Science.gov

Sample records for gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry

  1. Rapid determination of polysaccharides in BianTi Soft Extract by spectrophotometry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minxia; Shen, Jie; Yang, Kai; Qian, Songxiang; Feng, Sujuan

    2010-04-01

    A simple approach for the rapid determination of polysaccharides in BianTi Soft Extract using spectrophotometry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. The mixed standard solution composed of D-glucose, D-mannose, galactose and D-xylose in different proportions (1.00: 1.01: 0.12: 0.05) was prepared according to the monosaccharide composition analysis of the polysaccharides by GC-MS. The determination of polysaccharides by UV-Vis spectrophotometer was performed after 35-min color reaction, in which 1 ml 5% phenol and 4 ml sulfate was used. The assay of the method validation has shown that the method was stable, reliable and feasible. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied in the preparation procedure of BianTi Soft Extract, selecting out optimal decoction conditions and suitable decoction container. It suggests that the convenient method could be useful for the quality control of BianTi Soft Extract. Meanwhile, it may be an alternative for polysaccharides determination of other formulations. PMID:20668575

  2. ANALYSIS OF TECHNICAL CHLORDANE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The composition of technical chlordane has been investigated by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, employing a column commonly used for pesticide residue analysis. Partial or complete structure identification have been assigned to some 45 individual constituents. Many...

  3. Applications of Hadamard transform to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Huang; Kaneta, Takashi; Chen, Hung-Ming; Chen, Wen-Xiong; Chang, Hung-Wei; Liu, Ju-Tsung

    2008-08-01

    Successful application of the Hadamard transform (HT) technique to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is described. Novel sample injection devices were developed to achieve multiple sample injections in both GC and LC instruments. Air pressure was controlled by an electromagnetic valve in GC, while a syringe pump and Tee connector were employed for the injection device in LC. Two well-known, abused drugs, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), were employed as model samples. Both of the injection devices permitted precise successive injections, resulting in clearly modulated chromatograms encoded by Hadamard matrices. After inverse Hadamard transformation of the encoded chromatogram, the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of the signals were substantially improved compared with those expected from theoretical values. The S/N ratios were enhanced approximately 10-fold in HT-GC/MS and 6.8 in HT-LC/MS, using the matrices of 1023 and 511, respectively. The HT-GC/MS was successfully applied to the determination of MDMA in the urine sample of a suspect. PMID:18570388

  4. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  5. Estimation of brassylic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah, Erica N. Pfarr, Pooja Thapliyal, Nicholas S. Dusek, Kristofer L. Schiele, Christy Gallagher-Lein, and James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to estimate Brassylic Acid (BA) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BA is a product obtained from the oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). BA has various applications for making nylons and high performance polymers. BA is a 13 carbon compound with two carboxylic acid functional groups at the terminal end. BA has a long hydrocarbon chain that makes the molecule less sensitive to some of the characterization techniques. Although BA can be characterized by NMR, both the starting material (EA) and products BA and nonanoic acid (NA) have peaks at similar {delta}, ppm values. Hence it becomes difficult for the quick estimation of BA during its synthesis.

  6. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  7. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of biofluids and extracts.

    PubMed

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M; Al-Talla, Zeyad A; Yang, Yang; Kharbatia, Najeh M

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been widely used in metabonomics analyses of biofluid samples. Biofluids provide a wealth of information about the metabolism of the whole body and from multiple regions of the body that can be used to study general health status and organ function. Blood serum and blood plasma, for example, can provide a comprehensive picture of the whole body, while urine can be used to monitor the function of the kidneys, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) will provide information about the status of the brain and central nervous system (CNS). Different methods have been developed for the extraction of metabolites from biofluids, these ranging from solvent extracts, acids, heat denaturation, and filtration. These methods vary widely in terms of efficiency of protein removal and in the number of metabolites extracted. Consequently, for all biofluid-based metabonomics studies, it is vital to optimize and standardize all steps of sample preparation, including initial extraction of metabolites. In this chapter, recommendations are made of the optimum experimental conditions for biofluid samples for GC-MS, with a particular focus on blood serum and plasma samples. PMID:25677149

  8. Mercury determination in blood by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, S K; Kinter, M; Herold, D A

    1994-01-01

    A stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method using 196Hg as an internal standard is described for determining Hg in blood. In this method, the blood samples are not subjected to any digestion to avoid the loss of Hg. A solution of 0.6M HCl is used to free Hg present in blood from proteins. The pH of the solution is adjusted to 9 using borate buffer and Hg chelated using lithium bis(trifluoroethyl)dithiocarbamate. All isotope ratio measurements are made using an organic mass spectrometer. Overall precision values for the five major Hg isotopes relative to 202Hg are 1.6-2.3% when 10 ng samples of chelated Hg are analyzed. No appreciable memory or carryover effect is observed when two synthetic mixtures differing in 196Hg/202Hg ratios by a factor of 30 are sequentially analyzed. The method is validated by determining Hg in blood samples using isotope dilution GC-MS. PMID:7946912

  9. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric studies of canine urinary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Zhang, C H; Kosugi, C; Matsumoto, I

    1995-04-01

    After the urine was treated with urease, lyophilized, and trimethylsilylated, it was examined for metabolic profiles in Dalmatian dogs and Shetland sheepdogs by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which simultaneously analyzes organic acids, amino acids, sugars, sugar alcohols, purine and pyrimidine bases, and nucleosides. The profiles were compared with those from human specimens. As clarified in past studies, Dalmatian dogs showed an extreme decrease in allantoin, which is the final product of purine metabolism in the canine of other species, and a marked detection of uric acid peak. This finding suggests that purine metabolism in Dalmatian dogs is different from that in the other species. Only two Shetland sheepdogs, whose mother had chronic renal failure, showed a marked excretion of uric acid, as in Dalmatian dogs. In addition, some Dalmatian dogs, who were maintained on a protein-restricted diet, showed a little excretion of uric acid. A large amount of uric acid is detected in combination with pentose-monosaccharides, hexose-monosaccharides and sugar alcohols in neonatal human urine in comparison with the present dog samples. A marked difference between the canine and the humans is that phenylacetylglycine, which is derived from the aromatic amino acid phenylalanine, is excreted in the canine urine. Phenylacetylglycine is not detected in the human urine, and there have been no reports of its excretion in canine urine. PMID:7492634

  10. Classification of natural resins by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Rhourrhi-Frih, B; West, C; Pasquier, L; Andr, P; Chaimbault, P; Lafosse, M

    2012-09-21

    Twenty-six resins from six botanical sources belonging to the class Magnoliopsida were compared based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data. The extracts were analysed by GC after silylation and by reversed phase LC combined with atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI) mass spectrometry. The chromatograms were re-organized in data matrices, where each sample was represented by a single column comprising 2755 observations (intensity, time, m/z) in GC-MS and 360 observations in LC-MS. A simple comparison of resin fingerprints was attempted by organizing data according to a three dimensional bubble chart (retention time against m/z where each point was a bubble which size represented the ion intensity) where it is possible to easily superimpose the fingerprints. Thus the common and different species can be easily observed enabling to classify the resins. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on characteristics of GC-MS and LC-MS profiles affords a complete description of the classes of the resins and shows that 26 resins are divided into five main clusters Commiphora mukul, Daniella oliveri, Gardenia gummifera, Canarium madagascariensis, Boswellia dalzielii and Boswellia serrata, respectively. In conclusion, the proposed method has been applied to three other resinous samples from the Burseraceae family to evaluate their alteration state. PMID:22885042

  11. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  12. Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell-Baguley, Brittany; Hipp, Rachael E.; Morgan, Neal R.; Morgan, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment in which gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used for latent fingerprint extraction and analysis on glass beads or glass slides is conducted. The results determine that the fingerprint residues are gender dependent.

  13. AN EPA MANUAL FOR ORGANICS ANALYSIS USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedural manual defines the areas of applicability of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in environmental analysis. The manual includes sample preparation methods specifically adapted to this measurement technique, data processing and interpretation methods, quality cont...

  14. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

  15. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  16. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In

  17. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic

  18. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  19. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Antonia; Barbas, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic fingerprinting, the main tool in metabolomics, is a non-targeted methodology where all detectable peaks (or signals), including those from unknown analytes, are considered to establish sample classification. After pattern comparison, those signals changing in response to a specific situation under investigation are identified to gain biological insight. For this purpose, gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS) has a drawback in that only volatile compounds or compounds that can be made volatile after derivatization can be analysed, and derivatization often requires extensive sample treatment. However, once the analysis is focused on low molecular weight metabolites, GC-MS is highly efficient, sensitive, and reproducible. Moreover, it is quantitative, and its compound identification capabilities are superior to other separation techniques because GC-MS instruments obtain mass spectra with reproducible fragmentation patterns, which allow for the creation of public databases. This chapter describes well-established protocols for metabolic fingerprinting (i.e. the comprehensive analysis of small molecules) in plasma and urine using GC-MS. Guidelines will also be provided regarding subsequent data pre-treatment, pattern recognition, and marker identification. PMID:21207291

  20. Chemical Discrimination in Turbulent Gas Mixtures with MOX Sensors Validated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance. PMID:25325339

  1. Detection of new propofol metabolites in human urine using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Favetta, P; Dufresne, C; Désage, M; Païssé, O; Perdrix, J P; Boulieu, R; Guitton, J

    2000-01-01

    Using hyphenated analytical techniques, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), a study on minor propofol metabolites in human urine was conducted. These techniques allowed identification of two new phase I metabolites (2-(omega-propanol)-6-isopropylphenol and 2-(omega-propanol)-6-isopropyl-1,4-quinol). In addition, their four corresponding conjugates (three glucuronides and one sulphate) were detected. Thus in human urine at least eight conjugate metabolites are produced, derived from four different aglycones (propofol; 2, 6-diisopropyl-1,4-quinol; 2-(omega-propanol)-6-isopropylphenol and 2-(omega-propanol)-6-isopropyl-1,4-quinol). PMID:11013422

  2. [Analysis of cracking gas compressor fouling by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Fang, Fei; Wei, Tao; Liu, Shuqing; Jiang, Guangshen; Cai, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The fouling from the different sections of the cracked gas compressor in Daqing Petrochemical Corporation was analyzed by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS). All the samples were cracked in RJ-1 tube furnace cracker at the cracking temperature of 500 degrees C, and separated with a 60 m DB-1 capillary column. An electron impact ionization (EI) source was used with the ionizing voltage of 70 eV. The results showed the formation of fouling was closely related with cyclopentadiene which accounted for about 50% of the cracking products. Other components detected were 1-butylene, propylene, methane and n-butane. This Py/GC-MS method can be used as an effective approach to analyze the causes of fouling in the petrochemical plants. PMID:24063202

  3. Determination of Alkyl Methanesulfonates in Doxazosin Mesylate by Gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Sitaram, C.; Rupakula, R. B.; Reddy, B. N.; Sastry, C. S. P

    2011-01-01

    High sensitive rapid gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of four carcinogenic alkyl methanesulfonates viz. methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, isopropyl methanesulfonate and n-butyl methanesulfonate in doxazosin mesylate has been presented by using selective ion monitoring mode. The optimum separation was achieved between methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, isopropyl methanesulfonate and n-butyl methanesulfonate on a DB-5 (30 m×0.32 mm×1.0 μm) capillary column under programming temperature. Acetonitrile, water and ammonia (90:9:1 v/v/v) mixture was used as diluent. Various factors involved in the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method development are also presented. This method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The limit of quantitation of methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, isopropyl methanesulfonate and n-butyl methanesulfonate is 6 ppm with respect to 30 mg/ml of doxazosin mesylate. PMID:22131634

  4. Characterisation of beeswax in works of art by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedures.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2004-03-01

    Pyrolysis (Py) with in situ derivatisation with hexamethyldisilazane-gas chroma-break tography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure based on microwave-assisted saponification were used to identify the organic components in small sized beeswax samples. With the latter procedure quantitative recoveries can be made and hydrocarbons, alcohols and omega-1-diols in the neutral fraction, and fatty acids and omega-1-hydroxy acids in the acidic fraction can be efficiently separated and detected. Both procedures were used to characterise a wax anatomic sculpture "The Plague" (1691-1694) by Gaetano Zumbo, resulting in the identification of beeswax and a Pinaceae resin. The GC-MS analysis brought to light some essential differences in beeswax composition between the raw material and the old modelled wax thus giving some clear indications about the recipe used by the sculptor. PMID:14989483

  5. Formation of dehydroalanine from mimosine and cysteine: artifacts in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Hu, Zeping; Wiedner, Susan D.; Kim, Jong Seo; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

    2011-08-15

    Trimethylsilyation is a chemical derivatization procedure routinely applied in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics. In this report, through de novo structural elucidation and comparison with authentic standards, we demonstrate that mimosine can be completely converted into dehydroalanine and 3,4-dihydroxypyridine during the trimethylsilyating process. Similarly, dehydroalanine can be formed from derivatization of cysteine. This conversion is a potential interference in GC-MS-based global metabolomics, as well as in analysis of amino acids.

  6. Acetic acid improves the sensitivity of theophylline analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saka, Kanju; Uemura, Koichi; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2007-02-01

    In the analysis of theophylline by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we found that the addition of acetic acid to the solvent (ethyl acetate) decreased the adsorption of theophylline to the glass wool packed into the inlet liner. The addition of acetic acid to ethyl acetate improved the sensitivity for theophylline (optimum concentration of 3%). This simple and sensitive method without derivatization can be applied to the quantification of theophylline in serum samples in clinical and toxicological practice. PMID:17011247

  7. Global urinary metabolic profiling procedures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2011-10-01

    The role of urinary metabolic profiling in systems biology research is expanding. This is because of the use of this technology for clinical diagnostic and mechanistic studies and for the development of new personalized health care and molecular epidemiology (population) studies. The methodologies commonly used for metabolic profiling are NMR spectroscopy, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In this protocol, we describe urine collection and storage, GC/MS and data preprocessing methods, chemometric data analysis and urinary marker metabolite identification. Results obtained using GC/MS are complementary to NMR and LC/MS. Sample preparation for GC/MS analysis involves the depletion of urea via treatment with urease, protein precipitation with methanol, and trimethylsilyl derivatization. The protocol described here facilitates the metabolic profiling of ∼400-600 metabolites in 120 urine samples per week. PMID:21959233

  8. Comprehensive Urine Drug Screen by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Ramoo, Bheemraj; Funke, Melissa; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Drug screening is an essential component of clinical toxicology laboratory service. Some laboratories use only automated chemistry analyzers for limited screening of drugs of abuse and few other drugs. Other laboratories use a combination of various techniques such as immunoassays, colorimetric tests, and mass spectrometry to provide more detailed comprehensive drug screening. Mass spectrometry, gas or liquid, can screen for hundreds of drugs and is often considered the gold standard for comprehensive drug screening. We describe an efficient and rapid gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for comprehensive drug screening in urine which utilizes a liquid-liquid extraction, sample concentration, and analysis by GC/MS. PMID:26660182

  9. Study on volatile components in salami by reverse carrier gas headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Procida, G; Conte, L S; Fiorasi, S; Comi, G; Favretto, L G

    1999-01-01

    Salami are a typical seasoned sausage of Italy; a number of types are produced, according to local traditional recipes. As industrial production has taken place, a number of problems rise in obtaining products similar to the traditional ones. The use of selected microbial starters is permitted by Italian law for some years and at present, microbiological research is engaged in selecting starters similar to the ones isolated from traditional products, with the aim of obtaining organoleptic characteristics close to the ones of traditional recipes. A study was carried out concerning the characterisation of volatile components of salami by headspace capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As during the sampling step, analytes could reach the analytical column, the carrier gas rate was back flushed in the latter, while a pre column was used as cold trap. Then GC-MS analysis follows. By these techniques, we were able to highlight typical profiles of different salami, as well as monitoring the ripening of a traditional and a starter added salami. Main peaks are of fermentative origin, while also peaks from spices were detected. Ethyl propionate was used as internal standard to be able to normalise the peaks amounts. PMID:10023625

  10. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of historical varnishes of ancient Italian lutes and violin.

    PubMed

    Echard, J P; Benoit, C; Peris-Vicente, J; Malecki, V; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Vaiedelich, S

    2007-02-12

    The organic constituents of historical vanishes from two ancient Italian lutes and a Stradivari violin, kept in the Musée de la musique in Paris, have been characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results have been compared with the chromatograms and mass spectra of recent as well as old naturally aged reference materials. The three historical varnishes analyzed have been shown to be oil varnishes, probably mixtures of linseed oil with resins. Identification of diterpenoids and triterpenoids compounds, and of the resins that may have been ingredients of the varnishes, are discussed in this paper. PMID:17386601

  11. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, J.

    1995-08-23

    The Savannah River Site contains approximately 1500 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are collected. Many of these samples are sent off-site for various analyses, including the determination of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report describes accomplishments that have been made during the past year which will ultimately allow VOC analysis to be performed on-site using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Through the use of the on-site approach, it is expected that there will be a substantial cost savings. This approach will also provide split-sample analysis capability which can serve as a quality control measure for off-site analysis.

  12. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  13. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the chemical characterisation of modern and archaeological figs (Ficus carica).

    PubMed

    Ribechini, Erika; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2011-06-24

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethylsilylation, and analytical pyrolysis using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) for in situ derivatisation followed by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis (Pyrolysis-silylation-GC/MS) were used to investigate the hydrolysable and soluble constituents, and the polymerised macromolecules of an archaeological fig (Ficus carica) recovered in Zaragoza (Spain), as well as of modern figs. The main aim was to study the compositional alterations undergone by the fig tissues in a particular archaeological environment: the fig was in a vessel and covered by a layer of a mixture of orpiment and gypsum. A comparison between the GC/MS results from modern and archaeological figs revealed that degradative reactions took place, leading to the disappearance/depletion of reactive (unsaturated fatty acids) and sensitive compounds (phytosterols and triterpenes). Py-silylation-GC/MS data provided evidence of a significant degradation of the saccharide and lipid components of the fig tissue, which left a residue enriched in polyphenols and polyesters. PMID:21570079

  14. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  15. [Determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ghengyun; Zhang, Weiya; Li, Lixia; Shen, Yalei; Lin, Junfeng; Xie, Tangtang; Chu, Naiqing

    2014-08-01

    An effective method was established for the simultaneous determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Glycol ethers in leather and leather products were ultrasonically extracted at 45 °C, using ethyl acetate as the extraction solvent. The extracts were purified by solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and then analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode. The content of each analyte was calibrated by external standard method. The limit of detection of ethylene glycol ethyl ether (EGEE) was 0. 10 mg/kg under the condition of signal to noise (S/N) of 3 and the limits of the other 11 glycol ethers were all less than 0.05 mg/kg. The spiked recoveries varied from 81. 2% to 95. 5% at three different spiked levels with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 1.4% to 6. 6%. The proposed method is simple, rapid and accurate, with the limits of detection much less than the requirements of the Regulation Concerning Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) of European Union. It is applicable to the determination of residual glycol ethers in leather and leather products, and provides a reference for the relevant testing standards. PMID:25434128

  16. Composition of ultrathin binary polymer brushes by thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Diego; Sparnacci, Katia; Laus, Michele; Ferrarese Lupi, Federico; Giammaria, Tommaso Jacopo; Seguini, Gabriele; Ceresoli, Monica; Perego, Michele; Gianotti, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, a reliable and rugged thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) method was developed to determine the composition of ultrathin films consisting of binary blends of functional polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) grafted to a silicon wafer. A general methodology will be given to address the composition determination problem for binary or even multicomponent polymer brush systems using the PS/PMMA-based samples as a paradigmatic example. In this respect, several distinct tailor-made materials were developed to ensure reliable calibration and validation stages. The analytical method was tested on unknown samples to follow the composition evolution in PS/PMMA brushes during the grafting reaction. A preferential grafting of the PMMA was revealed in full agreement with its preferential interaction with the SiO2 polar surface. Graphical abstract A reliable and rugged thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) method was developed to determine the composition of ultrathin films consisting of binary blends of functional polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) grafted to a silicon wafer. PMID:26873220

  17. Metabolomics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: Combined Targeted and Untargeted Profiling.

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics is ideal for identifying and quantitating small-molecule metabolites (<650 Da), including small acids, alcohols, hydroxyl acids, amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, sterols, catecholamines, drugs, and toxins, often using chemical derivatization to make these compounds sufficiently volatile for gas chromatography. This unit shows how GC-MS-based metabolomics allows integration of targeted assays for absolute quantification of specific metabolites with untargeted metabolomics to discover novel compounds. Complemented by database annotations using large spectral libraries and validated standard operating procedures, GC-MS can identify and semiquantify over 200 compounds from human body fluids (e.g., plasma, urine, or stool) per study. Deconvolution software enables detection of more than 300 additional unidentified signals that can be annotated through accurate mass instruments with appropriate data processing workflows, similar to untargeted profiling using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. GC-MS is a mature technology that uses not only classic detectors (quadrupole) but also target mass spectrometers (triple quadrupole) and accurate mass instruments (quadrupole-time of flight). This unit covers sample preparation from mammalian samples, data acquisition, quality control, and data processing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27038389

  18. Derivatization of pinacolyl alcohol with phenyldimethylchlorosilane for enhanced detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Albo, Rebecca L F; Valdez, Carlos A; Leif, Roald N; Mulcahy, Heather A; Koester, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    A derivatization procedure for the qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of pinacolyl alcohol (PA) that employs phenyldimethylchlorosilane (PhDMClS) and the promoter N-methylimidazole is described. While PA, underivatized, can be detected using conventional gas chromatographic methods, its polarity and low boiling point make its detection in complex matrices challenging. The silylation procedure described herein generates a PA-derivative exhibiting an increased on-column retention time, thus shifting its GC-MS signal away from commonly encountered, volatile, interfering analytes. Derivatized PA could be distinguished from other PhDMClS-derivatized isomeric alcohols by its unique retention time and mass spectrum. The derivatization was demonstrated to perform well in the GC-MS analysis and identification of PA in samples from Proficiency Tests administered by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). PMID:24481624

  19. Community air monitoring for pesticides-part 2: multiresidue determination of pesticides in air by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hengel, Matt; Lee, P

    2014-03-01

    Two multiresidue methods were developed to determine pesticides in air collected in California. Pesticides were trapped using XAD-4 resin and extracted with ethyl acetate. Based on an analytical method from the University of California Davis Trace Analytical Laboratory, pesticides were detected by analyzing the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine chlorothalonil, chlorthal-dimethyl, cycloate, dicloran, dicofol, EPTC, ethalfluralin, iprodione, mefenoxam, metolachlor, PCNB, permethrin, pronamide, simazine, trifluralin, and vinclozolin. A GC with a flame photometric detector was used to determine chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos oxon, diazinon, diazinon oxon, dimethoate, dimethoate oxon, fonophos, fonophos oxon, malathion, malathion oxon, naled, and oxydemeton. Trapping efficiencies ranged from 78 to 92 % for low level (0.5 μg) and 37-104 % for high level (50 and 100 μg) recoveries. Little to no degradation of compounds occurred over 31 days; recoveries ranged from 78 to 113 %. In the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) method, pesticides were detected by analyzing the extract by GC-MS to determine chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, dichlorvos, dicofol, endosulfan 1, endosulfan sulfate, oxyfluorfen, permethrin, propargite, and trifluralin. A liquid chromatograph coupled to a MS was used to determine azinphos-methyl, chloropyrifos oxon, DEF, diazinon, diazinon oxon, dimethoate, dimethoate oxon, diuron, EPTC, malathion, malathion oxon, metolachlor, molinate, norflurazon, oryzalin, phosmet, propanil, simazine and thiobencarb. Trapping efficiencies for compounds determined by the CDFA method ranged from 10 to 113, 22 to 114, and 56 to 132 % for 10, 5, and 2 μg spikes, respectively. Storage tests yielded 70-170 % recovery for up to 28 days. These multiresidue methods represent flexible, sensitive, accurate, and cost-effective ways to determine residues of various pesticides in ambient air. PMID:24370860

  20. Discrimination between tablet production methods using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hailin; Carter, James F; Brereton, Richard G; Eckers, Christine

    2003-03-01

    Wet granulation and direct compression are two processes employed in tablet preparation. In this paper, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) is used to discriminate these processes with the help of chemometric techniques. The data analysis procedure is as follows. First, deconvolute the Py-GC-MS data of each sample into concentration profiles and spectra, and then construct a matrix with each compound corresponding to one column; those contained only in a small number of samples are then removed. Second, the main principal components are kept after excluding three variables and one sample, and further processed by Fisher discriminant analysis. Third, the resultant data are assigned to classes using unsupervised and supervised classification methods. Results from cross-validation show that only 3 of 20 samples are misclassified by the Mahalanobis distance measure. PMID:12705389

  1. Identification of several human urinary metabolites of 6-benzoyl benzoxazolinone by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bastide, M; Chabard, J L; Lartigue, C; Bargnoux, H; Petit, J; Berger, J A; Mansour, H A; Lesieur, D; Buch, N

    1991-08-01

    The biotransformation of 6-benzoyl benzoxazolinone (6-BB), a non-narcotic peripheral analgesic, was studied in eight healthy volunteers after oral administration of a single dose of 1 g. Urinary metabolites were extracted either with ethyl acetate at different pH values or by percolating at pH 5 through Amberlite XAD 2 ion-exchange resin. Eluates were concentrated under vacuum, purified by thin-layer chromatography and analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or direct insertion probe mass spectrometry. Metabolites were identified with reference to the mass spectra of various synthesized compounds assumed to be metabolites of 6-BB, as N-methylated or monohydroxylated compounds. Another metabolic pathway was cleavage of the benzoxazolinone heterocycle giving 2-amino-5-benzoyl phenol after hydrolysis and decarboxylation. N-methyl, N-acetyl and hydroxylated metabolites having an amino-5-benzoyl phenol structure were also found. PMID:1768705

  2. Use of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) in Nonscience Major Course Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecka, Keith S.; Lerman, Zafra M.; Angelos, Sanford A.

    1996-06-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been utilized with nonscience majors in the courses: "Modern Methods in Science: Discovering Molecular Secrets"; "The Extraordinary Chemistry of Ordinary Things"; "From Ozone to Oil Spills: Chemistry, the Environment and You"; and "Crime Lab Chemistry: Solving Crime through Analytical Chemistry". Our efforts have centered on introducing prospective science communicators (film, video, radio, television, and journalism majors) to science relative to their majors and personal interests. Quality lecture-discussion topics, "mystery"-based laboratory activities have assisted in introducing and/or explaining specific areas of chemistry that attempt to reduce fear of subject matter. Students have also used GC-MS, as a form of alternative assessment, in course projects that have been based on their majors, personal interests, and cultural backgrounds. Students have also conducted advanced independent work in different areas of chemistry, including the analysis of nail polishes and lacquers and eleven aromatic compounds present in three different brands of gasoline.

  3. Profiling of plasma metabolites in canine oral melanoma using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    KAWABE, Mifumi; BABA, Yuta; TAMAI, Reo; YAMAMOTO, Ryohei; KOMORI, Masayuki; MORI, Takashi; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most common and aggressive tumors in the oral cavity of dog. The tumor has a poor prognosis, and methods for diagnosis and prediction of prognosis after treatment are required. Here, we examined metabolite profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for development of a discriminant model for evaluation of prognosis. Metabolite profiles were evaluated in healthy and melanoma plasma samples using orthogonal projection to latent structure using discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Cases that were predicted to be healthy using the OPLS discriminant model had no advanced lesions after radiation therapy. These results indicate that metabolite profiling may be useful in diagnosis and prediction of prognosis of canine malignant melanoma. PMID:25843037

  4. [Differentiation of ballpoint pen inks by thermodesorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2004-01-01

    Differentiation and classification of ink entries with dated samples of a reference collection are important aspects in the examination of questioned documents. Classification of writing inks is presently achieved by analysis of dyes and colorants contained in the ink. This technique has its limitations in newly developed ink formulations with identical dye composition but differing in their solvents and binder resins. This paper introduces a method for the determination of solvents and binder resins of an ink sample directly from paper without sample preparation. This aim is accomplished by thermodesorption of the sample followed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The method was tested on numerous samples of ballpoint pen inks, which were subsequently grouped into several solvent and resin subgroups. A case study shows the applicability of the newly developed method. PMID:15666970

  5. Determination of glyphosate, glyphosate metabolites, and glufosinate in human serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Motojyuku, Megumi; Saito, Takeshi; Akieda, Kazuki; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2008-11-15

    This paper describes an assay for the determination of glyphosate (GLYP), glyphosate metabolites [(aminomethyl) phosphonic acid] (AMPA), and glufosinate (GLUF) in human serum. After protein precipitation using acetonitrile and solid-phase extraction, serum samples were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The assay was linear over a concentration range of 3-100.0 microg/ml for GLYP, AMPA, and GLUF. The overall recoveries for the three compounds were >73%. The intra- and inter-day variations were <15%. Precision and accuracy were 6.4-10.6% and 88.2-103.7%, respectively. The validated method was applied to quantify the GLYP and AMPA content in the serum of a GLYP-poisoned patient. In conclusion, the method was successfully applied for the determination of GLYP and its metabolite AMPA in serum obtained from patient of GLYP-poisoning. PMID:18945648

  6. Verification of chemical composition of commercially available propolis extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Czyżewska, Urszula; Konończuk, Joanna; Teul, Joanna; Drągowski, Paweł; Pawlak-Morka, Renata; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Miltyk, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    Propolis is a resin that is collected by honeybees from various plant sources. Due to its pharmacological properties, it is used in commercial production of nutritional supplements in pharmaceutical industry. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied for quality control analysis of the three commercial specimens containing aqueous-alcoholic extracts of bee propolis. More than 230 constituents were detected in analyzed products, including flavonoids, chalcones, cinnamic acids and their esters, phenylpropenoid glycerides, and phenylpropenoid sesquiterpenoids. An allergenic benzyl cinnamate ester was also identified in all tested samples. This analytical method allows to evaluate biological activity and potential allergenic components of bee glue simultaneously. Studies on chemical composition of propolis samples may provide new approach to quality and safety control analysis in production of propolis supplementary specimens. PMID:25198412

  7. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of nitrosamines in red wine.

    PubMed

    Lona-Ramirez, Fernando J; Gonzalez-Alatorre, Guillermo; Rico-Ramírez, Vicente; Perez-Perez, Ma Cristina I; Castrejón-González, Edgar O

    2016-04-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms) are highly active carcinogens that have been detected in food and beverages. Currently certain studies report their presence in red wine, while others fail to detect their presence. In this study the head space solid phase micro-extraction technique coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was applied to quantify four NAms in different types of red wine. The technique was found to be a simple, precise, fast and environmentally friendly alternative for the quantification of volatile NAms. A factorial analysis was carried out to evaluate the influence of the parameters on the HS-SPME technique. This is the first study that such analysis has been reported and where NAms in red wine have been quantified using HS-SPME-GC-MS. The method was validated by calculating the linearity, limit of detection and quantification. Two of the four NAms analyzed were found to be present in red wine samples. PMID:26593598

  8. Characterization and quantification of fluoxymesterone metabolite in horse urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masayuki; Aramaki, Sugako; Hosoe, Tomoo; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Kijima-Suda, Isao; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-07-01

    Fluoxymesterone, an anabolic steroid with the 17alpha-methyl,17beta-hydroxy group, has been developed as an oral formulation for therapeutic purposes. However, it is also used illegally in racehorses to enhance racing performance. In this study, we detected 9alpha-fluoro-17,17-dimethyl-18-norandrostane-4,13-dien-11beta-ol-3-one by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which has not been reported as a fluoxymesterone metabolite so far in horse. It was synthesized for use as a reference standard, and characterized on the basis of (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra, as well as GC/MS EI mass spectra of TMS derivatives. It was excreted as the main metabolite in horse urine, and its reference standard could be synthesized easily. Therefore, this metabolite could be a useful target for a doping test of fluoxymesterone in racehorses. PMID:18614835

  9. Subsurface detection of fossil fuel pollutants by photoionization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robbat, Albert; Considine, Thomas; Antle, Patrick M

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes analysis of environmental pollutants at depth without bringing sample to the surface. It is based on an improved 3-stage Peltier freeze trap, which efficiently pre-concentrates volatile coal tar and petroleum hydrocarbons, and an integrated system for detecting pollutants on-line, in real-time by photoionization detection and quantitation by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) as the probe is advanced into the subsurface. Findings indicate measurement precision and accuracy for volatiles meet EPA criteria for hazardous waste site investigations. When a Teflon membrane inlet is used to detect contaminants in groundwater, its 140 degrees C temperature limit restricts analyte collection in soil to C(2)-phenanthrenes. Two case studies demonstrate the probe is well-suited to tracking petroleum and coal tar plumes from source to groundwater. PMID:20594575

  10. Improvements in bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium purity as determined with gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    BARTRAM,MICHAEL E.

    2000-03-08

    Bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium (MgCp2) is used commonly as a source for doping nitride materials with magnesium. Increased oxygen incorporation known to accompany the use of MgCp2 makes the purity of this precursor an important consideration in nitride CVD. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS) methods have now been developed for the identification of volatile impurities in MgCp2. Diethylether, an oxygen containing organic compound (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}), and additional organic impurities were found in the MgCp2 supplied by three manufacturers. Subsequent refinements in the synthetic processes by these companies have resulted in the availability of MgCp2 free of ether and other organic impurities as determined by GCMS.

  11. High-speed, low-pressure gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for essential oil analysis.

    PubMed

    Poynter, Samuel D H; Shellie, Robert A

    2008-07-18

    Analysis of parsley and fennel essential oils was performed by using low-pressure gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The low-pressure instrument configuration was achieved by fitting a GC-MS instrument with a 530microm I.D. capillary column and an appropriate capillary restrictor at the inlet of the column. Comparison of the performance of the low-pressure GC-MS setup was made with fast GC-MS using a narrow-bore capillary column. By comparing the two approaches side-by-side the benefits of low-pressure GC-MS for characterisation of moderately complex essential oils comprising less than 50 detectable components can be fully appreciated. Although efficiency is sacrificed, the improved sample capacity of the 530microm I.D. column leads to higher peak intensities and in-turn better mass spectral library matching thus providing highly satisfactory results. PMID:18406412

  12. DETERMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SOILS USING EQUILIBRIUM HEADSPACE ANALYSIS AND CAPILLARY COLUMN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing methods for determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil matrices using the purge and trap technique with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) have several problems, which include preserving sample integrity from collection to analysis and efficient...

  13. THE IDENTIFICATION OF POLYCHLORINATED TERPHENYLS AT TRACE LEVELS IN HUMAN ADIPOSE TISSUE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pooled samples of human adipose extracts representative of the general population of the United States were examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The use of gel permeation chromatography for cleanup was found to offer a significant improvement in detection capability....

  14. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining

  15. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  16. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  17. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to

  18. ANALYSIS OF TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMBUSTION PROCESS EMISSIONS USING NOVEL MULTIDIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the analysis of trace-level organic combustion process emissions using novel multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) procedures. It outlines the application of the technique through the analyses of various incinerator effluent and produ...

  19. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining…

  20. Morphological and Chemoprofile (Liquid Chromatography-mass Spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-mass Spectroscopy) Comparisons of Cyperus scariosus R. Br and Cyperus rotundus L.

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Lavanya; Katragadda, Suresh Babu; Botlagunta, Mahendran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyperus scariosus (CS) R.Br and Cyperus rotundus (CR) L. belongs to Cyperaceae family which is well-reputed in the traditional systems of medicine. Although they grow in different agro-climatic conditions, they are often considered to be synonymous with each other. Objective: The present study was aimed to systematically classify both the species CS and CR through their morphological features and chemical profiling using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS), gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and thin layer chromatography patterns of the rhizome extracts. Materials and Methods: A method (LC-MS analysis) has been developed on Agilent LC-MSD Trap SL mass spectrometer equipped with Waters HR C18 column (3.9 mm × 300 mm, 6 μm) using isocratic elution with acetonitrile and water (70:30% v/v ratio). GC-MS analysis was performed on a Shimadzu GC-MS-QP 2010 equipped with DB-5 capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 μm). Results: Chemoprofiling of CS and CR using LC-MS and GC-MS suggested that these two are different based on their deferential spectral pattern, however, some of the common peaks were found in both the species. In addition, we also performed the preliminary phytochemical investigation of hexane and chloroform extracts of these species, which led to the isolation of stigmasterol, β-sitosterol and lupeol as major constituents in CS. Conclusion: In summary, we have developed optimal chromatographic conditions (LC-MS and GC-MS) and morphological profiles to classify both the species, that is, CS and CR. Collectively, our analytical results coupled with the morphological data clearly suggested that CS and CR are morphologically different. SUMMARY The huge demand for herbal medicine has put pressure on the supply of natural resources which ultimately results in use of substandard materials or substitution and adulteration. The medicinal plants, Cyperus rotundus L and Cyperus scariosus R.Br which belongs to cyperaceae family and extensively used in the traditional systems of medicine. Although these two species are grown in different soil conditions, Cyperus scariosus R.Br often treated as synonymous of Cyperus rotundus. Thus, the present study was undertaken to classify these two species systematically using the modern analytical techniques as a powerful tools. Further, we also carried out the preliminary phytochemical investigation of hexane and chloroform extracts of cyperus scariosus rhizomes, which resulted in the isolation of three compounds namely Sitosterol, Stigmasterol and Lupeol. PMID:26929579

  1. Determination of hormonal growth promoters in bovine hair: comparison of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for estradiol benzoate and nortestosterone decanoate.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Eleanor; Rambaud, Lauriane; Le Bizec, Bruno; O'Keeffe, Michael

    2009-04-01

    The detection of steroid residues in hair is a powerful strategy to demonstrate long-term administration of these growth promoters in meat production animals. Analysis of the ester form of administered steroids is an unambiguous approach to prove the illegal use of natural hormones. For detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was generally used. However, recent advances in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology have improved the robustness and potential sensitivity of this method. This paper describes development and validation, according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, of LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/MS methods, in two separate laboratories, for determination of steroid esters in bovine hair. Bovine hair samples taken from animals treated with estradiol-3-benzoate and nortestosterone decanoate, as well as from an untreated animal, were used to evaluate the comparability of the results of the two validated methods. The results of the inter-comparison demonstrate that both the LC-MS/MS and the GC-MS/MS methods are fit for purpose and capable of determining steroid esters in hair samples from treated bovine animals. PMID:19286025

  2. Determination of ortho-phenylphenol in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M J; Brzak, K A; Bormett, G A

    1997-12-01

    A sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was developed to quantitate total o-phenylphenol (OPP) (free plus conjugates) in human urine. Conjugates of OPP were acid-hydrolyzed to free OPP, derivatized to the pentafluorobenzoyl ester derivative and analyzed via negative-ion chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two stable isotope analogs of OPP were shown to be suitable as internal standards for this method (D2-phenol ring, 13C6-phenyl ring). A synthetic method is presented for the preparation of the D2-OPP internal standard. The 13C6-OPP analog was also shown to be useful as an alternate test material for laboratory-based exposure studies. The limit of quantitation for this method was 1 ng OPP/ml urine. Calibration curves were linear for the analyte over the concentration range of 0.5-1117 ng OPP/ml urine. Relative recovery of OPP from urine ranged from 97.0 to 104.7%. Low levels of OPP (mean=6+/-7 ng/ml; n=22) were found in control human urine samples. The method was validated with urine samples obtained from human volunteers undergoing a dermal exposure study with 12C-/13C6-/14C-OPP. This method was developed to aid in assessments of human exposure to OPP during a variety of uses of the compound. PMID:9448066

  3. Development of a technique for mercury speciation and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Barshick, C.M.; Britt, P.F.; Vance, M.A.; Duckworth, D.C.

    1997-07-01

    One element of concern to DOE is mercury. Mercury was used extensively at the DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee from 1950 to 1963 in the process of making lithium deuteride, a component of nuclear weapons. Although both the inorganic and organometallic forms of mercury are toxic to humans, the organic compounds are often more toxic. Since the toxicity of mercury is a function of its chemical form, an understanding of the interactions between commercially discharged mercury, naturally occurring mercury, and the environment in which they are present is vital. In this report, the authors have been investigating gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the analysis of both the organometallic and inorganic forms of mercury in the same environmental sample (e.g., solutions, soils, and sludges). Although gas chromatography is the classical technique for analyzing organic molecules, (e.g., organometallic compounds) little has been done on the analysis of inorganic compounds. In a previous publication, the authors described how a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber could be used to sample organomercurials from aqueous samples. An alkylation reaction was then carried out to transform chemically mercury nitrate into dimethylmercury; subsequent GC/MS analysis of this compound permitted quantification of the inorganic constituent. Subsequently, several different alkylation reagents have been synthesized that methylate any inorganic mercury compound to methylmercury iodide. Here, the authors report results on alkylation reaction time and the effect of pH on the population of the product.

  4. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Study of tert-Butylarsine Stability and Purification

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, M.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Bruskas, L.A.; Killeen, K.P.

    1999-07-20

    TBA (tert-butylarsine, H{sub 2}AsC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) has been demonstrated to be an effective arsenic precursor for the deposition of compound semiconductors such as GaAs by MOCVD (metal organic chemical vapor deposition). TBA is used as a liquid (bubbler) source in MOCVD and is a less toxic alternative to the more commonly used gaseous arsine (AsH{sub 3}). Materials and device performance using TBA have in many cases equaled or surpassed those using arsine. This includes the first observation of fractional quantum Hall behavior in a two dimensional electron gas structure grown by MOCVD. Despite the beneficial characteristics, the use of TBA in our laboratories has revealed some inconsistent behavior. Small pressure rises have been observed in the TBA bubbler sources when left unused over a period of many days. Measurements of the TBA partial pressure using UV absorption revealed that new absorption peaks could be observed after storage. The features of the absorption profile were insufficient to ascribe to a specific chemical species. Attempts to remove the gaseous impurities with liquid nitrogen freeze-pump-thaw techniques had limited success. Unfortunately, there is no published information on the room temperature decomposition of TBA. In this paper, we present a series of GCMS (gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy) analyses designed to determine the stability of TBA and identify its decomposition products in storage containers. The GCMS is also used to evaluate several methods for in-situ purification of TBA.

  5. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief that this multivariate analysis will enable superior differentiation capabilities. In addition, noise and system artifacts challenge the analysis of GC-MS data collected on lower cost equipment, ubiquitous in commercial laboratories. This research has the potential to affect many areas of analytical chemistry including materials analysis, medical testing, and environmental surveillance. It could also provide a method to measure adsorption parameters for chemical interactions on various surfaces by measuring desorption as a function of temperature for mixtures. We have presented results of a novel method for examining offgas products of a common PDMS material. Our method involves utilizing a stepped TD/GC-MS data acquisition scheme that may be almost totally automated, coupled with multivariate analysis schemes. This method of data generation and analysis can be applied to a number of materials aging and thermal degradation studies.

  6. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC-MS are demonstrated and discussed. PMID:9879375

  7. Multi-class method for biomonitoring of hair samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Möder, Monika; Gaudl, Alexander; Alonso, Esteban; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Currently, non-invasive biomonitoring of human exposure to organic pollutants bases upon the analysis mainly of urine and human breast milk. While mostly persistent organic pollutants are the center of interest, the aim of our study was to develop a method for the determination of different chemical classes of emerging pollutants (organophosphorus flame retardants, plastic additives such as phthalates, bisphenol A, insecticides, antimicrobials, preservatives and musk fragrances) in hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The preferred sample preparation included hydrolysis of the hair with trifluoroacetic acid in methanol followed by a liquid-liquid extraction using hexane/ethyl acetate. The validated method is characterized by recoveries higher than 77 % for most analytes, relative standard deviations below 16 % and limits of detection between 2 pg mg(-1) (HHCB) and 292 pg mg(-1) (propylparaben) using 50 mg of dry hair. After respective blank corrections, bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and the musk fragrance HHCB were the predominant compounds determined in all hair samples at concentrations between 32 and 59 ng mg(-1) and 0.8-13 ng mg(-1), respectively. The bactericide triclosan and the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) were detected in selected hair samples at 2 and 0.8 ng mg(-1), respectively. PMID:26427497

  8. Identification of tartary buckwheat tea aroma compounds with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peiyou; Ma, Tingjun; Wu, Li; Shan, Fang; Ren, Guixing

    2011-08-01

    Tartary buckwheat tea, which is an important and healthy product, has a distinct malty aroma. However, its characteristic aroma compounds have not been elucidated. The aims of present study were identification and quantification of its aroma compounds. The analyses were performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after 3 different isolation techniques. Seventy-seven compounds were identified. Among these compounds, 35 were quantified by available standards. The compounds with a high probability of contribution to the tartary buckwheat tea aroma (OAV ≥ 10) were as follows: 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone, nonanal, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, benzeneacetaldehyde, maltol, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, trimethylpyrazine. Some nutritional and bioactive compounds were also identified in this study, such as linoleic acid, niacin, vanillic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin, butylated hydroxytoluene. Practical Application: Tartary buckwheat, one type of buckwheat, has gained much attention from nutritionists and medical doctors in recent years. It is rich in rutin, quercetin, and other nutrients that are good for health. Tartary buckwheat-based product such as tartary buckwheat tea is an important and popular healthy product in China, Japan,South Korea, European countries as well as in American countries. It has a distinct malty aroma. The present study first identified and quantified of its aroma compounds. The results will draw attention to other researchers in food flavor and buckwheat filed. PMID:22417522

  9. EIder: A compound identification tool for gas chromatography mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Koo, Imhoi; Kim, Seongho; Shi, Biyun; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Song, Ming; McClain, Craig; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-05-27

    We report software entitled EIder (EI mass spectrum identifier) that provides users with eight literature reported spectrum matching algorithms for compound identification from gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data. EIder calculates retention index according to experimental conditions categorized by column class, column type and data type, where 9 empirical distribution functions of the absolute retention index deviation to its mean value were constructed using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2011 retention index database to improve the accuracy of compound identification. EIder filters compound candidates based on elementary composition and derivatization reagent, and automatically adds the molecular information of the native compound to each derivatized compound using a manually created database. When multiple samples are analyzed together, EIder performs cross-sample alignment and provides an option of using an average mass spectrum for compound identification. Furthermore, a suite of graphical user interfaces are implemented in EIder to allow users to both manually and automatically modify the identification results using experimental information at various analysis stages. Analysis of three types of GC-MS datasets indicates that the developed EIder software can improve the accuracy of compound identification. PMID:27131963

  10. Headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of volatile compounds in murici (Byrsonima crassifolia l. Rich).

