagnostic metabolite ratios. PMID:26493852

  6. Ancient wood of the Acqualadrone rostrum: materials history through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and sulfur X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frank, Patrick; Caruso, Francesco; Caponetti, Eugenio

    2012-05-15

    In 2008 the rostrum from an ancient warship was recovered from the Mediterranean near Acqualadrone, Sicily. To establish its provenance and condition, samples of black and brown rostrum wood were examined using sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). GC/MS of pyrolytic volatiles yielded only guaiacyl derivatives, indicating construction from pinewood. A derivatized extract of black wood yielded forms of abietic acid and sandaracopimaric acid consistent with pine pitch waterproofing. Numerical fits to the sulfur K-edge XAS spectra showed that about 65% of the endogenous sulfur consisted of thiols and disulfides. Elemental sulfur was about 2% and 7% in black and brown wood, respectively, while pyritic sulfur was about 12% and 6%. About 2% of the sulfur in both wood types was modeled as trimethylsulfonium, possibly reflecting biogenic (dimethylsulfonio)propionate. High-valent sulfur was exclusively represented by sulfate esters, consistent with bacterial sulfotransferase activity. Traces of chloride were detected, but no free sulfate ion. In summary, the rostrum was manufactured of pine wood and subsequently waterproofed with pine pitch. The subsequent 2300 years included battle, foundering, and marine burial followed by anoxia, bacterial colonization, sulfate reduction, and mobilization of transition metals, which produced pyrite and copious appended sulfur functionality. PMID:22545724

  7. Nanoscale-supported heteropoly acid as a new fiber coating for solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemi, Mir Mahdi; Hassani, Sona; Rafiee, Ezzat; Yousefi, Vahid

    2015-02-13

    In the present study, 12-tungstophosphoric (PW) acid as heteropoly acid, supported on silica-coated ?-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs), was used as a new fiber coating for solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The ?-Fe2O3@SiO2-PW nanocomposite with high surface area was synthesized and characterized by SEM and FT-IR. The prepared nanocomposite was immobilized on a stainless steel wire for fabrication of the SPME fiber. The fiber was evaluated for the extraction of some phenolic compounds (PCs) from water sample in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A one-at-a-time optimization strategy was applied for optimizing the important extraction parameters such as extraction temperature, extraction time, ionic strength, stirring rate, pH, and desorption temperature and time. In optimum conditions, the repeatability for one fiber (n=3), expressed as relative standard deviation (R.S.D. %), was between 4.8% and 9.6% for the test compounds. The detection limits for the studied compounds were between 0.004 and 0.05 pg mL(-1). The developed method offers the advantage of being simple to use, with shorter analysis time, lower cost of equipment, thermal stability of fiber and high relative recovery in comparison to conventional methods of analysis. PMID:25618361

  8. Characterization and chemical composition of fatty acids content of watermelon and muskmelon cultivars in Saudi Arabia using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Albishri, Hassan M.; Almaghrabi, Omar A.; Moussa, Tarek A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The growth in the production of biodiesel, which is principally fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), has been phenomenal in the last ten years because of the general desire to cut down on the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, and also as a result of the increasing cost of fossil fuels. Objective: Establish whether there is any relationship between two different species (watermelon and muskmelon) within the same family (Cucurbitaceae) on fatty acid compositions and enumerate the different fatty acids in the two species. Materials and Methods: Extraction of fatty acids from the two species and preparation the extract to gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis to determine the fatty acids compositions qualitatively and quantitatively. Results: The analyzed plants (watermelon and muskmelon) contain five saturated fatty acids; tetrdecanoic acid, pentadecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, heptadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid with different concentrations, while muskmelon contains an extra saturated fatty acid named eicosanoic acid. The watermelon plant contains five unsaturated fatty acids while muskmelon contains three only, the two plants share in two unsaturated fatty acids named 9-hexadecenoic acid and 9-octadecenoic acid, the muskmelon plant contains higher amounts of these two acids (2.04% and 10.12%, respectively) over watermelon plant (0.88% and 0.25%, respectively). Conclusion: The chemical analysis of watermelon and muskmelon revealed that they are similar in saturated fatty acids but differ in unsaturated fatty acids which may be a criterion of differentiation between the two plants. PMID:23661995

  9. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for studying N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate copolymers and their dissolution behaviour.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Aleksandra; Ghaffar, Abdul; Feilden, Andrew; Treacher, Kevin; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Schoenmakers, Peter

    2011-11-14

    Knowledge on the solubility behaviour and dissolution rate of speciality and commodity polymers is very important for the use of such materials in high-tech applications. We have developed methods for the quantification and characterization of dissolved copolymers of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (VP) and vinyl acetate (VA) during dissolution in water. The methods are based on pyrolysis (Py) performed in a programmed-temperature vaporization injector with subsequent identification and quantification of the components in the pyrolysate using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). By injecting large volumes and applying cryo-focussing at the top of the column, low detection limits could be achieved. The monomer ratio was found to have the greatest effect on the dissolution rate of the PVP-co-VA copolymers. The material with the highest amount of VA (50%) dissolves significantly slower than the other grades. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and Py-GC-MS were used to measure molecular weights and average chemical compositions, respectively. Combined off-line SEC//Py-GC-MS was used to determine the copolymer composition (VP/VA ratio), as a function of the molecular weight for the pure polymers. In the dissolution experiments, a constant VP/VA ratio across the dissolution curve was observed for all copolymers analysed. This suggests a random distribution of the two monomers over the molecules. PMID:22023866

  10. Studies on the human metabolism and the toxicologic detection of the cough suppressant dropropizine in urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Staack, Roland F; Theobald, Denis S; Maurer, Hans H

    2004-08-01

    Studies are described on the metabolism and the toxicologic analysis of the nonopioid cough suppressant dropropizine [R,S-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperazinyl)1,2-propandiol, DRO] in human urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The metabolism studies showed that DRO was metabolized in humans mainly by hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, by N-dealkylation of the parent drug and of the hydroxyl-metabolite to the corresponding N-phenylpiperazines, and by degradation of the piperazine moiety. The authors' systematic toxicologic analysis (STA) procedure using full-scan GC-MS after acid hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and microwave-assisted acetylation allowed the unambiguous detection of DRO and its above-mentioned metabolites in human urine up to about 32 hours after intake of a single common therapeutic dose. The target analytes were found to be the parent compound DRO (earlier phase of excretion) and the hydroxylated metabolite para-hydroxy-DRO (later phase of excretion). Both allowed unambiguous detection of an intake of DRO and also differentiation from other phenylpiperazine derivatives. PMID:15257075

  11. Acetone-activated polyimide electrospun nanofiber membrane for thin-film microextraction and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of phenols in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenghong; Wu, Dapeng; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-09-11

    In this work, a polyimide nanofiber membrane was electrospun and applied as sorbent for thin film microextraction (TFME). After TFME of phenols in water samples, direct thermal desorption of the sorbent at 300°C followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (TD-GC-MS) analysis was carried out. The extraction efficiency of TFME was enhanced by 6-12 times for phenols after activation with acetone. The positive effect of acetone activation was correlated to the increased hydrophilicity of the membrane. Extraction parameters, including mass of nanofiber membrane, pH value, NaCl concentration and extraction time, were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the LODs and LOQs for analysis of phenols in spiked purified water were 0.0006-0.008 and 0.002-0.025?gL(-1), respectively. The linearity range was more than two orders of magnitude (R>0.99). The RSDs of intra-batch and inter-batch were 4.3-7.4% and 2.7-10.6% (n=3). Finally the method was applied to real samples, including tap water, sea water, and waste water. These results indicate that the polyimide nanofiber membrane is a promising candidate as TFME sorbent for determination of polar analytes in water samples coupled with TD-GC-MS. PMID:26277026

  12. Microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization for rapid analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Mou, Zhao-Li; Hao, Shuang-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2012-11-01

    A rapid and practical microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization (MAED) method was developed for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine. Several critical experimental parameters for MAED, including reaction temperature, microwave power and the amount of derivatization reagent (methanol), were optimized with response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and total unsaturated fatty acids content obtained with MAED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional Soxhlet or microwave extraction and then derivatization method. The investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of the derivatization reaction revealed that microwave assistance could reduce activation energy and increase the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor. The MAED method simplified the sample preparation procedure, shortened the reaction time, but improved the extraction and derivatization efficiency of lipids and reduced ingredient losses, especially for the oxidization and isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, speed and practicality of this method indicates great potential for high throughput analysis of fatty acids in natural medicinal samples. PMID:22968083

  13. Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

    2013-02-01

    Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 %C2%B0C. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (%236 and %2310), one commercially available formulation (%2321), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl %2310 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl %2310 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

  14. Fully automated determination of macrocyclic musk fragrances in wastewater by microextraction by packed sorbents and large volume injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vallecillos, Laura; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2012-11-16

    A fully automated method has been developed for the determination of eight macrocyclic musk fragrances in urban wastewater. The procedure includes the enrichment of the analytes by microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) followed by large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS). The main factors in the MEPS technique were optimized. For all of the analytes, the highest enrichment factors were achieved when 4 mL samples were extracted by using C18 MEPS-sorbent and 50 ?L of ethyl acetate were used for desorption. The eluate was directly analysed by GC-MS. Detection limits were found to be between 5 ng L(-1) and 10 ng L(-1), depending on the target analytes. In addition, under optimized conditions, the method gave good levels of intra-day and inter-day repeatability in wastewater samples with relative standard deviation (RSD) (n=3, 1,000 ng L(-1)) less than 5% and 9%, respectively. The applicability of the method was tested with wastewater samples from two influent and effluent urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The analysis of influent urban wastewater revealed the presence of most of the macrocylic musks at concentrations higher than the method quantification limits (MQLs), being the most abundant analyte ambrettolide at 9.29 ?g L(-1). In addition, the analyses of effluent urban wastewater showed a decrease in the concentrations with macrocyclic musk concentrations of between not detected (n.d.) and 2.26 ?g L(-1) being detected. PMID:23062975

  15. Fast determination of synthetic polycyclic musks in sewage sludge and sediments by microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Fang; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2010-04-23

    One-step in situ microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (MA-HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is presented as a fast and solvent-free technique to determine synthetic polycyclic musks in sewage sludge and sediment samples. Six synthetic polycyclic musks (galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN), celestolide (ADBI), traseolide (ATII), cashmeran (DPMI) and phantolide (AHMI)) were selected in the method development and validation. The effects of extraction parameters for the quantitative extraction of these analytes by one-step MA-HS-SPME were systematically investigated. The dewatered solid sample mixed with 20-mL deionized water (containing 3 g of NaCl in a 40-mL sample-vial) was efficiently extracted by a polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fiber placed in the headspace when the extraction slurry was microwave irradiated at 80 W for 5 min. The limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.04 to 0.1 ng/g, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/g (fresh weight). A preliminary analysis of sludge and sediment samples revealed that HHCB and AHTN were the two most commonly detected synthetic polycyclic musks; using a standard addition method, their total concentrations were determined to range from 0.3 to 10.9 ng/g (fresh weight) with relative standard deviation (RSD) ranging from 4% to 10%. PMID:20303495

  16. Determination of synthetic polycyclic musks in aqueous samples by ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Ya; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-02-01

    A simple and solvent-minimized procedure for the determination of six commonly found synthetic polycyclic musks in aqueous samples using ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of analytes from water samples were systematically investigated. The best extraction conditions involved the rapid injection of a mixture of 1.0 mL of isopropyl alcohol (as a dispersant) and 10 ?L of carbon tetrachloride (as an extractant) into 10 mL of water containing 0.5 g of sodium chloride in a conical-bottom glass tube. After ultrasonication for 1.0 min and centrifugation at 5,000 rpm (10 min), the sedimented phase 1.0 ?L was directly injected into the GC-MS system. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were less than 0.6 ng/L. The precision for these analytes, as indicated by relative standard deviations (RSDs), was less than 11% for both intra- and interday analysis. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 71 and 104%. Their total concentrations were determined in the range from 8.3 to 63.9 ng/L in various environmental samples by using a standard addition method. PMID:22139524

  17. Determination of synthetic polycyclic musks in water by microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chen; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes a rapid and solvent-free method, microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (MA-HS-SPME), for the extraction of six commonly used synthetic polycyclic musks: galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN), celestolide (ADBI), traseolide (ATII), cashmeran (DPMI) and phantolide (AHMI) from water samples prior to their determination using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of various extraction parameters for the quantitative extraction of these analytes by MA-HS-SPME were systematically investigated and optimized. The analytes in a 20-mL water sample (in a 40-mL sample-vial containing 4 g of NaCl) were efficiently extracted by a polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fiber placed in the headspace when the system was microwave irradiated at 180 W for less than 4 min. The limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.05 to 0.1 ng/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were less than 0.2 ng/L. A preliminary analysis of wastewater samples revealed that HHCB and AHTN were the two most commonly detected synthetic polycyclic musks; using a standard addition method, their concentration were determined to range from 1.2 to 37.3 ng/L with relative standard deviation (RSD) ranging from 2 to 6%. The results obtained using this approach are better than those from the conventional oil-bath HS-SPME. PMID:19720378

  18. At-line microextraction by packed sorbent-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of UV filter and polycyclic musk compounds in water samples.

    PubMed

    Moeder, Monika; Schrader, Steffi; Winkler, Ursula; Rodil, Rosario

    2010-04-23

    An at-line analysis protocol is presented that allows the determination of four UV filters, two polycyclic musk compounds and caffeine in water at concentration level of ng L(-1). The fully automated method includes analytes enrichment by Microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) coupled directly to large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two common SPE phases, C8 and C18, were examined for their suitability to extract the target substances by MEPS. The analytes were extracted from small sample volumes of 800 microL with recoveries ranging from 46 to 114% for the C8-sorbent and 65-109% for the C18-sorbent. Limits of detection between 34 and 96 ng L(-1) enable the determination of the analytes at common environmental concentration levels. Both sorbents showed linear calibration curves for most of the analytes up to a concentration level of 20 ng mL(-1). Carryover was minimized by washing the sorbents 10 times with 100 microL methanol. After this thorough cleaning, the MEPS are re-used and up to 70 analyses can be performed with the same sorbent. The fully automated microextraction GC-MS protocol was evaluated for the influence of matrix substances typical for wastewater. Dilution of samples prior to MEPS is recommended when the polar caffeine is present at high concentration. Real water samples were analyzed by the MEPS-GC-MS method and compared to standard SPE. PMID:20334867

  19. Simultaneous determination of parabens and synthetic musks in water by stir-bar sorptive extraction and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Borrull, Francesc; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2012-02-01

    This study focuses on a method for simultaneously determining personal care products in a wide range of polarities in different water matrices. The method is based on stir-bar sorptive extraction followed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Prior to extraction, the parabens were acetylated to improve their affinity for the polydimethylsiloxane phase of the stir bar. The method showed good linearity, repeatability and reproducibility between days for all compounds and limits of detection at low ng/L levels (between 0.02 and 0.3?ng/L). The proposed method is also environmentally friendly, because it does not use organic solvents, and reduces the risk of external pollution, due to the minimal manipulation of the sample required. The method developed was successfully applied for the analysis of personal care products in different kinds of water matrices: influents and effluents of urban and industrial wastewater treatment plants, effluents of a reverse osmosis treatment plant and river waters. The influents of urban treatment plants generally showed the highest values for synthetic musks, with concentrations of up to 2219?ng/L of galaxolide, whereas the highest concentrations of parabens were detected in the industrial treatment plants influents. PMID:22282419

  20. One-step microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction for the rapid determination of synthetic polycyclic musks in oyster by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Fang; Liu, Li-Lian; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-07-15

    A rapid, simple and solvent-free procedure was developed for the determination of synthetic polycyclic musks in oyster samples by using one-step microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (MA-HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Two commonly used synthetic polycyclic musks, galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN), were selected in the method development and validation. The parameters (microwave irradiation power, extraction time, amount of water added, pH value and addition of NaCl) affecting the extraction efficiency of analytes from oyster slurry were systematically investigated and optimised. The best extraction conditions were achieved when the oyster tissue mixed with 10-mL deionised water (containing 3g of NaCl in a 40-mL sample-vial) was microwave irradiated at 80 W for 5 min. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.1 ng/g in 5-g of wet tissue. The good precision and accuracy of one-step MA-HS-SPME coupled with GC-MS for the determination of trace level of AHTN in oyster samples was also demonstrated. PMID:25683427

  1. Evaluation of the metabolic chiral inversion of d-selenomethionine in rats by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Takehisa; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Goto, Hitomi; Shinohara, Yoshihiko; Shinohara, Atsuko; Omori, Yuki; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Yokoyama, Kazuhito

    2015-12-10

    The stereoselective pharmacokinetics of selenomethionine enantiomers in rats has been studied to evaluate the chiral inversion of d-selenomethionine to the l-enantiomer. After bolus intravenous administration of d- or l-selenomethionine to rats, the plasma concentrations of these two enantiomers were determined by stereoselective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring. This method involved derivatization of selenomethionine enantiomers with HCl in methanol to form methyl ester followed by N-acylation with (+)-?-methoxy-?-trifluoromethylphenylacetyl chloride to form the diastereomeric amide, and separation of the diastereomer on GC with an achiral column. Plasma concentrations of administered d- and l-selenomethionine declined with terminal half-lives of 96±17min and 91±6min, respectively. l-Selenomethionine appeared rapidly in plasma after administration of d-selenomethionine, whereas d-selenomethionine was not detected in plasma after administration of l-selenomethionine. The fraction of conversion of d-selenomethionine to l-selenomethionine was estimated to be 61.3±14.5%. The present method evaluates the stereoselective pharmacokinetics of selenomethionine enantiomers, including the estimation of the metabolic chiral inversion. PMID:26001566

  2. Sublimation extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: A new technique for future in situ analyses of purines and pyrimidines on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Cleaves, H. J.; Buch, A.; Schubert, M.; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a sublimation technique coupled with chemical derivatization and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect nucleobases and other volatile organic compounds derived from bacteria in Mars analog materials. To demonstrate this technique, a sample of serpentine inoculated with Escherichia coli ( E. coli) cells was heated to 500 °C for several seconds under Martian ambient pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, then derivatized and analyzed by GC-MS. We found that adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil were the most abundant molecules detected in the sublimed E. coli extract by GC-MS. In addition, nucleobases were also detected in sublimed extracts of a deep-sea sediment sample, seawater, and soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile after heating the samples under the same conditions. Our results indicate that nucleobases can be easily isolated directly from natural samples using sublimation and then detected by GC-MS after chemical derivatization. The sublimation-based extraction technique is one approach that should be considered for use by future in situ instruments designed to detect organic compounds relevant to life in the Martian regolith.

  3. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following microwave distillation and headspace solid-phase microextraction for fast analysis of essential oil in dry traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Deng, Chunhui; Li, Yan; Ye, Hao; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2006-11-10

    In this paper, a novel method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following microwave distillation-headspace solid-phase microextraction (MD-HS-SPME) was developed for the determination of essential oil in dry traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). TCM is dried before being preserved and used, there is too little water to absorb microwave energy and heat the TCM samples. In the work, carbonyl iron powders (CIP) was added and mixed with the dried TCM sample, which was used as microwave absorption solid medium for dry distillation of the TCM. At the same time, SPME was used for the extraction and concentration of essential oil after MD. The dry rhizomes of Atractylodes lancea DC was used as the model TCM, and used in the study. The MD-HS-SPME parameters including fiber coating, microwave power, irradiation time, and the amount of added CIP, were studied. To demonstrate the method feasibility, the conventional HS-SPME method was also used for the analysis of essential oil in the TCM. Experimental results show that more compounds were isolated and identified by MD-HS-SPME than those by HS-SPME. Compared to conventional HS-SPME, the advantages of the proposed method are: short extraction time and high extraction efficiency. All experimental results show that the proposed method is an alternative tool for fast analysis of essential oils in dry TCMs. PMID:16950328

  4. Multiresidue method for the determination of pharmacologically active substances in egg and honey using a continuous solid-phase extraction system and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Abdelmonaim; Ballesteros, Evaristo

    2015-07-01

    A sensitive, selective, efficient gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of 22 pharmacologically active substances (antibacterials, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, antiseptics, antiepileptics, lipid regulators, ?-blockers and hormones) in eggs and honey was developed. The sample pretreatment includes precipitation of proteins and lipids with acetonitrile:water (3:2, v/v), centrifugation and continuous solid-phase extraction for cleanup and preconcentration. The proposed method was validated with quite good analytical results including limits of detection of 0.4-3.3 ng/kg for 2g of sample and good linearity (r(2)>0.995) throughout the studied concentration ranges. The recoveries of analytes from real honey and egg samples spiked at concentrations of 15-2,000 ng/kg fell in the range 87-102%, with relative standard deviations from 2.6% to 7.0%. The method was successfully used to determine the target compounds in various types of eggs (hen, quail and duck) and honey samples (flower, forest, acacia, sunflower, clover and pine tree). Two samples of hen eggs bought at supermarkets and one of quail eggs were found to contain florfenicol, pyrimethamine, estrone and 17?-estradiol at levels from 0.095 to 2.7 ?g/kg. PMID:25704684

  5. Rapid screening of haloacetamides in water using salt-assisted liquid-liquid extraction coupled injection-port silylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzu-Ling; Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2015-11-27

    The rapid screening of trace amounts of the nitrogenous disinfection by-products, haloacetamides (HAcAms), in drinking and swimming pool water was performed by a simple and reliable procedure based on salt-assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) combined with injection-port silylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (IPS-GC-MS) method. The optimal SALLE conditions involved the injection of 4-mL of ethyl acetate into a 10-mL water sample (pH 7) containing 3-g of sodium sulfate. After vortex extraction for 1min and centrifugation, 10?L of the extract (mixed with 1?L of MTBSTFA) was directly determined by IPS-GC-MS. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were determined to be 0.03-0.3?g/L. Precision, as indicated by relative standard deviations (RSDs), was less than 10% for both intra- and inter-day analysis. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 76% and 94%. The SALLE plus IPS-GC-MS was successfully applied to quantitatively determine HAcAms from drinking and swimming pool water samples, and the total concentrations of the compounds ranged from 0.43 to 4.03?g/L. PMID:26518495

  6. Determination of nicotine and other minor alkaloids in international cigarettes by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weijia; Ashley, David L; Watson, Clifford H

    2002-10-01

    Nicotine, nornicotine, anabasine, and anatabine are the most abundant alkaloids in tobacco. Along with the addictiveness of nicotine, other properties, including their occurrence in tobacco at relatively high concentrations, and as the primary precursors for the highly carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosoamines, make these chemicals important from a public health standpoint Therefore, developing a fast and accurate quantitative method to screen large numbers of cigarette samples for these alkaloids was important. This report describes the first use of headspace analysis using solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the unambiguous detection of tobacco alkaloids. Detection and confirmation of each analyte isestablished by both chromatographic retention times and the ratio of reconstructed ion chromatogram peak areas from characteristic quantitation ion and confirmation ion. Twenty-eight cigarette brands from 14 countries were analyzed. Surprisingly, the minor alkaloids' response factors varied considerably among different styles of cigarettes. Accurate quantification was achieved using a three-point standard addition protocol. The standard addition approach was essential to obtain accurate measurements by minimizing matrix effects that would otherwise have contributed to quantitation bias. Significant differences in the alkaloid profiles were measured in the different cigarette brands. These results strongly suggest that such differences reflect variations associated with blend compositions, tobacco quality, and manufacturing practices. PMID:12380807

  7. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry reveal a remarkable degree of structural damage in the DNA of wild fish exposed to toxic chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Malins, D C; Gunselman, S J

    1994-01-01

    The use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring (GC-MS/SIM) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy revealed a remarkable degree of damage in the hepatic DNA of fish exposed to toxic environmental chemicals, compared with controls. The exposed fish, which were neoplasm-free, were part of a population with a high incidence of liver cancer. GC-MS/SIM showed markedly high concentrations of hydroxyl radical-induced ring-opening products (e.g., 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine) and 8-hydroxy adducts of adenine and guanine (e.g., 8-hydroxyguanine) in the DNA. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in spectral areas, such as those assigned to NH vibrations of nucleotide bases and CO vibrations of deoxyribose. This diverse and extensive damage to DNA provides a perspective of premalignant changes resulting from xenobiotic exposure and a promising basis for predicting cancer risk in animals and humans. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7809168

  8. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method optimized using response surface modeling for the quantitation of fungal off-flavors in grapes and wine.

    PubMed

    Sadoughi, Navideh; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Antalick, Guillaume; Blackman, John W; Steel, Christopher C

    2015-03-25

    An optimized method for the quantitation of volatile compounds responsible for off-aromas, such as earthy odors, found in wine and grapes was developed. The method involved a fast and simple headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) for simultaneous determination of 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 3-octanone, fenchone, 1-octen-3-one, trans-2-octen-1-ol, fenchol, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-methylisoborneol, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, geosmin, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole, and pentachloroanisole. The extraction of the temperature and time were optimized using response surface methodology in both wine base (WB) and grape base (GB). Low limits of detection (0.1-5 ng/L in WB and 0.05-1.6 in GB) and quantitation (0.3-17 in WB and 0.2-6.2 in GB) with good recoveries (83-131%) and repeatability [4.3-9.8% coefficient of variation (CV) in WB and 5.1-11.1% CV in GB] and reproducibility (3.6-10.2 in WB and 1.9-10.9 in GB) indicate that the method has excellent sensitivity and is suitable for the analysis of these off-flavor compounds in wine and grape juice samples. PMID:25703150

  9. Characterization of volatile components of Iranian saffron using factorial-based response surface modeling of ultrasonic extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Parastar, Hadi; Ebrahimi-Najafabadi, Heshmatollah

    2009-08-14

    The volatile components of Iranian saffron were extracted using ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE) technique and then were separated and detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Variables affecting the extraction procedure were screened by using a 2(5-1) fractional factorial design and among them; sample amount, solvent volume, solvent ratio and extraction time were optimized by applying a rotatable central composite design (CCD). The optimum values of factors were: 2.38g sample, 29.04mL solvent, 69.23% MeOH solvent ratio and 71.8min for the extraction time. Forty constituents were identified for Iranian saffron by GC-MS representing 90% of the total peak area. The major components were 2,6,6-trimethyl-1,3-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxaldehyde, namely safranal (26.29%), bicyclo[3,2,0]hept-2-ene-,4-ethoxy-,endo (5.69%), linoleic acid (4.77%), 4-hydroxy-2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexene-1-carboxaldehyde, namely HTCC (4.44%), and nonadecanol (3.32%). Some new compounds were identified for the first time in saffron. In addition, the results of this study were compared with those of Greek saffron. PMID:19595355

  10. Rapid determination of anilines in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diao, Chun-Peng; Wei, Chao-Hai

    2012-05-01

    A rapid, sensitive and environmentally friendly method for the analysis of 14 anilines in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed and optimized. In the proposed method, cyclohexane was used as the extraction solvent as its toxicity was much lower than that of the solvent usually used in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). In the optimized conditions, the method exhibited good analytical performance. Based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, limits of detection for anilines were in the range of 0.07 to 0.29 ?g L(-1), and the linear range was 0.5-200 ?g L(-1) with regression coefficients (r(2)) higher than 0.9977. It was efficient for qualitative and quantitative analysis of anilines in water samples. The relative standard deviations varied from 2.9 to 8.6% depending on different compounds indicating good precision. Tap water and river water were selected for evaluating the application to real water samples. The relative recoveries of anilines for the two real samples spiked with 10 ?g L(-1) anilines were in the scope of 78.2-114.6% and 77.3-115.6%, respectively. PMID:22434272

  11. Determination of Neutral Monosaccharides as Per-O-methylated Derivatives Directly from a Drop of Whole Blood by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ciucanu, Ionel; Pilat, Lumini?a; Ciucanu, Cristian Ionu?; ?i?u, Eugen

    2015-11-01

    A new analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous quantification of neutral monosaccharides from a drop of whole blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS) of their per-O-methylated derivatives. The per-O-methylation reaction with methyl iodide and solid sodium hydroxide in methyl sulfoxide was used for the first time for analysis of blood monosaccharides. A blood drop volume of 0.6 ?L was used without special purification. The elimination of the undesirable components was carried out during methylation in the presence of a strong base and by liquid extraction of the per-O-methylated monosaccharides. The neutral monosaccharides with an anomeric center gave four per-O-methylated isomers, which were well-separated using a capillary column. Identification was done by electron impact mass spectrometry fragmentation, retention times, and library searching. The limits of detection were determined for standards and varied from 2.0 to 2.3 ng mL(-1). Recoveries for human blood samples varied from 99.22% to 99.65%. The RSD values ranged from 1.92 to 2.37. The method is fast, sensitive, reproducible, and an alternative to current methods for quantitative analysis of blood monosaccharides. PMID:26444378

  12. Determination of atranol and chloroatranol in perfumes using simultaneous derivatization and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-Nogueroles, Marina; Chisvert, Alberto; Salvador, Amparo

    2014-05-15

    A new analytical method based on simultaneous derivatization and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), for the determination of the allergenic compounds atranol and chloroatranol in perfumes, is presented. Derivatization of the target analytes by means of acetylation with anhydride acetic in carbonate buffer was carried out. Thereby volatility and detectability were increased for improved GC-MS sensitivity. In addition, extractability by DLLME was also enhanced due to a less polar character of the solutes. A liquid-liquid extraction was performed before DLLME to clean up the sample and to obtain an aqueous sample solution, free of the low polar matrix from the essential oils, as donor phase. Different parameters, such as the nature and volume of both the extraction and disperser solvents, the ionic strength of the aqueous donor phase or the effect of the derivatization reagent volume, were optimized. Under the selected conditions (injection of a mixture of 750?L of acetone as disperser solvent, 100?L of chloroform as extraction solvent and 100?L of anhydride acetic as derivatization reagent) the figures of merit of the proposed method were evaluated. Limits of detection in the low ngmL(-1) range were obtained. Matrix effect was observed in real perfume samples and thus, standard addition calibration is recommended. PMID:24793850

  13. Simultaneous detection and quantification of select nitromusks, antimicrobial agent, and antihistamine in fish of grocery stores by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Foltz, James; Abdul Mottaleb, M; Meziani, Mohammed J; Rafiq Islam, M

    2014-07-01

    Continually detected biologically persistent nitromusks; galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN) and musk ketone (MK), antimicrobial triclosan (TCS), and antihistamine diphenhydramine (DPH) were examined for the first time in edible fillets originating from eight fish species grown in salt- and fresh-water. The sampled fish collected from local grocery stores were homogenized, extracted, pre-concentrated and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using selected ion monitoring (SIM). The presence of the target compounds in fish extracts was confirmed based on similar mass spectral features and retention behavior with standards. Internal standard based calibration plots were used for quantification. The HHCB, AHTN, TCS and DPH were consistently observed with concentration of 0.163-0.892, 0.068-0.904, 0.189-1.182, and 0.942-7.472 ng g(-1), respectively. These values are at least 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than those obtained in environmental fish specimens. The MK was not detected in any fish. PMID:24377446

  14. Development of a stir bar sorptive extraction and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determining synthetic musks in water samples.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Borrull, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the development of an analytical method for determining 9 synthetic musks in water matrices. The developed method is based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), coated with polydimethylsiloxane, and coupled with a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system (TD-GC-MS). SBSE can efficiently trap and desorb the analytes providing low limits of detection (between 0.02 ng L?¹ and 0.3 ng L?¹). Method validation showed good linearity, repeatability and reproducibility for all compounds. Furthermore, the limited manipulation of the sample required in this method implies a significant decrease of the risk of external contamination of the samples. The performance of the method in real samples was evaluated by analysing biological wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent and effluent samples, reverse osmosis treatment plant effluents and river waters. The most abundant musk was galaxolide with values up to 2069 ng L?¹ and 1432 ng L?¹ in the influent and effluent of urban WWTP samples, respectively. Cashmeran, Pantolide and Tonalide were also detected in all the matrices with values up to 94 ng L?¹, 26 ng L?¹ and 88 ng L?¹, respectively. Although in Europe the use of nitromusks in cosmetics is prohibited, musk xylene and musk ketone were detected both in the WWTP and in the river samples. As far as we know, this is the first time than a SBSE method coupled with TD is applied for the determination of synthetic musks in water samples. PMID:21130460

  15. Improvement of a headspace solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the analysis of wheat bread volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; Carcea, Marina; Castagna, Claudia; Magrì, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    An improved method based on headspace solid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS) was proposed for the semi-quantitative determination of wheat bread volatile compounds isolated from both whole slice and crust samples. A DVB/CAR/PDMS fibre was used to extract volatiles from the headspace of a bread powdered sample dispersed in a sodium chloride (20%) aqueous solution and kept for 60min at 50°C under controlled stirring. Thirty-nine out of all the extracted volatiles were fully identified, whereas for 95 other volatiles a tentative identification was proposed, to give a complete as possible profile of wheat bread volatile compounds. The use of an array of ten structurally and physicochemically similar internal standards allowed to markedly improve method precision with respect to previous HS-SPME/GC-MS methods for bread volatiles. Good linearity of the method was verified for a selection of volatiles from several chemical groups by calibration with matrix-matched extraction solutions. This simple, rapid, precise and sensitive method could represent a valuable tool to obtain semi-quantitative information when investigating the influence of technological factors on volatiles formation in wheat bread and other bakery products. PMID:26118802

  16. Determination of dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl sulfone in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after preparation using 2,2-dimethoxypropane.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akito; Yamamoto, Shinobu; Narai, Rie; Nishida, Manami; Yashiki, Mikio; Sakui, Norihiro; Namera, Akira

    2010-05-01

    A method for routinely determination of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and dimethyl sulfone (DMSO(2)) in human urine was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The urine sample was treated with 2,2-dimethoxypropane (DMP) and hydrochloric acid for efficient removal of water, which causes degradation of the vacuum level in mass spectrometer and shortens the life-time of the column. Experimental DMP reaction parameters, such as hydrochloric acid concentration, DMP-urine ratio, reaction temperature and reaction time, were optimized for urine. Hexadeuterated DMSO was used as an internal standard. The recoveries of DMSO and DMSO(2) from urine were 97-104 and 98-116%, respectively. The calibration curves showed linearity in the range of 0.15-54.45 mg/L for DMSO and 0.19-50.10 mg/L for DMSO(2). The limits of detection of DMSO and DMSO(2) were 0.04 and 0.06 mg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations of intra-day and inter-day were 0.2-3.4% for DMSO and 0.4-2.4% for DMSO(2). The proposed method may be useful for the biological monitoring of workers exposed to DMSO in their occupational environment. PMID:19688817

  17. Quantification of free and esterified sterols in Portuguese olive oils by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Sara S; Fernandes, José O; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2006-09-22

    A simple and accurate method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE), transesterification and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of free and esterified sterols of olive oil. In order to achieve better separation of esterified and free sterols, silica and alumina SPE adsorbents were tested. Separations by silica provided more reproducible results. The transesterification of both sterol fractions was found to be more user friendly than saponification as a method to liberate the sterols from the respective esters. The free sterols were then silylated with N,O-bis-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) with 1% of trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS). The most favourable conditions for exploitation of this reagent were established. The optimized methodology was suitable for evaluation of free and esterified sterols in Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) olive oils and monovarietal olive oils with different maturation indices. The prevailing phytosterols in all olive oils were beta-sitosterol and campesterol. The free sterols predominated, although they seemed to decrease with the maturation of the olive fruits. PMID:16860809

  18. Optimization of a Solid-Phase Microextraction method for the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis of blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius Schott) fruit volatiles.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, M F; Sanz, J; Sanz, M L; Giuffrè, A M; Sicari, V; Soria, A C

    2015-07-01

    A Solid-Phase Microextraction method for the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis of blackberry (Rubus sp.) volatiles has been fully optimized by means of a Box-Behnken experimental design. The optimized operating conditions (Carboxen/Polydimethylsiloxane fiber coating, 66°C, 20 min equilibrium time and 16 min extraction time) have been applied to the characterization for the first time of the volatile composition of Rubus ulmifolius Schott blackberries collected in Italy and Spain. A total of 74 volatiles of different functionality were identified; esters and aliphatic alcohols were the predominant classes in both sample types. Methylbutanal (2.02-25.70%), ethanol (9.84-68.21%), 2,3-butanedione (2.31-14.71%), trans-2-hexenal (0.49-17.49%), 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (0.08-7.39%), 1-hexanol (0.56-16.39%), 1-octanol (0.49-10.86%) and methylbutanoic acid (0.53-21.48%) were the major compounds in most blackberries analyzed. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of semiquantitative data showed that only two variables (ethyl decanoate and ethyl acetate) were necessary for a successful differentiation of blackberries according to their harvest location. PMID:25704677

  19. Detection of Stimulants and Narcotics by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Sports Doping Control.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Brian D; Kucherova, Yulia; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Sports drug testing laboratories are required to detect several classes of compounds that are prohibited at all times, which include anabolic agents, peptide hormones, growth factors, beta-2 agonists, hormones and metabolic modulators, and diuretics/masking agents. Other classes of compounds such as stimulants, narcotics, cannabinoids, and glucocorticoids are also prohibited, but only when an athlete is in competition. A single class of compounds can contain a large number of prohibited substances and all of the compounds should be detected by the testing procedure. Since there are almost 70 stimulants on the prohibited list it can be a challenge to develop a single screening method that will optimally detect all the compounds. We describe a combined liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing method for detection of all the stimulants and narcotics on the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Urine for LC-MS/MS testing does not require sample pretreatment and is a direct dilute and shoot method. Urine samples for the GC-MS method require a liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride. PMID:26660193

  20. A non-invasive biomonitoring method for assessing levels of urinary pyrethroid metabolites in diapered children by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shun; Ueyama, Jun; Kondo, Takaaki; Saito, Isao; Shibata, Eiji; Gotoh, Masahiro; Nomura, Hiroshi; Wakusawa, Shinya; Nakai, Kunihiko; Kamijima, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for quantitative measurement of urinary metabolites of pyrethroid (PYR) insecticides, trans-chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid (CDCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), extracted from disposable diapers. This study was approved by the university ethics committees, and informed consent was obtained from all the parents for their children and from adult volunteers. After extraction of PYR metabolites in the absorber of diapers with 5?ml acetone, the metabolites in the eluents were extracted with tert-butyl methyl ether, derivatized with 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were 0.55??g/l for CDCA and 0.09??g/l for 3-PBA in 2?ml urine extracted from diapers. Within-series and between-day precisions were <14% (CV%) over the concentration range of metabolites from 0.4 to 20.4??g/l urine. When concentrations of each metabolite were measured with the developed method after pouring 2?ml urine, which was obtained from adults both in a general population and pest control operators, on diapers, good correlations were shown between the measured results and the concentrations measured directly for the respective urine with the conventional method (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient 0.889 for CDCA and 0.989 for 3-PBA; n=27-28). The developed method would be applicable to epidemiological studies. PMID:23756699

  1. Catalytic hydroprocessing of SRC-II heavy distillate fractions: Conversion of the acidic fractions characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, D.W.; Petrakis, L.; Li, C.; Gates, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetics data have been determined for the catalytic hydroprocessing of the acidic fractions of a heavy distillate of a liquid derived from Powhatan No. 5 coal. A commercial, sulfided Ni-Mo/..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst was used in the experiments, carried out at 350/sup 0/C and 120 atm with the coal liquid fractions dissolved in cyclohexane. The feed and hydrotreated products were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The data were analyzed with group-type methods for compound classes, and results were also obtained for some individual organooxygen compounds. Catalytic hydroprocessing leads to a large increase in the number of compounds and a shift to lower boiling ranges. The data are broadly consistent with reaction networks determined with pure compounds; the most important reactions include aromatic ring hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation, and hydrodemethylation. Pseudo-first-order rate constants for conversion of the predominant organooxygen coupounds are on the order of 10/sup -4/ L/(g of catalysts); the reactivity decreases in the order cyclohexylphenol > dimethylhydroxyindan > tetrahydronaphthol > phenylphenol > 1-naphthol.

  2. Development of sample clean up methods for the analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methyl mycocerosate biomarkers in sputum extracts by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nicoara, Simona C.; Turner, Nicholas W.; Minnikin, David E.; Lee, Oona Y.-C.; O'Sullivan, Denise M.; McNerney, Ruth; Mutetwa, Reggie; Corbett, Liz E.; Morgan, Geraint H.

    2015-01-01

    A proof of principle gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method is presented, in combination with clean up assays, aiming to improve the analysis of methyl mycocerosate tuberculosis biomarkers from sputum. Methyl mycocerosates are generated from the transesterification of phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs), extracted in petroleum ether from sputum of tuberculosis suspect patients. When a high matrix background is present in the sputum extracts, the identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to the methyl derivatives of PDIMs analytes may be hindered by the closely eluting methyl ether of cholesterol, usually an abundant matrix constituent frequently present in sputum samples. The purification procedures involving solid phase extraction (SPE) based methods with both commercial Isolute-Florisil cartridges, and purpose designed molecularly imprinted polymeric materials (MIPs), resulted in cleaner chromatograms, while the mycocerosates are still present. The clean-up performed on solutions of PDIMs and cholesterol standards in petroleum ether show that, depending on the solvent mix and on the type of SPE used, the recovery of PDIMs is between 64 and 70%, whilst most of the cholesterol is removed from the system. When applied to petroleum ether extracts from representative sputum samples, the clean-up procedures resulted in recoveries of 36–68% for PDIMs, allowing some superior detection of the target analytes. PMID:25728371

  3. A novel approach for simultaneous determination of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole and derivatives of 2-thiouracil in animal tissue by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Zou, Qiong-Hui; Xie, Meng-Xia; Han, Jie

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach for determination of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) and other thyreostatic residues in animal tissues by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selected ion monitoring mode was developed. The analytes in animal tissues (including hypothyroid, pork muscle and beef samples) were extracted by acetonitrile, and then purified by a matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) procedure after the extraction residues had been dissolved in water. The thyreostatic residues were derivatized by pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFBBr) under strong basic conditions and then N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) before GC/MS analysis. Different kinds of solid supports with various polarities for the MSPD procedure were investigated, and it was found that silica gel was suitable for the purpose. The average recoveries of the thyreostatic drugs in animal tissues ranged from 71.5-96.9% with the relative standard deviations below 10%. By using the developed method, the limits of detection were 10 microg/kg for MBI; 5 microg/kg for 6-phenyl-2-thiouracil; and 2 microg/kg for 2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil and 6-propyl-2-thiouracil. The stability of the thyreostatic drugs in spiked animal tissues was tested, and the results showed that the thyreostatic drugs did not decompose within 3 months if the sample was stored in darkness below -20 degrees C. PMID:17394127

  4. Stir frit microextraction: an approach for the determination of volatile compounds in water by headspace-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Pijuán, M; Alcudia-León, M C; Lucena, R; Cárdenas, S; Valcárcel, M

    2012-08-17

    In this article, a novel extraction approach, called stir frit microextraction (SFME), is presented. The new approach combines the extractive capability of a commercial polyethylene frit (20 ?m of pore size) with the stirring in the same device. The proposed extraction procedure allows the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene isomers and styrene (BTEX-S) in water samples. The analytes are extracted on the frit, previously conditioned with methanol, under continuous magnetic stirring. Once the extraction is performed, the frit is transferred to a headspace vial where the volatile compounds are desorbed from the frit (90 °C, 30 min) in a headspace module and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Headspace conditions (time and temperature) as well as extraction conditions (ionic strength, type of stirring, extraction time, stirring rate and sample volume) have been systematically evaluated. The method was characterized on the basis of its linearity, sensitivity and precision. Limits of detection were in the range from 18 ng/L (o-xylene) to 65 ng/L (benzene). The repeatability of the proposed method, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) varied between 3.8% (toluene) and 8.2% (m- and p-xylene). The recovery study carried out in different water samples provided an average recovery of 94%, which demonstrated the applicability of the stir frit microextraction for the analytical problem selected in this article. PMID:22771255

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine ("Tetramine") Spiked into Beverages by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Validation by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J; Hok, S; Alcaraz, A; Koester, C

    2008-11-13

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, commonly known as tetramine, is a highly neurotoxic rodenticide (human oral LD{sub 50} = 0.1 mg/kg) used in hundreds of deliberate food poisoning events in China. Here we describe a method for quantitation of tetramine spiked into beverages, including milk, juice, tea, cola, and water and cleaned up by C8 solid phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was based upon fragmentation of m/z 347 to m/z 268. The method was validated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in SIM mode for ions m/z 212, 240, and 360. The limit of quantitation was 0.10 {micro}g/mL by LC/MS/MS versus 0.15 {micro}g/mL for GC/MS. Fortifications of the beverages at 2.5 {micro}g/mL and 0.25 {micro}g/mL were recovered ranging from 73-128% by liquid-liquid extraction for GC/MS analysis, 13-96% by SPE and 10-101% by liquid-liquid extraction for LC/MS/MS analysis.

  6. GC-MS in the analysis of organic compounds in meteorites. [Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Romiez, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    The application of an analytical approach combining gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has shown that the amino acid composition of meteorite extracts is quite complex. A computer was used in the evaluation of the data obtained in the investigations. The computer programs developed have been concerned solely with the mass spectra of amino acids. Specialized programs have been written to determine the number of carbon atoms in an amino acid which is a member of any of three subclasses.

  7. Analysis of Essential Oil in Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) Leaves and Tubers by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Helmi, Zead; Al Azzam, Khaldun Mohammad; Tsymbalista, Yuliya; Ghazleh, Refat Abo; Shaibah, Hassan; Aboul-Enein, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate, for the first time, the chemical composition of essential oil of the tubers and leaves of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), a species of sunflower native to eastern North America, growing in Ukraine. Methods: A hydrodistillation apparatus was used for the extraction of volatile components and then it was analysed by gas chromatography equipped with a split-splitless injector (split ratio, 1:50) and flame ionization detector (FID). The oil was analyzed under linear temperature programming applied at 4°C/min from 50°C - 340°C. Temperatures of the injector and FID detector were maintained at 280°C and 300°C, respectively. The chemical analysis of the oil was carried out using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), to determine the chemical composition of the volatile fraction. Results: The essential oils content ranged from 0.00019 to 0.03486 and 0.00011 to 0.00205 (g/100g), in leaves and tubers, respectively. The qualitative and quantitative analysis led to the identification of 17 components in both species samples. The major component found in leaves and tubers was (-)-?-bisabolene with 70.7% and 63.1%, respectively. Conclusion: Essential oil profile of Jerusalem artichoke species showed significant differences between leaves and tubers species. Additionally, the leaves of Jerusalem artichoke are a promising source of natural ?-bisabolene. PMID:25671184

  8. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Driedger, Arthur R., III

    1993-01-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  9. Analysis of methaqualone in biological matrices by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography. Comparison with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plaut, O; Girod, C; Staub, C

    1998-04-01

    The analysis of methaqualone (MTQ) in biological matrices by capillary electrophoresis (CE) is described. This methods uses liquid-liquid extraction and micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC), an operation mode of CE. Separations are made using a 25 cm long capillary and a borate/phosphate buffer at pH 8.2. Using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (GC-MS) as reference method, MTQ has been analyzed in urine, blood, gastric content and hair. For hair analysis, supercritical fluid extraction was compared with liquid-liquid extraction. Linearity was established in urine and blood between 0.25 and 10.0 micrograms/ml. MTQ recovery from blood was estimated at 60%. The limit of detection of this method in urine is about 0.10 microgram/ml. Drawbacks and advantages of MECC over GC-MS are discussed. PMID:9627981

  10. Hydrocarbons identified in extracts from estuarine water accommodated no. 2 fuel oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Walker, A. L.; Bieri, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented on a computerized gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analysis of methylene chloride and n-heptane extracts of a No. 2 fuel oil accommodated estuarine water sample. The analytical method is briefly described, and the limitations on the identifications are categorized. Some attempt was made to determine major and trace constituents in the water accommodate. Altogether 66 hydrocarbon compounds were identified specifically, and 75 compounds were partially identified. Seven compounds could be recognized as major constituents of the water accommodated oil and ten were present only as traces. The aromatic compounds found were alkyl benzenes, naphthalene, tetralin, indane, biphenyl, fluorene, anthracene, and some of their alkyl substituted isomers in the range of carbon numbers C7 to C15. Four n-alkanes, C10 to C13, were found along with four other assorted hydrocarbons.

  11. Development and application of compact denuder sampling techniques with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for halogen speciation in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Julian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Volcanoes are a large source for several reactive atmospheric trace gases including sulphur and halogen containing species. The detailed knowledge of volcanic plume chemistry can give insights into subsurface processes and can be considered as a useful geochemical tool for monitoring of volcanic activity, especially halogen to sulphur ratios (e.g. Bobrowski and Giuffrida, 2012; Donovan et al., 2014). The reactive bromine species bromine monoxide (BrO) is of particular interest, because BrO as well as SO2 are readily measurable by UV spectrometers at a safe distance. Furthermore it is formed in the plume by a multiphase reaction mechanism under depletion of ozone in the plume. The abundance of BrO changes as a function of the reaction time and therefore distance from the vent as well as the spatial position in the plume. Due to the lack of analytical approaches for the accurate speciation of certain halogens (HBr, Br2, Br, BrCl, HOBr etc.) there are still uncertainties about the magnitude of volcanic halogen emissions and in particular their specificationtheir species and therefore also in the understanding of the bromine chemistry in volcanic plumes (Bobrowski et al., 2007). In this study, the first application of a 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (1,3,5-TMB)-coated gas diffusion denuder (Huang and Hoffmann, 2008) on volcanic gases proved to be suitable to collect selectively gaseous bromine species with oxidation states of +1 or 0 (Br2 and BrO(H)), while being ignorant to HBr (OS -1). The reaction of 1,3,5-TMB with bromine gives 1-bromo-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzene (1-bromo-2,4,6-TMB) - other halogens give corresponding products. The diffusion denuder technique allows sampling of gaseous compounds exclusively without collecting particulate matter. Choosing a flow rate of 500 mL-min-1 and a denuder length of 0.5 m a nearly quantitative collection efficiency was achieved. Solvent elution of the derivatized analytes and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gives a limit of detection below 1 ng of bromine. The method was applied on volcanic gas plumes at Mt. Etna and Mt. Stromboli in Italy in July 2014 and on fumarolic gas emissions at Mt. Lastarria in Chile in November 2014. The results show significant amounts of the concerning bromine species (lower ppb range). Comprehensive data evaluation and comparison with results of impinger extraction with NaOH solution as well as chamber experiments are still in progress. References Bobrowski, N. and G. Giuffrida: Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006-2009. Solid Earth, 3, 433-445, 2012 Bobrowski, N., R. von Glasow, A. Aiuppa, S. Inguaggiato, I. Louban, O. W. Ibrahim and U. Platt: Reactive halogen chemistry in volcanic plumes. J. Geophys. Res., 112, 2007 Donovan A., V. Tsanev, C. Oppenheimer and M. Edmonds: Reactive halogens (BrO and OClO) detected in the plume of Soufrière Hills Volcano during an eruption hiatus. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 15, 3346-3363, 2014 Huang, R.-J. and T. Hoffmann: A denuder-impinger system with in situ derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of gaseous iodine-containing halogen species. Journal of Chromatography A, 1210, 135-141, 2008

  12. Methods of Analysis - Determination of Pyrethroid Insecticides in Water and Sediment Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2009-01-01

    A method for the determination of 14 pyrethroid insecticides in environmental water and sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in response to increasing concern over the effects of pyrethroids on aquatic organisms. The pyrethroids included in this method are ones that are applied to many agricultural and urban areas. Filtered water samples are extracted for pyrethroids using solid-phase extraction (SPE) with no additional cleanup steps. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a microwave-assisted extraction system, and the pyrethroids of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences by passing the extracts through stacked graphitized carbon and alumina SPE cartridges, along with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography and gel-permeation chromatography (HPLC/GPC). Quantification of the pyrethroids from the extracted water and sediment samples is done using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) or gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS). Recoveries in test water samples fortified at 10 ng/L ranged from 83 to 107 percent, and recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 ug/kg ranged from 82 to 101 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 5 to 9 percent in the water samples and 3 to 9 percent in the sediment samples. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), in water ranged from 2.0 to 6.0 ng/L using GC/MS and 0.5 to 1.0 ng/L using GC/MS/MS. For sediment, the MDLs ranged from 1.0 to 2.6 ug/kg dry weight using GC/MS and 0.2 to 0.5 ug/kg dry weight using GC/MS/MS. The matrix-spike recoveries for each compound, when averaged for 12 environmental water samples, ranged from 84 to 96 percent, and when averaged for 27 environmental sediment samples, ranged from 88 to 100 percent.

  13. Sample Processing technique onboard ExoMars (MOMA) to analyze organic compounds by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Brault, A.; Pinnick, V.; Siljeström, S.; Raulin, F.; Steininger, H.; Goesmann, F.; MOMA Team

    2011-12-01

    With the aim of separating and detecting organic compounds from Martian soil onboard the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars 2018 upcoming joint ESA/NASA mission, we have developed three different space compatible sample preparation techniques compatible with space missions, able to extract and analyze by GC-MS a wide range of volatile and refractory compounds, including chirality analysis. Then, a sample processing utilizing three derivatization/extraction reactions has been carried out. The first reaction is based on a silyl reagent N-Methyl-N- (Tert-Butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) [1], the second one, N,N-Dimethylformamide Dimethylacetal (DMF-DMA) [2,3] is dedicated to the chirality detection and the third one is a thermochemolysis based on the use of tetramethylammoniumhydroxide (TMAH). The sample processing system is performed in an oven, dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample (50-100mg). The internal temperature of the oven ranges from 20 to 900 °C. The extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300°C for 5 to 20 min. Then, the chemical derivatization of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil sample by using a derivatyization capsule which contains a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the targeted molecules, this step allows their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any thermal degradation. Once derivatized, the volatile target molecules are trapped in a chemical trap and promptly desorbed into the gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. Thermochemolysis is directly performed in the oven at 400°C during 5 min with a 25% (w/w) methanol solution of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Then, pyrolysis in the presence of TMAH allows both an efficient cleavage of polar bonds and the subsequent methylation of COOH, OH and NH2 groups, hence the release of less polar, GC-amenable compounds. By using thermochemolysis several families of biological molecules were detected such as fatty acids, n-alkenes and n-alkanols [4]. [1] A. Buch et al., Development of a gas chromatography compatible Sample Processing System (SPS) for the in-situ analysis of refractory organic matter in martian soil: preliminary result. Advances in Space Research 43, 143-151, 2009. [2] C. Freissinet et al., Journal of Chromatography A.1217 (5), 731-740, 2010. [3] U. Meierhenrich et al., Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis 60, 13-26, 2001. [4] C. Geffroy-Rodier et al., Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 85, 2009.

  14. Nitrogen incorporation in Titan's tholins inferred by high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Carrasco, Nathalie; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Touboul, David; Szopa, Cyril; Buch, Arnaud; Pernot, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    Influx of solar photons and heavy charged particles from Saturn's magnetosphere on Titan's atmosphere - mainly comprised of methane and nitrogen - induce an intense organic photochemistry which leads to the formation of a large amount of aerosols in suspension in the atmosphere. In order to infer the role of nitrogen in aerosol formation processes we produced laboratory analogs of Titan's aerosols. In this work, we compare the composition of different analogs by using high resolution mass spectrometry and propose an additional study using gas-chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry for a new kind of analog produced by polymerization of cryogenically trapped gaseous neutral species. The comparison of these materials emphasizes the importance of ion chemistry processes for the inclusion of nitrogen in molecules constituting Titan's tholins. A statistical approach is also used for the treatment of high resolution mass spectra of these highly complex organic materials. This method allows distinguishing molecular families that can be reconstructed by an ideal copolymer. We investigate several copolymer reconstructions, and we suggest that an HCN (or CH3CN)/C2H4 based copolymer agrees well with the polymeric structure of tholins produced with 5% of methane in nitrogen.

  15. Determination of emerging halogenated flame retardants and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in serum by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cequier, Enrique; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Becher, Georg; Thomsen, Cathrine

    2013-10-01

    Emerging flame retardants are used in a great variety of household goods and thus have the potential to pollute our indoor environment. Health concerns regarding exposure to these flame retardants demand new methods to survey their occurrence in humans. This work describes development and optimization of an analytical method comprising solid phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for the determination of besides 15 polybrominated diphenyl ethers, 7 emerging halogenated flame retardants in human serum (1,2-bis[2,4,6-tribromophenoxy] ethane, decabromodiphenyl ethane, hexabromobenzene, Dechlorane Plus(®), hexachlorocyclopentenyl-dibromocyclooctane, dechlorane 602 and 603). The method was thoroughly validated at three spiking levels obtaining averaged recoveries >80% with a RSD of 5% (n=12). Accuracies ranged from 88 to 125% except for DBDPE, which averaged 66% with overall RSD of 11% (n=12). Method limits of detection (MLD) ranged from 0.3 to 5.4 pg/mL serum, except for decabromodiphenyl ether and decabromodiphenyl ethane for which MLDs were 14 and 20 pg/mL serum, respectively. In human serum samples from Norway, we were able to detect and quantify hexabromobenzene, 1,2-bis[2,4,6-tribromophenoxy] ethane, Dechlorane Plus(®), Dechlorane 602 and 603. PMID:23992842

  16. Laboratory Activity for the Determination of Nicotine in Electronic Cigarette Liquids using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Todd; Bida, Morgan R.; Robinson, Risa J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the prevalence and popularity of electronic cigarettes (ECs) has increased noticeably and a large market for their refillable nicotine solutions (e-liquids) has also rapidly increased. These e-liquids contain nicotine, an addictive and potentially dangerous stimulant, but often the actual nicotine content differs significantly from manufacturers’ labelling, due in part to lack of regulation for these products. A laboratory activity for undergraduate students was developed to directly test e-liquids for nicotine content using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a means for teaching the instrumentation to undergraduate students using an authentic, real-world example. The activity introduces and/or re-emphasizes the theory and operation of GC-MS, standard/sample preparation, calibration curves, internal standards, selected ion monitoring mode of MS operation, and method validation. The laboratory experiment is designed for students enrolled in Quantitative Analysis courses (like Analytical Chemistry or Instrumental Analysis), but portions are also suitable for lower level chemistry courses or even those designed for allied health professionals or non-chemistry majors. Given the current popularity of ECs, this activity can provide the chemistry curriculum with a timely, real-world, and contemporary application in which crucial course content is taught. Students can also benefit from the inherent discussion of ECs, regulations, and related social aspects of smoking and EC vaping – which can serve as a secondary learning outcome. PMID:26478904

  17. Rapid sequential separation of essential oil compounds using continuous heart-cut multi-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Ok; Kim, Yujin; Kim, Hee-su; Hyun, Sun-Hee; Kim, So-Hyun; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Marriott, Philip J

    2011-05-01

    A method for separation and identification of peaks in essential oil samples based on rapid repetitive heart-cutting using multidimensional gas chromatography (MDGC)-mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with a cryotrapping interface is described. Lavender essential oil is analyzed by employing repetitive heart-cut intervals of 1.00 and 1.50 min, achieved in a parallel MDGC-MS/GC-FID experiment. The number of peaks that were detected in 1D GC operation above a given response threshold more than tripled when MDGC-MS employing the cryotrapping module method was used. In addition, MDGC-MS enabled detection of peaks that were not individually evident in 1D GC-MS, owing to effective deconvolution in time of previously overlapped peaks in 1D GC. Thus separation using the cryomodulation approach, without recourse to using deconvolution software, was possible. Peaks widths decreased by about 5-7-fold with the described method, peak capacity increased from about 9 per min to 60 per min, and greater sensitivity results. Repeatability of retention times for replicate analyses in the multidimensional mode was better than 0.02% RSD. The present study suggests that the described heart-cutting technique using MDGC-MS can be used for general improvement in separation and identification of volatile compounds. PMID:21420684

  18. Enhancement of mass spectral data handling using an IBM personal computer. [For gas chromatography-mass spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trudell, D.E.

    1987-03-01

    A method for interfacing an IBM Personal Computer (PC) to a Hewlett-Packard (HP) 9825 desktop computer system is described. The HP 9825 computer provides control and data acquisition for an HP 5970A Mass Selective Detector (MSD) coupled to an HP 5880A gas chromatograph (GC). The GC/MSD is used in catalyst deactivation studies for identification and characterization of organic compounds in complex mixtures. The complexity of the samples has prompted the need to access commercially available mass spectral search systems to take advantage of large mass spectral data bases and various search algorithms. The interface permits mass spectral data to be transferred from the HP 9825 computer to the IBM PC and stored on diskette. The stored spectral data can then be transferred from the IBM PC to a commercial mass spectral search system. The interface provides several advantages, including efficient and economical transfer of mass spectral files to a commercial search system, permanent storage of spectral data on diskette, and off-line data analysis while analyzing samples with the GC/MSD.

  19. Application of solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of chlorophenols in leather.

    PubMed

    de Souza Silveira, Cristine D; Martendal, Edmar; Soldi, Valdir; Carasek, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    This paper proposes a new analytical procedure based on the headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) technique and gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry (GC-SIM-MS) for the determination of 16 phenols extracted from leather samples. The optimized conditions for the HS-SPME were obtained through two experimental designs - a two-level fractional factorial design followed by a central composite design - using the commercial SPME fiber polyacrylate 85??m (PA). The best extraction conditions were as follows: 200??L of derivatizing agent (acetic anhydride), 20?mL of saturated aqueous NaCl solution and extraction time and temperature of 50?min and 75°C, respectively. All optimized conditions were obtained with fixed leather sample mass (250?mg), vial volume (40?mL) and phosphate buffer pH (12) and concentration (50?mmol/L). Detection limits ranging from 0.03 to 0.20?ng/g, and relative standard deviation (RSD) lower than 10.23% (n=6) for a concentration of 800?ng/g (chlorophenols) and 1325?ng/g (2-phenylphenol) in the splitless mode were obtained. The recovery was studied at three concentration levels by adding different amounts of phenols to the leather sample and excellent recoveries ranging from 90.0 to 107.2% were obtained. The validated method was shown to be suitable for the quantification of phenols in leather samples, as it is simple, relatively fast and sensitive. PMID:22282421

  20. A NEW METHOD OF PEAK DETECTION FOR ANALYSIS OF COMPREHENSIVE TWO-DIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY DATA*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongho; Ouyang, Ming; Jeong, Jaesik; Shen, Changyu; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We develop a novel peak detection algorithm for the analysis of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF MS) data using normal-exponential-Bernoulli (NEB) and mixture probability models. The algorithm first performs baseline correction and denoising simultaneously using the NEB model, which also defines peak regions. Peaks are then picked using a mixture of probability distribution to deal with the co-eluting peaks. Peak merging is further carried out based on the mass spectral similarities among the peaks within the same peak group. The algorithm is evaluated using experimental data to study the effect of different cut-offs of the conditional Bayes factors and the effect of different mixture models including Poisson, truncated Gaussian, Gaussian, Gamma, and exponentially modified Gaussian (EMG) distributions, and the optimal version is introduced using a trial-and-error approach. We then compare the new algorithm with two existing algorithms in terms of compound identification. Data analysis shows that the developed algorithm can detect the peaks with lower false discovery rates than the existing algorithms, and a less complicated peak picking model is a promising alternative to the more complicated and widely used EMG mixture models. PMID:25264474

  1. A NEW METHOD OF PEAK DETECTION FOR ANALYSIS OF COMPREHENSIVE TWO-DIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY DATA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongho; Ouyang, Ming; Jeong, Jaesik; Shen, Changyu; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-06-01

    We develop a novel peak detection algorithm for the analysis of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF MS) data using normal-exponential-Bernoulli (NEB) and mixture probability models. The algorithm first performs baseline correction and denoising simultaneously using the NEB model, which also defines peak regions. Peaks are then picked using a mixture of probability distribution to deal with the co-eluting peaks. Peak merging is further carried out based on the mass spectral similarities among the peaks within the same peak group. The algorithm is evaluated using experimental data to study the effect of different cut-offs of the conditional Bayes factors and the effect of different mixture models including Poisson, truncated Gaussian, Gaussian, Gamma, and exponentially modified Gaussian (EMG) distributions, and the optimal version is introduced using a trial-and-error approach. We then compare the new algorithm with two existing algorithms in terms of compound identification. Data analysis shows that the developed algorithm can detect the peaks with lower false discovery rates than the existing algorithms, and a less complicated peak picking model is a promising alternative to the more complicated and widely used EMG mixture models. PMID:25264474

  2. The Global Volatile Signature of Veal via Solid-phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The volatile composition of veal has yet to be reported and is one of the important factors determining meat character and quality. To identify the most important aroma compounds in veal from Holstein bull calves fed one of three diets, samples were subjected to solid-phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Most of the important odorants were aldehydes and alcohols. For group A (veal calves fed entirely on milk for 90 d before slaughter), the most abundant compound class was the aldehydes (52.231%), while that was alcohols (26.260%) in group C (veal calves fed starter diet for at least 60 d before slaughter). In both classes the absolute percentages of the volatile compounds in veal were different indicating that the veal diet significantly (p<0.05) affected headspace volatile composition in veal as determined by principal component analysis (PCA). Twenty three volatile compounds showed significance by using a partial least-squared discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) (VIP>1). The establishment of the global volatile signature of veal may be a useful tool to define the beef diet that improves the organoleptic characteristics of the meat and consequently impacts both its taste and economic value.

  3. Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, V.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Pereira, A.S.; Cardoso, J.N. ); Cabral, J.A. )

    1999-07-15

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC columns. The combination of this technique with mass spectrometry is not so common and application to aerosols is novel. The HTGC and HTGC-MS analyses of smoke samples taken by particle filtration from combustion of different species of plants provided the characterization of various classes of HMW compounds reported to occur for the first time in emissions from biomass burning. Among these components are a series of wax esters with up to 58 carbon numbers, aliphatic hydrocarbons, triglycerides, long chain methyl ketones, alkanols and a series of triterpenyl fatty acid esters which have been characterized as novel natural products. Long chain fatty acids with more than 32 carbon numbers are not present in the smoke samples analyzed. The HMW compounds in smoke samples from the burning of plants from Amazonia indicate the input of directly volatilized natural products in the original plants during their combustion. However, the major organic compounds extracted from smoke consist of a series of lower molecular weight polar components, which are not natural products but the result of the thermal breakdown of cellulose and lignin. In contrast, the HMW natural products may be suitable tracers for specific sources of vegetation combustion because they are emitted as particles without thermal alternation in the smoke and can thus be related directly to the original plant material.

  4. [Analysis of the components of floral scent in Glochidion puberum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with dynamic headspace adsorption].

    PubMed

    Huang, Daihong; Zhang, Zhenguo; Chen, Guoping; Li, Houhun; Shi, Fuchen

    2015-03-01

    The floral scent plays the important key role in maintaining the obligate pollination mutualism between Glochidion plants and Epicephala moths. In the study, the dynamic headspace adsorption technique was employed to collect the floral scent emitted by Glochidion puberum, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the detection and identification of volatile chemical components in headspace samples of flowers from G. puberum. The peak area normalization was used to determine the relative contents of each odour component. The results showed that 45 compounds mainly consisting of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were isolated from the floral scent produced by G. puberum. Especially, both linalool (38.06%) and ?-elemene (23.84%) were considered as the major scent components of G. puberum. It was speculated that linalool and ?-elemene may be the two potential compounds attracting female Epicephala moths. The study provided the basic data for further electroantennographic detection and bioassays to identify the compounds having the actual physiological activity to female Epicephala moths. PMID:26182476

  5. Method development for the determination of wood preservatives in commercially treated wood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Š?ávová, Jana; Sedgeman, Carl A; Smith, Zachary T; Frink, Lillian A; Hart, Jessica A; Niri, Vadoud H; Kubátová, Alena

    2011-09-30

    Fungicides and insecticides are commonly used preservatives to protect wood products against microbiological degradations. Currently, there is a lack of analytical methods addressing the quantitative determination of a wide range of wood preserving species in wood matrices. In this study, a reliable method was developed for the determination of a mixture of wood preserving agents with differing chemical structures (i.e., properties), including tebuconazole (TAZ), propiconazole (PAZ), 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC), and permethrin (PER), in pine wood. The analyte recoveries obtained by Soxhlet and multiple-stage sonication extractions were compared. While both extraction methods yielded similar results (80-100%), Soxhlet extraction was found to be less labor-intensive and thus preferred providing also lower RSDs of 1-6%. In comparison to methanol, commonly used as an extraction solvent for triazoles, acetone yielded similar extraction efficiencies for all analytes while reducing the time of sample concentration. The solid phase extraction method for triazoles was adapted to allow for a separation of IPBC and PER from the wood matrix. As opposed to previous studies, three recovery standards were employed, which enabled the correction of individual analyte losses during the sample preparation. The matrix-affected limits of detection (LODs) using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection were nearly the same for triazoles 0.07 and 0.21 ng g(-1) for PAZ and TAZ in sapwood and 0.18 and 0.21 ng g(-1) in heartwood, respectively. Higher LODs were observed for IPBC and PER: 3.9 and 1.7 ng g(-1) in sapwood, and 2.0 and 6.0 ng g(-1) in heartwood, respectively. The recoveries in the wood submitted to commercial sample treatment showed gradient distribution of analytes depending on the penetration of the treatment. PMID:21839199

  6. [Characterization of aroma active compounds in blood orange juice by solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Xie, Bijun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yun; Pan, Siyi

    2008-07-01

    Volatile compounds of fresh blood orange juice were analyzed by solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) and the aroma active compounds were identified by olfactometry. The volatile compounds were extracted by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) using a divinylbenzene/carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (DVB/CAR/PDMS) fiber for 40 min at 40 degrees C. The analysis was carried out using an HP 6890N GC equipped with an HP-5 column (30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm ) directly connected to an HP 5975 series mass selective detector and a sniffing port (ODP2, Gerstel) using helium as carrier gas. Compound identifications were made by the comparison of the mass spectra, retention times, retention indices (I(R)) and odor of the volatile components in the extracts with those of the corresponding reference standards. Forty-six compounds were identified by GC-MS and I(R). The major components of the juice were limonene (86.36%), linalool (3.69%), beta-myrcene (1.79%), octanal (1.32%) and valencene (1.27%). GC-MS-olfactometry analysis was performed to determine 34 compounds with aroma activity, of which 23 compounds were identified. The major contributors to orange juice aroma activity are ethyl butanoate, octanal, gamma-terpinene, 4-acetyl-1-methyleyclohexene, decanal, (-)-carvone, geranyl acetate, valencene. These compounds of strong aroma intensity represent 7.22% of the total volatile compounds. Other four unknown compounds (I(R), <800; I(R) = 1020, 1143, 1169, separately) are also the major contributors to the overall aroma. PMID:18959252

  7. Chemometric-based determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples using ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction combined to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahmadvand, Mohammad; Sereshti, Hassan; Parastar, Hadi

    2015-09-25

    In the present research, ultrasonic-assisted emulsification-microextraction (USAEME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been proposed for analysis of thirteen environmental protection agency (EPA) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples. Tetrachloroethylene was selected as extraction solvent. The main parameters of USAEME affecting the efficiency of the method were modeled and optimized using a central composite design (CCD). Under the optimum conditions (9?L for extraction solvent, 1.15% (w/v) NaCl (salt concentration) and 10min for ultrasonication time), preconcentration factor (PF) of the PAHs was in the range of 500-950. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) as a second-order calibration algorithm was used for resolution, identification and quantification of the target PAHs in the presence of uncalibrated interferences. The regression coefficients and relative errors (REs, %) of calibration curves of the PAHs were in the satisfactory range of 0.9971-0.9999 and 1.17-6.59%, respectively. Furthermore, analytical figures of merit (AFOM) for univariate and second-order calibrations were obtained and compared. As an instance, the limit of detections (LODs) of target PAHs were in the range of 1.87-18.9 and 0.89-6.49ngmL(-1) for univariate and second-order calibration, respectively. Finally, the proposed strategy was used for determination of target PAHs in real water samples (tap and hookah waters). The relative recoveries (RR) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 68.4-109.80% and 2.15-6.93%, respectively. It was concluded that combination of multivariate chemometric methods with USAEME-GC-MS can be considered as a new insight for the analysis of target analytes in complex sample matrices. PMID:26319375

  8. Analysis of volatile compounds emitted from fresh Syringa oblata flowers in different florescence by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Zu-Guang; Lee, Maw-Rong; Shen, De-Long

    2006-08-18

    In this study, a simple and solvent-free method was developed for determination of the volatile compounds from fresh flowers of Syringa oblata using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The SPME parameters were studied, the optimum conditions of a 65mum polydimethylsiloxan/divinylbenezene (PDMS/DVB), extraction temperature of 25 degrees C and extraction time of 30 min were obtained and applied to extraction of the volatile compounds emitted from fresh flowers of S. oblata. The volatile compounds released from fresh flowers of S. oblata were separated and identified by GC-MS. Lilac aldehyde A, lilac aldehyde B, lilac aldehyde C, lilac aldehyde D, lilac alcohol A, lilac alcohol B, lilac alcohol C, lilac alcohol D, alpha-pinene, sabinene, beta-pinene, myrcene, d-limonene, eucalyptol, cis-ocimene, benzaldehyde, terpinolene, linalool, benzene acetaldehyde, alpha-terpineol, p-methoxyanisole, p-anisaldehyde, (Z,E)-alpha-farnesene and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene were the most abundant volatiles released from fresh flowers of S. oblata var. alba. The relative contents of main volatile fragrance were found to be different in emissions from two varieties of S. oblata flowers (white or purple in color). The four isomers of lilac alcohol and four isomer lilac aldehyde were the characteristic components of the scent of fresh flowers of S. oblata. The main volatile fragrance from fresh flowers of S. oblata var. alba in different florescence ((A) flower buds; (B) at the early stage of flower blooming; (C) during the flower blooming; (D) at the end of flower blooming; (E) senescence) were studied in this paper. The results demonstrated that headspace SPME-GC-MS is a simple, rapid and solvent-free method suitable for analysis of volatile compounds emitted from fresh flowers of S. oblata in different florescence. PMID:17723612

  9. Optimization of large volume injection-programmable temperature vaporization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis for the determination of estrogenic compounds in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, A; Fernández, L A; Olivares, M; Prieto, A; Etxebarria, N; Usobiaga, A; Zuloaga, O

    2010-12-24

    Large volume injection-programmable temperature vaporization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-PTV-GC-MS) was optimized for the determination of estrone (E1), 17?-estradiol (E2), 17?-ethynyl estradiol (EE2), mestranol (MeEE2) and estriol (E3) for their determination in environmental samples (estuarine water, wastewater, fish bile and fish homogenate) after derivatization with 25 ?L (BSTFA+1% TMCS) and 125 ?L of pyridine. Experimental designs such as Plackett-Burman (PBD) and central composite designs (CCDs) were used to optimize the LVI-PTV variables (cryo-focusing temperature, vent time, vent flow, vent pressure, injection volume, purge flow to split vent, splitless time and injection speed). Optimized conditions were as follows: 45 ?L of n-hexane extract are injected at 60°C and 6 ?L/s with a vent flow and a vent pressure of 50 mL/min and 7.7 psi, respectively, during 5 min; then the split valve is closed for 1.5 min and afterwards the injector is cleaned at 100 mL/min before the next injection. The method was applied to the determination of estrogenic compounds in environmental samples such as estuarine water, wastewater, and fish homogenate and bile. Limits of detection (0.04-0.15 ng/L for water samples, 0.04-0.67 ng/g for fish bile and 0.1-7.5 ng for fish homogenate) obtained were approx. ten times lower than those obtained by means of a common split/splitless inlet. PMID:21092978

  10. Dispersive solid-phase extraction based on oleic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for UV-filter determination in water samples.