    PubMed

    Alves, G L; Franco, M R B

    2003-01-24

    Northern and Northeastern Brazil have a natural diversity of fruits, many of which are considered exotic, presenting different flavors and aromas. The enormous diversity of fruits represents a promising area for research on aromas. There is also a great potential for the manufacture of juices, desserts or other processed products. Murici is a typical fruit from these regions presenting a different flavor, reminiscent of that of cheese. This fruit is consumed mainly as juice, ice cream or as liquor, greatly appreciated by the local population. Headspace volatile compounds of three lots of the fruit from Cear (Fortaleza) were collected by suction on Porapak Q for 2 h and desorbed with 300 microl of acetone. The isolated volatile compounds were separated by high resolution GC. Forty-six volatile compounds were detected, of which 41 were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Kovats indices. The most abundant compounds were ethanol (28.3%) and ethyl hexanoate (25.1%). Butanoic acid (5.1%), hexanoic acid (5.1%) and methyl butyrate (2.8%) were also detected in the headspace of the fruit and confirm its unusual cheese aroma. PMID:12580497

  11. Towards smaller and faster gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems for field chemical detection.

    PubMed

    Smith, P A; Sng, M T; Eckenrode, B A; Leow, S Y; Koch, D; Erickson, R P; Jackson Lepage, C R; Hook, G L

    2005-03-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is already an important laboratory method, but new sampling techniques and column heating approaches will expand and improve its usefulness for detection and identification of unknown chemicals in field settings. In order to demonstrate commercially-available technical advances for both sampling and column heating, we used solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling of both water and air systems, followed by immediate analysis with a resistively heated analytical column and mass spectrometric detection. High-concern compounds ranging from 140 to 466 amu were analyzed to show the applicability of these techniques to emergency situations impacting public health. A field portable (about 35 kg) GC-MS system was used for analysis of water samples with a resistively heated analytical column externally mounted as a retrofit using the air bath oven of the original instrument design to heat transfer lines. The system used to analyze air samples included a laboratory mass spectrometer with a dedicated resistive column heating arrangement (no legacy air bath column oven). The combined sampling and analysis time was less than 10 min for both air and water sample types. By combining dedicated resistive column heating with smaller mass spectrometry systems designed specificallyfor use in the field, substantially smaller high performance field-portable instrumentation will be possible. PMID:15844534

  12. Toward automated chromatographic fingerprinting: A non-alignment approach to gas chromatography mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Vestner, Jochen; de Revel, Gilles; Krieger-Weber, Sibylle; Rauhut, Doris; du Toit, Maret; de Villiers, André

    2016-03-10

    In contrast to targeted analysis of volatile compounds, non-targeted approaches take information of known and unknown compounds into account, are inherently more comprehensive and give a more holistic representation of the sample composition. Although several non-targeted approaches have been developed, there's still a demand for automated data processing tools, especially for complex multi-way data such as chromatographic data obtained from multichannel detectors. This work was therefore aimed at developing a data processing procedure for gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data obtained from non-targeted analysis of volatile compounds. The developed approach uses basic matrix manipulation of segmented GC-MS chromatograms and PARAFAC multi-way modelling. The approach takes retention time shifts and peak shape deformations between samples into account and can be done with the freely available N-way toolbox for MATLAB. A demonstration of the new fingerprinting approach is presented using an artificial GC-MS data set and an experimental full-scan GC-MS data set obtained for a set of experimental wines. PMID:26893085

  13. Issues pertaining to the analysis of buprenorphine and its metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Shan; Lin, Dong-Liang; Yang, Shu-Ching; Wu, Meng-Yan; Liu, Ray H; Su, Lien-Wen; Cheng, Pai-Sheng; Liu, Chiareiy; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2010-03-01

    "Substitution therapy" and the use of buprenorphine (B) as an agent for treating heroin addiction continue to gain acceptance and have recently been implemented in Taiwan. Mature and widely utilized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology can complement the low cost and highly sensitive immunoassay (IA) approach to facilitate the implementation of analytical tasks supporting compliance monitoring and pharmacokinetic/pharmacogenetic studies. Issues critical to GC-MS analysis of B and norbuprenorphine (NB) (free and as glucuronides), including extraction, hydrolysis, derivatization, and quantitation approaches were studied, followed by comparing the resulting data against those derived from IA and two types of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. Commercial solid-phase extraction devices, highly effective for recovering all metabolites, may not be suitable for the analysis of free B and NB; acetyl-derivatization products exhibit the most favorable chromatographic, ion intensity, and cross-contribution characteristics for GC-MS analysis. Evaluation of IA, GC-MS, and LC-MS/MS data obtained in three laboratories has proven the 2-aliquot GC-MS protocol effective for the determination of free B and NB and their glucuronides. PMID:20122691

  14. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  15. Pharmaceuticals in grocery market fish fillets by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mottaleb, Musavvir Arafat; Stowe, Carly; Johnson, Daniel R; Meziani, Mohammed J; Mottaleb, M Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Occurrences of pharmaceuticals are evident in aquatic organisms. A reproducible gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method using selected ion monitoring (SIM) has been used to determine the anti-histamine diphenhydramine (DPH), anti-anxiety diazepam (DZP), anti-seizure carbamazepine (CZP) drugs and their metabolites in grocery stores fish that were homogenized, extracted, pre-concentrated, cleaned up, and examined. Identifications of the compounds in extracts were obtained by comparing similar mass spectral features and retention properties with standards. Among nine frequently detected drugs, only DPH and DZP were observed and ranged from 0.61 to 6.21 and 1.99 to 16.57 ng/g, respectively, in fourteen fish species. These concentration values were lower than the environmental fish. Mean spike recoveries of analytes exceeded 75% with relative standard deviations (RSD)<10%. The statistically-derived method detection limits (MDLs) for nine compounds ranged from 0.13 to 5.56 ng/g. Average surrogate recoveries were 80-85% with 4-9% RSD. PMID:26213006

  16. Identification of floral scent in chrysanthemum cultivars and wild relatives by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hainan; Zhang, Ting; Fan, Qingqing; Qi, Xiangyu; Zhang, Fei; Fang, Weimin; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi; Chen, Sumei

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major volatile compounds and their relative concentrations in flowers of different chrysanthemum cultivars and their wild relatives. The volatile organic components of fresh flowers were analyzed using a headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In total, 193 volatile organic components were detected; the major scent components were monoterpenoids and oxygenated monoterpenoids, which accounted for 68.59%-99.93% of the total volatiles in all tested materials except for Chrysanthemum indicum collected from Huangshan, in which they accounted for only 37.45% of total volatiles. The major volatile compounds were camphor, α-pinene, chrysanthenone, safranal, myrcene, eucalyptol, 2,4,5,6,7,7ab-hexahydro-1H-indene, verbenone, β-phellandrene and camphene. In a hierarchical cluster analysis, 39 accessions of Chrysanthemum and its relatives formed six clusters based on their floral volatile compounds. In a principal component analysis, only spider type flowers were located closely on the score plot. The results of this study provide a basis for breeding chrysanthemum cultivars which desirable floral scents. PMID:25816078

  17. Analysis of cooking oil fumes by ultraviolet spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Wang, K; Zhu, J; Koga, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper investigated the components, especially aldehydes, in the fume condensates from four kinds of cooking oil using ultraviolet (UV) spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). It was observed that there was a great change of the UV absorption spectra from the results of the unheated oil to the results of the fume after heat treatment (190-200, 230-240, and 270-280 degrees C). There was a strong peak within the wavelength range of 260-270 nm in each condensate sample. From the GC-MS results, it was tentatively deduced that there were some 2,4-dialkylenaldehydes and other conjugated compounds in the condensates. The results showed there were large amounts of hexanal and 2-heptenal in the cooking oil fume and that the total aldehyde peak areas of the condensates from four kinds of oil were around 30-50% of the total peak area at 270-280 degrees C. PMID:11600023

  18. [Simultaneous determination of nine preservatives in fruits using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Peng, Shunü; Wang, Qiuquan; Fang, Lanlan; Guo, Shanyong; Zeng, Zhouhua; Lin, Zhuguang

    2014-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was established for the simultaneous determination of nine typical preservatives (pyrimethanil, chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, triadimefon, thiabendazole, imazalil, myclobutanil, iprodione, prochloraz) in fruits. The fruit samples were subjected to ultrasonic extraction with hexane/ethyl acetate (1/1, v/v), and followed by purification using diatomite column chromatography with hexane/ethyl acetate (1/3, v/v) eluant. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the nine preservatives were performed on the GC-MS at full-scan (SCAN) and selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes, in which triphenylphosphate was used as the internal standard. The detection limits obtained for the nine preservatives were ranged from 0.10 microg/kg to 2.16 microg/kg. The average recoveries were in the range of 75.3% to 128% at the spiked levels of 50, 100 and 200 microg/kg with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.57% to 11.6% (n = 5). The results showed that the developed method is sensitive and accurate for the determination of the nine preservatives in fruits. PMID:24783871

  19. Characterization of ballpoint pen inks by thermal and desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2005-09-01

    The characterization of ink on paper is of importance for dating and comparing questioned ink entries in forensic document examination. Inks are commonly characterized by their colorant profile that is identified by well-established analytical methods. Numerous ink formulations show identical colorant profiles, though. In order to differentiate inks that are not distinguishable by colorant analysis, a method for the characterization of colorless ink ingredients, namely binders, solvents and additives is necessary. In this paper, we propose a technique for the analysis of colorless compounds in ballpoint inks using direct thermal desorption of the ink on paper followed by chemical analysis of the desorbed volatile compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As compared to liquid extraction and subsequent analysis of the extracts, the technique avoids possible contamination risks. Sensitivity is very high due to the enrichment of volatile components by thermal desorption. Even from old samples, the chromatograms obtained by the method enable the determination of binder polymers, solvents and additives. Pure binders as used by ink manufacturers were analyzed for unambiguous assignment of analytical results to specific polymers. To prove the practical applicability, we analyzed 121 ballpoint pens, not all having the same colorant profile, and grouped the pens into resin and solvent categories. PMID:16225233

  20. Automated thermochemolysis reactor for detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Rands, Anthony D; Losee, Scott C; Holt, Brian C; Williams, John R; Lammert, Stephen A; Robison, Richard A; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Milton L

    2013-05-01

    An automated sample preparation system was developed and tested for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for eventual use in the field. This reactor is capable of automatically processing suspected bio-threat agents to release and derivatize unique chemical biomarkers by thermochemolysis (TCM). The system automatically controls the movement of sample vials from one position to another, crimping of septum caps onto the vials, precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. The specific operations of introduction of sample vials, solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling, injection into the GC-MS system, and ejection of used vials from the system were performed manually in this study, although they can be integrated into the automated system. Manual SPME sampling is performed by following visual and audible signal prompts for inserting the fiber into and retracting it from the sampling port. A rotating carousel design allows for simultaneous sample collection, reaction, biomarker extraction and analysis of sequential samples. Dipicolinic acid methyl ester (DPAME), 3-methyl-2-butenoic acid methyl ester (a fragment of anthrose) and two methylated sugars were used to compare the performance of the autoreactor with manual TCM. Statistical algorithms were used to construct reliable bacterial endospore signatures, and 24 out of 25 (96%) endospore-forming Bacillus species were correctly identified in a statistically designed test. PMID:23601976

  1. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  2. Determination of steroidal estrogens in flushed dairy manure wastewater by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Travis A; Graetz, Donald A; Wilkie, Ann C; Szabo, Nancy J; Diaz, Carolyn S

    2006-01-01

    There is a critical need to accurately measure the concentrations of natural steroidal estrogens in flushed dairy manure wastewater (FDMW) to assess any potential risk of waterway contamination resulting from land application. Estrogens are a concern because low concentrations (10-100 ng L-1) in water can adversely affect aquatic vertebrate species such as fish, turtles, and frogs by disrupting the normal function of their endocrine systems. The objective of this study was to develop a sample preparation method that permits the quantification of four natural steroidal estrogens (17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estrone, and estriol) in FDMW by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Solid-phase extraction with graphitized carbon black was used for the bulk extraction of estrogens from FDMW and additional sample purification was accomplished with C-18. The sample preparation method allowed estrogens to be detected accurately by GC-MS in FDMW. Spiked recovery experiments indicated that the method is satisfactory for measuring the estrogens of interest in FDMW with average recovery of >90%. As expected in FDMW, characterization of the estrogen profile revealed a large abundance of 17alpha-estradiol relative to 17beta-estradiol and estrone. Estriol was not detected in FDMW. The methodology developed in this research helps provide an analytical foundation for the quantification of steroidal estrogens in FDMW by GC-MS. PMID:16585610

  3. Impurity profiling of trinitrotoluene using vacuum-outlet gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brust, Hanneke; Willemse, Sander; Zeng, Tuoyu; van Asten, Arian; Koeberg, Mattijs; van der Heijden, Antoine; Bolck, Annabel; Schoenmakers, Peter

    2014-12-29

    In this work, a reliable and robust vacuum-outlet gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is introduced for the identification and quantification of impurities in trinitrotoluene (TNT). Vacuum-outlet GC-MS allows for short analysis times; the analysis of impurities in TNT was performed in 4min. This study shows that impurity profiling of TNT can be used to investigate relations between TNT samples encountered in forensic casework. A wide variety of TNT samples were analyzed with the developed method. Dinitrobenzene, dinitrotoluene, trinitrotoluene and amino-dinitrotoluene isomers were detected at very low levels (<1wt.%) by applying the MS in selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Limits of detection ranged from 6ng/mL for 2,6-dinitrotoluene to 43ng/mL for 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene. Major impurities in TNT were 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,3,4-trinitrotoluene. Impurity profiles based on seven compounds showed to be useful to TNT samples from different sources. Statistical analysis of these impurity profiles using likelihood ratios demonstrated the potential to investigate whether two questioned TNT samples encountered in forensic casework are from the same source. PMID:25488253

  4. Determination of cyclamate in urine by derivatized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Mohd; Middha, Deepak; Rasool, Shaik N.; Shukla, Sudhir K.; Baggi, Tulsidas R.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: It is important in toxicological/drug screening work to rule out the possible interfering analytes, to eliminate the false positive or negative results. In this paper, we describe a simple, selective, and sensitive derivatized GC-MS method for the determination of cyclohexylsulfamic acid (cyclamate) in urine. Materials and Methods: Elite- 5MS capillary column was used for the separation of analytes and detection using GC-MS. The analysis was carried out in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM) in the range of 26 to 200 using m/z values of 57, 30, 55, 41, 44, 67, 82, 98, and 39. Results and Discussion: The method is based on the conversion of cyclamate into nitroso derivative of cyclamate followed by its gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. The limit of detection, limit of quantitation, and linearity range of the proposed method were found to be 0.2 μg/ ml, 0.7 μg/ml, and 1-15 μg/ml, respectively. The recovery of the present method is in the range of 88-94%. Conclusion: The proposed method can be applied for detection and quantification of cyclamate in urine. PMID:23559823

  5. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  6. Metabolomic profiling in inner ear fluid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Irino, Yasuhiro; Kitamoto, Junko; Fukuda, Yuriko; Inokuchi, Go; Hasegawa, Shingo; Otsuki, Naoki; Yoshida, Masaru; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2015-10-01

    The composition and homeostasis of inner ear fluids are important in hearing function. The purpose of this study was to perform metabolomic analysis of the inner ear fluid in guinea pig cochlea, which has not been previously reported in literature, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seventy-seven kinds of metabolites were detected in the inner ear fluid. Six metabolites, ascorbic acid, fructose, galactosamine, inositol, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, and meso-erythritol, were significantly more abundant, and nine metabolites, phosphate, valine, glycine, glycerol, ornithine, glucose, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, were less abundant in the inner ear fluid than in plasma. The levels of ten metabolites, 3-hydroxy-butyrate, glycerol, fumaric acid, galactosamine, pyruvate+oxaloacetic acid, phosphate, meso-erythritol, citric acid+isocitric acid, mannose, and inositol, in the inner ear fluid significantly changed after loud noise exposure. These observations may help to elucidate various clinical conditions of sensorineural hearing loss, including noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:26343935

  7. Isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine for stable isotope analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-09-01

    A method for the isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine is described that allows stable isotope determinations of taurine to be made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The isolation procedure can be applied to 0.1 ml of plasma; the recovery of plasma taurine was 70 to 80%. For gc separation, taurine was converted to its dimethylaminomethylene methyl ester derivative which could not be detected by hydrogen flame ionization, but could be monitored readily by NH/sub 3/ chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The derivatization reaction occurred partially on-column and required optimization of injection conditions. Using stable isotope ratiometry multiple ion detection, (M + 2 + H)/sup +//(M + H)/sup +/ ion ratio of natural abundance taurine was determined with a standard deviation of less than +-0.07% of the ratio. The (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine/taurine mole ratios of standard mixtures could be accurately determined to 0.001. This stable isotope gc-ms method is suitable for studying the plasma kinetics of (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine in infants who are at risk with respect to taurine depletion.

  8. Determination of Menthol in Plasma and Urine by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Frazee, Clint; Kearns, Gregory; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Menthol, a monoterpene, is a principal component of peppermint oil and is used extensively in consumer products as a flavoring aid. It is also commonly used medicinally as a topical skin coolant; to treat inflammation of the mucous membranes, digestive problems, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); and in preventing spasms during endoscopy and for its spasmolytic effect on the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract. Menthol has a half life of 3-6 h and is rapidly metabolized to menthol glucuronide which is detectable in urine and serum following menthol use. We describe a method for the determination of total menthol in human plasma and urine using liquid/liquid extraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selected ion monitoring mode and menthol-d4 as the internal standard. Controls are prepared with menthol glucuronide and all samples undergo enzymatic hydrolysis for the quantification of total menthol. The method has a linear range of 5-1000 ng/mL, and coefficient of variation <10%. PMID:26660189

  9. Determination of free and ethoxylated alkylphenols in leather with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, He-Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2010-12-10

    An analytical approach was developed to determine nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP), nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEO(n)) and octylphenol ethoxylates (OPEO(n)) in leather samples involving the conversion of NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) into the corresponding NP and OP. The four targets were extracted from samples using ultrasonic-assisted acetonitrile extraction. NP and OP in the extracts were directly isolated with hexane and quantitatively determined with 4-n-nonylphenol as internal standard by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) in the extracts, they were first converted into NP and OP with aluminum triiodide as cleavage agent, and the yielded NP and OP were determined by GC-MS. The contents of NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) were calculated by normalizing to NPEO(9) and OPEO(9), respectively. This method was properly validated and the real sample tests revealed the pollution significance of leather by NPEO(n) and OPEO(n). PMID:21067757

  10. Evaluation of the quality of sandalwood essential oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Simmonds, Monique S J; Kite, Geoffrey C

    2004-03-01

    Trade and historic oils from 'sandalwoods', labelled as Amyris balsamifera, Eremophila mitchelli, Fusanus acuminatus (= Santalum acuminatum), Santalum album, S. austrocaledonicum, S. latifolium, S. spicatum and S. yasi, were assessed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using GC-MS, none of the oils assessed complied with the internationally recognised standard of a 90% santalol content, and only about half of the trade sandalwood oils met with recent International Organisation for Standardisation standards. The majority of trade oils, reportedly from S. album, contained approximately 50-70% santalols (Z-alpha and Z-beta). Thus, the internationally recognised specification (90% santalols) for S. album requires re-evaluation by more efficient analysis methods. In view of the issues associated with the quality of sandalwood oils being traded, specifications of > or = 43% Z-alpha-santalol and > or = 18% Z-beta-santalol for S. album oil estimated by GC-MS are suggested. GC-MS are recommended as it assists with authentication and quality control issues associated with sandalwood oils. PMID:14989484

  11. Magnetic solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometrical analysis of sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; NguyenVan, Manh; Wang, Lijia; Cai, Qingyun

    2015-08-01

    Fluorenyl functionalized superparamagnetic core/shell magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, Fe3O4@SiO2@Flu) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The MNPs having an average diameter of 200nm were then used as solid-phase extraction sorbent for the determination of 16 priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples designated by United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The main influencing parameters, including sorbent amount, desorption solvent, sample volume and extraction time were optimized. Analyses were performed on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels. Limit of detection ranging from 0.5 to 4.0ng/L were obtained. The repeatability was investigated by evaluating the intra- and inter-day precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 13.1%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PAHs in water samples with the recoveries in the range of 96.0-106.7%. PMID:26122856

  12. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry based metabolic profiling reveals biomarkers involved in rice-gall midge interactions.

    PubMed

    Agarrwal, Ruchi; Bentur, Jagadish Sanmallappa; Nair, Suresh

    2014-09-01

    The Asian rice gall midge (Orseolia oryzae Wood-Mason) is a serious pest of rice that causes huge loss in yield. While feeding inside the susceptible host, maggots secrete substances that facilitate the formation of a hollow tube-like structure called gall and prevent panicle formation. The present investigation was carried out to get an account of biochemical changes occurring in the rice plant upon gall midge feeding. Metabolic profiling of host tissues from three rice varieties, namely, TN1, Kavya, and RP2068, exposed to gall midge biotype 1 (GMB1), was carried out using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). TN1 and GMB1 represented compatible interaction, while Kavya and GMB1 as well as RP2068 and GMB1 represented incompatible interactions. The current study identified several metabolites that could be grouped as resistance, susceptibility, infestation, and host features based on their relative abundance. These may be regarded as biomarkers for insect-plant interaction in general and rice-gall midge interaction in particular. PMID:25059749

  13. Analysis of volatile compounds of Malaysian Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) honey using gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nurul Syazana, M S; Gan, S H; Halim, A S; Shah, Nurul Syazana Mohamad; Gan, Siew Hua; Sukari, Halim Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The constituents of honey's volatile compounds depend on the nectar source and differ depending on the place of origin. To date, the volatile constituents of Tualang honey have never been investigated. The objective of this study was to analyze the volatile compounds in local Malaysian Tualang honey. A continuous extraction of Tualang honey using five organic solvents was carried out starting from non-polar to polar solvents and the extracted samples were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Overall, 35 volatile compounds were detected. Hydrocarbons constitute 58.5% of the composition of Tualang honey. Other classes of chemical compounds detected included acids, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, terpenes, furans and a miscellaneous group. Methanol yielded the highest number of extracted compounds such as acids and 5-(Hydroxymethyl) furfural (HMF). This is the first study to describe the volatile compounds in Tualang honey. The use of a simple one tube, stepwise, non-thermal liquid-liquid extraction of honey is a advantageous as it prevents sample loss. Further research to test the clinical benefits of these volatile compounds is recommended. PMID:24146441

  14. Systematic error in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantification of hydrolyzed urinary steroids.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju-Yeon; Ha, Young Wan; Moon, Myeong Hee; Chung, Bong Chul; Choi, Man Ho

    2010-02-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling can lead to an understanding of various disease mechanisms as well as to identifying new diagnostic biomarkers by comparing the metabolites related in quantification. However, the unexpected transformation of urinary steroids during enzymatic hydrolysis with Helix pomatia could result in an underestimation or overestimation of their concentrations. A comparison of beta-glucuronidase extracted from Escherichia coli revealed 18 conversions of 84 steroids tested as an unexpected transformation under hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase extracted from Helix pomatia. In addition to the conversion of 3beta-hydroxy-5-ene steroids into 3-oxo-4-ene steroids, which has been reported, the transformation of 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-reduced and 3beta-hydroxy-5beta-reduced steroids to 3-oxo-5alpha-reduced and 3-oxo-5beta-reduced steroids, respectively, was newly observed. The formation of by-products was in proportion to the concentration of substrates becoming saturated against the enzyme. The substances belonging to these three steroid groups were undetectable at low concentrations, whereas the corresponding by-products were overestimated. These results indicate that the systematic error in the quantification of urinary steroids hydrolyzed with Helix pomatia can lead to a misreading of the clinical implications. All these hydrolysis procedures are suitable for study purposes, and the information can help prevent false evaluations of urinary steroids in clinical studies. PMID:20086107

  15. Structural identification of petroleum acids by conversion to hydrocarbons and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Michael J; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-08-18

    Identification of individual petroleum acids ("naphthenic" acids, NA) has proved challenging for decades, due to the extreme complexity of many petroleum acid mixtures. This has hindered detailed understanding of the role of NA in petroleum generation and oil production processes, refinery corrosion, as wood preservatives, and as environmental toxicants. Some recent advances have been made due to improved chromatographic separation of esters of the acids by multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC × GC-MS), but relatively few reference spectra of esters are available for comparison. Here we report a complementary method based on a combination of a modified historical approach of converting NA to the corresponding hydrocarbons, followed by analysis by GC × GC-MS. Many published spectra exist for reference hydrocarbons making comparisons of reference spectra with those of the unknowns, much more feasible. As an example, we report identification of over 30 individual bicyclic naphthenic acids as the bicyclane hydrocarbons. These include both fused and bridged acids possessing methyl, dimethyl, and ethyl alkyl substituents as well as some terpenoid-derived acids. The study provides the most comprehensive analysis of one of the major classes of NA (the bicyclic acids) to date. There is now clear potential for this method to be used for the structural elucidation of other unknown acids (e.g., oil sands acids) and functionalized biomarkers in complex mixtures. PMID:26171636

  16. Identification of monoacylglycerol regio-isomers by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Destaillats, Frdric; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Nagy, Kornl; Dionisi, Fabiola

    2010-02-26

    Monoacylglycerols (MAGs) are lipids found in trace amounts in plants and animal tissues. While they are widely used in various industrial applications, accurate determination of the regio-specific distribution is hindered by the lack of stable, commercially available standards. Indeed, unsaturated beta-MAG (or Sn-2 MAG) readily undergoes isomerization into alpha-MAG (acyl chain is attached to the Sn-1 or the Sn-3 position). In the present study, we describe structural elucidation of alpha- and beta-regio-isomers of monopalmitoyl-glycerol (MAG C16:0) as model compounds in their silylated forms using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with electronic impact (EI) ionization. MS fragmentation of alpha-MAG C16:0 is characterized by the loss of methylene(trimethylsilyl)oxonium (103 amu) and the consecutive loss of acyl chain yielding a fragment ion at m/z 205. The fragmentation pattern of beta-MAG C16:0 shows a series of diagnostic fragments at m/z 218, 203, 191 and 103 that are not formed from the alpha-isomer and hereby enable reliable distinction of these regio-isomers. Possible fragmentation scenarios are postulated to explain the formation of these marker ions, which were also applied to characterize the regio-isomer composition of a complex mixture of MAG sample containing n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:20097347

  17. [Comparison of metabolite extraction from Boea hygrometrica by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Duan, Lixin; Gong, Yuehua; Deng, Xin

    2014-02-01

    This study is aiming to establish an efficient metabolite extraction method for exploration of molecular mechanisms of desiccation tolerance of the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica using a metabolomics approach. The extracts of metabolite in B. hygrometrica using methanol solution (method A) and methanol-chloroform-water solution (method B) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The total numbers of chromatographic peaks, extraction efficiency, retention time and the peak stability were compared. The results showed that for fresh materials, the total chromatographic peak number of method B is more than that of method A; the extraction efficiency of nine representative metabolites by method B is higher than that by method A; the comparison of 10 random chromatographic peaks revealed that the relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the retention time are less than 1% for both methods, whereas the RSD values of the extraction efficiency is different. The percentage of peaks that owned RSD values of the extraction efficiency higher than 10% is 50% for method A and 100% for method B. In addition, method B was also efficient for dry materials from B. hygrometrica. The number of chromatographic peaks, RSD value of retention time and extraction efficiency of dry materials was similar to that of fresh materials using method B, but decreased sharply using method A. Putting together, our study provided evidence that method B is an efficient extraction method for further analysis of metabolites from this resurrection species. PMID:24941750

  18. Compound Identification Using Partial and Semi-partial Correlations for Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongho; Koo, Imhoi; Jeong, Jaesik; Wu, Shiwen; Shi, Xue; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Compound identification is a key component of data analysis in the applications of gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS). Currently, the most widely used compound identification is mass spectrum matching, in which dot product and its composite version are employed as spectral similarity measures. Several forms of transformations for fragment ion intensities have also been proposed to increase the accuracy of compound identification. In this study, we introduced partial and semi-partial correlations as mass spectral similarity measures and applied them to identify compounds along with different transformations of peak intensity. The mixture versions of the proposed method were also developed to further improve the accuracy of compound identification. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed spectral similarity measures, the National Institute of Standard Technology (NIST) mass spectral library and replicate spectral library were used as the reference library and the query spectra, respectively. Identification results showed that the mixture partial and semi-partial correlations always outperform both the dot-product and its composite measure. The mixture similarity with semi-partial correlation has the highest accuracy of 84.6% in compound identification with a transformation of (0.53, 1.3) for fragment ion intensity and m/z value, respectively. PMID:22794294

  19. Comparative Analysis of Mass Spectral Matching-based Compound Identification in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Imhoi; Kim, Seongho; Zhang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Compound identification in gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS) is usually achieved by matching query spectra to spectra present in a reference library. Although several spectral similarity measures have been developed and compared using a small reference library, it still remains unknown how the relationship between the spectral similarity measure and the size of reference library affects on the identification accuracy as well as the optimal weight factor. We used three reference libraries to investigate the dependency of the optimal weight factor, spectral similarity measure and the size of reference library. Our study demonstrated that the optimal weight factor depends on not only spectral similarity measure but also the size of reference library. The mixture semi-partial correlation measure outperforms all existing spectral similarity measures in all tested reference libraries, in spite of the computational expense. Furthermore, the accuracy of compound identification using a larger reference library in future is estimated by varying the size of reference library. Simulation study indicates that the mixture semi-partial correlation measure will have the best performance with the increase of reference library in future. PMID:23726352

  20. Metabolic products in urine of preterm infants characterized via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hu; Li, Sitao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Hong; Liu, Mengxian; Shi, Congcong; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the metabolic products of urine associated with preterm birth, thus providing clinical guidelines for intestinal and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants. Methods: Urine samples of 47 preterm infants and 45 full-term infants were collected and prepared for trimethylsilylation by treatment with urease. The levels of lysine, phenylalanine, histidine, ornithine, fumaric acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactose, stearic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and statistically analyzed. Results: The normalized concentrations of the following metabolites in preterm infant urine samples were significantly lower than that of full-term infant urine samples: lysine (P = 0.003), phenylalanine (P = 0.001), histidine (P = 0.006), ornithine (P = 0.000), fumaric acid (P = 0.002), malic acid (P = 0.006), succinic acid (P = 0.000), lactose (P = 0.000), stearic acid (P = 0.000) and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (P = 0.000). Conclusions: The results of the GC/MS analysis indicated that amino acid, carbohydrate, and fatty acid metabolism defects exist in preterm infants. The use of GC/MS to determine metabolic products in urine samples could be helpful for prospectively evaluating the nutritional status of preterm infants, and therefore providing clinical guidelines on reasonable nutritional support. PMID:26629171

  1. Determination of phthalate esters in teas and tea infusions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Liping; Ma, Lijuan; Qiao, Yang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-04-15

    Phthalate esters (PAEs), a group of environmental pollutants which are carcinogenic to human body, have been detected in teas. In this work, five PAEs in teas and tea infusions were quantitatively determined by a modified simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After the optimization of SDE, the proposed method afforded a wide range of linearity and high linear regression coefficients with the limits of detection range of 0.24-3.72 μg/kg. The average recoveries were 79.83-116.67% for tea samples and 78.22-101.64% for tea infusions with all the relative standard deviations below 20%. The total content of five PAEs in teas was 1.135-3.734 mg/kg and the total dissolving ratio of five PAEs from tea to infusion was 19.05-28.07% for the selected tea samples. The risk assessment result of all the selected tea samples demonstrated that the population with the habit of drinking tea won't cause risk to human health. PMID:26675858

  2. Analysis of endogenous aldehydes in human urine by static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Serrano, María; Gallego, Mercedes; Silva, Manuel

    2016-03-11

    Endogenous aldehydes (EAs) generated during oxidative stress and cell processes are associated with many pathogenic and toxicogenic processes. The aim of this research was to develop a solvent-free and automated analytical method for the determination of EAs in human urine using a static headspace generator sampler coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS). Twelve significant EAs used as markers of different biochemical and physiological processes, namely short- and medium-chain alkanals, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyl aldehydes have been selected as target analytes. Human urine samples (no dilution is required) were derivatized with O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine in alkaline medium (hydrogen carbonate-carbonate buffer, pH 10.3). The HS-GC-MS method developed renders an efficient tool for the sensitive and precise determination of EAs in human urine with limits of detection from 1 to 15ng/L and relative standard deviations, (RSDs) from 6.0 to 7.9%. Average recoveries by enriching urine samples ranged between 92 and 95%. Aldehydes were readily determined at 0.005-50μg/L levels in human urine from healthy subjects, smokers and diabetic adults. PMID:26879451

  3. Valid internal standard technique for arson detection based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, Pedro A S; Borges, Carlos M F; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N

    2012-09-28

    The most popular procedures for the detection of residues of accelerants in fire debris are the ones published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM E1412-07 and E1618-10). The most critical stages of these tests are the conservation of fire debris from the sampling to the laboratory, the extraction of residues of accelerants from the debris to the activated charcoal strips (ACS) and from those to the final solvent, as well as the analysis of sample extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and the interpretation of the instrumental signal. This work proposes a strategy for checking the quality of the sample conservation, the accelerant residues transference to final solvent and GC-MS analysis, using internal standard additions. It is used internal standards ranging from a highly volatile compound for checking debris conservation to low volatile compound for checking GC-MS repeatability. The developed quality control (QC) parameters are not affected by GC-MS sensitivity variation and, specifically, the GC-MS performance control is not affected by ACS adsorption saturation that may mask test performance deviations. The proposed QC procedure proved to be adequate to check GC-MS repeatability, ACS extraction and sample conservation since: (1) standard additions are affected by negligible uncertainty and (2) observed dispersion of QC parameters are fit for its intended use. PMID:22920302

  4. Identification of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mareck, U; Sigmund, G; Opfermann, G; Geyer, H; Thevis, M; Schänzer, W

    2005-01-01

    Letrozole (1-(bis-(4-cyanophenyl)methyl)-1,2,4-triazole) is used therapeutically as a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (Femara) to treat hormone-sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. For doping purposes it may be used to counteract the adverse effects of an extensive abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (gynaecomastia) and to increase the testosterone concentration by stimulation of the testosterone biosynthesis. The use of aromatase inhibitors has been prohibited by IOC/WADA regulations for male and female athletes since September 2001 and January 2005, respectively. Spot urine samples from women suffering from metastatic breast cancer and being treated with letrozole were collected and analysed to develop/optimise the detection system for metabolites of letrozole to allow the identification of athletes who do not comply with the internationally prohibited use of this cancer drug. The assay was based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and the main metabolite of letrozole (bis-4-cyanophenylmethanol) was identified by comparison of its mass spectrum and retention time with that of a bis-4-cyanophenylmethanol reference. The full-scan spectrum, diagnostic ions and a validation of the method for the analysis of bis-4-cyanophenylmethanol are presented. PMID:16299697

  5. Analysis of Tropical Forest Fire Emissions Using in Situ Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry during Sambba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaeian, J.; Lewis, A. C.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lee, J. D.; Purvis, R.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical atmospheric profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made over Amazonia using an in situ gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), including isoprene, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and products of biomass burning such as benzene. Measurements were made in the Amazonian (Rondônia and Amazonas) region during September 2012, a period of extensive biomass burning. Data was obtained between 100m and 8500m from the FAAM BAe 146 research aircraft. Isoprene was observed to be constrained overwhelmingly to the boundary layer (height typically ~2500m) with mean boundary layer mixing ratio of ~2 ppbv and a peak of ~5 ppbv at the lowest flight levels of 100 m. First generation isoprene oxidation products, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, were quantified individually rather than as the sum of the pair, which is more commonly found in the literature. Both MACR and MVK were constrained primarily to the boundary layer, however trace quantities could be seen in the free troposphere to a height of 8000 m. Benzene from biomass burning was observed in both boundary layer and free troposphere, with a peak mixing ratio of ~0.8 ppbv at 750 m. This work will present the spatial distribution of isoprene within the boundary as a function of underlying surface type. The vertical profiles of all species are then compared to representative simulations from the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model and conclusions drawn on the success of the model in representing emissions and oxidation chemistry.

  6. APPLICATIONS OF INFORMATION THEORY AND PATTERN RECOGNITION TO GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF TOXIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The number of information channels contained in the gas chromatographic, mass spectrometric, and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of 78 toxic organic compounds has been determined. The toxic compounds are those routinely monitored in ambient air samples usi...

  7. Urine Mescaline Screening With a Biochip Array Immunoassay and Quantification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Battal, Dilek; Barnes, Allan J; Castaneto, Marisol S; Martin, Thomas M; Klette, Kevin L; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-12-01

    Mescaline, the primary psychoactive chemical in peyote cactus, has been consumed for thousands of years in ancient religious ceremonies. The US military wanted to determine if mescaline intake was a problem for personnel readiness. Twenty thousand seventeen urine specimens negative for cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, and amphetamines were tested for mescaline with the Randox Drugs of Abuse V (DOA-V) biochip array immunoassay at the manufacturer's recommended cutoff of 6 mcg/L. A sensitive and specific method for mescaline quantification in urine was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with electron impact ionization. Standard curves, using linear least squares regression with 1/x weighting, were linear from 1 to 250 mcg/L with coefficients of determination >0.994. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision was <4.4 coefficient of variation (%CV), with accuracies >90.4%. Mean extraction efficiencies were >92.0% across the linear range. This fully validated method was applied for the confirmation of urinary mescaline in 526 presumptive-positive specimens and 198 randomly selected presumptive-negative specimens at the manufacturer's 6 mcg/L cutoff. No specimen confirmed positive at the GC/MS limit of quantification of 1 mcg/L. Results indicated that during this time frame, there was insufficient mescaline drug use in the military to warrant routine screening in the drug testing program. However, mescaline stability, although assessed, could have contributed to lower prevalence. We also present a validated GC/MS method for mescaline quantification in urine for reliable confirmation of suspected mescaline intake. PMID:25992796

  8. [Simultaneous determination of 8 polybrominated biphenyls in human serum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Jingguang; Huang, Feifei; Wu, Yongning

    2012-05-01

    A comprehensive analytical method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 8 polybrominated biphenyl congeners (PBBs: BB-15, 18, 52, 101, 153, 180, 194 and 206) in human serum. After the protein was removed, the sample was cleaned-up by an Oasis HLB solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, then purified further by a two-layer cartridge containing activated silica gel and a mixture of silica gel and sulfuric acid, in which elution solvent was optimized. The eluent was evaporated to about 100 microL by a gentle nitrogen stream for GC-MS analysis. The separation was performed on a DB-5ms column (15 m x 0.25 mm x 0.1 microm) and the qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out in electron impact (EI) selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, in which isotope was used as internal standard. The limits of detection (LODs, 3.14 times of standard deviation) and the limits of quantification (LOQs, 10 times of standard deviation) were 0.002-0.029 ng/mL and 0.008-0.092 ng/mL respectively for the 8 PBBs. The average recoveries for all PBBs at three spiked levels were 74.24%-119.49% with the relative standard deviations in the range of 1.23%-12.02%. The method was verified by accurate analysis of BB-153 in organic contaminant standard reference materials (SRM) 1957 and 1958. This method is simple, rapid, accurate, precise and fit for the determination of PBBs in human serum. PMID:22934409

  9. Postmortem interval estimation: a novel approach utilizing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based biochemical profiling.

    PubMed

    Kaszynski, Richard H; Nishiumi, Shin; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Kondo, Takeshi; Takahashi, Motonori; Asano, Migiwa; Ueno, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    While the molecular mechanisms underlying postmortem change have been exhaustively investigated, the establishment of an objective and reliable means for estimating postmortem interval (PMI) remains an elusive feat. In the present study, we exploit low molecular weight metabolites to estimate postmortem interval in mice. After sacrifice, serum and muscle samples were procured from C57BL/6J mice (n = 52) at seven predetermined postmortem intervals (0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h). After extraction and isolation, low molecular weight metabolites were measured via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and examined via semi-quantification studies. Then, PMI prediction models were generated for each of the 175 and 163 metabolites identified in muscle and serum, respectively, using a non-linear least squares curve fitting program. A PMI estimation panel for muscle and serum was then erected which consisted of 17 (9.7 %) and 14 (8.5 %) of the best PMI biomarkers identified in muscle and serum profiles demonstrating statistically significant correlations between metabolite quantity and PMI. Using a single-blinded assessment, we carried out validation studies on the PMI estimation panels. Mean ± standard deviation for accuracy of muscle and serum PMI prediction panels was -0.27 ± 2.88 and -0.89 ± 2.31 h, respectively. Ultimately, these studies elucidate the utility of metabolomic profiling in PMI estimation and pave the path toward biochemical profiling studies involving human samples. PMID:26931122

  10. Quantitation of opioids in whole blood by electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Shan, Xiaoqin; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate

    2011-03-01

    Opioids are frequently encountered in Forensic Toxicology casework. A PubMed literature search was conducted to find a method using electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine whole blood specimens. A previously published method was identified, and an updated version was provided by the State of North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. This procedure was used as a starting point for development and validation of a refined procedure to be used in the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office Forensic Toxicology laboratory for routine analysis of antemortem forensic toxicology case samples. Materials and instrumentation common to most forensic toxicology laboratories were utilized while obtaining detection limits from 1 to 10 ng/mL and quantitation limits of 2.5 to 10 ng/mL using 1 mL of whole blood. Target compounds were chosen based on applicability to the method as well as availability and common use in the United States and include dihydrocodeine, codeine, morphine, hydrocodone, 6-monoacetylmorphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and oxymorphone. Each analyte demonstrated two zero-order linear ranges (r(2) > 0.990) over the concentrations evaluated (from 2.5 to 500 ng/mL). The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 12%. Quantitative accuracy was within 27% at 2.5 ng/mL, 11% at 10 ng/mL, and 8% at 50 ng/mL. The validated method provides a more sensitive procedure for the quantitation of common opioids in blood using standard laboratory equipment and a small amount of sample. PMID:21396229

  11. Determination of Synthetic Cathinones in Urine Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Techniques.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei-Yin; Ko, Ya-Chun; Lin, Mei-Chih; Wang, Po-Yu; Chen, Yu-Pen; Chiueh, Lih-Ching; Shih, Daniel Yang-Chih; Chou, Hsiu-Kuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the abuse of synthetic cathinones has increased considerably. This study proposes a method, based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), to analyze and quantify six synthetic cathinones in urine samples: mephedrone (4-MMC), methylone (bk-MDMA), butylone, ethylone, pentylone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In our procedure, the urine samples undergo solid-phase extraction (SPE) and derivatization prior to injection into the GC-MS device. Separation is performed using a HP-5MS capillary column. The use of selective ion monitoring (SIM mode) makes it is good sensitivity in this method, and the entire analysis process is within 18 min. In addition, the proposed method maintains linearity in the calibration curve from 50 to 2,000 ng/mL (r(2) > 0.995). The limit of detection of this method is 5 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (20 ng/mL); the limit of quantification is 20 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (50 ng/mL). In testing, the extraction performance of SPE was between 82.34 and 104.46%. Precision and accuracy results were satisfactory <15%. The proposed method was applied to six real urine samples, one of which was found to contain 4-MMC and bk-MDMA. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method in the identification of synthetic cathinones in urine, with regard to the limits of detection and quantification. This method is highly repeatable and accurate. PMID:26410364

  12. Thin layer chromatography convulsant screen extended by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Braselton, W Emmett; Johnson, Malgorzata

    2003-01-01

    Acute onset convulsive disorders in the canine may result from exposure to a variety of toxicants including strychnine, insecticides, metaldehyde, zinc phosphide, methylxanthines, drugs of abuse, bromethalin, and the tremorgenic mycotoxins (roquefortine and penitrem A). Although several of the above can be identified in a single gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) screen most have to be determined by separate tests. This report describes a modification of the strychnine extraction procedure, which allows thin layer chromatographic (TLC) identification of strychnine, bromethalin, roquefortine, and penitrem A in suspect baits, stomach contents or vomitus, and extends the identification to a wide variety of drugs, pesticides, and environmental contaminants by GC-MS. Samples were mixed with base, extracted into CH2Cl2 and the organic fraction back-extracted with acid. The organic fraction (neutrals) was purified by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and analyzed by TLC to determine penitrem A and bromethalin. The acidic aqueous fraction was adjusted to pH > 9 and extracted into CH2Cl2. The resulting CH2Cl2 layer (bases) was then analyzed by TLC to determine strychnine and roquefortine. The organic basic and neutral fractions were recombined with a late eluting GPC fraction and analyzed by GC-MS. Of 312 samples analyzed by TLC from 1995 to 2001, 35 were positive for strychnine alone, 58 were positive for both roquefortine and penitrem A, 4 were positive for roquefortine alone, and 1 was positive for bromethalin. None of the samples were positive for penitrem A alone. Samples negative by TLC were analyzed by the GC-MS extended procedure since mid-1999, and 14 have shown positive for a wide variety of compounds with convulsant activity. PMID:12580294

  13. Age determination of ballpoint pen ink by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2008-07-01

    Two main approaches can be used for determining the age of an ink: indirect dating and direct dating. Indirect dating is based on the chemical analysis of an ink followed by comparison with known samples in a reference collection. The collection should contain information about the inks including the market introduction dates. This approach may allow for an anachronism to be detected. The second concept is based on measuring ink components that change with age. The analysis of solvents in ballpoint inks may be a useful parameter for determining the age of ink on paper. In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that thermal desorption of ink directly from paper, followed by chemical analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), is a promising procedure for characterizing ink-binder resins and solvents. Preliminary tests showed that monitoring the evaporation of ink solvent from ink on paper is not a suitable method for ink dating. Thermal analysis of ink on paper in two steps revealed that fresh ink releases a relative amount of solvent at a certain low temperature in a defined period of time, which decreases as the ink ages. As a consequence, this relative amount of solvent released at a certain low temperature, and its decrease with time, can be used to estimate ink age. This age-dependent parameter was studied in 85 different inks ranging in age from 1 week to 1.5 years. It was found that some inks showed a significant decrease of this parameter up to an age of several months, and that the aging process can be monitored within this period. For other inks, however, the age-dependent parameter decreases relatively fast, e.g., within a few days, to a constant level, which can be too fast for casework. Based on these results, a general procedure for assessing the age of ballpoint pen inks on paper was developed. PMID:18503526

  14. Simultaneous determination of psychotropic phenylalkylamine derivatives in human hair by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Jung, Kyu Sung; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Jae Il; In, Moon Kyo

    2007-01-01

    A gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of thirteen psychotropic phenylalkylamine derivatives (amphetamine; AP, phentermine; PT, methamphamine; MA, cathinone; Khat, methcathinone; MCAT, fenfluramine; FFA, desmethylselegiline; DSEL, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine; MDA, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine; MDMA, 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine; MDEA, norketamine; NKT, mescaline; MES, 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine; 2CB) in human hair. Hair samples (20 mg) were washed with distilled water and acetone, cut into small fragments (<1 mm), and incubated in 0.25 M methanolic HCl under ultrasonication at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The resulting solutions were evaporated to dryness, derivatized using trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) at 70 degrees C for 30 min, and analyzed by GC/MS. The linear ranges were 0.02-25.0 ng/mg for AP, PT, Khat, FFA, DSEL, MDMA, and 2CB; 0.05-25.0 ng/mg for MA, MCAT, and MES; 0.05-12.5 ng/mg for MDA; and 0.1-25.0 ng/mg for MDEA and NKT, with good correlation coefficients (r(2) > 0.9985). The intra-day, inter-day, and inter-person precisions were within 12.7%, 14.8%, and 16.8%, respectively. The intra-day, inter-day, and inter-person accuracies were between -10.7 and 13.4%, -12.7 and 11.6%, and -15.3 and 11.9%, respectively. The limits of quantifications (LOQs) for each compound were lower than 0.08 ng/mg. The recoveries were in the range of 76.7-95.6%. The method proved to be suitable for the simultaneous qualification and quantification of phenylalkylamine derivatives in hair specimens. PMID:17474080

  15. Triple sorbent thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry determination of vapor phase organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.Y.; Skeen, J.T.; Dindal, A.B.; Higgins, C.E.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    A thermal desorption/ps chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) has been evaluated for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vapor phase samples using Carbosieve S-III/Carbotrap/Carotrap C triple sorbent traps (TST) similar to those available from a commercial source. The analysis was carried out with a Hewlett-Packard 5985A or 5995 GC/MS system with a modified injector to adapt an inhouse manufactured short-path desorber for transferring desorbate directly onto a cryofocusing loop for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Vapor phase standards generated from twenty six compounds were used for method validation, including alkanes, alkyl alcohols, alkyl ketones, and alkyl nitrites, a group of representative compounds that have previously been identified in a target airborne matrix. The method was validated based on the satisfactory results in terms of reproducibility, recovery rate, stability, and linearity. A relative, standard deviation of 0.55 to 24.3 % was obtained for the entire TD process (generation of gas phase standards, spiking the standards on and desorbing from TST) over a concentration range of 20 to 500 ng/trap. Linear correlation coefficients for the calibration curves as determined ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 and limits of detection ranged from 3 to 76 ng. For a majority of standards, recoveries of greater than 90% were observed. For three selected standards spiked on TSTS, minimal loss (10 to 22%) was observed after storing the spiked in, a 4{degree}C refrigerator for 29 days. The only chromatographable artifact observed was a 5% conversion of isopropanol to acetone. The validated method been successfully applied, to the determination of VOCs collected from various emission sources in a diversified concentration range.