    PubMed

    Román, Iván P; Chisvert, Alberto; Canals, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    A sensitive analytical method to concentrate and determine extensively used UV filters in cosmetic products at (ultra)trace levels in water samples is presented. The method is based on a sample treatment using dispersive solid-phase extraction (dSPE) with laboratory-made chemisorbed oleic acid-coated cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2)O(4)@oleic acid) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as optimized sorbent for the target analytes. The variables involved in dSPE were studied and optimized in terms of sensitivity, and the optimum conditions were: mass of sorbent, 100mg; donor phase volume, 75 mL; pH, 3; and sodium chloride concentration, 30% (w/v). After dSPE, the MNPs were eluted twice with 1.5 mL of hexane, and then the eluates were evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with 50 ?L of N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) for the injection into the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Under the optimized experimental conditions the method provided good levels of repeatability with relative standard deviations below 16% (n=5, at 100 ng L(-1) level). Limit of detection values ranged between 0.2 and 6.0 ng L(-1), due to the high enrichment factors achieved (i.e., 453-748). Finally, the proposed method was applied to the analysis of water samples of different origin (tap, river and sea). Recovery values showed that the matrices under consideration do not significantly affect the extraction process. PMID:21411104

  11. Simultaneous analysis of 10 trihalomethanes at nanogram per liter levels in water using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography mass-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sebastien; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Joll, Cynthia A; Heitz, Anna

    2012-05-18

    Trihalomethanes are predominantly formed during disinfection of water via reactions of the oxidant with natural organic matter. Even though chlorinated and brominated trihalomethanes are the most widespread organic contaminants in drinking water, when iodide is present in raw water iodinated trihalomethanes can also be formed. The formation of iodinated trihalomethanes can lead to taste and odor problems and is a potential health concern since they have been reported to be more toxic than their brominated or chlorinated analogs. Currently, there is no published standard analytical method for I-THMs in water. The analysis of 10 trihalomethanes in water samples in a single run is challenging because the iodinated trihalomethanes are found at very low concentrations (ng/L range), while the regulated chlorinated and brominated trihalomethanes are present at much higher concentrations (above ?g/L). An automated headspace solid-phase microextraction technique, with a programmed temperature vaporizer inlet coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, was developed for routine analysis of 10 trihalomethanes i.e. bromo-, chloro- and iodo-trihalomethanes in water samples. The carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fiber was found to be the most suitable. The optimization, linearity range, accuracy and precision of the method are discussed. The limits of detection range from 1 ng/L to 20 ng/L for iodoform and chloroform, respectively. Matrix effects in treated groundwater, surfacewater, seawater, and secondary wastewater were investigated and it was shown that the method is suitable for the analysis of trace levels of iodinated trihalomethanes in a wide range of waters. The method developed in the present study has the advantage of being rapid, simple and sensitive. A survey conducted throughout various process stages in an advanced water recycling plant showed the presence of iodinated trihalomethanes at ng/L levels. PMID:22494640

  12. Determination of nandrolone metabolites in human urine: comparison between liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buiarelli, Francesca; Giannetti, Luigi; Jasionowska, Renata; Cruciani, Claudia; Neri, Bruno

    2010-07-15

    Nandrolone (19-nortestosterone) is an androgenic anabolic steroid illegally used as a growth-promoting agent in animal breeding and as a performance enhancer in athletics. Therefore, its use was officially banned in 1974 by the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Following nandrolone administration, the main metabolites in humans are 19-norandrosterone, 19-norethiocolanolone and 19-norepiandrosterone, and their presence in urine is the basis of detecting its abuse. The present work was undertaken to determine, in human urine, nandrolone metabolites (phase I and phase II) by developing and comparing multiresidue liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods. A double extraction by solid-phase extraction (SPE) was necessary for the complete elimination of the interfering compounds. The proposed methods were also tested on a real positive sample, and they allow us to determine the conjugated/free fractions ratio reducing the risk of false positive or misleading results and they should allow laboratories involved in doping control analysis to monitor the illegal use of steroids. The advantages of LC/MS/MS over GC/MS (which is the technique mainly used) include the elimination of the hydrolysis and derivatization steps: it is known that during enzymatic hydrolysis several steroids can be converted into related compounds and deconjugation is not always 100% effective. The validation parameters for the two methods were similar (limit of quantification (LOQ) <1 ng/mL and percentage coefficient of variance (CV%) <16.4), and both were able to confirm unambiguously all the analytes, thus confirming the validity of both techniques. PMID:20533318

  13. Determination of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in water, sediment, soil, biota, and biosolid using large-volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Gao; Alaee, Mehran; Steer, Helena; Tait, Tara; Williams, Zackery; Brimble, Samantha; Svoboda, Lewina; Barresi, Enzo; Dejong, Maryl; Schachtschneider, Joanne; Kaminski, Ed; Norwood, Warren; Sverko, Ed

    2013-10-01

    Several methods were developed to detect the cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMSs) including octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) in water, sediment, soil, biota, and biosolid samples. Analytical techniques employed to optimize measurement of this compound class in various matrices included membrane-assisted solvent extraction in water, liquid-solid extraction for sediment, soil, biota, and biosolid samples. A subsequent analysis of the extract was conducted by large-volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS). These methods employed no evaporative techniques to avoid potential losses and contamination of the volatile siloxanes. To compensate for the inability to improve detection limits by concentrating final sample extract volumes we used a LVI-GC-MS. Contamination during analysis was minimized by using a septumless GC configuration to avoid cVMS's associated with septum bleed. These methods performed well achieving good linearity, low limits of detection, good precision, recovery, and a wide dynamic range. In addition, stability of cVMS in water and sediment was assessed under various storage conditions. D4 and D5 in Type-I (Milli-Q) water stored at 4°C were stable within 29d; however, significant depletion of D6 (60-70%) occurred only after 3d. Whereas cVMS in sewage influent and effluent were stable at 4°C within 21d. cVMS in sediment sealed in amber glass jars at -20°C and in pentane extracts in vials at -15°C were stable during 1month under both storage conditions. PMID:23211330

  14. Evaluation of magnetic nanoparticles to serve as solid-phase extraction sorbents for the determination of endocrine disruptors in milk samples by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Synaridou, Maria-Evangelia S; Sakkas, Vasilios A; Stalikas, Constantine D; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2014-06-27

    A rapid magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) is proposed based on C18-functionalized magnetic silica nanoparticles as sorbents, for the determination of endocrine disruptors - 20 organochlorine pesticides and 6 polychlorinated biphenyls - in milk samples. Magnetic nanoparticles are characterized by several techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-Ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Fourier transform-infrared. The MSPE is performed by dispersion of the Fe3O4@SiO2@C18 nanoparticles in milk samples with sonication, after protein precipitation. Then, the sorbent is collected by applying an external magnetic field and the analytes are desorbed by n-hexane. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of target analytes by the magnetic nanoparticles are investigated, including washing and elution solvents, amount of sorbents, time of extraction and elution, sample and elution solvent volume. The proposed method is optimized by means of experimental design and response surface methodology. When coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection and under optimum extraction conditions, average recoveries of target analytes are found to be in the range of 79% to 116%. The proposed MSPE-GC-MS analytical method has a linear calibration curve for all target analytes with coefficients of determination to range from 0.9950 to 0.9999. The limits of quantification are found to be between 0.2 and 1?g/L ensuring compliance with the maximum residue limits established by European Commission and Codex Alimentarius, for OCPs and PCBs residues in milk. The proposed method is applied to the determination of target analytes in milk samples from local markets. PMID:24837417

  15. Determination of five booster biocides in seawater by stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, I; Chaguaceda, E; Bujalance, M; Morales, E

    2013-01-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption (TD)-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have been optimized for the determination of five organic booster biocides (Chlorothalonil, Dichlofluanid, Sea-Nine 211, Irgarol 1051 and TCMTB) in seawater samples. The parameters affecting the desorption and absorption steps were investigated using 10 mL seawater samples. The optimised conditions consisted of an addition of 0.2 g mL(-1) KCl to the sample, which was extracted with 10mm length, 0.5mm film thickness stir bars coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and stirred at 900 rpm for 90 min at room temperature (25 °C) in a vial. Desorption was carried out at 280 °C for 5 min under 50 mL min(-1) of helium flow in the splitless mode while maintaining a cryotrapping temperature of 20 °C in the programmed-temperature vaporization (PTV) injector of the GC-MS system. Finally, the PTV injector was ramped to a temperature of 280 °C and the analytes were separated in the GC and detected by MS using the selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The detection limits of booster biocides were found to be in the range of 0.005-0.9 ?g L(-1). The regression coefficients were higher than 0.999 for all analytes. The average recovery was higher than 72% (R.S.D.: 7-15%). All these figures of merit were established running samples in triplicate. This simple, accurate, sensitive and selective analytical method may be used for the determination of trace amounts of booster biocides in water samples from marinas. PMID:23246091

  16. Validated Method for the Quantification of Buprenorphine in Postmortem Blood Using Solid-Phase Extraction and Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Limon Khatun; Andrews, Rebecca; Paterson, Sue

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive and fully validated method was developed for the quantification of buprenorphine in postmortem blood. After a two-step protein precipitation process using acetonitrile, buprenorphine was purified using mixed-mode (C8/cation exchange) solid-phase extraction cartridges. Endogenous water-soluble compounds and lipids were removed from the cartridges before the samples were eluted, concentrated and derivatized using N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide. The samples were analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (2D GC-MS) in selective ion-monitoring mode. A low polarity Rxi(®)-5MS (30 m × 0.25 mm I.D. × 0.25 µm) was used as the primary column and the secondary column was a mid-polarity Rxi(®) -17Sil MS (15 m × 0.32 mm I.D. × 0.25 µm). The assay was linear from 1.0 to 50.0 ng/mL (r(2) > 0.99; n = 6). Intraday (n = 6) and interday (n = 9) imprecisions (percentage relative standard deviation, % RSD) were <5% and the average recovery was 60%. The limit of detection (LOD) of the method was 0.5 ng/mL and limit of quantification was 1.0 ng/mL. 2D GC-MS improved the LOD of buprenorphine by 20-fold compared with analysis on a conventional GC-MS. The method was highly selective with no interference from endogenous compounds or from 62 commonly encountered drugs. To prove method applicability to forensic postmortem cases, 14 authentic postmortem blood samples were analyzed. PMID:25962609

  17. Analysis of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by on-line coupled supercritical fluid extraction-liquid chromatography-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimmo, Masahiko; Adler, Heidi; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Hartonen, Kari; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    An on-line supercritical fluid extraction-liquid chromatography-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SFE-LC-GC-MS) method was developed for the analysis of the particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The limits of detection of the system for the quantification standards were in the range of 0.25-0.57 ng, while the limits of determinations for filter samples varied from 0.02 to 0.04 ng m -3 (24 h sampling). The linearity was excellent from 5 to 300 ng ( R2>0.967). The analysis could be carried out in a closed system without tedious manual sample pretreatment and with no risk of errors by contamination or loss of the analytes. The results of the SFE-LC-GC-MS method were comparable with those for Soxhlet and shake-flask extractions with GC-MS. The new method was applied to the analysis of PAHs collected by high-volume filter in the Helsinki area to study the seasonal trend of the concentrations. The individual PAH concentrations varied from 0.015 to more than 1 ng m -3, while total PAH concentrations varied from 0.81 to 5.68 ng m -3. The concentrations were generally higher in winter than in summer. The mass percentage of the total PAHs in total suspended particulates ranged from 2.85×10 -3% in July to 15.0×10 -3% in December. Increased emissions in winter, meteorological conditions, and more serious artefacts during the sampling in summer season may explain the concentration profiles.

  18. [Extraction of triazine herbicides from environmental water samples with magnetic graphene nanoparticles as the adsorbent followed by determination using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guijiang; Zang, Xiaohuan; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2013-11-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of seven triazine herbicides in environmental water samples by magnetic solid-phase extraction with graphene-based magnetic nanoparticles (G-Fe3O4 MNPs) as the adsorbent coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection. The main factors influencing the extraction efficiency including the amount of G-Fe3O4, the extraction time, the pH and the ionic strength of sample solution and the desorption conditions were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the enrichment factors of the method for the analytes were in the range from 574 to 968; the linearities of the method ranged from 0.01 to 10.0 microg/L for simazine, propazine, metribuzin, simetryn and cyanazine, from 0.05 to 10.0 microg/L for atrazine and from 0.01 to 8.0 microg/L for prometryn, with the correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.996 8 to 0.999 8. The limits of detection were in the range between 1.0 and 5.0 ng/L. Good reproducibilities were obtained with the relative standard deviations below 10.5%. The developed method was applied to the analysis of the triazine herbicides in different water samples (lake, well and tap). The recoveries of the method were in the range from 79.8% to 118.3% at the spiked levels of 0.5 microg/L and 2.0 microg/L. The results indicated that the developed method can be used as a simple and efficient technique for the determination of the triazine herbicides in environmental water samples. PMID:24558842

  19. Comparison of five derivatizing agents for the determination of amphetamine-type stimulants in human urine by extractive acylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dobos, Adrienn; Hidvégi, Elod; Somogyi, Gábor Pál

    2012-06-01

    Five acylation reagents have been compared for use as derivatizing agents for the analysis of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The evaluated reagents were heptafluorobutyric anhydride, pentafluoropropionic anhydride, trifluoroacetic anhydride, acetic anhydride (AA) and N-methyl-bis(trifluoroacetamide). The ATS included amphetamine, methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA). A mixture of the ATS was added to urine (1 mL) followed by KOH solution and saturated NaHCO(3) solution. The sample was then extracted with dichloromethane and the derivatizing agent and 2 µL were injected into the GC-MS instrument. The derivatizing agents were compared with reference to the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios, peak area values, relative standard deviations (RSDs), linearities, limits of detection (LODs) and selectivities. The acetic anhydride proved to be the best according to the S/N ratio and peak area results for amphetamine, MA, MDMA and MDEA. The best RSD values of peak areas and of S/N ratios at 3 µg/mL were also given by AA in cases of MDA, MDMA and MDEA. At 20 µg/mL, the lowest RSD values of peak areas for MDA and the lowest RSD values of S/N ratios for MA, MDA, MDMA and MDEA were again given by AA. Additionally, the highest correlation coefficients for MA, MDA, MDMA and MDEA and the lowest LOD results for MA, MDMA and MDEA were produced by AA. PMID:22582269

  20. Measurement of non-enteric emission fluxes of volatile fatty acids from a California dairy by solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanis, Phillip; Sorenson, Mark; Beene, Matt; Krauter, Charles; Shamp, Brian; Hasson, Alam S.

    Dairies are a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in California's San Joaquin Valley; a region that experiences high ozone levels during summer. Short-chain carboxylic acids, or volatile fatty acids (VFAs), are believed to make up a large fraction of VOC emissions from these facilities, although there are few studies to substantiate this. In this work, a method using a flux chamber coupled to solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) fibers followed by analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed to quantify emissions of six VFAs (acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, pentanoic acid, hexanoic acid and 3-methyl butanoic acid) from non-enteric sources. The technique was then used to quantify VFA fluxes from a small dairy located on the campus of California State University Fresno. Both animal feed and animal waste are found to be major sources of VFAs, with acetic acid contributing 70-90% of emissions from the sources tested. Measured total acid fluxes during spring (with an average temperature of 20 °C) were 1.84 ± 0.01, 1.06 ± 0.08, (1.3 ± 0.5) × 10 -2, (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -2 and (1.2 ± 0.5) × 10 -2 g m -2 h -1 from silage, total mixed rations, flushing lane, open lot and lagoon sources, respectively. VFA emissions from the sources tested total 390 ± 80 g h -1. The data indicate high fluxes of VFAs from dairy facilities, but differences in the design and operation of dairies in the San Joaquin Valley as well as seasonal variations mean that additional measurements must be made to accurately determine emissions inventories for the region.

  1. Graphitic carbon nitrides modified hollow fiber solid phase microextraction for extraction and determination of uric acid in urine and serum coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying-Pei; Chen, Juan; Qi, Huan-Yang; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2015-11-01

    An elevated uric acid (UA) in urine or serum can affect renal function and blood pressure, which is an indicator of gout, cardiovascular and renal diseases, hypertension, etc. In this work, a new type of mixed matrix membrane (MMM), based on graphitic carbon nitrides (g-CNs) and hollow fiber (HF), was prepared and combined with solid phase microextraction (SPME) mode to determine UA in urine and serum followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The porous g-CNs were dispersed in ammonia, and then the exfoliated g-CNs nanosheets were held in the pores of HF by capillary forces and sonification. The prepared g-CNs modified HF (g-CNs-HF) was immersed in biofluid directly to extract UA with SPME mode and the solvent-free mode is convenient for further derivatization and analysis. To achieve the highest extraction efficiency (EF), main extraction and derivatization parameters, such as g-CNs-HF immobilizing time, sonification power and time of extraction, derivatization and desorption time, were optimized. Under the optimum extraction conditions, a favorable linearity of UA was obtained in the range 0.1-200?gmL(-1) with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9990, and the average recoveries at three spiked levels of UA in urine and serum ranged from 80.7% to 121.6%, from 84.7% to 101.1%, respectively. The obtained results demonstrated the developed g-CNs-HF-SPME is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, solvent-free method for the analysis of UA in biofluid. PMID:26444336

  2. Dispersive micro solid-phase extraction for the rapid analysis of synthetic polycyclic musks using thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wu-Hsun; Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2013-09-13

    A simple and solvent-free method for the rapid analysis of five synthetic polycyclic musks in water samples is described. The method involves the use of dispersive micro solid-phase extraction (D-?-SPE) coupled with direct thermal desorption (TD) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in the selected-ion-storage (SIS) mode. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from water sample and the thermal desorption conditions in the GC injection-port were optimized using a central composite design method. The optimal extraction conditions involved immersing 3.2mg of a typical octadecyl (C18) bonded silica adsorbent (i.e., ENVI-18) in a 10mL water sample. After extraction by vigorously shaking for 1.0min, the adsorbents were collected and dried on a filter. The adsorbents were transferred to a micro-vial, which was directly inserted into GC temperature-programmed injector, and the extracted target analytes were then thermally desorbed in the GC injection-port at 337°C for 3.8min. The limits of quantitation (LOQs) were determined to be 1.2-3.0ng/L. Precision, as indicated by relative standard deviations (RSDs), was less than 9% for both intra- and inter-day analysis. Accuracy, expressed as the mean extraction recovery, was between 74 and 90%. A preliminary analysis of the river water samples revealed that galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN) were the two most common synthetic polycyclic musks present. Using a standard addition method, their concentrations were determined to in the range from 11 to 140ng/L. PMID:23932027

  3. Development of stir-bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of musks in vegetables and amended soils.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Josu; Bizkarguenaga, Ekhiñe; Iparraguirre, Arantza; Fernández, Luis Ángel; Zuloaga, Olatz; Prieto, Ailette

    2014-02-17

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and environment-friendly method based on stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) to determine 8 synthetic musks (musk ambrette, musk ketone, celestolide, tonalide, galaxolide, phantolide, traseolide, and cashmeran) in vegetables (lettuce, carrot, and pepper) and amended soil samples. In a first step sorptive extraction was studied both in the headspace (HSSE) and in the immerse mode (SBSE). The best results were obtained in the immersion mode which was further studied. The influence of the main factors: methanol (20%) and NaCl addition (0%), extraction temperature (40°C) and time (180 min), extraction solvent volume (9 mL) and stirring rate (600 rpm) on the efficiency of SBSE was evaluated by means of experimental designs. In the case of TD, desorption time (10 min), desorption temperature (300°C), cryo-focusing temperature (-30°C), vent flow (75 mL/min) and vent pressure (7.2 psi) were studied using both a fractioned factorial design and a central composite design (CCD). The method was validated in terms of apparent recoveries (AR%), method detection limits (MDLs) and precision at two different concentration levels. Although quantification using instrumental calibration rendered odd results in most of the cases, satisfactory recoveries (74-126%) were obtained in the case of matrix-matched calibration approach for all of the analytes and matrices studied at the two concentration levels evaluated. MDLs in the range of 0.01-0.8 ng/g and 0.01-1.1 ng/g were obtained for vegetables and amended soil samples, respectively. RSD values within 1-23% were obtained for all the analytes and matrices. Finally, the method was applied to the determination of musks in vegetable and amended soil samples. PMID:24491767

  4. An automated headspace solid-phasemicroextraction followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method to determine macrocyclic musk fragrances in wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Vallecillos, Laura; Borrull, Francesc; Pocurull, Eva

    2013-11-01

    A fully automated method has been developed for determining eight macrocyclic musk fragrances in wastewater samples. The method is based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Five different fibres (PDMS 7 ?m, PDMS 30 ?m, PDMS 100 ?m, PDMS/DVB 65 ?m and PA 85 ?m) were tested. The best conditions were achieved when a PDMS/DVB 65 ?m fibre was exposed for 45 min in the headspace of 10 mL water samples at 100 °C. Method detection limits were found in the low ng L?1 range between 0.75 and 5 ng L?1 depending on the target analytes. Moreover, under optimized conditions, the method gave good levels of intra-day and inter-day repeatabilities in wastewater samples with relative standard deviations (n =5, 1,000 ng L?1) less than 9 and 14 %, respectively. The applicability of the method was tested with influent and effluent urban wastewater samples from different wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The analysis of influent urban wastewater revealed the presence of most of the target macrocyclic musks with, most notably, the maximum concentration of ambrettolide being obtained in WWTP A (4.36 ?g L?1) and WWTP B (12.29 ?g L?1), respectively. The analysis of effluent urban wastewater showed a decrease in target analyte concentrations, with exaltone and ambrettolide being the most abundant compounds with concentrations varying between below method quantification limit (

  5. Validation of an isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for combined analysis of oxysterols and oxyphytosterols in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Schött, Hans-Frieder; Lütjohann, Dieter

    2015-07-01

    We describe the validation of a method for the analysis of oxysterols, i.e. oxycholesterols and oxyphytosterols, in human serum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM). Concentrations of 7?- and 7?-hydroxy-, and 7oxo-cholesterol, -campesterol, and -sitosterol as well as 4?-hydroxycholesterol and side-chain oxygenated 24S-, 25-, and 27-hydroxycholesterol were determined by isotope dilution methodology. After saponification at room temperature the oxysterols were extracted, separated from their substrates, cholesterol, campesterol, and sitosterol, by solid phase extraction, and subsequently derivatised to their corresponding trimethylsilyl-ethers prior to GC-MS-SIM. In order to prevent artificial autoxidation butylated hydroxytoluene and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were added. The validation of the method was performed according to the International Conference on Harmonisation guidance, including limits of detection and quantification, ranges, recovery and precision. Due to improved instrumental settings and work-up procedure, limits of detection and quantification ranged between 8.0-202.0pg/mL and 28.0-674pg/mL, respectively. Recovery data in five calibration points varied between 91.9% and 116.8% and in serum samples between 93.1% and 118.1%. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the recovery of all compounds was <10%. Well satisfying CVs for within-day precision (2.1-10.8%) and for between-day precision (2.3-12.1%) were obtained. More than 20 samples could be processed in a single routine day and test series of about 300 samples can be realised without impairment of the validation parameters during a sequence. Comparison of oxysterol and oxyphytosterol content in serum and plasma revealed no difference. A fully validated isotope dilution methodology for the quantification of oxycholesterols and oxyphytosterols from human serum or plasma is presented. PMID:25701095

  6. Quantitative analysis of aberrant fatty acid composition of zebrafish hepatic lipids induced by organochlorine pesticide using stable isotope-coded transmethylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hongying; Dong, Linjie; Dong, Qingjian; Ke, Changshu; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Cong; Dai, Ling

    2012-07-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been extensively used worldwide for agricultural purposes. Due to their resistance to metabolism, a major public health concern has been raised. Aberrant hepatic lipid composition has been a hallmark of many liver diseases associated with exposure to various toxins and chemicals. And thus lots of efforts have been focused on the development of analytical techniques that can rapidly and quantitatively determine the changes in fatty acid composition of hepatic lipids. In this work, changes in fatty acid composition of hepatic lipids in response to DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) exposure were quantitatively analyzed by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometric approach based on stable isotope-coded transmethylation. It has been quantitatively demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids including C20:3n3, C20:4n6, and C22:6n3 decrease in response to DDT exposure. However, saturated long chain fatty acids including C16:0, C18:0, as well as monounsaturated long chain fatty acid C18:1n9 consistently increase in a DDT-concentration-dependent manner. In particular, much higher changes in the level of hepatic C16:0 and C18:0 for male fish were observed than that for female fish. These experimental results are in accordance with qualitative histopathological analysis that revealed liver morphological alterations. The stable isotope-coded mass spectrometric approach provides a reliable means for investigating hepatotoxicity associated with fatty acid synthesis, desaturation, mitochondrial beta-oxidation, and lipid mobilization. It should be useful in elucidation of hepatotoxic mechanisms and safety assessment of environmental toxins. PMID:22648165

  7. Optimization of ultrasonic-assisted extraction for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar-based fertilizer by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Sun, Mingxing; Zhu, Zhixiu; Zhang, Jidong; Shen, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Application of biochar-based fertilizers is increasingly being considered for its potential agronomic and environmental benefits. However, biochar may contain residues of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as a result of its production by pyrolysis. The strong adsorption of PAHs to biochar makes extraction and analysis of biochar-based fertilizers difficult. This study optimizes the extraction of PAHs in biochar-based fertilizer samples by using an ultrasonic bath for quantification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among 12 solvents, acetone-cyclohexane (1:1) mixture was selected as the optimum solvent for extraction. Three variables affecting the extraction were studied by Box-Behnken design. The optimum conditions were 57 °C extraction temperature, 81 min extraction time, and two extraction cycles, which were validated by assessing the linearity of analysis, LOD, LOQ, recovery, and levels of PAHs in real biochar-based fertilizer samples. Results revealed that the 16 U.S. EPA PAHs had good linearity, with squared correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. LODs were low, ranging from 2.2 ng g(-1) (acenaphthene) to 23.55 ng g(-1) (indeno[1,2,3-cd]perylene), and LOQs varied from 7.51 ng g(-1) to 78.49 ng g(-1). The recoveries of 16 individual PAHs from the three biochar-based fertilizer samples were 81.8-109.4 %. Graphical Abstract Use of RSM to optimize UAE for extraction of the PAHs in biochar-based fertilizer. PMID:26048058

  8. Differential distribution of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts to sulfur and nitrogen residues in blood proteins as revealed using Raney nickel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lesgards, Jean-François; Frayne, Isabelle Robillard; Comte, Blandine; Busseuil, David; Rhéaume, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rosiers, Christine Des

    2009-11-15

    Quantification of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) bound to circulating proteins may prove to be useful in evaluating the role of this bioactive lipoperoxidation by-product in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Recently, we developed a quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) assay of total protein-bound HNE (HNE-P) in blood after reduction with NaB(2)H(4) and cleavage with Raney nickel. Whereas it has been assumed that Raney nickel cleaves only Michael adducts of HNE to cysteine via a thioether bond (HNE-SP), results from this study demonstrate that our GCMS method also detects with precision picomoles of HNE adducts via nitrogen residues (HNE-NP). Specifically, evidence was obtained using various study models, including polyamino acids consisting of cysteine, lysine, and histidine and a biologically relevant molecule, albumin. Furthermore, we show that dinitrophenylhydrazine treatment before Raney nickel treatment can be used to discriminate and quantify the various HNE-P molecular species in plasma and blood samples from normal rats, which range between 0.15 and 3 pmol/mg protein or 10 to 600 nM. However, whereas HNE-SP predominated in whole blood, we detected HNE-NP only in plasma. We also identified another significant MS signal, which we attribute to protein-bound 1,4-dihydroxynonane (DHN-P) presumably formed from the enzymatic reduction of HNE-P. The distribution profile of all these species in plasma differed from that observed when physiologically relevant concentrations of albumin and HNE were incubated in vitro. Furthermore, interestingly, hypercholesterolemic rabbits showed higher plasma levels of HNE-NP, but not of DHN-P. Beyond documenting the presence of various types of HNE-P in circulating proteins, our results emphasize the importance of enzymatic mechanisms in situ as a factor determining their distribution in the various blood compartments under various conditions. PMID:19682568

  9. A new method for quantifying prenatal exposure to ethanol by microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of meconium followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Cabarcos, Pamela; Tabernero, María Jesús; Alvarez, Iván; Miguez, Martha; Fernández, Purificación; Bermejo, Ana María

    2012-07-01

    Ethanol is a legal and widely available substance. There are health and social consequences associated with its abuse. One of the most important problems is related to alcohol consumption during pregnancy. In fact, prenatal ethanol exposure can be associated with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), a term used to describe a wide range of potentially lifelong effects that include physical, mental, behavioral, and learning disabilities. Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), which are non-oxidative metabolites of ethanol, are currently used as biomarkers of direct ethanol consumption in different matrices, including hair, blood, skin surface, and meconium. Analysis of these compounds in meconium reveals exposure to alcohol during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. An important finding for evaluation of gestational ethanol exposure is the fact that FAEEs do not cross the placenta. Because they accumulate in the fetal gut from approximately the 20th week of gestation until birth, this provides a wide window of detection of chronic exposure to alcohol. The sum of the concentrations of all the FAEEs, with a cutoff of 2 nmol g(-1) or 600 ng g(-1) meconium, has been recommended as evidence of maternal alcohol use. We introduce a novel technique to quantify ethyl myristate, ethyl palmitate, ethyl stearate, and their deuterated analogues (as internal standards, IS) in meconium using microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Limits of detection and quantification were 50 and 100 ng g(-1) for all analytes except ethyl stearate (LOD 100 ng g(-1) and LOQ 500 ng g(-1)). Calibration curves were linear from the LOQ to 5000 ng g(-1). The validated method was applied to the analysis of 81 meconium samples. PMID:22669306

  10. Determination of ultraviolet filters in bathing waters by stir bar sorptive-dispersive microextraction coupled to thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Juan L; Chisvert, Alberto; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Salvador, Amparo

    2016-01-15

    In this work, a new approach that combines the advantages of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE), i.e. stir bar sorptive-dispersive microextraction (SBSDµE), is employed as enrichment and clean-up technique for the sensitive determination of eight lipophilic UV filters in water samples. The extraction is accomplished using a neodymium stir bar magnetically coated with oleic acid-coated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as sorbent material, which are detached and dispersed into the solution at high stirring rate. When stirring is stopped, MNPs are magnetically retrieved onto the stir bar, which is subjected to thermal desorption (TD) to release the analytes into the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system. The SBSDµE approach allows for lower extraction time than SBSE and easier post-extraction treatment than DSPE, while TD allows for an effective and solvent-free injection of the entire quantity of desorbed analytes into GC-MS, and thus achieving a high sensitivity. The main parameters involved in TD, as well as the extraction time, were evaluated. Under the optimized conditions, the method was successfully validated showing good linearity, limits of detection and quantification in the low ngL(-1) range and good intra- and inter-day repeatability (RSD<12%). This accurate and sensitive analytical method was applied to the determination of trace amounts of UV filters in three bathing water samples (river, sea and swimming pool) with satisfactory relative recovery values (80-116%). PMID:26592603

  11. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of synthetic musk fragrances in aqueous matrices by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Homem, Vera; Alves, Alice; Alves, Arminda; Santos, Lúcia

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and simple method for the simultaneous determination of twelve synthetic musks in water samples, using ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was successfully developed. The influence of seven factors (volume of the extraction solvent and disperser solvent, sample volume, extraction time, ionic strength, type of extraction and disperser solvent) affecting the UA-DLLME extraction efficiency was investigated using a screening design. The significant factors were selected and optimised employing a central composite design: 80?L of chloroform, 880?L of acetonitrile, 6mL of sample volume, 3.5% (wt) of NaCl and 2min of extraction time. Under the optimised conditions, this methodology was successfully validated for the analysis of 12 synthetic musk compounds in different aqueous samples (tap, sea and river water, effluent and influent wastewater). The proposed method showed enrichment factors between 101 and 115 depending on the analyte, limits of detection in the range of 0.004-54ngL(-1) and good repeatability (most relative standard deviation values below 10%). No significant matrix effects were found, since recoveries ranged between 71% and 118%. Finally, the method was satisfactorily applied to the analysis of five different aqueous samples. Results demonstrated the existence of a larger amount of synthetic musks in wastewaters than in other water samples (average concentrations of 2800ngL(-1) in influent and 850ngL(-1) in effluent). Galaxolide, tonalide and exaltolide were the compounds most detected. PMID:26653427

  12. Traditional sampling with laboratory analysis and solid phase microextraction sampling with field gas chromatography/mass spectrometry by military industrial hygienists.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip A; Kluchinsky, Timothy A; Savage, Paul B; Erickson, Richard P; Lee, Arthur P; Williams, Kenneth; Stevens, Michael; Thomas, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the United States Department of Defense or the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Rapid on-site detection and identification of environmental contaminants to which personnel may be exposed is often needed during military deployment situations. The availability of military industrial hygienists with capabilities for "complete" on-site exposure assessment of chemical species should allow detection and identification of a number of important stressors almost immediately following sample collection. Portable gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) provides a rapid and efficient separation of volatile and semivolatile organic analytes, accompanied by sensitive electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) detection. The use of GC/MS in the field is limited, however, by equipment cost, complexity of the equipment, and the analytical process. Additionally, a skilled operator is needed to obtain useful separations and to interpret mass spectral data. To demonstrate benefits and limitations of "complete" exposure assessment capabilities, a previously unidentified complex mixture, produced by thermal dispersion of riot control agents, was examined. Established active sampling methods were used with laboratory analyses. Solid phase microextraction, a passive sampling method that simplifies preparation for GC/MS analysis, also was used with a field-portable GC/MS system. Both sampling/analysis methods were used to detect CS riot control agent-derived air contaminants dispersed from riot control type canisters through oxidizer-supported combustion of a chemical fuel. PMID:12173177

  13. Highly sensitive determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air dust by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after molecularly imprinted polymer extraction.

    PubMed

    Krupadam, Reddithota J; Bhagat, Bhagyashree; Khan, Muntazir S

    2010-08-01

    A method based on solid--phase extraction with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) has been developed to determine five probable human carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air dust by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Molecularly imprinted poly(vinylpyridine-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) was chosen as solid-phase extraction (SPE) material for PAHs. The conditions affecting extraction efficiency, for example surface properties, concentration of PAHs, and equilibration times were evaluated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, pre-concentration factors for MIP-SPE ranged between 80 and 93 for 10 mL ambient air dust leachate. PAHs recoveries from MIP-SPE after extraction from air dust were between 85% and 97% and calibration graphs of the PAHs showed a good linearity between 10 and 1000 ng L(-1) (r = 0.99). The extraction efficiency of MIP for PAHs was compared with that of commercially available SPE materials--powdered activated carbon (PAC) and polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin (XAD)--and it was shown that the extraction capacity of the MIP was better than that of the other two SPE materials. Organic matter in air dust had no effect on MIP extraction, which produced a clean extract for GC-MS analysis. The detection limit of the method proposed in this article is 0.15 ng L(-1) for benzo[a]pyrene, which is a marker molecule of air pollution. The method has been applied to the determination of probable carcinogenic PAHs in air dust of industrial zones and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:20526768

  14. Improved quantification of livestock associated odorous volatile organic compounds in a standard flow-through system using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuyan; Zhu, Wenda; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Jenks, William S; Laor, Yael; Leeuwen, J Hans van; Hoff, Steven J

    2015-10-01

    Aerial emissions of odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are an important nuisance factor from livestock production systems. Reliable air sampling and analysis methods are needed to develop and test odor mitigation technologies. Quantification of VOCs responsible for livestock odor remains an analytical challenge due to physicochemical properties of VOCs and the requirement for low detection thresholds. A new air sampling and analysis method was developed for testing of odor/VOCs mitigation in simulated livestock emissions system. A flow-through standard gas generating system simulating odorous VOCs in livestock barn emissions was built on laboratory scale and tested to continuously generate ten odorous VOCs commonly defining livestock odor. Standard VOCs included sulfur VOCs (S-VOCs), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), and p-cresol. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was optimized for sampling of diluted odorous gas mixtures in the moving air followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. CAR/PDMS 85?m fiber was shown to have the best sensitivity for the target odorous VOCs. A practical 5-min sampling time was selected to ensure optimal extraction of VFAs and p-cresol, as well as minimum displacement of S-VOCs. Method detection limits ranged from 0.39 to 2.64ppbv for S-VOCs, 0.23 to 0.77ppbv for VFAs, and 0.31ppbv for p-cresol. The method developed was applied to quantify VOCs and odorous VOC mitigation with UV light treatment. The measured concentrations ranged from 20.1 to 815ppbv for S-VOCs, 10.3 to 315ppbv for VFAs, and 4.73 to 417ppbv for p-cresol. Relative standard deviations between replicates ranged from 0.67% to 12.9%, 0.50% to 11.4%, 0.83% to 5.14% for S-VOCs, VFAs, and p-cresol, respectively. This research shows that a simple manual SPME sampler could be used successfully for quantification of important classes of odorous VOCs at concentrations relevant for real aerial emissions from livestock operations. PMID:26456221

  15. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Sediment and Soil by Pressurized Solvent Extraction, Solid-Phase Extraction, and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 61 compounds in environmental sediment and soil samples is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater and wastewater-impacted sediment on aquatic organisms. This method also may be used to evaluate the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water and sediment quality of urban streams. Method development focused on the determination of compounds that were chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from interfering matrix components by high-pressure water/isopropyl alcohol extraction. The compounds were isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing chemically modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. The cartridges were dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds were eluted with methylene chloride (80 percent)-diethyl ether (20 percent) through Florisil/sodium sulfate SPE cartridge, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-sand samples fortified at 4 to 72 micrograms averaged 76 percent ?13 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method reporting levels for single-component compounds ranged from 50 to 500 micrograms per kilogram. The concentrations of 20 out of 61 compounds initially will be reported as estimated with the 'E' remark code for one of three reasons: (1) unacceptably low-biased recovery (less than 60 percent) or highly variable method performance (greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation), (2) reference standards prepared from technical mixtures, or (3) potential blank contamination. Samples were preserved by freezing to -20 degrees Celsius. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory has established a 1-year sample-holding time limit (prior to sample extraction) from the date of sample collection (if the sample is kept at -20?C) until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of the sample-freezing procedure.

  16. The use of molecular-statistical methods for the calculation of thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption for identification of organic compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Alexey K.

    2002-08-01

    The current state of research on the theoretical description of adsorption in the Henry region by semiempirical molecular-statistical procedures, as applied to identification of organic compounds in complex mixtures, is considered. Various approaches to correcting the atom-atom potential parameters used to determine thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption are compared. Examples of calculations involved in the chromatographic and chromatography-mass spectrometric identification of model and real organic compounds including isomers are given. The bibliography includes 89 references.

  17. Determination of a wide range of volatile organic compounds in ambient air using multisorbent adsorption/thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankow, J.F.; Luo, W.; Isabelle, L.M.; Bender, D.A.; Baker, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Adsorption/thermal desorption with multisorbent air-sampling cartridges was developed for the determination of 87 method analytes including halogenated alkanes, halogenated alkenes, ethers, alcohols, nitriles, esters, ketones, aromatics, a disulfide, and a furan. The volatilities of the compounds ranged from that of dichlorofluoromethane (CFC12) to that of 1,2,3- trichlorobenzene. The eight most volatile compounds were determined using a 1.5-L air sample and a sample cartridge containing 50 mg of Carbotrap B and 280 mg of Carboxen 1000; the remaining 79 compounds were determined using a 5-L air sample and a cartridge containing 180 mg of Carbotrap B and 70 mg of Carboxen 1000. Analysis and detection were by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The minimum detectable level (MDL) concentration values ranged from 0.01 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for chlorobenzene to 0.4 ppbv for bromomethane; most of the MDL values were in the range 0.02-0.06 ppbv. No breakthrough was detected with the prescribed sample volumes. Analyte stability on the cartridges was very good. Excellent recoveries were obtained with independent check standards. Travel spike recoveries ranged from 90 to 110% for 72 of the 87 compounds. The recoveries were less than 70% for bromomethane and chloroethene and for a few compounds such as methyl acetate that are subject to losses by hydrolysis; the lowest travel spike recovery was obtained for bromomethane (62%). Blank values for all compounds were either below detection or very low. Ambient atmospheric sampling was conducted in New Jersey from April to December, 1997. Three sites characterized by low, moderate, and high densities of urbanization/traffic were sampled. The median detected concentrations of the compounds were either similar at all three sites (as with the chlorofluorocarbon compounds) or increased with the density of urbanization/traffic (as with dichloromethane, MTBE, benzene, and toluene). For toluene, the median detected concentrations were 0.23, 0.42, and 0.70 ppbv at the three sites. Analytical precision was measured using duplicate sampling. As expected, the precision deteriorated with decreasing concentration. At concentrations greater than 0.2 ppbv, most duplicates differed by less than 20%; below the MDL values, the differences between the duplicates were larger, but they were still typically less than 40%.

  18. PyMS: a Python toolkit for processing of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data. Application and comparative study of selected tools

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a technique frequently used in targeted and non-targeted measurements of metabolites. Most existing software tools for processing of raw instrument GC-MS data tightly integrate data processing methods with graphical user interface facilitating interactive data processing. While interactive processing remains critically important in GC-MS applications, high-throughput studies increasingly dictate the need for command line tools, suitable for scripting of high-throughput, customized processing pipelines. Results PyMS comprises a library of functions for processing of instrument GC-MS data developed in Python. PyMS currently provides a complete set of GC-MS processing functions, including reading of standard data formats (ANDI- MS/NetCDF and JCAMP-DX), noise smoothing, baseline correction, peak detection, peak deconvolution, peak integration, and peak alignment by dynamic programming. A novel common ion single quantitation algorithm allows automated, accurate quantitation of GC-MS electron impact (EI) fragmentation spectra when a large number of experiments are being analyzed. PyMS implements parallel processing for by-row and by-column data processing tasks based on Message Passing Interface (MPI), allowing processing to scale on multiple CPUs in distributed computing environments. A set of specifically designed experiments was performed in-house and used to comparatively evaluate the performance of PyMS and three widely used software packages for GC-MS data processing (AMDIS, AnalyzerPro, and XCMS). Conclusions PyMS is a novel software package for the processing of raw GC-MS data, particularly suitable for scripting of customized processing pipelines and for data processing in batch mode. PyMS provides limited graphical capabilities and can be used both for routine data processing and interactive/exploratory data analysis. In real-life GC-MS data processing scenarios PyMS performs as well or better than leading software packages. We demonstrate data processing scenarios simple to implement in PyMS, yet difficult to achieve with many conventional GC-MS data processing software. Automated sample processing and quantitation with PyMS can provide substantial time savings compared to more traditional interactive software systems that tightly integrate data processing with the graphical user interface. PMID:22647087

  19. Investigation of characterization method for nanoparticles in roadside atmosphere by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a pyrolyzer.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Shinji

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric nanoparticles (<0.050 microm) have caused great concern recently due to their potential to affect human health. However, little is known about the chemical composition, sources, and atmospheric behavior of atmospheric nanoparticles. Although gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after solvent extraction is a commonly used and powerful method for the identification of nonpolar organic compounds in particles, solvent-extraction methods are difficult to apply to nanoparticles because nanoparticles are present in small masses in spite of their high number concentrations. Therefore, we made an attempt to apply thermal desorption-GC/MS (TD-GC/MS), which was expected to be more sensitive than solvent-extraction methods, to atmospheric nanoparticles. A commercial pyrolyzer was used for TD. Prior to the application, the optimum TD-GC/MS conditions for atmospheric particles and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) collected on filters were investigated. Various TD parameters, including desorption time and temperature, were investigated using these test samples and a n-alkanes standard solution. The optimum TD conditions were as follows: ramped desorption from 50 degrees C to 450 degrees C at 50 degrees C min(-1) and then hold for 2 min. Desorption was incomplete at temperatures of 250 degrees C or lower, and considerable pyrolysis occurred at temperatures of 550 degrees C or higher. The TD-GC/MS performance, including the linearity of the calibration curves, repeatability, detection and quantification limits, and sample recovery, under the optimized conditions was evaluated for n-alkanes. It was found that the TD-GC/MS could be applied to extremely small amount of particles (e.g., 5 microg for DEP). The TD-GC/MS was applied to the size-resolved particles, including the nanoparticle fraction (0.0290-0.0580 microm), from roadside atmosphere, and the concentrations of C18-C33 n-alkanes in the particles were determined. The chromatogram pattern of the roadside 0.102-0.163 microm (major size range for DEP) particles was similar to that of the DEP sample. The chromatogram pattern of the roadside nanoparticles was similar to that of diesel lubricating oil, although the proportion of less volatile compounds was slightly larger in the nanoparticles. It is suggested that lubricating oil strongly contributed to the nonpolar organic composition of the roadside nanoparticles, and that more volatile organic compounds in the nanoparticles evaporated in the atmosphere. It was shown that the TD-GC/MS is effective for characterization of atmospheric nanoparticles. PMID:17590418

  20. Combined quantification of faecal sterols, stanols, stanones and bile acids in soils and terrestrial sediments by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Birk, Jago Jonathan; Dippold, Michaela; Wiesenberg, Guido L B; Glaser, Bruno

    2012-06-15

    Faeces incorporation can alter the concentration patterns of stanols, stanones, ?(5)-sterols and bile acids in soils and terrestrial sediments. A joint quantification of these substances would give robust and specific information about the faecal input. Therefore, a method was developed for their purification and determination via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based on a total lipid extract (TLE) of soils and terrestrial sediments. Stanols, stanones, ?(5)-steroles and bile acids were extracted by a single Soxhlet extraction yielding a TLE. The TLE was saponified with KOH in methanol. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction was applied to recover the biomarkers from the saponified extract and to separate the bile acids from the neutral stanoles, stanones and ?(5)-steroles. The neutral fraction was directly purified using solid phase extraction (SPE) columns packed with 5% deactivated silica gel. The bile acids were methylated in dry HCl in methanol and purified on SPE columns packed with activated silica gel. A mixture of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) and pyridine was used to silylate the hydroxyl groups of the stanols and ?(5)-sterols avoiding a silylation of the keto groups of the stanones in their enol-form. Silylation of the bile acids was carried out with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing N-trimethylsilylimidazole (TSIM). TLEs from a set of soils with different physico-chemical properties were used for method evaluation and for comparison of amounts of faecal biomarkers analysed with saponification and without saponification of the TLE. Therefore, a Regosol, a Podzol and a Ferralsol were sampled. To proof the applicability of the method for faecal biomarker analyses in archaeological soils and sediments, additional samples were taken from pre-Columbian Anthrosols in Amazonia and an Anthrosol from a site in central Europe settled since the Neolithic. The comparison of the amounts of steroids in combination with and without saponification of the TLE showed that high amounts of faecal biomarkers occur bound to other lipids and were liberated by saponification. The method was evaluated by standard addition. The standard contained 5?-stanols, 5?-stanones and their 5?-isomers together with ?(5)-sterols and bile acids (19 substances). The standard addition revealed mean recoveries of individual substances ?85%. The recoveries of biomarkers within each biomarker group did not differ significantly. Precisions were ?0.22 (RSD) and quantification limits were between 1.3 and 10 ng g(-1) soil. These data showed that the method can be applied for quantification of trace amounts of faecal steroids and for the analyses of steroid patterns to detect enhanced faeces deposition in soils and sediments. PMID:22560452

  1. On-line monitoring of benzene air concentrations while driving in traffic by means of isotopic dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davoli, E; Cappellini, L; Moggi, M; Ferrari, S; Fanelli, R

    1996-01-01

    There is no shortage of information about the average benzene concentrations in urban air, but there is very little about microenvironmental exposure, such as in-vehicle concentrations while driving in various traffic conditions, while refuelling, or while in a parking garage. The main reason for this lack of data is that no analytical instrumentation has been available to measure on-line trace amounts of benzene in such situations. We have recently proposed a highly accurate, high-speed cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system for monitoring benzene concentrations in air. Accuracy of the analytical data is achieved by enrichment of the air sample before trapping, with a stable isotope permeation tube system. The same principles have been applied to a new instrument, specifically designed for operation on an electric vehicle (Ducato Elettra, Fiat). The zero emission vehicle and the fully transportable, battery-operated GC/MS system provide a unique possibility of monitoring benzene exposure in real everyday situations such as while driving, refuelling, or repairing a car. All power consumptions have been reduced so as to achieve a battery-operated GC/MS system. Liquid nitrogen cryofocusing has been replaced by a packed, inductively heated, graphitized charcoal microtrap. The instrument has been mounted on shock absorbers and installed in the van. The whole system has been tested in both fixed and mobile conditions. The maximum monitoring period without external power supply is 6 h. The full analytical cycle is 4 min, allowing close to real-time monitoring, and the minimum detectable level is 1 microgram/m3 for benzene. In-vehicle monitoring showed that, when recirculation was off and ventilation on, i.e., air from outside the vehicle was blown inside, concentrations varied widely in different driving conditions: moving from a parking lot into normal traffic on an urban traffic condition roadway yielded an increase in benzene concentration from 17 to 62.3 micrograms/m3 even if the actual distance was small. A larger increase was observed when a car was left with the engine running at a distance 2 m from the zero emission vehicle: We measured an increment of benzene concentrations from 15.2 to 174.4 micrograms/m3 with a car equipped with a catalytic converter, and from 19.1 to 386.3 micrograms/m3 with a car without such a converter. PMID:8738357

  2. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - determination of organonitrogen herbicides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Wydoski, Duane S.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Zamboni, Jana L.; Foreman, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the isolation of organonitrogen herbicides from natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction cartridges containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to remove the herbicides. The cartridges are dried using carbon dioxide, and adsorbed herbicides are removed from the cartridges by elution with 1.8 milliliters of hexaneisopropanol (3:1). Extracts of the eluants are analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of at least three characteristic ions. The method detection limits are dependent on sample matrix and each particular herbicide. The method detection limits, based on a 100-milliliter sample size, range from 0.02 to 0.25 microgram per liter. Recoveries averaged 80 to 115 percent for the 23 herbicides and 2 metabolites in 1 reagent-water and 2 natural-water samples fortified at levels of 0.2 and 2.0 micrograms per liter.

  3. Radiation Metabolomics. 3. Biomarker Discovery in the Urine of Gamma-Irradiated Rats Using a Simplified Metabolomics Protocol of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Combined with Random Forests Machine Learning Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Christian; Patterson, Andrew D.; Slavík, Josef; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Ledermann, Monika; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation metabolomics employing mass spectral technologies represents a plausible means of high-throughput minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. A simplified metabolomics protocol is described that employs ubiquitous gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and open source software including random forests machine learning algorithm to uncover latent biomarkers of 3 Gy ? radiation in rats. Urine was collected from six male Wistar rats and six sham-irradiated controls for 7 days, 4 prior to irradiation and 3 after irradiation. Water and food consumption, urine volume, body weight, and sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, phosphate and urea excretion showed major effects from exposure to ? radiation. The metabolomics protocol uncovered several urinary metabolites that were significantly up-regulated (glyoxylate, threonate, thymine, uracil, p-cresol) and down-regulated (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, adipate, pimelate, suberate, azelaate) as a result of radiation exposure. Thymine and uracil were shown to derive largely from thymidine and 2?-deoxyuridine, which are known radiation biomarkers in the mouse. The radiation metabolomic phenotype in rats appeared to derive from oxidative stress and effects on kidney function. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a promising platform on which to develop the field of radiation metabolomics further and to assist in the design of instrumentation for use in detecting biological consequences of environmental radiation release. PMID:19630524

  4. Radiation metabolomics. 3. Biomarker discovery in the urine of gamma-irradiated rats using a simplified metabolomics protocol of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with random forests machine learning algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Christian; Patterson, Andrew D; Slavík, Josef; Krausz, Kristopher W; Ledermann, Monika; Gonzalez, Frank J; Idle, Jeffrey R

    2009-08-01

    Abstract Radiation metabolomics employing mass spectral technologies represents a plausible means of high-throughput minimally invasive radiation biodosimetry. A simplified metabolomics protocol is described that employs ubiquitous gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and open source software including random forests machine learning algorithm to uncover latent biomarkers of 3 Gy gamma radiation in rats. Urine was collected from six male Wistar rats and six sham-irradiated controls for 7 days, 4 prior to irradiation and 3 after irradiation. Water and food consumption, urine volume, body weight, and sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, phosphate and urea excretion showed major effects from exposure to gamma radiation. The metabolomics protocol uncovered several urinary metabolites that were significantly up-regulated (glyoxylate, threonate, thymine, uracil, p-cresol) and down-regulated (citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, adipate, pimelate, suberate, azelaate) as a result of radiation exposure. Thymine and uracil were shown to derive largely from thymidine and 2'-deoxyuridine, which are known radiation biomarkers in the mouse. The radiation metabolomic phenotype in rats appeared to derive from oxidative stress and effects on kidney function. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a promising platform on which to develop the field of radiation metabolomics further and to assist in the design of instrumentation for use in detecting biological consequences of environmental radiation release. PMID:19630524

  5. Novel and rapid method for determination of organophosphorus pesticide residues in edible fungus using direct gas purge microsyringe extraction coupled on-line with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nan, Jingxi; Wang, Juan; Piao, Xiangfan; Yang, Cui; Wu, Xue; Quinto, Maurizio; Li, Donghao

    2015-09-01

    In this work a new analytical method for a rapid and simultaneous determination of 28 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) residues in edible fungus using gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE), coupled with on-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GP-MSE-GC-MS) has been developed and optimized. GP-MSE, a novel gas flow liquid-phase microextraction technique, has been then fruitfully used as innovative and one-step extraction procedure, allowing a direct injection into the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometry detector (GC-MS) system without any further cleaning step. Once optimized, the GP-MSE-GC-MS analysis procedure showed reproducibility values, resolutions, linear responses, detection and quantification limits that allowed to consider this method suitable for the analysis of the 28 OPPs in real samples. Furthermore, OPP recoveries and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 85.26% to 100.21%, and from 1.6% to 6.9%, respectively. This procedure was then used for the analysis of real samples and the obtained results were compared with those of ultrasonic extraction-solid phase extraction. Among the 28 OPPs, 14 of them were found in Lentinus edodes and Enoki mushrooms fungus samples, with a total concentrations of 112.7 and 210.7 ?g kg(-1), respectively. This work demonstrated then that GP-MSE-GC-MS provided a highly efficient, solvent-saving, accurate and sensitive quantitative analysis method for a rapid determination of OPPs in edible fungus. PMID:26003693

  6. Advances in Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry & Lab Automation

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    #12;Advances in Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry & Lab Automation 2 Publisher's Note Kevin Davies&EN Media Group 4 Top Ten Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry, and Lab Automation Papers APPLICATION NOTES 10 Detection Of Methylmalonic Acid (MMA) In Plasma Using Hydro- philic Interaction Liquid Chromatography (HILIC

  7. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of vetiver essential oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Belhassen, Emilie; Baldovini, Nicolas; Brevard, Hugues; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2013-05-01

    Vetiver essential oils (VEO) are important raw ingredients used in perfume industry, entering the formula of numerous modern fragrances. Vetiver oils are considered to be among the most complex essential oils, resulting most of the time in highly coeluted chromatograms whatever the analytical technique. In this context, conventional gas chromatography has failed to provide a routine tool for the accurate qualitative and quantitative analysis of their constituents. Applying comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography techniques (GC×GC-FID/MS) afforded the mean to separate efficiently vetiver oil constituents in order to identify them in a more reliable way. Moreover, this is the first time that a complete true quantitation of each constituent is carried out on such complex oils by means of internal calibration. Finally, we have studied the influence of the injection mode on the determined chemical composition, and showed that several alcohols underwent dehydration under defined chromatographic conditions (splitless mode) usually recommended for quantitation purposes. PMID:23522261

  8. Assessment of the chemical changes during storage of phenol-formaldehyde resins pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry, inverse gas chromatography and Fourier transform infra red methods.

    PubMed

    Strzemiecka, B; Voelkel, A; Zi?ba-Palus, J; Lachowicz, T

    2014-09-12

    The chemical changes occurring in the phenol-formaldehyde resins (resol and novolac type) during their storage were investigated. In this paper the FT-IR, py-GCMS and inverse gas chromatography methods were applied for assessment of the changes occurring during storage of the phenolic resins. We have found that during storage some examined resins occurred partial curing. The results from all techniques applied are consistent. Py-GCMS is useful technique for screening the storage processes but IGC seems to be most sensitive one. PMID:25092596

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Smith, Steven G.; Fehlberg, Kevin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 41 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in natural-water samples using C-18 solid-phase extraction and determination by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the pesticides. The columns are dried using carbon dioxide or nitrogen gas, and adsorbed pesticides are removed from the columns by elution with 3.0 milliliters of hexane-isopropanol (3:1). Extracted pesticides are determined by capillary- column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 4 micrograms per liter (g/L) for most pesticides, with the exception of widely used corn herbicides--atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor--which have upper concentration limits of 20 g/L. Single- operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.001 to 0.018 g/L. Average short-term single-operator precision in reagent- water samples is 7 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 8 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. Mean recoveries in reagent-water samples are 73 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 83 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on the solid-phase extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time.

  10. Analysis and quantitation of volatile organic compounds emitted from plastics used in museum construction by evolved gas analysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Samide, Michael J; Smith, Gregory D

    2015-12-24

    Construction materials used in museums for the display, storage, and transportation of artwork must be assessed for their tendency to emit harmful pollution that could potentially damage cultural treasures. Traditionally, a subjective metals corrosion test known as the Oddy test has been widely utilized in museums for this purpose. To augment the Oddy test, an instrumental sampling approach based on evolved gas analysis (EGA) coupled to gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectral (MS) detection has been implemented for the first time to qualitatively identify off-gassed pollutants under specific conditions. This approach is compared to other instrumental methods reported in the literature. This novel application of the EGA sampling technique yields several benefits over traditional testing, including rapidity, high sensitivity, and broad detectability of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Furthermore, unlike other reported instrumental approaches, the EGA method was used to determine quantitatively the amount of VOCs emitted by acetate resins and polyurethane foams under specific conditions using both an external calibration method as well as surrogate response factors. EGA was successfully employed to rapidly characterize emissions from 12 types of common plastics. This analysis is advocated as a rapid pre-screening method to rule out poorly performing materials prior to investing time and energy in Oddy testing. The approach is also useful for rapid, routine testing of construction materials previously vetted by traditional testing, but which may experience detrimental formulation changes over time. As an example, a case study on batch re-orders of rigid expanded poly(vinyl chloride) board stock is presented. PMID:26687162

  11. Development and validation of an automated static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SHS-GC-MS) method for monitoring the formation of ethyl methane sulfonate from ethanol and methane sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Jacq, Karine; Delaney, Ed; Teasdale, Andrew; Eyley, Steve; Taylor-Worth, Karen; Lipczynski, Andrew; Reif, Van D; Elder, David P; Facchine, Kevin L; Golec, Simon; Oestrich, Rolf Schulte; Sandra, Pat; David, Frank

    2008-12-15

    An automated sample preparation and analysis procedure was developed to monitor the formation of ethyl methane sulfonate from reaction mixtures containing ethanol and methane sulfonic acid. The system is based on a liquid handling robot combined with a static headspace module. The formed ethyl methane sulfonate is analysed after derivatisation with pentafluorothiophenol using static headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SHS-GC-MS). Using the automated reaction-derivatisation-headspace GC-MS system, the formation of ethyl methane sulfonate can be monitored in different reaction mixtures under different reaction conditions, including temperature, water content and pH. Excellent linearity, repeatability and robustness were obtained, allowing the system to be used in kinetic studies. PMID:18996665

  12. Aroma active volatiles in four southern highbush blueberry cultivars determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaofen; Rouseff, Russell

    2014-05-21

    Aroma active volatiles in four southern highbush blueberry cultivars ('Prima Dona', 'Jewel', 'Snow Chaser', and 'Kestrel') were determined using solid phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and identified via GC-PFPD and GC-MS using retention indices of reference compounds and mass spectral data. The aromas of total, unseparated SPME extracts evaluated using GC-O were rated 8.2-9.0/10 for the four cultivars in terms of similarity to the original blueberry homogenates. In terms of GC-O aroma similarity, those aroma active volatile groups characterized as green, fruity, and floral were most intense. Of the 43 volatiles found to have aroma activity, 38 were identified and 13 had not been previously reported in blueberries. Although linalool and (E)-2-hexenal were common major aroma impact volatiles, dominant aroma-active volatiles were different for each cultivar. Principal component analysis confirmed that each cultivar possessed a unique aroma active profile as each cultivar was clustered into a separate score plot quadrant. PMID:24758568

  13. Cross validation of gas chromatography-flame photometric detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for measuring dialkylphosphate metabolites of organophosphate pesticides in human urine.

    PubMed

    Prapamontol, Tippawan; Sutan, Kunrunya; Laoyang, Sompong; Hongsibsong, Surat; Lee, Grace; Yano, Yukiko; Hunter, Ronald Elton; Ryan, P Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd; Panuwet, Parinya

    2014-01-01

    We report two analytical methods for the measurement of dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites of organophosphate pesticides in human urine. These methods were independently developed/modified and implemented in two separate laboratories and cross validated. The aim was to develop simple, cost effective, and reliable methods that could use available resources and sample matrices in Thailand and the United States. While several methods already exist, we found that direct application of these methods required modification of sample preparation and chromatographic conditions to render accurate, reliable data. The problems encountered with existing methods were attributable to urinary matrix interferences, and differences in the pH of urine samples and reagents used during the extraction and derivatization processes. Thus, we provide information on key parameters that require attention during method modification and execution that affect the ruggedness of the methods. The methods presented here employ gas chromatography (GC) coupled with either flame photometric detection (FPD) or electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) with isotopic dilution quantification. The limits of detection were reported from 0.10ng/mL urine to 2.5ng/mL urine (for GC-FPD), while the limits of quantification were reported from 0.25ng/mL urine to 2.5ng/mL urine (for GC-MS), for all six common DAP metabolites (i.e., dimethylphosphate, dimethylthiophosphate, dimethyldithiophosphate, diethylphosphate, diethylthiophosphate, and diethyldithiophosphate). Each method showed a relative recovery range of 94-119% (for GC-FPD) and 92-103% (for GC-MS), and relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 20%. Cross-validation was performed on the same set of urine samples (n=46) collected from pregnant women residing in the agricultural areas of northern Thailand. The results from split sample analysis from both laboratories agreed well for each metabolite, suggesting that each method can produce comparable data. In addition, results from analyses of specimens from the German External Quality Assessment Scheme (G-EQUAS) suggested that the GC-FPD method produced accurate results that can be reasonably compared to other studies. PMID:24280209

  14. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity, Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Woodfordia fruticosa Kurz. Leaf Extract and Host Toxicity Testing With In Vitro Cultured Lymphocytes From Human Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Debasmita; Patnaik, Rajashree; Ghosh, Goutam; Padhy, Rabindra N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To locate a plant with suitable phytochemicals for use as antimicrobial agents to control multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria as a complementary medicine, without host toxicity as monitored through cultured lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood. Methods The methanol crude leaf extract of the plant Woodfordia fruticosa was subjected to antimicrobial assay in vitro with nine pathogenic MDR bacteria from clinical samples. This was followed by bioassay-guided fractionation with seven non-polar to polar solvents, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis of the n-butanol fraction, and monitoring of the host toxicity of the leaf extract with in vitro grown lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood. Results The leaf extract of W. fruticosa had a controlling capacity for MDR bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of the n-butanol fraction were < 1.89 mg/mL extract and 9.63 mg/mL extract, respectively. The gas chromatography–mass spectrometry spectrum of the n-butanol fraction confirmed the presence of 13 peaks of different compounds with retention times of 9.11 minutes, 9.72 minutes, 10.13 minutes, 10.78 minutes, 12.37 minutes, 12.93 minutes, 18.16 minutes, 21.74 minutes, 21.84 minutes, 5.96 minutes, 12.93 minutes, 24.70 minutes, and 25.76 minutes. The six leading compounds were: diethyl phthalate: IUPAC name: diethyl benzene-1,2-dicarboxylate; 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl) phenol: IUPAC name: 5-methyl-2-propan-2-ylphenol; (E )-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1-thiol: IUPAC name: (2Z)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1-thiol; 2,6,10-dodecatrien-1-ol, 3,7,11-trimethyl-, (E,E ): IUPAC name: 2,6,10-dodecatrien-1-ol; 3,7,11-trimethyl-, (E,E); 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl) phenol: IUPAC name: 2-methoxy-4-[(1E)-prop-1-en-1-yl]phenol; hexadecanoic acid: IUPAC name: hexadecanoic acid. Conclusion The presence of antimicrobial compounds that are therapeutically potent against MDR bacteria was confirmed in W. fruticosa. The crude leaf extract showed no host toxicity with human lymphocytes; the n-butanol fraction of the extract was the most suitable bioactive fraction. The terpenes isolated were: 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl) phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl) phenol, 2,6-octadien-1-ol, 3,7-dimethyl-(E)-2,6-octadienal, 3,7-dimethylcyclohexanol, and cyclohexanol, 2-methylene-5-(1-methylethenyl) which were reported to have specifically antimicrobial activity. PMID:25389517

  15. Analysis of enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in plant emissions using portable dynamic air sampling/solid-phase microextraction (PDAS-SPME) and chiral gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Williams, Jonathan

    A portable dynamic air sampler (PDAS) using a porous polymer solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibre has been validated for the determination of biogenic enantiomeric and non-enantiomeric monoterpenes in air. These compounds were adsorbed in the field, and then thermally desorbed at 250 °C in a gas chromatograph injector port connected via a ?-cyclodextrin capillary separating column to a mass spectrometer. The optimized method has been applied for investigating the emissions of enantiomeric monoterpenes from Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir), Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) and Lavandula lanata (Lavender) which were selected as representative of coniferous trees and aromatic plants, respectively. The enantiomers of ?-pinene, sabinene, camphene, ?-3-carene, ?-pinene, limonene, ?-phellandrene, 4-carene and camphor were successfully determined in the emissions from the three plants. While Douglas-fir showed a strong predominance toward (-)-enantiomers, Rosemary and Lavender demonstrated a large variation in enantiomeric distribution of monoterpenes. The simplicity, rapidity and sensitivity of dynamic sampling with porous polymer coated SPME fibres coupled to chiral capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) makes this method potentially useful for in-field investigations of atmosphere-biosphere interactions and studies of optically explicit atmospheric chemistry.

  16. Two suicidal fatalities due to the ingestion of chlorfenvinphos formulations: simultaneous determination of the pesticide and the petroleum distillates in tissues by gas chromatography-flame-ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María A; Ballesteros, Salomé

    2012-01-01

    Chlorfenvinphos (CFVP) is an organophosporus insecticide designated as a threat agent by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). However, there are very few reported cases of poisonings in humans and none with postmortem toxicological analysis. We report the first two fatalities due to suicidal massive ingestion of a veterinary formulation containing CFVP and petroleum distillates. Case 1: A 24-year-old woman was found dead by her mother. According to the police records, the room was filled with an odor of solvents or pesticides and feces. There was an empty bottle of Supona(®) near the body and a suicide note on a Bible on a table. The only relevant postmortem finding was that the lungs appeared congested and edematous. Case 2: A 60-year-old man committed in his van by ingesting an unknown product. The vehicle was locked and had an odor that resembled an acid, sulfate, or solvent according to different witnesses. There was a suicide note as well as multiple containers containing automobile products nearby. The stomach of the victim was filled with abundant pale greenish fluid with a similar odor to that presented in the vehicle. The simultaneous toxicological screening and quantitation of CFVP and petroleum distillates [a mixture of trimethylbenzene isomers (TMBs)] was performed by means of gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) and confirmation was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Disposition of CFVP and TMBs in different tissues were, respectively, as follows: Case 1: heart blood, 8.6 and 3.7 mg/L; liver, 60.0 and 33.4 mg/kg; and stomach contents, 1132 mg/L (792.4 mg total) and 377.0 mg/L (263.9 mg total). Case 2: heart blood, 4.4 and 6.5 mg/L; urine, 1.4 and detected (< LOQ); bile 7.8 and 12.2 mg/L; vitreous 0.3 mg/L and detected (< LOQ); liver, 139.2 and 172.1 mg/kg; and stomach contents, 76,168 mg/L (72,359 mg total) and 108,109 mg/L (102,703 mg total). Results of alcohol, other volatiles, abused and therapeutic drugs were negative in both cases. The proposed analytical method allows the simultaneous determination of a wide variety of pesticides and additives, including petroleum distillates suitable for toxicological investigation in forensic and clinical cases. This is crucial to solving poisoning cases in which the poisoning source is uncertain. PMID:22290752

  17. Pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of a series of buried woods and coalified logs that increase in rank from peat to subbituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, P.G.; Lerch, H.E. III; Verheyen, T.V.

    1987-04-01

    To better understand the coalification process, the authors have conducted numerous studies of the chemical structural composition of xylem tissue from gymnosperm wood and related woods that has been coalified to varying degrees. The studies presented in this paper examine the chemical nature of buried and coalified xylem tissue at the molecular level. To achieve this, the authors employed pyrolysis/gas chromatography (py/gc) and pyrolysis/gas chromotography/mass spectrometry (py/gc/ms). Pyrolysis techniques have been used to examine peat, coal, coalified wood, and related substances.

  18. Factors That Contribute to Assay Variation in Quantitative Analysis of Sex Steroid Hormones Using Liquid and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The list of physiological events in which sex steroids play a role continues to increase. To decipher the roles that sex steroids play in any condition requires high quality cohorts of samples and assays that provide highly accurate quantitative measures. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS and GC-MS) have…

  19. Quantification of trace O-containing compounds in GTL process samples via Fischer-Tropsch reaction by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Daniella R; Pereira, Vinícius B; Stelzer, Karen T; Gomes, Alexandre O; Neto, Francisco R Aquino; Azevedo, Débora A

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) was successfully applied to eight real Brazilian Fischer-Tropsch (FT) product samples for the quantitative analysis of O-containing compounds. It not only allowed identifying and quantifying simultaneously a large number of O-containing compounds but also resolved many co-eluting components, such as carboxylic acids, which co-elute in one-dimensional gas chromatography. The homologous series of alcohols and carboxylic acids as trimethylsilyl derivatives were detected and identified at trace levels. The absolute quantification of each compound was accomplished with reliability using analytical curves. Linear alcohols (from C5 to C19), branched alcohols (C6-C13) and carboxylic acids (C4 to C12) were obtained in the range of 1.58mgg(-1) to 14.75mgg(-)(1), 0.51mgg(-)(1) to 1.12mgg(-1) and 0.21mgg(-)(1) to 1.63mgg(-)(1) of FT product samples, respectively. GC×GC-TOFMS provided a linear range (from 0.3ngµL(-1) to 10ngµL(-1)), good precision (<8%), and excellent accuracy (recovery range of 77% to 118%) for quantification of individual O-containing compounds in FT product samples. The results can benefit the development of gas-to-liquid technologies from natural gas and guide the choice of an FT conversion process that generates clean products with higher added value. PMID:26452870

  20. Variability of matrix effects in liquid and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis of pesticide residues after QuEChERS sample preparation of different food crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC) coupled to sophisticated mass spectrometry (MS) instruments are among the most powerful analytical tools currently available to monitor pesticide residues in food, among other applications. However, both GC-MS and LC-MS are susceptible to matrix effects whi...

  1. NATURE OF UNRESOLVED COMPLEX MIXTURE IN SIZE-DISTRIBUTED EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL WOOD COMBUSTION AS MEASURED BY THERMAL DESORPTION-GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) in size resolved fine aerosol emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is examined. The aerosols are sorted by size in an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and subsequently analyzed by thermal desorbtion/gas chroma...

  2. DETECTION OF HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC TRACERS IN VEGETATION SMOKE SAMPLES BY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R823990)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography
    (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of
    complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds
    which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC
    columns. The combination of this technique wit...

  3. Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Activity of Chamaecyparis obtusa Leaf Extract against the HCT116 Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Line and Investigation of the Bioactive Compound by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Youn; Lee, Seul-Gi; Oh, Taek-Joo; Lim, Sa Rang; Kim, So-Hyun; Lee, Hong Jin; Kim, Young-Suk; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2015-01-01

    Chamaecyparis obtusa (CO) belongs to the Cupressaceae family, and it is found widely distributed in Japan and Korea. In this study, the anti-proliferative activities of the methanol and water extracts of CO leaves against a human colorectal cancer cell line (HCT116) were investigated. The methanol extract of CO leaves, at a concentration of 1.25 µg/mL, exhibited anti-proliferative activity against HCT116 cells, while displaying no cytotoxicity against Chang liver cells. Comparative global metabolite profiling was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with multivariate statistical analysis, and it was revealed that anthricin was the major compound contributing to the anti-proliferative activity. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases played a key role in the apoptotic effect of the methanol extract of CO leaves in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the methanol extract and anthricin derived from CO leaves might be useful in the development of medicines with anti-colorectal cancer activity. PMID:26445036

  4. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of geosmin and methylisoborneol in water using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Ziegler, A.C.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of two common odor-causing compounds in water, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, was modified and verified by the U.S. Geological Survey's Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas. The optimized method involves the extraction of odor-causing compounds from filtered water samples using a divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane cross-link coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. Detection of the compounds is accomplished using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Precision and accuracy were demonstrated using reagent-water, surface-water, and ground-water samples. The mean accuracies as percentages of the true compound concentrations from water samples spiked at 10 and 35 nanograms per liter ranged from 60 to 123 percent for geosmin and from 90 to 96 percent for 2-methylisoborneol. Method detection limits were 1.9 nanograms per liter for geosmin and 2.0 nanograms per liter for 2-methylisoborneol in 45-milliliter samples. Typically, concentrations of 30 and 10 nanograms per liter of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, respectively, can be detected by the general public. The calibration range for the method is equivalent to concentrations from 5 to 100 nanograms per liter without dilution. The method is valuable for acquiring information about the production and fate of these odor-causing compounds in water.

  5. Methods of analysis and quality-assurance practices of the U.S. Geological Survey organic laboratory, Sacramento, California; determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical method and quality-assurance practices were developed for a study of the fate and transport of pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Sacramento and San Joaquin River. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended parti- culate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide, and the pesticides were eluted with three 2-milliliter aliquots of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1). The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for analytes determined per 1,500-milliliter samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.047 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 47 to 89 percent for 12 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.05 and 0.26 microgram per liter. The method was modified to improve the pesticide recovery by reducing the sample volume to 1,000 milliliters. Internal standards were added to improve quantitative precision and accuracy. The analysis also was expanded to include a total of 21 pesticides. The method detection limits for 1,000-milliliter samples ranged from 0.022 to 0.129 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 38 to 128 percent for 21 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.10 and 0.75 microgram per liter.