  16. Measurement of cocaine and metabolites in urine, meconium, and diapers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lombardero, N; Casanova, O; Behnke, M; Eyler, F D; Bertholf, R L

    1993-01-01

    Analytical methods were evaluated for measuring cocaine (CO), benzoylecgonine (BE), and ecgonine methyl ester (EME) in urine and methanolic extracts from meconium and diapers by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Volatile derivatives of the extracted drugs were generated before GC/MS analysis. Methanolic extracts from meconium and diapers were reconstituted in drug-free urine and treated as above. The limit of detection for the GC/MS method was calculated to be approximately 11 ng per mL. Within-run coefficients of variation (CVs) for urinary CO, BE, and EME were 5.7, 5.3, and 11.4 percent, respectively (N = 10); corresponding CVs for meconium 6.4, 10.7, and 21.9 percent (N = 8). Quantitative results were linear from 25 to 10,000 ng per g of meconium and 25 to 5,000 ng per mL of urine. Day-to-day precision varied from eight percent (CV) for BE in refrigerated or frozen urine to 34 percent for EME in refrigerated meconium. Recoveries of CO, BE, and EME from urine were 63, 19, and 42 percent, respectively; corresponding recoveries from meconium were 64, 21, and 25 percent. Cocaine and metabolites were extracted from wet but meconium-free diapers into methanol, which was evaporated before reconstituting in drug-free urine and extraction on a solid phase column. The CO, BE, and EME were detected in previously drug-free meconium after portions were deposited in a diaper which was wet with drug-positive urine. Unless precautions are taken to prevent extracorporeal contamination of meconium with urine, concentrations of CO and metabolites in meconium may be substantially augmented by contamination with urine. Analysis by GC/MS of CO and metabolites extracted from diapers provides an attractive alternative to collection of urine, which is difficult and may cause discomfort for the neonate. PMID:8239486

  17. Determination of organoarsenic warfare agents in sediment samples from Skagerrak by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tørnes, John Aasulf; Opstad, Aase Mari; Johnsen, Bjørn Arne

    2006-03-01

    In 1945 the Norwegian authorities gave permission to scuttle ships loaded with captured chemical ammunition on board in an area approximately 14x4 km in size, 25 nautical miles south-east of Arendal. An investigation was carried out in 2002 to inspect four wrecks by using a remote-operated vehicle with video cameras. The Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (Forsvarets forskningsinstitutt, FFI) carried out the project on behalf of the Norwegian Pollution Control Authority (SFT). Sediment samples were collected at eight positions around each wreck. One of the wrecks was broken up into several smaller parts. Here sediments were collected at one additional position close to one of the parts. From each position, at least two sediment cores were taken up to the surface. One of the cores from each position was sliced into three parts that were immediately frozen. The other whole cores were frozen on board the ship and transported back to the laboratory in a freezer. In total, sediment samples from 33 different locations were collected and analysed for organoarsenic warfare agents and some of their decomposition products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after derivatisation with 1-propanethiol. Most of the identified organoarsenic compounds found in the sediment samples are parts of the arsine oil mixture produced by Germany during World War II. The compounds were found both close to the wreck and at a somewhat longer distance from the wrecks. The highest concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected close to a bomb seen on the seabed. The organoarsenic warfare agents adamsite or lewisite were not found in any of the samples. Lewisite is not reported to have been produced during World War II, but was nevertheless looked for in the samples. PMID:15993928

  18. Assessment of oil weathering by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, time warping and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Linus M V; Olsen, Rasmus R; Hansen, Asger B; Andersen, Ole; Christensen, Jan H

    2007-09-14

    Detailed characterization and understanding of oil weathering at the molecular level is an essential part of tiered approaches for forensic oil spill identification, for risk assessment of terrestrial and marine oil spills, and for evaluating effects of bioremediation initiatives. Here, a chemometric-based method is applied to data from two in vitro experiments in order to distinguish the effects of evaporation and dissolution processes on oil composition. The potential of the method for obtaining detailed chemical information of the effects from evaporation and dissolution processes, to determine weathering state and to distinguish between various weathering processes is investigated and discussed. The method is based on comprehensive and objective chromatographic data processing followed by principal component analysis (PCA) of concatenated sections of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry chromatograms containing homologue series of n-alkanes (m/z 85) and alkyltoluenes (m/z 105). The PCA model based solely on in vitro samples and validated by samples from an authentic marine oil spill gives a detailed description of the temporal changes in n-alkane and alkyltoluene compositions. The PCA model is able to distinguish the two physical weathering processes both with respect to removal rate and relative changes. The model shows that evaporation has a large impact on both the alkyltoluenes and on the n-alkanes (e.g., nC-18 is completely removed after 192 days of in vitro evaporation). Dissolution, however, is shown to be a much slower process for weathering of heavy fuel oils with only limited impact on the alkyltoluenes, and no effects on the n-alkane distribution. PMID:17669412

  19. Improved method for rapid detection of phthalates in bottled water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otero, Paz; Saha, Sushanta Kumar; Moane, Siobhan; Barron, John; Clancy, Gerard; Murray, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    An improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for simple, rapid and precise quantification of phthalates in drinking water is presented. This method was validated for bis (2-n-butoxyethyl) phthalate (DBEP), bis (2-n-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-butyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dihexyl phthalate (DHP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP) and dinonyl phthalate (DINP). Linearity of 0.9984>r(2)>0.9975 in the range of 0.075-4.8μg/mL for the selected phthalates was obtained. Accuracy values were in the range of 93-114% and RSD% for the analysis of 1.2μg/mL of each phthalate was below 2.3% (n=9). This new method design has significantly improved the detection in terms of rapidity, specificity, repeatability and accuracy compared to available methods. The procedure has been applied to the analyses of three different brands of commercially available bottled mineral water and the corresponding plastic bottles. Phthalates were extracted with dichloromethane and re-constituted in cyclohexane prior to GC-MS analysis. When the validated GC-MS method was applied to the quantification of the selected phthalates in the samples, only DBP (up to 0.0675±0.0018μg/mL) and DEHP (up to 1.6848±0.1631μg/mL) were found. Furthermore, we provide specific data about the concentration of DBP and DEHP in bottled water attributable to migration of phthalates from respective plastic bottles. PMID:26134297

  20. Systematic analysis of glycerol: colourimetric screening and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric confirmation.

    PubMed

    Sardela, Vinícius F; Scalco, Fernanda B; Cavalcante, Karina M; Simoni, Ruth E; Silva, Deyvison R; Pereira, Henrique Marcelo G; de Oliveira, Maria Lúcia L Costa; Aquino Neto, Francisco R

    2015-10-01

    Glycerol is a naturally occurring polyol in the human body, essential for several metabolic processes. It is widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and medical industries and in clinical practice as a plasma volume expander (PVE). Athletes, however, may use glycerol to mask the presence of forbidden substances or to enhance performance, inclusively through hyperhydration achieved by glycerol ingestion with added fluid. These practices are considered doping, and are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Therefore, glycerol was introduced in the prohibited list. Doping through glycerol ingestion can readily be identified by detection of elevated glycerol concentrations in urine. In this paper, a protocol for the fast detection of glycerol in urine is proposed. It consists of a previous visual colourimetric screening, followed by a quantitative/qualitative confirmation analysis by mass spectrometry. The screening procedure involves a reaction in which polyhydric alcohols are oxidized by periodate to formic acid and formaldehyde, which is detected by the addition of a fuchsin solution. For the subsequent qualitative/quantitative confirmation analysis, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based approach with a non-deuterated internal standard and a drying step of only 10 min is proposed. The linear correlation was demonstrated within WADA´s threshold range. The calculated RSD were 2.1% for within-day precision and 2.8% for between-day precision. The uncertainty estimation was calculated, and a value of 2.7% was obtained. The procedure may also be used for the analysis of other polyols in urine, as for example the PVE mannitol. PMID:26112364

  1. Nitrate Reduction in a Groundwater Microcosm Determined by 15N Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Gran; Annadotter, Helne

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO3?-N liter?1. Traces of 15NO3? were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day?1. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of 15N2, 15N2O, 15NH4+, and 15N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO3? and NH4+ were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g?1 day?1. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N2, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO3? was reduced to NH4+. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month. PMID:16348048

  2. Chemometric Profile of Root Extracts of Rhodiola imbricata Edgew. with Hyphenated Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometric Technique

    PubMed Central

    Tayade, Amol B.; Dhar, Priyanka; Kumar, Jatinder; Sharma, Manu; Chauhan, Rajinder S.; Chaurasia, Om P.; Srivastava, Ravi B.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodiola imbricata Edgew. (Rose root or Arctic root or Golden root or Shrolo), belonging to the family Crassulaceae, is an important food crop and medicinal plant in the Indian trans-Himalayan cold desert. Chemometric profile of the n-hexane, chloroform, dichloroethane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and 60% ethanol root extracts of R. imbricata were performed by hyphenated gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique. GC/MS analysis was carried out using Thermo Finnigan PolarisQ Ion Trap GC/MS MS system comprising of an AS2000 liquid autosampler. Interpretation on mass spectrum of GC/MS was done using the NIST/EPA/NIH Mass Spectral Database, with NIST MS search program v.2.0g. Chemometric profile of root extracts revealed the presence of 63 phyto-chemotypes, among them, 1-pentacosanol; stigmast-5-en-3-ol, (3?,24S); 1-teracosanol; 1-henteracontanol; 17-pentatriacontene; 13-tetradecen-1-ol acetate; methyl tri-butyl ammonium chloride; bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate; 7,8-dimethylbenzocyclooctene; ethyl linoleate; 3-methoxy-5-methylphenol; hexadecanoic acid; camphor; 1,3-dimethoxybenzene; thujone; 1,3-benzenediol, 5-pentadecyl; benzenemethanol, 3-hydroxy, 5-methoxy; cholest-4-ene-3,6-dione; dodecanoic acid, 3-hydroxy; octadecane, 1-chloro; ethanone, 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl); ?-tocopherol; ascaridole; campesterol; 1-dotriacontane; heptadecane, 9-hexyl were found to be present in major amount. Eventually, in the present study we have found phytosterols, terpenoids, fatty acids, fatty acid esters, alkyl halides, phenols, alcohols, ethers, alkanes, and alkenes as the major group of phyto-chemotypes in the different root extracts of R. imbricata. All these compounds identified by GC/MS analysis were further investigated for their biological activities and it was found that they possess a diverse range of positive pharmacological actions. In future, isolation of individual phyto-chemotypes and subjecting them to biological activity will definitely prove fruitful results in designing a novel drug. PMID:23326358

  3. Identification of n-Decane Oxidation Products in Corynebacterium Cultures by Combined Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bacchin, Paolo; Robertiello, Andrea; Viglia, Aurelio

    1974-01-01

    The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique was employed to characterize n-decane oxidation products of Corynebacterium strains 7E1C and 269 (SNAM Progetti collection) after 73 h of incubation at 35 C. Corynebacterium 7E1C accumulated consistent amounts of esters of long chain acids with long chain alcohols, mainly decyldecanoate as well as products with mono- and diterminal carboxylic functions. Corynebacterium 269 yielded 1-decanol and 1-10 decanediol as principal oxidation products. PMID:4441062

  4. Comparison of the structures of humic substances from aquatic and terrestrial sources by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Philp, R. P.; Gillam, A. H.; Gilbert, T. D.; Tate, K. R.

    1983-03-01

    Four humic extracts isolated from terrestrial, mahne, plankton and freshwater sources have been investigated by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that substantial quantities of phenols (some not derived from lignin), pyrroles and nitrites (derived from proteins, nucleic acids or porphyrins) are decomposition products. Small amounts of furans (derived from carbohydrates) and unsaturated ketones (derived from polycarboxylic aliphatic acids) are also present. The results illustrate how parent material, transport factors and biological activity affect the composition of humic extracts.

  5. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry computer analysis of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in man and his environment--A multimedia environmental study.

    PubMed

    Barkley, J; Bunch, J; Bursey, J T; Castillo, N; Cooper, S D; Davis, J M; Erickson, M D; Harris, B S; Kirkpatrick, M; Michael, L C; Parks, S P; Pellizzari, E D; Ray, M; Smith, D; Tomer, K B; Wagner, R; Zweidinger, R A

    1980-04-01

    As part of a study to make a comparative analysis of selected halogenated compounds in man and the environmental media, a quantitative gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of the levels of the halogenated compounds found in the breath, blood and urine of an exposed population (Old Love Canal area, Niagara, New York) and their immediate environment (air and water) was undertaken. In addition, levels of halogenated hydrocarbons in air samples taken in the general Buffalo, Niagara Falls area were determined. PMID:7448328

  6. Identification of New Metabolites of Bacterial Transformation of Indole by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SPG transformed indole completely in the presence of an additional carbon source. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde as biotransformation products. This is the first report of the formation of indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde from indole by any bacterium. PMID:25548566

  7. Pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of kerogens and kerogen precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Meent, D.; Brown, S. C.; Philp, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of kerogens and kerogen precursors isolated from DSDP samples, oil shales and recent algal mats have been examined by Curie point pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study has shown that the three main types of kerogens (marine, terrestrial and mixtures of both) can be characterized using these techniques. The marine (algal) kerogens yield principally aliphatic products and the terrestrial kerogens yield more aromatic and phenolic products with some n-alkanes and n-alkenes. The yields of n-alkanes and n-alkenes increase and phenols decrease with increasing geologic age, however, pyrolysis-GC cannot be used to characterize the influence of short term diagenesis on the kerogen structure.

  8. Extending the range of compounds amenable for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Gordin, Alexander; Amirav, Aviv

    2003-04-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) suffers from a major limitation in that an expanding number of thermally labile or low volatility compounds of interest are not amenable for analysis. We found that the elution temperatures of compounds from GC can be significantly lowered by reducing the column length, increasing the carrier gas flow rate, reducing the capillary column film thickness and lowering the temperature programming rate. Pyrene is eluted at 287 degrees C in standard GC-MS with a 30 m x 0.25 mm I.D. column with 1-microm DB5ms film and 1-ml/min He column flow rate. In contrast, pyrene is eluted at 79 degrees C in our "Supersonic GC-MS" system using a 1 m x 0.25 mm I.D. column with 0.1-microm DB5ms film and 100-ml/min He column flow rate. A simple model has been invoked to explain the significantly (up to 208 degrees C) lower elution temperatures observed. According to this model, every halving of the temperature programming rate, or number of separation plates (either through increased flow rate or due to reduced column length), results in approximately 20 degrees C lower elution temperature. These considerably lower elution temperatures enable the analysis of an extended range of thermally labile and low volatility compounds, that otherwise could not be analyzed by standard GC-MS. We demonstrate the analysis of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as decacyclene with ten fused rings, well above the current GC limit of PAHs with six rings. Even a metalloporphirin such as magnesiumoctaethylporphin was easily analyzed with elution temperatures below 300 degrees C. Furthermore, a range of thermally labile compounds were analyzed including carbamates such as methomyl, aldicarb, aldicarbsulfone and oxamyl, explosives such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate, Tetryl and HMX, and drugs such as reserpine (608 a.m.u.). Supersonic GC-MS was used, based on the coupling of a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) inlet and ion sources with a bench-top Agilent 6890 GC plus 5972 MSD. The Supersonic GC-MS provides enhanced molecular ion without any ion source related peak tailing. Thus, the lower GC separation power involved in the analysis of thermally labile and low volatility compounds is compensated by increased separation power of the MS gained from the enhanced molecular ion. Several implications of these findings are discussed, including our conclusion that slower chromatography leads to better analysis of thermally labile compounds. PMID:12741601

  9. Analytical strategies for characterizing organic paint media using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Maria Perla; Andreotti, Alessia; Bonaduce, Ilaria; Modugno, Francesca; Ribechini, Erika

    2010-06-15

    Throughout history, artists have experimented with a variety of organic-based natural materials, using them as paint binders, varnishes, and ingredients for mordants in gildings. Artists often use many layers of paint to produce particular effects. How we see a painting is thus the final result of how this complex, highly heterogeneous, multimaterial, and multilayered structure interacts with light. The chemical characterization of the organic substances in paint materials is of great importance for artwork conservation because the organic components of the paint layers are particularly subject to degradation. In addition, understanding the organic content and makeup of paint materials allows us to differentiate between the painting techniques that have been used over history. Applying gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis to microsamples of paint layers is widely recognized as the best approach for identifying organic materials, such as proteins, drying oils, waxes, terpenic resins, and polysaccharide gums. The method provides essential information for reconstructing artistic techniques, assessing the best conditions for long-term preservation, and planning restoration. In this Account, we summarize the more common approaches adopted in the study of the organic components of paint materials. Our progress in developing GC/MS analytical procedures in the field of cultural heritage is presented, focusing on problems that arise from (i) the presence of mixtures of many chemically complex and degraded materials, (ii) the interference of inorganic species, (iii) the small size of the samples, and (iv) the risk of contamination. We outline some critical aspects of the analytical strategy, such as the need to optimize specific wet-chemical sample pretreatments in order to separate the various components, hydrolyze macromolecular analytes, clean-up inorganic ions, and derivatize polar molecules for subsequent GC/MS separation and identification. We also discuss how to interpret the chromatographic data so as to be able to identify the materials. This identification is based on the presence of specific biomarkers (chemotaxonomy), on the evaluation of the overall chromatographic profile, or on the quantitative analysis of significant compounds. GC/MS-based analytical procedures have for 20 years provided important contributions to conservation science, but challenges and opportunities still coexist in the field of organic-based paint materials. We give selected examples and provide case studies showing how a better understanding of the chemical composition of organic paint materials and of their degradation pathways contribute to a better knowledge our cultural heritage, and to its preservation for future generations. PMID:20180544

  10. Plasma metabolomic profiling of dairy cows affected with ketosis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ketosis is an important problem for dairy cows` production performance. However, it is still little known about plasma metabolomics details of dairy ketosis. Results A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique was used to investigate plasma metabolic differences in cows that had clinical ketosis (CK, n=22), subclinical ketosis (SK, n=32), or were clinically normal controls (NC, n=22). The endogenous plasma metabolome was measured by chemical derivatization followed by GC/MS, which led to the detection of 267 variables. A two-sample t-test of 30, 32, and 13 metabolites showed statistically significant differences between SK and NC, CK and NC, and CK and SK, respectively. Orthogonal signal correction-partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed that the metabolic patterns of both CK and SK were mostly similar, with the exception of a few differences. The development of CK and SK involved disturbances in many metabolic pathways, mainly including fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway. A diagnostic model arbitrary two groups was constructed using OPLS-DA and receiver–operator characteristic curves (ROC). Multivariate statistical diagnostics yielded the 19 potential biomarkers for SK and NC, 31 for CK and NC, and 8 for CK and SK with area under the curve (AUC) values. Our results showed the potential biomarkers from CK, SK, and NC, including carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, even sitosterol and vitamin E isomers, etc. 2-piperidinecarboxylic acid and cis-9-hexadecenoic acid were closely associated with metabolic perturbations in ketosis as Glc, BHBA and NEFA for dealing with metabolic disturbances of ketosis in clinical practice. However, further research is needed to explain changes of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid, α-aminobutyric acid, methylmalonic acid, sitosterol and α-tocopherol in CK and SK, and to reveal differences between CK and SK. Conclusion Our study shows that some new biomarkers of ketosis from plasma may find new metabolic changes to have clinically new utility and significance in diagnosis, prognosis, and prevention of ketosis in the future. PMID:24070026

  11. Detecting Organic Compounds in Martian Soil Analogues Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of the 1976 Viking missions was to determine whether organic compounds, possibly of biological origin, were present in the Martian surface soils. The Viking gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) instruments found no evidence for any organic compounds of Martian origin above a few parts per billion in the upper 10 cm of surface soil [l], suggesting the absence of a widely distributed Martian biota. However, Benner et d. have suggested that significant amounts of non-volatile organic compounds, possibly including oxidation products of bioorganic molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS [2]. Moreover, other key organic compounds important to biology, such as amino acids and nucleobases, would also likely have been missed by the Viking GCMS as these compounds require chemical derivatization to be stable in a GC column [3]. Recent pyrolysis experiments with a Mars soil analogue that had been innoculated with Escherichia coli bacteria have shown that amino acid decomposition products (amines) and nucleobases are among the most abundant products generated after pyrolysis of the bacterial cells [4,5]. At the part per billion level (Viking GCMS detection limit), these pyrolysis products generated from several million bacterial cells per gram of Martian soil would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments [4]. Analytical protocols are under development for upcoming in situ lander opportunities to target several important biological compounds including amino acids and nucleobases. For example, extraction and chemical derivatization techniques [3] are being adapted for space flight use to transform reactive or fragile molecules that would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments, into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by GCMS. Recent experiments carried out at NASA Goddard have shown that using this derivatization technique all of the targeted compounds mentioned above can be separated on a GC column and detected by MS at sub-picomole (< 10(exp -l2 mole) levels. With these methods, the detection limit for amino acids, carboxylic acids and nucleobases is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than the Viking GCMS instruments for these compounds. Preliminary results using this analytical technique on a variety of Martian soil analogues will be presented.

  12. Authentication of Organically and Conventionally Grown Basils by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Chemical Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengfang; Chen, Pei; Yu, Liangli; Harrington, Peter de B.

    2013-01-01

    Basil plants cultivated by organic and conventional farming practices were accurately classified by pattern recognition of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) data. A novel extraction procedure was devised to extract characteristic compounds from ground basil powders. Two in-house fuzzy classifiers, i.e., the fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) and the fuzzy optimal associative memory (FOAM) for the first time, were used to build classification models. Two crisp classifiers, i.e., soft independent modeling by class analogy (SIMCA) and the partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used as control methods. Prior to data processing, baseline correction and retention time alignment were performed. Classifiers were built with the two-way data sets, the total ion chromatogram representation of data sets, and the total mass spectrum representation of data sets, separately. Bootstrapped Latin partition (BLP) was used as an unbiased evaluation of the classifiers. By using two-way data sets, average classification rates with FuRES, FOAM, SIMCA, and PLS-DA were 100 ± 0%, 94.4 ± 0.4%, 93.3 ± 0.4%, and 100 ± 0%, respectively, for 100 independent evaluations. The established classifiers were used to classify a new validation set collected 2.5 months later with no parametric changes except that the training set and validation set were individually mean-centered. For the new two-way validation set, classification rates with FuRES, FOAM, SIMCA, and PLS-DA were 100%, 83%, 97%, and 100%, respectively. Thereby, the GC/MS analysis was demonstrated as a viable approach for organic basil authentication. It is the first time that a FOAM has been applied to classification. A novel baseline correction method was used also for the first time. The FuRES and the FOAM are demonstrated as powerful tools for modeling and classifying GC/MS data of complex samples and the data pretreatments are demonstrated to be useful to improve the performance of classifiers. PMID:23398171

  13. Identification of gibberellins A20 and A 29 in seed of Pisum sativum cv. Progress No. 9 by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frydman, V M; Macmillan, J

    1973-03-01

    The gibberellin A1 (GA1)-like and GA5-like fractions from immature seeds of Pisum sativum cv. Progress No. 9 were identified by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as GA29 and GA20 respectively. PMID:24458812

  14. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  15. The detection of nicotine in a Late Mayan period flask by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Zagorevski, Dmitri V; Loughmiller-Newman, Jennifer A

    2012-02-29

    Several ancient Mayan vessels from the Kislak Collection of the US Library of Congress were examined for the presence of alkaloids. One of them, a codex-style flask, bears a text that appears to read yo-'OTOT-ti 'u-MAY, spelling y-otoot 'u-may 'the home of its/his/her tobacco'. Samples extracted from this Late Classic period (600 to 900 AD) container were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) methods. Nicotine was identified as the major component of the extracts. LC/MS analyses also yielded signals due to nicotine mono-oxides. The identities of the compounds were determined by comparison of the chromatographic and/or mass spectral characteristics with those from standards and literature data. High-resolution high mass accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra of protonated nicotine and nicotine mono-oxides were measured to verify and to correct previous product ion assignments. These analyses provided positive evidence for nicotine from a Mayan vessel, indicating it as a likely holder of tobacco leafs. The result of this investigation is the first physical evidence of tobacco from a Mayan container, and only the second example where the vessel content recorded in a Mayan hieroglyphic text has been confirmed directly by chromatography/mass spectrometry trace analysis. PMID:22279016

  16. Identification of Gibberellins in Norway Spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) by Combined Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Odén, Per Christer; Schwenen, Ludger; Graebe, Jan E.

    1987-01-01

    Gibberellins A1 (GA1), A3 and A9 were identified from extracts of shoots of 6-month old Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings by the use of sequential reverse and normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), bioassay, radioimmunoassay (RIA) and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The bioassay and RIA were used after fractionation by HPLC to detect the GA-containing fractions, which were then examined by GC-MS. The GAs identified are considered to be endogenous. PMID:16665471

  17. ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXTRACTS BY CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY AND CAPILLARY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative sensitivities of fused-silica capillary column gas chromatography/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FSCC/GC/FT-IR) versus packed-column GC/FT-IR and FSCC/GC/FT-IR versus fused-silica capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (FSCC/GC/MS) were compa...

  18. Flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using ≈4mLmin(-1) gas flows.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of the herein described research was focused on performing satisfactory flow modulation (FM), in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), using an MS-compatible second-dimension gas flow of approx. 4mLmin(-1). The FM model used was based on that initially proposed by Seeley et al. [3]. The use of limited gas flows was enabled through fine tuning of the FM parameters, in particular the duration of the re-injection (or flushing) process. Specifically, the application of a long re-injection period (i.e., 700ms) enabled efficient accumulation-loop flushing with gas flows of about 4mLmin(-1). It was possible to apply such extended re-injection periods by using different restrictor lengths in the connections linking the modulator to the auxiliary pressure source. FM GC×GC-MS applications were performed on a mixture containing C9-10 alkanes, and on a sample of essential oil. GC×GC-MS sensitivity was compared with that attained by using conventional GC-MS analysis, in essential oil applications. It was observed that signal intensities were, in general, considerably higher in the FM GC×GC-MS experiments. PMID:26968229

  19. The use of stable isotopes and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the identification of steroid metabolites in the equine

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, E.; Dumasia, M.C.; Teale, P.; Smith, S.J.; Cox, J.; Marshall, D.; Gower, D.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry has been used successfully in the elucidation of structures of urinary steroid metabolites in the horse and in the identification of metabolites isolated from in vivo perfusion and in vitro incubation studies using equine tissue preparations. Deuterium-labeled steroids, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta-diol have been synthesized by base-catalyzed isotope exchange methods and the products characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. (16,16(-2)H2)Dehydroepiandrosterone (plus radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone) was perfused into a testicular artery of a pony stallion and was shown to be metabolized into 2H2-labeled testosterone, 4-androstenedione, isomers of 5-androstene-3,17-diol, 19-hydroxytestosterone, and 19-hydroxy-4-androstenedione. In further studies, equine testicular minces have been incubated with 2H2-labeled and radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone and 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. The metabolites, whose identity was confirmed by stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proved the interconversion of the two substrates, as well as formation of testosterone and 4-androstenedione. The aromatization of dehydroepiandrosterone was also confirmed, together with the formation of an isomer of 5(10)-estrene-3,17-diol from both substrates showing 19-demethylation without concomitant aromatization. In studies of the feto-placental unit, the allantochorion was shown to aromatize (2H5)testosterone to (2H4)estradiol, the loss of one 2H from the substrate being consistent with aromatization of the A ring. The formation of 6-hydroxyestradiol was also confirmed in this study. The same technique has been valuable in determining the structure of two metabolites of nandrolone isolated from horse urine.

  20. Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to determine phthalate and organophosphate esters from air samples.

    PubMed

    Aragón, M; Borrull, F; Marcé, R M

    2013-08-16

    A method based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed to determine four organophosphate esters, seven phthalate esters, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate in the gas phase from harbour and urban air samples. The method involves the sampling of 1.5L of air in a Tenax TA sorbent tube followed by thermal desorption (using a Tenax TA cryogenic trap) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The repeatability of the method expressed as %RSD (n=3) is less than 15% and the MQLs are between 0.007μgm(-3) (DMP, TBP, BBP, TPP and DnOP) and 6.7μgm(-3) (DEHP). The method was successfully applied in two areas (urban and harbour) testing two and three points in each one, respectively. Some of these compounds were found in both urban and harbour samples. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant compound found in both areas at concentration levels between 6.7μgm(-3) and 136.4μgm(-3). This study demonstrates that thermal desorption is an efficient method for the determination of these semi-volatile compounds in the gas phase fraction of air samples. PMID:23859797

  1. Hydrogenation Reactions during Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Polymer Samples Using Hydrogen Carrier Gas.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Freeman, Robert R; Teramae, Norio; Ohtani, Hajime

    2016-05-17

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of polymer samples is studied focusing on the effect of hydrogen (H2) carrier gas on chromatographic and spectral data. The pyrograms and the related mass spectra of high density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene, and polystyrene (PS) serve to illustrate the differences between the species formed in H2 and the helium environment. Differences in the pyrograms and the spectra are generally thought to be a result of the hydrogenation reaction of the pyrolyzates. From the peak intensity changes in the pyrograms of HDPE and PS, hydrogenation of unsaturated pyrolyzates is concluded to occur when the pyrolysis is done in H2. Moreover, additional hydrogenation of the pyrolyzates occurs in the electron ionization source of a MS detector when H2 is used as a carrier gas. Finally, the applicability of mass spectral libraries to characterize pyrograms obtained in H2 is illustrated using 24 polymers. The effect of the hydrogenation reaction on the library search results is found to be negligible for most polymer samples with polar and nonpolar monomer units. PMID:27125864

  2. Application of capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry/computer techniques to synoptic survey of organic material in bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Pereira, W.E.; Johnson, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A bed sediment sample taken from an area impacted by heavy industrial activity was analyzed for organic compounds of environmental significance. Extraction was effected on a Soxhlet apparatus using a freeze-dried sample. The Soxhlet extract was fractionated by silica gel micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic compounds was accomplished by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. More than 50 compounds were identified; these include saturated hydrocarbons, olefins, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as aldehydes and ketones. The role of bed sediments as a source or sink for organic pollutants is discussed. ?? 1981.

  3. [Analysis of oxygenates from fischer-Tropsch synthesis oil using column liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrography].

    PubMed

    Fan, Gaixian; Xu, Yuanyuan; Li, Ying; Li, Ying; Xiang, Hongwei; Li, Yongwang

    2007-11-01

    A liquid chromatographic column filled with silica gel of 100 - 200 mesh was used to separate cold trap oil from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as eluent. With this pretreatment method, the cold trap oil was separated into two major classes, namely, hydrocarbons and oxygenates. Minor components were also enriched and determined, and small peaks adjacent to big peaks and tailings were also well solved. The oxygenates were then analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and 139 components were identified. PMID:18257312

  4. Identification of dicyclic and tricyclic hydrocarbons in the saturate fraction of a crude oil by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.S.; Miller, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    A saturate fraction of an oil which was generated primarily from terrestrial organic matter was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The authors searched for specific organic compounds that could be used as unambiguous indicators of terrestrial input. Two isomeric C/sub 15/ and two isomeric C/sub 15/ dicyclic hydrocarbons were identified as well as 11 tricyclic hydrocarbons. Structural characterizations were based on mass spectral data and structures of probable blo-chemical precursors. Skeletal structures of the tricyclic compounds occur in four distinct types. Only three of the four types may be used as terrestrial blomarkers. 4 figures, 1 table.

  5. Quantitative confirmation of dimetridazole and ipronidazole in swine feed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with multiple ion detection.

    PubMed

    Morris, W J; Nandrea, G J; Roybal, J E; Munns, R K; Shimoda, W; Skinner, H R

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from 4 types of swine feed containing 0.11 ppm each of dimetridazole (DMZ) and ipronidazole (IPR) were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using multiple ion detection (MID) techniques. We demonstrate in this paper that the quantitative results obtained by capillary GC/MS with MID are comparable for both compounds to results obtained by liquid chromatography and have a lower coefficient of variation for DMZ. Moreover, consistency in the ion ratios (5 ions in DMZ and 6 ions in IPR) permits identification of these compounds by electron ionization MS. PMID:3624166

  6. Direct analysis of oligomeric tackifying resins in rubber compounds by automatic thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Kim

    1999-01-01

    Two analytical methods, automatic thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (ATD-GC/MS) and pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), were applied as direct methods for the analysis of oligomeric tackifying resins in a vulcanized rubber. The ATD-GC/MS method, based on discontinuous volatile extraction, was found to be an effective means for direct analysis of the oligomeric tackifying resins contained in a vulcanized rubber. The oligomeric tackifying resins, such as t-octylphenolformaldehyde (TOPF) resin, rosin-modified terpene resin, and cashew resin, could be directly analyzed in vulcanized rubber by ATD-GC/MS. Much simpler total ion chromatograms were obtained by ATD-GC/MS than by flash pyrolysis with a Curie-point pyrolyzer, permitting much easier interpretation. Ions at m/z 206, 135, and 107 were fingerprints in the characteristic mass spectra obtained by ATD-GC/MS for TOPF resin in the vulcanized rubber. 1H-Indene, styrene, and isolongifolene were observed as their characteristic mass spectra in the pyrolyzate of the rosin-modified terpene resin. From the cashew resin, phenol, 3-methylphenol, and 4-(1,1,3, 3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol were obtained as the characteristic pyrolyzates by discontinuous thermal extraction via ATD-GC/MS. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10589102

  7. Studies of long chain lipids in insects by high temperature gas chromatography and high temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Paul A; Wilde, Michael J; Martin, Stephen J; Cva?ka, Josef; Vrkoslav, Vladimr; Rowland, Steven J

    2013-07-01

    The organic compounds occurring naturally on the cuticles (surfaces) of insects are important for insect communication, help to act as protective water barriers and are useful in chemical taxonomy. Typically the cuticular lipids are only studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of hexane or pentane extracts, so the normal limitations of GC-MS makes it perhaps unsurprising that compounds with more than about 35 carbon atoms have only rarely been reported. Here we show by high temperature (HT) GC and HTGC-MS of extracts of eleven species of insects from nine genera, that longer chain compounds are actually common. Wax esters and triacylglycerides are virtually ubiquitous in such extracts, but long chain (>C35) hydrocarbons also sometimes occur. Whilst the latter have occasionally been reported previously from mass spectrometry studies, the use of the HTGC combination with MS allowed even some isobaric isomers to be separated and thus more complete lipid distributions to be monitored. Since the physical properties of cuticular compounds depend on this composition of the mixtures, such differences may influence the water loss rates of the insects, amongst other effects. In addition, the high molecular weight compound profiles may allow species to be more easily differentiated, one from another. It would be interesting to apply these methods to examination of the cuticular lipids of insects on a more routine basis, ideally in combination with MALDI-TOF-MS and imaging methods. PMID:23726079

  8. Analysis of odour compounds from scented consumer products using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Jennifer; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga

    2016-01-21

    Scented consumer products are being bought in increasing amounts and gaining more popularity. There is, however, relatively little information available about their ingredients, emissions and allergenic potential. Frequently, a mixture of different fragrance substances and not solely an individual substance contributes to the overall desired smell. The aim of this study was to investigate the odorous volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in consumer products containing fragrances. Over 44 products were selected: various scented candles, printing products with different scent types and other products types particularly meant to be used indoors. Measurements were carried out in a desiccator. Air samples were collected on thermal desorption tubes to determine the released fragrance substances by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) was used to obtain sensory data and to ensure no important odorant was overlooked. Using both methods it was possible to distinguish between odour active and inactive compounds and subsequently to identify almost 300 different odorants across all scented products. Besides the advantage of differentiation, as the human nose is a very sensitive detector, GC-O was found to be a useful tool for detecting traces and chosen target compounds. One focus in this study lay on the 26 EU-regulated fragrance allergens to prove their relevance in scented consumer goods. In total, 18 of them were identified, with at least one substance being present in almost every product. Benzyl alcohol, cinnamaldehyde, citronellol, eugenol, linalool and limonene were the prevalently detected allergens. Particularly linalool and limonene were observed in over 50% of the products. In addition, eugenol appeared to be one of the most frequently detected compounds in trace-level concentrations in the candle emissions. PMID:26724768

  9. Survey results of benzene in soft drinks and other beverages by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Patricia J; Diachenko, Gregory W; Perfetti, Gracia A; McNeal, Timothy P; Hiatt, Michael H; Morehouse, Kim M

    2008-01-23

    Benzene, a carcinogen that can cause cancer in humans, may form at nanogram per gram levels in some beverages containing both benzoate salts and ascorbic or erythorbic acids. Through a series of reactions, a hydroxyl radical forms that can decarboxylate benzoate to form benzene. Elevated temperatures and light stimulate these reactions, while sugar and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) can inhibit them. A headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the determination of benzene in beverages was developed and validated. The method was used to conduct a survey of 199 soft drinks and other beverages. The vast majority of beverages sampled contained either no detectable benzene or levels below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's drinking water limit of 5 ng/g. Beverages found to contain 5 ng/g benzene or more were reformulated by the manufacturers. The amount of benzene found in the reformulated beverages ranged from none detected to 1.1 ng/g. PMID:18072742

  10. A new extraction technique for in situ analyses of amino and carboxylic acids on Mars by gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Glavin, D. P.; Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Rodier, C.; Navarro-González, R.; Raulin, F.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    In order to target key organic compounds in the Martian regolith using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we have developed a new extraction procedure coupled with chemical derivatization. This new technique was tested on a Mars analog soil sample collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile. We found that amino and carboxylic acids can be extracted from the Atacama soil in a 1:1 mixture of isopropanol and water after ultrasonic treatment for 30 min. The extracted organic compounds were then derivatized in a single-step reaction using N-methyl- N-( tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) as the silylating agent in order to transform these compounds into volatile species that can then be detected by GC-MS. We are currently developing a miniaturized reaction cell suited for spaceflight, where both organic extraction and chemical derivatization processes can take place in a single step.

  11. Determination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, caffeine, and triclosan in wastewater by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul M; Foster, Gregory D

    2004-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are a class of chemicals whose fate in the environment has received increasing attention in the past few years. A quantitative method was developed for the determination of acidic pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, and diclofenac), caffeine and the antibacterial triclosan in wastewater effluent. The compounds were extracted from wastewater samples on Waters Oasis HLB solid-phase extraction columns, derivatized with N,O-bis [Trimethylsilyl] trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Estimated method detection limits ranged from 6 to 45 ng/L based on replicate analyses (n = 10). This method was applied to the analysis of effluent from a wastewater treatment plant and compounds were detected at concentrations of 18-72 ng/L. PMID:15332662

  12. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of biological particulates collected during recent space shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. L.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Biological particulates collected on air filters during shuttle missions (STS-40 and STS-42) were identified using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). A method was developed for identifying the atmospheric particles and their sources through the analysis of standard materials and the selection of "marker" compounds specific to the particle type. Pyrolysis spectra of biological standards were compared with those of airborne particles collected during two space shuttle missions; marker compounds present in the shuttle particle spectra were matched with those of the standards to identify the source of particles. Particles of 0,5--1-mm diameter and weighing as little as 40 micrograms could be identified using this technique. The Py-GC/MS method identified rat food and soilless plant-growth media as two sources of particles collected from the shuttle atmosphere during flight.

  13. The use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry to demonstrate progesterone treatment in bovines.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Geert; Mangelinckx, Sven; Courtheyn, Dirk; De Kimpe, Norbert; Matthijs, Bert; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Currently, no analytical method is available to demonstrate progesterone administration in biological samples collected in rearing animals, and therefore, tracking the abuse of this popular growth promoter is arduous. In this study, a method is presented to reveal progesterone (PG) treatment on the basis of carbon isotope measurement of 5β-pregnane-3α, 20α-diol (BAA-PD), a major PG metabolite excreted in bovine urine, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-MS/C/IRMS). 5-Androstene-3β,17α-diol (AEdiol) is used as endogenous reference compound. Intermediate precisions (n=11) of 0.56‰ and 0.68‰ have been determined for AEdiol and BAA-PD, respectively. The analytical method was used for the very first time to successfully differentiate urine samples collected in treated and untreated animals. PMID:27157423

  14. The identification of synthetic organic pigments in modern paints and modern paintings using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Joanna; Singer, Brian W; Perry, Justin J; Bacon, Anne

    2011-05-01

    A collection of more than 70 synthetic organic pigments were analysed using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). We report on the analysis of diketo-pyrrolo-pyrrole, isoindolinone and perylene pigments which are classes not previously reported as being analysed by this technique. We also report on a number of azo pigments (2-naphthol, naphthol AS, arylide, diarylide, benzimidazolone and disazo condensation pigments) and phthalocyanine pigments, the Py-GC-MS analysis of which has not been previously reported. The members of each class were found to fragment in a consistent way and the pyrolysis products are reported. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of paints used by the artist Francis Bacon (1909-1992), to simultaneously identify synthetic organic pigments and synthetic binding media in two samples of paint taken from Bacon's studio and micro-samples taken from three of his paintings and one painting attributed to him. PMID:21416165

  15. Accelerated solvent extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smoked food samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Lee, A S; Lewis, M; Kamath, B; Archer, R K

    1999-03-01

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) is a new sample extraction method offering a number of advantages such as low pe -extraction cost, reduced solvent and time consumption, and simplified extraction protocols. In this study, the ASE method was applied to the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from biological samples. For recovery studies, fish tissues and ground pork were used as sample matrices. Sample aliquots fortified with 16 PAHs were extracted by ASE, and the extracts were treated with sulfuric acid and Florisil, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The PAH recoveries by the ASE method were found to be comparable with or better than those by Soxhlet extraction. The extraction and quantitation method was then applied to the determination of PAHs in several smoked meat samples obtained from a local market. Up to 12 PAHs were found to be present at concentrations ranging from 3 to 52 ng/g wet sample. PMID:10552416

  16. Simultaneous determination of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.Q.

    1989-03-01

    A multiresidue method was developed for the simultaneous determination of low parts per billion (ppb) concentrations of the herbicides alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Known amounts of /sup 15/N,/sup 13/C-alachlor and /sup 2/H/sub 5/-atrazine were added to each sample as internal standards. The samples were then prepared by a solid phase extraction with no further cleanup. A high resolution GC/low resolution MS system with data acquisition in selected ion monitoring mode was used to quantitate herbicides in the extract. The limit of detection was 0.05 ppb for water and 0.5 ppb for soil. Accuracy greater than 80% and precision better than 4% was demonstrated with spiked samples.

  17. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy: Reliable techniques for analysis of Parthenium mediated vermicompost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajiv, P.; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Venckatesh, Rajendran

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy have been carried out to investigate the chemical composition of Parthenium mediated vermicompost. Four different concentrations of Parthenium and cow dung mixtures were vermicomposted using the earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae). FT-IR spectra reveal the absence of Parthenin toxin (sesquiterpene lactone) and phenols in vermicompost which was obtained from high concentration of cow dung mixed treatments. GC-MS analysis shows no phenolic compounds and predominant level of intermediate metabolites such as 4,8,12,16-Tetramethylheptadecan-4-olide (7.61%), 2-Pentadecanone, 6,10,14-trimethyl- (5.29%) and Methyl 16-methyl-heptadecanoate (4.69%) during the vermicomposting process. Spectral results indicated that Parthenin toxin and phenols can be eradicated via vermicomposting if mixed with appropriate quantity of cow dung.

  18. The analysis of tire rubber traces collected after braking incidents using Pyrolysis-GasChromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, Garry

    2007-09-01

    Automobile tire marks can routinely be found at the scenes of crime, particularly hit-and-run accidents and are left on road surfaces because of sudden braking or the wheels spinning. The tire marks are left due to the friction between the tire rubber and the solid road surface, and do not always demonstrate the tire tread pattern. However, the tire mark will contain traces of the tire. In this study, Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry was used to analyze 12 tires from different manufacturer's and their traces collected after braking incidents. Tire marks were left on a conglomerate road surface with sudden braking. The samples were pyrolysed without removal of contaminant in a micro-furnace type pyrolyser. Quantitative and qualitative analysis were performed on all the samples. All 12 samples were distinguished from each other. Each of the tire traces were identified as coming from there original source. PMID:17767653

  19. High-throughput and highly sensitive analysis method for polyisoprene in plants by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Shinya; Bamba, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Yoshihisa; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Okazawa, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Natural polyisoprene is a biopolymer consisting of isoprene units (C(5)H(8)) that is used commercially in household, medical, and industrial materials. For the management of natural polyisoprene production, the selection of high-yield polyisoprene-producing trees, and an understanding of polyisoprene biosynthesis, a high-throughput and highly sensitive screening method for the quantification of polyisoprene is required. In this study, we examined pyrolysates from polyisoprenes, polyprenols, carotenoids, ubiquinone (CoQ-10), and sterols by pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PyGC/MS) and determined that the amounts of isoprene and limonene released from polyprenols and polyisoprenes were dependent upon their molecular weights. Based on these results, we developed a relative quantification method for polyisoprene in leaves by direct analysis of 1 mg of leaves using PyGC/MS. This novel quantification method eliminated extraction steps and can be used in the measurement of polyisoprene contents in Eucommia ulmoides and Hevea brasiliensis. PMID:20057156

  20. Identification of Flavor Components in Perfumes by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knupp, Gerd; Kusch, Peter; Neugebauer, Michael

    2002-01-01

    An experiment for identification of flavor components in Original Eau de Cologne by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with electron impact ionization was developed. A new SPME fiber with a dual coating of divinylbenzene and Carboxen, each suspended in polydimethylsiloxane, was used. The compounds were identified by search of the NIST 98 MS Library or by comparison with pure standards. The experiment was developed for second-year chemistry students to learn the principles of analytical instrumentation (GC-MS) and sample preparation techniques (HS-SPME). The students are able to complete this experiment in a single four-hour laboratory session.

  1. Occurrence and formation of trihalomethanes in marine aquaria studied using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Honglan; Adams, Craig

    2012-03-01

    The occurrence and formation of chlorinated and brominated trihalomethanes (THMs) were studied in artificial saltwater and natural seawater marine aquaria as well as in groundwater and surface waters. A new headspace solid-phase microextraction method was used, which included gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and provided method detection limits of less than 0.1 microg/L, with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 to 5. The results showed that disinfection by using either chlorine or ozone caused a significant formation of THMs in situ. Speciation of the THMs was a strong function of the water matrix, with initial bromide concentrations playing a pivotal role. These results provide a tool for understanding and monitoring the formation of key disinfection byproducts in marine aquaria that may cause respiratory, eye irritation, or other health concerns. PMID:22755487

  2. Rapid identification of pork for halal authentication using the electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nurjuliana, M; Che Man, Y B; Mat Hashim, D; Mohamed, A K S

    2011-08-01

    The volatile compounds of pork, other meats and meat products were studied using an electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer (GCMS-HS) for halal verification. The zNose was successfully employed for identification and differentiation of pork and pork sausages from beef, mutton and chicken meats and sausages which were achieved using a visual odor pattern called VaporPrint, derived from the frequency of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector of the electronic nose. GCMS-HS was employed to separate and analyze the headspace gasses from samples into peaks corresponding to individual compounds for the purpose of identification. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for data interpretation. Analysis by PCA was able to cluster and discriminate pork from other types of meats and sausages. It was shown that PCA could provide a good separation of the samples with 67% of the total variance accounted by PC1. PMID:21420795

  3. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of JWH-018 metabolites in urine samples with direct comparison to analytical standards.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Beth; Durham, Bill; Gidden, Jennifer; Lay, Jackson O

    2013-06-10

    JWH-018 (1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole) is one of numerous potential aminoalkylindoles contained in products marketed as 'K2' or 'Spice'. Investigation of the urinary metabolites from consumption of these compounds is important because they are banned in the United States and many European countries. An efficient extraction procedure and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method were developed for detection of 'K2' metabolites in urine from individuals suspected of using these products. Analytical standards were used to elucidate the structure-specific mass spectral fragmentations and retention properties to confirm proposed identifications and support quantitative studies. A procedure for the synthesis of one of these metabolites (5-hydroxypentyl JWH-018) was also developed. Results are comparable to existing LC-MS/MS methods, with the same primary metabolites detected. The specific metabolite hydrolysis products include 4-hydroxpentyl, 5-hydroxypentyl, and N-pentanoic acid derivatives. PMID:23683902

  4. Determination of some volatile compounds in alcoholic beverage by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Feher, I.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The volatile composition of alcoholic beverage was studied by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME) method and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Some volatile compounds, such as alcohols, esters, terpenes and other are mainly responsible for the flavor of fortified wines and their amounts specify the quality of the alcoholic beverages. From this perspective it is interesting to develop a rapid, selective and sensitive analytical method suitable for simultaneous quantification of the main molecules being responsible for the organoleptic characteristic of alcoholic beverages. Vermouth fortified drink was analyzed in order to characterize the volatile profile. Using the HS-SPME/GC-MS a number of twenty-six volatile compounds from a commercial market alcoholic beverage were identified. The most abundant compounds were m-thymol, o-thymol and eugenol, alongside of the ethyl ester compounds.

  5. Measuring the Composition and Stable-Isotope Labeling of Algal Biomass Carbohydrates via Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Brian O; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a method to measure carbohydrate composition and stable-isotope labeling in algal biomass using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The method consists of two-stage hydrochloric acid hydrolysis, followed by chemical derivatization of the released monomer sugars and quantification by GC/MS. Fully (13)C-labeled sugars are used as internal standards for composition analysis. This convenient, reliable, and accurate single-platform workflow offers advantages over existing methods and opens new opportunities to study carbohydrate metabolism of algae under autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions using metabolic flux analysis and isotopic tracers such as (2)H2O and (13)C-glucose. PMID:27042946

  6. Applying pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to the identification of oriental lacquers: study of two lacquered shields.

    PubMed

    Frade, José Carlos; Ribeiro, Maria Isabel; Graça, José; Rodrigues, José

    2009-12-01

    Oriental lacquers have been used as coating materials for thousands of years for wooden, ceramics, leather and metal objects. Lacquers are natural polymers obtained from three species growing in different regions of Asia: Rhus vernicifera (China, Japan and Korea); Rhus succedanea (Vietnam and Taiwan); and Melanorrhoea usitate (Myanmar and Thailand). The identification of lacquer films is important for conservation and restoration purposes, as well as for art history studies because it may help in determining the origin of the lacquered objects. In this work, pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a filament-type pyrolyser was successfully applied to the characterization of oriental lacquers. A method to identify the three kinds of lacquer was developed and applied to the study of two lacquered shields imported from Asia in the sixteenth century. The materials that constitute the shields were also examined by Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy and details of the lacquering technique are reported. PMID:19705106

  7. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach for the characterization of goat milk compared with cow milk.

    PubMed

    Scano, Paola; Murgia, Antonio; Pirisi, Filippo M; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    In this work, the polar metabolite pool of commercial caprine milk was studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical data analysis. Experimental data were compared with those of cow milk and the discriminant analysis correctly classified milk. By the same means, differences due to heat treatments (UHT or pasteurization) on milk samples were also investigated. Results of the 2 discriminant analyses were combined, with the aim of finding the discriminant metabolites unique for each class and shared by 2 classes. Valine and glycine were specific to goat milk, talose and malic acid to cow milk, and hydroxyglutaric acid to pasteurized samples. Glucose and fructose were shared by cow milk and UHT-treated samples, whereas ribose was shared by pasteurized and goat milk. Other discriminant variables were not attributed to specific metabolites. Furthermore, with the aim to reduce food fraud, the issue of adulteration of caprine milk by addition of cheaper bovine milk has been also addressed. To this goal, mixtures of goat and cow milk were prepared by adding the latter in a range from 0 to 100% (vol/vol) and studied by multivariate regression analysis. The error in the level of cow milk detectable was approximately 5%. These overall results demonstrated that, through the combined approach of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical data analysis, we were able to discriminate between milk typologies on the basis of their polar metabolite profiles and to propose a new analytical method to easily discover food fraud and to protect goat milk uniqueness. The use of appropriate visualization tools improved the interpretation of multivariate model results. PMID:25108860

  8. Lipid fatty acid profile analyses in liver and serum in rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids (FA) are essential components of lipids and exhibit important biological functions. The analyses of FAs are routinely carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, after multi-step sample preparation. In this study, several key experimental factors were carefully examined, validat...

  9. Thermal ExtractionTwo-Dimensional Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry with Heart-Cutting for Nitrogen Heterocyclics in Biomass Burning Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction-two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE-GC-MS) method (with heart-cutting) is developed for quantitatively assessing nitrogen (N-bearing organic species (e.g., pyrrole, pyridine, nitriles, and amines) in aerosols emitted from agricultural fir...

  10. DETERMINATION OF A BOUND MUSK XYLENE METABOLITE IN CARP HEMOGLOBIN AS A BIOMARKER OF EXPOSURE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY USING SELECTED ION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Musk xylene (MX) is widely used as a fragrance ingredient in commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (AMX) metabolite was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Detection of AMX occur...

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Bisphenol A Leached from Household Plastics by Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bettie Obi; Burke, Fernanda M.; Harrison, Rebecca; Burdette, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of trace levels of bisphenol A (BPA) leached out of household plastics using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is reported here. BPA is an endocrine-disrupting compound used in the industrial manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles and epoxy resin can liners. This experiment…

  12. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and

  13. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and…

  14. Analysis of Whiskey by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Upper Division Analytical Chemistry Experiment Guided by Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janel E.; Zimmerman, Laura B.; Gardner, Michael A.; Lowe, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of whiskey samples prepared by a green microextraction technique, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), before analysis by a qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, is described as a laboratory experiment for an upper division instrumental methods of analysis laboratory course. Here, aroma compounds in…

  15. Analysis of Whiskey by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Upper Division Analytical Chemistry Experiment Guided by Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janel E.; Zimmerman, Laura B.; Gardner, Michael A.; Lowe, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of whiskey samples prepared by a green microextraction technique, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), before analysis by a qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, is described as a laboratory experiment for an upper division instrumental methods of analysis laboratory course. Here, aroma compounds in

  16. AUTOMATED GEL-PERMEATION SYSTEM FOR REMOVAL OF LIPIDS IN GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF FATTY TISSUES FOR XENOBIOTIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interference of natural lipids in gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of xenobiotic chemicals in fatty tissue can be substantially reduced using gel-permeation chromatographic removal of the lipids. This paper presents an inexpensive controller which can be used wi...

  17. METHOD 530 DETERMINATION OF SELECT SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ MASS SPECTROMETRY (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1.1. This is a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the determination of selected semivolatile organic compounds in drinking waters. Accuracy and precision data have been generated in reagent water, and in finished ground and surface waters for the compounds li...

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Bisphenol A Leached from Household Plastics by Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bettie Obi; Burke, Fernanda M.; Harrison, Rebecca; Burdette, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of trace levels of bisphenol A (BPA) leached out of household plastics using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is reported here. BPA is an endocrine-disrupting compound used in the industrial manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles and epoxy resin can liners. This experiment

  19. Quantitation of diethylene glycol and its metabolites by gas chromatography mass spectrometry or ion chromatography mass spectrometry in rat and human biological samples.

    PubMed

    Perala, Adam W; Filary, Mark J; Bartels, Michael J; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2014-05-01

    The misuse of the commonly used chemical diethylene glycol (DEG) has lead to many poisonings worldwide. Methods were developed for analysis of DEG and its potential metabolites; ethylene glycol, glycolic acid, oxalic acid, diglycolic acid and hydroxyethoxy acetic acid in human urine, serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples, collected following a DEG-associated poisoning in the Republic of Panama during 2006. In addition, methods were developed for rat blood, urine, kidney and liver tissue to support toxicokinetic analysis during the conduct of DEG acute toxicity studies in the rat. Sample analysis was conducted using two techniques; ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity and negative ion electrospray ionization with MS detection or with gas chromatography using electron impact ionization or methane negative chemical ionization with MS detection. Stable-isotope-labeled analogs of each analyte were employed as quantitative internal standards in the assays. PMID:24668490

  20. Accuracy profile validation of a new analytical method for propane measurement using headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Fiona; Augsburger, Marc; Varlet, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    Propane can be responsible for several types of lethal intoxication and explosions. Quantifying it would be very helpful to determine in some cases the cause of death. Some gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods of propane measurements do already exist. The main drawback of these GC-MS methods described in the literature is the absence of a specific propane internal standard necessary for accurate quantitative analysis. The main outcome of the following study was to provide an innovative Headspace-GC-MS method (HS-GC-MS) applicable to the routine determination of propane concentration in forensic toxicology laboratories. To date, no stable isotope of propane is commercially available. The development of an in situ generation of standards is thus presented. An internal-labeled standard gas (C₃DH₇) is generated in situ by the stoichiometric formation of propane by the reaction of deuterated water (D₂O) with Grignard reagent propylmagnesium chloride (C₃H₇MgCl). The method aims to use this internal standard to quantify propane concentrations and, therefore, to obtain precise measurements. Consequently, a complete validation with an accuracy profile according to two different guidelines, the French Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Techniques (SFSTP) and the Gesellschaft für toxikologische und Forensische Chemie (GTFCh), is presented. PMID:24327620

  1. High Sensitivity Quantitative Lipidomics Analysis of Fatty Acids in Biological Samples by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Oswald; Armando, Aaron M.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically considered to be simple membrane components serving as structural elements and energy storing entities, fatty acids are now increasingly recognized as potent signaling molecules involved in many metabolic processes. Quantitative determination of fatty acids and exploration of fatty acid profiles have become common place in lipid analysis. We present here a reliable and sensitive method for comprehensive analysis of free fatty acids and fatty acid composition of complex lipids in biological material. The separation and quantitation of fatty acids is achieved by capillary gas chromatography. The analytical method uses pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization and negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chromatographic procedure provides base line separation between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths as well as between most positional isomers. Fatty acids are extracted in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards for high quantitation accuracy. Mass spectrometer conditions are optimized for broad detection capacity and sensitivity capable of measuring trace amounts of fatty acids in complex biological samples. PMID:21787881

  2. [Determination of monoethylglycinexylidide concentration in serum using solid phase extraction and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenxia; Zhang, Ruiming; Cao, Wei; Ouyang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Haiping; Dong, Peide; Meng, Xingkai

    2008-05-01

    A novel method for the determination of monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) (lidocaine metabolin) in serum using solid phase extraction (SPE) and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was established. The serum sample was extracted with a CN-SPE column. An HP-5MS capillary column (15 m x 0.25 mm x 0.1 microm) was used. The initial temperature of the column was set at 100 degrees C, held for 1 min, then raised to 200 degrees C at 40 degrees C/min, and held at 200 degrees C for 0.5 min. The sample size was 2 microL, and the split ratio was set at 1 : 1. The carrier gas was high purity helium with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The monitoring ions for the determination were m/z 58 for MEGX and m/z 86 for procaine (internal standard). The calibration curve of MEGX had good linear relationship in the range of 1.562 - 25 ng/mL ( r = 0.998 1). The limit of detection was 0.5 ng/mL. The extraction recovery ranged from 80.1% to 85.7%. The method advanced the quantitative analysis of MEGX in serum by combining rapid and efficient SPE with specific and sensitive quantitation by GC-MS. PMID:18724665

  3. Fluoroacetylation/fluoroethylesterification as a derivatization approach for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in metabolomics: preliminary study of lymphohyperplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Karamani, Anna A; Fiamegos, Yiannis Ch; Vartholomatos, George; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2013-08-01

    Metabolic fingerprinting in combination with gas chromatography and multivariate analysis is being extensively employed for the improved understanding of biological changes induced by endogenous or exogenous factors. Chemical derivatization increases the sensitivity and specificity of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for polar or thermally labile biological compounds, which bear derivatizable groups. Thus, there is a constant demand for simple methods of derivatization and separation that satisfy the need for metabolite analysis, identifying as many chemical classes of compounds as possible. In this study, an optimized protocol of extraction and derivatization is established as a generally applicable method for the analysis of a wide range of classes of metabolites in urine, whole blood and saliva. Compounds of biological relevance bearing hydroxyl- carboxyl- and amino-groups are derivatized using single-step fluoroacetylation/fluoroethylesterification after proper optimization of the protocol. Subsequently, the developed derivatization procedure is engaged in finding blood metabolic biomarkers, induced by lymphohyperplastic disease, through the metabolomic fingerprinting approach, the multivariate modeling (hierarchical cluster analysis) and GC-MS. Our preliminary, GC-MS-based metabolomic fingerprinting study underlines the contribution of certain metabolites to the discrimination of patients with lymphohyperplastic diseases. PMID:23806352

  4. Characterization of aroma compounds of Chinese famous liquors by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and flash GC electronic-nose.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Yu, Dan; Niu, Yunwei; Chen, Feng; Song, Shiqing; Zhu, Jiancai; Zhu, Guangyong

    2014-01-15

    Aroma composition of five Chinese premium famous liquors with different origins and liquor flavor types was characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and flash gas chromatographic electronic nose system. Eighty-six aroma compounds were identified, including 5 acids, 34 esters, 10 alcohols, 9 aldehydes, 4 ketones, 4 phenols, and 10 nitrous and sulfuric compounds. To investigate possible correlation between aroma compounds identified by GC-MS and sensory attributes, multivariate ANOVA-PLSR (APLSR) was performed. It turned out that there were 30 volatile composition, ethyl acetate, ethyl propanoate, ethyl 2-methyl butanoate, ethyl 3-methyl butanoate, ethyl lactate, ethyl benzenacetate, 3-methylbutyl acetate, hexyl acetate, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-heptanol, phenylethyl alcohol, acetaldehyde, 1,1-diethoxy-3-methyl butane, furfural, benzaldehyde, 5-methyl-2-furanal, 2-octanone, 2-n-butyl furan, dimethyl trisulfied and 2,6-dimethyl pyrazine, ethyl nonanoate, isopentyl hexanoate, octanoic acid, ethyl 5-methyl hexanoate, 2-phenylethyl acetate,ethyl oleate, propyl hexanoate, butanoic acid and phenol, ethyl benzenepropanoate, which showed good coordination with Chinese liquor characteristics. The multivariate structure of this electronic nose responses was then processed by principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). According to the obtained results, GC-MS and electronic nose can be used for the differentiation of the liquor origins and flavor types. PMID:24333641

  5. Isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/Mass spectrometry of D/H by high temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hilkert; Douthitt; Schlter; Brand

    1999-07-01

    Of all the elements, hydrogen has the largest naturally occurring variations in the ratio of its stable isotopes (D/H). It is for this reason that there has been a strong desire to add hydrogen to the list of elements amenable to isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (irm-GC/MS). In irm-GC/MS the sample is entrained in helium as the carrier gas, which is also ionized and separated in the isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Because of the low abundance of deuterium in nature, precise and accurate on-line monitoring of D/H ratios with an IRMS requires that low energy helium ions be kept out of the m/z 3 collector, which requires the use of an energy filter. A clean mass 3 (HD(+.)) signal which is independent of a large helium load in the electron impact ion source is essential in order to reach the sensitivity required for D/H analysis of capillary GC peaks. A new IRMS system, the DELTA(plus)XL(trade mark), has been designed for high precision, high accuracy measurements of transient signals of hydrogen gas. It incorporates a retardation lens integrated into the m/z 3 Faraday cup collector. Following GC separation, the hydrogen bound in organic compounds must be quantitatively converted into H(2) gas prior to analysis in the IRMS. Quantitative conversion is achieved by high temperature conversion (TC) at temperatures >1400 degrees C. Measurements of D/H ratios of individual organic compounds in complicated natural mixtures can now be made to a precision of 2 per thousand (delta notation) or, better, with typical sample amounts of approximately 200 ng per compound. Initial applications have focused on compounds of interest to petroleum research (biomarkers and natural gas components), food and flavor control (vanillin and ethanol), and metabolic studies (fatty acids and steroids). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10407302

  6. SPECIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS BY CONE PENETROMETRY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R826184)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chroma tography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collec...

  7. PRECOLUMN SAMPLE ENRICHMENT DEVICE FOR ANALYSIS OF AMBIENT VOLATILE ORGANICS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC/MS) identification of air pollutants generally requires a preconcentration step to provide sufficient sample for analysis. Cryogenic trapping is often used to enrich the sample since nitrogen and oxygen are not condensed. It does, howeve...

  8. Performance and optimization of a combustion interface for isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, M. P.; Studley, S. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions and systems for on-line combustion of effluents from capillary gas chromatographic columns and for removal of water vapor from product streams were tested. Organic carbon in gas chromatographic peaks 15 s wide and containing up to 30 nanomoles of carbon was quantitatively converted to CO2 by tubular combustion reactors, 200 x 0.5 mm, packed with CuO or NiO. No auxiliary source of O2 was required because oxygen was supplied by metal oxides. Spontaneous degradation of CuO limited the life of CuO reactors at T > 850 degrees C. Since NiO does not spontaneously degrade, its use might be favored, but Ni-bound carbon phases form and lead to inaccurate isotopic results at T < 1050 degrees C if gas-phase O2 is not added. For all compounds tested except CH4, equivalent isotopic results are provided by CuO at 850 degrees C, NiO + O2 (gas-phase mole fraction, 10(-3)) at 1050 degrees C and NiO at 1150 degrees C. The combustion interface did not contribute additional analytical uncertainty, thus observed standard deviations of 13C/12C ratios were within a factor of 2 of shot-noise limits. For combustion and isotopic analyses of CH4, in which quantitative combustion required T approximately 950 degrees C, NiO-based systems are preferred, and precision is approximately 2 times lower than that observed for other analytes. Water must be removed from the gas stream transmitted to the mass spectrometer or else protonation of CO2 will lead to inaccuracy in isotopic analyses. Although thresholds for this effect vary between mass spectrometers, differential permeation of H2O through Nafion tubing was effective in both cases tested, but the required length of the Nafion membrane was 4 times greater for the more sensitive mass spectrometer.

  9. Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomic Approach for Optimization and Toxicity Evaluation of Earthworm Sub-Lethal Responses to Carbofuran

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Prem Narain

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding mechanism of toxicity, the development of biomarkers (biochemicals that vary significantly with exposure to chemicals) for pesticides and environmental contaminants exposure is still a challenging task. Carbofuran is one of the most commonly used pesticides in agriculture and said to be most toxic carbamate pesticide. It is necessary to identify the biochemicals that can vary significantly after carbofuran exposure on earthworms which will help to assess the soil ecotoxicity. Initially, we have optimized the extraction conditions which are suitable for high-throughput gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics for the tissue of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma. Upon evaluation of five different extraction solvent systems, 80% methanol was found to have good extraction efficiency based on the yields of metabolites, multivariate analysis, total number of peaks and reproducibility of metabolites. Later the toxicity evaluation was performed to characterize the tissue specific metabolomic perturbation of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma after exposure to carbofuran at three different concentration levels (0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg of soil). Seventeen metabolites, contributing to the best classification performance of highest dose dependent carbofuran exposed earthworms from healthy controls were identified. This study suggests that GC-MS based metabolomic approach was precise and sensitive to measure the earthworm responses to carbofuran exposure in soil, and can be used as a promising tool for environmental eco-toxicological studies. PMID:24324663

  10. New pilot for validation of automated analyses of organics by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS): application to space researches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Robert; Buch, Arnaud; Chazalnoel, Pascale; Geffroy, Claude; David, Marc

    The search for complex organic molecules in extraterrestrial environments, including important biomolecules such as amino acids and carboxylic acids, will require after an extraction a derivatization step to transform these organic compounds into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Current and future space missions, such as Mars Science Laboratory (MSL 2011, will include such derivatization method and thus a dedicated laboratory pilot is needed to validate protocols before launch of the probes. A new in situ generic Derivatization-Pyrolysis Unit (DPU) is presented. Derivatization is carried out in a 4 mL reactor placed on a GCMS injector for automated derivatization as well as for pre- and post treatment of the sample. The DPU unit is evaluated in terms of its technical features. The performances are illustrated with applications including conventional and in situ derivatization for using terrestrial Mars analog materials enriched by a 5 nmol amino acids solution. The DPU allows the analysis of a wide range of molecules to be detected and can be adapted to samples from any solid spatial object such as Mars, asteroids and comets. This pilot is a good basis for the validation of future generations of instruments, such as the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) of the Exomars 2018 mission, dedicated to the search for organics in spatial environments.

  11. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method-based urine metabolomic profile of rats with pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, WEI; WEN, XIAOKE; SHENG, XIAOQI; ZHENG, YI; XIAO, ZUOQI; LUO, JIEYING; CHEN, SHUQIONG; WANG, YICHAO; CHENG, ZENENG; XIANG, DAXIONG; NIE, YICHU

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) can lead to a poor outcome of severe sequelae, and the current methods of clinical diagnosis are not satisfactory. Metabolomics is an effective method for the identification of disease-related metabolite biomarkers to facilitate disease diagnosis. However, to the best of our knowledge, no PID-associated metabolomic study has yet been carried out. The metabolomic changes of rats with PID were investigated in the present study. A PID model was constructed by the multi-pathogenic infection of the upper genital tract in rats. Infiltration of inflammatory cells and elevated expression levels of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in the uterus and fallopian tubes validated the disease model. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with derivatization was used to determine the urine metabolomic profile. Principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminant analysis of the data sets showed a clear separation of metabolic profiles between rats with PID and control rats. Eighteen differentiating metabolites were found, including four amino acids, three fatty acids, nine organic acids, and two sugars, which indicated alterations in sugar metabolism, the citric acid cycle, amino acid metabolism and fatty acid metabolism. These metabolites could be potential biomarkers of PID, and this research may offer a new approach to evaluate the effect of anti-PID drugs in pre-clinical or clinical trials. PMID:27168785

  12. Determination of organoarsenicals in the environment by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Szostek, B.; Aldstadt, J. H.; Environmental Research

    1998-05-22

    The development of a method for the analysis of organoarsenic compounds that combines dithiol derivatization with solid-phase microextraction (SPME) sample preparation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. Optimization focused on a SPME-GC-MS procedure for determination of 2-chlorovinylarsonous acid (CVAA), the primary decomposition product of the chemical warfare agent known as Lewisite. Two other organoarsenic compounds of environmental interest, dimethylarsinic acid and phenylarsonic acid, were also studied. A series of dithiol compounds was examined for derivatization of the arsenicals, and the best results were obtained either with 1,3-propanedithiol or 1,2-ethanedithiol. The derivatization procedure, fiber type, and extraction time were optimized. For CVAA, calibration curves were linear over three orders of magnitude and limits-of-detection were <6x10{sup -9} M in solution, the latter a more than 400x improvement compared to conventional solvent extraction GC-MS methods. A precision of <10% R.S.D. was typical for the SPME-GC-MS procedure. The method was applied to a series of water samples and soil/sediment extracts, as well as to aged soil samples that had been contaminated with Lewisite.

  13. Applications of Hadamard transform-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the detection of hexamethyldisiloxane in a wafer cleanroom.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Kuo, Samuel; Yang, Jonathan; Hsiung, Szu-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2012-01-13

    The Hadamard transform-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HT-GC/MS) technique was successfully employed for the detection of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO, C(6)H(18)OSi(2)) at the sub-nL/L level in a semiconductor wafer cleanroom. Indoor air samples were collected from the room, according to EPA Method TO-17 using a Tedlar bag where the air samples were allowed to pass through an absorption tube for 24 h. The condensed components were then heated and simultaneously injected into a GC column through a Hadamard-injector, which was operated in accordance with the Hadamard codes. Compared to the single injection used in most GC/MS systems, the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios were substantially improved after the inverse Hadamard transformation of the encoded chromatogram. Under optimized conditions, when cyclic S-matrix orders of 255, 1023 and 2047 were used, the S/N ratios of the HMDSO signals were substantially improved by 7.4-, 15.1- and 20.1-fold, respectively. These improvements are in good agreement with theoretically calculated values (8.0-, 16.0- and 22.6-fold, respectively). We found that when the HT-GC/MS technique was applied, HMDSO could be detected at the 0.1 nL/L level. PMID:22192564

  14. Unknown exposures: gaps in basic characterization addressed with person-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip A; Roe, Marc T A; Sadowski, Charles; Lee, Edgar D

    2011-03-01

    A newly developed person-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system was used to analyze several solvent standards, contact cement, paint thinner, and polychlorinated biphenyl samples. Passive solid phase microextraction sampling and fast chromatography with a resistively heated low thermal mass GC column were used. Results (combined sampling and analysis) were obtained in <2 min for solvent, contact cement, and paint thinner samples, and in <13 min for the polychlorinated biphenyl sample. Mass spectra produced by the small toroidal ion trap detector used were similar to those produced with heavily used transmission quadrupole mass spectrometers for polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, simple alkanes, and cycloalknes, while mass spectra for benzene and the ketone compounds analyzed showed evidence for ion/molecule reactions in the ion trap. For one of the contact cement samples analyzed, no evidence was found to indicate the presence of n-hexane, although the relevant material safety data sheet listed this ingredient. Specific chemical constituents corresponding to a potentially wide range of petroleum distillate compounds were identifiable from GC-MS analyses. The possibility for an improved basic characterization step in the exposure assessment process exists with the availability of fast, person-portable GC-MS, although work is needed to further refine this tool and understand the best ways it may be used. PMID:21318921

  15. Development and Applications of Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Emergency Responders, the Military, and Law-Enforcement Organizations.

    PubMed

    Leary, Pauline E; Dobson, Gareth S; Reffner, John A

    2016-05-01

    Portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) systems are being deployed for field use, and are designed with this goal in mind. Performance characteristics of instruments that are successful in the field are different from those of equivalent technologies that are successful in a laboratory setting. These field-portable systems are extending the capabilities of the field user, providing investigative leads and confirmatory identifications in real time. Many different types of users benefit from the availability of this technology including emergency responders, the military, and law-enforcement organizations. This manuscript describes performance characteristics that are important for field-portable instruments, especially field-portable GC-MS systems, and demonstrates the value of this equipment to the disciplines of explosives investigations, fire investigations, and counterfeit-drug detection. This paper describes the current state of portable GC-MS technology, including a review of the development of portable GC-MS, as well as a demonstration of the value of this capability using different examples. PMID:27006020

  16. Headspace-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for determination of sulphur mustard and related compounds in soil.

    PubMed

    Røen, Bent T; Unneberg, Erik; Tørnes, John Aa; Lundanes, Elsa

    2010-04-01

    Methods for trace determination of sulphur mustard (HD) and some related cyclic sulphur compounds in soil samples have been developed using headspace-trap in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Two quite different types of soil were employed in the method optimisation (sandy loam and silty clay loam). Prior to analysis, water saturated with sodium chloride was added to the samples, at a water to soil ratio of 1:1. A detection limit of 3 ng/g was achieved for HD, while the cyclic sulphur compounds 1,4-thioxane, 1,3-dithiolane and 1,4-dithiane could be detected at 0.2-0.7 ng/g. The methods were validated in the concentration range from the limit of quantification (LOQ) to hundred times LOQ. The within assay precision at fifty times LOQ was 6.9-7.3% relative standard deviation (RSD) for determination of the cyclic sulphur compounds, and 15% RSD for determination of HD. Recoveries were in the range of 43-60% from the two soil types. As the technique requires very little sample preparation, the total time for sample handling and analysis was less than 1h. The technique was successfully employed for the determination of cyclic sulphur compounds in a sediment sample from an old dumping site for chemical munitions, known to contain HD degradation products. PMID:20189185

  17. Characterization of polyvinyl resins used as binding media in paintings by pyrolysis-silylation-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Doménech-Carbó, Maria Teresa; Bitossi, Giovanna; Osete-Cortina, Laura; de la Cruz-Cañizares, Juana; Yusá-Marco, Dolores Julia

    2008-06-01

    Polyvinyl resins, in particular poly(vinyl acetate) emulsions (PVA), are widely used in contemporary paintings as binding media, because of the optimum mechanical and optical properties these polymers confer on the paint layers. A study has been carried out to chemically characterize samples of PVA resins prepared as coating films from commercial products currently available from fine arts suppliers. For this purpose, a new method has been based on "on-line" silylation-pyrolysis using hexamethyldisilazane as derivatisation reagent in pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). This proposed procedure leads to unambiguous identification of this type of binder and improves conventional direct Py-GC-MS. PVA media used in three contemporary paintings from a private collection and from the Museum of Fine Arts of Málaga (Spain) have been successfully identified with this procedure. As a second step of this work, a study devoted to the characterization of changes in the chemical composition of the PVA commercial products studied has been carried out. Effects induced in the specimens by three different types of artificial accelerated ageing process--thermal, UV light, and in an SO(2)-polluted chamber--were compared. PMID:18084746

  18. Determining the levels of volatile organic pollutants in urban air using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Nicoara, Simona; Tonidandel, Loris; Traldi, Pietro; Watson, Jonathan; Morgan, Geraint; Popa, Ovidiu

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the application of a method based on coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, using an isotopically labelled internal standard for the quantitative analysis of benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and o-, m-, p-xylenes (X). Their atmospheric concentrations were determined based on short-term sampling, in different sites of Cluj-Napoca, a highly populated urban centre in N-W Romania, with numerous and diversified road vehicles with internal combustion engines. The method is relatively inexpensive and simple and shows good precision and linearity in the ranges of 7-60 mug/m(3) (B), 13-90 mug/m(3) (T), 7-50 mug/m(3) (E), 10-70 mug/m(3) (X-m,p), and 20-130 mug/m(3) (X-o). The limits of quantitation/detection of the method LOQ/LOD are of 10/5 mug/m(3) (Xo), 5/3 mug/m(3) (B, E, X-m,p), and of 3/1 mug/m(3) (T), respectively. PMID:20168976

  19. Rapid Determination of Clenbuterol in Pork by Direct Immersion Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Diru; Wu, Susu; Xu, Jianqiao; Jiang, Ruifen; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-02-01

    Direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for rapid analysis of clenbuterol in pork for the first time. In this work, a low-cost homemade 44 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fiber was employed to extract clenbuterol in pork. After extraction, derivatization was performed by suspending the fiber in the headspace of the 2 mL sample vial saturated with a vapor of 100 µL hexamethyldisilazane. Lastly, the fiber was directly introduced to GC-MS for analysis. All parameters that influenced absorption (extraction time), derivatization (derivatization reagent, time and temperature) and desorption (desorption time) were optimized. Under optimized conditions, the method offered a wide linear range (10-1000 ng g(-1)) and a low detection limit (3.6 ng g(-1)). Finally, the method was successfully applied in the analysis of pork from the market, and recoveries of the method for spiked pork were 97.4-105.7%. Compared with the traditional solvent extraction method, the proposed method was much cheaper and fast. PMID:26306572

  20. [Pyrolysis of the Lysimachia foenum-graecum Hance extract by online pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yekun; Miao, Enming; Geng, Yongqin; Wei, Yuling; Xu, Jicang; Li, Xuemei; Ding, Zhongtao; Zhou, Jun

    2014-05-01

    In order to study the pyrolytic properties of Lysimachia foenum-graecum Hance extract, it was pyrolysed and detected by online pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). The pyrolytic experimental conditions were designed to simulate the real combustion conditions inside a burning cigarette. The sample was heated at 30 degrees C/s from 300 to 900 degrees C (held for 5 s) under the flow of 9% oxygen in nitrogen. The pyrolytic components and volatile components were compared. The results showed that 64 pyrolytic components were detected, with 88.27% of the total peak area, including linoleic acid ethyl ester (10.33%), hexadecanoic acid, ethyl ester (9.12%), 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid, (Z,Z,Z) - (8.03%), 2-furan-carboxaldehyde, 5-(hydroxymethyl) - (6.02%), neophytadiene (5.12%), heptadecanoic acid, ethyl ester (4.50%), acetic acid, phenyl ester (3.51%), 5-methoxy-2, 2-di-methylindan-1-one (2.73%). The number of pyrolytic components was more than that of the volatile components, and 20 components were identified in both pyrolytic components and volatile components, including higher fatty acids and their esters, neophytadiene, 2-furancarboxaldehyde, (hydroxymethyl)-, and 2 (5H)-furanone, 3-hydroxy-4, 5-dimethyl-. The on-line pyrolysis was similar to the real cigarette combustion conditions. The method is a simple, rapid and good qualitative method for the pyrolysis. PMID:25185319

  1. Determination of Volatile Compounds in Four Commercial Samples of Japanese Green Algae Using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings. PMID:24592162

  2. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ulva fasciata (Green Seaweed) Extract and Evaluation of Its Cytoprotective and Antigenotoxic Effects.

    PubMed

    Rodeiro, Idania; Olguín, Sitlali; Santes, Rebeca; Herrera, José A; Pérez, Carlos L; Mangas, Raisa; Hernández, Yasnay; Fernández, Gisselle; Hernández, Ivones; Hernández-Ojeda, Sandra; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Valencia-Olvera, Ana; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological properties of Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract were examined. Five components were identified in one fraction prepared from the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and palmitic acid and its ethyl ester accounted for 76% of the total identified components. Furthermore, we assessed the extract's antioxidant properties by using the DPPH, ABTS, and lipid peroxidation assays and found that the extract had a moderate scavenging effect. In an experiment involving preexposition and coexposition of the extract (1-500 µg/mL) and benzo[a]pyrene (BP), the extract was found to be nontoxic to C9 cells in culture and to inhibit the cytotoxicity induced by BP. As BP is biotransformed by CYP1A and CYP2B subfamilies, we explored the possible interaction of the extract with these enzymes. The extract (25-50 µg/mL) inhibited CYP1A1 activity in rat liver microsomes. Analysis of the inhibition kinetics revealed a mixed-type inhibitory effect on CYP1A1 supersome. The effects of the extract on BP-induced DNA damage and hepatic CYP activity in mice were also investigated. Micronuclei induction by BP and liver CYP1A1/2 activities significantly decreased in animals treated with the extract. The results suggest that Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract inhibits BP bioactivation and it may be a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:26612994

  3. Mass spectral studies on vinylic degradation products of sulfur mustards under gas chromatography/mass spectrometry conditions.

    PubMed

    Sai Sachin, L; Karthikraj, R; Kalyan Kumar, K; Sony, T; Prasada Raju, N; Prabhakar, S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustards are a class of vesicant chemical warfare agents that rapidly degrade in environmental samples. The most feasible degradation products of sulfur mustards are chloroethyl vinylic compounds and divinylic compounds, which are formed by the elimination of one and two HCl molecules from sulfur mustards, respectively. The detection and characterization of these degradation products in environmental samples are an important proof for the verification of sulfur mustard usage. In this study, we synthesized a set of sulfur mustard degradation products, i.e., divinylic compounds (1-7) and chloroethyl vinylic compounds (8-14), and characterized using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) under electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) (methane) conditions. The EI mass spectra of the studied compounds mainly included the fragment ions that resulted from homolytic cleavages with or without hydrogen migrations. The divinylic compounds (1-7) showed [M-SH](+) ions, whereas the chloroethylvinyl compounds (8-14) showed [M-Cl](+) and [M-CH2CH2Cl](+) ions. Methane/CI mass spectra showed [M+H](+) ions and provided molecular weight information. The GC retention index (RI) values were also calculated for the studied compounds. The EI and CI mass spectral data together with RI values are extremely useful for off-site analysis for the verification of the chemical weapons convention and also to participate in official Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons proficiency tests. PMID:26764309

  4. Recent trends in application of multivariate curve resolution approaches for improving gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Parastar, Hadi

    2011-08-15

    Essential oils (EOs) are valuable natural products that are popular nowadays in the world due to their effects on the health conditions of human beings and their role in preventing and curing diseases. In addition, EOs have a broad range of applications in foods, perfumes, cosmetics and human nutrition. Among different techniques for analysis of EOs, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is the most important one in recent years. However, there are some fundamental problems in GC-MS analysis including baseline drift, spectral background, noise, low S/N (signal to noise) ratio, changes in the peak shapes and co-elution. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) approaches cope with ongoing challenges and are able to handle these problems. This review focuses on the application of MCR techniques for improving GC-MS analysis of EOs published between January 2000 and December 2010. In the first part, the importance of EOs in human life and their relevance in analytical chemistry is discussed. In the second part, an insight into some basics needed to understand prospects and limitations of the MCR techniques are given. In the third part, the significance of the combination of the MCR approaches with GC-MS analysis of EOs is highlighted. Furthermore, the commonly used algorithms for preprocessing, chemical rank determination, local rank analysis and multivariate resolution in the field of EOs analysis are reviewed. PMID:21726708

  5. Coupled two-step microextraction devices with derivatizations to identify hydroxycarbonyls in rain samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2006-06-23

    Coupling a two-step liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine/bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (PFBHA)/(BSTFA) derivatization was developed to detect hydroxycarbonyls in rainwater samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). LPME provides a fast and inexpensive pre-concentration, and miniaturized extraction to analyze the target compounds rainwater samples. Derivatization techniques offer a clear method to identify target compounds. The hydroxycarbonyls were determined using two-step derivatizations. Dynamic-LPME was applied in the first derivatization, and head-space single drop derivatization was employed in the second reaction. The LODs varied from 0.023 to 4.75 microg/l. The calibration curves were linear for at least two orders of magnitude with R2>or=0.994. The precision was within 6.5-12%, and the relative recoveries in rainwater were more than 89% (the amount added ranged from 0.3 to 15 microg/l). A field sample was found to contain 2.54 microg/l of hydroxyacetone and 0.110 microg/l of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone. Hydroxyacetone was also detected in one of the tested samples at a concentration of 2.39 microg/l. PMID:16643930

  6. Alternative method for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    García-Villalba, Rocio; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; García-Conesa, Maria T; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos; Larrosa, Mar

    2012-06-01

    Short-chain fatty acids are the major end products of bacterial metabolism in the large bowel. They derive mostly from the bacterial breakdown of carbohydrates and are known to have positive health benefits. Due to the biological relevance of these compounds it is important to develop efficient, cheap, fast, and sensitive analytical methods that enable the identification and quantification of the short-chain fatty acids in a large number of biological samples. In this study, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples. These volatile compounds were extracted with ethyl acetate and 4-methyl valeric acid was used as an internal standard. No further cleanup, concentration, and derivatization steps were needed and the extract was directly injected onto the column. Recoveries ranged between 65 and 105%, and no matrix effects were observed. The proposed method has wide linear ranges, good inter- and intraday variability values (below 2.6 and 5.6%, respectively) and limits of detection between 0.49 μM (0.29 μg/g) and 4.31 μM (3.8 μg/g). The applicability of this analytical method was successfully tested in faecal samples from rats and humans. PMID:22674825

  7. Alternative method for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    García-Villalba, Rocio; Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; García-Conesa, Maria T; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Carlos Espín, Juan; Larrosa, Mar

    2012-08-01

    Short-chain fatty acids are the major end products of bacterial metabolism in the large bowel. They derive mostly from the bacterial breakdown of carbohydrates and are known to have positive health benefits. Due to the biological relevance of these compounds it is important to develop efficient, cheap, fast, and sensitive analytical methods that enable the identification and quantification of the short-chain fatty acids in a large number of biological samples. In this study, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of short-chain fatty acids in faecal samples. These volatile compounds were extracted with ethyl acetate and 4-methyl valeric acid was used as an internal standard. No further cleanup, concentration, and derivatization steps were needed and the extract was directly injected onto the column. Recoveries ranged between 65 and 105%, and no matrix effects were observed. The proposed method has wide linear ranges, good inter- and intraday variability values (below 2.6 and 5.6%, respectively) and limits of detection between 0.49 μM (0.29 μg/g) and 4.31 μM (3.8 μg/g). The applicability of this analytical method was successfully tested in faecal samples from rats and humans. PMID:22865755

  8. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum: A validation study using solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Marta P B; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Dang, Ngoc A; Walters, Elisabetta; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Kolk, Arend H J

    2016-02-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem, especially in developing countries. Correct identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection is extremely important for providing appropriate treatment and care to patients. Here we describe a solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method (SPE-THM-GC-MS) for the detection of five biomarkers for M. tuberculosis. The method for classification is developed and validated through the analysis of 112 sputum samples from patients suspected of having TB. Twenty of twenty-five MTB culture-positive sputum samples were correctly classified as positive by our improved SPE-THM-GC-MS method. Eighty-five of eighty-seven MTB culture-negative samples were also negative by SPE-THM-GC-MS. The overall sensitivity of the new SPE-THM-GC-MS method is 80% (20/25) and the specificity is 98% (85/87) compared with culture. The method proved to be reliable and, although complex in principle, easy to operate due to the high degree of automation. PMID:26807702

  9. [Determination of musk ketone in aquatic products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with dispersive solid phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Ding, Liping; Guo, Jing; Chen, Zhitao; Zhao, Jianhui; Zheng, Ling; Cai, Wei

    2013-05-01

    A dispersive solid phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was established for the determination of trace amounts of musk ketone in aquatic products. The target analyte in the samples was extracted with acetonitrile containing 1% acetic acid, cleaned-up with the mixture of N-propyl-ethylenediamine (PSA), C18 and graphitized carbon (GCB), and analyzed by GC-MS under selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode and quantified by the external standard method. The orthogonal experiment was carried out to optimize the pre-treatment conditions. Under the optimal conditions, good linear relationship was obtained in the range of 1 - 50 microg/L for musk ketone with correlation coefficient not less than 0.999, and the limits of detection (S/N = 3) was 0.30 microg/kg. The recoveries of musk ketone in the prawn and tilapia blank samples at three spiked levels of 1.0, 2.0 and 10.0 microg/kg ranged from 91.8% to 110.6% with RSDs in the range of 2.6% - 8.4%. The method is simple, rapid and accurate, and can be used for the routine analysis of musk ketone in aquatic products. PMID:24010352

  10. Determination of metaldehyde in human serum by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Morita, Seiji; Motojyuku, Megumi; Akieda, Kazuki; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2008-11-15

    A rapid headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) method has been developed for the determination of metaldehyde in human serum samples. Metaldehyde is extensively used as a molluscicide for the control of slugs and snails, and cases of metaldehyde poisoning have been reported. Metaldehyde was headspace-extracted on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber at 70 degrees C for 25 min, desorbed, and analyzed rapidly by GC-MS. The method was validated for limit of detection (LOD), linearity, precision, and recovery. Although the recovery of the sample was very low, the method itself was rapid with a low detection limit of 0.25 microg/ml, R.S.D. value 12.6%, and linearity range 0.5-25.0 microg/ml (r(2)=0.999). The results demonstrated that the SPME-GC-MS method for the analysis of metaldehyde is simple, rapid, solvent-free, and does not require any pre-analysis conversions. PMID:18945651

  11. Detection and identification of carprofen and its in vivo metabolites in greyhound urine by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dumasia, M C; Ginn, A; Hyde, W; Peterson, J; Houghton, E

    2003-05-25

    Rimadyl (carprofen) was administered orally to the racing greyhound at a dose of 2.2 mg kg(-1). Following both alkaline and enzymatic hydrolysis, postadministration urine samples were extracted by mixed mode solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges to identify target analyte(s) for forensic screening and confirmatory analysis methods. The acidic isolates were derivatised as trimethylsilyl ethers (TMS) and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Carprofen and five phase I metabolites were identified. Positive ion electron ionisation (EI(+)) mass spectra of the TMS derivatives of carprofen and its metabolites show a diagnostic base peak at M(+)*. -117 corresponding to the loss of COO-Si-(CH(3))(3) group as a radical. GC-MS with positive ion ammonia chemical ionisation (CI(+)) of the compounds provided both derivatised molecular mass and some structural information. Deutromethylation-TMS derivatisation was used to distinguish between aromatic and aliphatic oxidations of carprofen. The drug is rapidly absorbed, extensively metabolised and excreted as phase II conjugates in urine. Carprofen, three aromatic hydroxy and a minor N-hydroxy metabolite were detected for up to 48 h. For samples collected between 2 and 8 h after administration, the concentration of total carprofen ranged between 200 and 490 ng ml(-1). The major metabolite, alpha-hydroxycarprofen was detected for over 72 h and therefore can also be used as a marker for the forensic screening of carprofen in greyhound urine. PMID:12705970

  12. Identification and Quantification of Several Contaminated Compounds in Replacement Liquids of Electronic Cigarettes by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin-Aa; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2015-07-01

    Electronic cigarettes (E-cigarettes) are devices that are refilled with replacement liquids, which normally contain propylene glycol, nicotine and the desired flavor blend. Many consumers suspect that hazardous substances are present in addition to nicotine content. In this study, eight contaminated compounds in 105 replacement liquids from 11 types of E-cigarettes sold in the Republic of Korea were identified and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Diethyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate were detected in concentration ranges of 0.01-1745.20 mg/L (47.6% detection frequency) and 0.06-81.89 mg/L (79.1% detection frequency) in the replacement liquids. Triethylene glycol, tetraethylene glycol and pentaethylene glycol were quantified in concentration ranges of 0.1-19.3 mg/L (10.5% detection frequency), 0.1-30.1 mg/L (12.4% detection frequency) and 0.1-24.9 mg/L (6.7% detection frequency) in the same samples. cis-3-Hexene-1-ol, methyl cinnamate and dodecane were quantified in concentration ranges of 0.03-3267.46 mg/L (70.5% detection frequency), 4.41-637.54 mg/L (6.7% detection frequency) and 0.01-639.96 mg/L (47.6% detection frequency) in the samples. PMID:25404560

  13. [Determination of short chain chlorinated paraffins in leather products by solid phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiya; Wan, Xin; Li, Lixia; Wang, Chengyun; Jin, Shupei; Xing, Jun

    2014-10-01

    The short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are the additives frequently used in the leather production in China, but they have been put into the list of forbidden chemicals issued by European Union recently. In fact, there is not a commonly recognized method for the determination of the SCCPs in the leather products due to the serious matrix interferences from the leather products and the complex chemical structures of the SCCPs. A method of solid phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-MS) was established for the determination of the SCCPs in the leather products after the optimization of the SPE conditions. It was found that the interferences from the leather products were thor- oughly separated from the analyte of the SCCPs on a home-made solid phase extraction (SPE) column filled with silica packing while eluted with a mixed solvent of n-hexane-methylene chloride (2:1, v/v). With this method, the recoveries for the SCCPs spiked in the real leather samples varied from 90.47% to 99.00% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 6.7%, and the limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.069 and 0.110 mg/kg. This method is suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis of SCCPs in the leather products. PMID:25739278

  14. Comparison of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and immunoassay techniques on concentrations of atrazine in storm runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydy, M.J.; Carter, D.S.; Crawford, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were used to measure concentrations of dissolved atrazine in 149 surface-water samples. Samples were collected during May 1992-September 1993 near the mouth of the White River (Indiana) and in two small tributaries of the river. GC/MS was performed on a Hewlett- Packard 5971A with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring of filtered water samples extracted by C-18 solid phase extraction: ELISA was performed with a magnetic-particle-based assay with photometric analysis. ELISA results compared reasonably well to GC/MS measurements at concentrations below the Maximum Contaminant Level for drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (3.0 ??g/L), but a systematic negative bias was observed at higher concentrations. When higher concentration samples were diluted into the linear range of calibration, the relation improved. A slight positive bias was seen in all of the ELISA data compared to the GC/MS results, and the bias could be partially explained by correcting the ELISA data for cross reactivity with other triazine herbicides. The highest concentrations of atrazine were found during the first major runoff event after the atrazine was applied. Concentrations decreased throughout the rest of the sampling period even though large runoff events occurred during this time, indicating that most atrazine loading to surface waters in the study area occurs within a few weeks after application.

  15. Novel ethyl-derivatization approach for the determination of fluoride by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pagliano, Enea; Meija, Juris; Ding, Jianfu; Sturgeon, Ralph E; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Mester, Zoltán

    2013-01-15

    We report a novel derivatization chemistry for determination of fluoride based on the batch reaction of fluoride ions with triethyloxonium tetrachloroferrate(III) in a closed vessel to yield fluoroethane. Gaseous fluoroethane was readily separated from the matrix, sampled from the headspace, and determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method was validated using rainwater certified reference material (IRMM CA408) and subsequently applied to the determination of fluoride in various matrixes, including tap water, seawater, and urine. An instrumental limit of detection of 3.2 μg/L with a linear range up to 50 mg/L was achieved. The proposed derivatization is a one-step reaction, requires no organic solvents, and is safe, as the derivatizing agent is nonvolatile. Determination of fluoride is affected by common fluoride-complexing agents, such as Al(III) and Fe(III). The effect of large amounts of these interferences was studied, and the adverse effect of these ions was eliminated by use of the method of standard additions. PMID:23215254

  16. Comprehensive combinatory standard correction: a calibration method for handling instrumental drifts of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems.