  6. Construction and analysis of correlation networks based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry metabonomics data for lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and intervention with volatile oil from Angelica sinensis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yong-Li; Ji, Peng; Xue, Zi-Yu; Wei, Yan-Ming

    2015-10-13

    Angelica sinensis (AS) is a well-known important traditional Chinese medicine that yields a volatile oil with anti-inflammatory effects. However, the holistic therapeutic effects and the mechanism underlying such effects of the volatile oil of A. sinensis (VOAS) are not yet well understood. Here, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabonomic study was conducted to explore the significantly altered metabolites for better understanding of VOAS and to assess the integral efficacy of VOAS on a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation rat model. Principal component analysis was used to investigate the global metabonomic alterations and to evaluate the therapeutic effects of VOAS in rats. Clear separations were observed in the comparison of the metabolite profiles of the normal control (NC) group, the LPS-stimulated group (MI), the VOAS group, and the dexamethasone (Dex) group. VOAS exerted therapeutic effects on the LPS-stimulated group, which were in accordance with the results of cytokine analyses and blood physiobiochemical assay. Furthermore, a total of 20, 17, and 22 metabolites distributed in 27 metabolic pathways were respectively identified in plasma, liver, and lung samples as significantly altered metabolites of MI, VOAS, Dex, and NC of the same background. Network analysis revealed that glycine, glutamate, malic acid, succinate, arachidonic acid, glycerol, galactose, and glucose were hub metabolites of the inflammation correlation network. Results indicated that VOAS exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect by adjusting the Krebs cycle, improving the glucose content, and restoring the fatty acid metabolism. PMID:26399193

  7. A validated procedure for detection and quantitation of salvinorin a in pericardial fluid, vitreous humor, whole blood and plasma using solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Margalho, Cláudia; Gallardo, Eugenia; Castanheira, Alice; Vieira, Duarte Nuno; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Real, Francisco Corte

    2013-08-23

    The use of vitreous humor and pericardial fluid as alternative matrices to blood and plasma in the field of forensic toxicology is described to quantitate low levels of Salvinorin A using ethion as internal standard. The method was optimized and fully validated using international accepted guidelines. The developed methodology utilizes a solid phase extraction procedure coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry operated in the selected ion monitoring mode. The method was linear in the range of 5.0-100ng/mL with determination coefficients higher than 0.99 in 100?L of vitreous humor and in 250?L of each matrix pericardial fluid, whole blood and plasma. The limits of detection and quantitation were experimentally determined as 5.0ng/mL, intra-day precision, intermediate precision and accuracy were in conformity with the criteria normally accepted in bioanalytical method validation. The sample cleanup step presented mean efficiencies between 80 and 106% in the different biological specimens analyzed. According to the low volumes of samples used, and the low limits achieved using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer, which is available in most laboratories, we can conclude that the validated methodology is sensitive and simple and is suitable for the application in forensic toxicology laboratories for the routine analysis of Salvinorin A in both conventional and unconventional biological samples. PMID:23871557

  8. [Determination of 30 organochlorine pesticides in animal-originated food products using combined purification by gel permeation chromatography and solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Lü, Bing; Zhu, Pan; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2013-08-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of 30 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in animal-originated food, including pork, chicken, fish and shrimp. The combined purification by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) were established by optimizing different fraction collection times. The detection conditions can be achieved by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using selective ion monitoring (SIM). Isotopic internal standards were used for the quantitative determination of the 30 OCPs. The sample pretreatment procedure was based on acetonitrile extraction and combined purification of GPC and Florisil SPE cartridge. The experimental results showed that the linear ranges for 30 OCPs were 5.0 - 500.0 microg/L, the correlation coefficients were better than 0.996, and the method detection limits (MDLs) of the 30 OCPs were 0.2 - 2.7 microg/kg. The spiked recoveries at three levels of 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 microg/kg using pork, chicken, fish and shrimp samples as blank matrices were in the range of 55.0% - 119.1%, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 0.4% - 15.0%. The method has the advantages of wide linear range, high sensitivity and efficient clean-up procedure, and consistent with the demand of pesticide routine analysis. PMID:24369606

  9. Influence of harvest maturity and fruit logistics on pineapple (Ananas comosus [L.] Merr.) volatiles assessed by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Steingass, Christof B; Grauwet, Tara; Carle, Reinhold

    2014-05-01

    Profiling of volatiles from pineapple fruits was performed at four ripening stages using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). In total, 142 volatiles were detected, of which 132 were identified. Multivariate data analysis was carried out to assess the effect of post-harvest storage on volatiles composition of green-ripe sea-freighted pineapple in comparison to air-freighted fruits harvested at full maturity. The latter fruits were characterised by volatiles described as potent odorants in pineapples, such as ?-octalactone, ?-lactones, 1-(E,Z)-3,5-undecatriene and 1,3,5,8-undecatetraene, as well as various methyl esters. In contrast, post-harvest storage of green-ripe sea-freighted fruits resulted in an increased formation of ethyl esters, acetates, acetoxy esters and alcohols, thus allowing the authentication of sea- and air-freighted pineapples, respectively. Particularly, compounds presumably derived from methyl-branched amino acid catabolism were identified in the fruits at later post-harvest stages. In addition, physicochemical traits were determined to characterise the fruit maturity stages. PMID:24360466

  10. Characterization and quantitative amino acids analysis of analgesic peptides in cinobufacini injection by size exclusion chromatography, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Si, Nan; Bo, Gao; Hu, Hao; Yang, Jian; Bian, Baolin; Zhao, Hai Yu; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Cinobufacini injection that comes from the water extract of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor skin is widely used for cancer treatment in China. Peptide is one of its major types of constituents, however the biological effects and content of this injection are little reported. In present study, the analgesic effect of peptides was determined and evaluated by in-vivo models. To characterize and quantitatively analyze these peptides, a reliable and efficient method combining size exclusion chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with amino acid analysis was developed. The peptides presented as a series of analogs with similar molecular weights mostly ranging from 2 to 8 kDa. The amino acid analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to determine both free and combined amino acids (FAA and CAA) in cinobufacini injection. This method achieved good linearity (R(2) , 0.9909-0.9999) and low limit of detection and quantification. FAA and CAA samples were efficiently analyzed by modified Phenomenex EZ: faast procedure. For the sample analysis, the method showed good repeatability (relative standard deviation, RSD???10%). For most FAA and CAA the mean recoveries were >80% with RSD <10%. The GC-MS based method is useful for quality assurance of both FAA and CAA in cinobufacini injection. PMID:24924921

  11. Detection of furan levels in select Chinese foods by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method and dietary exposure estimation of furan in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Sijia, Wu; Enting, Wang; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPMEGC/MS) method was developed to detection the levels of furan in 191 selected food products obtained from the Chinese markets. The performance of the analysis method was evaluated by some quality parameters such as limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), linearity, recovery, and runto-run (n=6) and day-to-day (n=18) precisions. The LOD and the LOQ of the method were 0.059 ng/g and 0.175 ng/g, respectively. The recovery of the method in fruit juice, canned jam, and infant formula ranged from 93.25% to 104.69%. The results from this study showed that furan was detected in almost all analyzed samples. Furan contents in different food samples varied greatly according to the raw materials and processing conditions. The higher contents of furan were detected in traditional Chinese liquor (61.63 ng/g), coffee (71.36 ng/g), tea (68.28 ng/g) and pickle (85.63 ng/g). The dietary intake of furan was estimated to be 0.093 ?g/kg b.w.t/day in adults and 0.333 ?g/kg b.w.t/day in infants at 6 months. Further studies are needed to reveal other sources of dietary furan exposure. PMID:24262489

  12. Simultaneous identification and quantification of the sugar, sugar alcohol, and carboxylic acid contents of sour cherry, apple, and ber fruits, as their trimethylsilyl derivatives, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Füzfai, Zsófia; Katona, Zsolt F; Kovács, Etelka; Molnár-Perl, Ibolya

    2004-12-15

    Our gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method--developed for the simultaneous quantitation of mono-, di-, and trisaccharides, sugar alcohols, caboxylic and amino acids, measured as their trimethylsilyl-(oxime) ether/ester derivatives, from one solution by a single injection, prepared in the presence of the fruit matrix--has been extended/utilized for special purposes. The compositions of (i) freshly harvested and stored sour cherries (Prunus cerasus), (ii) apples obtained from organic and integrated productions (Malus domestica), and (iii) green and ripe bers (Zizyphus mauritiana L.) were compared. On the basis of earlier, basic researches (derivatization, quantitation, and fragmentation studies of authentic compounds), we demonstrate the reproducible quantitation of the main and minor constituents in a wide concentration range (approximately 1 x 10(-)(3) to >/=40%, in total up to < or =98%, calculated on dry matter basis of the fruit matrices). Reproducibility of quantitations, calculated on the basis of their total ion current values, provided an average reproducibility of 3.3 (sour cherries), 6.2 (apple), and 4.3 (ber) RSD %, respectively. PMID:15675786

  13. Novel unbreakable solid-phase microextraction fibers on stainless steel wire and application for the determination of oxadiargyl in environmental and agricultural samples in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Es-Haghi, Ali; Baghernejad, Masoud; Bagheri, Habib

    2014-10-01

    Sol-gel based solid-phase microextraction fibers supported by a stainless steel wire were fabricated and employed for GC-MS determination of oxadiargyl in real samples. The fibers were based on four compounds with different polarity: polar and non-polar (end-capped) poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and poly(ethylene-propyleneglycol)-monobutyl ether (UCON). For this purpose, the surface of the stainless steel was initially modified by (3-mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane. The results of the modification procedure were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. After the modification, four different sol-gel based SPME fibers with different values of polarity, polar and non-polar PDMS, PEG, and UCON have been prepared and investigated. They are supposed to be employed to determinate oxadiargyl in agricultural and environmental samples prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Most important parameters that affect the extraction efficiency were also optimized. Under optimized conditions, the proposed method was found to be linear for the concentrations ranging from 100 ng L(-1) to 2 mg L(-1) with R(2)=0.997. Limit of detection (LOD) of 40 ng L(-1) and relative standard deviation of less than 10% were obtained. Relative recovery in environmental and agricultural samples was in the range of 73-96%. PMID:25059153

  14. Online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water by automated microscale solid-phase extraction with large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; George, John E; McCarty, Christina L

    2007-12-28

    A fully automated analytical method was developed for the online in situ analysis of selected semi-volatile organic compounds in water. The method used a large-volume injection/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry coupled with a fully automated microscale solid-phase extraction technique, which was based on x-y-z robotic techniques. Water samples were extracted by using a 96-well solid-phase extraction plate. For most analytes included in this study, the obtained linear calibrations ranged from 0.05 to 5.0 microg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.996-1.000, the method detection limits were less than 0.1 microg/L, and the relative recoveries were in the range of 70-120% with a relative standard deviation of less than 15% for fortified reagent water samples. The applications to chlorinated tap water, well water, and river water have been validated. The obtained results were similar to those resulting from fortified reagent water samples for all analytes except metribuzin, bromacil, aldrin, and methoxychlor. Matrix effects were observed for these analytes. In general, this fully automated analytical method was rugged, reliable, and easy to operate, and was capable of providing real-time data to water treatment and distribution systems as well as water reservation and protection systems. In addition, the method could reduce the analytical costs associated with sample collection, transportation, storage, and preparation. PMID:18036538

  15. Simultaneous Detection of Androgen and Estrogen Abuse in Breeding Animals by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/Combustion/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) Evaluated against Alternative Methods.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Geert; Mangelinckx, Sven; Courtheyn, Dirk; De Kimpe, Norbert; Matthijs, Bert; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    The administration of synthetic homologues of naturally occurring steroids can be demonstrated by measuring (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratios of their urinary metabolites. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS) was used in this study to appraise in a global approach isotopic deviations of two 17?-testosterone metabolites (17?-testosterone and etiocholanolone) and one 17?-estradiol metabolite (17?-estradiol) together with those of 5-androstene-3?,17?-diol as endogenous reference compound (ERC). Intermediate precisions of 0.35‰, 1.05‰, 0.35‰, and 0.21‰, respectively, were observed (n = 8). To assess the performance of the analytical method, a bull and a heifer were treated with 17?-testosterone propionate and 17?-estradiol-3-benzoate. The sensitivity of the method permitted the demonstration of 17?-estradiol treatment up to 24 days. For 17?-testosterone treatment, the detection windows were 3 days and 24 days for the bull and the heifer, respectively. The capability of GC-MS/C/IRMS to demonstrate natural steroid abuse for urinary steroids was eventually compared to those of mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) when measuring intact steroid esters in blood and hair. PMID:26271751

  16. Enrichment and determination of octylphenol and nonylphenol in environmental water samples by solid-phase microextraction with carboxylated carbon nano-spheres coating prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gong, Sheng-Xiang; Wang, Xia; Li, Lei; Wang, Ming-Lin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a novel and simple method for the sensitive determination of endocrine disrupter compounds octylphenol (OP) and nonylphenol (NP) in environmental water samples has been developed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Carboxylated carbon nano-spheres (CNSs-COOH) are used as a novel SPME coating via physical adhesion. The CNSs-COOH fiber possessed higher adsorption efficiency than 100 ?m polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) fiber and was similar to 85 ?m polyacrylate (PA) fiber for the two analytes. Important parameters, such as extraction time, pH, agitation speed, ionic strength, and desorption temperature and time, were investigated and optimized in detail. Under the optimal parameters, the developed method achieved low limits of detection of 0.13~0.14 ng·L(-1) and a wide linear range of 1~1000 ng·(-1) for OP and NP. The novel method was validated with several real environmental water samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:26302960

  17. A retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method based on stir-bar sorptive extraction and thermal desorption for automated determination of synthetic musk fragrances in natural and wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Arbulu, Maria; Sampedro, M Carmen; Unceta, Nora; Gómez-Caballero, Alberto; Goicolea, M Aránzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2011-05-20

    A stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) method followed by automated thermal desorption (ATD) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was optimized for determining trace levels of 18 synthetic fragrances (musks). Using the method developed a retention time locked library is created and converted to a screening database. This homebuilt database can be combined with deconvolution software for the identification of musks. A factorial design was provide to evaluate the main parameters and interactions between the factors affecting the process of SBSE. Operating with de MS-detector in the full-scan mode, high sensitivity with detection limits in the low ng L(-1) range, and good linearity and repeatability were achieved for all musks. The applicability of the method developed was tested in natural waters (surface and groundwater) and wastewater of a plant treatment (WWPT). The results obtained confirmed the usefulness of the proposed method for the determination and unequivocal identification of musks. This approach enables the developed method to be used for routine screening of environmental samples and posterior rapid quantitation of the positive samples. PMID:21444087

  18. Determination of 1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene and related compounds in marine pore water by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using disposable optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Eganhouse, Robert P; DiFilippo, Erica L

    2015-10-01

    A method is described for determination of ten DDT-related compounds in marine pore water based on equilibrium solid-phase microextraction (SPME) using commercial polydimethylsiloxane-coated optical fiber with analysis by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). Thermally cleaned fiber was directly exposed to sediments and allowed to reach equilibrium under static conditions at the in situ field temperature. Following removal, fibers were rinsed, dried and cut into appropriate lengths for storage in leak-tight containers at -20°C. Analysis by TD-GC/MS under full scan (FS) and selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes was then performed. Pore-water method detection limits in FS and SIM modes were estimated at 0.05-2.4ng/L and 0.7-16pg/L, respectively. Precision of the method, including contributions from fiber handling, was less than 10%. Analysis of independently prepared solutions containing eight DDT compounds yielded concentrations that were within 6.9±5.5% and 0.1±14% of the actual concentrations in FS and SIM modes, respectively. The use of optical fiber with automated analysis allows for studies at high temporal and/or spatial resolution as well as for monitoring programs over large spatial and/or long temporal scales with adequate sample replication. This greatly enhances the flexibility of the technique and improves the ability to meet quality control objectives at significantly lower cost. PMID:26346188

  19. Sensory screening for large-format natural corks by "dry soak" testing and its correlation to headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) releasable trichloroanisole (TCA) analysis.

    PubMed

    Macku, Carlos; Gonzalez, Lesa; Schleussner, Christiane; Mesquita, Ana Cristina; Herwatt, James W; Kirch, Leonard C; Schwartz, Rob J

    2009-09-01

    Large-format natural corks were individually screened for trichloroanisole (TCA) taint and other non-characteristic cork odors by smelling the high relative humidity headspace of the jarred closure during expert panel sensory sessions. The method was coined "dry soak sensory screening". Out of a population of 2296 corks, 138 specimens [6% of the total population (TP)] were retained because of unusual odors, ranging from mild to severe. All retained corks were analyzed for releasable TCA (RTCA) by the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique. Results indicated that 30 corks (1.3% TP) had concentrations between 1.0 and 5.0 ppt. Most of these corks had non-typical TCA odors described as ashtray, musty, moldy, dirty, and wet cardboard. A total of 13 retained corks (0.57% TP) had RTCA values higher than 5.0 ppt, mostly displaying the typical TCA odor. Dry soak screening has been determined to be a clean, fast, and most importantly, a nondestructive method ideal for screening large-format natural corks with off odors. PMID:19722710

  20. Simultaneous determination of parabens, alkylphenols, phenylphenols, bisphenol A and triclosan in human urine, blood and breast milk by continuous solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Abdelmonaim; Rascón, Andrés J; Ballesteros, Evaristo

    2016-02-01

    A highly sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the determination of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) including parabens, alkylphenols, phenylphenols, bisphenol A and triclosan in human breast milk, blood and urine samples is proposed. Blood and milk require a pretreatment to remove proteins and other substances potentially interfering with the continuous solid-phase extraction (SPE) system used; on the other hand, urine samples can be directly introduced into the system after filtering. Analytes are retained on a LiChrolut EN column and derivatized by silylation following elution with acetonitrile. The resulting trimethylsilyl derivatives are determined by GC-MS. The proposed method exhibited good linearity (r(2)>0.995) for all target EDCs over the concentration range 0.7-10,000ng/l in urine, and 3.3-50,000ng/l in blood and milk. Also, it provided low limits of detection (0.2-1.8ng/l in urine, and 1.0-9.0ng/l in blood and milk), good precision (relative standard deviations less than 7%) and recoveries from 86 to 104%. A total of 24 human fluid samples were analyzed and most found to contain some target EDC at concentrations from 0.10 to 14?g/l. PMID:26637951

  1. Silicone rod extraction followed by liquid desorption-large volume injection-programmable temperature vaporiser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for trace analysis of priority organic pollutants in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Alejandra; Posada-Ureta, Oscar; Olivares, Maitane; Vallejo, Asier; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2013-12-15

    In this study a priority organic pollutants usually found in environmental water samples were considered to accomplish two extraction and analysis approaches. Among those compounds organochlorine compounds, pesticides, phthalates, phenols and residues of pharmaceutical and personal care products were included. The extraction and analysis steps were based on silicone rod extraction (SR) followed by liquid desorption in combination with large volume injection-programmable temperature vaporiser (LVI-PTV) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Variables affecting the analytical response as a function of the programmable temperature vaporiser (PTV) parameters were firstly optimised following an experimental design approach. The SR extraction and desorption conditions were assessed afterwards, including matrix modification, time extraction, and stripping solvent composition. Subsequently, the possibility of performing membrane enclosed sorptive coating extraction (MESCO) as a modified extraction approach was also evaluated. The optimised method showed low method detection limits (3-35 ng L(-1)), acceptable accuracy (78-114%) and precision values (<13%) for most of the studied analytes regardless of the aqueous matrix. Finally, the developed approach was successfully applied to the determination of target analytes in aqueous environmental matrices including estuarine and wastewater samples. PMID:24209370

  2. PYROLYSIS/GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY OF A SERIES OF BURIED WOODS AND COALIFIED LOGS THAT INCREASE IN RANK FROM PEAT TO SUBBITUMINOUS COAL.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, Patrick G.; Lerch, Harry E.; Kotra, Rama K.; Verheyen, Vincent T.

    1987-01-01

    To better understand the coalification process, we have conducted numerous studies of the chemical structural composition of xylem tissue from gymosperm wood and related woods that has been coalified to varying degrees. The studies presented here, examine the chemical nature of buried and coalified xylem tissue at the molecular level. To achieve this, we employed pyrolysis/gas chromatography (py/gc) and pyrolysis/gas chromotography/mass spectrometry (py/gc/ms). Pyrolysis techniques have been used to examine peat, coal, coalified wood, and related substances. However, the technique has not been previously applied to a systematic and histologically-related series of coalified woods. It is particularly useful to compare the results from pyrolytic studies with the data obtained from solid-state **1**3C NMR.

  3. Identification and differentiation of barbiturates, other sedative-hypnotics and their metabolites in urine integrated in a general screening procedure using computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H H

    1990-09-14

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric procedure is described for the identification and differentiation of sedative-hypnotics and their metabolites in urine. The following 24 barbiturates and thirteen other hypnotics could be detected: acecarbromal, allobarbital, amobarbital, aprobarbital, barbital, brallobarbital, bromisoval, (sec)butabarbital, butalbital, butobarbital, carbromal, clomethiazole, crotylbarbital, cyclobarbital, cyclopentobarbital, diethylallylacetamide, dipropylbarbital, glutethimide, guaifenesin, ethinamate, heptabarbital, hexobarbital, meprobamate, methaqualone, metharbital, methohexital, methylphenobarbital, methyprylone, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, propallylonal, pyrithyldione, secobarbital, thiobutabarbital, thiopental, vinbarbital and vinylbital. The procedure presented is integrated in a general screening procedure (general unknown analysis) for several groups of drugs detecting over 300 drugs and over 1000 of their metabolites. It includes cleavage of conjugates by acid hydrolysis, isolation by liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization by acetylation, separation by capillary gas chromatography, and identification by computerized mass spectrometry. Using mass chromatography with the selected ions m/z 83, 117, 141, 167, 169, 207, 221 and 235, the presence of barbiturates, other hypnotics and/or their metabolites was indicated. The identity of positive signals in the reconstructed mass chromatograms was confirmed by a visual or computerized comparison of the stored full mass spectra with the reference spectra. The sample preparation, mass chromatograms, reference mass spectra and gas chromatographic retention indices are documented. PMID:2079506

  4. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon-ionization for characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Otto, Stefan; Streibel, Thorsten; Erdmann, Sabrina; Klingbeil, Sophie; Schulz-Bull, Detlef; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-10-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), as a part of dissolved organic matter (DOM), are environmental pollutants of the marine compartment. This study investigates the origin of PAH, which is supposed to derive mainly from anthropogenic activities, and their alteration along the salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea. Pyrolysis in combination with gas chromatography and two mass selective detectors in one measurement cycle are utilized as a tool for an efficient trace analysis of such complex samples, by which it is possible to detect degradation products of high molecular structures. Along the north-south transect of the Baltic Sea a slightly rising trend for PAH is visible. Their concentration profiles correspond to the ship traffic as a known anthropogenic source, underlined by the value of special isomer ratios such as phenanthrene and anthracene (0.31-0.45) or pyrene and fluoranthene (0.44-0.53). The detection of naphthalene and the distribution of its alkylated representatives support this statement. PMID:26277803

  5. Determination and Validation of a Solid-phase Extraction Gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometry for the Quantification of Methadone and Its Principal Metabolite in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Chiadmi, Fouad; Schlatter, Joël

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a solid-phase extraction gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry method for the determination of methadone (MDN) and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) in human plasma. The linear response was obtained over the concentration range from 10 to 2000 ng/mL for MDN and EDDP. The absolute recoveries of MDN and EDDP were 95.9%–98.9% and 94.8%–102.4%, with relative standard deviation (RSD) ranging from 1.8% to 2.7% and 1.8% to 3.9%, respectively. The intra- and interday precisions were found to be less than 5% for both analytes. The limits of detection of MDN and EDDP were 4 and 5 ng/mL, respectively. The presented method was convenient for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies in patients on heroin-assisted MDN therapy. PMID:26339186

  6. Determination of suspected fragrance allergens extended list by two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in ready-to-inject samples.

    PubMed

    Rey, Aurélien; Corbi, Elise; Pérès, Christophe; David, Nathalie

    2015-07-24

    A new strategy was developed to elucidate and quantify 56 (69 analytes including isomers) suspected chemically defined fragrance allergens in perfumes that were recently targeted by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). Samples were analyzed with a two-dimensional gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry system (GC-GC-MS). Method performance was evaluated by the accuracy profile approach to determine uncertainties around the regulation limit of 10mg/kg. This strategy was finally applied to 62 commercialized perfumes, analyzed in the routine workflow. Depending on the matrix, an acceptable result was obtained for 88-100% of the target analytes, which means that results were accurately defined under or above 10mg/kg. This method saves considerable time for complete analysis and could be adopted for routine analysis due to its ruggedness and cost effectiveness. PMID:26051085

  7. Pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize organic matter and its relationship to uranium content of Appalachian Devonian black shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Gas Chromatographic analysis of volatile products formed by stepwise pyrolysis of black shales can be used to characterize the kerogen by relating it to separated, identified precursors such as land-derived vitrinite and marine-source Tasmanites. Analysis of a Tasmanites sample shows exclusively n-alkane and -alkene pyrolysis products, whereas a vitrinite sample shows a predominance of one- and two-ring substituted aromatics. For core samples from northern Tennessee and for a suite of outcrop samples from eastern Kentucky, the organic matter type and the U content (<10-120ppm) show variations that are related to precursor organic materials. The samples that show a high vitrinite component in their pyrolysis products are also those samples with high contents of U. ?? 1981.

  8. Characterization of Essential Oil Components from Aromatic Plants that Grow Wild in the "Piana del Sele" (Salerno, Southern Italy) using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naviglio, Daniele; Le Grottaglie, Laura; Vitulano, Manuela; Trifuoggi, Marco; Gallo, Monica

    2015-07-01

    Essential oils from Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, Melissa officinalis and Mentha spicata growing wild in the "Piana del Sele" (Salerno, Southern Italy) have been extracted by hydro-distillation, quantified and characterized by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detection (FID) and mass-spectrometry (MS). Sixty-nine compounds were identified and classified according to their chemical classes. The results showed that the composition of the essential oils was extremely variable and specific for each botanical species. Hydrocarbons were the most abundant class in all essential oils except for sage where aldehydes and ketones were the most representative compounds. Only for thyme was a higher content of alcohols found. PMID:26411033

  9. Quantification of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene in internal combustion engine exhaust with time-weighted average solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baimatova, Nassiba; Koziel, Jacek A; Kenessov, Bulat

    2015-05-11

    A new and simple method for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene (BTEX) quantification in vehicle exhaust was developed based on diffusion-controlled extraction onto a retracted solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coating. The rationale was to develop a method based on existing and proven SPME technology that is feasible for field adaptation in developing countries. Passive sampling with SPME fiber retracted into the needle extracted nearly two orders of magnitude less mass (n) compared with exposed fiber (outside of needle) and sampling was in a time weighted-averaging (TWA) mode. Both the sampling time (t) and fiber retraction depth (Z) were adjusted to quantify a wider range of Cgas. Extraction and quantification is conducted in a non-equilibrium mode. Effects of Cgas, t, Z and T were tested. In addition, contribution of n extracted by metallic surfaces of needle assembly without SPME coating was studied. Effects of sample storage time on n loss was studied. Retracted TWA-SPME extractions followed the theoretical model. Extracted n of BTEX was proportional to Cgas, t, Dg, T and inversely proportional to Z. Method detection limits were 1.8, 2.7, 2.1 and 5.2 mg m(-3) (0.51, 0.83, 0.66 and 1.62 ppm) for BTEX, respectively. The contribution of extraction onto metallic surfaces was reproducible and influenced by Cgas and t and less so by T and by the Z. The new method was applied to measure BTEX in the exhaust gas of a Ford Crown Victoria 1995 and compared with a whole gas and direct injection method. PMID:25911428

  10. Evaluation of the contamination of spirits by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of twelve polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), included in the list of priority pollutants, in different spirits has been obtained by means of a rapid and sensitive method based on gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The environmentally friendly ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) technique allowed the easy and effective preconcentration of the PAHs from the sample matrices. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the nature and volume of the extractant solvent, and the addition of salt, as well as the sonication parameters were investigated and optimized. The absence of matrix effects under the optimized conditions allowed the sample quantification against aqueous standards. Detection limits ranged between 1.8 and 6.3 ng L(-1), depending on the compound. Different spirit samples were successfully analyzed using the proposed method, and contents of up to 0.9 ?g L(-1) were found. Relative recoveries at fortified levels of 0.2 and 1 ?g L(-1) were in the range 84-118%. PMID:26212977

  11. Fractionation of technical octabromodiphenyl ether by countercurrent chromatography combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and offline and online (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Simon; Conrad, Jürgen; Vetter, Walter

    2015-06-12

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) is a technique, which uses two immiscible liquid phases for a separation process in a long and hollow tube. The technique allows the separation of high amounts of sample (50mg to several grams) with a low consumption of solvents. In this study, we fractionated 50mg technical octabromodiphenyl ether (DE-79) and analyzed the fractions by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy. CCC separations were performed with n-hexane/acetonitrile as solvent system in tail-to-head (i.e. the upper phase is mobile) mode. Twelve CCC fractions were studied for the PBDE composition. CCC elution of PBDE congeners was dependent both on the degree of bromination and substitution pattern. Higher brominated congeners eluted faster than lower brominated congeners and isomers with vicinal hydrogen atoms eluted last. In addition to several known PBDE congeners in DE-79, we were able to unequivocally identify BDE 195 in DE-79 and we could verify the presence of BDE 184. Finally, we also established the online hyphenation of CCC with (1)H NMR. The use of deuterated solvents could be avoided by using n-hexane/acetonitrile as two-phase system. By online CCC-(1)H NMR in stop-flow mode we were able to detect eight PBDE congeners in the mixture. PMID:25913330

  12. Quantification of prominent volatile compounds responsible for muskmelon and watermelon aroma by purge and trap extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Fredes, Alejandro; Sales, Carlos; Barreda, Mercedes; Valcárcel, Mercedes; Roselló, Salvador; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic headspace purge-and-trap (DHS-P&T) methodology for the determination and quantification of 61 volatile compounds responsible for muskmelon and watermelon aroma has been developed and validated. The methodology is based on the application of purge-and-trap extraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to (ion trap) mass spectrometry detection. For this purpose two different P&T sorbent cartridges have been evaluated. The influence of different extraction factors (sample weight, extraction time, and purge flow) on extraction efficiency has been studied and optimised using response surface methodology. Precision, expressed as repeatability, has been evaluated by analysing six replicates of real samples, showing relative standard deviations between 3% and 27%. Linearity has been studied in the range of 10-6130 ng mL(-1) depending on the compound response, showing coefficients of correlation between 0.995 and 0.999. Detection limits ranged between 0.1 and 274 ng g(-1). The methodology developed is well suited for analysis of large numbers of muskmelon and watermelon samples in plant breeding programs. PMID:26213027

  13. High-sensitivity detection of short-chain fatty acids in porcine ileal, cecal, portal and abdominal blood by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Matsukawa, Noriko; Tomonaga, Shozo; Inoue, Ryo; Ushida, Kazunari; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2014-04-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetate, propionate and n-butyrate, are the main end-products of fermentation in the large intestine. SCFA are rapidly absorbed from the large intestinal mucosa to provide energy to the host. In this study, high-sensitivity detection of SCFA was demonstrated in blood using the gas chromatometry with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Few studies have measured SCFA in porcine blood. Therefore, SCFA concentrations in the ileal (IV), cecal (CV), portal (PV) and abdominal (AV) vein blood, urine (Ur) and saliva (Sa) were measured by GC-MS. All body fluids were collected from four 5-month-old pigs. Cecal (CD) and ileal (ID) digesta, and cecal (CM) and ileal (IM) mucosa were also collected and their corresponding SCFA concentrations were measured using ion-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography. GC-MS analyses were successful to determine the SCFA concentrations in the porcine body fluids. n-Butyrate concentration was surprisingly high in CV and its proportion remained higher in CV than that in CD and CM. Acetate showed a constantly high proportion in all porcine body fluids. Propionate was detected at a relatively high proportion in CV, IV and PV, but was low in AV. PMID:24612389

  14. Optimization and application of headspace-solid-phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of volatile compounds in cherry wines.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Zhou, Xuan; Niu, Yunwei; Yu, Dan; Zhu, Jiancai; Zhu, Guangyong

    2015-01-26

    A simple, rapid and solvent-free multi-residue method has been developed and applied to confirm and quantify a series of volatile compounds in five cherry wines by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Four parameters (e.g., coating material of fiber, temperature and time of extraction, and addition of sodium chloride in the solution) of headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) were optimized, resulting in the best extraction condition including 50/30 ?m DVB/CAR/PDMS fiber, 45 min and 50 °C of SPME, and 2g of sodium chloride addition in the wine during the extraction. The SPME had LODs and LOQs ranging from 0.03 to 7.27 ?g L(-1) and 0.10 to 24.24 ?g L(-1) for analytic compounds, respectively. Repeatability and reproducibility values were all below 19.8%, with mean values of 12.7% and 10.5%, respectively. Regression coefficients (R(2)) of detective linearity of the standard curves was higher than 0.9852. Moreover, relative recoveries of analytical targets were achieved in a range of 60.7-125.6% with good relative standard deviation values (?20.6%). In addition, a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the aroma profiles of the wines, which indicated that five samples were distinctly divided into two groups based on their different geographical origins and volatile compounds. PMID:25544009

  15. Chemometric study and optimization of extraction parameters in single-drop microextraction for the determination of multiclass pesticide residues in grapes and apples by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amvrazi, Elpiniki G; Tsiropoulos, Nikolaos G

    2009-11-01

    A simple and rapid single-drop microextraction method coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (SDME-GC/MS) for the determination of 20 pesticides with different physicochemical properties in grapes and apples was optimized by the use of a multivariate strategy. Emphasis on the optimization study was given to the role of ionic strength, sugar concentration and pH of the donor sample solution prepared from the fruit samples. Since all three variables were found to affect negatively SDME (a lower extraction efficiency was observed as the values of variables were increased for most of the pesticides studied), donor sample solution was optimized using a central composite design to evaluate the optimum pH value and the optimum dilution of the sample extract. With some exceptions (chlorpyrifos ethyl, alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, pyriproxyfen, lambda-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin), the optimum method included the dilution of the analytical sample by 12.5-fold with a buffered acetone/water solution at pH=4 and exhibited good analytical characteristics for the majority of target analytes (pyrimethanil, pirimicarb, metribuzin, vinclozolin, fosthiazate, procymidone, fludioxonil, kresoxim methyl, endosulfan sulfate, fenhexamid, iprodione, phosalone, indoxacarb and azoxystrobin) by providing high enrichment factors (14-328), low limits of detection (0.0003-0.007 microg/g), and good precision (relative standard deviations below 15%). PMID:19783253

  16. Use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the assessment of the contamination caused by small concentrations of nitrophenols in soils and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacho, Juan-Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Nitrophenols (NPs) are widely distributed environmental contaminants that can be present in soils and sediments due to the degradation of some pesticides (parathion and fenitrothion) or by accidental spilling in ammunition plants or storage places. This communication reports a rapid and sensitive procedure for the determination of the most common NPs in soils by using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as the analytical technique. Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) was employed for the extraction of the NPs from the soil samples to an organic solvent. Next, the resulting UAE extracts were submitted to dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) for achieving an effective preconcentration. DLLME is an easy-to-carry out, environmentally friendly separation technique involving minimal amounts of organic solvents. Since the volatility of NPs is low, as a previous stage to the GC-MS measurement the compounds were derivatized using a simple "in-situ" acetylation procedure. The main parameters affecting the UAE stage, as well as the DLLME and derivatization steps, were investigated looking for maximum analytical signals. The optimized procedure provided extraction recoveries in the 72-86% range, with precision values (expressed as relative standard deviation, RSD) ? 12%, and detection limits ranging from 1.3 and 3.3 ng g-1, depending on the compound. 20 soil and sediment samples, from military, industrial and agricultural areas were analyzed by the studied procedure in order to check its applicability.

  17. Identification of halogenated photoproducts generated after ultraviolet-irradiation of parabens and benzoates in water containing chlorine by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rivera, Gerardo; Llompart, Maria; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Lores, Marta

    2014-07-01

    This work presents a new solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-based approach to investigate the formation of halogenated by-products generated by the UV-induced photodegradation of parabens and their congener benzoates in water containing chlorine. Degradation of parent species, and further identification of their transformation by-products were monitored by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In order to improve detectability, SPME was applied as a preconcentration step after UV-irradiation of target preservatives. Experiments performed with dechlorinated water, ultrapure water, and tap water showed that under UV-light, the presence of even low levels of free chlorine, increases the photodegradation rate of target preservatives, enhancing the formation of halogenated photoproducts. Monobrominated, dibrominated and bromochlorinated hydroxybenzoates were identified, and the transformation of benzoates into halogenated parabens was also confirmed. Bromination is expected to occur when free chlorine is present, due to the presence of traces of bromide in water samples. Five halogenated phenols (mainly brominated) were detected as breakdown photoproducts from both families of target preservatives. On the basis of the appearance of the aforementioned by-products, a tentative transformation pathway, consistent with the photoformation-photodecay kinetics of the by-products, is proposed herein for the first time. PMID:24856965

  18. Hollow fiber based liquid phase microextraction for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in ecological textiles by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jin'an; Chen, Guosheng; Qiu, Junlang; Jiang, Ruifen; Zeng, Feng; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) coupled gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was firstly developed to determine 10 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in ecological textiles. The present method can offer high separation efficiencies with minimal sample and solvent consumption. The extraction conditions were optimized, including the types of hollow fiber and organic solvent, the extraction time, the stirring and the salinity. Under the optimized conditions, the linear ranges of OCPs in cotton, terylene and fur samples were 5-1000ng/g, 10-1000ng/g and 10-800ng/g, respectively, and the detection limit of the three samples were 0.07-2.30ng/g, 0.89-1.66ng/g and 0.06-1.04ng/g, respectively. The optimized method was then successfully used to determine the OCPs in 3 kinds of spiked real samples, including cotton, terylene and fur. The good recoveries and RSDs of the quantification in real textile samples were obtained and the results were confirmed by the traditional liquid extraction method (GB/T 18412-2006). This study proved that the HF-LPME method, which was simple, low-cost and virtually solvent-free, was reliable for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the harmful OCP residues in ecological textiles. PMID:26695278

  19. Evaluation of three headspace sorptive extraction coatings for the determination of volatile terpenes in honey using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2015-06-19

    Headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) was used to preconcentrate seven monoterpenes (eucalyptol, linalool, menthol, geraniol, carvacrol, thymol and eugenol) for separation by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three commercially available coatings for the stir bars, namely Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polyacrilate (PA) and Ethylene glycol-silicone (EG-Silicone), were tested, and the influential parameters both in the adsorption and the thermal desorption steps were optimized. PDMS provided the best sensitivity for linalool, geraniol, menthol and eucalyptol, whereas EG-Silicone was best for extracting the phenolic monoterpenes studied. Considering the average obtained slopes from all compounds, PDMS pointed as the best option, and the analytical characteristics for the HSSE-TD-GC-MS method using this coating were obtained. Quantification of the samples was carried out by matrix-matched calibration using a synthetic honey. Detection limits ranged between 0.007 and 0.032 ng g(-1), depending on the compound. Twelve honey samples of different floral origins were analyzed using the HSSE-GC-MS method, the analytes being detected at concentrations up to 64 ng g(-1). PMID:25958092

  20. Thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry approach for characterization of the volatile fraction from amber specimens: a possibility of tracking geological origins.