    PubMed

    Deport, Coralie; Ratel, Jérémy; Berdagué, Jean-Louis; Engel, Erwan

    2006-05-26

    The current work describes a new method, the comprehensive combinatory standard correction (CCSC), for the correction of instrumental signal drifts in GC-MS systems. The method consists in analyzing together with the products of interest a mixture of n selected internal standards, and in normalizing the peak area of each analyte by the sum of standard areas and then, select among the summation operator sigma(p = 1)(n)C(n)p possible sums, the sum that enables the best product discrimination. The CCSC method was compared with classical techniques of data pre-processing like internal normalization (IN) or single standard correction (SSC) on their ability to correct raw data from the main drifts occurring in a dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Three edible oils with closely similar compositions in volatile compounds were analysed using a device which performance was modulated by using new or used dynamic headspace traps and GC-columns, and by modifying the tuning of the mass spectrometer. According to one-way ANOVA, the CCSC method increased the number of analytes discriminating the products (31 after CCSC versus 25 with raw data or after IN and 26 after SSC). Moreover, CCSC enabled a satisfactory discrimination of the products irrespective of the drifts. In a factorial discriminant analysis, 100% of the samples (n = 121) were well-classified after CCSC versus 45% for raw data, 90 and 93%, respectively after IN and SSC. PMID:16631179

  17. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in human saliva by a static sorptive extraction method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soini, Helena A; Klouckova, Iveta; Wiesler, Donald; Oberzaucher, Elisabeth; Grammer, Karl; Dixon, Sarah J; Xu, Yun; Brereton, Richard G; Penn, Dustin J; Novotny, Milos V

    2010-09-01

    Human saliva not only helps control oral health (with anti-microbial proteins), but it may also play a role in chemical communication. As is the case with other mammalian species, human saliva contains peptides, proteins, and numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A high-throughput analytical method is described for profiling a large number of saliva samples to screen the profiles of VOCs. Saliva samples were collected in a non-stimulated fashion. The method utilized static stir bar extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The method provided excellent reproducibility for a wide range of salivary compounds, including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, amides, lactones, and hydrocarbons. Furthermore, substantial overlap of salivary VOCs and the previously reported skin VOCs in the same subject group was found in this study by using pattern recognition analyses. Sensitivity, precision, and reproducibility of the method suggest that this technique has potential in physiological, metabolomic, pharmacokinetic, forensic, and toxicological studies of small organic compounds where a large number of human saliva samples are involved. PMID:20809147

  18. Effect of piperine on pharmacokinetics of sodium valproate in plasma samples of rats using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Bushra; Pillai, K. K.; Tamboli, E. T.; Ahmad, Sayeed

    2015-01-01

    Piperine (PIP) is used as anticonvulsant in traditional Chinese medicine. Co-administration of low-dose sodium valproate with PIP has been regarded to have potential anticonvulsant activity. Aim: This study was intended to investigate the effect of PIP on the pharmacokinetics of sodium valproate (SVP) in the plasma samples of rats using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Materials and Methods: The plasma samples obtained after oral administration of SVP, 150 mg/kg and SVP, 150 mg/kg + PIP, and 5 mg/kg to male Wistar rats were used to quantify the concentrations in plasma using GC-MS method. Results: A simple and accurate method developed in-house was applied for the analysis of plasma samples of Wistar rats after oral administration of SVP and PIP + sodium valproate, respectively. The pharmacokinetic parameters reported 14.8-fold increase in plasma concentration (maximum observed concentration in the concentration-time profile), 4.6-fold increase in area under the curve and slightly prolonged time to reach that concentration (1 h) of SVP in presence of PIP. Conclusion: The study reaffirms the bioenhancing effect of PIP suggesting possibility of dose reduction of SVP while co-adminstering with PIP. PMID:26681892

  19. A rapid and simple procedure for the determination of ephedrine alkaloids in dietary supplements by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marchei, Emilia; Pellegrini, Manuela; Pacifici, Roberta; Zuccaro, Piergiorgio; Pichini, Simona

    2006-08-28

    A simple method for the determination of ephedrine alkaloids: ephedrine (EF), pseudoephedrine (PE), norpseudoephedrine (NPE), norephedrine (NE) and methylpseudoephedrine (MPE) in dietary supplements by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is described. After the addition of 3,4-methylenedioxypropylamphetamine as internal standard, a liquid-liquid extraction procedure in alkaline conditions with chloroform/isopropanol (9:1, v/v) was applied to the samples prior to analysis. Chromatography was performed on a fused capillary column and analytes, derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride, were determined in the selected-ion-monitoring (SIM) mode. The method was validated in the range 0.3-10 microg/mg for EP, 0.06-2.5 microg/mg for PE and NPE and 0.04-1 microg/mg NE and MPE. Mean recovery ranged between 65.7 and 81.3% for the different analytes in dietary supplements. The quantification limits were 0.3 microg/mg for EP, 0.06 microg/mg for PE, 0.04 microg/mg for NPE, NE and MPE. The method was applied to analysis of various dietary supplements containing Ma-huang (Ephedra Sinica) and Sida Cordifolia plant extracts promoted for aiding weight control and boosting sports performance and energy. PMID:16580167

  20. Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for improved analysis of geosmin and other fungal "off" volatiles in grape juice.

    PubMed

    Morales-Valle, H; Silva, L C; Paterson, R R M; Oliveira, J M; Venâncio, A; Lima, N

    2010-10-01

    Geosmin is a volatile fungal metabolite with an earthy aroma produced in grape products from rotten grapes. The accumulation of geosmin in grapes is caused by the interaction of Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum. Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) has great utility for collecting volatile compounds in wine. However, contamination with earthy odours may have occurred previously in the must and novel methods are required for this commodity. In the present report, several parameters of the SPME were evaluated to optimize geosmin extraction. The method permitted quantification of geosmin and other fungal volatiles by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) at very low concentrations. Limits of detection and quantification (L(D) and L(Q)) for geosmin were 4.7 ng L(-1) and 15.6 ng L(-1) respectively. The RSD was 4.1% and the recovery rates ranged from 115% to 134%. Uniquely, haloanisoles were analyzed by using only one internal standard (2,3,6-trichloroanisole) thus avoiding the synthesis of deuterated anisole analogues that are used as internal standard in other methods. The method was used for the analysis of grape juice samples inoculated with B. cinerea and P. expansum. Geosmin and methylisoborneol were the compounds that appeared to contribute most to earthy odours, although other fungal compounds which are claimed to cause earthy or mouldy off-odours were detected (e.g. 1-octen-3-ol and fenchol). PMID:20655340

  1. Fuzzy C-means clustering for chromatographic fingerprints analysis: A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry case study.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Bazrafshan, Alisina

    2016-03-18

    Fuzzy C-means clustering (FCM) is proposed as a promising method for the clustering of chromatographic fingerprints of complex samples, such as essential oils. As an example, secondary metabolites of 14 citrus leaves samples are extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The obtained chromatographic fingerprints are divided to desired number of chromatographic regions. Owing to the fact that chromatographic problems, such as elution time shift and peak overlap can significantly affect the clustering results, therefore, each chromatographic region is analyzed using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to address these problems. Then, the resolved elution profiles are used to make a new data matrix based on peak areas of pure components to cluster by FCM. The FCM clustering parameters (i.e., fuzziness coefficient and number of cluster) are optimized by two different methods of partial least squares (PLS) as a conventional method and minimization of FCM objective function as our new idea. The results showed that minimization of FCM objective function is an easier and better way to optimize FCM clustering parameters. Then, the optimized FCM clustering algorithm is used to cluster samples and variables to figure out the similarities and dissimilarities among samples and to find discriminant secondary metabolites in each cluster (chemotype). Finally, the FCM clustering results are compared with those of principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and Kohonon maps. The results confirmed the outperformance of FCM over the frequently used clustering algorithms. PMID:26916594

  2. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. PMID:26493981

  3. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ulva fasciata (Green Seaweed) Extract and Evaluation of Its Cytoprotective and Antigenotoxic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rodeiro, Idania; Olguín, Sitlali; Santes, Rebeca; Herrera, José A.; Pérez, Carlos L.; Mangas, Raisa; Hernández, Yasnay; Fernández, Gisselle; Hernández, Ivones; Hernández-Ojeda, Sandra; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Valencia-Olvera, Ana; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological properties of Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract were examined. Five components were identified in one fraction prepared from the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and palmitic acid and its ethyl ester accounted for 76% of the total identified components. Furthermore, we assessed the extract's antioxidant properties by using the DPPH, ABTS, and lipid peroxidation assays and found that the extract had a moderate scavenging effect. In an experiment involving preexposition and coexposition of the extract (1–500 µg/mL) and benzo[a]pyrene (BP), the extract was found to be nontoxic to C9 cells in culture and to inhibit the cytotoxicity induced by BP. As BP is biotransformed by CYP1A and CYP2B subfamilies, we explored the possible interaction of the extract with these enzymes. The extract (25–50 µg/mL) inhibited CYP1A1 activity in rat liver microsomes. Analysis of the inhibition kinetics revealed a mixed-type inhibitory effect on CYP1A1 supersome. The effects of the extract on BP-induced DNA damage and hepatic CYP activity in mice were also investigated. Micronuclei induction by BP and liver CYP1A1/2 activities significantly decreased in animals treated with the extract. The results suggest that Ulva fasciata aqueous-ethanolic extract inhibits BP bioactivation and it may be a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:26612994

  4. Analytical platform for metabolome analysis of microbial cells using methyl chloroformate derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smart, Kathleen F; Aggio, Raphael B M; Van Houtte, Jeremy R; Villas-Bôas, Silas G

    2010-09-01

    This protocol describes an analytical platform for the analysis of intra- and extracellular metabolites of microbial cells (yeast, filamentous fungi and bacteria) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The protocol is subdivided into sampling, sample preparation, chemical derivatization of metabolites, GC-MS analysis and data processing and analysis. This protocol uses two robust quenching methods for microbial cultures, the first of which, cold glycerol-saline quenching, causes reduced leakage of intracellular metabolites, thus allowing a more reliable separation of intra- and extracellular metabolites with simultaneous stopping of cell metabolism. The second, fast filtration, is specifically designed for quenching filamentous micro-organisms. These sampling techniques are combined with an easy sample-preparation procedure and a fast chemical derivatization reaction using methyl chloroformate. This reaction takes place at room temperature, in aqueous medium, and is less prone to matrix effect compared with other derivatizations. This protocol takes an average of 10 d to complete and enables the simultaneous analysis of hundreds of metabolites from the central carbon metabolism (amino and nonamino organic acids, phosphorylated organic acids and fatty acid intermediates) using an in-house MS library and a data analysis pipeline consisting of two free software programs (Automated Mass Deconvolution and Identification System (AMDIS) and R). PMID:20885382

  5. Monitoring human exposure to ethylene oxide by the determination of hemoglobin adducts using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, P.B.; Bailey, E.; Gorf, S.M.; Toernqvist, M.O.; Osterman-Golkar, S.; Kautiainen, A.; Lewis-Enright, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    Globin samples from ethylene oxide-exposed workers and non-exposed referrents were analyzed by two methods: (i) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of Nt-(2-hydroxyethyl)histidine as its methyl ester heptafluorobutyryl derivative, after hydrolysis of the protein and isolation of the alkylated amino acid by ion exchange chromatography. The internal standard, Nt-(2-hydroxy-d4-ethyl)histidine, was added to the protein before hydrolysis. (ii) Determination of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine after derivatization of the protein by a modified Edman procedure, extraction and g.c.-m.s. determination of alkylated N-terminal valine in the form of its pentafluorophenylthiohydantoin derivative. The internal standard used was in this case a globin with a known content of hydroxy-d4-ethylated amino acids. The two methods gave consistent results, especially at high levels of alkylated products. The average content of hydroxyethylhistidine was 0.6 nmol/g higher than the content of hydroxyethylvaline. Higher levels of background alkylation (of unknown origin) were recorded with the histidine method as compared with the valine method, suggesting that the latter assay should show greater sensitivity for low level ethylene oxide exposure monitoring.

  6. Screening and determination of benzodiazepines in whole blood using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Maeno, Y; Iwasa, M; Matoba, R; Nagao, M

    2000-09-11

    Benzodiazepines are one of the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of a wide spectrum of clinical disorders. They are used as anticonvulsants, anxiolytics, hypnotics or muscle relaxants with different duration of action. In this paper, a simple and sensitive method for the determination of benzodiazepines in whole blood using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is described. The drugs spiked in whole blood were extracted with an Oasis HLB solid-phase extraction cartridge (Waters), which contains a copolymer designed to have a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance. GC/MS analysis was performed using a Shimadzu QP-5000 equipped with a BPX5 capillary column (15 mx0.32 mm I.D., film thickness 0.25 microm, SGE). Nineteen benzodiazepines and two thienodiazepines were well separated from each other on their SIM chromatograms and also on the TIC with the exception of oxazolam to cloxazolam separation. The blank extract from whole blood gave no peaks that interfered with all benzodiazepines and thienodiazepines on the chromatogram. The calibration curves for selected benzodiazepines with fludiazepam as an internal standard showed excellent linearity over the concentration range 5-500 ng/ml blood with a correlation coefficients of >0.995. The detection limits ranged from 0.2 to 20 ng/ml blood. The method is simple and sensitive for the determination of benzodiazepines in whole blood and seems to be useful in the practice of forensic science. PMID:10978650

  7. Identifying acetylated lignin units in non-wood fibers using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    del Río, José C; Gutiérrez, Ana; Martínez, Angel T

    2004-01-01

    A series of non-wood plant fibers, namely kenaf, jute, sisal and abaca, have been analyzed upon pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) of the whole material. The pyrolysis products mainly arise from the carbohydrate and lignin moieties of the fibers. The lignin-derived phenols belonged to the p-hydroxyphenylpropanoid (H), guaiacylpropanoid (G) and syringylpropanoid (S) structures, and showed a high S/G ratio of between 2.0 and 5.4, the highest corresponding to kenaf. Among the lignin-derived phenols released, small amounts of sinapyl and coniferyl acetates (in both cis- and trans-forms) were identified for the first time upon Py-GC/MS of lignocellulosic materials. Acetylation of the sinapyl and coniferyl alcohols was at the gamma-position of the side chain. The release of these alcohols derived from intact acetylated lignin units upon pyrolysis seems to indicate that the native lignin in the fibers selected for this study is at least partially acetylated. Sinapyl (and coniferyl) acetates have recently been suggested to be authentic lignin precursors involved in the polymerization of lignin along with the normal sinapyl and coniferyl alcohols. Py-GC/MS will offer a convenient and rapid tool for analyzing naturally acetylated lignins, as well as to screen plant materials for the presence of acetylated units in lignin. PMID:15164346

  8. Determination of carbon number distributions of complex phthalates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with ammonia chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Di Sanzo, Frank P; Lim, Peniel J; Han, Wenning W

    2015-01-01

    An assay method for phthalate esters with a complex mixture of isomer of varying carbon numbers, such as di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) and di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) positive chemical ionization (PCI) with 5% ammonia in methane is described. GC-MS-PCI-NH3, unlike GC-MS electron ionization (EI) (GC-MS-EI) that produces generally m/z 149 ion as the main base peak and low intensity M(+) peaks, produces higher intensity (M + 1) ions that allow the determination of total (R + R') carbon number distributions based on the various R and R' alkyl groups of the di-esters moiety. The technique allows distinguishing among the various commercial DINP and DIDP plasticizers. The carbon number distributions are determined in the acceptable range of <0.1 mole percent to >85 mole percent (m/m). Several examples of analysis made on commercial DINP and DIDP are presented. The use of only 5% instead of 100% ammonia simplifies use of GC-MS-PCI-NH3 but still produces sufficient M + 1 ion intensities that are appropriate for the assay. In addition, use of low concentrations of ammonia mitigates potential safety aspects related to use of ammonia and provides less corrosion for the instrument hardware. PMID:26240191

  9. Simultaneous Determination of 10 Photoinitiators in Milk by Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyan; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Yajing; Chen, Yanjie

    2016-05-01

    Photoinitiators (PIs) are widely used in food packaging materials, can migrate easily from packaging materials to food, and cause food contamination. It is essential to establish a method of determining PIs residues in food. A new method for simultaneously determining 10 kinds of PIs in milk has been established by using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) combined with a simple method of protein precipitation as the pretreatment approach and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as the detecting technique. The limits of detection for 10 PIs in different milks were between 0.05 and 1.4 μg/L (skimmed milk), between 0.07 and 2.2 μg/L (semi-skimmed milk), between 0.11 and 4.4 μg/L (whole milk), respectively. The recoveries were from 71.5% to 133.5%, and the relative standard deviations were less than 15%. Twelve kinds of packed milk with different brands and fat contents were determined using this method. PMID:27010861

  10. Analysis of volatile compounds emitted by filamentous fungi using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roze, Ludmila V; Beaudry, Randolph M; Linz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) analytical approach that identifies and analyzes volatile compounds in the headspace above a live fungal culture. This approach is a sensitive, solvent-free, robust technique; most importantly from a practical standpoint, this approach is noninvasive and requires minimal sample handling. Aliquots of liquid fungal cultures are placed into vials equipped with inert septa and equilibrated at a constant temperature, and headspace gases are sampled using an SPME fiber inserted through the septum into the headspace above the fungal culture for a standardized period of time. The outer polymer coating of a fused silica fiber absorbs volatiles from the headspace; the volatiles are then desorbed in the hot GC inlet and chromatographed in the usual manner. The separated compounds are subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. All steps in volatile profiling of a single sample from volatile sorption on a fiber to obtaining a list of volatiles can take as little as 15 min or can be extended to several hours if longer sorption is required for compounds present at very low levels and/or have low rates of diffusion. PMID:23065613

  11. Simultaneous determination of cannabidiol, cannabinol, and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Suh, Sung Ill; In, Moon Kyo; Paeng, Ki-Jung; Chung, Bong Chul

    2005-09-01

    An analytical method was developed for evaluating the cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) level in human hair using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Hair samples (50 mg) were washed with isopropyl alcohol and cut into small fragments (< 1 mm). After adding a deuterated internal standard, the hair samples were incubated in 1.0 M NaOH for 10 min at 95 degrees C. The analytes from the resulting hydrolyzed samples were extracted using a mixture of n-hexane-ethyl acetate (75:25, v/v). The extracts were then evaporated, derivatized, and injected into the GC-MS. The recovery ranges of CBD, CBN, and delta9-THC at three concentration levels were 37.9-94.5% with good correlation coefficients (r2 >0.9989). The intra-day precision and accuracy ranged from -9.4% to 17.7%, and the inter-day precision and accuracy ranged from -15.5% to 14.5%, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) for CBD, CBN, and delta9-THC were 0.005, 0.002, and 0.006 ng/mg, respectively. The applicability of this method of analyzing the hair samples from cannabis abusers was demonstrated. PMID:16212242

  12. Evaluation of beer deterioration by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/multivariate analysis: a rapid tool for assessing beer composition.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João A; Barros, António S; Carvalho, Beatriz; Brandão, Tiago; Gil, Ana M; Ferreira, António C Silva

    2011-02-18

    Beer stability is a major concern for the brewing industry, as beer characteristics may be subject to significant changes during storage. This paper describes a novel non-targeted methodology for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to accelerated aging (induced by thermal treatment: 18 days at 45 °C), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in tandem with multivariate analysis (GC-MS/MVA). Optimization of the chromatographic run was performed, achieving a threefold reduction of the chromatographic time. Although losing optimum resolution, rapid GC runs showed similar chromatographic profiles and semi-quantitative ability to characterize volatile compounds. To evaluate the variations on the global volatile signature (chromatographic profile and m/z pattern of fragmentation in each scan) of beer during thermal deterioration, a non-supervised multivariate analysis method, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), was applied to the GC-MS data. This methodology allowed not only the rapid identification of the degree of deterioration affecting beer, but also the identification of specific compounds of relevance to the thermal deterioration process of beer, both well established markers such as 5-hydroxymethylfufural (5-HMF), furfural and diethyl succinate, as well as other compounds, to our knowledge, newly correlated to beer aging. PMID:21227435

  13. [Determination of nine triazole pesticides in environmental waters using solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    You, Minghua; Sun, Guangda; Chen, Meng; Yuan, Dongxing

    2008-11-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 9 triazole pesticides in environmental water using C18 cartridge for the extraction and enrichment, NH2 cartridge for the clean-up and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the detection. The linear range of calibration curves for the 9 target pesticides was between 0.025 mg/L and 0.500 mg/L. The detection limits were in the range of 0.002 - 0.009 microg/L. The 9 target pesticides were measured in river water and sea water at 0.025 microg/L and 0.100 microg/L spiking levels, recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSD, n = 3) were 68.4% - 113.9% and 1.6% - 6.9% for river water and 70.3% - 115.2% and 0.8% - 8.2% for sea water, respectively. The method is simple, sensitive, selective and suitable for the qualification of pesticide multiresidue analysis. It has been successfully applied to the survey of 9 triazole pesticide residues in Jiulong River Estuary, Fujian. PMID:19253548

  14. Rapid Determination of Dichlofluanid Residues in Vegetables Using Dispersive-SPE Sample Preparation Combined with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue; Cao, Shurui; Li, Xianliang; Xi, Cunxian; Ding, Xiaowen; Xu, Fen; Hu, Jiangtao; Chen, Zhiqiong

    2016-05-01

    A method for rapid determination of dichlofluanid residue in vegetables using dispersive solid-phase extraction (dispersive-SPE) sample preparation combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. Samples were extracted with actone-ethyl acetate (1:1, V/V), and then detected by GC-MS with an external standard method after being purified by optimized primary secondary amine, graphitized carbon black and anhydrous magnesium sulphate (MgSO4). It turned out that dichlofluanid showed a good linearity (y= 2.7E+ 5x- 2710.5) over the range of 0.02-2.00 mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The limit of detection was 0.13 μg/kg (S/N = 3) and the limit of quantification was 0.43 µg/kg (S/N = 10). The recoveries of the dichlofluanid were in the range of 73.3-106.7, 83.3-116.7 and 83.3∼106.7% with the spiked levels of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg, and the relative standard deviations were in the range of 4.1-22.3%. Compared with the reported literature, the method is more simple, rapid, sensitive, reliable and can be applied to many vegetables. PMID:26921896

  15. On-line monitoring trihalomethanes in chlorinated water by membrane introduction-fast gas chromatography mass-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, C C; Her, G R

    2000-09-29

    An analytical method based on membrane introduction and fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed for the on-line monitoring of trihatomethanes (THMs) in chlorinated drinking water. The coupling of membrane introduction with fast GC-MS offers the advantage of membrane introduction as an on-line sampling device and fast GC-MS as a separation and identification method. While maintaining the on-line monitoring characteristic of traditional membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS), the difficulty of distinguishing CHCl3 and CHBrCl2 in MIMS was overcome by rapid GC separation and MS analysis. Water permeated across the membrane affected the analysis of CHBr2Cl and CHBr3. A method based on controlling the injection temperature and injection time has been developed to overcome the moisture problem. This method is simple and less time consuming than the conventional moisture removing method. Under typical operating conditions, the sampling rate was about 20 samples h(-1) capable of on-line monitoring THMs in chlorinated drinking water. The detection limits of this system were found to be about 2 ppt, 4 ppt, 4 ppt, and 8 ppt for CHCl3 CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl, and CHBr3, respectively. PMID:11043597

  16. Simultaneous determination of tramadol, O-desmethyltramadol and N-desmethyltramadol in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Abdel-Aziz Y; Mohamed, Khaled M; Nasser, Ahmed Y; Button, Jennifer; Holt, David W

    2013-05-01

    Analytical procedures for the determination of tramadol (T), O-desmethyltramadol (ODT), and N-desmethyltramadol (NDT) in human urine have been developed and validated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Sample preparation involved liquid-liquid extraction with methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and followed by back extraction with 0.1 M hydrochloric acid. Proadifen (SKF525A) was selected as internal standard (IS). Extraction efficiencies of T, ODT and NDT were 102.12, 101.30, and 98.21%, respectively. The calibration curves were linear (r(2)>0.99) in the concentration range 10-1000 ng/mL for all compounds. Limits of quantification (LOQ) were 10, 10 and 20 ng/mL for T, ODT and NDT, respectively. Intra-assay precision was within 1.29-6.48% and inter-assay precision was within 1.28-6.84% for T, ODT and NDT. Intra-assay accuracy was within 91.79-106.89% for all analytes. This method detected urine concentrations of T, ODT and NDT in six healthy volunteers for 7 days after administration of 50 mg oral doses of tramadol. PMID:23542669

  17. Acute toxicity of plant essential oils to scarab larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and their analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Christopher M; Reding, Michael E; Oliver, Jason B; Moyseenko, James J; Youssef, Nadeer; Krause, Charles R

    2013-02-01

    Larvae of scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) are important contaminant and root-herbivore pests of ornamental crops. To develop alternatives to conventional insecticides, 24 plant-based essential oils were tested for their acute toxicity against third instars of the Japanese beetle Popillia japonica Newman, European chafer Rhizotrogus majalis (Razoumowsky), oriental beetle Anomala orientalis (Waterhouse), and northern masked chafer Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. Diluted solutions were topically applied to the thorax, which allowed for calculating LD50 and LD90 values associated with 1 d after treatment. A wide range in acute toxicity was observed across all four scarab species. Of the 24 oils tested, allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamon leaf, clove, garlic, and red thyme oils exhibited toxicity to all four species. Allyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic oil tested against the European chafer, and among the most toxic against the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, and northern masked chafer. Red thyme was also comparatively toxic to the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer. Interspecific variability in susceptibility to the essential oils was documented, with 12, 11, 8, and 6 of the 24 essential oils being toxic to the oriental beetle, Japanese beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer, respectively. Analysis of the active oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a diverse array of compounds, mostly consisting of mono- and sesquiterpenes. These results will aid in identifying active oils and their constituents for optimizing the development of plant essential oil mixtures for use against scarab larvae. PMID:23448028

  18. Pilot for Validation of Online Pretreatments for Analyses of Organics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: Application to Space Research.

    PubMed

    David, M; Musadji, N-Y; Labanowski, J; Sternberg, R; Geffroy-Rodier, C

    2016-05-17

    The search for complex organic molecules in extraterrestrial environments, including important biomolecules such as amino and fatty acids, will require a space compatible sample handling system to enable their detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For the future Mars exploratory mission Exomars 2018 aimed at organic molecules detection, a dedicated laboratory pilot, called Device for Pretreatment of Sample (DPS), reproducing representative space operating conditions has been developed. After its optimization, it aimed at validating under development protocols and interpreting forthcoming in situ resulting data. The DPS, dedicated to organic compounds' analysis, is discussed in terms of its technical features. The derivatization is carried out on a 50-100 mg mineral sample in a 4 mL reactor coupled with a GC-MS injector to simulate on line in situ derivatization-volatilization-transfer steps. Three derivatization reactions have been carried out with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) as silylating reagent, N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal (DMF-DMA) and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) as methylating agents. The performances are illustrated by comparison of conventional and in situ silylation, developed for space research applications, using terrestrial mineral matrix and Mars analog materials enriched with 25 nmol of each targeted organic molecule. The work presented in this rationale has established that the use of derivatization reactions widens the scope of targeted molecules but also clearly points out mineral matrix effect. Decreasing mineral influence on pretreatment will be the next scientific challenge in in situ analysis. PMID:27108566

  19. Development of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique to diagnose white snakeroot (Ageratina altissima) poisoning in a cow.

    PubMed

    Meyerholtz, Kimberly A; Burcham, Grant N; Miller, Margaret A; Wilson, Christina R; Hooser, Stephen B; Lee, Stephen T

    2011-07-01

    An 8-year-old, crossbred beef cow was referred to the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University for a complete necropsy in October 2009. The cow was the sixth to die in a 7-day period. Affected cows were reportedly stumbling and became weak, excitable, and recumbent. Histologically, myonecrosis was severe in the skeletal muscles and mild in the heart and tongue. According to the submitter, exposure to a poisonous plant was suspected, and a plant specimen received from this case was identified as white snakeroot (Ageratina altissima). Using the white snakeroot specimen, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analytical method for the detection of tremetone and dehydrotremetone (2 components of white snakeroot) was developed. Both tremetone and dehydrotremetone were detected in the plant specimen. Dehydrotremetone was recovered from the liver, while neither component was recovered in the rumen content. In the past, because of the lack of standard reference material, the diagnosis of white snakeroot poisoning was based mainly on history of exposure and the presence of the plant in the rumen. The analytical method described herein can be used to document exposure to tremetone or dehydrotremetone in cases of suspected white snakeroot poisoning when coupled with the appropriate clinical signs and lesions. PMID:21908322

  20. Volatile composition of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Pinho, P Guedes; Gonçalves, Rui F; Valentão, Patrícia; Pereira, David M; Seabra, Rosa M; Andrade, Paula B; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2009-04-01

    A total of 88 volatile and semi-volatile components were formally or tentatively identified in flowers, leaves and stems of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (cv. Little Bright Eye), by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and by dichloromethane extraction, combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). These include some diterpenic compounds (manool and manoyl oxides), a sesquiterpen (alpha-bisabolol), and some pyridine, pyrazine, indol and carotenoid derivatives. Applying multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and agglomerative hierarchic cluster analysis) to the HS-SPME-GC-MS data, it was possible to characterize each part of the vegetal material using a relative small number of compounds. Hence, flowers were richer in terpenic molecules (including limonene), alpha-bisabolol, methyljasmonate, cis-jasmone, 2-phenylethanol, phenylacetaldehyde, trans-2-octenal, benzylic alcohol and 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine. Leaves can be characterized by the methyl and propyl esters of fatty acids, mono- and disaturated, trans-phytol, carotenoid derivative compounds, hydrofarnesylacetone, methylanthranilate, manool and epi-manool oxide, while stems have high levels of volatile aldehydes, such as hexanal, octanal, cis-2-nonenal, cis-2-decenal, cis, trans-2,6-nonadienal, trans, trans-2,4-decadienal and cis, trans-2,4-decadienal. Dichloromethane extraction allowed also the identification of some alkaloid-like compounds that were not detected by HS-SPME. PMID:19186019

  1. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Based Study on Urine Metabolomics in Rats Chronically Poisoned with Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingjie; Zhang, Meiling; Sun, Fa; Ma, Jianshe; Hu, Lufeng; Yang, Xuezhi; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GS-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to explore the metabolic variability in urine of chronically hydrogen sulfide- (H2S-) poisoned rats relative to control ones. The changes in endogenous metabolites were studied by partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) and independent-samples t-test. The metabolic patterns of H2S-poisoned group are separated from the control, suggesting that the metabolic profiles of H2S-poisoned rats were markedly different from the controls. Moreover, compared to the control group, the level of alanine, d-ribose, tetradecanoic acid, L-aspartic acid, pentanedioic acid, cholesterol, acetate, and oleic acid in rat urine of the poisoning group decreased, while the level of glycine, d-mannose, arabinofuranose, and propanoic acid increased. These metabolites are related to amino acid metabolism as well as energy and lipid metabolism in vivo. Studying metabolomics using GC-MS allows for a comprehensive overview of the metabolism of the living body. This technique can be employed to decipher the mechanism of chronic H2S poisoning, thus promoting the use of metabolomics in clinical toxicology. PMID:25954748

  2. [Determination of residues of cyromazine and its metabolite melamine in chickens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinle; Liu, Qi; Li, Dan; Wang, Shuhuai; Wang, Xia

    2009-07-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method has been established for the determination of cyromazine and its metabolite melamine in chickens. The homogenized tissue samples added with melamine-15N3 were extracted with acidic acetonitrile-water solution, and defatted with dichloromethane. The samples were derivatized with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), after solid-phase extraction (SPE) which was performed on Oasis MCX cartridges, and then detected by GC-MS. Cyromazine was quantified by an external standard method, and melamine by an internal standard method using melamine-15N3. The results indicated that the linearities of cyromazine and melamine were within the range of 100 - 1,000 microg/L, and their limits of quantification (LOQ) were 20 microg/kg. The mean recoveries of chicken samples fortified at three concentrations of 20, 40 and 80 microg/kg were within the range of 75% - 110%. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra- and inter- batch were less than 10% and 15%, respectively. The application of this method was further demonstrated by analyzing 10 real samples which were brought from local markets. The results show that this method is simple, rapid, sensitive and specific. It is appropriate for the identification and quantification of cyromazine and its metabolite melamine in chickens. PMID:19938492

  3. Analysis of Trace Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (QACs) in Vegetables Using Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lei; Wang, Xiong-Ke; Li, Yan-Wen; Huang, Xian-Pei; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Li, Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui

    2015-08-01

    A reliable, sensitive, and cost-effective method was developed for determining three quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) including dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, and didodecyldimethylammonium chloride in various vegetables using ultrasonic-assisted extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The variety and acidity of extraction solvents, extraction times, and cleanup efficiency of sorbents were estimated to obtain an optimized procedure for extraction of the QACs in nine vegetable matrices. Excellent linearities (R(2) > 0.992) were obtained for the analytes in the nine matrices. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.7-6.0 and 2.3-20.0 ?g/kg (dry weight, dw) in various matrices, respectively. The recoveries in the nine matrices ranged from 70.5% to 108.0% with relative standard deviations below 18.0%. The developed method was applied to determine the QACs in 27 vegetable samples collected from Guangzhou in southern China, showing very high detection frequency with a concentration of 23-180 ?g/kg (dw). PMID:26165915

  4. Characterisation and discrimination of various types of lac resin using gas chromatography mass spectrometry techniques with quaternary ammonium reagents.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, K; del Ro, J C

    2014-04-18

    A variety of lac resin samples obtained from artists' suppliers, industrial manufacturers, and museum collections were analysed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and reactive pyrolysis GCMS with quaternary ammonium reagents. These techniques allowed a detailed chemical characterisation of microgram-sized samples, based on the detection and identification of derivatives of the hydroxy aliphatic and cyclic (sesquiterpene) acids that compose the resin. Differences in composition could be related to the nature of the resin, e.g. wax-containing (unrefined), bleached, or aged samples. Furthermore, differences in the relative abundances of aliphatic hydroxyacids appear to be associated with the biological source of the resin. The diagnostic value of newly characterised lac components, including 8-hydroxyacids, is discussed here for the first time. Identification of derivatised components was aided by AMDIS deconvolution software, and discrimination of samples was enhanced by statistical evaluation of data using principal component analysis. The robustness of the analyses, together with the minimal sample size required, make these very powerful approaches for the characterisation of lac resin in museum objects. The value of such analyses for enhancing the understanding of museum collections is illustrated by two case studies of objects in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art: a restorer's varnish on a painting by Luca Signorelli, and a pictorial inlay in an early nineteenth-century High Chest by George Dyer. PMID:24642395

  5. Validation of biomarkers for distinguishing Mycobacterium tuberculosis from non-tuberculous mycobacteria using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ngoc A; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Walters, Elisabetta; Claassens, Mareli; van Soolingen, Dick; Vivo-Truyols, Gabriel; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Kolk, Arend H J

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major international health problem. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) from non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is critical for decisions regarding patient management and choice of therapeutic regimen. Recently we developed a 20-compound model to distinguish between MTB and NTM. It is based on thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and partial least square discriminant analysis. Here we report the validation of this model with two independent sample sets, one consisting of 39 MTB and 17 NTM isolates from the Netherlands, the other comprising 103 isolates (91 MTB and 12 NTM) from Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa. All the MTB strains in the 56 Dutch samples were correctly identified and the model had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 94%. For the South African samples the model had a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 100%. Based on our model, we have developed a new decision-tree that allows the differentiation of MTB from NTM with 100% accuracy. Encouraged by these findings we will proceed with the development of a simple, rapid, affordable, high-throughput test to identify MTB directly in sputum. PMID:24146846

  6. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh milk by hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Loh, Saw Hong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Hasan, Mohamed Noor; Aboul Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-02-01

    In this work, a two-phase hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) method combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is developed to provide a rapid, selective and sensitive analytical method to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fresh milk. The standard addition method is used to construct calibration curves and to determine the residue levels for the target analytes, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene, thus eliminating sample pre-treatment steps such as pH adjustment. The HF-LPME method shows dynamic linearity from 5 to 500 µg/L for all target analytes with R(2) ranging from 0.9978 to 0.9999. Under optimized conditions, the established detection limits range from 0.07 to 1.4 µg/L based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1. Average relative recoveries for the determination of PAHs studied at 100 µg/L spiking levels are in the range of 85 to 110%. The relative recoveries are slightly higher than those obtained by conventional solvent extraction, which requires saponification steps for fluorene and phenanthrene, which are more volatile and heat sensitive. The HF-LPME method proves to be simple and rapid, and requires minimal amounts of organic solvent that supports green analysis. PMID:22776739

  7. Characterization of important odorants in steamed male Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Na; Gu, Saiqi; Tao, Ningping; Wang, Xichang; Ji, Siru

    2014-07-01

    Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) from Yangcheng Lake in Jiangsu Province is a popular species due to its unique pleasant aroma and intensive umami taste. In this study, odorants in steamed male E. sinensis were investigated using the headspace-monolithic material sorptive extraction technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O). A total of 74 volatile compounds were found, and the results of the GC-MS-O analysis, combined with odor activity values, showed that trimethylamine (fishy, ammonia-like odor), (Z)-4-heptenal (mushroom-like odor), and benzaldehyde (paint-like odor) were the important odorants (IOs) in all 4 of the edible parts of steamed male E. sinensis. Furthermore, heptanal (mushroom-like odor) was common to the abdomen, claw, and leg meat but was not found as the IO in the gonad. The abdomen meat also contained 3-methylbutanal (vegetable-like, grassy odor), while 2 additional IOs were found in claw meat (2-methylbutanal, which has a mushroom odor and 3-ethyl-2,5-dimethylpyrazine, which has a chocolate-like, musty odor). Another IO (2-nonanone, chocolate-like odor) was also found in leg meat, while (E)-2-nonenal (green, fruity odor) was the IO found exclusively in the gonad. PMID:24962135

  8. Wavelet- and Fourier-transform-based spectrum similarity approaches to compound identification in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koo, Imhoi; Zhang, Xiang; Kim, Seongho

    2011-07-15

    The high-throughput gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technology offers a powerful means of analyzing a large number of chemical and biological samples. One of the important analyses of GC/MS data is compound identification. In this work, novel spectral similarity measures based on the discrete wavelet and Fourier transforms were proposed. The proposed methods are composite similarities that are composed of weighted intensities and wavelet/Fourier coefficients using cosine correlation. The performance of the proposed approaches along with the existing similarity measures was evaluated using the NIST Chemistry WebBook mass database maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as a library of reference spectra and repetitive mass spectral data as query spectra. The analysis results showed that the identification accuracies of the wavelet- and Fourier-transform-based methods were improved by 2.02% and 1.95%, respectively, compared to that of the weighted dot product (cosine correlation) and by 3.01% and 3.08%, respectively, compared to that of the composite similarity measure. The improved identification accuracy demonstrates that the proposed approaches outperformed the existing similarity measures in the literature. PMID:21651237

  9. Wavelet and Fourier Transforms-based Spectrum Similarity Approaches to Compound Identification in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Imhoi; Zhang, Xiang; Kim, Seongho

    2011-01-01

    The high-throughput gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology offers a powerful means of analyzing a large number of chemical and biological samples. One of the important analyses of GC-MS data is compound identification. In this work, novel spectral similarity measures based on the discrete wavelet and Fourier transforms were proposed. The proposed methods are composite similarities that are composed of weighted intensities and wavelet/Fourier coefficients using cosine correlation. The performance of the proposed approaches along with the existing similarity measures was evaluated using the NIST Chemistry WebBook mass database maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as a library of reference spectra and repetitive mass spectral data as query spectra. The analysis results showed that the identification accuracies of the wavelet/Fourier transform-based methods were improved by 2.02% and 1.95%, respectively, comparing the weighted dot product (cosine correlation) and by 3.01% and 3.08%, respectively, comparing to the composite similarity measure. The improved identification accuracy demonstrates that the proposed approaches outperformed the existing similarity measures in the literature. PMID:21651237

  10. A rapid and simple procedure for the determination of synephrine in dietary supplements by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marchei, Emilia; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta; Pellegrini, Manuela; Zuccaro, Piergiorgio

    2006-06-16

    A simple and rapid procedure based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described for determination of synephrine, active principle of Citrus aurantium plant, in solid and liquid dietary supplements. After the addition of 3,4-methylenedioxypropylamphetamine as internal standard (I.S.), a liquid-liquid extraction procedure in alkaline conditions with chloroform/isopropanol (9:1, v/v) was applied to the samples prior to analysis. Chromatography was performed on a fused capillary column and synephrine and I.S., derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride, were determined in the selected-ion-monitoring (SIM) mode. The method was validated in the range 0.1-50 microg/mg or microg/mL synephrine. Mean recovery ranged between 89.3% and 90.5% in both solid and liquid dietary supplements. The quantification limit was 0.1 microg/mg or microg/ml. The method was applied to analysis of various dietary supplements promoted for aiding weight control containing, among other constituents such as ephedrine alkaloids and methylxanthines, Citrus aurantium. Amount of synephrine present in such products ranged from 3.1 microg/mg solid product to 480.2 microg/mL liquid product. PMID:16698212

  11. Quantitative ester analysis in cachaca and distilled spirits by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Eduardo S P; Cardoso, Daniel R; Franco, Douglas W

    2008-07-23

    An analytical procedure for the separation and quantification of ethyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl lactate, ethyl octanoate, ethyl nonanoate, ethyl decanoate, isoamyl octanoate, and ethyl laurate in cachaca, rum, and whisky by direct injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed. The analytical method is simple, selective, and appropriated for the determination of esters in distilled spirits. The limit of detection ranged from 29 (ethyl hexanoate) to 530 (ethyl acetate) microg L(-1), whereas the standard deviation for repeatability was between 0.774% (ethyl hexanoate) and 5.05% (isoamyl octanoate). Relative standard deviation values for accuracy vary from 90.3 to 98.5% for ethyl butyrate and ethyl acetate, respectively. Ethyl acetate was shown to be the major ester in cachaca (median content of 22.6 mg 100 mL(-1) anhydrous alcohol), followed by ethyl lactate (median content of 8.32 mg 100 mL(-1) anhydrous alcohol). Cachaca produced in copper and hybrid alembic present a higher content of ethyl acetate and ethyl lactate than those produced in a stainless-steel column, whereas cachaca produced by distillation in a stainless-steel column present a higher content of ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate, and ethyl laurate. As expected, ethyl acetate is the major ester in whiskey and rum, followed by ethyl lactate for samples of rum. Nevertheless, whiskey samples exhibit ethyl lactate at contents lower or at the same order of magnitude of the fatty esters. PMID:18570431

  12. Fast determination of Z-ligustilide in plasma by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry following headspace single-drop microextraction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ling; Deng, Chunhui; Wang, Ben; Shen, Xizhong

    2007-06-01

    Angelica sinensis (danggui in Chinese) is a common traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and its essential oil has been used for the treatment of many diseases such as hepatic fibrosis. Z-Ligustilide has been found to be an important active component in the TCM essential oil. In this work, for the first time, headspace single-drop microextraction (HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the determination of Z-ligustilide in rabbit plasma after oral administration of essential oil of danggui. The extraction parameters of solvent selection, solvent volume, sample temperature, extraction time, stirring rate, and ion strength were systemically optimized. Furthermore, the method linearity, detection limit, and precision were also investigated. It was shown that the proposed method provided good linearity (0.02-20 microg/mL, R2 = 0.997), low detection limit (10 ng/mL), and good precision (RSD value less than 9%). Finally, HS-SDME followed by GC/MS was used for fast determination of Z-ligustilide in rabbit plasma at different time intervals after oral administration of danggui essential oil. The experimental results suggest that HS-SDME followed by GC/MS is a simple, sensitive, and low-cost method for the determination of Z-ligustilide in plasma, and a low-cost approach to pharmacokinetics studies of active components in TCMs. PMID:17623474

  13. Development of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry following headspace solid-phase microextraction for fast determination of asarones in plasma.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Lin, Shuang; Huang, Taoming; Duan, Gengli; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2006-01-01

    Asarones (alpha-asarone and beta-asarone) are the active components in the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) of Acorus tatarinowii Schott, which has been used to treat epilepsy for several thousand years. To perform the pharmacokinetics (PK) study of alpha- and beta-asarone from the TCM essential oil, a simple, rapid and sensitive method was developed for the determination of asarones from the TCM in rabbit plasma, based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with electron ionization (EI). The extraction parameters of headspace volume, fiber coating, sample temperature, extraction time, stirring rate and ion strength were systemically optimized. Furthermore, the method linearity, detection limit and precision were also investigated. It was shown that the proposed method provided a good linearity (0.02-20 microg/mL, R(2) > 0.99), low detection limit (<2.0 ng/mL) and good precision (RSD < 7.0%). Finally, HS-SPME followed by GC/MS was applied to fast determination of alpha- and beta-asarone in rabbit plasma at different time points after oral adminstration of the essential oil from A. tatarinowii. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method provides an alternative approach to the PK studies of volatile compounds in TCMs. PMID:16773672

  14. Simultaneous Determination of Tramadol and Its Metabolite in Human Urine by the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bilal; Erdem, Ali Fuat

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive and efficient method was developed for determination of tramadol and its metabolite (O-desmethyltramadol) in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Tramadol, O-desmethyltramadol and medazepam (internal standard) were extracted from human urine with a mixture of ethylacetate and diethylether mixture (1 : 1, v/v) at basic pH with liquid-liquid extraction. The calibration curves were linear (r = 0.99) over tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 ng/mL and 7.5 to 300 ng/mL, respectively. The method had an accuracy of >95% and intra- and interday precision (relative standard deviation %) of ≤4.93 and ≤4.62% for tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol, respectively. The extraction recoveries were found to be 94.1 ± 2.91 and 96.3 ± 3.46% for tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol, respectively. The limit of quantification using 0.5 mL human urine was 10 ng/mL for tramadol and 7.5 ng/mL for O-desmethyltramadol. After oral administration of 100 mg of tramadol hydrochloride to a patient, the urinary excretion was monitored during 24 h. About 15% of the dose was excreted as unchanged tramadol. PMID:25616987

  15. [Determination of migration of 25 primary aromatic amines from food contact plastic materials by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Chengfa; Xiao, Daoqing; Liang, Feng; Chen, Zhinan; Schen, Xuhui; Sun, Xiaoying; Li, Yongtao

    2013-01-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the determination of the migration of 25 primary aromatic amines (PAAs) from food contact plastic materials and articles. The samples were extracted by deionized water and 30 g/L acetic acid, and the pH value of the solution was adjusted to 8 - 10 with ammonia. The extracts were cleaned up and concentrated on an SPE column, then eluted by equal volume of methyl-tert-butyl ether and ethanol. The analysis of the target compounds was performed by GC-MS. The results indicated that the limits of detection were in the range of 0.4 -2.0 microg/kg for different PAAs. The recoveries and relative standard deviations (n = 7) of 10 microg/kg PAAs ranged from 51.6% -118.4% and 0.5% -9.8%, respectively, except the 2,4-diaminoanisole in the acid simulant. The effects of different experimental conditions such as the pH value and volume ratio of methyl-tert-butyl ether and ethanol were studied. The results showed that the method is accurate and stable, and could meet the requirement of the European Commission Regulation (EU) No 10/2011 for the determination of primary aromatic amines. It can be applied in the analysis of the primary aromatic amines in real food contact plastic material and article samples. PMID:23667989

  16. Determination of fecal sterols by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with solid-phase extraction and injection-port derivatization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingming; Hu, Ruikang; Yue, Junqi; Yang, Zhaoguang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2009-02-13

    Injection-port derivatization combined with solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed and applied for the first time to determine five types of fecal sterols (coprostanol, cholestanol, epicholestanol, epicoprostanol and cholesterol) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In this method, silylation of fecal sterols was performed with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) at GC injection-port. The factors influential to this technique such as injection-port temperature, purge-off time, derivatization reagent (BSTFA) volume, and the type of organic solvent were investigated. In addition, the conditions of SPE (including the type of SPE cartridge, the type of elution organic solvent) were also studied. After SPE followed by injection-port silylation by GC-MS, good linearity of analytes was achieved in the range of 0.02-10ng/mL with coefficients of determination, R(2)>0.995. Good reproducibility was obtained with relative standard deviation less than 19.6%. The limits of detection ranged from 1.3ng/mL to 15ng/mL (S/N=3) in environmental water samples. Compared with traditional off-line silylation of fecal sterols performed with water bath (60 degrees C, 30min), this injection-port silylation method is much simpler and convenient. The developed method has been successfully applied for the analysis of fecal sterols from real environmental water samples. PMID:19147150

  17. Plasma Metabolite Profiling and Chemometric Analyses of Lung Cancer along with Three Controls through Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Mazhar, Shumaila; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Rizi, Nadeem; Atta-ur-Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has been the most common death causing cancer in the world for several decades. This study is focused on the metabolite profiling of plasma from lung cancer (LC) patients with three control groups including healthy non-smoker (NS), smokers (S) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (COPD) samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to identify the comparative and distinguishing metabolite pattern for lung cancer. Metabolites obtained were identified through National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral (Wiley registry) and Fiehn Retention Time Lock (RTL) libraries. Mass Profiler Professional (MPP) Software was used for the alignment and for all the statistical analysis. 32 out of 1,877 aligned metabolites were significantly distinguished among three controls and lung cancer using p-value ≤ 0.001. Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLSDA) model was generated using statistically significant metabolites which on external validation provide high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (78.6%). Elevated level of fatty acids, glucose and acids were observed in lung cancer in comparison with control groups apparently due to enhanced glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis and acidosis, indicating the metabolic signature for lung cancer. PMID:25712604

  18. Rapid determination and confirmation of biogenic amines in tuna loin by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using ethylchloroformate derivative.

    PubMed

    Marks, Heidi S; Anderson, Collin R

    2006-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method is described for the easy rapid determination and simultaneous confirmation of the biogenic amines putrescine (PUT), cadaverine (CAD), histamine (HTA), and spermidine (SPD) in fresh frozen tuna loin. The method can also be used to monitor tyramine (TYR). The method involves homogenization of fish tissue, extraction of biogenic amines into trichloroacetic acid solution, centrifugation, alkalization, and derivatization of supernatant with ethylchloroformate. All seafood species were fortified to contain 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 12.5, and 25.0 microg/g (ppm) PUT, CAD, and SPD; and 10.0, 20.0, 40.0, 50.0, and 100.0 microg/g (ppm) HTA. Determination was based on standard curves for each analyte using peak areas with matrix standards equivalent to a concentration range bracketing the spike level. A set of 5 matrix controls (unfortified tuna tissue) was also analyzed; only endogenous SPD was found in all samples. The interassay average recoveries ranged from 57 to 79% across analytes and spike levels. PMID:17225607

  19. Analysis of ammonium nitrate headspace by on-fiber solid phase microextraction derivatization with gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Adam L; Andrews, Benjamin; Hammond, Mark; Collins, Greg E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2016-01-15

    A novel analytical method has been developed for the quantitation of trace levels of ammonia in the headspace of ammonium nitrate (AN) using derivatized solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Ammonia is difficult to detect via direct injection into a GC-MS because of its low molecular weight and extreme polarity. To circumvent this issue, ammonia was derivatized directly onto a SPME fiber by the reaction of butyl chloroformate coated fibers with the ammonia to form butyl carbamate. A derivatized externally sampled internal standard (dESIS) method based upon the reactivity of diethylamine with unreacted butyl chloroformate on the SPME fiber to form butyl diethylcarbamate was established for the reproducible quantification of ammonia concentration. Both of these compounds are easily detectable and separable via GC-MS. The optimized method was then used to quantitate the vapor concentration of ammonia in the headspace of two commonly used improvised explosive device (IED) materials, ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate aluminum powder (Ammonal), as well as identify the presence of additional fuel components within the headspace. PMID:26718189

  20. Development of Sensitive and Specific Analysis of Vildagliptin in Pharmaceutical Formulation by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Uçaktürk, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and fully validated for the determination of vildagliptin (VIL) in pharmaceutical formulation. Prior to GC-MS analysis, VIL was efficiently derivatized with MSTFA/NH4I/β-mercaptoethanol at 60°C for 30 min. The obtained O-TMS derivative of VIL was detected by selected ion monitoring mode using the diagnostic ions m/z 223 and 252. Nandrolone was chosen as internal standard. The GC-MS method was fully validated by the following validation parameters: limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, stability, robustness, and ruggedness. LOD and LOQ were found to be 1.5 and 3.5 ng mL−1, respectively. The GC-MS method is linear in the range of 3.5–300 ng mL−1. The intra- and interday precision values were less than ≤3.62%. The intra- and interday accuracy values were found in the range of −0.26–2.06%. Finally, the GC-MS method was successfully applied to determine VIL in pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:26682085

  1. Nitrogen isotopic analyses by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Amino acids containing natural-abundance levels of 15N were derivatized and analyzed isotopically using a technique in which individual compounds are separated by gas chromatography, combusted on-line, and the product stream sent directly to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For samples of N2 gas, standard deviations of ratio measurement were better than 0.1% (Units for delta are parts per thousand or per million (%).) for samples larger than 400 pmol and better than 0.5% for samples larger than 25 pmol (0.1% 15N is equivalent to 0.00004 atom % 15N). Results duplicated those of conventional, batchwise analyses to within 0.05%. For combustion of organic compounds yielding CO2/N2 ratios between 14 and 28, in particular for N-acetyl n-propyl derivatives of amino acids, delta values were within 0.25% of results obtained using conventional techniques and standard deviations were better than 0.35%. Pooled data for measurements of all amino acids produced an accuracy and precision of 0.04 and 0.23%, respectively, when 2 nmol of each amino acid was injected on column and 20% of the stream of combustion products was delivered to the mass spectrometer.

  2. Determination of O6-butylguanine in DNA by immunoaffinity extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfanti, M.; Magagnotti, C.; Galli, A.; Bagnati, R.; Moret, M.; Gariboldi, P.; Fanelli, R.; Airoldi, L. )

    1990-11-01

    A sensitive, specific, and rapid method for quantitating the minor adduct O6-butylguanine (O6BuG) in hydrolyzed DNA has been developed by combining immunoaffinity chromatography and high resolution gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Polyclonal antibodies raised against O6BuG were coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B and used for sample clean-up and extraction of the specific O6-alkylguanine. After addition of O6BuG and its deuterium labeled analogue (O6BuG-D7), used as internal standard, hydrolyzed DNA was applied on the immunoaffinity column and washed with water, and the immunoadsorbed butylated guanines were eluted with acetone/water cetome/water (95/5) before gas chromatographic derivatization. O6BuG and O6BuG-D7 were analyzed and quantitated by high resolution gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry as their pentafluorobenzyl-trimethylsilyl derivatives. Immunoaffinity column capacity and O6BuG recovery from this column were 1.53 nmol O6BuG/column and 62 +/- 5%, respectively. The method was applied to evaluate O6BuG levels in DNA butylated in vitro with 10 mM N-nitroso-Nr-butylurea or isolated from rats given an i.p. dose of 185 mg/kg N-nitroso-N-butylurea or N-nitrosodibutylamine. In the first case the level of modifications present in calf thymus DNA was 104 mumol O6BuG/mol guanine, and in the second case O6BuG in liver DNA was about 6 times higher after N-nitroso-N-butylurea (2.11 mumol O6BuG/mol guanine) than after N-nitrosodibutylamine (0.34 mumol O6BuG/mol guanine) treatment. These results indicate that O6BuG formed in vivo can be isolated and quantitated by this method, which may also be useful for studying DNA damage and repair mechanisms.

  3. Determination of pesticides in compost by pressurized liquid extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Kuniaki; Asada, Takashi; Oikawa, Kikuo

    2005-10-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was developed for the determination of pesticides in compost. The investigated pesticides included two fungicides, two herbicides and 10 insecticides. The pesticides were extracted from the compost by pressurized liquid extraction. The extract was cleaned up by a partition between hexane and acetonitrile followed by a dispersive solid-phase extraction using a porous carbon made from Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens). The overall recoveries were 81-104% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 2.4 to 12%. The minimum detectable concentrations were 0.02-0.04 microg g(-1). This method was successfully applied to a compost sample from food waste as well as commercial compost. PMID:16196130

  4. Analysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in foods by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, E; Santos, F J; Puignou, L; Galceran, M T

    2006-11-24

    A new, simple and selective method for the analysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in foods by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is proposed. Several derivatising procedures based on the formation of an HMF silylated derivative using different reagents were studied. Among the derivatising reagents examined, N,O-bis-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) provided the best derivatisation yield. Sample clean-up was also optimised, using either liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane or solid-phase extraction (SPE) with several commercially available cartridges, and the best results were obtained using ENV+ cartridges. Quality parameters such as day-to-day and run-to-run precision (RSD<10%), linearity (between 25 and 700 ng g(-1)) and detection limit (6 ng g(-1)) were established. This method was successfully applied to the analysis of HMF content in several Spanish food samples from a local market, such as jam, honey, orange juice and bakery products. PMID:17010355

  5. Determination of elemental sulfur in explosives and explosive residues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Kimberly S

    2005-01-01

    A new method for the positive identification of elemental sulfur in explosives and explosive residues is developed. Following a carbon disulfide wash of explosives or explosive residues, a sample of the extracted material is injected onto a gas chromatography (GC) column, then analyzed via mass-selective (MS) detection. A positive identification of elemental sulfur is based on both retention time and fragmentation pattern. The GC-MS method is demonstrated to be useful in detecting and positively identifying elemental sulfur from both burned and unburned explosive mixtures. With a detection limit of 2.5 ng (2.5 x 10(-9) grams) of elemental sulfur on the column, it is shown to be 400 times more sensitive than the presumptive chemical color test that is currently the method employed for detection of small amounts of sulfur. PMID:15831002

  6. Isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for cadmium determination in urine.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, S K; Orth, R G; Wendling, J; Kinter, M; Herold, D A

    1993-01-01

    A stable isotope dilution gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method using 106Cd as an internal standard is described for determining Cd in urine. In this method, the urine matrix is digested with HNO3 + H2O2 and the Cd is chelated with lithium bis(trifluoroethyl)dithiocarbamate. All isotope ratio measurements are made with an organic mass spectrometer. Overall precision values for the five major isotopes relative to 114Cd are 1 to 3% when 10-ng samples of chelated Cd are analyzed. Accuracy of the method is established by measuring Cd in the NIST freeze-dried urine reference material. A small memory effect is observed when measuring isotope ratios differing by a factor of 10. This can, however, be minimized by optimum addition of the internal standard solution. PMID:8381496

  7. Determination of dithiocarbamates and milneb residues in foods by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Munetomo; Noda, Satoko; Kosugi, Masaki; Ishiduka, Noriko; Mizukoshi, Kazushi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Nemoto, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    A highly sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed for dithiocarbamates (DTCs) and milneb in foods. DTCs and milneb were extracted from foods with cysteine-EDTA solution as sodium salts, and methylated with methyl iodide. Methyl derivatives of DTCs and milneb were cleaned up on a neutral alumina mini column and determined by GC-MS. The mean recoveries of DTCs and milneb were in the range of 72-120%, except for methiram. The quantification limits were 0.01 mg/kg (as CS(2)) in foods except tea (0.1 mg/kg as CS(2)). The developed method was applied to 10 compounds (4 dimethyldithiocarbamates, 3 ethylenebisdithiocarbamates, polycarbamates, propineb and milneb). PMID:21071904

  8. Quantitation of ethyl glucuronide in serum & urine by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priyamvada; Bharat, Venkatesh; Murthy, Pratima

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Alcohol misuse has now become a serious public health problem and early intervention is important in minimizing the harm. Biochemical markers of recent and high levels of alcohol consumption can play an important role in providing feedback regarding the health consequences of alcohol misuse. Existing markers are not sensitive to recent consumption and in detecting early relapse. Ethyl glucuronide (EtG), a phase-II metabolite of ethanol is a promising marker of recent alcohol use and can be detected in body fluids. In this study an analytical technique for quantitation of EtG in body fluids using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric detection (MS) was developed and validated. Methods: De-proteinization of serum and urine samples was done with perchloric acid and hydrochloric acid, respectively. Serum samples were passed through phospholipids removal cartridges for further clean up. EtG was isolated using amino propyl solid phase extraction columns. Chromatographic separation was achieved by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Results: Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 50 and 150 ng/ml for urine and 80 and 210 ng/ml for serum, respectively. Signal to noise ratio was 3:1, mean absolute recovery was 80-85 per cent. Significant correlation was obtained between breath alcohol and serum EtG levels (r=0.853) and urine EtG and time since last abuse (r = -0.903) in clinical samples. Interpretation & conclusions: In the absence of other standardized techniques to quantitate EtG in biological samples, this GC-MS method was found to have high throughput and was sensitive and specific. PMID:25857498

  9. Methods of analysis-Determination of pesticides in sediment using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, Michelle L.; McWayne, Megan M.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the determination of 119 pesticides in environmental sediment samples is described. The method was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in support of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The pesticides included in this method were chosen through prior prioritization. Herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides along with degradates are included in this method and span a variety of chemical classes including, but not limited to, chloroacetanilides, organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, triazines, and triazoles. Sediment samples are extracted by using an accelerated solvent extraction system (ASE®, and the compounds of interest are separated from co-extracted matrix interferences (including sulfur) by passing the extracts through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) along with the use of either stacked graphitized carbon and alumina solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges or packed Florisil®. Chromatographic separation, detection, and quantification of the pesticides from the sediment-sample extracts are done by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Recoveries in test sediment samples fortified at 10 micrograms per kilogram (μg/kg) dry weight ranged from 75 to 102 percent; relative standard deviations ranged from 3 to 13 percent. Method detection limits (MDLs), calculated by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures (40 CFR 136, Appendix B), ranged from 0.6 to 3.4 μg/kg dry weight.

  10. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  11. Integration of Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Methods for Differentiating Ricin Preparation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Melville, Angela M.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Colburn, Heather A.; Victry, Kristin D.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-05-17

    The investigation of crimes involving chemical or biological agents is infrequent, but presents unique analytical challenges. The protein toxin ricin is encountered more frequently than other agents and is found in the seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis. Typically, the toxin is extracted from castor seeds utilizing a variety of different recipes that result in varying purity of the toxin. Moreover, these various purification steps can also leave or differentially remove a variety of exogenous and endogenous residual components with the toxin that may indicate the type and number of purification steps involved. We have applied three gas chromatographic - mass spectrometric (GC-MS) based analytical methods to measure the variation in seed carbohydrates and castor oil ricinoleic acid as well as the presence of solvents used for purification. These methods were applied to the same samples prepared using four previously identified toxin preparation methods starting from four varieties of castor seeds. The individual data sets for seed carbohydrate profiles, ricinoleic acid or acetone amount each provided information capable of differentiating different types of toxin preparations across seed types. However, the integration of the data sets using multivariate factor analysis provided a clear distinction of all samples based on the preparation method and independent of the seed source. In particular the abundance of mannose, arabinose, fucose, ricinoleic acid and acetone were shown to be important differentiating factors. These complementary tools provide a more confident determination of the method of toxin preparation.

  12. Potential biomarkers of smoked fentanyl utilizing pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Rona K; Bell, Suzanne C; Kraner, James C; Callery, Patrick S

    2009-10-01

    Fentanyl is a potent opioid analgesic that is increasingly becoming a choice drug of abuse. Fentanyl transdermal patches (FTPs) are easily obtained and consumed by smoking the reservoir gel and/or the whole patch. This allows for an increased bioavailability when inhaled. A method using analytical pyrolysis was developed to identify possible biomarkers associated with smoked fentanyl and FTPs. Pyrolysis was carried out under anaerobic and aerobic conditions using helium and air coupled to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. The presence of a trap enhanced recovery and afforded a positive identification of pyrolytic products. Anaerobic and aerobic pyrolysis of fentanyl and FTPs consistently yielded propionanilide as the major pyrolytic product along with pyridine and previously reported metabolites (norfentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl). Analysis of fentanyl resulted in chlorine-containing compounds, presumably formed from the HCl salt of fentanyl. Analysis of FTPs showed significant polymeric and hydrocarbon compounds and products likely derived from the gel matrix. Fentanyl in the FTPs was in the citrate salt form; therefore, the chlorine-containing pyrolytic products obtained with the neat drug were not observed. Based on this application, it may be possible to identify what salt form of the drug was smoked based on pyrolytic products and to target distinguishing metabolic products for future research. PMID:19874647

  13. Hydrocarbon phenotyping of algal species using pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Biofuels derived from algae biomass and algae lipids might reduce dependence on fossil fuels. Existing analytical techniques need to facilitate rapid characterization of algal species by phenotyping hydrocarbon-related constituents. Results In this study, we compared the hydrocarbon rich algae Botryococcus braunii against the photoautotrophic model algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using pyrolysis-gas chromatography quadrupole mass spectrometry (pyGC-MS). Sequences of up to 48 dried samples can be analyzed using pyGC-MS in an automated manner without any sample preparation. Chromatograms of 30-min run times are sufficient to profile pyrolysis products from C8 to C40 carbon chain length. The freely available software tools AMDIS and SpectConnect enables straightforward data processing. In Botryococcus samples, we identified fatty acids, vitamins, sterols and fatty acid esters and several long chain hydrocarbons. The algae species C. reinhardtii, B. braunii race A and B. braunii race B were readily discriminated using their hydrocarbon phenotypes. Substructure annotation and spectral clustering yielded network graphs of similar components for visual overviews of abundant and minor constituents. Conclusion Pyrolysis-GC-MS facilitates large scale screening of hydrocarbon phenotypes for comparisons of strain differences in algae or impact of altered growth and nutrient conditions. PMID:20492649

  14. Using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy fingerprint analyses to document process and progress of oil degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Roques, D.E.; Overton, E.B.; Henry, C.B.

    1994-07-01

    One of the challenges in testing the effectiveness of bioremediation products is the lack of a standardized testing protocol. One requirement of any such evaluation is baseline and benchmark analyses of the oil and its degradation processes. The method described uses high resolution gas chromatography maw spectroscopy (GC/MS). This method has been adapted from oil fingerprinting techniques used by our group for oil spill response to major spills such as T/V Exxon Valdez and T/V Megaborg. It results in a high degree of chemical and spectral resolution from a single analysis that allows quantification of saturated hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), sulfur heterocycles and selected biomarkers such as hopanes and steranes. High resolution GC/MS and compound specific analyses are a viable and efficient method of analyzing the extent and progress of oil bioremediation and that it should be possible to standardize the method for monitoring the biodegradation of oil. Data are also presented that show increased useful information obtained from this method and suggest possible future uses for this expanded database. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Quantification of Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins by Deuterodechlorination Combined with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Haijun; Zou, Lili; Wu, Ping; Yu, Zhengkun; Lu, Xianbo; Chen, Jiping

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) is extremely difficult because of their complex compositions with thousands of isomers and homologues. A novel analytical method, deuterodechlorination combined with high resolution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-HRMS), was developed. A protocol is applied in the deuterodechlorination of SCCPs with LiAlD4, and the formed deuterated n-alkanes of different alkane chains can be distinguished readily from each other on the basis of their retention time and fragment mass ([M](+)) by HRGC-HRMS. An internal standard quantification of individual SCCP congeners was achieved, in which branched C10-CPs and branched C12-CPs were used as the extraction and reaction internal standards, respectively. A maximum factor of 1.26 of the target SCCP concentrations were determined by this method, and the relative standard deviations for quantification of total SCCPs were within 10%. This method was applied to determine the congener compositions of SCCPs in commercial chlorinated paraffins and environmental and biota samples after method validation. Low-chlorinated SCCP congeners (Cl1-4) were found to account for 32.4%-62.4% of the total SCCPs. The present method provides an attractive perspective for further studies on the toxicological and environmental characteristics of SCCPs. PMID:26938369

  16. Sediment matrix effects in analysis of pyrethroid insecticides using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongli; You, Jing; Lydy, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, we developed a gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry method for analyzing nine pyrethroid insecticides in sediment after accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction cleanup. The operation was optimized, and negative chemical ionization was selected to improve analytical selectivity. The sediment matrix effects on qualification were evaluated, and matrix-matched standard solutions, along with the internal standard calibration, were used to reduce the matrix-induced chromatographic response enhancement. The method detection limits were 0.68 to 1.43 microg/kg dry weight (dw), and recoveries were 70.3 to 143.3%, 61.1 to 169.7%, and 65.7 to 118.8%, with relative SDs of 4.2% to 32.1%, 4.9 to 23.6%, and 1.5 to 23.3% at the spiked levels of 1.0, 5.0 and 20 microg/kg dw, respectively. The method was also validated by measuring pyrethroids in field-contaminated sediment samples collected in central California and southern Illinois. PMID:20340013

  17. Determination of Selected Phthalates by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in Personal Perfumes.

    PubMed

    Orecchio, Santino; Indelicato, Roberta; Barreca, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    A simple and fast method is proposed to analyze commercial personal perfumes. Our method includes measurement of phthalates, known to be major sources of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDC), which originate from the less volatile fraction of perfumes. The quantification of phthalates were carried out directly with no sample preparation required on 30 samples of commercial products using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a detector. The total concentrations of 15 investigated compounds ranged from 17 to 9650 mg/L with an average of 2643 mg/L. The highest total concentration was found in cologne. Diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were detected in appreciable concentrations. Further, it was found that the composition of counterfeit samples varied widely from that of authentic products. The composition of old products was different from that of recent perfumes, which contain less harmful chemicals, attributed to the ban on some phthalates in Europe due their toxicity. It should be noted that older and contaminated products are not equivalent to authentic products when considering quality, safety, and probably effectiveness. Older and nonapproved perfumes contain chemicals that are not allowed for commercial use and may contain toxic impurities. PMID:26262443

  18. Improved sensitivity gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of parabens in waters using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure for the introduction of ionic liquid samples in gas chromatography (GC) is proposed. This procedure, based on microvial insert thermal desorption, allows the direct analysis of the compounds preconcentrated by ionic liquid based liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-LLME) using the combination of a thermal desorption unit (TDU) and a programmed temperature vaporization injector (PTV). Two different IL-LLME methodologies, one based on the formation of a microdroplet emulsion by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other through ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) were studied and evaluated. IL-DLLME proved advantageous and consequently, it was adopted for preconcentration purposes. This easy to apply approach was used for the determination of five parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and isobutyl paraben) in swimming pool waters, after in situ acetylation. The optimized conditions of TDU/PTV allowed the analytes contained in 20 µL of the enriched IL to be transferred to the capillary column. Quantification of the samples was carried out against aqueous standards, and quantification limits of between 4.3 and 8.1 ng L(-1) were obtained, depending on the compound. Concentrations of between 9 and 47 ng L(-1) for some analytes were obtained in the analysis of ten samples. PMID:26695305

  19. High-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for skin surface lipids profiling.

    PubMed

    Michael-Jubeli, Rime; Bleton, Jean; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2011-01-01

    Skin surface lipids (SSLs) arising from both sebaceous glands and skin removal form a complex lipid mixture composed of free fatty acids and neutral lipids. High-temperature gas chromatography coupled with electron impact or chemical ionization mass spectrometry was used to achieve a simple analytical protocol, without prior separation in classes and without prior cleavage of lipid molecules, in order to obtain simultaneously i) a qualitative characterization of the individual SSLs and ii) a quantitative evaluation of lipid classes. The method was first optimized with SSLs collected from the forehead of a volunteer. More than 200 compounds were identified in the same run. These compounds have been classified in five lipid classes: free fatty acids, hydrocarbons, waxes, sterols, and glycerides. The advantage to this method was it provided structural information on intact compounds, which is new for cholesteryl esters and glycerides, and to obtain detailed fingerprints of the major SSLs. These fingerprints were used to compare the SSL compositions from different body areas. The squalene/cholesterol ratio was used to determine the balance between sebaceous secretion and skin removal. This method could be of general interest in fields where complex lipid mixtures are involved. PMID:20952798

  20. What experimental factors influence the accuracy of retention projections in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael B; Barnes, Brian B; Boswell, Paul G

    2014-12-19

    Programmed-temperature gas chromatographic (GC) retention information is difficult to share because it depends on so many experimental factors that vary among laboratories. Though linear retention indexing cannot properly account for experimental differences, retention times can be accurately calculated, or "projected", from shared isothermal retention vs. temperature (T) relationships, but only if the temperature program and hold-up time vs. T profile produced by a GC is known with great precision. The effort required to measure these profiles were previously impractical, but we recently showed that they can be easily back-calculated from the programmed-temperature retention times of a set of 25 n-alkanes using open-source software at www.retentionprediction.org/gc. In a multi-lab study, the approach was shown to account for both intentional and unintentional differences in the temperature programs, flow rates, and inlet pressures produced by the GCs. Here, we tested 16 other experimental factors and found that only 5 could reduce accuracy in retention projections: injection history, exposure to very high levels of oxygen at high temperature, a very low transfer line temperature, an overloaded column, and a very short column (≤15m). We find that the retention projection methodology acts as a hybrid of conventional retention projection and retention indexing, drawing on the advantages of both; it properly accounts for a wide range of experimental conditions while accommodating the effects of experimental factors not properly taken into account in the calculations. Finally, we developed a four-step protocol to efficiently troubleshoot a GC system after it is found to be yielding inaccurate retention projections. PMID:25482038

  1. What Experimental Factors Influence the Accuracy of Retention Projections in Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael B.; Barnes, Brian B.; Boswell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Programmed-temperature gas chromatographic (GC) retention information is difficult to share because it depends on so many experimental factors that vary among laboratories. Though linear retention indexing cannot properly account for experimental differences, retention times can be accurately calculated, or “projected”, from shared isothermal retention vs. temperature (T) relationships, but only if the temperature program and hold-up time vs. T profile produced by a GC is known with great precision. The effort required to measure these profiles were previously impractical, but we recently showed that they can be easily back-calculated from the programmed-temperature retention times of a set of 25 n-alkanes using open-source software at www.retentionprediction.org/gc. In a multi-lab study, the approach was shown to account for both intentional and unintentional differences in the temperature programs, flow rates, and inlet pressures produced by the GCs. Here, we tested 16 other experimental factors and found that only 5 could reduce accuracy in retention projections: injection history, exposure to very high levels of oxygen at high temperature, a very low transfer line temperature, an overloaded column, and a very short column (≤ 15 m). We find that the retention projection methodology acts as a hybrid of conventional retention projection and retention indexing, drawing on the advantages of both; it properly accounts for a wide range of experimental conditions while accommodating the effects of experimental factors not properly taken into account in the calculations. Finally, we developed a four-step protocol to efficiently troubleshoot a GC system after it is found to be yielding inaccurate retention projections. PMID:25482038

  2. Metabotyping of human colorectal cancer using two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mal, Mainak; Koh, Poh Koon; Cheah, Peh Yean; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2012-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in the world. The limitations of the currently available methods and biomarkers for CRC management highlight the necessity of finding novel markers. Metabonomics can be used to search for potential markers that can provide molecular insight into human CRC. The emergence of two-dimensional gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) has comprehensively enhanced the metabolic space coverage of conventional GC/MS. In this study, a GC × GC/TOFMS was developed for the tissue-based global metabonomic profiling of CRC. A Pegasus GC × GC/TOFMS (Leco Corp., St. Joseph, MI, USA) system comprising an Agilent 7890 GC and Pegasus IV TOFMS was used for this purpose. An Agilent DB-1 (30 m × 250 μm × 0.25 μm) fused silica capillary column and a Restek Rxi®-17 (1 m × 100 μm × 0.10 μm) fused silica capillary column were used as the primary and secondary columns, respectively. The method was applied for global metabonomic profiling of matched CRC and normal tissues (n = 63) obtained from 31 CRC patients during surgery. An attempt was also made to compare GC × GC/TOFMS with GC/MS and NMR in similar application. The results showed that the metabotype associated with CRC is distinct from that of normal tissue and led to the identification of chemically diverse marker metabolites. Metabolic pathway mapping suggested deregulation of various biochemical processes such as glycolysis, Krebs cycle, osmoregulation, steroid biosynthesis, eicosanoid biosynthesis, bile acid biosynthesis, lipid, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism. PMID:22374317

  3. Simultaneous detection of ten psychedelic phenethylamines in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Sarah; Banuelos, Stephanie; Perrella, Laura; Hardy, Brittany

    2011-09-01

    Psychedelic phenethylamines are an emerging class of designer drugs capable of producing a complex array of sought after adrenergic and hallucinogenic effects. Toxicological detection poses a number of challenges to laboratories. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure for the detection of psychedelic amphetamines using techniques that are widely accepted in forensic toxicology laboratories. In all, 10 target analytes were selected: 2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromophenethylamine (2C-B), 2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-H), 2,5-dimethoxy-4iodophenethylamine (2C-I), 2,5-dimethoxy-4ethylthiophenethylamine (2C-T-2), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-(n)propylthiophenethylamine (2C-T-7), 4-methylthioamphetamine (4-MTA), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromoamphetamine (DOB), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine (DOET), 2,5-dimethoxy4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), and 2,5-dimethoxy-4methylamphetamine (DOM). Target drugs in urine were analyzed by gas chromatography in selected ion monitoring mode after mixed-mode solid-phase extraction. Limits of detection for all analytes were 2-10 ng/mL, and limits of quantitation were 10 ng/mL or less. Precision evaluated at 50 and 500 ng/mL yielded CVs of 0.4-7.9% and accuracy in the range 91-116%. Calibration curves were linear to 1500 ng/mL using mescaline-d₉ as the internal standard. No carryover was evident at 5000 ng/mL (the highest concentration tested) and no interferences were observed from the presence of other structurally related compounds or endogenous bases. PMID:21871155

  4. An empirical Bayes model using a competition score for metabolite identification in gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry (MS) based metabolite profiling has been increasingly popular for scientific and biomedical studies, primarily due to recent technological development such as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC/TOF-MS). Nevertheless, the identifications of metabolites from complex samples are subject to errors. Statistical/computational approaches to improve the accuracy of the identifications and false positive estimate are in great need. We propose an empirical Bayes model which accounts for a competing score in addition to the similarity score to tackle this problem. The competition score characterizes the propensity of a candidate metabolite of being matched to some spectrum based on the metabolite's similarity score with other spectra in the library searched against. The competition score allows the model to properly assess the evidence on the presence/absence status of a metabolite based on whether or not the metabolite is matched to some sample spectrum. Results With a mixture of metabolite standards, we demonstrated that our method has better identification accuracy than other four existing methods. Moreover, our method has reliable false discovery rate estimate. We also applied our method to the data collected from the plasma of a rat and identified some metabolites from the plasma under the control of false discovery rate. Conclusions We developed an empirical Bayes model for metabolite identification and validated the method through a mixture of metabolite standards and rat plasma. The results show that our hierarchical model improves identification accuracy as compared with methods that do not structurally model the involved variables. The improvement in identification accuracy is likely to facilitate downstream analysis such as peak alignment and biomarker identification. Raw data and result matrices can be found at http://www.biostat.iupui.edu/~ChangyuShen/index.htm Trial Registration 2123938128573429 PMID:21985394

  5. Onsite well screening with a transportable gas chromatography/mass spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Eckenrode, B.A.; Owens, B.

    1992-10-15

    The number of hazardous waste site operations continue to multiply. The requirements for efficient chemical assessment and monitoring of these sites become more stringent daily. As more samples are required, the time required for cleanup operations also increases and may make analytical costs prohibitive. Thus improvements in operation efficiency and reduction of cost in evaluating specific sites to minimize or eliminate their toxic effects on the surrounding environment are critical. For many years a formal policy did not exist for the disposal of waste solvents and other chemicals, thus many of these compounds were disposed of ensite. So long as these materials were contained onsite they were not considered to pose a threat to the surrounding environment. We have since determined that many of these compounds found their way into the groundwater. Contaminants such as trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene, which were heavily used for cleaning and degreasing purposes, must be monitored. Groundwater wells can be used to define the location and extent of the migration of any contaminant plume and aid in the determination of required cleanup. The major problem is that monitoring of hundreds of wells may be necessary, requiring several hundred samples on a quarterly basis to characterize the degree and extent of any contamination. Onsite analysis of monitoring wells for this characterization of waste operations could provide time savings and significant cost reduction. Field analyses can provide the required analytical results quickly and at a reduced cost without compromising either sample integrity or data quality. By using onsite analytical instrumentation, such as a field-transportable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), screening analyses can be performed to eliminate retturning to the laboratory with meaningless samples. Onsite GC/MS will provide qualitative or semi-quantitative information that can significantly simplify subsequent laboratory analyses.

  6. Organic compounds present in the natural Amazonian aerosol: Characterization by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Bim; Guyon, Pascal; Taylor, Philip E.; Artaxo, Paulo; Maenhaut, Willy; Glovsky, M. Michael; Flagan, Richard C.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2003-12-01

    As part of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)-Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (CLAIRE) 2001 campaign in July 2001, separate day and nighttime aerosol samples were collected at a ground-based site in Amazonia, Brazil, in order to examine the composition and temporal variability of the natural "background" aerosol. We used a high-volume sampler to separate the aerosol into fine (aerodynamic diameter, AD < 2.5 μm) and coarse (AD > 2.5 μm) size fractions and quantified a range of organic compounds in methanolic extracts of the samples by a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric technique. The carbon fraction of the compounds could account for an average of 7% of the organic carbon (OC) in both the fine and coarse aerosol fractions. We observed the highest concentrations of sugars, sugar alcohols, and fatty acids in the coarse aerosol samples, which suggests that these compounds are associated with primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) observed in the forest atmosphere. Of these, trehalose, mannitol, arabitol, and the fatty acids were found to be more prevalent at night, coinciding with a nocturnal increase in PBAP in the 2-10 μm size range (predominantly yeasts and other small fungal spores). In contrast, glucose, fructose, and sucrose showed persistently higher daytime concentrations, coinciding with a daytime increase in large fungal spores, fern spores, pollen grains, and, to a lesser extent, plant fragments (generally >20 μm in diameter), probably driven by lowered relative humidity and enhanced wind speeds/convective activity during the day. For the fine aerosol samples a series of dicarboxylic and hydroxyacids were detected with persistently higher daytime concentrations, suggesting that photochemical production of a secondary organic aerosol from biogenic volatile organic compounds may have made a significant contribution to the fine aerosol. Anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan, galactosan), which are specific tracers for biomass burning, were detected only at low levels in the fine aerosol samples. On the basis of the levoglucosan-to-OC emission ratio measured for biomass burning aerosol, we estimate that an average of ˜16% of the OC in the fine aerosol was due to biomass burning during CLAIRE 2001, indicating that the major fraction was associated with biogenic particles.

  7. Analysis of chemical profiles of insect adhesion secretions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Manuela; Gerhardt, Heike; Schmitt, Christian; Betz, Oliver; Albert, Klaus; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the chemical analysis of molecular profiles of tarsal secretions of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Forsskål, 1775) by gas chromatography hyphenated with quadrupol mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy. Special focus of this study was to elaborate on sampling methods which enable selective microscale extraction of insect secretions in a spatially controlled manner, in particular tarsal adhesive secretions and secretions located on cuticle surfaces at the tibia. Various solvent sampling procedures and contact solid-phase microextraction (SPME) methods were compared in terms of comprehensiveness and extraction efficiencies as measured by signal intensities in GC-MS. Solvent sampling with water as extraction solvent gave access to the elucidation of chemical profiles of polar compound classes such as amino acids and carbohydrates, but is extremely tedious. Contact SPME on the other hand can be regarded as a simplified and more elegant alternative, in particular for the lipophilic compound fraction. Many proteinogenic amino acids and ornithine as well as carbohydrate monomers arabinose, xylose, glucose, and galactose were detected in tarsal secretions after acid hydrolysis of aqueous extracts. Qualitatively similar but quantitatively significantly different molecular profiles were found for the lipid fraction which contained mainly n-alkanes and internally branched monomethyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethyl-alkanes in the C23-C49 range as well as long chain fatty acids and aldehydes. Especially, hydrocarbons with >C40 carbon numbers have previously been rarely reported for insect secretions. The results suggest that the investigated insect secretions are complex emulsions which allow the attachment of tarsi on various otherwise incompatible materials of smooth and rough surfaces. The solid consistence of the established alkanes at ambient temperatures might contribute to a semi-solid consistence of the adhesive, amalgamating partly opposing functions such as slip resistance, tarsal release, desiccation resistance, and mechanical compliance. The methods developed can be extended to other similar applications of studying compositions of insect secretions of other species. PMID:25479867

  8. Quantitative analysis of urinary glycerol levels for doping control purposes using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Guddat, Sven; Flenker, Ulrich; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    The administration of glycerol to endurance athletes results in an increased fluid retention and improved performance, particularly under hot and humid conditions. Consequently, glycerol is considered relevant for sports drug testing and methods for its detection in urine specimens are required. A major issue in this regard is the natural occurrence of trace amounts of glycerol in human urine, which necessitates a quantitative analysis and the determination of normal urinary glycerol levels under various sporting conditions. A quantitative method was established using a gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry-based approach that was validated with regard to lower limit of detection (0.3 microg mL(-1)), lower limit of quantification (0.9 microg mL(-1)), specificity, linearity (1.0-98.0 microg mL(-1)), intraday and interday precision (<20% at 2.4, 24.1 and 48.2 microg mL(-1)) as well as accuracy (92-110%). Sample aliquots of 20 microL were enriched with five-fold deuterated glycerol, dried and derivatised using N-methyl-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) before analysis. The established method was applied to a total of 1039 doping control samples covering various sport disciplines (349 endurance samples, 286 strength sport samples, 325 game sport samples and 79 other samples) in- and out-of-competition, which provided quantitative information about the glycerol content commonly observed in elite athletes' urine samples. About 85% of all specimens yielded glycerol concentrations < 20.0 microg mL(-1) and few reached values up to 132.6 microg mL(-1). One further sample, however, was found to contain 2690 microg mL(-1), which might indicate the misuse of glycerol, but no threshold for urinary glycerol concentrations has been established yet due to the lack of substantial data. Based on the results obtained from the studied reference population, a threshold for glycerol levels in urine set at 200 microg mL(-1) is suggested, which provides a tool to doping control laboratories to test for the misuse of this agent in elite and amateur sport. PMID:18708691

  9. [Determination of pentachlorophenol residues in textiles and leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Mou, J; Chen, M; Zou, M

    1999-07-01

    A method for determination of pentachlorophenol residues in textiles and leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed. The pentachlorophenol residues in samples was acidified with sulphuric acid solution (6 mol/L) and extracted with n-hexane. After the n-hexane layer was washed with sodium sulphate solution (20 g/L)until it was clear, determination was made by means of a gas chromatograph equipped with MSD, using external standard method. A DB-17 fused silica capillary column (30 m x 0.25 mm i.d.; 0.25 micron film thickness) was employed in the analysis, The column temperature program included a 2 min isothermal period at 50 degrees C, temperature increased at a rate of 30 degrees C/min to 220 degrees C, and hold for 1 min; temperature increased of at a rate 6 degrees C/min to 260 degrees C, and hold for 1 min. Mass spectra were obtained by electron impact at 70 eV and the determination was made by means of SIM mode, selected monitoring ion (m/z) was 264 amu. The detection limit was 0.02 mg/kg. The average recovery was from 86.7% to 93.1% and CV (n = 10) is from 4.1% to 5.9%. This method was already used to determine the mass concentration of pentachlorophenol residues in raw cotton, towel, shirt, leather gloves, leather watchguard. The method is simple, rapid and accurate. PMID:12552858

  10. Development and Application of Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Bound Trinitrotoluene Residues in Soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, J.M.; Mckay, A.J.; Derito, C.; Watanabe, C.; Thorn, K.A.; Madsen, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    TNT (trinitrotoluene) is a contaminant of global environmental significance, yet determining its environmental fate has posed longstanding challenges. To date, only differential extraction-based approaches have been able to determine the presence of covalently bound, reduced forms of TNT in field soils. Here, we employed thermal elution, pyrolysis, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to distinguish between covalently bound and noncovalently bound reduced forms of TNT in soil. Model soil organic matter-based matrixes were used to develop an assay in which noncovalently bound (monomeric) aminodinitrotoluene (ADNT) and diaminonitrotoluene (DANT) were desorbed from the matrix and analyzed at a lower temperature than covalently bound forms of these same compounds. A thermal desorption technique, evolved gas analysis, was initially employed to differentiate between covalently bound and added 15N-labeled monomeric compounds. A refined thermal elution procedure, termed "double-shot analysis" (DSA), allowed a sample to be sequentially analyzed in two phases. In phase 1, all of an added 15N-labeled monomeric contaminant was eluted from the sample at relatively low temperature. In phase 2 during high-temperature pyrolysis, the remaining covalently bound contaminants were detected. DSA analysis of soil from the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant (LAAP; ???5000 ppm TNT) revealed the presence of DANT, ADNT, and TNT. After scrutinizing the DSA data and comparing them to results from solvent-extracted and base/acid-hydrolyzed LAAP soil, we concluded that the TNT was a noncovalently bound "carryover" from phase 1. Thus, the pyrolysis-GC/MS technique successfully defined covalently bound pools of ADNT and DANT in the field soil sample.

  11. Comparison of four extraction methods for the determination of fungicide residues in grapes through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lagunas-Allué, L; Sanz-Asensio, J; Martínez-Soria, M T

    2012-12-28

    Four different methods for simultaneous extraction of vinclozolin, dichlofluanid, penconazole, captan, quinoxyfen, fluquinconazol, boscalid and pyraclostrobin from grapes were optimized and further tested. Microwave assisted extraction (MAE), matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD), solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and QuEChERS were compared in terms of their limits of detection and quantification and recoveries. For MAE, MSPD and ethyl acetate extraction, the optimal conditions were optimized by using experimental designs. The analysis was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode (GC-MS, SIM). The proposed methods showed good sensitivity, limits of quantification were lower than MRLs and precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) ranged from 2.9 to 11.1%. The recoveries obtained from MAE, MSPD, SLE and QuEChERS were in the range 78-100%, 66-102%, 58-88% and 68-96%, respectively. In addition, the four methods were compared in two ways: by means of calibration curves obtained with 10 fortified samples in the studied range of concentrations and by the application of statistical tests such as Levene's test (to study variance homogeneity), ANOVA and Tukey's test (in case of Levene's test was satisfactory) for the assessment of the information obtained in the analysis of real samples. Both ways of comparison led to the same results: no differences between the four methods for the extraction of vinclozolin, dichofluanid, quinoxyfen, fluquinconazol and pyraclostrobin were found. However, there were differences for the analysis of captan, boscalid and penconazole. PMID:23182285

  12. Selective pressurized liquid extraction of estrogenic compounds in soil and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zulin; Rhind, Stewart M; Kerr, Christine; Osprey, Mark; Kyle, Carol E

    2011-01-24

    A selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) method, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), for the simultaneous extraction and clean-up of estrone (E1), 17?-estradiol (E2), 17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2), estriol (E3) and bisphenol A (BPA) from soil samples is described. The on-line clean-up of soil by SPLE was achieved using different organic matter retainers, including silica, alumina and Florisil, the most effective being silica. Thus, different amounts of silica, in conjunction with different extraction solvents (acetone, ethyl acetate, isohexane and dichloromethane), either alone or in combination, were used to extract the target chemicals from spiked soil samples. It was shown that 3g silica resulted in satisfactory rates of recovery of target compounds and acetone:dichloromethane (1:3, v/v) was efficient in extracting and eluting estrogenic compounds for SPLE. Variables affecting the SPLE efficiency, including temperature and pressure were studied; the optimum parameters were 60C and 1500 psi, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) of the proposed method were 0.02-0.37 ng g(-1) for the different estrogenic chemicals studied. The outputs using the proposed method were linear over the range from 0.1 to 120 ng g(-1) for E1, E2, EE2, 0.2-120 ng g(-1) for E3, and 0.5-120 ng g(-1) for BPA. The optimized method was further verified by performing spiking experiments in natural soil matrices; good rates of recovery and reproducibility were achieved for all selected compounds and the method was successfully applied to soil samples from Northeast Scotland, for the determination of the target compounds. PMID:21168548

  13. Estimation of D-Arabinose by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry as Surrogate for Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan in Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    De, Prithwiraj; Amin, Anita G.; Valli, Eloise; Perkins, Mark D.; McNeil, Michael; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2015-01-01

    Globally, tuberculosis is slowly declining each year and it is estimated that 37 million lives were saved between 2000 and 2013 through effective diagnosis and treatment. Currently, diagnosis relies on demonstration of the bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), in clinical specimens by serial sputum microscopy, culture and molecular testing. Commercial immunoassay lateral flow kits developed to detect Mtb lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine as a marker of active TB exhibit poor sensitivity, especially in immunocompetent individuals, perhaps due to low abundance of the analyte. Our present study was designed to develop methods to validate the presence of LAM in a quantitative fashion in human urine samples obtained from culture-confirmed TB patients. Herein we describe, a consolidated approach for isolating LAM from the urine and quantifying D-arabinose as a proxy for LAM, using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. 298 urine samples obtained from a repository were rigorously analyzed and shown to contain varying amounts of LAM-equivalent ranging between ~10–40 ng/mL. To further substantiate that D-arabinose detected in the samples originated from LAM, tuberculostearic acid, the unique 10-methyloctadecanoic acid present at the phosphatidylinositol end of LAM was also analyzed in a set of samples and found to be present confirming that the D-arabinose was indeed derived from LAM. Among the 144 samples from culture-negative TB suspects, 30 showed presence of D-arabinose suggesting another source of the analyte, such as disseminated TB or from non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. Our work validates that LAM is present in the urine samples of culture-positive patients in small but readily detectable amounts. The study further substantiates LAM in urine as a powerful biomarker for active tuberculosis. PMID:26633829

  14. Structural elucidation of chemical constituents from Benincasa hispida seeds and Carissa congesta roots by gas chromatography: Mass spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Gaurav M.; Nalawade, Vivek V.; Mukadam, Aaditi S.; Chaskar, Pratip K.; Zine, Sandeep P.; Somani, Rakesh R.; Une, Hemant D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benincasa hispida (BH) and Carissa congesta (CC) are regarded as ethnopharmacological imperative plants in Asian countries. Objective: Phytochemical screening of the extracts has shown the presence of steroids, flavonoids, saponins, glycosides, tannins, phenolic compounds, fixed oils, and fats in the BH and CC extracts. The presence of lupeol has been reported previously by us using high-performance thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Materials and Methods: Present research studies encompasses identification of chemical constituents in BH seeds and CC roots petroleum ether extracts by hyphenated technique such as gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (MS) which when coupled gives a clear insight of constituents. Results: The components were identified by matching mass spectra with MS libraries. There were 13 and 10 different compounds analyzed from CC and BH, respectively. The components present were Pentanoic acid, 5-hydroxy, 2,4-butylphenyl; n-Hexadecanoic acid (Palmitic acid); Sulfurous acid, 2-ethylhexylhepatdecyl ester; n-Tridecane; 6-methyltridecane; (9E, 12E)-9,12-Octadecadienyl chloride, Hexadecanoic acid, 3-(trimethylsilyl)-oxy] propyl ester; 9,12-Octadecadenoic acid, 2 hydroxy-1-(hyroxymethylethyl) ester; 9,12-Octadecadienoic acid, 2,3 dihydroxypropyl ester; n-Propyl-9,12-Octadecadienoate, Lupeol; Taraxasterol; 6a, 14a-Methanopicene, perhydro-12,4a, 61a, 9,9,12a-hepatmethyl-10-hydoxy and 9-Octadecene; 2-Isoprpenyl-5-methyl-6-hepten-1-ol; n-Hexadecanoic acid, 2-hyroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl) ethyl ether; Butyl-9,12-Octadecadieonate; Friedoolean-8-en-3-one; friedours-7-en-3-one; 13,27-Cyclosuran-3-one; Stigmaste-7,25-dien-3-ol (3β, 5α); Stigmasta-7,16-dien-3-ol; chrondrillasterol in BH seeds and CC roots extracts respectively. Conclusion: Eluted components from the extracts could provide further researchers to work with various pharmacological activities related models and studies. PMID:26130941

  15. Methadone concentrations in blood, plasma, and oral fluid determined by isotope-dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ching; Chen, Bud-Gen; Yang, Shu-Ching; Wang, Yu-Shan; Huang, Shiao-Ping; Huang, Mei-Han; Chen, Tai-Jui; Liu, Hsu-Chun; Lin, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ray H; Jones, A Wayne

    2013-05-01

    Methadone (MTD) is widely used for detoxification of heroin addicts and also in pain management programs. Information about the distribution of methadone between blood, plasma, and alternative specimens, such as oral fluid (OF), is needed in clinical, forensic, and traffic medicine when analytical results are interpreted. We determined MTD and its metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) in blood, plasma, blood cells, and OF by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after adding deuterium-labeled internal standards. The analytical limits of quantitation for MTD and EDDP by this method were 20 and 3 ng/mL, respectively. The amounts of MTD and EDDP were higher in plasma (80.4 % and 76.5 %) compared with blood cells (19.6 % and 23.5 %) and we found that repeated washing of blood cells with phosphate-buffered saline increased the amounts in plasma (93.6 % and 88.6 %). Mean plasma/blood concentration ratios of MTD and EDDP in spiked samples (N = 5) were 1.27 and 1.21, respectively. In clinical samples from patients (N = 46), the concentrations of MTD in plasma and whole blood were highly correlated (r = 0.92, p < 0.001) and mean (median) plasma/blood distribution ratios were 1.43 (1.41). The correlations between MTD in OF and plasma (r = 0.46) and OF and blood (r = 0.52) were also statistically significant (p < 0.001) and the mean OF/plasma and OF/blood distribution ratios were 0.55 and 0.77, respectively. The MTD concentration in OF decreased as salivary pH increased (more basic). These results will prove useful in clinical and forensic medicine when MTD concentrations in alternative specimens are compared and contrasted. PMID:23090648

  16. Cerumen of Australian stingless bees ( Tetragonula carbonaria): gas chromatography-mass spectrometry fingerprints and potential anti-inflammatory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, Flavia Carmelina; Brooks, Peter Richard; Wallace, Helen Margaret; Russell, Fraser Donald

    2011-04-01

    Cerumen, or propolis, is a mixture of plant resins enriched with bee secretions. In Australia, stingless bees are important pollinators that use cerumen for nest construction and possibly for colony's health. While extensive research attests to the therapeutic properties of honeybee ( Apis mellifera) propolis, the biological and medicinal properties of Australian stingless bee cerumen are largely unknown. In this study, the chemical and biological properties of polar extracts of cerumen from Tetragonula carbonaria in South East Queensland, Australia were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and in vitro 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) cell-free assays. Extracts were tested against comparative (commercial tincture of A. mellifera propolis) and positive controls (Trolox and gallic acid). Distinct GC-MS fingerprints of a mixed diterpenic profile typical of native bee cerumen were obtained with pimaric acid (6.31 ± 0.97%, w/w), isopimaric acid (12.23 ± 3.03%, w/w), and gallic acid (5.79 ± 0.81%, w/w) tentatively identified as useful chemical markers. Characteristic flavonoids and prenylated phenolics found in honeybee propolis were absent. Cerumen extracts from T. carbonaria inhibited activity of 5-LOX, an enzyme known to catalyse production of proinflammatory mediators (IC50 19.97 ± 2.67 μg/ml, mean ± SEM, n = 4). Extracts had similar potency to Trolox (IC50 12.78 ± 1.82 μg/ml), but were less potent than honeybee propolis (IC50 5.90 ± 0.62 μg/ml) or gallic acid (IC50 5.62 ± 0.35 μg/ml, P < 0.001). These findings warrant further investigation of the ecological and medicinal properties of this stingless bee cerumen, which may herald a commercial potential for the Australian beekeeping industry.