    PubMed

    Vîrgolici, Marian; Ponta, Corneliu; Manea, Mihaela; Negu?, Daniel; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Moise, Ioan; Suv?il?, Rare?; Teodor, Eugen; Sârbu, Costel; Medvedovici, Andrei

    2010-03-19

    Research on the chemical composition of fossil resins has evolved during the last decades as a multidisciplinary field and is strongly oriented toward the correlation with their geological and botanical origin. Various extraction procedures and chromatographic techniques have been used together for identifying the volatile compounds contained in the fossil resin matrix. Hyphenation between thermal desorption (TD), gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry detection (MS) has been chosen to investigate the volatile compounds fraction from ambers with a focus on Romanite (Romanian amber) and Baltic amber species. A data analysis procedure was developed for the main purpose of fingerprinting ambers based on the MS identity of the peaks generated by the volatile fraction, together with their relative percentual area within the chromatogram. Chromatographic data analysis was based entirely on Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution &Identification System (AMDIS) software to produce deconvoluted mass spectra which were used to build-up a mixed mass spectra and relative retention scale library. Multivariate data analysis was further applied on AMDIS results with successful discrimination between Romanite and Baltic ambers. A special trial was conducted to generate pyrolysis "like" macromolecular structure breakdown to volatile compounds by gamma irradiation with a high absorbed dose of 500 kGy. Contrary to our expectations the volatile fraction fingerprints were not modified after irradiation experiments. A complementary non-destructive new approach by ESR spectroscopy was also proposed for discriminating between Romanite and Baltic ambers. PMID:20149381

  1. Monitoring the benzene contents in soft drinks using headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: a survey of the situation on the belgian market.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Christof; Detavernier, Christ'l; Van Bocxlaer, Jan F; Vermeylen, Rudi; Van Peteghem, Carlos

    2008-06-25

    Whenever benzoic acid is combined with ascorbic acid in acidic beverages such as soft drinks, benzene can be formed. To determine the current situation on the Belgian market, a headspace gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was developed, which needs little to no sample preparation. This method was then used to analyze 134 soft drinks sampled on the Belgian market by the Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain. Thirty-three percent of the samples contained no detectable benzene, whereas the majority of the samples (47%) contained trace amounts below the limit of quantification of the method (0.3 microg L (-1)). Ten samples were above the European limit for benzene in drinking water of 1 microg L (-1), and one sample had a concentration of 10.98 microg L (-1), thereby exceeding the action limit for benzene in soft drinks of 10 microg L (-1) discussed at the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health of the European Commission. Statistical analyses revealed that besides benzoic acid, ascorbic acid, and acidity regulators, the packing may also play an important role in benzene formation. PMID:18522398

  2. Determination of free and total phthalates in commercial whole milk products in different packaging materials by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jialu; Chen, Wanxin; Zhu, Hangcui; Wang, Chengjun

    2015-12-01

    We developed a method for extraction and determination of free and total phthalate esters in commercial whole milk products. The free phthalates in milk samples were extracted with ethyl acetate after general pretreatment procedures including protein precipitation, centrifugation, and filtration. The bound phthalates in samples were first desorbed with the aid of ultrasound irradiation before extraction of total phthalates. The separation and determination of phthalates in extracts was performed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection. The detection limits were in the range of 0.09 to 0.36ng/g and the average recovery between 79.1 and 110.3%. The developed methods were applied to extract and determine phthalates in commercial whole milk products with different packaging materials, including plastic, glass, and metal. All samples contained several phthalates, including diethyl, diisobutyl, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalates at concentrations between 2.60 and 156.4ng/g. The identified phthalates occurred in both free and bound forms. The amounts of phthalates in milk samples packaged in glass and metal containers were much lower than those in plastic containers. Plastic packaging materials are a possible source of phthalate contamination in commercial whole milk products, and a considerable portion of bleached phthalates from packaging can be adsorbed on proteins and other solid components of milk. PMID:26454292

  3. Simultaneous determination of ten antihistamine drugs in human plasma using pipette tip solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Chika; Kumazawa, Takeshi; Lee, Xiao-Pen; Fujishiro, Masaya; Kuriki, Ayako; Marumo, Akemi; Seno, Hiroshi; Sato, Keizo

    2006-01-01

    Ten antihistamine drugs, diphenhydramine, orphenadrine, chlorpheniramine, diphenylpyraline, triprolidine, promethazine, homochlorcyclizine, cyproheptadine, cloperastine and clemastine, have been found to be extractable from human plasma samples using MonoTip C18 tips, inside which C18- bonded monolithic silica gel was fixed. Human plasma (0.1 mL) containing the ten antihistamines was mixed with 0.4 mL of distilled water and 25 microL of a 1 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 8.0). After centrifugation of the mixture, the supernatant fraction was extracted to the C18 phase of the tip by 25 repeated aspirating/dispensing cycles using a manual micropipettor. The analytes retained on the C18 phase were then eluted with methanol by five repeated aspirating/dispensing cycles. The eluate was injected into a gas chromatography (GC) injector without evaporation and reconstitution steps, and was detected by a mass spectrometer with selected ion monitoring in the positive-ion electron impact mode. The separation of the ten drugs from each other and from impurities was generally satisfactory using a DB-1MS column (30 m x 0.32 mm i.d., film thickness 0.25 microm). The recoveries of the ten antihistamines spiked into plasma were 73.8-105%. The regression equations for the ten antihistamines showed excellent linearity with detection limits of 0.02-5.0 ng/0.1 mL. The within-day and day-to-day coefficients of variation for plasma were not greater than 9.9%. The data obtained from determination of diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine in human plasma after oral administration of the drugs are also presented. PMID:16419026

  4. Improvements in the methodology of monitoring sulfur mustard exposure by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of cleaved and derivatized blood protein adducts.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Richard J; Smith, J Richard; Boyd, Brian L; Capacio, Benedict R

    2008-01-01

    An analytical method for determining exposure to 2,2'-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD) has been enhanced. The method is based on the cleavage of adducted HD (protein-hydroxyethylthioethyl esters) to produce thiodiglycol. Following cleavage, a deuterated internal standard is added, and the analytes are extracted, derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Inclusion of a concentration step, addition of solid sodium bicarbonate to neutralize excess derivatization reagent, and optimization of method and instrument conditions provided dramatic increases in signal-to-noise ratio. A five-day precision and accuracy study was conducted, including interday and intraday unknown analysis. Linearity was verified by a R(2) > 0.9995 for all five curves evaluated. The precision and accuracy of the assay were demonstrated to be excellent by evaluation of the interday and intraday unknown samples (< 10% relative standard deviation and relative error in most cases). Statistical treatment of the method blanks and calibration results demonstrated a reduction in the limit of quantitation from 25 nM (HD, human plasma, in vitro) to 1.56 nM. Sample and calibration stability through the analytical sequence was established by the inclusion of continuing calibration verification standards (< 5% error). Short-term sample stability was verified by reinjection of a calibration set after 18 days (R(2) = 0.9997). Quantitative agreement with the previous method was supported by the analysis of a 50 nM standard protein sample (HD, rat plasma) with both methodologies (< 1% error). PMID:18269790

  5. Organotin speciation in environmental matrices by automated on-line hydride generation-programmed temperature vaporization-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Serra, H; Nogueira, J M F

    2005-11-11

    In the present contribution, a new automated on-line hydride generation methodology was developed for dibutyltin and tributyltin speciation at the trace level, using a programmable temperature-vaporizing inlet followed by capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the selected ion-monitoring mode acquisition (PTV-GC/MS(SIM)). The methodology involves a sequence defined by two running methods, the first one configured for hydride generation with sodium tetrahydroborate as derivatising agent and the second configured for speciation purposes, using a conventional autosampler and data acquisition controlled by the instrument's software. From the method-development experiments, it had been established that injector configuration has a great effect on the speciation of the actual methodology, particularly, the initial inlet temperature (-20 degrees C; He: 150 ml/min), injection volume (2 microl) and solvent characteristics using the solvent venting mode. Under optimized conditions, a remarkable instrumental performance including very good precision (RSD < 4%), excellent linear dynamic range (up to 50 microg/ml) and limits of detection of 0.12 microg/ml and 9 ng/ml, were obtained for dibutyltin and tributyltin, respectively. The feasibility of the present methodology was validated through assays upon in-house spiked water (2 ng/ml) and a certified reference sediment matrix (Community Bureau of Reference, CRM 462, Nr. 330 dibutyltin: 68+/-12 ng/g; tributyltin: 54+/-15 ng/g on dry mass basis), using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample enrichment and multiple injections (2 x 5 microl) for sensitivity enhancement. The methodology evidenced high reproducibility, is easy to work-up, sensitive and showed to be a suitable alternative to replace the currently dedicated analytical systems for organotin speciation in environmental matrices at the trace level. PMID:16257299

  6. Determination of methylmercury in fish using focused microwave digestion following by Cu2+ addition, sodium tetrapropylborate derivatization, n-heptane extraction, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Syr-Song; Chou, Shin-Shou; Hwang, Deng-Fwu

    2004-01-23

    The analytical procedure for analysis of methylmercury in fish was developed. It involves microwave-assisted digestion with alkaline solution (tetramethylammonium hydroxide), addition of Cu2+, aqueous-phase derivatization of methylmercury with sodium tetrapropylborate, and subsequent extraction with n-heptane. The methylmercury derivative was desorbed in the splitless injection port of a gas chromatograph and subsequently analyzed by electron impact mass spectrometry. Optimum conditions allowed sample throughout to be controlled by the instrumental analysis time (near 7 min per sample) but not by the sample preparation step. At the power of 15-30, 45, and 60-75 W, sample preparation time is only 3.5, 2.5, and 1.5 min, respectively. The proposed method was finally validated by the analysis of three biological certified reference materials, BCR CRM 464 tuna fish, NRC DORM-2 dogfish muscle, and NRC DOLT-2 dogfish liver. The detection limit of the overall procedure was found to be 40 ng/g of biological tissue for methylmercury. The recovery of methylmercury was 91.2-95.3% for tuna, 89.3-94.7% for marlin, and 91.7-94.8% for shark, respectively. The detected and certified values of methylmercury of three biological certified reference materials were as follows: 5.34 +/- 0.30 microg/g (mean +/- S.D.) and 5.50 +/- 0.17 microg/g for CRM 464 tuna fish, 4.34 +/- 0.24 and 4.47 +/- 0.32 microg/g for NRC DORM-2 dogfish muscle, and 0.652 +/- 0.053 and 0.693 +/- 0.055 microg/g for NRC DOLT-2 dogfish liver, respectively. It indicated that the method was well available to quantify the methylmercury in fish. PMID:14753723

  7. Aptamer-functionalized stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for selective enrichment and determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Lin, Saichai; Gan, Ning; Zhang, Jiabin; Qiao, Li; Chen, Yinji; Cao, Yuting

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel aptamer-functionalized stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) was developed for selective enrichment of the low abundance polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from fish samples. This approach was based on the immobilization of aptamer which could recognize 2,3',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB72) and 2',3',4',5,5'-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB106) on one kind of metal-organic frameworks (Zn4O(BDC)3, MOF-5). MOF-5 as a substrate was prepared by potential-controlled cathodic electrodeposition on stainless steel. This aptamer-functionalized stir bar sorptive extraction (Apt-MOF SBSE) fiber could be facile synthesized in one-step. PCB72 and PCB106 were employed as target analytes for selective extraction by the developed method. The adsorbed targets could be desorbed easily in pH 3.0 100mM glycine-HCl buffers and then extracted by the methylene chloride. Afterwards, the detection was carried out with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The Apt-MOF SBSE pretreatment coupled with GC-MS exhibited high selectivity, good binding capacity, stability and reproducibility for the detection of PCBs. It provided a linear range of 0.02-250ngmL(-1) with a good coefficient of determination (R(2)=0.9991-0.9996) and the detection limit was 0.003-0.004ngmL(-1). More importantly, the method was successfully utilized for the determination of PCBs in fish samples with good enrichment factor (1930-2304). Therefore, this new SBSE coating opens up the possibility of selective enrichment of a given target PCBs from complex fish samples. PMID:26717840

  8. Matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of fifteen halogenated flame retardants in mollusks.

    PubMed

    Villaverde-de-Sáa, Eugenia; Valls-Cantenys, Carme; Quintana, José Benito; Rodil, Rosario; Cela, Rafael

    2013-07-26

    This study presents the development and validation of a new analytical method for the simultaneous determination of fifteen analytes classified as halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) - nine brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) and six novel HFRs - in different kinds of mollusks using matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by gas chromatography coupled to negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS). The proposed method is the first one developed for such a broad range of HFRs in aquatic biota, featuring several advantages, including low solvent and sample intake, simplicity of operation, reduced cost and integration of extraction and clean-up into a single step. Under optimal conditions, 0.5g of freeze-dried sample, 0.5g of a primary-secondary amine (PSA) as solid support, a sorbent combination of 1.75g of florisil (deactivated with 5% Milli-Q water), 1.75g of acidified silica (10% (w/w) H2SO4) and 0.5g of silica, and 10mL dichloromethane as elution solvent were used. Standard addition over the extract was required however for the correct quantification due to matrix effects in the GC system, particularly for novel HFRs, that could not be compensated with the internal standards. The method afforded LODs in the range of 0.003-0.07ngg(-1) dry weight (0.0006-0.014ngg(-1) on a wet weight basis, assuming an 80% sample water content), except for decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) (0.6ngg(-1) dry weight, 0.12ngg(-1) wet weight). The accuracy of the method was evaluated with three different types of spiked mollusk species using surrogate standards and standard addition over the extract for quantification and the recoveries were in the 70-120% range, except for bis(2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-phthalate (DEHTBP) in clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) samples (46% recovery). Moreover, the method was successfully validated with standard reference materials (SRMs) of salmon and mussel tissues for BDEs. Finally, the method was applied to the determination of HFRs in different kind of freeze-dried mollusks: mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), cockle (Cerastoderma edule) and clam (R. philippinarum). Raft cultured mussels showed the highest concentrations of HFRs (up to 0.8ngg(-1) wet weight of BDE-209). PMID:23809805

  9. On-line coupling of solid-phase extraction to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine musk fragrances in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Vallecillos, Laura; Borrull, Francesc; Pocurull, Eva

    2014-10-17

    An on-line coupling solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been developed for the first time to preconcentrate trace amounts of 17 musk fragrances extensively used in personal care products (6 polycyclic musks, 3 nitro musks, 7 macrocyclic musks and 1 polycyclic musk degradation product) from wastewater samples, prior to analysis by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry through an on-column interface. A 10 mm × 2 mm I.D. precolumn packed with Oasis HLB (60 ?m) or C18 (60 ?m) was compared for the optimization of the solid-phase extraction process. The parameters affecting the transfer of the analytes from the precolumn to the GC system (e.g. flow-rate, temperature and solvent vapor exit time) as well as SPE parameters (e.g. sample flow, sample volume, elution solvent, etc.) were optimized. An organic modifier such as methanol was added to the sample before the extraction process to avoid adsorption problems. The use of the MS detector under selected ion monitoring acquisition enabled the analytes to be quantified at low ng L(-1) levels, preconcentrating only 10 mL of sample, and the limits of detection were between 1 and 30 ng L(-1). The method was applied for the determination of musk fragrances in wastewater samples from three urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The analysis of influent urban wastewater revealed that galaxolide, tonalide and ambrettolide were the most abundant musk compounds with concentrations ranging between 18 ng L(-1) and 45,091 ng L(-1), 852 ng L(-1) and 49,904 ng L(-1) and 507 ng L(-1) and 21,528 ng L(-1) respectively. The remaining musks were present at lower concentrations and two of the macrocyclic musk studied (musk MC4 and civetone) were not detected. The analysis of effluent wastewater showed a decrease in the concentrations of all of the compounds present in influent samples, with the decrease being more significantly in the case of polycyclic and nitro musks than for macrocyclic musks. Only HHCB-lactone remained constant or increased its concentration. PMID:25240651

  10. Headspace stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of the diluted vapor phase of cigarette smoke delivered to an in vitro cell exposure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navneet; Cabral, Jean-Louis; Morin, André; Waldron, Karen C

    2011-01-14

    Advanced smoke generation systems, such as the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine used in combination with the BAT exposure chamber, allow for the generation, dilution and delivery of fresh cigarette smoke to cell or tissue cultures for in vitro cell culture analyses. Recently, our group confirmed that the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) is a reliable tool to generate and deliver repeatable and reproducible exposure concentrations of whole smoke to in vitro cultures. However, the relationship between dose and diluted smoke components found within the exposure chamber has not been characterized. The current study focused on the development of a headspace stir bar sorptive extraction (HSSE) method to chemically characterize some of the vapor phase components of cigarette smoke generated by the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) and collected within a cell culture exposure chamber. The method was based on passive sampling within the chamber by HSSE using a Twister™ stir bar. Following exposure, sorbed analytes were recovered using a thermal desorption unit and a cooled injection system coupled to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry for identification and quantification. Using the HSSE method, sixteen compounds were identified. The desorption parameters were assessed using ten reference compounds and the following conditions led to the maximal response: desorption temperature of 200°C for 2 min with cryofocussing temperature of -75°C. During transfer of the stir bars to the thermal desorption system, significant losses of analytes were observed as a function of time; therefore, the exposure-to-desorption time interval was kept at the minimum of 10±0.5 min. Repeatability of the HSSE method was assessed by monitoring five reference compounds present in the vapor phase (10.1-12.9% RSD) and n-butyl acetate, the internal standard (18.5% RSD). The smoke dilution precision was found to be 17.2, 6.2 and 11.7% RSD for exposure concentrations of 1, 2 and 5% (v/v) cigarette vapor phase in air, respectively. A linear response of analyte abundance was observed as a function of dilution. Extrapolation to 100% (v/v) cigarette vapor phase, i.e., undiluted smoke, gave yields for the five compounds ranging from 6 to 450 ng for 10 min exposure. PMID:21163485

  11. Dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with one-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as a powerful tool to differentiate banana cultivars based on their volatile metabolite profile.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Marisela; Pereira, Jorge; Câmara, José S

    2012-10-15

    In this study the effect of the cultivar on the volatile profile of five different banana varieties was evaluated and determined by dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction (dHS-SPME) combined with one-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (1D-GC-qMS). This approach allowed the definition of a volatile metabolite profile to each banana variety and can be used as pertinent criteria of differentiation. The investigated banana varieties (Dwarf Cavendish, Prata, Maçã, Ouro and Platano) have certified botanical origin and belong to the Musaceae family, the most common genomic group cultivated in Madeira Island (Portugal). The influence of dHS-SPME experimental factors, namely, fibre coating, extraction time and extraction temperature, on the equilibrium headspace analysis was investigated and optimised using univariate optimisation design. A total of 68 volatile organic metabolites (VOMs) were tentatively identified and used to profile the volatile composition in different banana cultivars, thus emphasising the sensitivity and applicability of SPME for establishment of the volatile metabolomic pattern of plant secondary metabolites. Ethyl esters were found to comprise the largest chemical class accounting 80.9%, 86.5%, 51.2%, 90.1% and 6.1% of total peak area for Dwarf Cavendish, Prata, Ouro, Maçã and Platano volatile fraction, respectively. Gas chromatographic peak areas were submitted to multivariate statistical analysis (principal component and stepwise linear discriminant analysis) in order to visualise clusters within samples and to detect the volatile metabolites able to differentiate banana cultivars. The application of the multivariate analysis on the VOMs data set resulted in predictive abilities of 90% as evaluated by the cross-validation procedure. PMID:23442718

  12. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Wastewater Compounds by Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Barber, Larry B.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of 67 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater on aquatic organisms. This method also may be useful for evaluating the impact of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are an indicator of wastewater or that have been chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted with dichloromethane-diethyl ether (4:1) and determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 4 micrograms per liter averaged 74 percent ? 7 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds (excluding hormones and sterols) averaged 0.15 microgram per liter. Samples are preserved by filtration, the addition of 60 grams NaCl, and storage at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory has established a sample-holding time (prior to sample extraction) of 14 days from the date of sample collection until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of these sample-preservation procedures.

  13. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Moderate-Use Pesticides and Selected Degradates in Water by C-18 Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Stroppel, Max E.; Foreman, William T.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A method for the isolation and analysis of 21 parent pesticides and 20 pesticide degradates in natural-water samples is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase-extraction columns that contain octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the analytes. The columns are dried by using nitrogen gas, and adsorbed analytes are eluted with ethyl acetate. Extracted analytes are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 2 micrograms per liter (?g/L) for most analytes. Single-operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.00 1 to 0.057 ?g/L. Validation data also are presented for 14 parent pesticides and 20 degradates that were determined to have greater bias or variability, or shorter holding times than the other compounds. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes in pesticide-grade water before extraction was 4 days. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes after extraction on the dry solid-phase-extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time. The method complements existing U.S. Geological Survey Method O-1126-95 (NWQL Schedules 2001 and 2010) by using identical sample preparation and comparable instrument analytical conditions so that sample extracts can be analyzed by either method to expand the range of analytes determined from one water sample.

  14. Monitoring of atmospheric gaseous and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in South African platinum mines utilising portable denuder sampling with analysis by thermal desorption-comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Geldenhuys, G; Rohwer, E R; Naudé, Y; Forbes, P B C

    2015-02-01

    Concentrations of diesel particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in platinum mine environments are likely to be higher than in ambient air due to the use of diesel machinery in confined environments. Airborne PAHs may be present in gaseous or particle phases each of which has different human health impacts due to their ultimate fate in the body. Here we report on the simultaneous sampling of both phases of airborne PAHs for the first time in underground platinum mines in South Africa, which was made possible by employing small, portable denuder sampling devices consisting of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) multi-channel traps connected in series separated by a quartz fibre filter, which only require small, battery operated portable personal sampling pumps for air sampling. Thermal desorption coupled with comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TofMS) was used to analyse denuder samples taken in three different platinum mines. The samples from a range of underground environments revealed that PAHs were predominantly found in the gas phase with naphthalene and mono-methylated naphthalene derivatives being detected at the highest concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 18 ?g m(-3). The particle bound PAHs were found in the highest concentrations at the idling load haul dump vehicle exhausts with a dominance of fluoranthene and pyrene. Particle associated PAH concentrations ranged from 0.47 to 260 ng m(-3) and included benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and benzo[ghi]perylene. This work highlights the need to characterise both phases in order to assess occupational exposure to PAHs in this challenging sampling environment. PMID:25582484

  15. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group : determination of selected herbicides and their degradation products in water using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kish, J.L.; Thurman, E.M.; Scribner, E.A.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for the extraction and analysis of eight herbicides and five degradation products using solid-phase extraction from natural water samples followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is presented in this report. This method was developed for dimethenamid; flufenacet; fluometuron and its degradation products, demethylfluometuron (DMFM), 3-(trifluromethyl)phenylurea (TFMPU), 3-(trifluromethyl)-aniline (TFMA); molinate; norflurazon and its degradation product, demethylnorflurazon; pendamethalin; the degradation product of prometryn, deisopropylprometryn; propanil; and trifluralin. The eight herbicides are used primarily in the southern United States where cotton, rice, and soybeans are produced. The exceptions are dimethenamid and flufenacet, which are used on corn in the Midwest. Water samples received by the U.S. Geological Survey's Organic Geochemistry Research Group in Lawrence, Kansas, are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then passed through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica (C-18) to extract the compounds. The herbicides and their degradation products are removed from the column by ethyl acetate elution. The eluate is evaporated under nitrogen, and components then are separated, identified, and quantified by injecting an aliquot of the concentrated extract into a high-resolution, fused-silica capillary column of a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer under selected-ion mode. Method detection limits ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ?g/L for all compounds with the exception of TFMPU, which has a method detection limit of 0.32 ?g/L. The mean absolute recovery is 107 percent. This method for the determination of herbicides and their degradation products is valuable for acquiring information about water quality and compound fate and transport in water.

  16. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of pharmacologically active substances in urine and blood samples by use of a continuous solid-phase extraction system and microwave-assisted derivatization.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Abdelmonaim; Ballesteros, Evaristo

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine 22 pharmacologically active substances (frequently used in the treatment of human and animal's diseases) including analgesics, antibacterials, anti-epileptics, antiseptics, ?-blockers, hormones, lipid regulators and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories in blood and urine samples. Samples were subjected to continuous solid-phase extraction in a sorbent column (Oasis HLB), and then the target analytes were eluted with ethyl acetate and derivatized in a household microwave oven at 350 W for 3 min. Finally, these products were determined in a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer equipped with a DB-5 fused silica capillary column. The analyte detection limits thus obtained ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 ng L?¹ for urine samples and 0.8-5.6 ng L?¹ for blood samples. Recoveries from both blood and urine ranged from 85 to 102%, and within-day and between-day relative standard deviations were all less than 7.5%. The proposed method offers advantages in reduction of the exposure danger to toxic solvents used in conventional sample pretreatment, simplicity of the extraction processes, rapidity, and sensitivity enhancement. The method was successfully used to quantify pharmacologically active substances in human and animal (lamb, veal and pig) blood and urine. The hormones estrone and 17?-estradiol were detected in virtually all samples, and so were other analytes such as acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and triclosan in human samples, and florfenicol, pyrimethamine and phenylbutazone in animal samples. PMID:22391330

  17. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by microwave-assisted silylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis for simultaneous trace quantification of bisphenol A and 13 ultraviolet filters in wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Pena, A; Fernandes, J O

    2015-10-01

    A novel multi-residue gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was validated for the simultaneous determination of trace levels (ng/L) of 13 UV-filters and bisphenol A (BPA) in wastewater samples. It was based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLMME) followed by rapid microwave-assisted silylation of the analytes. Several parameters of both extraction and derivatization steps such as type of extractive and dispersive solvents, solvent volumes, pH, salt addition, time and power of microwave were evaluated to achieve the highest yield and to attain the lowest detection limits. Optimized DLLME consisted in the formation of a cloudy solution promoted by the fast addition to the sample (10mL) of a mixture of tetrachloroethylene (50?L, extraction solvent) in acetone (1mL, dispersive solvent). The sedimented phase obtained was evaporated and further silylated under the irradiation of 600W microwave for 5min, being the derivatization yields similar to those obtained after a conventional heating process for 30min at 75°C. Limits of detection and quantification of the method using real samples were 2ng/L and 10ng/L, respectively. Mean extraction efficiency of 82% for three concentrations were achieved, supporting the accuracy of the method. Intra-day and inter-day repeatability of measurements (expressed as relative standard deviation) were lower than 22%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of UV-filters and BPA in samples collected from 15 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Portugal. Eight analytes were detected, among which 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-(dimethylamino)benzoate, octocrylene, and BPA were consistently found in the three seasons of collection. PMID:26341596

  18. Determination of 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole in soils contaminated by rocket fuel using solid-phase microextraction, isotope dilution and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yegemova, Saltanat; Bakaikina, Nadezhda V; Kenessov, Bulat; Koziel, Jacek A; Nauryzbayev, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Environmental monitoring of Central Kazakhstan territories where heavy space booster rockets land requires fast, efficient, and inexpensive analytical methods. The goal of this study was to develop a method for quantitation of the most stable transformation product of rocket fuel, i.e., highly toxic unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine - 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole (MTA) in soils using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Quantitation of organic compounds in soil samples by SPME is complicated by a matrix effect. Thus, an isotope dilution method was chosen using deuterated analyte (1-(trideuteromethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole; MTA-d3) for matrix effect control. The work included study of the matrix effect, optimization of a sample equilibration stage (time and temperature) after spiking MTA-d3 and validation of the developed method. Soils of different type and water content showed an order of magnitude difference in SPME effectiveness of the analyte. Isotope dilution minimized matrix effects. However, proper equilibration of MTA-d3 in soil was required. Complete MTA-d3 equilibration at temperatures below 40°C was not observed. Increase of temperature to 60°C and 80°C enhanced equilibration reaching theoretical MTA/MTA-d3 response ratios after 13 and 3h, respectively. Recoveries of MTA depended on concentrations of spiked MTA-d3 during method validation. Lowest spiked MTA-d3 concentration (0.24 mg kg(-1)) provided best MTA recoveries (91-121%). Addition of excess water to soil sample prior to SPME increased equilibration rate, but it also decreased method sensitivity. Method detection limit depended on soil type, water content, and was always below 1 mg kg(-1). The newly developed method is fully automated, and requires much lower time, labor and financial resources compared to known methods. PMID:26078153

  19. Determination of vitamins D2 and D3 in selected food matrices by online high-performance liquid chromatography-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Nestola, Marco; Thellmann, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    An online normal-phase liquid chromatography-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of vitamins D2 and D3 in selected food matrices. Transfer of the sample from HPLC to GC was realized by large volume on-column injection; detection was performed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Typical GC problems in the determination of vitamin D such as sample degradation or sensitivity issues, previously reported in the literature, were not observed. Determination of total vitamin D content was done by quantitation of its pyro isomer based on an isotopically labelled internal standard (ISTD). Extracted ion traces of analyte and ISTD showed cross-contribution, but non-linearity of the calibration curve was not determined inside the chosen calibration range by selection of appropriate quantifier ions. Absolute limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for vitamins D2 and D3 were calculated as approximately 50 and 150 pg, respectively. Repeatability with internal standard correction was below 2 %. Good agreement between quantitative results of an established high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV) method and HPLC-GC-MS was found. Sterol-enriched margarine was subjected to HPLC-GC-MS and HPLC-MS/MS for comparison, because HPLC-UV showed strong matrix interferences. HPLC-GC-MS produced comparable results with less manual sample cleanup. In summary, online hyphenation of HPLC and GC allowed a minimization in manual sample preparation with an increase of sample throughput. PMID:25192789

  20. Trace analysis of benzophenone-derived compounds in surface waters and sediments using solid-phase extraction and microwave-assisted extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kotnik, Kristina; Kosjek, Tina; Krajnc, Uroš; Heath, Ester

    2014-05-01

    This study describes a procedure for determining eight benzophenone-derived compounds in surface waters and sediments. These include the pharmaceutical ketoprofen, its phototransformation products 3-ethylbenzophenone and 3-acetylbenzophenone, and five benzophenone-type ultraviolet (UV) filters. The proposed analytical method involves the pre-concentration of water samples by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of sediment samples followed by derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Different parameters were investigated to achieve optimal method performance. Recoveries of 91 to 96 % from water samples were obtained using HLB Oasis SPE cartridges, whereas MAE of sediments (30 min at 150 °C) gave recoveries of 80 to 99 %. Limits of detection were between 0.1 and 1.9 ng L(-1) for water samples and from 0.1 to 1.4 ng g(-1) for sediment samples. The developed method was applied to environmental samples and revealed the presence of UV filters in the majority of the surface waters with up to 690 ng L(-1) of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone. By contrast, ketoprofen (?2,900 ng L(-1)) and its degradation products (?320 ng L(-1)) were found in only two rivers, both receiving wastewater treatment plant effluents. Sediment analysis revealed benzophenone to be present in concentrations up to 650 ng g(-1), whereas concentrations of other compounds were considerably lower (?32 ng L(-1)). For the first time, quantifiable amounts of two ketoprofen transformation products in the aqueous environment are reported. PMID:24682231

  1. Simultaneous determination of methyl tert-butyl ether, its degradation products and other gasoline additives in soil samples by closed-system purge-and-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Mònica; Lacorte, Sílvia; Barceló, Damià

    2006-11-01

    A new protocol for the simultaneous determination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE); its main degradation products: tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and tert-butyl formate (TBF); other gasoline additives, oxygenate dialkyl ethers: ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE); aromatics: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) and other compounds causing odour events such as dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in soils has been developed. On the basis of US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) method 5035A, a fully automated closed-system purge-and-trap coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) was optimised and permitted to detect microg/kg concentrations in solid matrices avoiding losses of volatile compounds during operation processes. Parameters optimised were the sampling procedure, sample preservation and storage, purging temperature, matrix effects and quantification mode. Using 5 g of sample, detection limits were between 0.02 and 1.63 microg/kg and acceptable method precision and accuracy was obtained provided quantification was performed using adequate internal standards. Soil samples should be analysed as soon as possible after collection, stored under -15 degrees C for not longer than 7 days if degradation products have to be analysed. The non-preservative alternative (empty vial) provided good recoveries of the most analytes when freezing the samples up to 7 day holding time, however, if biologically active soil are analysed the preservation with trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate (Na(3)PO(4).12H(2)O or TSP) is strongly recommended more than sodium bisulphate (NaHSO(4)). The method was finally applied to provide threshold and background levels of several gasoline additives in a point source and in sites not influenced by gasoline spills. The proposed method provides the directions for the future application on real samples in current monitoring programs at gasoline pollution risk sites where till now little monitoring data for MTBE in soils are available. PMID:16904119

  2. Contact solid-phase microextraction with uncoated glass and polydimethylsiloxane-coated fibers versus solvent sampling for the determination of hydrocarbons in adhesion secretions of Madagascar hissing cockroaches Gromphadorrhina portentosa (Blattodea) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Heike; Schmitt, Christian; Betz, Oliver; Albert, Klaus; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Molecular profiles of adhesion secretions of Gromphadorrhina portentosa (Madagascar hissing cockroach, Blattodea) were investigated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with particular focus on a comprehensive analysis of linear and branched hydrocarbons. For this purpose, secretions from the tarsi (feet), possibly contributing to adhesion on smooth surfaces, and control samples taken from the tibiae (lower legs), which contain general cuticular hydrocarbons that are supposed to be not involved in the biological adhesion function, were analyzed and their molecular fingerprints compared. A major analytical difficulty in such a study constitutes the representative, spatially controlled, precise and reproducible sampling from a living insect as well as the minute quantities of insect secretions on both tarsi and tibiae. Thus, three different in vivo sampling methods were compared in terms of sampling reproducibility and extraction efficiency by replicate measurement of samples from tarsi and tibiae. While contact solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber showed higher peak intensities, a self-made uncoated glass fiber had the best repeatability in contact-SPME sampling. Chromatographic profiles of these two contact-SPME sampling methods were statistically not significantly different. Inter-individual variances were larger than potentially existing minor differences in molecular patterns of distinct sampling methods. Sampling by solvent extraction was time consuming, showed lower sensitivities and was less reproducible. In general, sampling by contact-SPME with a cheap glass fiber turned out to be a viable alternative to PDMS-SPME sampling. Hydrocarbon patterns of the tarsal adhesion secretions were qualitatively similar to those of epicuticular hydrocarbon profiles of the tibiae. However, hydrocarbons were in general less abundant in tarsal secretions than secretions from tibiae. PMID:25728659

  3. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry studies of carbon metabolism in the actinomycin D producer Streptomyces parvulus by use of 13C-labeled precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Inbar, L; Lapidot, A

    1991-01-01

    Fructose and glutamate metabolism was monitored in cell suspensions of streptomyces parvulus by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. The experiments were performed for cells grown with various 13C sources in a growth medium containing D-[U-13C]fructose, L-[13C]glutamate, or L-[U-13C]aspartate and with nonlabeled precursors to compare intracellular pools in S. parvulus cells at different periods of the cell life cycle. The transport of fructose into the cells was biphasic in nature; during rapid transport, mannitol, fructose, and glucose 6-phosphate were accumulated intracellularly, whereas during the passive diffusion of fructose, the intracellular carbohydrate pool comprised mainly trehalose (1,1'-alpha-alpha-D-glucose). The regulation of fructokinase activity by the intracellular intermediates may play an important role in fructose catabolism in S. parvulus. Transaldolase activity in S. parvulus was determined from the 13C nuclear magnetic resonance labeling pattern of trehalose carbons obtained from cells grown in medium containing either L-[U-13C]aspartate or L-[U-13C]glutamate. Only carbons 4, 5, and 6 of the disaccharide were labeled. Isotopomer analysis of the trehalose carbons led us to conclude that the flux through the reverse glycolytic pathway, condensation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate with dihydroxyacetone phosphate, makes at best a minor contribution to the 13C-labeled glucose units observed in trehalose. The pentose pathway and transaldolase activity can explain the labeling pattern of 4,5,6-13C3 of trehalose. Moreover, the transfer of the 13C label of L-[U-13C]aspartate into the different isotopomers of trehalose C4, C5, and C6 by the transaldolase activity allowed us to calculate the relative fluxes from oxaloacetate via gluconeogenesis and through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The ratio of the two fluxes is approximately 1. However, the main carbon source for trehalose synthesis in S. parvulus is fructose and not glutamate or aspartate. The 13C enrichment and isotopomer population, measured by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, of the actinomycin D peptide ring enabled us to specify the origins of the five amino acids of actinomycin D. Threonine and proline exhibited isotopomer populations similar to that of the extracellular L-[13C]glutamate, indicating that protein catabolism is the origin of their 13C label, whereas the isotopomer populations of sarcosine and N-methylvaline were similar to those of the new intracellular pool of S. parvulus that originated from D-[U-13C]fructose during the production of actinomycin D. PMID:1744035

  4. Simultaneous determination of bisphenol A and bisphenol B in beverages and powdered infant formula by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Almeida, C; Mendes, E; Fernandes, J O

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable, cost-effective, fast and simple method to quantify simultaneously both bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol B (BPB) in liquid food matrixes such as canned beverages (soft drinks and beers) and powdered infant formula using dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) with in-situ derivatisation coupled with heart-cutting gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For the optimisation of the DLLME procedure different amounts of various extractive and dispersive solvents as well as different amounts of the derivative reagent were compared for their effects on extraction efficiency and yields. The optimised procedure consisted of the injection of a mixture containing tetrachloroethylene (extractant), acetonitrile (dispersant) and acetic anhydride (derivatising reagent) directly into an aliquot of beverage samples or into an aqueous extract of powdered milk samples obtained after a pretreatment of the samples. Given the compatibility of the solvents used, and the low volumes involved, the procedure was easily associated with GC-MS end-point determination, which was accomplished by means of an accurate GC dual column (heart-cutting) technique. Careful optimisation of heart-cutting GC-MS conditions, namely pressure of front and auxiliary inlets, have resulted in a good analytical performance. The linearity of the matrix-matched calibration curves was acceptable, with coefficients of determination (r2) always higher than 0.99. Average recoveries of the BPA and BPB spiked at two concentration levels into beverages and powdered infant formula ranged from 68% to 114% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was <15%. The limits of detection (LOD) in canned beverages were 5.0 and 2.0 ng l(-1) for BPA and BPB, respectively, whereas LOD in powdered infant formula were 60.0 and 30.0 ng l(-1), respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ) in canned beverages were 10.0 and 7.0 ng l-1 for BPA and BPB, respectively, whereas LOQ in powdered infant formula were 200.0 and 100.0 ng l(-1), respectively. BPA was detected in 21 of 30 canned beverages (ranging from 0.03 to 4.70 µg l(-1)) and in two of seven powdered infant formula samples (0.23 and 0.40 µg l(-1)) collected in Portugal. BPB was only detected in canned beverages being positive in 15 of 30 samples analysed (ranging from 0.06 to 0.17 µg l(-1)). This is the first report about the presence of BPA and BPB in canned beverages and powdered infant formula in the Portuguese market. PMID:21240700

  5. Optimization of ultrasound assisted-emulsification-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction by experimental design methodologies for the determination of sulfur compounds in wines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jofré, Viviana P; Assof, Mariela V; Fanzone, Martín L; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Martínez, Luis D; Silva, María F

    2010-12-17

    A new method was developed for analyzing sulfur compounds in the aroma of white wines using ultrasound assisted-emulsification-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection. In the present work, the analytical method for simultaneous determination of seven sulfur compounds (methylmercaptoacetate, methyl(methylthio)acetate, 2-methylthioethanol, 3-methylthiopropanol, 3-methylthiohexanol, 4-methylthio-4-methyl-2-pentanone and hexanethiol) is reported. Parameters that affect the efficiency of the methodology such as extracting and dispersing solvents, sample volume, ion strength, cavitation time and centrifugation time were investigated using a fractionated factorial 2(6-1) (R=V) screening design. Then, the factors presenting significant positive effects on the analytical response (extracting volume, ion strength, cavitation time and centrifugation time) were considered in a further central composite design to optimize the operational conditions for the ultrasound assisted-emulsification-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure. Additionally, multiple response simultaneous optimization by using the desirability function was used to find the optimum experimental conditions. The best results were obtained using pH sample 4.25, extractant volume 150?L, ionic strength 8.75% NaCl, cavitation time 20s and centrifugation time 50s. The use of the optimized ultrasound assisted-emulsification-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique allowed to obtain the best extraction results with the minimum interference from other substances from the matrix, and it allowed to quantify the analytes in white wine samples by calibration graphs. Recoveries ranging from 91.99% to 125.87% for all sulfur compounds proved the accuracy of the proposed method in white wine samples. Method detection limits were in the range of 0.36-1.67ngmL(-1) and limits of quantitation were between 0.63 and 3.02ngmL(-1) for sulfur compounds in white wine samples. The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination concentrations of sulfur compounds in different commercial Chardonnay wine samples from Mendoza, Argentine. PMID:21094391

  6. Analysis of ketamine and norketamine in urine by automatic solid-phase extraction (SPE) and positive ion chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-mi; Lee, Ju-seon; Choi, Sang-kil; Lim, Mi-ae; Chung, Hee-sun

    2008-01-30

    Ketamine (KT) is widely abused for hallucination and also misused as a "date-rape" drug in recent years. An analytical method using positive ion chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS) with an automatic solid-phase extraction (SPE) apparatus was studied for the determination of KT and its major metabolite, norketamine (NK), in urine. Six ketamine suspected urine samples were provided by the police. For the research of KT metabolism, KT was administered to SD rats by i.p. at a single dose of 5, 10 and 20mg/kg, respectively, and urine samples were collected 24, 48 and 72 h after administration. For the detection of KT and NK, urine samples were extracted on an automatic SPE apparatus (RapidTrace, Zymark) with mixed mode type cartridge, Drug-Clean (200 mg, Alltech). The identification of KT and NK was by PCI-GC-MS. m/z238 (M+1), 220 for KT, m/z 224 (M+1), 207 for NK and m/z307 (M+1) for Cocaine-D(3) as internal standard were extracted from the full-scan mass spectrum and the underlined ions were used for quantitation. Extracted calibration curves were linear from 50 to 1000 ng/mL for KT and NK with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. The limit of detection (LOD) was 25 ng/mL for KT and NK. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 50 ng/mL for KT and NK. The recoveries of KT and NK at three different concentrations (86, 430 and 860 ng/mL) were 53.1 to 79.7% and 45.7 to 83.0%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day run precisions (CV) for KT and NK were less than 15.0%, and the accuracies (bias) for KT and NK were also less than 15% at the three different concentration levels (86, 430 and 860 ng/mL). The analytical method was also applied to real six KT suspected urine specimens and KT administered rat urines, and the concentrations of KT and NK were determined. Dehydronorketamine (DHNK) was also confirmed in these urine samples, however the concentration of DHNK was not calculated. SPE is simple, and needs less organic solvent than liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), and PCI-GC-MS can offer both qualitative and quantitative information for urinalysis of KT in forensic analysis. PMID:17553643

  7. Cortisol production rates measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, N.V.; Yergey, A.L. )

    1990-04-01

    Cortisol production rates (FPRs) in physiologic and pathologic states in humans have been investigated over the past 30 years. However, there has been conflicting evidence concerning the validity of the currently accepted value of FPRs in humans (12 to 15 mg/m2/d) as determined by radiotracer methodology. The present study reviews previous methods proposed for the measurement of FPRs in humans and discusses the applications of the first method for the direct determination of 24-hour plasma FPRs during continuous administration of a stable isotope, using a thermospray high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. The technique is fast, sensitive, and, unlike gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, does not require derivatization, allowing on-line detection and quantification of plasma cortisol after a simple extraction procedure. The results of determination of plasma FPRs by stable tracer/mass spectrometry are directly in units of mass/time and, unlike radiotracer methods, are independent of any determination of volume of distribution or cortisol concentration. Our methodology offers distinct advantages over radiotracer techniques in simplicity and reliability since only single measurements of isotope ratios are required. The technique was validated in adrenalectomized patients. Circadian variations in daily FRPs were observed in normal volunteers, and, to date, results suggest a lower FRP in normal children and adults than previously believed. 88 references.

  8. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of 86 volatile organic compounds in water by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, including detections less than reporting limits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connor, Brooke F.; Rose, Donna L.; Noriega, Mary C.; Murtaugh, Lucinda K.; Abney, Sonja R.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents precision and accuracy data for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the nanogram-per-liter range, including aromatic hydrocarbons, reformulated fuel components, and halogenated hydrocarbons using purge and trap capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. One-hundred-four VOCs were initially tested. Of these, 86 are suitable for determination by this method. Selected data are provided for the 18 VOCs that were not included. This method also allows for the reporting of semiquantitative results for tentatively identified VOCs not included in the list of method compounds. Method detection limits, method performance data, preservation study results, and blank results are presented. The authors describe a procedure for reporting low-concentration detections at less than the reporting limit. The nondetection value (NDV) is introduced as a statistically defined reporting limit designed to limit false positives and false negatives to less than 1 percent. Nondetections of method compounds are reported as ?less than NDV.? Positive detections measured at less than NDV are reported as estimated concentrations to alert the data user to decreased confidence in accurate quantitation. Instructions are provided for analysts to report data at less than the reporting limits. This method can support the use of either method reporting limits that censor detections at lower concentrations or the use of NDVs as reporting limits. The data-reporting strategy for providing analytical results at less than the reporting limit is a result of the increased need to identify the presence or absence of environmental contaminants in water samples at increasingly lower concentrations. Long-term method detection limits (LTMDLs) for 86 selected compounds range from 0.013 to 2.452 micrograms per liter (?g/L) and differ from standard method detection limits (MDLs) in that the LTMDLs include the long-term variance of multiple instruments, multiple operators, and multiple calibrations over a longer time. For these reasons, LTMDLs are expected to be slightly higher than standard MDLs. Recoveries for all of the VOCs tested ranged from 36 (tert-butyl formate) to 155 percent (pentachlorobenzene). The majority of the compounds ranged from 85 to 115 percent recovery and had less than 5 percent relative standard deviation for concentrations spiked between 1 to 500 ?g/L in volatile blank-, surface-, and ground-water samples. Recoveries of 60 set spikes at low concentrations ranged from 70 to 114 percent (1,2,3- trimethylbenzene and acetone). Recovery data were collected over 6 months with multiple instruments, operators, and calibrations. In this method, volatile organic compounds are extracted from a water sample by actively purging with helium. The VOCs are collected onto a sorbent trap, thermally desorbed, separated by a Megabore gas chromatographic capillary column, and finally determined by a full-scan quadrupole mass spectrometer. Compound identification is confirmed by the gas chromatographic retention time and by the resultant mass spectrum, typically identified by three unique ions. An unknown compound detected in a sample can be tentatively identified by comparing the unknown mass spectrum to reference spectra in the mass-spectra computer-data system library compiled by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  9. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Quantitation: Applications and Methods

    E-print Network

    Baird, Serena Nicole

    2013-12-31

    , and environmental hazards. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is capable of completing such tasks using a variety of quantitative methods. In Chapter 1, these methods are presented with regards to chemical warfare agent studies. External calibration...

  10. Characterization of polychlorinated biphenyl isomers in Sovol and trichlorodiphenyl formulations by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection and high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.; Sandell, E. )

    1992-10-01

    The composition of two technical polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) formulations, Sovol and Trichlorodiphenyl, has been characterized by high-resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) with electron capture detection (ECD) and HRGC-mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. Identification of the individual PCB components has been made by comparison of relative retention times (RRTs) for seven individual PCB standards, for individual peaks of Sovol and Trichlorodiphenyl, and for different types of Aroclor mixtures. Also, the correlation to literature data was analyzed. The accuracy of PCB determination with this approach depends on the similarity of the production process and the high reproducibility of retention time data obtained for individual peaks by HRGC-ECD. Average weight percent distribution of the PCB isomer group was calculated for Sovol and Trichlorodiphenyl and compared to Aroclor data. The results indicate that Sovol and Trichlorodiphenyl formulations are fairly close to Aroclors 1254 and 1242, respectively. 22 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. On-site profiling and speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at manufactured gas plant sites by a high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe coupled to a photoionization detector and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Considine; Albert Robbat Jr.

    2008-02-15

    A new high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe (HTTL-MIP) coupled to a photoionization detector (PID) and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) was used to rapidly profile and speciate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the subsurface. PID signals were in agreement with GC/MS results. Correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.99 were obtained for discrete and composite samples collected from the same exact location. Continuous probe advancement with PID detection found coal tar, a dense nonaqueous phase liquid, in soil channels and saturated media. When samples were collected conventionally, split, solvent extracted, and analyzed in the field and confirmation laboratory, GC/MS measurement precision and accuracy were indistinguishable; despite the fact the field laboratory produced data five times faster than the laboratory using standard EPA methods. No false positive/negatives were found. Based on these findings, increased confidence in site conceptual models should be obtained, since PID response indicated total PAH presence/absence in 'real-time', while GC/MS provided information as to which PAH was present and at what concentration. Incorporation of this tool into a dynamic workplan will provide more data at less cost enabling environmental scientists, engineers, and regulators to better understand coal tar migration and its impact on human health and the environment. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  13. Analysis of Organic Molecules Extracted from Mars Analogues and Influence of Their Mineralogy Using N-Methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)Trifluoroacetamide Derivatization Coupled with Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry in Preparation for the Sample Analysis at Mars Derivatization Experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalport, F.; Glavin, D. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Coll, P.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; McAdam, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    The search for complex organic molecules on Mars, including important biomolecules such as amino acids and carboxylic acids will require a chemical extraction and derivatization step to transform these organic compounds into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). We have developed, a one-pot extraction and chemical derivatization protocol using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF) for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The temperature and duration the derivatization reaction, pre-concentration of chemical derivatives, and gas chromatographic separation parameters have been optimized under SAM instrument design constraints. MTBSTFA/DMF extraction and derivatization at 300 C for several minutes of a variety of terrestrial Mars analogue materials facilitated the detection of amino acids and carboxylic acids in a surface soil sample collected from the Atacama Desert and a carbonate-rich stromatolite sample from Svalbard. However, the rapid reaction of MTBSTFA with water in several analogue materials that contained high abundances of hydrated minerals and the possible deactivation of derivatized compounds by iron oxides, as detected by XRD/XRF using the CheMin field unit Terra, proved to be highly problematic for the direct extraction of organics using MTBSTFA, The combination of pyrolysis and two different chemical derivatization methods employed by SAM should enable a wide range of organic compounds to be detected by GCMS if present on Mars,

  14. DETERMINATION OF PESTICIDES IN COMPOSITE DIETARY SAMPLES BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY IN THE SELECTED ION MONITORING MODE USING A TEMPERATURE PROGRAMMABLE LARGE VOLUME INJECTOR WITH PRE-SEPARATION COLUMN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of a temperature-programmable pre-separation column in the gas chromatographic injection port permits determination of a wide range of semi-volatile pesticides including organochlorines, organophosphates, triazines, and anilines in fatty composite dietary samples while reduci...

  15. Method for Characterization of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids in Atmospheric Aerosols Using Ion Chromatography Mass

    E-print Network

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Lacey C. Brent,* Jessica L. Reiner, Russell R. Dickerson, and Lane C. Sander spectroscopy (FTIR), liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (LCUV), or nuclear magnetic resonance chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) methods have demonstrated reliable structural identification of water

  16. Differential Protein Expression Analysis via Liquid-Chromatography/Mass-Spectrometry Data Visualization

    E-print Network

    Linsen, Lars

    Differential Protein Expression Analysis via Liquid-Chromatography/Mass-Spectrometry Data, Germany (a) (b) Figure 1: Interactive visualization of liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry data: (a of liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry data in a 3D space, which allows for the understanding

  17. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices for determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey California District Organic Chemistry Laboratory, 1996-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Baker, Lucian M.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2000-01-01

    A method of analysis and quality-assurance practices were developed to study the fate and transport of pesticides in the San Francisco Bay-Estuary by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended-particulate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide and the pesticides were eluted with three cartridge volumes of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1) solution. The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for pesticides ranged from 0.002 to 0.025 microgram per liter for 1-liter samples. Recoveries ranged from 44 to 140 percent for 25 pesticides in samples of organic-free reagent water and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Bay water fortified at 0.05 and 0.50 microgram per liter. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges ranged from 10 to 257 days.

  18. Determination of UV-filter residues in bathing waters by liquid chromatography UV-diode array and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after micelle mediated extraction-solvent back extraction.

    PubMed

    Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Sakkas, Vasilios A; Albanis, Triantafyllos A; Lampropoulou, Dimitra A

    2005-06-01

    A preconcentration methodology utilizing the cloud point phenomenon is described in this study for the determination of sunscreen agent residues in bathing waters by reversed phase liquid chromatography with UV detection and gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The method employs the entrapment of the analytes in the micelles of the non-ionic surfactant TX-114, upon increase of the solution temperature to 60 degrees C. The analytes are either re-extracted or back extracted from the final micellar extract into appropriate organic solvents, a procedure that facilitates the direct application of the method not only with liquid chromatography but mostly importantly with gas chromatographic analysis. Ultrasonication was employed to assist the procedure and accelerate the extraction of the analytes into the solvent phase. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the method affords satisfactory recoveries in the range of 95-102% and relative standard deviation lower than 6% without interference from the presence of the surfactant. The method was successfully applied to the determination of UV filters in natural waters. PMID:15988982

  19. Characterization of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in green and fermented leaves of Bergenia crassifolia L. by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ID-CUBE direct analysis in real time-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chernetsova, Elena S; Shikov, Alexander N; Crawford, Elizabeth A; Grashorn, Sebastian; Laakso, I; Pozharitskaya, Olga N; Makarov, Valery G; Hiltunen, Raimo; Galambosi, Bertalan; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2014-01-01

    Chemical compositions of volatile and semi-volatile components in green and fermented leaves of Bergenia crassifolia L. were studied. Leaf components were identified using gas chromatography with low resolution mass spectrometry and direct analysis in real time (DART) high resolution mass spectrometry with an ID-CUBE ion source. Phytol, nerolidol, geraniol, linalool, alpha-bisabolol, alpha-bisabololoxide B, alpha-cadinol, delta-cadinene, alpha-terpineol and several other marker compounds of special interest were defined, for which the process of fermentation significantly changed their content in the leaves. Low resolution El GC-MS and ID-CUBE DART-HRMS were found to be complementary methods, as they provide different information, helpful to increase the confidence of identification. PMID:24895781

  20. Characterization of plant materials by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry: high-resolution mass spectrometry, time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry, and Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of spruce needles

    SciTech Connect

    Schulten, H.F.; Simmleit, N.; Mueller, R.

    1989-02-01

    In the course of a forest damage research project spruce needles are analyzed, without pretreatment except drying and milling, by in-source pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry. The mass signals are assigned by using high-resolution mass measurements and thermal degradation products identified by Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography. It is demonstrated that the thermal degradation products characterize the main chemical constituents of spruce needs such as polysaccharides and lignin. Furthermore, thermostable constituents such as lipids, steroids, and flavons are detected. The thermal degradation process is studied by temperature-programmed microfurnace pyrolysis in combination with time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry. The integrated interpretation of results achieved by the presented methods can be applied for the universal characterization of complex and in particular nonsoluble, polydisperse biological and geochemical materials.

  1. S1 certification of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in a candidate certified reference material (organochlorine pesticides in tea) by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della Wai-Mei; Wong, Yee-Lok; Cheng, Eddie Chung-Chin; Lo, Man-Fung; Ho, Clare; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Wong, Siu-Kay

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the certification of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in a candidate tea certified reference material (code: GLHK-11-03) according to the requirements of the ISO Guide 30 series. Certification of GLHK-11-03 was based on an analytical method purposely developed for the accurate measurement of the mass fraction of the target analytes in the material. An isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) method involving determination by (i) gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) and (ii) gas chromatography-electron ionization-high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-EI-HRMS) techniques was employed. The performance of the described method was demonstrated through participation in the key comparison CCQM-K95 "Mid-Polarity Analytes in Food Matrix: Mid-Polarity Pesticides in Tea" organized by the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance-Metrology in Chemistry in 2012, where the study material was the same as the certified reference material (CRM). The values reported by using the developed method were in good agreement with the key comparison reference value (KCRV) assigned for beta-endosulfan (727?±?14 ?g kg(-1)) and endosulfan sulfate (505?±?11 ?g kg(-1)), where the degree of equivalence (DoE) values were 0.41 and 0.40, respectively. The certified values of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in dry mass fraction in GLHK-11-03 were 350, 730, and 502 ?g kg(-1), respectively, and the respective expanded uncertainties, due to sample inhomogeneity, long-term and short-term stability, and variability in the characterization procedure, were 27 ?g kg(-1) (7.8 %), 48 ?g kg(-1) (6.6 %), and 33 ?g kg(-1) (6.6 %). PMID:25619984

  2. Measurement of breakthrough volumes of volatile chemical warfare agents on a poly(2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide)-based adsorbent and application to thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-09-01

    To establish adequate on-site solvent trapping of volatile chemical warfare agents (CWAs) from air samples, we measured the breakthrough volumes of CWAs on three adsorbent resins by an elution technique using direct electron ionization mass spectrometry. The trapping characteristics of Tenax(®) TA were better than those of Tenax(®) GR and Carboxen(®) 1016. The latter two adsorbents showed non-reproducible breakthrough behavior and low VX recovery. The specific breakthrough values were more than 44 (sarin) L/g Tenax(®) TA resin at 20°C. Logarithmic values of specific breakthrough volume for four nerve agents (sarin, soman, tabun, and VX) showed a nearly linear correlation with the reciprocals of their boiling points, but the data point of sulfur mustard deviated from this linear curve. Next, we developed a method to determine volatile CWAs in ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography (TD-GC/MS). CWA solutions that were spiked into the Tenax TA(®) adsorbent tubes were analyzed by a two-stage TD-GC/MS using a Tenax(®) TA-packed cold trap tube. Linear calibration curves for CWAs retained in the resin tubes were obtained in the range between 0.2pL and 100pL for sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and sulfur mustard; and between 2pL and 100pL for VX and Russian VX. We also examined the stability of CWAs in Tenax(®) TA tubes purged with either dry or 50% relative humidity air under storage conditions at room temperature or 4°C. More than 80% sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and sulfur mustard were recovered from the tubes within 2 weeks. In contrast, the recoveries of VX and Russian VX drastically reduced with storage time at room temperature, resulting in a drop to 10-30% after 2 weeks. Moreover, we examined the trapping efficiency of Tenax TA(®) adsorbent tubes for vaporized CWA samples (100mL) prepared in a 500mL gas sampling cylinder. In the concentration range of 0.2-2.5mg/m(3), >50% of sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and HD were recovered, whereas <1% of VX and Russian VX were recovered in the same concentration range. The results indicate that CWA vapors, with the exception of VX and Russian VX, can be measured by an on-site collection procedure using the Tenax(®) TA resin tubes, followed by a subsequent TD-GC/MS analysis. PMID:26239699

  3. Non-targeted metabolomics study for the analysis of chemical compositions in three types of tea by using gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Zhongda; Ye, Guozhu; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2014-08-01

    Tea is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world for its benefits to daily life and health. To discover the difference and correlation of chemical compositions in the three typical types of tea, a non-targeted metabolomics method was developed. After the optimization of extraction methods, gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry were applied for metabolomics analysis, 1,812 and 2,608 features were obtained, respectively. By comparing with the known compounds in public and/or commercial databases, 173 compounds were tentatively identified, and 109 of them were experimentally confirmed by standards. Totally, 33 tea samples including 12, 12 and 9 samples of green, oolong and black tea, respectively, were analyzed by using the above two methods. Multivatiate analysis, Mann-Whitney U test and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to find and visualize the differential components in the three types of tea. Finally, 90 compounds, which contain catechins, amino acids, organic acids, flavonol glycosides, alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, etc, were found with a significant difference among them. This study demonstrates the potentials and power of metabolomics methods to understand the chemical secrets of tea. This should help a lot to optimize the processes of agriculture, storage, preparation and consumption. PMID:25434114

  4. Identification and quantification of (polymeric) hindered-amine light stabilizers in polymers using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-ultraviolet absorbance detection-evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Coulier, L; Kaal, E R; Tienstra, M; Hankemeier, Th

    2005-01-14

    Direct analysis of polymers containing polymeric hindered amine light stabilizers (HALS) by using pyrolysis coupled to GC-MS is applied successfully for fast and straightforward identification of these HALS additives. Each of the HALS additives shows different pyrolysis gas chromatograms containing characteristic pyrolysis products. As a result, HALS additives with very similar chemical structures, e.g. Chimassorb 944 and Chimassorb 2020, can be distinguished. A HPLC method with both ultraviolet (UV) and evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) is developed to quantify the various HALS additives in extracts of polymers. The critical factor of the HPLC method is the use of a basic amine, like n-hexylamine, as a solvent additive to facilitate the elution of HALS additives. The various HALS additives can be distinguished according to retention time and peak shape and by using different detection methods. The suitability of the developed methods is demonstrated by the analytical performance of the HPLC method and the identification and determination of the actual content of HALS additives in polyolefines using pyrolysis GC-MS and HPLC. The HPLC method can also be used for the determination of the specific migration of HALS additives from food contact materials. PMID:15679160

  5. Ripening-dependent metabolic changes in the volatiles of pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) fruit: I. Characterization of pineapple aroma compounds by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Steingass, Christof Björn; Carle, Reinhold; Schmarr, Hans-Georg

    2015-03-01

    Qualitative ripening-dependent changes of pineapple volatiles were studied via headspace solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography quadrupole mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC×GC-qMS). Early green-ripe stage, post-harvest ripened, and green-ripe fruits at the end of their commercial shelf-life were compared to air-freighted pineapples harvested at full maturity. In total, more than 290 volatiles could be identified by mass spectrometry and their linear retention indices. The majority of compounds comprise esters (methyl and ethyl esters of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, acetates), terpenes, alcohols, aldehydes, 2-ketones, free fatty acids, and miscellaneous ?- and ?-lactones. The structured separation space obtained by GC×GC allowed revealing various homologous series of compound classes as well as clustering of sesquiterpenes. Post-harvest ripening increased the diversity of the volatile profile compared to both early green-ripe maturity stages and on-plant ripened fruits. PMID:25701413

  6. Ripening-dependent metabolic changes in the volatiles of pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) fruit: II. Multivariate statistical profiling of pineapple aroma compounds based on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Steingass, Christof Björn; Jutzi, Manfred; Müller, Jenny; Carle, Reinhold; Schmarr, Hans-Georg

    2015-03-01

    Ripening-dependent changes of pineapple volatiles were studied in a nontargeted profiling analysis. Volatiles were isolated via headspace solid phase microextraction and analyzed by comprehensive 2D gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC×GC-qMS). Profile patterns presented in the contour plots were evaluated applying image processing techniques and subsequent multivariate statistical data analysis. Statistical methods comprised unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to classify the samples. Supervised partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression were applied to discriminate different ripening stages and describe the development of volatiles during postharvest storage, respectively. Hereby, substantial chemical markers allowing for class separation were revealed. The workflow permitted the rapid distinction between premature green-ripe pineapples and postharvest-ripened sea-freighted fruits. Volatile profiles of fully ripe air-freighted pineapples were similar to those of green-ripe fruits postharvest ripened for 6 days after simulated sea freight export, after PCA with only two principal components. However, PCA considering also the third principal component allowed differentiation between air-freighted fruits and the four progressing postharvest maturity stages of sea-freighted pineapples. PMID:25651901

  7. Fish contamination by polychlorobiphenyls: the mass spectrometric ortho effect in a new and easy gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of the seven indicators. The case of Bluefin Tuna.

    PubMed

    Masci, Maurizio; Orban, Elena; Nevigato, Teresina

    2015-01-01

    A simple instrumental procedure was developed to carry out the not simple analysis of PCBs in fish samples. PCBs with the same degree of chlorination (the isomers) are expected to be totally indistinguishable among them by all existing detectors and by all existing mass spectrometers, and there is no apparent solution in those frequent cases where two isomers chromatographically coelute. Generally such coelutions are solved by means of multidimensional GC, but it is a complex technique impractical for most laboratories. The present research focuses on the seven important "indicator PCBs" by using the mass spectrometer in an innovative way. The "mass spectrometric ortho effect" was usefully exploited in addressing coelutions between isomers. Other new important observations on mass spectra were decisive in solving the apparent problem arising from coelutions between higher chlorinated PCBs with the lower chlorinated ones when low-resolution MS is used. With the proposed procedure, the seven indicators are analyzed in a simple way and with a degree of accuracy never observed with the conventional gas chromatography. The method was applied to some Bluefin Tuna fish samples of big size suspected to have not negligible levels of PCBs due to the high position of this species in the food chain. The supposition was partly confirmed. On the basis of the results here obtained, the recently introduced EU Regulation on six of the seven indicators shows one critical point: in the present paper, an amendment to the Regulation is proposed. A number of important validation measures are reported. PMID:25498559

  8. Application of pyrolysis-mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization for characterization of crude oils.

    PubMed

    Otto, Stefan; Streibel, Thorsten; Erdmann, Sabrina; Sklorz, Martin; Schulz-Bull, Detlef; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-15

    A novel analytical system for gas-chromatographic investigation of complex samples has been developed, that combines the advantages of several analytical principles to enhance the analytical information. Decomposition of high molecular weight structures is achieved by pyrolysis and a high separation capacity due to the chromatographic step provides both an universal as well as a selective and sensitive substance detection. The latter is achieved by simultaneously applying electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (EI-QMS) for structural elucidation and [1+1]-resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization (REMPI) combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS). The system has been evaluated and tested with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) standards. It was applied to crude oil samples for the first time. In such highly complex samples several thousands of compounds are present and the identification especially of low concentrated chemical species such as PAH or their polycyclic aromatic sulfur containing heterocyclic (PASH) derivatives is often difficult. Detection of unalkylated and alkylated PAH together with PASH is considerably enhanced by REMPI-ToFMS, at times revealing aromatic structures which are not observable by EI-QMS due to their low abundance. On the other hand, the databased structure proposals of the EI-QMS analysis are needed to confirm structural information and isomers distinction. The technique allows a complex structure analysis as well as selective assessment of aromatic substances in one measurement. Information about the content of sulfur containing compounds plays a significant role for the increase of efficiency in the processing of petroleum. PMID:25542090

  9. Stir-bar-sorptive extraction and liquid desorption combined with large-volume injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for ultra-trace analysis of musk compounds in environmental water matrices.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Rita M; Nogueira, J M F

    2010-03-01

    Stir-bar-sorptive extraction with liquid desorption followed by large-volume injection and capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring acquisition mode (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) has been developed to monitor ultra-traces of four musks (celestolide (ADBI), galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN) and musk ketone (MK)) in environmental water matrices. Instrumental calibration (LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) and experimental conditions that could affect the SBSE-LD efficiency are discussed. Assays performed on 30-mL water samples spiked at 200 ng L(-1) under optimized experimental conditions yielded recoveries ranging from 83.7?±?8.1% (MK) to 107.6?±?10.8% (HHCB). Furthermore, the experimental data were in very good agreement with predicted theoretical equilibria described by octanol-water partition coefficients (K (PDMS/W)???K (O/W)). The methodology also showed excellent linear dynamic ranges for the four musks studied, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9961, limits of detection and quantification between 12 and 19 ng L(-1) and between 41 and 62 ng L(-1), respectively, and suitable precision (< 20%). Application of this method for analysis of the musks in real water matrices such as tap, river, sea, and urban wastewater samples resulted in convenient selectivity, high sensitivity and accuracy using the standard addition methodology. The proposed method (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) was shown to be feasible and sensitive, with a low-sample volume requirement, for determination of musk compounds in environmental water matrices at the ultra-trace level, overcoming several disadvantages presented by other sample-preparation techniques. PMID:20049588

  10. Screening of sulphonamides in egg using gas chromatography-mass-selective detection and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tarbin, J A; Clarke, P; Shearer, G

    1999-06-11

    A rapid extraction and clean-up procedure for sulphonamide antibiotics in eggs suitable for both GC-MSD and LC-MS end determinations has been developed. The drugs were extracted using acetonitrile, acidified using acetic acid and cleaned-up using cation- and anion-exchange. For determination by GC-MSD, extracts were derivatised with diazomethane followed by pentafluoropropionic acid anhydride. For LC-MS extracts were taken up in water and used directly. The methodology developed was validated at the 100 and 25 microg kg(-1) levels, equivalent to the MRL and one quarter of the MRL. Results for the GC-MS procedure were quantitated against deuterated sulphadiazine with relative recoveries ranging from 54% for sulphachloropyridazine to 135.5% for sulphamethazine. Recoveries for the LC-MS procedure ranged from 33% for sulphaguanidine to 92% for sulphamethazine and sulphadimethoxine. PMID:10410935

  11. Statistical Assessment of Time and Mass Alignment Quality in Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry 

    E-print Network

    Velando, Isaac

    2011-01-11

    This research evaluated the efficacy of an alignment quality algorithm and follows its development. Proteomics research frequently involves liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods for data collection. To correct for systematic errors...

  12. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY ANALYSIS OF BISPHENOL A (BPA) IN ENVIRONMENTAL

    E-print Network

    Gosselin, Louis A.

    CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY ANALYSIS OF BISPHENOL A (BPA, Augustana Campus April 2015 © Amna Farooq THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY (Kamloops) #12;ii Abstract Bisphenol is from rivers and streams. Presence of bisphenols in the environment is crucial and use of analytical

  13. Capillary Electrophoresis and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Bisphenol A in Environmental Waters

    E-print Network

    Gosselin, Louis A.

    Capillary Electrophoresis and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Bisphenol. Cheeptham Bisphenol A (BPA) and its structural analogues (BPF, BPS, BPP, BPZ, BADGE, BPAP, BPAF) are used water is from rivers and streams. Presence of bisphenols in the environment is crucial and use

  14. Review of Peak Detection Algorithms in Liquid-Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqiu; Gonzalez, Elias; Hestilow, Travis; Haskins, William; Huang, Yufei

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we will discuss peak detection in Liquid-Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS) from a signal processing perspective. A brief introduction to LC/MS is followed by a description of the major processing steps in LC/MS. Specifically, the problem of peak detection is formulated and various peak detection algorithms are described and compared. PMID:20190954

  15. ANALYSIS OF CHLORINATED HERBICIDES BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method that uses high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) for the analysis of chlorinated phenoxyacid herbicides is described. uring method development different techniques were used to increase both the sensitivity and the specificity of thermospray H...

  16. APPLICATION OF A SPRAY DEPOSITION METHOD FOR REVERSED PHASE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four coal gasification wastewater samples were analyzed for nonvolatile and polar organics by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Samples were separated on a reverse phase liquid chromatographic column using an aqueous solvent as the eluant. A special spray depositio...

  17. DIRECT ANALYSIS OF RAT BILE FOR ACETAMINOPHEN AND TWO OF ITS CONJUGATED METABOLITES VIA THERMOSPRAY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bile from rats treated with acetaminophen was analyzed by direct injection onto a thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system. Two conjugated metabolites of acetaminophen were separated by the high-pressure liquid chromatographic system and analyzed by mass spectro...

  18. Determination of Senecio alkaloids by thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parker, C E; Verma, S; Tomer, K B; Reed, R L; Buhler, D R

    1990-01-01

    A series of Senecio alkaloid and alkaloid N-oxide standards has been analyzed using positive and negative ion thermospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with an ammonium acetate-containing mobile phase. On-line separations of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from extracts of Senecio jacobaea (tansy ragwort) and Senecio vulgaris (common groundsel) were done using an ammonium hydroxide-containing mobile phase. All of the alkaloids known to be present in the extracts were detected by ammonium hydroxide thermospray LC/MS, as well as many other components which may be as-yet-unidentified alkaloids. PMID:2306545

  19. Combining peak- and chromatogram-based retention time alignment algorithms for multiple chromatography-mass spectrometry datasets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern analytical methods in biology and chemistry use separation techniques coupled to sensitive detectors, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). These hyphenated methods provide high-dimensional data. Comparing such data manually to find corresponding signals is a laborious task, as each experiment usually consists of thousands of individual scans, each containing hundreds or even thousands of distinct signals. In order to allow for successful identification of metabolites or proteins within such data, especially in the context of metabolomics and proteomics, an accurate alignment and matching of corresponding features between two or more experiments is required. Such a matching algorithm should capture fluctuations in the chromatographic system which lead to non-linear distortions on the time axis, as well as systematic changes in recorded intensities. Many different algorithms for the retention time alignment of GC-MS and LC-MS data have been proposed and published, but all of them focus either on aligning previously extracted peak features or on aligning and comparing the complete raw data containing all available features. Results In this paper we introduce two algorithms for retention time alignment of multiple GC-MS datasets: multiple alignment by bidirectional best hits peak assignment and cluster extension (BIPACE) and center-star multiple alignment by pairwise partitioned dynamic time warping (CeMAPP-DTW). We show how the similarity-based peak group matching method BIPACE may be used for multiple alignment calculation individually and how it can be used as a preprocessing step for the pairwise alignments performed by CeMAPP-DTW. We evaluate the algorithms individually and in combination on a previously published small GC-MS dataset studying the Leishmania parasite and on a larger GC-MS dataset studying grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Conclusions We have shown that BIPACE achieves very high precision and recall and a very low number of false positive peak assignments on both evaluation datasets. CeMAPP-DTW finds a high number of true positives when executed on its own, but achieves even better results when BIPACE is used to constrain its search space. The source code of both algorithms is included in the OpenSource software framework Maltcms, which is available from http://maltcms.sf.net. The evaluation scripts of the present study are available from the same source. PMID:22920415

  20. Simultaneous Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Quantification of Urinary Opiates, Cocaine, and Metabolites in Opiate-Dependent Pregnant Women in Methadone-Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shakleya, Diaa M.; Dams, Riet; Choo, Robin E.; Jones, Hendree; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Opiates, cocaine, and metabolites were quantified by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) in 284 urine specimens, collected thrice weekly, to monitor possible drug relapse in 15 pregnant heroin-dependent women. Opiates were detected in 149 urine specimens (52%) with limits of quantification (LOQ) of 10–50 ?g/L. Morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, and/or morphine-6-glucuronide were positive in 121 specimens; 6-acetylmorphine, a biomarker of heroin ingestion, was quantifiable in only 7. No heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, papaverine, or noscapine were detected. One hundred and sixty-five urine specimens (58%) from all 15 participants were positive for one or more cocaine analytes (LOQ 10–100 ?g/L). Ecgonine methylester (EME) and/or benzoylecgonine were the major cocaine biomarkers in 142. Anhydroecgonine methylester, a biomarker of smoked cocaine, was positive in six; cocaethylene and/or ecgonine ethylester, biomarkers of cocaine and ethanol co-ingestion, were found in 25. At the current Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration cutoffs for total morphine (2000 ?g/L), codeine (2000 ?g/L), 6-acetylmorphine (10 ?g/L), and benzoylecgonine (100 ?g/L), 16 opiate- and 29 cocaine-positive specimens were identified. Considering 100 ?g/L EME as an additional urinary cocaine biomarker would identify 51 more positive cocaine specimens. Of interest is the differential pattern of opiate and cocaine biomarkers observed after LC–MS as compared to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:20109298

  1. Detecting trace components in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry data sets with two-dimensional wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Duane C.; Snapp, Robert R.