  17. Global profiling of ultraviolet-induced metabolic disruption in Melissa officinalis by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooah; Yun, Eun Ju; Hossain, Md Aktar; Lee, Hojoung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2012-08-01

    Melissa officinalis contains various secondary metabolites that have health benefits. Generally, irradiating plants with ultraviolet (UV)-B induces the accumulation of secondary metabolites in plants. To understand the effect of UV-B irradiation on the metabolism of M. officinalis, metabolomics based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used in this study. The GC-MS analysis revealed 37 identified metabolites from various chemical classes, including alcohols, amino acids, inorganic acids, organic acids, and sugars. The metabolite profiles of the groups of M. officinalis irradiated with UV-B were separated and differentiated according to their irradiation times (i.e., 0, 1, and 2 h), using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA), respectively. The PCA score plots of PC1 and PC2 showed that the three groups with different irradiation times followed a certain trajectory with increasing UV-B irradiation. HCA revealed that metabolic patterns differed among the three groups, and the 1 h-irradiated group was more similar to the control group (0 h) than the 2 h-irradiated group. In particular, UV-B irradiation of plants led to a decrease in sugars such as fructose, galactose, sucrose, and trehalose and an increase in metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway, and the phenylpropanoid pathway. This study demonstrated that metabolite profiling with GC-MS is useful for gaining a holistic understanding of UV-induced changes in plant metabolism. PMID:22729379

  18. Determination of amphetamine-type stimulants, ketamine and metabolites in fingernails by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Shin, Soon Ho; In, Moon Kyo

    2010-01-30

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous qualification and quantification of methamphetamine (MA), amphetamine (AP), 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-amphetamine (MDA), ketamine (KET) and norketamine (NKT) in fingernails. Fingernail samples (20mg) were washed with distilled water and methanol, digested with 1.0M sodium hydroxide at 95 degrees C for 30 min, and then extracted with ethyl acetate. Extract solutions were evaporated to dryness, derivatized using heptafluorobutyric anhydride (HFBA) at 60 degrees C for 30 min, and analyzed by GC-MS. The linear ranges were 0.1-20.0 ng/mg for AP, MDMA and NKT, 0.2-20.0 ng/mg for MA and MDA, and 0.4-20.0 ng/mg for KET, with the coefficients of determination (r(2)>or=0.9989). The intra- and inter-day precisions were within 7.1% and 10.6%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day accuracies were -10.9% to 0.8% and -4.3% to 4.5%, respectively. The limits of detections (LODs) and the limits of quantifications (LOQs) for each analyte were lower than 0.094 ng/mg and 0.314 ng/mg, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 72.3-94.9%. The average fingernail growth rates of two subjects for three years and six subjects for two months were 3.12 mm/month and 3.16 mm/month, respectively. The method proved to be suitable also for the simultaneous detection and quantification of MA, MDMA, KET and their metabolites in fingernails. PMID:19926235

  19. Simultaneous determination of six hydrophilic ethers at trace levels using coconut charcoal adsorbent and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stepien, D K; Püttmann, W

    2013-02-01

    The main objective of the following study was to determine the efficiency of a method that uses coconut charcoal as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbent in order to simultaneously detect six hydrophilic ether species in water in the low microgram-per-liter range. The applied method was validated for quantification of ethyl tert-butyl ether, 1,4-dioxane, ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (monoglyme), diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (diglyme), triethylene glycol dimethyl ether (triglyme) and tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme). SPE followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the extracts using the selected ion monitoring mode allowed for establishing low detection limits in the range of 0.007-0.018 μg/L in ultrapure water and 0.004-0.020 μg/L in environmental samples. Examination of the method accuracy and precision resulted in a recovery greater than 86.8 % for each compound with a relative standard deviation of less than 6.6 %. A stability study established a 5-day holding time for the unpreserved water samples and extracts. Finally, 27 samples obtained from surface water bodies in Germany were analyzed for the six hydrophilic ethers. Each analyte was detected in at least eight samples at concentrations reaching 2.0 μg/L. The results of this study emphasize the advantage of the method to simultaneously determine six hydrophilic ether compounds. The outcome of the surface water analyses augments a concern about their frequent and significant presence in surface water bodies in Germany. PMID:23232954

  20. Screening for petrochemical contamination in seafood by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bencsath, F Aladar; Benner, Ronald A; Abraham, Ann; Wang, Yuesong; El Said, Kathleen R; Jester, Edward L E; Plakas, Steven M

    2015-05-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS) method is described, to screen seafood for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with petrochemical taint. VOCs are extracted from the headspace of heated sample homogenates by adsorption onto a SPME fiber and desorbed for analysis by GC-MS. Targeted compounds are determined semi-quantitatively using representative calibration standards for the various classes (alkanes, alkylbenzenes, indanes/tetralins, and naphthalenes) of VOCs analyzed. Sample preparation is minimal, and the analyses are rapid and automated with a capacity of 50 samples per day. The method was optimized in terms of headspace temperature, sample heating time, extraction time, and desorption time using oyster samples fortified with target compounds. Calibrations for hydrocarbon components were linear in the range of 8.3-167 ng/g; the limit of detection ranged between 0.05 and 0.21 ng/g, and the limit of quantitation between 0.16 and 0.69 ng/g. Good precision (RSD < 10 % at 16.7 ng/g for individual VOCs) and accuracy (recovery range 89-118 % at 25 ng/g) were obtained in oyster, crab, shrimp, and finfish matrices. The trueness of the method was demonstrated by quantifying VOCs at 1-2-ppb levels in oyster fortified with certified reference material NIST SRM 1491a. Following single laboratory validation, the method was employed for the determination of VOCs in seafood exposed to oil contaminated seawater and for the determination of background VOC levels in seafood species from the Gulf of Mexico and local food stores. The method as described can be used to supplement human sensory testing for petrochemical taint in seafood. PMID:25796529

  1. Hyphenated and comprehensive liquid chromatography×gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Marta P B; Denekamp, Ilse; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Kolk, Arend H J; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2016-03-25

    Tuberculosis is one of the world's most emerging public health problems, particularly in developing countries. Chromatography based methods have been used to tackle this epidemic by focusing on biomarker detection. Unfortunately, interferences from lipids in the sputum matrix, particularly cholesterol, adversely affect the identification and detection of the marker compounds. The present contribution describes the serial combination of normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) with thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (THM-GC-MS) to overcome the difficulties of biomarker evaluation. The in-series combination consists of an LC analysis where fractions are collected and then transferred to the THM-GC-MS system. This was either done with comprehensive coupling, transferring all the fractions, or with hyphenated interfacing, i.e. off-line multi heart-cutting, transferring only selected fractions. Owing to the high sensitivity and selectivity of LC as a sample pre-treatment method, and to the high specificity of the MS as a detector, this analytical approach, NPLC×THM-GC-MS, is extremely sensitive. The results obtained indicate that this analytical set-up is able to detect down to 1×10(3) mycobacteria/mL of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain 124, spiked in blank sputum samples. It is a powerful analytical tool and also has great potential for full automation. If further studies demonstrate its usefulness when applied blind in real sputum specimens, this technique could compete with the current smear microscopy in the early diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:26585206

  2. A novel derivative for the assessment of urinary and salivary nitrate using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah J; Siervo, Mario; Persson, Emma; McKenna, Louise M; Bluck, Leslie J C

    2008-12-01

    Previous gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods for determining nitrate in biological samples involve either hazardous chemicals or produce multiple isomers that can be difficult to quantitate. Modification of these methods, by the nitration of mesitylene instead of benzene and in the presence of trifluoroacetic anhydride rather than sulphuric acid, should enable simple isotopic quantitation for use in tracer studies, for example, in the measurement of nitric oxide production. Desiccated urine and saliva samples, in addition to aqueous labelled and unlabelled nitrate standards, were treated with trifluoroacetic anhydride and mesitylene at 70 degrees C for 1 h, cooled, then sequentially washed with deionised water and aqueous sodium bicarbonate. The solution of nitromesitylene in mesitylene was separated, dried and analysed by GC/MS. The full mass spectra exhibited abundant ions at m/z 165 and 166 corresponding to the unlabelled and labelled molecular species of nitromesitylene, respectively. Selected ion monitoring of these masses for a series of gravimetrically prepared standards indicated good agreement with isotopic enrichments in the range 0.0625-5 mole % excess, and at nitrate concentrations within the physiological range of 0.078-2 mmol/L. Derivatised samples were stable with respect to isotopic enrichments and nitrate concentrations at -20 degrees C for up to 21 days and exhibited excellent repeatability. Nitration of mesitylene proved to be a simple and rapid method for the measurement of isotope ratios in aqueous nitrates by GC/MS, which has applications in tracer studies and in concentration determinations by isotope dilution techniques for nitric oxide production. PMID:19039799

  3. Oxidative stress: Determination of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in human and rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Zelzer, S; Mangge, H; Oberreither, R; Bernecker, C; Gruber, H-J; Prüller, F; Fauler, G

    2015-10-01

    The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is a biomarker of oxidative stress which is essentially involved in the pathophysiology of many diseases. The analysis of HNE is challenging because this aldehyde is extremely reactive and thus unstable. Hence, we adopted a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method based on derivatization of HNE with pentafluorobenzyl-hydroxylamine-HCl followed by trimethylsilylation to trimethylsilyl ethers. Ions representative for a negative ion chemical ionization mode were recorded at m/z = 152 for HNE and at m/z = 162 for the deuterated analogon (HNE-d11) as internal standard. This excellent stable and precise GC-MS method was carefully validated for HNE, and showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.998), and high specificity and sensitivity. Within-day precisions were 4.4-6.1% and between-day precisions were 5.2-10.2%. Accuracies were between 99% and 104% for the whole calibration range (2.5-250 nmol/L) of HNE. To examine the versatility of this modified GC-MS method, we analyzed HNE in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma in a well-defined collective of migraine patients; recently published. The results underline our former observations that women with migraine are afflicted with increased levels of HNE. Patients with thyroidal dysfunction showed no significant HNE alterations. This was confirmed by normal HNE EDTA plasma levels in hyper- und hypothyroid Sprague-Dawley rats. Taken together, the GC-MS method presented herein is of excellent quality to record oxidative stress-related bioactive HNE levels. This is important for a reorientation of oxidative stress analytics in other human diseases first of atherosclerosis and cancer. PMID:26053028

  4. Response to weaning and dietary L-glutamine supplementation: metabolomic analysis in piglets by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying-ping; Wu, Tian-xing; Hong, Qi-hua; Sun, Jiang-ming; Chen, An-guo; Yang, Cai-mei; Li, Xiao-yan

    2012-01-01

    A novel metabolomic method based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied to determine the metabolites in the serum of piglets in response to weaning and dietary L-glutamine (Gln) supplementation. Thirty-six 21-d-old piglets were randomly assigned into three groups. One group continued to suckle from the sows (suckling group), whereas the other two groups were weaned and their diets were supplemented with 1% (w/w) Gln or isonitrogenous L-alanine, respectively, representing Gln group or control group. Serum samples were collected to characterize metabolites after a 7-d treatment. Results showed that twenty metabolites were down-regulated significantly (P<0.05) in control piglets compared with suckling ones. These data demonstrated that early weaning causes a wide range of metabolic changes across arginine and proline metabolism, aminosugar and nucleotide metabolism, galactose metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, and fatty acid metabolism. Dietary Gln supplementation increased the levels of creatinine,D-xylose, 2-hydroxybutyric acid, palmitelaidic acid, and α-L-galactofuranose (P<0.05) in early weaned piglets, and were involved in the arginine and proline metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism. A leave-one-out cross-validation of random forest analysis indicated that creatinine was the most important metabolite among the three groups. Notably, the concentration of creatinine in control piglets was decreased (P=0.00001) compared to the suckling piglets, and increased (P=0.0003) in Gln-supplemented piglets. A correlation network for weaned and suckling piglets revealed that early weaning changed the metabolic pathways, leading to the abnormality of carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and lipid metabolism, which could be partially improved by dietary Gln supplementation. These findings provide fresh insight into the complex metabolic changes in response to early weaning and dietary Gln supplementation in piglets. PMID:22761248

  5. Serum level of 19-hydroxyandrostenedione during pregnancy and at delivery determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Osawa, Y.; Ohnishi, S.; Yarborough, C.; Ohigashi, S.; Kosaki, T.; Hashino, M.; Yanaihara, T.; Nakayama, T. )

    1990-04-01

    19-Hydroxyandrostenedione (19-OHA) is secreted from the adrenal glands in men and women and also from the placenta during pregnancy. It has been found to cause hypertension in animal models. We have synthesized (7,7-2H2)-19-OHA with high deuterium content and, together with (7,7-2H2)A and (9,11-2H2)estrone (E1), have developed a quantitative assay of serum level 19-OHA, A, and E1 using the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-mass fragmentography method to monitor individual subjects throughout pregnancy. The labeled 19-OHA, used as internal standard, showed only 6.73% of unlabeled compound. Recovery of standard 19-OHA, A, and E1 (5,000 pg each) added to male plasma was 97.4 +/- 2.3%, 96.3 +/- 2.1%, and 100.1 +/- 4.1% (mean +/- SD), respectively; the intraassay coefficient of variation was 2.1%, 3.5%, and 3.8%, respectively. Ten pregnant subjects without complications and 10 pregnant subjects near term with hypertension were selected (with informed consent). The 19-OHA and E1 serum concentrations of maternal venous blood from uncomplicated pregnancies increased significantly as gestation progressed (19-OHA: first trimester, 225 +/- 72; second trimester, 656 +/- 325; third trimester, 1,518 +/- 544 pg/ml), reaching the highest level at delivery (19-OHA: 1,735 +/- 684 pg/ml). Whereas a positive correlation was found between the level of 19-OHA and E1, no apparent change of the A level was observed during pregnancy. Levels of the three steroid hormones in pregnancy complicated by hypertension in the second and third trimester were not found to be significantly different from those of normal pregnancy (19-OHA of hypertensive subjects: second trimester, 762 +/- 349; third trimester, 1,473 +/- 491 pg/ml).

  6. Accurate analysis of trace earthy-musty odorants in water by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kang; Zhang, Jin Na; Zhao, Min; He, Ya Juan

    2012-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method was developed for the simultaneous separation and determination of trace earthy-musty compounds including geosmin, 2-methylisoborneol, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2,3,4-trichloroanisole, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, and 2,3,6-trichloroanisole in water samples. This method combined headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and used naphthalene-d(8) as internal standard. A divinylbenzene/carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber exposing at 90°C for 30 min provided effective sample enrichment in HS-SPME. These compounds were separated by a DB-1701MS capillary column and detected in selected ion monitoring mode within 12 min. The method showed a good linearity from 1 to 100 ng L(-1) and detection limits within (0.25-0.61 ng L(-1)) for all compounds. Using naphthalene-d(8) as the internal standard, the intra-day relative standard deviation (RSD) was within (2.6-3.4%), while the inter-day RSD was (3.5-4.9%). Good recoveries were obtained for tap water (80.5-90.6%), river water (81.5-92.4%), and lake water (83.5-95.2%) spiked at 10 ng L(-1). Compared with other methods using HS-SPME for determination of odor compounds in water samples, this present method had more analytes, better precision, and recovery. This method was successfully applied for analysis of earthy-musty odors in water samples from different sources. PMID:22740259

  7. Molecular analysis of intact preen waxes of Calidris canutus (Aves: Scolopacidae) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dekker, M H; Piersma, T; Damsté, J S

    2000-05-01

    The intact preen wax esters of the red knot Calidris canutus were studied with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/MS/MS. In this latter technique, transitions from the molecular ion to fragment ions representing the fatty acid moiety of the wax esters were measured, providing additional resolution to the analysis of wax esters. The C21-C32 wax esters are composed of complex mixtures of hundreds of individual isomers. The odd carbon-numbered wax esters are predominantly composed of even carbon-numbered n-alcohols (C14, C16, and C18) esterified predominantly with odd carbon-numbered 2-methyl fatty acids (C7, C9, C11, and C13), resulting in relatively simple distributions. The even carbon-numbered wax esters show a far more complex distribution due to a number of factors: (i) Their n-alcohol moieties are not dominated by even carbon-numbered n-alcohols esterified with odd carbon-numbered 2-methyl fatty acids, but odd and even carbon-numbered n-alcohols participate in approximately equal amounts; (ii) odd carbon-numbered methyl-branched alcohols participate abundantly in these wax ester clusters; and (iii) with increasing molecular weight, various isomers of the 2,6-, 2,8-, and 2,10-dimethyl branched fatty acids also participate in the even carbon-numbered wax esters. The data demonstrate that there is a clear biosynthetic control on the wax ester composition although the reasons for the complex chemistry of the waxes are not yet understood. PMID:10907788

  8. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Raman imaging measurement of squalene content and distribution in human hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Chen, Guoqiang; Ji, Chengdong; Hoptroff, Michael; Jones, Andrew; Collins, Luisa Z; Janssen, Hans- Gerd

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the measurement of the squalene content from root to tip, in both Chinese black virgin and bleached hair. Deuterated squalene was used as the internal standard. For quantification, selective ion monitoring (SIM) at m/z 410.0 and 347.0 were monitored for squalene and deuterated squalene, respectively. Different methods for the extraction of squalene from ex vivo human hair were compared including organic solvent extraction and acid/alkali hydrolysis. The best extraction efficiency was obtained by using a mixed solvent consisting of chloroform:methanol = 2:1 (v:v). The linear range of squalene ran from 1.0 to 50.0 μg mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.10 μg mL(-1) (corresponding to 0.005 mg g(-1) in human hair), which enabled quantification of squalene in human hair at very low level. The recovery of squalene was 96.4 ± 1.46 % (n = 3). Using the above-mentioned mixed solvent extraction, squalene content in human hair was successfully quantified from root to tip. Meanwhile, a Raman imaging method was developed to visualize the squalene distribution in Chinese white virgin hair from cuticle to medulla. Graphical Abstract Raman image of squalene distribution in Chinese white virgin hair (microtomed hair cross section). PMID:26825344

  9. Characterization of livestock odors using steel plates, solid-phase microextraction, and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Bulliner, Edward A; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Wright, Donald

    2006-10-01

    Livestock operations are associated with emissions of odor, gases, and particulate matter (PM). Livestock odor characterization is one of the most challenging analytical tasks. This is because odor-causing gases are often present at very low concentrations in a complex matrix of less important or irrelevant gases. The objective of this project was to develop a set of characteristic reference odors from a swine barn in Iowa and, in the process, identify compounds causing characteristic swine odor. Odor samples were collected using a novel sampling methodology consisting of clean steel plates exposed inside and around the swine barn for < or =1 week. Steel plates were then transported to the laboratory and stored in clean jars. Headspace solid-phase microextraction was used to extract characteristic odorants collected on the plates. All of the analyses were conducted on a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry system where the human nose is used as a detector simultaneously with chemical analysis via mass spectrometry. Multidimensional chromatography was used to isolate and identify chemicals with high-characteristic swine odor. The effects of sampling time, distance from a source, and the presence of PM on the abundance of specific gases, odor intensity, and odor character were tested. Steel plates were effectively able to collect key volatile compounds and odorants. The abundance of specific gases and odor was amplified when plates collected PM. The results of this research indicate that PM is major carrier of odor and several key swine odorants. Three odor panelists were consistent in identifying p-cresol as closely resembling characteristic swine odor, as well as attributing to p-cresol the largest odor response out of the samples. Further research is warranted to determine how the control of PM emissions from swine housing could affect odor emissions. PMID:17063862

  10. Response to weaning and dietary L-glutamine supplementation: metabolomic analysis in piglets by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying-ping; Wu, Tian-xing; Hong, Qi-hua; Sun, Jiang-ming; Chen, An-guo; Yang, Cai-mei; Li, Xiao-yan

    2012-07-01

    A novel metabolomic method based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied to determine the metabolites in the serum of piglets in response to weaning and dietary L-glutamine (Gln) supplementation. Thirty-six 21-d-old piglets were randomly assigned into three groups. One group continued to suckle from the sows (suckling group), whereas the other two groups were weaned and their diets were supplemented with 1% (w/w) Gln or isonitrogenous L-alanine, respectively, representing Gln group or control group. Serum samples were collected to characterize metabolites after a 7-d treatment. Results showed that twenty metabolites were down-regulated significantly (P<0.05) in control piglets compared with suckling ones. These data demonstrated that early weaning causes a wide range of metabolic changes across arginine and proline metabolism, aminosugar and nucleotide metabolism, galactose metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, and fatty acid metabolism. Dietary Gln supplementation increased the levels of creatinine, D-xylose, 2-hydroxybutyric acid, palmitelaidic acid, and ?-L-galactofuranose (P<0.05) in early weaned piglets, and were involved in the arginine and proline metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism. A leave-one-out cross-validation of random forest analysis indicated that creatinine was the most important metabolite among the three groups. Notably, the concentration of creatinine in control piglets was decreased (P=0.00001) compared to the suckling piglets, and increased (P=0.0003) in Gln-supplemented piglets. A correlation network for weaned and suckling piglets revealed that early weaning changed the metabolic pathways, leading to the abnormality of carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and lipid metabolism, which could be partially improved by dietary Gln supplementation. These findings provide fresh insight into the complex metabolic changes in response to early weaning and dietary Gln supplementation in piglets. PMID:22761248

  11. Determination of alkylamines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Jia, W. T.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkylamines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkylamines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkylamines in aerosol particles. Alkylamines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg (or 0.02-0.04 ng m-3). For the IC approach, a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkylamines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkylamines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng (or 0.9-6.4 ng m-3), and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkylamines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  12. Determination of alkyl amines in atmospheric aerosol particles: a comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.-J.; Li, W.-B.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wang, Q. Y.; Ho, K.-F.; Cao, J. J.; Wang, G. H.; Chen, X.; Haddad, I. EI; Zhuang, Z. X.; Wang, X. R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Hoffmann, T.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years low molecular weight alkyl amines have been recognized to play an important role in particle formation and growth in the lower atmosphere. However, major uncertainties are associated with their atmospheric processes, sources and sinks, mostly due to the lack of ambient measurements and the difficulties in accurate quantification of alkyl amines at trace level. In this study, we present the evaluation and optimization of two analytical approaches, i.e., gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC), for the determination of alkyl amines in aerosol particles. Alkyl amines were converted to carbamates through derivatization with isobutyl chloroformate for GC-MS determination. A set of parameters affecting the analytical performances of the GC-MS approach, including reagent amount, reaction time and pH value, was evaluated and optimized. The accuracy is 84.3-99.1%, and the limits of detection obtained are 1.8-3.9 pg. For the IC approach, a solid phase extraction (SPE) column was used to separate alkyl amines from interfering cations before IC analysis. 1-2% (v/v) of acetone (or 2-4% (v/v) of acetonitrile) was added to the eluent to improve the separation of alkyl amines on the IC column. The limits of detection obtained are 2.1-15.9 ng and the accuracy is 55.1-103.4%. The lower accuracy can be attributed to evaporation losses of amines during the sample concentration procedure. Measurements of ambient aerosol particle samples collected in Hong Kong show that the GC-MS approach is superior to the IC approach for the quantification of primary and secondary alkyl amines due to its lower detection limits and higher accuracy.

  13. [Serum metabolome by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in patients with ulcerative colitis and celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Sitkin, S I; Tkachenko, E I; Vakhitov, T Ia; Oreshko, L S; Zhigalova, T N

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is the emerging science of measurement and analysis of metabolome--the complete set of low molecular weight compounds in a cell, tissue, organ or whole organism. One of the aims of metabolomics is to research the response of an organism to a pathophysiological insult by measuring the concentrations of small molecule metabolites in biofluids and tissues and its dynamics. Intestinal microbiota is most probably involved in the development and maintenance of autoimmune inflammation in ulcerative colitis and celiac disease. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC - MS) of serum generates comprehensive metabolic profiles, reflecting integrated human (systemic) and gut microbial metabolism which may be altered in disease states. The aim of this study was to investigate GC - MS-based serum metabolomic profiles in UC and CD patients. Serum metabolic profiles were collected from 75 individuals: 20 patients with mild-moderate active UC, 35 CD patients, and 20 healthy controls (HC). We characterized 84 serum metabolites by use GC-MS. 18 metabolites at least have a combined (human + microbial) origin. In serum of UC patients, phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA), 3-indolylacetic acid (IAA), succinic acid (SA) and fumaric acid (FA) were the metabolites most prominently increased, whereas 3-phenylpropionic acid (PPA) was significantly decreased. Serum of CD patients showed significant increases in IAA, 3-indolepropionic acid (IPA), SA and FA. Increased serum levels of succinic acid suggest its possible damaging effect on intestinal mucosa especially in ulcerative colitis. Orally administered butyrate + inulin as supplement to mesalazine in UC or gluten free diet in CD was effective in reducing disease activity with a marked improvement of serum metabolomic profiles (including SA reduction) and gut microbiota in both diseases. There were no any adverse events. PMID:24933989

  14. Optimization of pressurized liquid extraction and purification conditions for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of UV filters in sludge.

    PubMed

    Negreira, N; Rodríguez, I; Rubí, E; Cela, R

    2011-01-14

    This work presents an effective sample preparation method for the determination of eight UV filter compounds, belonging to different chemical classes, in freeze-dried sludge samples. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were selected as extraction and determination techniques, respectively. Normal-phase, reversed-phase and anionic exchange materials were tested as clean-up sorbents to reduce the complexity of raw PLE extracts. Under final working conditions, graphitized carbon (0.5 g) was used as in-cell purification sorbent for the retention of co-extracted pigments. Thereafter, a solid-phase extraction cartridge, containing 0.5 g of primary secondary amine (PSA) bonded silica, was employed for off-line removal of other interferences, mainly fatty acids, overlapping the chromatographic peaks of some UV filters. Extractions were performed with a n-hexane:dichloromethane (80:20, v:v) solution at 75°C, using a single extraction cycle of 5 min at 1500 psi. Flush volume and purge time were set at 100% and 2 min, respectively. Considering 0.5 g of sample and 1 mL as the final volume of the purified extract, the developed method provided recoveries between 73% and 112%, with limits of quantification (LOQs) from 17 to 61 ng g(-1) and a linear response range up to 10 μg g(-1). Total solvent consumption remained around 30 mL per sample. The analysis of non-spiked samples confirmed the sorption of significant amounts of several UV filters in sludge with average concentrations above 0.6 μg g(-1) for 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate (EHMC) and octocrylene (OC). PMID:21144528

  15. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry assessment of amines in Port wine and grape juice after fast chloroformate extraction/derivatization.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Faria, M A; Fernandes, J O

    2011-08-24

    A simple, reliable, and sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantification of volatile and nonvolatile biogenic amines in Port wines and grape juices was developed and evaluated. The method was based on a previously reported two-phase derivatization procedure with isobutyl chloroformate in a toluene medium, which provides a quantitative reaction in 10 min. Following the derivatization step, the excess of reagent was eliminated by treatment with alkaline methanol. The derivatization procedure was performed directly on 1 mL of sample, avoiding any fastidious and time-consuming cleanup extraction steps. The method allows the simultaneous quantification of 22 amines, which can be found in wines: methylamine, dimethylamine, ethylamine, diethylamine, propylamine, isopropylamine, butylamine, isobutylamine, amylamine, isoamylamine, 2-methylbutylamine, hexylamine, pyrrolidine, piperidine, morpholine, 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine, cadaverine, 1,6-diaminohexane, 2-phenylethylamine, histamine, and tyramine. Because of the fact that histamine and tyramine derivatives are degraded during the isobutyl chloroformate elimination step, the corresponding determination was made after removal of the excess of derivatizing reagent by evaporating an aliquot of the toluene layer obtained after the reaction. The presented method showed excellent analytical characteristics in what linearity, recovery, repeatability, and limit of detections were respected. It was used to assess the concentration of biogenic amines in juice grapes and Tawny and Vintage Port wines with different aging times. On the whole, the total content of amines in Port wines was low. Most of the amines found in wines have their origin in the raw material used for their elaboration, so the Port winemaking process is not prone to the production of this kind of compounds. Total biogenic amine contents have shown a decrease with the aging of both types of Port wines. PMID:21732693

  16. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere - Analysis at the parts-per-trillion level by GC-MS. [Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    The propellant gases (Freons) used in aerosol spray cans can diffuse into the earth's upper atmosphere where they can react with the unfiltered ultraviolet radiation from the sun to reduce the earth's protective ozone layer. These Freons have been identified commonly by gas chromatography. Mass spectrometer data confirm other reports on the widespread concentrations of the Freons in the troposphere and demonstrate the presence of Freon 113 which has not been previously identified.

  17. Full evaporation dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for uniform enrichment of odor compounds in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    A method for analysis of a wide range of odor compounds in aqueous samples at sub-ng mL⁻¹ to μg mL⁻¹ levels was developed by full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compared to conventional DHS and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), FEDHS provides more uniform enrichment over the entire polarity range for odor compounds in aqueous samples. FEDHS at 80°C using 3 L of purge gas allows complete vaporization of 100 μL of an aqueous sample, and trapping and drying it in an adsorbent packed tube, while providing high recoveries (85-103%) of the 18 model odor compounds (water solubility at 25°C: log0.54-5.65 mg L⁻¹, vapor pressure at 25°C: 0.011-3.2 mm Hg) and leaving most of the low volatile matrix behind. The FEDHS-GC-MS method showed good linearity (r²>0.9909) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.21-5.2 ng mL⁻¹) for the model compounds even with the scan mode in the conventional MS. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analyses of key odor compounds including hydrophilic and less volatile characteristics in beverages (whiskey and green tea). In a single malt whiskey sample, phenolic compounds including vanillin could be determined in the range of 0.92-5.1 μg mL⁻¹ (RSD<7.4%, n=6). For a Japanese green tea sample, 48 compounds including 19 potent odorants were positively identified from only 100 μL of sample. Heat-induced artifact formation for potent odorants was also examined and the proposed method does not affect the additional formation of thermally generated compounds. Eighteen compounds including 12 potent odorants (e.g. coumarin, furaneol, indole, maltol, and pyrazine congeners) were determined in the range of 0.21-110 ng mL⁻¹ (RSD<10%, n=6). PMID:22542289

  18. Comparison of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis for in vivo estimates of metabolic fluxes.

    PubMed

    Croyal, Mikaël; Bourgeois, Raphaëlle; Ouguerram, Khadija; Billon-Crossouard, Stéphanie; Aguesse, Audrey; Nguyen, Patrick; Krempf, Michel; Ferchaud-Roucher, Véronique; Nobécourt, Estelle

    2016-05-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was compared with gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) for measurements of cholesterol (13)C enrichment after infusion of labeled precursor ([(13)C1,2]acetate). Paired results were significantly correlated, although GC-MS was less accurate than GC-C-IRMS for higher enrichments. Nevertheless, only GC-MS was able to provide information on isotopologue distribution, bringing new insights to lipid metabolism. Therefore, we assessed the isotopologue distribution of cholesterol in humans and dogs known to present contrasted cholesterol metabolic pathways. The labeled tracer incorporation was different in both species, highlighting the subsidiarity of GC-MS and GC-C-IRMS to analyze in vivo stable isotope studies. PMID:26898306

  19. Determination of parts-per-billion concentrations of dioxane in water and soil by purge and trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or charcoal tube enrichment gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, P.S.; Mauer, T.; Wagner, M.; Chase, S.; Giles, B.

    1987-08-01

    Two methods for the determination of 1,4-dioxane in water have been studied. The first method is a heated purge and trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system following salting out with sodium sulfate. The second method is an adsorption on coconut-shell charcoal and solvent desorption with carbon disulfide/methanol followed by analysis of the desorbate by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The first method is also successful for the determination of 1,4-dioxane in solids and sediments. The second method is shown to be successful for 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, and butoxyethanol in water. The two methods are compared by analyzing 15 samples by both methods and achieving similar results.

  20. Characterization of odor-active compounds of various Chrysanthemum essential oils by gas chromatography-olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and their correlation with sensory attributes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Fan, Binbin; Niu, Yunwei; Wu, Minling; Liu, Junhua; Ma, Shengtao

    2016-01-15

    Volatiles of five kinds of Chrysanthemum essential oils with different manufactures were characterized by descriptive sensory analysis, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and statistics analysis. Six sensory attributes (floral, woody, grassy, fruity, sour and minty) were selected to assess Chrysanthemum essential oils. A total of 38 volatile compounds were detected and quantified using standard substances by GC-O and GC-MS. Terpenes constituted the largest chemical group among the volatiles of the essential oils. Then partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used to elucidate the relationship between sensory attributes and aroma compounds. The result showed that α-pinene, β-thujene, α-terpinolen, β-cubebene, caryophyllene, (Z)β-farnesene, (-)-spathulenol, linalool, camphor, camphene, 4-terpineol, Z-citral and 4-isopropyltoluene were typical aroma compounds covaried with characteristic aroma of Chrysanthemum essential oils. PMID:26735711

  1. Determination of "new psychoactive substances" in postmortem matrices using microwave derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Margalho, Cláudia; Castanheira, Alice; Real, Francisco Corte; Gallardo, Eugenia; López-Rivadulla, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Despite worldwide efforts aiming to ban the marketing and subsequent abuse of psychoactive substances such as synthetic cathinones and phenethylamines, there has been an alarming growth of both in recent years. Different compounds similar to those already existing are continuously appearing in the market in order to circumvent the legislation. An analytical methodology has been validated for qualitative and quantitative determinations of d-cathine (d-norpseudoehedrine), ephedrine, methcathinone, 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-propan-2-amine (PMA), mephedrone, methedrone, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine (DOB), 2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-H), 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-B), 4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-I), 2-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-(ethylthio)phenyl]ethanamine (2C-T-2), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-isopropylthiophenethylamine (2C-T-4) and 2-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-(propylthio)phenyl]ethanamine (2C-T-7), in low volumes of vitreous humor (100μL), pericardial fluid (250μL) and whole blood (250μL), using deutered amphetamine, ephedrine and mephedrone as internal standards. The validation parameters included selectivity, linearity and limits of detection and quantification, intra- and interday precision and trueness, recovery and stability. The method included mixed-mode solid phase extraction, followed by microwave fast derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry operated in selected ion monitoring mode. The procedure was linear between 5 and 600ng/mL, with determination coefficients higher than 0.99 for all analytes. Intra- and interday precision ranged from 0.1 to 13.6%, while accuracy variability was within 80-120% interval from the nominal concentration at all studied levels. The extraction efficiencies ranged from 76.6 to 112.8%. Stability was considered acceptable for all compounds in the studied matrices. The developed assay was applied to authentic samples of the Laboratory of Chemistry and Forensic Toxicology, Centre Branch, of the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences, Portugal. PMID:26994330

  2. Validation of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the quantification of aerosolized Jet Propellant 8.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Katherine D; Campbell, Jerry L; Bartlett, Michael G; Witten, Mark L; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2005-11-01

    Jet Propellant 8 (JP-8) jet fuel is a kerosene-based fuel containing hundreds of hydrocarbons used by the military in NATO countries. Previous rodent inhalation studies carried out with aerosolized JP-8 never evaluated the exposure chamber atmosphere. For this reason, our laboratory developed an analytical method, with an accuracy of better than 80% and precision of better than 20%, for JP-8 aerosol and vapor samples using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A method was developed for quantification of selected individual components of JP-8 and for the total amount of JP-8 in aerosolized fuel. A 34 component surrogate hydrocarbon mixture (SHM) was developed and used for simultaneous analysis of the individual components. Three separate runs containing a standard curve and five replicates each at the selected concentrations were analyzed for both the SHM and neat JP-8. The resulting interday accuracy (100-percent relative error) and precision (relative standard deviation) values for the SHM were 86.5% or better and 8.0% or better, respectively. The intraday accuracy and precision values ranged from 99.29% to 84.50% and 0.97% to 12.4%, respectively. For the total amount of JP-8 in aerosol and vapor, the interday accuracy was 83.7% or better and interday precision was 7.0% or better. The intraday accuracy and precision values ranged from 94.8% to 80.4% and 2.4% to 10.5%, respectively. We then used this method to analyze samples collected from an inhalation chamber. From the data obtained, we are able to account for approximately 40-44% of the mass of the aerosol portion and 68-70% of the mass of the vapor portion. The aerosol represented 6-10% of the total mass of the aerosolized JP-8 fuel with the remaining portion being the vapor. From these experiments individual components were identified for further in vivo and in vitro toxicological testing. PMID:16233866

  3. Profiling oestrogens and testosterone in human urine by stable isotope dilution/benchtop gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Philipp; Hartmann, Michaela F; Remer, Thomas; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Wudy, Stefan A

    2010-12-12

    Oestrogens, such as oestrone (E(1)), 17β-oestradiol (E(2)), oestriol (E(3)) and their biologically active metabolites 2-methoxyoestrone (2-MeOE(1)), 2-hydroxyoestradiol (2-OHE(2)) 16-ketooestradiol (16-OE(2)), 16-epioestriol (16-epiE(3)), as well as testosterone (T) play an important role in physiological and pathological developmental processes during human development. We therefore aimed at developing an isotope dilution/bench top gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (ID/GC-MS) method, based on benchtop GC-MS, for the simultaneous determination ('profiling') of the above analytes in children. The method consisted of equilibration of urine (5 ml) with a cocktail containing stable isotope-labelled analogues of the analytes as internal standards ([2,4-(2)H(2)]E(1), [2,4,16,16-(2)H(4)]E(2), [2,4,17-(2)H(3)]E(3), [16,16,17-(2)H(3)]T, [1,4,16,16-(2)H(4)]2-MeOE(1), [1,4,16,16,17-(2)H(5)]2-OHE(2), [2,4,15,15,17-(2)H(5)]16-OE(2) and [2,4-(2)H(2)]16-epiE(3)). Then, solid-phase extraction (C(18) cartridges), enzymatic hydrolysis (sulphatase from Helix pomatia (type H-1)), re-extraction, purification by anion exchange chromatography and derivatisation to trimethylsilyl ethers followed. The samples were analysed by GC-MS (Agilent GC 6890N/5975MSD; fused silica capillary column 25 m × 0.2 mm i.d., film 0.10 μm). Calibration plots were linear and showed excellent reproducibility with coefficients of determination (r(2)) between 0.999 and 1.000. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were <2.21% for all quantified metabolites. Sensitivity was highest for 2-OHE(2) (0.25 pg per absolute injection: signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)=3) and lowest for 16-epiE(3) (2 pg per absolute injection: S/N=2.6), translating into corresponding urine sample analyte concentrations of 0.025 ng ml(-1) and 0.2 ng ml(-1), respectively. Accuracy - determined in a two-level spike experiment - showed relative errors ranging between 0.15% for 16-OE(2) and 11.63% for 2-OHE(2). Chromatography showed clear peak shapes for the components analysed. In summary, we describe a practical, sensitive and specific ID/GC-MS assay capable of profiling the above-mentioned steroids in human urine from childhood onwards. PMID:20619283

  4. Bicyclic naphthenic acids in oil sands process water: identification by comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Michael J; West, Charles E; Scarlett, Alan G; Jones, David; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-01-23

    Although bicyclic acids have been reported to be the major naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) and a well-accepted screening assay indicated that some bicyclics were the most acutely toxic acids tested, none have yet been identified. Here we show by comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), that >100 C8-15 bicyclic acids are typically present in OSPW. Synthesis or purchase allowed us to establish the GC×GC retention times of methyl esters of numerous of these and the mass spectra and published spectra of some additional types, allowed us to identify bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane, bicyclo[3.2.1]octane, bicyclo[4.3.0]nonane, bicyclo[3.3.1]nonane and bicyclo[4.4.0]decane acids in OSPW and a bicyclo[2.2.2]octane acid in a commercial acid mixture. The retention positions of authentic bicyclo[3.3.0]octane and bicyclo[4.2.0]octane carboxylic acid methyl esters and published retention indices, showed these were also possibilities, as were bicyclo[3.1.1]heptane acids. Bicyclo[5.3.0]decane and cyclopentylcyclopentane carboxylic acids were ruled out in the samples analysed, on the basis that the corresponding alkanes eluted well after bicyclo[4.4.0]decane (latest eluting acids). Bicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, bicyclo[3.2.2]nonane, bicyclo[3.3.2]decane, bicyclo[4.2.2]decane and spiro[4.5]decane carboxylic acids could not be ruled out or in, as no authentic compounds or literature data were available. Mass spectra of the methyl esters of the higher bicyclic C12-15 acids suggested that many were simply analogues of the acids identified above, with longer alkanoate chains and/or alkyl substituents. Our hypothesis is that these acids represent the biotransformation products of the initially somewhat more bio-resistant bicyclanes of petroleum. Although remediation studies suggest that many bicyclic acids can be relatively quickly removed from suitably treated OSPW, examination by GC×GC-MS may show which isomers are affected most. Knowledge of the structures will allow the toxicity of any residual isomers to be calculated and measured. PMID:25553910

  5. Pressurized liquid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fragrance allergens, musks, phthalates and preservatives in baby wipes.