    2007-09-01

    TWiGS (two-dimensional wavelet transform with generalized cross validation and soft thresholding) is a novel algorithm for denoising liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data for use in "shot-gun" proteomics. Proteomics, the study of all proteins in an organism, is an emerging field that has already proven successful for drug and disease discovery in humans. There are a number of constraints that limit the effectiveness of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for shot-gun proteomics, where the chemical signals are typically weak, and data sets are computationally large. Most algorithms suffer greatly from a researcher driven bias, making the results irreproducible and unusable by other laboratories. We thus introduce a new algorithm, TWiGS, that removes electrical (additive white) and chemical noise from LC-MS data sets. TWiGS is developed to be a true two-dimensional algorithm, which operates in the time-frequency domain, and minimizes the amount of researcher bias. It is based on the traditional discrete wavelet transform (DWT), which allows for fast and reproducible analysis. The separable two-dimensional DWT decomposition is paired with generalized cross validation and soft thresholding. The Haar, Coiflet-6, Daubechie-4 and the number of decomposition levels are determined based on observed experimental results. Using a synthetic LC-MS data model, TWiGS accurately retains key characteristics of the peaks in both the time and m/z domain, and can detect peaks from noise of the same intensity. TWiGS is applied to angiotensin I and II samples run on a LC-ESI-TOF-MS (liquid-chromatography-electrospray-ionization) to demonstrate its utility for the detection of low-lying peaks obscured by noise.

  2. Isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: methods for isotopic calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Brand, W. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    In trial analyses of a series of n-alkanes, precise determinations of 13C contents were based on isotopic standards introduced by five different techniques and results were compared. Specifically, organic-compound standards were coinjected with the analytes and carried through chromatography and combustion with them; or CO2 was supplied from a conventional inlet and mixed with the analyte in the ion source, or CO2 was supplied from an auxiliary mixing volume and transmitted to the source without interruption of the analyte stream. Additionally, two techniques were investigated in which the analyte stream was diverted and CO2 standards were placed on a near-zero background. All methods provided accurate results. Where applicable, methods not involving interruption of the analyte stream provided the highest performance (sigma = 0.00006 at.% 13C or 0.06% for 250 pmol C as CO2 reaching the ion source), but great care was required. Techniques involving diversion of the analyte stream were immune to interference from coeluting sample components and still provided high precision (0.0001 < or = sigma < or = 0.0002 at.% or 0.1 < or = sigma < or = 0.2%).

  3. Quantification of nerolidol in mouse plasma using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Alexandre Yukio; Sussmann, Rodrigo Antonio Ceschini; Kimura, Emilia Akemi; Cassera, Maria Belen; Katzin, Alejandro Miguel

    2015-07-10

    Nerolidol is a naturally occurring sesquiterpene found in the essential oils of many types of flowers and plants. It is frequently used in cosmetics, as a food flavoring agent, and in cleaning products. In addition, nerolidol is used as a skin penetration enhancer for transdermal delivery of therapeutic drugs. However, nerolidol is hemolytic at low concentrations. A simple and fast GC-MS method was developed for preliminary quantification and assessment of biological interferences of nerolidol in mouse plasma after oral dosing. Calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 0.010-5 ?g/mL nerolidol in mouse plasma with correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.99. Limits of detection and quantification were 0.0017 and 0.0035 ?g/mL, respectively. The optimized method was successfully applied to the quantification of nerolidol in mouse plasma. PMID:25880240

  4. Compound identification in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics by blind source separation.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Almenara, Xavier; Perera, Alexandre; Ramírez, Noelia; Cañellas, Nicolau; Correig, Xavier; Brezmes, Jesus

    2015-08-28

    Metabolomics GC-MS samples involve high complexity data that must be effectively resolved to produce chemically meaningful results. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) is the most frequently reported technique for that purpose. More recently, independent component analysis (ICA) has been reported as an alternative to MCR. Those algorithms attempt to infer a model describing the observed data and, therefore, the least squares regression used in MCR assumes that the data is a linear combination of that model. However, due to the high complexity of real data, the construction of a model to describe optimally the observed data is a critical step and these algorithms should prevent the influence from outlier data. This study proves independent component regression (ICR) as an alternative for GC-MS compound identification. Both ICR and MCR though require least squares regression to correctly resolve the mixtures. In this paper, a novel orthogonal signal deconvolution (OSD) approach is introduced, which uses principal component analysis to determine the compound spectra. The study includes a compound identification comparison between the results by ICA-OSD, MCR-OSD, ICR and MCR-ALS using pure standards and human serum samples. Results shows that ICR may be used as an alternative to multivariate curve methods, as ICR efficiency is comparable to MCR-ALS. Also, the study demonstrates that the proposed OSD approach achieves greater spectral resolution accuracy than the traditional least squares approach when compounds elute under undue interference of biological matrices. PMID:26210114

  5. Analysis of the thermal reaction products of para polyphenylene by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the volatiles and sublimate produced when para-polyphenylene is pyrolyzed to constant weight under vacuum in the temperature range from 380 to 1000 C indicates that the polymer undergoes thermal degradation in two stages. The first stage involved dehydrohalogenation, which is essentially a curing reaction that produces crosslinking between polyphenylene chains resulting from the loss of chlorine from the polymer in the form of hydrogen chloride. The second stage of the thermal degradation is dehydrogenation because hydrogen is the major volatile species. Increasing amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and 9, 10 benzphenanthrene) in the sublimate, concomitant with increasing C/H ratios of the polymeric residue with pyrolysis temperature, is consistent with the buildup of polynuclear structures in the polymer matrix.

  6. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of bioactive petalostigma extracts: Toxicity, antibacterial and antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Kalt, F. R.; Cock, I. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Petalostigma pubescens and Petalostigma triloculare were common components of pharmacopeia's of multiple Australian Aboriginal tribal groupings which traditionally inhabited the areas in which they grow. Among these groups, they had a myriad of medicinal uses in treating a wide variety of bacterial, fungal and viral infections. This study was undertaken to test P. pubescens and P. triloculare leaf and fruit extracts for the ability to inhibit bacterial and viral growth and thus validate Australian Aboriginal usage of these plants in treating bacterial and fungal diseases. Materials and Methods: P. pubescens, and P. triloculare leaves and fruit were extracted and tested for antimicrobial, antiviral activity and toxicity. The bioactive extracts were further examined by RP-HPLC and GC-MS to identify the component compounds. Results: The methanol, water and ethyl acetate leaf and fruit extracts of displayed potent antibacterial activity. The methanol and ethyl acetate extracts displayed the broadest specificity, inhibiting the growth of 10 of the 14 bacteria tested (71%) for the leaf extract and 9 of the 14 bacteria tested (64%) for the fruit extracts. The water extracts also had broad spectrum antibacterial activity, inhibiting the growth of 8 (57%) and 7 (50%) of the 14 bacteria tested, respectively. All antibacterial extracts were approximately equally effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, inhibiting the growth of 50-75% of the bacteria tested. The methanol, water and ethyl acetate extracts also displayed antiviral activity in the MS2 plaque reduction assay. The methanol and water extracts inhibited 26.6-49.0% and 85.4-97.2% of MS2 plaque formation, respectively, with the fruit extracts being more potent inhibitors. All ethyl acetate extracts inhibited 100% of MS2 plaque formation. All extracts were also non-toxic or of low toxicity. Analysis of these extracts by RP-HPLC showed that the P. triloculare ethyl acetate fruit extract was the least complex of the bioactive extracts. Subsequent analysis of this extract by GC-MS revealed that it contained 9 main compounds: acetic acid; 2,2-dimethoxybutane; 4-methyl-1,3-dioxane; decane; unadecane; 2-furanmethanol; 1,2-benzenediol; 1,2,3-benzenetriol; and benzoic acid. Conclusion: These studies validate Australian Aboriginal therapeutic usage of Petalostigma species and indicate their medicinal potential. PMID:24914307

  7. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in seafood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Mastovska, Katerina; Sorenson, Wendy R; Hajslova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to determine selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their relevant alkyl homologs in seafood matrixes using a fast sample preparation method followed by analysis with GC/MS. The sample preparation method involves addition of (13)C-PAH surrogate mixture to homogenized samples and extraction by shaking with a water-ethyl acetate mixture. After phase separation induced by addition of anhydrous magnesium sulfate-sodium chloride (2 + 1, w/w) and centrifugation, an aliquot of the ethyl acetate layer is evaporated, reconstituted in hexane, and cleaned up using silica gel SPE. The analytes are eluted with hexane-dichloromethane (3 + 1, v/v), the clean extract is carefully evaporated, reconstituted in isooctane, and analyzed by GC/MS. To allow for the use of various GC/MS instruments, GC columns, silica SPE cartridges, and evaporation techniques and equipment, performance-based criteria were developed and implemented in the qualification phase of the collaborative study. These criteria helped laboratories optimize their GC/MS, SPE cleanup, and evaporation conditions; check and eliminate potential PAH contamination in their reagent blanks; and become familiar with the method procedure. Ten laboratories from five countries qualified and completed the collaborative study, which was conducted on three seafood matrixes (mussel, oyster, and shrimp) fortified with 19 selected PAH analytes at five different levels of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) ranging from 2 to 50 ?g/kg. Each matrix had a varying mixture of three different BaP levels. The other studied PAHs were at varying levels from 2 to 250 ?g/kg to mimic typical PAH patterns. The fortified analytes in three matrixes were analyzed as blind duplicates at each level of BaP and corresponding other PAH levels. In addition, a blank with no added PAHs for each matrix was analyzed singly. Eight to 10 valid results were obtained for the majority of determinations. Mean recoveries of all tested analytes at the five different concentration levels were all in the range of 70-120%: 83.8-115% in shrimp, 77.3-107% in mussel, and 71.6-94.6% in oyster, except for a slightly lower mean recovery of 68.6% for benzo[ a ]anthracene fortified at 25 ?g/kg in oyster (RSDr: 5.84%, RSDR: 21.1%) and lower mean recoveries for anthracene (Ant) and BaP in oyster at all three fortification levels (50.3-56.5% and 48.2-49.7%, respectively). The lower mean recoveries of Ant and BaP were linked to degradation of these analytes in oyster samples stored at -20°C, which also resulted in lower reproducibility (RSDR values in the range of 44.5-64.7% for Ant and 40.6-43.5% for BaP). However, the repeatability was good (RSDr of 8.78-9.96% for Ant and 6.43-11.9% for BaP), and the HorRat values were acceptable (1.56-1.94 for Ant and 1.10-1.45 for BaP). In all other cases, repeatability, reproducibility, and HorRat values were as follows: shrimp: RSDr 1.40-26.9%, RSDR 5.41-29.4%, HorRat: 0.22-1.34; mussel: RSDr 2.52-17.1%, RSDR 4.19-32.5%, HorRat: 0.17-1.13; and oyster: RSDr 3.12-22.7%, RSDR 8.41-31.8%, HorRat: 0.34-1.39. The results demonstrate that the method is fit-for-purpose to determine PAHs and their alkyl homologs in seafood samples. The method was approved by the Expert Review Panel on PAHs as the AOAC Official First Action Method 2014.08. PMID:25905756

  8. DETERMINATION OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN BIOLOGICAL EXTRACTS BY RETENTION TIME LOCKING CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread use of pesticides in agricultural and urban areas (golf course and residential lawn applications) is largely responsible for the presence of these compounds in many water bodies. Transported by storm-waters, irrigation runoffs, wind, and treated and untreated sewag...

  9. QUANTIFICATION OF OCTACHLOROSTYRENE AND RELATED COMPOUNDS IN GREAT LAKES FISH BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residues of octachlorostyrene (OCS) and related polychlorinated compounds including isomers of heptachloro-, hexachloro-, and pentachlorostyrene; hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene, isomers of tetrachloro- and trichlorobenzene; and hexachlorobutadiene have been quantitated by ...

  10. Gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis of four polluted river waters for phenolic and organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Nomani, A A; Ajmal, M; Ahmad, S

    1996-03-01

    Forty-four water samples from eleven sampling points were collected from four highly polluted rivers of northern India once in each four seasons during 1988-1989. The samples were analyzed for phenol, chlorophenols, a few bromophenols and other organics. Phenol was found to be absent in all the analyzed samples. Trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol were frequently detected. Comparatively, the Ganges river was most polluted at Kannauj followed by Narora, Kachala and Fatehgarh. Maximum phenols were found at Mathura downstream of the Yamuna river followed by Mathura upstream, Okhla, ITO and none at Wazirabad. No phenols were detected in the water of the rivers Hindon and Kali at Ghaziabad and Aligarh, respectively. Some other organic pollutants were also identified by their mass spectra and supported by data from the computerized library, but, not quantified. PMID:24198068

  11. Characterization of lubricity improver additive in diesel by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Michelle J C; Perruso, Carlos R; de Azevedo, Débora A; Pinto, Angelo C

    2005-01-21

    The characterization of lubricity improver additives by GC-MS-SIM is an important tool for the development and monitoring of new formulations as well as for quality control of additives in diesel. A simple method for the quantification of a linoleic oil additive derivative in diesel has been developed. Calibration is performed by analysis of standard solutions containing 2-hydroxy-ethyl linoleate with pentadecanoyl propanoate as the internal standard. The proposed method permitted the quantification of the linoleate ester at a concentration of 300 microg/mL in the additived diesel. The recovery of additive and the repeatability of the quantitative results are evaluated. PMID:15700473

  12. Detection of soil microorganism in situ by combined gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M.; Duxbury, J. M.; Francis, A. J.; Adamson, J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were made to determine whether analysis of volatile metabolic products, formed in situ, is a viable procedure for an extraterrestrial life detection system. Laboratory experiments, carried out under anaerobic conditions with addition of carbon source, extended to include a variety of soils and additional substrates. In situ experiments were conducted without amendment using a vacuum sampling system.

  13. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY STUDY OF MIXED HALOACETIC ACIDS FOUND IN CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last two years, our laboratory and others have identified mono-, di-, and trichloro- acetic acids as major byproducts of drinking water disinfection. n areas of the country where relatively high levels of bromine ion are naturally present in the source water, it is expec...

  14. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry study of sterols from Pinus elliotti tissues.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Evans, R.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    A comparative study of the sterol components of slash pine (Pinus elliotti) callus tissue cultures, seeds, and seedlings was carried out using GC-MS techniques. Cholesterol, desmosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol and cycloeucalenol were identified in all tissues while lophenol and 24-methylenelophenol were identified in only the seed and seedlings. 24-Ethylidenelophenol was detected in trace concentrations in only the seedlings. Sitosterol was the predominant sterol component, i.e., 80.8, 38.1 and 47.8% of the tissue culture, seed and seedling sterols, respectively.

  15. Analysis of soil organic matter biomarkers by sequential chemical degradation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otto, Angelika; Simpson, Myrna J

    2007-02-01

    Low molecular weight (LMW) biomarkers can be used to trace the source and stage of soil organic matter. However, methods that selectively isolate these groups of compounds are underdeveloped. In this study, we isolate biomarkers by a successive series of extraction and chemical degradation procedures involving solvent extraction (TSE), base (BHY) and acid hydrolysis (AHY), and CuO oxidation (CUO). GC-MS was used to analyze these fractions and the extraction methods were verified by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. The GC-MS response was high for the BHY products (96%), intermediate for the TSE (30%) and CUO (19%), but very low for the AHY fraction (5%) indicating that the fractions contain polar or high molecular weight compounds. Aliphatic lipids (62%), phenols and benzyls (17%) were the predominant classes, accompanied by minor abundances of mono- and disaccharides, LMW acids, terpenoids, steroids, amino acids, and amino sugars. The TSE and BHY fractions contained mainly aliphatic lipids derived from plant waxes, cutin, and suberin. Lignin-derived phenols are the major products in the CUO fraction, and amino compounds and carbohydrates of various sources were identified in the AHY products. The sequential degradation method is useful for the isolation and identification of apolar, LMW biomarkers in soil. PMID:17390623

  16. Deuterium Exchange in Ethyl Acetoacetate: An Undergraduate GC-MS [Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy] Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinson, C. D.; Williams, J. M.; Tinnerman, W. N.; Malloy, T. B.

    2005-01-01

    The role of ethanol O-d in nullifying the deuterolysis may be demonstrated by determining that transesterification of methyl acetoacetate of the ethyl ester occurs as well as deuterium exchange of the five acetoacetate hydrogens. The significant acidity of the methylene protons in the acetoacetate group, the efficacy of base catalysis, the role of…

  17. Serum metabolomics in rats models of ketamine abuse by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiling; Wen, Congcong; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Fa; Wang, Shuanghu; Ma, Jianshe; Lin, Kezhi; Wang, Xianqin; Lin, Guanyang; Hu, Lufeng

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of ketamine on rats by examining the differences in serum metabolites between ketamine abuse group (Ket-group) and control group (Con-group). Compared to the Con-group, the level of phosphate, propanoic acid, ribitol and d-fructose of the Ket-group increased after continuous intraperitoneal administration of ketamine for 7 days, while the level of alanine, glycine, butanoic acid, valine, l-serine, l-proline, mannonic acid, octadecanoic acid and cholesterol decreased. After 14 days' administration, the level of alanine, butanoic acid, valine, l-leucine, phosphate, l-serine, l-threonine, propanetricarboxylic acid, hexadecanoic acid and oleic acid of the ketamine group increased while the level of mannonic acid, octadecanoic acid and cholesterol decreased. After stopping ketamine administration for 2 days, the level of butanoic acid, phosphate, aminomalonic acid, gluconic acid, hexadecanoic acid, oleic acid and arachidonic acid of Ket-group increased, while the level of glycine, l-lysine and cholesterol decreased. This study can provide invaluable information for the metabolites changes due to ketamine abuse. PMID:26540436

  18. ANALYSES OF FISH TISSUE BY VACUUM DISTILLATION/GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The analyses of fish tissue using VD/GC/MS with surrogate-based matrix corrections is described. Techniques for equilibrating surrogate and analyte spikes with a tissue matrix are presented, and equilibrated spiked samples are used to document method performance. The removal of a...

  19. Oxidative degradation of polysorbate surfactants studied by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Oleg V; Ji, Junyan A; Wang, Y John

    2015-03-01

    Polysorbates (PSs), as acquired from manufacturing processes and chemical nature of fatty acids (FAs) used in production of biotherapeutic formulations, are heterogeneous mixtures of structurally related compounds, covering a wide range of physicochemical properties. Such complexity presents a certain challenge for analysis of these important surfactants and demands the use of methods offering sufficient resolution to monitor individual classes of species and detect changes upon stress. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method, benefiting from the use of low m/z marker ions, simplifies profiling of PSs by providing detailed information on FA composition even of chromatographically overlapping peaks. The ability of the method to monitor individual components and follow their changes because of oxidative stress was explored. A water-soluble azo compound was used as a model oxidizer. Major degradation products of PS 80, because of reactions involving double bond, were identified as oxo-C9:0, keto-C18:1, hydroxyl-C18:1, epoxy-C18:0, and hydroperoxy-C18:1. Stability of PS 20 components was found to depend on the carbon number of polyethoxylated (POE) sorbitan FA ester and its order. Rates of oxidative degradation increased with the length of the FA ester and, moreover, POE sorbitan diesters degraded significantly faster in comparison to the corresponding monoesters upon the oxidative stress. PMID:25581232

  20. Identification of new flavonols in hybrid grapes by combined liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approaches.

    PubMed

    De Rosso, M; Tonidandel, L; Larcher, R; Nicolini, G; Dalla Vedova, A; De Marchi, F; Gardiman, M; Giust, M; Flamini, R

    2014-11-15

    Grape flavonols are involved in the phenomenon of copigmentation in red wines. These compounds are characterised by nutraceutical properties, have antioxidant activity and are studied for chemotaxonomy of grapes. In general, hybrid grapes are characterised by presence of polyphenols often qualitatively and quantitatively different from Vitis vinifera varieties. In this work, flavonols of 34 hybrid grape varieties (22 red and 12 white) produced by crossing of V. vinifera, Vitis riparia, Vitis labrusca, Vitis lincecumii and Vitis rupestris species, were studied. Compounds were characterised by combining different liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) methods: precursor-ion and neutral-loss multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM), and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Twenty-four glycoside flavonols were identified, including 4 quercetin, 5 myricetin, 4 kaempferol, 3 isorhamnetin, 2 laricitrin, 3 syringetin and 3 dihydroflavonol derivatives; myricetin hexoside-glucuronide, myricetin O-di-hexoside, syringetin O-di-hexoside, isorhamnetin rutinoside and kaempferol rutinoside were found in grape for the first time. Statistical analysis (PCA and cluster analysis) divided the samples in four groups on the basis of their flavonol profiles. PMID:24912722

  1. Comprehensive analysis of lipids in biological systems by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based lipidomics has been a subject of dramatic developments over the past decade. This review focuses on state of the art in LC-MS-based lipidomics, covering all the steps of global lipidomic profiling. On the basis of review of 185 original papers and application notes, we can conclude that typical LC-MS-based lipidomics methods involve: (1) extraction using chloroform/MeOH or MTBE/MeOH protocols, both with addition of internal standards covering each lipid class; (2) separation of lipids using short microbore columns with sub-2-?m or 2.6–2.8-?m (fused-core) particle size with C18 or C8 sorbent with analysis time <30 min; (3) electrospray ionization in positive- and negative-ion modes with full spectra acquisition using high-resolution MS with capability to MS/MS. Phospholipids (phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylinositols, phosphatidylserines, phosphatidylglycerols) followed by sphingomyelins, di- and tri-acylglycerols, and ceramides were the most frequently targeted lipid species. PMID:25309011

  2. Current role of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in clinical and forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Hans H

    2007-08-01

    This paper reviews multi-analyte single-stage and tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) procedures using different mass analyzers (quadrupole, ion trap, time-of-flight) for screening, identification, and/or quantification of drugs, poisons, and/or their metabolites in blood, plasma, serum, or urine published after 2004. Basic information about the biosample assayed, work-up, LC column, mobile phase, ionization type, mass spectral detection mode, and validation data of each procedure is summarized in tables. The following analytes are covered: drugs of abuse, analgesics, opioids, sedative-hypnotics, benzodiazepines, antidepressants including selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), herbal phenalkylamines (ephedrines), oral antidiabetics, antiarrhythmics and other cardiovascular drugs, antiretroviral drugs, toxic alkaloids, quaternary ammonium drugs and herbicides, and dialkylphosphate pesticides. The pros and cons of the reviewed procedures are critically discussed, particularly, the need for studies on matrix effects, selectivity, analyte stability, and the use of stable-isotope labeled internal standards instead of unlabeled therapeutic drugs. In conclusion, LC-MS will probably become a gold standard for detection of very low concentrations particularly in alternative matrices and for quantification in clinical and forensic toxicology. However, some drawbacks still need to be addressed and finally overcome. PMID:17377775

  3. Data preprocessing method for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Shi, Xue; Kim, Seongho; Zhang, Li; Patrick, Jeffrey S; Binkley, Joe; McClain, Craig; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-09-18

    A set of data preprocessing algorithms for peak detection and peak list alignment are reported for analysis of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based metabolomics data. For spectrum deconvolution, peak picking is achieved at the selected ion chromatogram (XIC) level. To estimate and remove the noise in XICs, each XIC is first segmented into several peak groups based on the continuity of scan number, and the noise level is estimated by all the XIC signals, except the regions potentially with presence of metabolite ion peaks. After removing noise, the peaks of molecular ions are detected using both the first and the second derivatives, followed by an efficient exponentially modified Gaussian-based peak deconvolution method for peak fitting. A two-stage alignment algorithm is also developed, where the retention times of all peaks are first transferred into the z-score domain and the peaks are aligned based on the measure of their mixture scores after retention time correction using a partial linear regression. Analysis of a set of spike-in LC-MS data from three groups of samples containing 16 metabolite standards mixed with metabolite extract from mouse livers demonstrates that the developed data preprocessing method performs better than two of the existing popular data analysis packages, MZmine2.6 and XCMS(2), for peak picking, peak list alignment, and quantification. PMID:22931487

  4. Analysis of sterols by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Kornél; Jakab, Annamaria; Pollreisz, Ferenc; Bongiorno, David; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Averna, Maurizio R; Noto, Davide; Vékey, Károly

    2006-01-01

    A newly developed high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) method has been successfully used to analyze plasma concentrations of various phytosterols (cholestanol and beta-sitosterol) and cholesterol metabolites (desmosterol and lathosterol). This was based on an unusual solvent combination of water/methanol vs. methanol/acetone/n-hexane applied on a Purospher Star RP-18e (125 x 2 mm, 3 microm) column, which proved excellent for the separation, identification and quantification of plasma sterols. Simple solid-phase extraction preparation of plasma samples was performed, followed by the developed fast and robust HPLC separation. Results on four groups of people were compared, those with low, normal and high plasma cholesterol levels and those with high cholesterol levels on statin therapy, and the results were evaluated using linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Variable selection for LDA was achieved using backward removal selection. Highly discriminatory variables were the ratios of desmosterol to sitosterol and of lathosterol to total plasma cholesterol. The latter ratio was also excellent for distinguishing subjects on statin therapy. The success rate of classification was 100%. The present pilot study shows the potential of HPLC/MS analysis and chemometrics for studying cholesterol-related disorders and warrants future full-scale medical study. PMID:16841361

  5. Quantitative Metabolome Analysis Based on Chromatographic Peak Reconstruction in Chemical Isotope Labeling Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Li, Liang

    2015-07-21

    Generating precise and accurate quantitative information on metabolomic changes in comparative samples is important for metabolomics research where technical variations in the metabolomic data should be minimized in order to reveal biological changes. We report a method and software program, IsoMS-Quant, for extracting quantitative information from a metabolomic data set generated by chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Unlike previous work of relying on mass spectral peak ratio of the highest intensity peak pair to measure relative quantity difference of a differentially labeled metabolite, this new program reconstructs the chromatographic peaks of the light- and heavy-labeled metabolite pair and then calculates the ratio of their peak areas to represent the relative concentration difference in two comparative samples. Using chromatographic peaks to perform relative quantification is shown to be more precise and accurate. IsoMS-Quant is integrated with IsoMS for picking peak pairs and Zero-fill for retrieving missing peak pairs in the initial peak pairs table generated by IsoMS to form a complete tool for processing CIL LC-MS data. This program can be freely downloaded from the www.MyCompoundID.org web site for noncommercial use. PMID:26086729

  6. Linker-assisted immunoassay and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the analysis of glyphosate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, E.A.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Bhullar, B.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel, sensitive, linker-assisted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (L'ELISA) was compared to on-line solidphase extraction (SPE) with high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) for the analysis of glyphosate in surface water and groundwater samples. The L'ELISA used succinic anhydride to derivatize glyphosate, which mimics the epitotic attachment of glyphosate to horseradish peroxidase hapten. Thus, L'ELISA recognized the derivatized glyphosate more effectively (detection limit of 0.1 ??g/L) and with increased sensitivity (10-100 times) over conventional ELISA and showed the potential for other applications. The precision and accuracy of L'ELISA then was compared with on-line SPE/HPLC/MS, which detected glyphosate and its degradate derivatized with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate using negative-ion electrospray (detection limit 0.1 ??g/L, relative standard deviation ??15%). Derivatization efficiency and matrix effects were minimized by adding an isotope-labeled glyphosate (2-13C15N). The accuracy of L'ELISA gave a false positive rate of 18% between 0.1 and 1.0 ??g/L and a false positive rate of only 1% above 1.0 ??g/L. The relative standard deviation was ??20%. The correlation of L'ELISA and HPLC/MS for 66 surface water and groundwater samples was 0.97 with a slope of 1.28, with many detections of glyphosate and its degradate in surface water but not in groundwater.

  7. Determination of nitrogen-15 enrichment of nitrate and nitrite using thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hogge, L.R.; Hynes, R.K.; Nelson, L.M.; Vestal, M.L.

    1986-11-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of percent /sup 15/N enrichment in NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ that is both rapid and sensitive. NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ separation was done by use of reverse-phase liquid chromatography with a mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate with tetrabutylammonium acetate as the ion pair reagent. The % /sup 15/N in isotopically enriched anions was determined by using thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Enrichment values were obtained on as little as 20 ng of NO/sub 2//sup -/-N/20 ..mu..L and 4 ng of NO/sub 3//sup -/-N/20 ..mu..L. The linear regression curve was plotted for the observed enrichment vs. the actual enrichment over the range from the natural abundance to 25% enrichment for each anion and the equation for the linear regression calculated (y = 1.16x + 0.7577 for NO/sub 2//sup -/ and y = 0.951x + 0.447 for NO/sub 3//sup -/). The coefficient of determination for the NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ curves was 0.988 and 0.987, respectively. The dynamic range of the method was found to be suitable for the range of NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ expected in plant xylem sap. Xylem sap samples obtained from NO/sub 3//sup -/ fed pea, Pisum sativum cv. Homesteader (3.9 ..mu..g of NO/sub 3//sup -/-N/mL, 24.7% /sup 15/N), contained a /sup 15/N enrichment of 25.4% +/- 0.7%.

  8. Dansylation isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for parallel profiling of human urinary and fecal submetabolomes.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoling; Wang, Nan; Chen, Deying; Li, Yunong; Lu, Yingfeng; Huan, Tao; Xu, Wei; Li, Liang; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-15

    Human urine and feces can be non-invasively collected for metabolomics-based disease biomarker discovery research. Because urinary and fecal metabolomes are thought to be different, analysis of both biospecimens may generate a more comprehensive metabolomic profile that can be better related to the health state of an individual. Herein we describe a method of using differential chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for parallel metabolomic profiling of urine and feces. Dansylation labeling was used to quantify the amine/phenol submetabolome changes among different samples based on (12)C-labeling of individual samples and (13)C-labeling of a pooled urine or pooled feces and subsequent analysis of the (13)C-/(12)C-labeled mixture by LC-MS. The pooled urine and pooled feces are further differentially labeled, mixed and then analyzed by LC-MS in order to relate the metabolite concentrations of the common metabolites found in both biospecimens. This method offers a means of direct comparison of urinary and fecal submetabolomes. We evaluated the analytical performance and demonstrated the utility of this method in the analysis of urine and feces collected daily from three healthy individuals for 7 days. On average, 2534 ± 113 (n = 126) peak pairs or metabolites could be detected from a urine sample, while 2507 ± 77 (n = 63) peak pairs were detected from a fecal sample. In total, 5372 unique peak pairs were detected from all the samples combined; 3089 and 3012 pairs were found in urine and feces, respectively. These results reveal that the urine and fecal metabolomes are very different, thereby justifying the consideration of using both biospecimens to increase the probability of finding specific biomarkers of diseases. Furthermore, the CIL LC-MS method described can be used to perform parallel quantitative analysis of urine and feces, resulting in more complete coverage of the human metabolome. PMID:26709303

  9. Tandem Extraction/Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Protocol for the Analysis of Acrylamide and Surfactant-related Compounds in Complex Aqueous Environmental Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a liquid chromatography?mass spectrometry (LC?MS)?based strategy for the detection and quantitation of acrylamide and surfactant?related compounds in aqueous complex environmental samples.

  10. A new approach to untargeted integration of high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    van der Kloet, Frans M; Hendriks, Margriet; Hankemeier, Thomas; Reijmers, Theo

    2013-11-01

    Because of its high sensitivity and specificity, hyphenated mass spectrometry has become the predominant method to detect and quantify metabolites present in bio-samples relevant for all sorts of life science studies being executed. In contrast to targeted methods that are dedicated to specific features, global profiling acquisition methods allow new unspecific metabolites to be analyzed. The challenge with these so-called untargeted methods is the proper and automated extraction and integration of features that could be of relevance. We propose a new algorithm that enables untargeted integration of samples that are measured with high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In contrast to other approaches limited user interaction is needed allowing also less experienced users to integrate their data. The large amount of single features that are found within a sample is combined to a smaller list of, compound-related, grouped feature-sets representative for that sample. These feature-sets allow for easier interpretation and identification and as important, easier matching over samples. We show that the automatic obtained integration results for a set of known target metabolites match those generated with vendor software but that at least 10 times more feature-sets are extracted as well. We demonstrate our approach using high resolution LC-MS data acquired for 128 samples on a lipidomics platform. The data was also processed in a targeted manner (with a combination of automatic and manual integration) using vendor software for a set of 174 targets. As our untargeted extraction procedure is run per sample and per mass trace the implementation of it is scalable. Because of the generic approach, we envision that this data extraction lipids method will be used in a targeted as well as untargeted analysis of many different kinds of TOF-MS data, even CE- and GC-MS data or MRM. The Matlab package is available for download on request and efforts are directed toward a user-friendly Windows executable. PMID:24139572

  11. Simple spectrophotometry method for the determination of sulfur dioxide in an alcohol-thionyl chloride reaction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinjian; Tan, Feng; Hartman, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Thionyl chloride is often used to convert alcohols into more reactive alkyl chloride, which can be easily converted to many compounds that are not possible from alcohols directly. One important reaction of alkyl chloride is nucleophilic substitution, which is typically conducted under basic conditions. Sulfur dioxide, the by-product from alcohol-thionyl chloride reactions, often reacts with alkyl chloride to form a sulfonyl acid impurity, resulting in yield loss. Therefore, the alkyl chloride is typically isolated to remove the by-products including sulfur dioxide. However, in our laboratory, the alkyl chloride formed from alcohol and thionyl chloride was found to be a potential mutagenic impurity, and isolation of this compound would require extensive safety measures. As a result, a flow-through process was developed, and the sulfur dioxide was purged using a combination of vacuum degassing and nitrogen gas sweeping. An analytical method that can quickly and accurately quantitate residual levels of sulfur dioxide in the reaction mixture is desired for in-process monitoring. We report here a simple ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry method for this measurement. This method takes advantage of the dramatic change in the UV absorbance of sulfur dioxide with respect to pH, which allows for accurate quantitation of sulfur dioxide in the presence of the strong UV-absorbing matrix. Each sample solution was prepared using 2 different diluents: 1) 50 mM ammonium acetate in methanol +1% v/v hydrochloric acid, pH 1.3, and 2) 50 mM ammonium acetate in methanol +1% glacial acetic acid, pH 4.0. The buffer solutions were carefully selected so that the UV absorbance of the sample matrix (excluding sulfur dioxide) at 276 nm remains constant. In the pH 1.3 buffer system, sulfur dioxide shows strong UV absorbance at 276 nm. Therefore, the UV absorbance of sample solution is the sum of sulfur dioxide and sample matrix. While in the pH 4.0 buffer system, sulfur dioxide has negligible UV absorbance at 276 nm, and the UV absorbance is attributed only to sample matrix. Quantitation of sulfur dioxide is achieved by subtracting the UV absorbance of sample solution at pH 4.0 from that at pH 1.3. The method is simple but sensitive, with a limit of quantitation of 80 ?g L(-1). The method linearity was demonstrated from 2 mg L(-1) to 40 mg L(-1) with an R(2) of 0.998, and the spiked recovery ranges from 94% to 105% within the same range. The results are comparable with those obtained using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), suggesting that this method is accurate. PMID:26388384

  12. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Characterization of coal-derived materials by field desorption mass spectrometry, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, supercritical fluid extraction, and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Robins, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    Under contract from the DOE , and in association with CONSOL Inc., Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated four principal and several complementary techniques for the analysis of non-distillable direct coal liquefaction materials in support of process development. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods were examined for potential usefulness as techniques to elucidate the chemical structure of residual (nondistillable) direct coal liquefaction derived materials. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) were evaluated for effectiveness in compound-class separation and identification of residual materials. Liquid chromatography (including microcolumn) separation techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and GC/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods were applied to supercritical fluid extracts. The full report authored by the PNL researchers is presented here. The following assessment briefly highlights the major findings of the project, and evaluates the potential of the methods for application to coal liquefaction materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of CONSOL`s contract.

  13. Analysis of Indole Alkaloids from Rhazya stricta Hairy Roots by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akhgari, Amir; Laakso, Into; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Yrjönen, Teijo; Vuorela, Heikki; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Rischer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Rhazya stricta Decne. (Apocynaceae) contains a large number of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). This study focused on the composition of alkaloids obtained from transformed hairy root cultures of R. stricta employing ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). In the UPLC-MS analyses, a total of 20 TIAs were identified from crude extracts. Eburenine and vincanine were the main alkaloids followed by polar glucoalkaloids, strictosidine lactam and strictosidine. Secodine-type alkaloids, tetrahydrosecodinol, tetrahydro- and dihydrosecodine were detected too. The occurrence of tetrahydrosecodinol was confirmed for the first time for R. stricta. Furthermore, two isomers of yohimbine, serpentine and vallesiachotamine were identified. The study shows that a characteristic pattern of biosynthetically related TIAs can be monitored in Rhazya hairy root crude extract by this chromatographic method. PMID:26694342

  14. Rapid and sensitive method for analysis of nitrate in meat samples using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Masoom Raza; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; ALOthman, Zeid A; Rafiquee, M Z A

    2015-12-01

    A sensitive and selective ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric method has been developed for the quantitative analysis of nitrate in meat samples. Selected ion reaction (SIR) mode was adopted to identify and quantify the nitrate. Chromatographic analyses were performed on a BEH C-18 column with a mobile phase consisting of a surfactant (Cetylpyridinium chloride) and acetonitrile in equal ratio (50/50, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL min(-1). The limit of detection and limit of quantitation of the developed method was found to be 0.0599 and 0.1817 mg kg(-1), respectively. The linearity of the proposed method was checked in the concentration range of 0.5-10 mg kg(-1) with an excellent correlation coefficient (r) of 0.997. The recovery of the nitrate in the meat samples were in the range of 98.02-98.99%. PMID:26184470

  15. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  16. Serum metabolomics study of the acute graft rejection in human renal transplantation based on liquid chromat