    PubMed

    Celeiro, Maria; Lamas, J Pablo; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Baby wipes and wet toilet paper are specific hygiene care daily products used on newborn and children skin. These products may contain complexes mixtures of harmful chemicals. A method based on pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of sixty-five chemical compounds (fragrance allergens, preservatives, musks, and phthalates) in wipes and wet toilet paper for children. These compounds are legislated in Europe according Regulation EC No 1223/2009, being twelve of them banned for their use in cosmetics, and one of them, 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC), is banned in products intended for children under 3 years. Also, propyl-, and butylparaben will be prohibited in leave-on cosmetic products designed for application on the nappy area of children under 3 years from April 2015. PLE is a fast, simple, easily automated technique, which permits to integrate a clean-up step during the extraction process reducing analysis time and stages. The proposed PLE-based procedure was optimized on real non-spiked baby wipe samples by means of experimental design to study the influence on extraction of parameters such as extraction solvent, temperature, extraction time, and sorbent type. Under the selected conditions, the method was validated showing satisfactory linearity, and intra-day, and inter-day precision. Recoveries were between 80-115% for most of the compounds with relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 15%. Finally, twenty real samples were analyzed. Thirty-six of the target analytes were detected, highlighting the presence of phenoxyethanol in all analyzed samples at high concentration levels (up to 0.8%, 800μgg(-1)). Methyl paraben (MeP), and ethyl paraben (EtP) were found in 40-50% of the samples, and the recently banned isobutyl paraben (iBuP) and isopropyl paraben (iPrP), were detected in one and seven samples, respectively, at concentrations between 0.093 and 247μgg(-1). In the case of phthalates, the forbidden phthalates dibutyl phtalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) were also found in thirteen samples at low levels. All the samples contained fragrance allergens in many cases at high levels (up to 2400μgg(-1)) and three musks were detected in the samples. Excluding the banned compounds, all samples complied with the concentration limits established by the European Regulation although 25% of them did not fulfill the labeling requirements for fragrance allergens. PMID:25662066

  6. Simultaneous determination of amphetamine-type stimulants and cannabinoids in fingernails by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Cheong, Jae Chul; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Jae Il; In, Moon Kyo

    2008-06-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous detection and quantification of four amphetamine-type stimulants (amphetamine (AP), methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)) and two cannabinoids (Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCCOOH)) in fingernails. Fingernail clippings (30 mg) were washed with distilled water and methanol, and then incubated in 1.0 M sodium hydroxide at 95 degrees C for 30 min. The compounds of interest were isolated by liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization with N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) at 70 degrees C for 15 min. The derivatized compounds were analyzed by GC-MS in the selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The linear ranges were 0.1-15.0 ng/mg for AP, 0.2-15.0 ng/mg for MDA, Delta9-THC and THCCOOH, and 0.2-30.0 ng/mg for MA and MDMA, with good correlation coefficients (r2 > 0.9991). The intra-day, inter-day, and inter-person precisions were within 10.6%, 6.3%, and 5.3%, respectively. The intra-day, inter-day and inter-person accuracies were between -6.1 and 5.0%, -6.2 and 5.7%, and -6.4 and 5.6%, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) for each compound were lower than 0.056 and 0.2 ng/mg, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 74.0-94.8%. Positive GC-MS results were obtained from specimens of nine suspected MA or cannabis abusers. The concentration ranges of MA, AP, and THCCOOH were 0.10-1.41, 0.12-2.64, and 0.20 ng/mg, respectively. Based on these results, the method proved to be effective for the simultaneous qualification and quantification of amphetamine-type stimulants and cannabinoids in fingernails. PMID:18563365

  7. Trimethylsilyl speciations of cathine, cathinone and norephedrine followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry: Direct sample preparation and analysis of khatamines.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Borbála; Fodor, Blanka; Boldizsár, Imre; Molnár-Perl, Ibolya

    2016-04-01

    A literature criticism is given on methods using currently gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine cathine (CAT), cathinone (CTN) and norephedrine (NE), jointly khatamines. In this study, khatamines' oximation, trimethylsilylation and mass fragmentation properties-applying N-Methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA), its trimethyliodosilane (TMIS) catalyst containing version (MSTFA(TMIS)), N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-was highlighted, at first. Derivatization, mass fragmentation and quantitation related, optimized model investigations have been carried out as a function of the reaction times and conditions. Special emphasis was put (i) on the stability of the primarily formed (CAT-2TMS, NE-2TMS, CTN-TMS(TMS-oximes)1,2), then transformed, fully derived (CAT-3TMS, NE-3MTS, CTN-2TMS(TMS-oximes)1,2) species, and, (ii) on the proportionally formed stable products, suitable to selective quantitation of all three natural amines, simultaneously. Results, as novelty to the field confirmed that (i) TMIS catalyzed trimethylsilyation triggers to form fully derivatized species unfortunately, in part only; while, (ii) khatamines' simultaneous quantitation needs to be carried out in a two steps derivatization process consisting of oximation (1st step, hydroxylamine in pyridine) and trimethylsilylation (2nd step, MSTFA), to the CAT-2TMS, NE-2TMS, CTN-TMS(TMS-oximes)1,2. These species were characterized with their retention, mass fragmentation and analytical performance properties, in model solutions and in the presence of plant tissues, as well: R(2), limit of quantitation (LOQ) data, expressed in pg/1μL injection basis, proved to be 62.5pg (CAT), 20pg (NE) and 62.5pg (CTN), respectively. The practical utility of proposal was enormously enhanced by the novel, direct sample preparation method. In this process, the freshly harvested, freeze-dried, then pulverized leaves of Catha edulis FORKS were directly derivatized, in the presence of the matrix. Reproducibility (in average 2.07 RSD% varying between 0.15 and 5.5 RSD%), linearity (0.9990-0.9994) and recovery (95.7-99.1%) values of the new sample preparation protocol was confirmed by the standard addition method for CAT, NE and CTN equally. From plant leaf, 0.061w/w% CAT and 0.014w/w% NE contents were obtained. In this tissue CTN was not found. Very likely attributable to the unfavorable climate for the plant: grown in Hungary of temperate zone and naturalized in the tropical Africa. PMID:26928873

  8. Facts about the artifacts in the measurement of oxidative DNA base damage by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, M

    1998-12-01

    Recently, several papers reported an artifactual formation of a number of modified bases from intact DNA bases during derivatization of DNA hydrolysates to be analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These reports dealt with 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-Gua), 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OH-Cyt), 8-hydroxyadenine (8-OH-Ade), 5-hydroxymethyluracil (5-OHMeUra) and 5-formyluracil that represent only a small percentage of the 20 or so modified DNA bases that can be analyzed by GC/MS. Removal of intact DNA bases by prepurification of calf thymus DNA hydrolysates using HPLC was shown to prevent artifactual formation of these modified bases during derivatization. It needs to be emphasized that the procedures for hydrolysis of DNA and derivatization of DNA hydrolysates used in these papers substantially differed from the established procedures previously described. Furthermore, a large number of relevant papers reporting the levels of these modified bases in DNA of various sources have been ignored. Interestingly, the levels of modified bases reported in the literature were not as high as those reported prior to prepurification. Most values for the level of 5-OH-Cyt were even lower than the level measured after prepurification. Levels of 8-OH-Ade were quite close to, or even the same as, or smaller than the level reported after prepurification. The same holds true for 5-OHMeUra and 8-OH-Gua. All these facts raise the question of the validity of the claims about the measurement of these modified DNA bases by GC/MS. A recent paper reported a complete destruction of 2, 6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (Fapy-Gua) and 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde) by formic acid under the conditions of DNA hydrolysis prior to GC/MS. The complete destruction of FapyGua and FapyAde by formic acid is in disagreement with the data on these compounds in the literature. These two compounds were measured by GC/MS following formic acid hydrolysis for many years in our laboratory and by other researchers with no difficulties. These facts clearly raise the question of the validity of the claims made about the previous measurements of these compounds by GC/MS. PMID:10098459

  9. A new reliable sample preparation for high throughput focused steroid profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Anizan, Sébastien; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Monteau, Fabrice; Cesbron, Nora; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2010-10-22

    The use of steroid hormones as growth promoters in cattle has been banned within the European Union since 1988 but can still be fraudulently employed in animal breeding farms for anabolic purposes. If an efficient monitoring of synthetic compounds (screening and confirmation) is ensured today by many laboratories, pointing out suspicious samples from a natural steroids abuse remains a tricky challenge due to the difficulty to set relevant threshold levels for these endogenous compounds. The development of focused profiling or untargeted metabolomic approaches is then emerging in this context, with the objective to reveal potential biomarkers signing an exogenous administration of such natural steroids. This study aimed to assess sample preparation procedures based on microextraction and adapt them to high throughput urinary profiling or metabolomic analyses based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurement. Two techniques have been tested and optimised, namely solid phase microextraction (SPME) and microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS), using five model steroid metabolites (16α-hydroxyandrosterone, 2α-hydroxytestosterone, 11-keto,5β-androstanedione, 6α-hydroxyestradiol and 7β-hydroxypregnenolone). The considered performance criteria included not only the absolute response of the targeted compounds but also the robustness of the materials, and the global aspect of the diagnostic ion chromatograms obtained. After only five successive urinary extractions, a clear degradation of the SPME fiber was observed which led to discard this method as a relevant technique for profiling, whereas no degradation was observed on MEPS sorbent. Repeatability and recovery yields were calculated from urine samples fortified at 500 μg L⁻¹ and extracted by MEPS. They were found respectively below 11% and above 60% for all model compounds. Detection limits were in the 5-15 μg L⁻¹ range depending on the compounds, and a good linearity was observed on the 10-75 μg L⁻¹ range (R² > 0.99). This methodology was applied on urine samples collected from control versus androstenedione-treated bovines, revealing a significant concentration increase for several well-known metabolites such as etiocholanolone, 5α-androstane-3β,17α-diol, 5β-androstane-3α,17α-diol and 5-androstene-3β,17α-diol. Finally, these results allowed to confirm the suitability of the developed strategy and give to this new MEPS application a promising interest in the field of GC-MS based steroid profiling and metabolomic. PMID:20537338

  10. Determination of alkyl anilines and alkyl pyridines in solvent refined coal distillates and aqueous extracts by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, L.T.

    1982-05-01

    Derivatization with acetic anhydride in aqueous media coupled with capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to distinguish alkyl anilines from alkyl pyridines. By use of this approach aniline, C-1 anilines, and C-2 anilines, as well as lesser quantities of C-2 pyridines and C-3 pyridines, were positively identified in a solvent refined coal (SRC-II) blended distillate and in an aqueous extract of the distillate. The extraction procedure and acetylation conditions employed were examined in detail and found suitable for quantitative analysis when combined with capillary gas chromatography.

  11. Analysis of pharmaceutical and other organic wastewater compounds in filtered and unfiltered water samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Phillips, Patrick; Smith, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effects of exposure of stream biota to complex mixtures of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds associated with wastewater requires the development of additional analytical capabilities for these compounds in water samples. Two gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analytical methods used at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to analyze organic compounds associated with wastewater were adapted to include additional pharmaceutical and other organic compounds beginning in 2009. This report includes a description of method performance for 42 additional compounds for the filtered-water method (hereafter referred to as the filtered method) and 46 additional compounds for the unfiltered-water method (hereafter referred to as the unfiltered method). The method performance for the filtered method described in this report has been published for seven of these compounds; however, the addition of several other compounds to the filtered method and the addition of the compounds to the unfiltered method resulted in the need to document method performance for both of the modified methods. Most of these added compounds are pharmaceuticals or pharmaceutical degradates, although two nonpharmaceutical compounds are included in each method. The main pharmaceutical compound classes added to the two modified methods include muscle relaxants, opiates, analgesics, and sedatives. These types of compounds were added to the original filtered and unfiltered methods largely in response to the tentative identification of a wide range of pharmaceutical and other organic compounds in samples collected from wastewater-treatment plants. Filtered water samples are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Unfiltered samples are extracted by using continuous liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. The compounds of interest for filtered and unfiltered sample types were determined by use of the capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The performance of each method was assessed by using data on recoveries of compounds in fortified surface-water, wastewater, and reagent-water samples. These experiments (referred to as spike experiments) consist of fortifying (or spiking) samples with known amounts of target analytes. Surface-water-spike experiments were performed by using samples obtained from a stream in Colorado (unfiltered method) and a stream in New York (filtered method). Wastewater spike experiments for both the filtered and unfiltered methods were performed by using a treated wastewater obtained from a single wastewater treatment plant in New York. Surface water and wastewater spike experiments were fortified at both low and high concentrations and termed low- and high-level spikes, respectively. Reagent water spikes were assessed in three ways: (1) set spikes, (2) a low-concentration fortification experiment, and (3) a high-concentration fortification experiment. Set spike samples have been determined since 2009, and consist of analysis of fortified reagent water for target compounds included for each group of 10 to18 environmental samples analyzed at the NWQL. The low-concentration and high-concentration reagent spike experiments, by contrast, represent a one-time assessment of method performance. For each spike experiment, mean recoveries ranging from 60 to 130 percent indicate low bias, and relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than ( Of the compounds included in the filtered method, 21 had mean recoveries ranging from 63 to 129 percent for the low-level and high-level surface-water spikes, and had low ()132 percent]. For wastewater spikes, 24 of the compounds included in the filtered method had recoveries ranging from 61 to 130 percent for the low-level and high-level spikes. RSDs were 130 percent) or variable recoveries (RSDs >30 percent) for low-level wastewater spikes, or low recoveries ( Of the compounds included in the unfiltered method, 17 had mean spike recoveries ranging from 74 to 129 percent and RSDs ranging from 5 to 25 percent for low-level and high-level surface water spikes. The remaining compounds had poor mean recoveries (130 percent), or high RSDs (>29 percent) for these spikes. For wastewater, 14 of the compounds included in the unfiltered method had mean recoveries ranging from 62 to 127 percent and RSDs 130 percent), or low mean recoveries (33 percent) for the low-level wastewater spikes. Of the compounds found in wastewater, 24 had mean set spike recoveries ranging from 64 to 104 percent and RSDs Separate method detection limits (MDLs) were computed for surface water and wastewater for both the filtered and unfiltered methods. Filtered method MDLs ranged from 0.007 to 0.14 microgram per liter (μg/L) for the surface water matrix and from 0.004 to 0.62 μg/L for the wastewater matrix. Unfiltered method MDLs ranged from 0.014 to 0.33 μg/L for the surface water matrix and from 0.008 to 0.36 μg/L for the wastewater matrix.

  12. Titan's Organic Aerosols : Molecular Composition And Structure Inferred From Systematic Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisson, Marietta; Szopa, Cyril; Buch, Arnaud; Carrasco, Nathalie; Gautier, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In spite of numerous studies carried out to characterize the chemical composition of laboratory analogues of Titan aerosols (tholins), their molecular composition as well as their structuration are still little known. If Pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Pyr-GCMS) has been used for years to give clues about this composition, the highly disparate results obtained show that they can be attributed to the analytical conditions used, to differences in the nature of the analogues studied, or both. In order to have a better description of Titan's tholins molecular composition, we led a systematic analysis of these materials by pyr-GCMS, exploring the analytical parameters to estimate the biases this technique can induce. With this aim, we used the PAMPRE experiment, a capacitively coupled RF cold plasma reactor (Szopa et al. 2006), to synthetize tholins with 2%, 5% and 10% of CH4 in N2. The three samples were systematically pyrolyzed in the temperature range 200-600°C with a 100°C step. The evolved gases were then injected into a GC-MS device for molecular identification. This systematic pyr-GC-MS analysis had two major objectives: (i) optimizing all the analytical parameters for the detection of a wide range of compounds and thus a characterization of the tholins composition as comprehensive as possible, and (ii) highlighting the role of the CH4 ratio on the tholins molecular structure. About a hundred of molecules have been identified in the pyrolysis products. Although an identical major pattern of nitriles and ethylene appears clearly for the three samples, some discriminant signatures were highlighted. The samples mainly differ by the number of released compounds. The results show especially an increase in the hydrocarbonaceous chains when the CH4 ratio increases. At the opposite, the formation of poly-nitrogenous compounds seems to be easier for lower CH4 ratios. We also performed a semi-quantitative study on the best represented chemical family in our chromatograms - namely nitriles: the existence of a relation between the quantity of a released compound and its molecular mass is consistent with the quantification of nitriles in the PAMPRE gas phase done by Gautier et al., 2011. Moreover, numerous species are present both in tholins and in the gas phase. That allowed us to make out potential precursors of the solid organic particles. From all these results, we conclude that the optimal pyrolysis temperature for a GC-MS analysis of our tholins is 600°C. This temperature choice results from the best compromise between the number of released compounds, the quality of the signal and the appearance of pyrolysis artefacts. Lastly, thanks to a review of pyr-GCMS studies carried out on Titan tholins since the first work of Khare et al. (1981), we compared all the previous analyses between them and with our own results in order to better understand the differences. References B. N. Khare et al., Icarus, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 290-297, Nov. 1981. C. Szopa et al., Planet. Space Sci., vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 394-404, Apr. 2006. T. Gautier et al., Icarus, vol. 213, no. 2, pp. 625-635, Jun. 2011.

  13. Chapter 3. Determination of semivolatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Burbank, Teresa L.; Olson, Mary C.; Iverson, Jana L.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 38 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semivolatile organic compounds in solid samples is described. Samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from the solid sample twice at 13,800 kilopascals; first at 120 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (50:50, volume-to-volume ratio), and then the sample is extracted at 200 degrees Celsius using a water/isopropyl alcohol mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio). The compounds are isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing divinylbenzene-vinylpyrrolidone copolymer resin. The cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted from the SPE material using a dichloromethane/diethyl ether mixture (80:20, volume-to-volume ratio) and passed through a sodium sulfate/Florisil SPE cartridge to remove residual water and to further clean up the extract. The concentrated extract is solvent exchanged into ethyl acetate and the solvent volume reduced to 0.5 milliliter. Internal standard compounds are added prior to analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Comparisons of PAH data for 28 sediment samples extracted by Soxhlet and the accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) method described in this report produced similar results. Extraction of PAH compounds from standard reference material using this method also compared favorably with Soxhlet extraction. The recoveries of PAHs less than molecular weight 202 (pyrene or fluoranthene) are higher by up to 20 percent using this ASE method, whereas the recoveries of PAHs greater than or equal to molecular weight 202 are equivalent. This ASE method of sample extraction of solids has advantages over conventional Soxhlet extraction by increasing automation of the extraction process, reducing extraction time, and using less solvent. Extract cleanup also is greatly simplified because SPE replaces commonly used gel permeation chromatography. The performance of the method (as expressed by mean recoveries and mean precision) was determined using Ottawa sand, a commercially available topsoil, and an environmental stream sediment, fortified at 1.5 and 15 micrograms per compound. Recoveries of PAH and semivolatile compounds in Ottawa sand samples fortified at 1.5 micrograms averaged 88 percent ? 9.4 percent relative standard deviation, and calculated initial method detection limits per compound averaged 14 micrograms per kilogram, assuming a 25-gram sample size. The recovery for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene is less than 60 percent; thus, the concentration of this compound will always be reported as estimated with the E remark code. The analysis of 25 alkylated PAH homolog groups also can be determined with this method with extra data analysis and review, but because of the lack of authentic reference standard compounds, these results are considered to be semiquantitative. The PAH homolog groups are quantitated using the response factor of a parent PAH method compound, if available. Precision data for the alkylated PAH homologs detected in a marine sediment standard reference material (SRM 1944) also are presented to document and demonstrate method capability.

  14. Determination of the chemical composition of titan4s aerosols analogues using pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Carrasco, N.

    2013-12-01

    The in situ chemical characterization of Titan's aerosols with the ACP-GCMS (Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyze-Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer) experiments onboard the Cassini-Huygens mission showed that the aerosols heated at 600°C were releasing two main gaseous compounds: NH3 and HCN. To better understand the process of production of these species at high temperature, and their relationship to the solid aerosol composition, it is possible to mimic in laboratory the Titan's atmosphere chemistry to produce analogues of Titan's aerosols (tholins), chemical and physical properties of which can be studied with laboratory instrumentation. In the present work, we studied the thermal decomposition of tholins produced with the PAMPRE cold plasma experiment[1]. For this study, pyrolysis at various temperatures, coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Pyr-GCMS), has been used in order to understand the origin and formation mechanism of the NH3 and HCN compounds. With this aim, two samples were produced using different initial CH4/N2 gaseous mixtures with different concentration ratios: (5:95) and (10:90). Pyr-GCMS was applied to characterize their chemical composition and molecule structure. In order to study the evolution of chemical compounds released as a function of temperature, the final pyrolysis temperature has been set from 100°C to 900°C with a 100°C step increment. The results show that the major compounds released are similar for the two different studied samples. They include hydrocarbon compounds, nitriles, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, and some pyrrole isomers. Moreover, whatever the final temperature is, acetonitrile is the most abundant compound released by the samples. At 100°C only water contribution can be detected. Then the number of compounds released increases with the temperature up to 600°C. With the temperature increase the nature of the gaseous species detected does not change significantly. Pyrrole was not detected until the temperature exceeds 600°C for (5:95) sample and 400°C for (10:90) sample. Benzene has also been detected at 800°C for the (5:95) sample and 700°C for (10:90) sample. In the same way, toluene has been detected for the (10:90) sample at 700°C but it has not been detected for the (5:95) sample. This could indicate that carbon percentage is directly related to the benzene and toluene production. HCN and NH3 as the major compounds detected in the ACP instrument were also found in our results. It confirms that the aerosol analogues produced in PAMPRE set-up are among the most similar to Titan's aerosols, as found in [2]. [1] C. Szopa, G. Cernogora, L. Boufendi, et al. : PAMPRE: A dusty plasma experiment for Titan's tholins production and study, Planetary and Space Science, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 394-404, 2006. [2] P. Coll, R. Navarro-González, C. Szopa, et al. : Can laboratory tholins mimic the chemistry producing Titan's aerosols? A review in light of ACP experimental results, Planetary and Space Science, vol. 77, pp. 91-103, 2013.

  15. Plant- versus microbial signature in densimetric fractions of mediterranean forest soils: a study by thermochemolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovira, Pere; Grasset, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Plant- versus microbial signature in densimetric fractions of mediterranean forest soils: a study by thermochemolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry The ageing of a given organic substrate decomposing in soil is strongly dependant of its microbial utilization and transformation (reworking) by the soil microflora. How far a given substrate or soil fraction has gone in this evolution is usually measured by means of molecular signatures, ratios between organic compounds which enlighten us about the origin and/or the degree of microbial reworking of a specific group of compounds: lipids, proteins, lignin, carbohydrates, etc. Owing to the biochemical heterogeneity of decomposing substrates it is unlikely that the degree of microbial reworking can be approached with a single signature. Applying a couple of them is much better, but obtaining a wide collection of molecular signatures can be time consuming. Here, instead of applying specific methods to obtain a collection of specific signatures, we apply TMAH-thermochemolysis to obtain a panoramic view of the biochemical composition of a series of densimetric fractions of soils. From the compounds identified after TMAH-thermochemolysis, a collection of indicators was obtained: (a) ratio between short and long-chained linear alkanoic acids; (b) ratio between branched and long-chained linear alkanoic acids; (c) ratio between C16 and total alpha-omega-alkanedioic acids; (d) ratio microbial to plant-derived 1-methoxyalkanes; (e) ratio syringyl to total lignin-derived phenolic compounds; (f) vanillic acid to vanillin ratio; (g) fucose/glucose ratio; and (h) xylose/glucose ratio. From these indicators a single numerical value is distilled, allowing to order a couple of densimetric fractions of soil organic matter according to its degree of microbial reworking. This approach was applied to the comparison of a couple of densimetric fractions of soil organic matter of three organic H horizons from mediterranean forest soils. Fractions were obtained by a sequential extraction with sodium polytungstate (NaPT) at density 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0, after ultrasonic disintegration of the sample. Before ultrasonic treatment, a previous extraction was done with NaPT d = 1.6, to isolate the free light fraction. Results were overall consistent in the sense that occluded fractions of density <1.8, and particularly those of density < 1.6, appear as the most microbially evolved. The free light fraction was overall the most fresh-, least evolved fraction. The dense fraction (d > 2.0), made of organomineral complexes with fine silt plus clay, was overall fresh and poorly microbially reworked. Our future work will be the application of this approach to the study of complete soil profiles and soil fractions, thus allowing to obtain a panoramic view of the stabilization of soil organic matter at different depths.

  16. Examination of the enantiomeric distribution of certain monoterpene hydrocarbons in selected essential oils by automated solid-phase microextraction-chiral gas chromatography-mass selective detection.

    PubMed

    Coleman, W M; Lawrence, B M

    2000-03-01

    A viable approach for the determination of sources of essential oils based on automatic injection solid-phase microextraction-chiral-gas chromatography-mass selective detection is demonstrated. With no sample preparation, it is shown that the source of essential oils such as peppermint, spearmint, and rosemary can be easily distinguished. Short fiber exposure times of approximately 6 s to the headspace above submicroliter quantities of the selected oils are all that is required to obtain both the required sensitivity and resolution to afford analyses with excellent reproducibilities (relative standard deviation values consistently less than 5.0%). PMID:10702916

  17. Commonly Practiced Quality Control and Quality Assurance Procedures for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis in Forensic Urine Drug-Testing Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, B A; Huestis, M A; Wilkins, D G

    1997-12-01

    Forensic urine drug-testing laboratories operate in a prescribed scientific and administrative manner to ensure accurate test results. All specimens positive by an initial immunoassay test must be confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). To provide adequate control and verification of these analytical processes, laboratories must implement appropriate policies and procedures to be used in routine practice. This review describes the following topics regarding GC/MS analyses: method validation, instrument performance, assay calibration, quality control, criteria for designating a positive test result, sample and batch acceptance criteria, and GC/MS data review. PMID:26269941

  18. Application of high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to the investigation of glycosidically bound components related to cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L. Var. Nanum) volatiles.

    PubMed

    Bicalho, B; Pereira, A S; Aquino Neto, F R; Pinto, A C; Rezende, C M

    2000-04-01

    Free and bound volatile components of a Brazilian cashew apple variety (Anacardium occidentale L. var. nanum) were obtained by simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE) and XAD-2 adsorption. According to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and retention indices, 62 free volatile constituents were characterized and quantified. They were esters (40%), terpenes (20%), hydrocarbons (14%), fatty acids (9%), aldehydes (8%), alcohols (3%), lactones (3%), ketones (1%), phenols (1%), and norisoprenoids (1%). The glycosidically bound volatile precursors were analyzed by high-temperature GC-MS, after room temperature silylation. Several conjugated alcohols and cinnamic acids were detected and reported as cashew apple glycosyl constituents for the first time. PMID:10775367

  19. Analysis of vinylidene chloride and 1-chlorobutane in foods packaged with polyvinylidene chloride casing films by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Ohno, H; Kawamura, Y

    2006-08-01

    A headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed for the simultaneous determination of vinylidene chloride and 1-chlorobutane in foods packaged with polyvinylidene chloride casing films. The solid foodstuff was homogenized with an equal mass of distilled water. The homogenate was incubated for 1 h at 90 degrees C in a sealed headspace vial, and the headspace gas was then analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in selected ion-monitoring mode using a bonded porous polymer-coated capillary column. The recovery rates of vinylidene chloride and 1-chlorobutane in foodstuffs were 94.5-103.9 and 85.8-120.3%, respectively. Among 13 samples tested, vinylidene chloride was detected at 0.001-0.020 microg g(-1) in 11 foodstuffs, and 1-chlorobutane was detected at 0.004-0.040 microg g(-1) in all 13 foodstuffs. Furthermore, vinylidene chloride was detected at 0.04 microg g(-1) in one casing film, and 1-chlorobutane was detected in all casing films. The results indicate that these compounds migrated from the casing films into the foodstuffs. PMID:16807210

  20. Determination of pesticide residues in nonfatty foods by supercritical fluid extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Lehotay, Steven J

    2002-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted to determine multiple pesticide residues in apple, green bean, and carrot by using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seventeen laboratories from 7 countries participated in the final study, and a variety of different instruments was used by collaborators. The procedure simply entails 3 steps: (1) mix 1.1 g drying agent (Hydromatrix) per 1 g frozen precomminuted sample, and load 4-5.5 g of this mixture into a 7-10 mL extraction vessel; (2) perform SFE for 20-30 min with a 1-2 mL/min flow rate of carbon dioxide at 0.85 g/mL density (320 atm, 60 degrees C); and (3) inject the extract, which was collected on a solid-phase or in a liquid trap, into the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer, using either an ion-trap instrument in full-scan mode or a quadrupole-type instrument in selected-ion monitoring mode. The ability of GC/MS to simultaneously quantitate and confirm the identity of the semivolatile analytes at trace concentrations is a strong feature of the approach. The selectivity of SFE and GC/MS avoids the need for post-extraction cleanup steps, and the conversion of the CO2 solvent to a gas after SFE eliminates the solvent evaporation step common in traditional methods. The approach has several advantages, but its main drawback is the lower recoveries for the most polar analytes, such as methamidophos and acephate, and the most nonpolar analytes, such as pyrethroids. Recoveries for most pesticides are >75%, and recoveries of nonpolar analytes are still >50%. The (within-laboratory) repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) values of the recoveries are generally <15%. More specifically, the average results from the 9-14 laboratories in the final analysis of 6 blind duplicates at 3 concentrations for each pesticide are as follows: carbofuran in apple (75-500 ng/g), 89% recovery, 7% RSDr, 9% reproducibility relative standard deviation (RSDR); diazinon in apple (60-400 ng/g), 83% recovery, 13% RSDr, 17% RSDR; vinclozolin in apple (6-400 ng/g), 97% recovery, 13% RSDr, 18% RSDR; chlorpyrifos in apple (50-300 ng/g), 105% recovery, 11% RSDr, 13% RSDR; endosulfan sulfate in apple (150-1000 ng/g), 95% recovery, 15% RSDr, 17% RSDR; trifluralin in green bean (30-200 ng/g), 58% recovery, 11% RSDr, 27% RSDR; dacthal in green bean (60-400 ng/g), 88% recovery, 11% RSDr, 17% RSDR; quintozene in green bean (60-400 ng/g), 79% recovery, 13% RSDr, 18% RSDR; chlorpyrifos in green bean (50-300 ng/g), 84% recovery, 11% RSDr, 17% RSDR; p,p'-DDE in green bean (45-300 ng/g), 64% recovery, 14% RSDr, 27% RSDR; atrazine in carrot (75-500 ng/g), 90% recovery, 11% RSDr, 15% RSDR; metalaxyl in carrot (75-500 ng/g), 89% recovery, 8% RSDr, 12% RSDR; parathion-methyl in carrot (75-500 ng/g), 84% recovery, 14% RSDr, 15% RSDR; chlorpyrifos in carrot (50-300 ng/g), 77% recovery, 13% RSDr, 19% RSDR; and bifenthrin in carrot (90-600 ng/g), 63% recovery, 12% RSDr, and 25% RSDR. All analytes except for the nonpolar compounds trifluralin, p,p'-DDE, and bifenthrin gave average Horwitz ratios of <1.0 when AOAC criteria were used. These 3 analytes had high RSDr values but lower RSDR values, which indicated that certain SFE instruments gave consistently lower recoveries for nonpolar compounds. The collaborative study results demonstrate that the method meets the purpose of many monitoring programs for pesticide residue analysis, and the Study Director recommends that it be adopted Official First Action. PMID:12374416

  1. Determination of breath gas composition of lung cancer patients using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with monolithic material sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen; Gao, Peng; Fan, Jun; Hashi, Yuki; Chen, Zilin

    2015-06-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method with monolithic material sorptive extraction (MMSE) pretreatment was developed to determine the breath gas composition in lung cancer patients. MonoTrap silica monolithic and hybrid adsorbent was selected as the extraction medium during MMSE, given its strong capacity to extract volatile organic compounds (VOC) from exhaled gas. Under the appropriate conditions, high extraction efficiency was achieved. Using the selected ion-monitoring mode, the limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio 3) for the benzene series was 0.012-2.172?ng?L(-1) . The limit of quantitation (signal-to-noise ratio, 10) was 0.042-7.24?ng?L(-1) . The linearity range of the method was 4-400?ng?L(-1) . Average recovery of the benzene series at lower concentrations was 65-74% (20?ng?L(-1) ). The relative standard deviation of benzene series contents determined within the linear range of detection was <10% of the mean level determined. Our proposed method is simple, rapid and sensitive, and can be competently applied to determine the breath gas composition of lung cancer patients. PMID:25421853

  2. Quantitative analysis of exogenous peptides in plasma using immobilized enzyme cleavage and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Márquez, C D; Lee, M L; Weintraub, S T; Smith, P C

    1997-10-24

    A method is presented for the analysis of peptides in plasma at picomole to femtomole levels. Peptides are isolated from plasma by solid-phase extraction, the peptide of interest is purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and selectively digested using immobilized trypsin or chymotrypsin to yield specific di- or tripeptides. These di- and tripeptides are esterified using heptafluorobutyric anhydride, alkylated with pentafluorobenzyl bromide, then quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionization. This method has been evaluated for a model synthetic heptapeptide, using a deuterium labeled analog as an internal standard. The half-life of the heptapeptide in human plasma was found to be 2 min. Extraction efficiencies of a tritiated peptide of similar size to the heptapeptide, [3H]DSLET, from plasma using either C18 or strong cation-exchange columns were 85+/-3 and 70+/-2%, respectively. Quantitation of fragments from the heptapeptide indicated that the analysis was linear from 1-50 ng of the heptapeptide per ml of plasma. This method was subsequently employed for pharmacokinetic studies of the biologically active peptide Met-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Leu, where linearity was obtained from 50 to 1000 ng/ml in rat plasma. This method demonstrated negligible side reaction by-products due to autolysis, and has potential for extensive use given the wide availability of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:9390710

  3. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction for the selective determination of methamphetamine, amphetamine, and methylenedioxyphenylalkylamine designer drugs in human whole blood by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Chika; Hara, Kenji; Uchigasaki, Seisaku; Lee, Xiao-Pen; Seno, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Sato, Keizo

    2012-03-01

    A novel method is described for the extraction of methamphetamine, amphetamine, and methylenedioxyphenylalkylamine designer drugs, such as 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine, N-methyl-1-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-butanamine, and 3,4-(methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-butanamine, from human whole blood using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction as highly selective sample clean-up technique. Whole blood samples were diluted with 10 mmol/L ammonium acetate (pH 8.6) and applied to a SupelMIP-Amphetamine molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction cartridge. The cartridge was then washed to eliminate interferences, and the amphetamines of interest were eluted with formic acid/methanol (1:100, v/v). After derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride, the analytes were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Recoveries of the seven amphetamines spiked into whole blood were 89.1-102%. The limits of quantification for each compound in 200 μL of whole blood were between 0.25 and 1.0 ng. The maximum intra- and inter-day coefficients of variation were 9.96 and 13.8%, respectively. The results show that methamphetamine, amphetamine, and methylenedioxyphenylalkyl-amine designer drugs can be efficiently extracted from crude biological samples such as whole blood by molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction with good reproducibility. This extraction method will be useful for the pretreatment of human samples before gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:22271670

  4. Evaluation of the matrix effect on gas chromatography - mass spectrometry with carrier gas containing ethylene glycol as an analyte protectant.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, Tomoharu; Ikami, Takahito; Sato, Takashi; Kikukawa, Koji; Kobayashi, Masato; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2016-02-19

    The consequences of matrix effects in GC are a major issue of concern in pesticide residue analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of an analyte protectant generator in pesticide residue analysis using a GC-MS system. The technique is based on continuous introduction of ethylene glycol into the carrier gas. Ethylene glycol as an analyte protectant effectively compensated the matrix effects in agricultural product extracts. All peak intensities were increased by this technique without affecting the GC-MS performance. Calibration curves for ethylene glycol in the GC-MS system with various degrees of pollution were compared and similar response enhancements were observed. This result suggests a convenient multi-residue GC-MS method using an analyte protectant generator instead of the conventional compensation method for matrix-induced response enhancement adding the mixture of analyte protectants into both neat and sample solutions. PMID:26810804

  5. Quantitation of amobarbital, butalbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, and secobarbital in urine, serum, and plasma using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Leonard L; Garg, Uttam

    2010-01-01

    Barbiturates are central nervous system depressants with sedative and hypnotic properties. Some barbiturates, with longer half-lives, are used as anticonvulsants. Their mechanism of action includes activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated neuronal transmission inhibition. Clinically used barbiturates include amobarbital, butalbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, secobarbital, and thiopental. Besides their therapeutic use, barbiturates are commonly abused. Their analysis is useful for both clinical and forensic proposes. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry is a commonly used method for the analysis of barbiturates. In the method described here, barbiturates from serum, plasma, or urine are extracted using an acidic phosphate buffer and methylene chloride. Barbital is used as an internal standard. The organic extract is dried and reconstituted with mixture of trimethylanilinium hydroxide (TMAH) and ethylacetate. The extract is injected into a gas chromatogram mass spectrometer where it undergoes "flash methylation" in the hot injection port. Selective ion monitoring and relative retention times are used for the identification and quantitation of barbiturates. PMID:20077060

  6. Characterisation of the aroma profiles of different honeys and corresponding flowers using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Seisonen, Sirli; Kivima, Evelin; Vene, Kristel

    2015-02-15

    The aroma profiles of thirteen different honey samples from four botanical origins: heather (Calluna vulgaris), raspberry (Rubus idaeus), rape (Brassica napus), alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and the blossoms of the four corresponding flowers were investigated to find odour-active compounds exclusively representing specific honeys based on odour-active compounds from the blossoms. Gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas-chromatography-olfactometry were used to determine and identify the odour-active compounds. Data was analysed using agglomerative hierarchical clustering and correspondence analysis. Honeys from the same botanical origin clustered together; however, none of the identified compounds were exclusive to a particular honey/blossom combination. Heather honey had the flavour profile most different to the others. Isophorone and 2-methylbutyric acid were found only in heather honeys. Heather honey was characterised by having more "sweet" and "candy-like" notes, raspberry honeys had more "green" notes, while alder buckthorn had more "honey" and "floral" notes. PMID:25236195

  7. Applications of Hadamard transform-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to the detection of acetone in healthy human and diabetes mellitus patient breath.

    PubMed

    Fan, Gang-Ting; Yang, Chien-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chen, Chien-Chung; Shih, Chung-Hung

    2014-03-01

    The Hadamard transform-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HT-GC/MS) technique was successfully employed to detect acetone, a biomarker for diabetes mellitus (DM) prediction, in human breath. Samples of exhaled breath were collected from four DM patients (one type-I and three type-II) and eight volunteers (nondiabetic healthy subjects), respectively. The gas samples, without any pretreatment, were simultaneously injected into a GC column through a Hadamard-injector based on Hadamard codes. Under optimized conditions, when cyclic S-matrix orders of 255, 1023 and 2047 were used, the S/N ratios of the acetone signals were substantially improved by 8.0-, 16.0- and 22.6-fold, respectively; these improvements are in good agreement with theoretically calculated values. We found that the breath acetone concentration levels in the four DM patients and the eight volunteers ranged from 1 to 10 ppmv and 0.1 to 1 ppmv, respectively. PMID:24468386

  8. Determination of alkyl anilines and alkyl pyridines in solvent refined coal distillates and aqueous extracts by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, L.J.

    1982-05-01

    Derivatization with acetic anhydride in aqueous media coupled with capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to distinguish alkyl anilines from alkyl pyridines. By use of this approach aniline, C-1 anilines, and C-2 anilines, as well as lesser quantities of C-2 pyridines and C-3 pyridines, were positively identified in a solvent refined coal (SRC)-II blended distallate and in an aqueous extract of the distallate. The extraction procedure and acetylation conditions employed were examined in detail and found suitable for quantitative analysis when combined with capiliary gas chromatography. The SRC-II blended distillate contained 8200-9025 ..mu..g/mL anilines and 1335 ..mu..g/mL pyridines. Distilled water equilibrated with the distillate (1:100, SRC-II:H/sub 2/O) contained 65.9-78.9 ..mu..g/mL anilines and 5.6 ..mu..g/mL pyridines.

  9. Determination of alkyl anilines and alkyl pyridines in solvent refined coal distillates and aqueous extracts by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, L.J.

    1983-05-01

    Derivation with acetic anhydride in aqueous media coupled with capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry was used to distinguish alkyl anilines from alkyl pyridines. By use of this approach aniline, C-1 anilines, and C-2 anilines, as well as lesser quantities of C-2 pyridines and C-3 pyridines, were positively identified in a solvent refined coal (SRC)-II blended distillate and in an aqueous extract of the distillate. The extraction procedure and acetylation conditions employed were examined in detail and found suitable for quantitative analysis when combined with capillary gas chromatography. The SRC-II blended distillate contained 8200-9025 ..mu..g/mL anilines and 1335 /sup +/g/mL pyridines. Distilled water equilibrated with the distillate (1:100, SRC-II:H/sub 2/O) contained 65.9-78.9 /sup +/g/mL anilines and 5.6 /sup +/g/mL pyridines. 3 figures, 1 table.

  10. Identification of the position and the stereochemistry of the double bond in monounsaturated fatty acid methyl esters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of dimethyl disulfide derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Scribe, P.; Guezennec, J.; Dagaut, J.; Pepe, C.; Saliot, A.

    1988-05-01

    A single-step derivatization procedure using dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) is described for monounsaturated fatty acid esters (MUFAME). The analysis of DMDS adducts by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is detailed: The mass spectra (electron impact 70 eV) show molecular ions (M/sup +/) and give key fragments that permit determination of the position of the original double bond. Alkylthiolation of Z- and E-MUFAME as a specific antiaddition leads, respectively, to the threo and erythro adducts. The two isomers are well-separated by gas chromatography, permitting precise stereochemistry of the initial double bond. Nevertheless, for a complex environmental mixture of MUFAME, the stereochemical identification is restricted to the linear series. This procedure is suitable for the analysis of trace compounds at the nanogram level such as encountered in the natural environment. An application is presented for the analysis of planktonic and bacterially derived fatty acids in recent marine sediments.

  11. A salting out-acetonitrile homogeneous extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of thirteen N-nitrosamines in skin care cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hao; Guo, Xindong; Xian, Yanping; Luo, Haiying; Wang, Bin; Wu, Yuluan

    2015-11-27

    A sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was established for the simultaneous determination of thirteen N-nitrosamines (NAs) in skin care cosmetics. The cosmetics samples were firstly dispersed by water and subsequently extracted and purified using salting out-acetonitrile homogeneous extraction method. Finally, the extracting solution was concentrated by slow nitrogen gas blowing. All of the samples were separated by INNOWAX capillary chromatographic column, and detected by selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and quantified by isotope internal standard method. The method was validated for linearity and range, accuracy, precision and sensitivity. Under the optimized condition, the calibration curves were linear over the selected concentration ranges of 2-500μg/L for all the thirteen analytes, with calculated coefficients of determination (R(2)) of greater than 0.996. The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantitation (LOQs) of the method were 3-15μg/kg and 10-50μg/kg, respectively. Recoveries were calculated at three levels of concentration spiked in two kinds of cosmetics (skin care cream and water). The values were found between 93.8% and 121.0% with relative standard deviation (RSD) values of 2.5-7.2% for intra-day precision (n=6) and 3.3-6.7% for inter-day precision (n=5). The method was successfully applied to analyze twenty-two cosmetics samples and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was detected in one sample with the concentration of 207μg/kg. PMID:26518490

  12. Simultaneous determination of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in animal tissues by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Chen, D; Yu, G; Yu, H; Pan, Y; Wang, Y; Huang, L; Yuan, Z

    2011-02-01

    A new multi-dimensional analytical method using gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-NPD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for qualitative and quantitative measurement of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in food animal tissues. This method is based on a new extraction procedure using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The analytes were extracted by phosphate buffer with trichloroacetic acid deproteinization and clean-up by C₁₈ solid-phase extraction (SPE) adding dodecanesulfonic acid sodium salt as an ion-pair reagent. The eluted fraction was evaporated and derivatised with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) for GC-NPD analysis and GC-MS confirmation. Parameters for extraction pressure, temperature and cycle of ASE, clean-up, derivatisation and analysis procedure were optimised. The method was validated in muscle, kidney and liver of swine, bovine with a low concentration (limit of quantification) of 16.4 and 21.4 µg kg⁻¹ for these two analytes using GC-NPD. For GC-MS, the limits of quantification were 4.1 and 5.6 µg kg⁻¹, respectively. Spiked recoveries from levels of 20 to 200 µg kg⁻¹ were found to be between 73% and 99% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 17% in GC-NPD. For GC-MS, levels from 5 to 20 µg kg⁻¹ had between 70% and 93% with an RSD of less than 21%. This rapid and reliable method can be used for the characterisation and quantification of residues of lincomycin and spectinomycin in animal tissues. PMID:21240824

  13. The characterization of eight maceral concentrates by means of Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography and Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nip, Margriet; De Leeuw, J. W.; Schenck, P. A.

    1988-03-01

    In order to study the relationships between the chemical structures of coals, coal macerals and their precursors (plant tissues), eight coal macerals originating from the Yorkshire coal basin (U.K.) were studied by Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography and Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The samples were selected on the basis of a previous study of a large set of macerals. The macerals were studied in order to relate structural moieties of the macerals, as reflected by their pyrolysis products, to structural elements of their likely precursors, plant tissues. The maceral pyrolysates mainly consist of alkylbenzenes, alkylnaphthalenes, alkylphenols and series of straight-chain alk-l-enes and alkanes over a wide molecular weight range. The relative contribution of the (hydroxy)aromatic pyrolysis products and of the straight-chain alk-l-enes and alkanes to each maceral pyrolysate was calculated, although the internal distribution patterns of the alkyl derivatives of these pyrolysis products exhibited to a certain extent dissimilarities. Differences between the relative contributions of these pyrolysis products to the pyrolysates of different macerals with the same coal rank and to those of similar macerals with different coal rank depend on differences in precursor material and the chemical modification of these precursors upon increasing coalification. Multivariate data treatment by means of factor analysis was chosen to compare the pyrolysis data - represented by these histograms - with the petrographic data and the proximate and ultimate analysis values of the macerals. In addition, similar analyses was performed on the macerals using such a low Curie temperature (358°C), that from some of the macerals "thermal extracts" were obtained, containing a series of n-alkanes and some isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane. Although these thermal extracts represent only a low percentage by weight of the maceral samples, their existence probably will affect both the chemical and physical properties of the macerals, although they are in fact no pan of the coal structure itself.

  14. New approach to multiresidue pesticide determination in foods with high fat content using disposable pipette extraction (DPX) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Guan, Hongxia; Brewer, William E; Morgan, Stephen L

    2009-11-25

    Organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides in corn muffin mix and cocoa beans were analyzed using disposable pipette extraction (DPX) for rapid cleanup followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The DPX method in this study used weak anion exchange (WAX) mechanisms to remove the major sample matrix interferences, fatty acids, from the chromatographic analyses. The limits of detection (LOD) were determined to be <10 ppb for all studied pesticides in corn muffin. DPX-WAX exhibited average recoveries reaching 100% for most targeted pesticides, with relative standard deviations below 10%. These results indicate that DPX with weak anion exchange sorbent is effective at eliminating fatty acid interferences in foods of high fat content prior to multiresidue pesticide analysis. Furthermore, the DPX cleanup method takes approximately 2 min to perform. In addition, removal of fatty acids from cocoa beans demonstrates the high capacity of this extraction method for samples containing up to 50% fat. PMID:19877640

  15. Simultaneous determination of anabolic steroids and synthetic hormones in meat by freezing-lipid filtration, solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jungju; Kim, Hye-Young; Chung, Bong Chul; Hong, Jongki

    2005-03-01

    Estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, zeranol and diethylstilbestrol including estradiol metabolites were determined simultaneously in meat. Extraction of growth hormones was carried out by ultasonication using a methanol-water mixture. The growth hormones in the meat extract can be effectively separated from lipids by freezing-lipid filtration, followed by C8-solid phase extraction (SPE). During freezing-lipid filtration, about 90% of lipids are removed without any significant loss of growth hormones. For further clean-up, silica- and aminopropyl-SPE were used. To enhance detection sensitivity, the growth hormones are derivatized with trimethylsilyl reagents. Quantitation using isotope-labelled internal standards was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode. The method detection limits were 0.1-0.4 microg/kg for all growth hormones. Overall recoveries of synthetic and natural growth hormones were 68-106% with coefficients of variation of 5-16% for the complete procedure. PMID:15844536

  16. Determination of testosterone in plasma from men by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, with high-resolution selected-ion monitoring and metastable peak monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Finlay, E.M.; Gaskell, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    Highly specific methods are described for determining testosterone in plasma or serum from men. Extract fractions obtained by selective isolation procedures are converted to tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) oximes/TBDMS ethers or methyl oximes/TBDMS ethers and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the high-resolution selected-ion monitoring or metastable peak-monitoring modes. (2H3)Testosterone and unlabeled 17-epitestosterone are used as the respective internal standards. When we applied the two procedures to analysis of samples of pooled plasma and serum used for external quality assessment of routine assays, the results agreed well. Interlaboratory values for mean concentrations obtained by routine immunoassays (y) consistently exceeded values obtained by our technique (x), although the values closely correlated (r . 0.997; y . 1.008x + 0.564 nmol/L).

  17. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of ethyl palmitate calibration and resolution with ethyl oleate as biomarker ethanol sub acute in urine application study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaniti, Ni Made; Manurung, Manuntun

    2016-03-01

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry is used to separate two and more compounds and identify fragment ion specific of biomarker ethanol such as palmitic acid ethyl ester (PAEE), as one of the fatty acid ethyl esters as early detection through conyugated reaction. This study aims to calibrate ethyl palmitate and develop analysis with oleate acid. This methode can be used analysis ethanol and its chemistry biomarker in ethanol sub-acute consumption as analytical forensic toxicology. The result show that ethanol level in urine rats Wistar were 9.21 and decreased 6.59 ppm after 48 hours consumption. Calibration curve of ethyl palmitate was y = 0.2035 x + 1.0465 and R2 = 0.9886. Resolution between ethyl palmitate and oleate were >1.5 as good separation with fragment ion specific was 88 and the retention time was 18 minutes.

  18. Direct chemical-analysis of uv laser-ablation products of organic polymers by using selective ion monitoring mode in gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yirang; Lee, H.W.; Fountain, S.T.; Lubman, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Trace quantities of laser ablated organic polymers were analyzed by using commercial capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; the instrument was modified so that the laser ablation products could be introduced into the capillary column directly and the constituents of each peak in the chromatogram were identified by using a mass spectrometer. The present study takes advantage of the selective ion monitoring mode for significantly improving the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer as a detector, which is critical in analyzing the trace quantities and confirming the presence or absence of the species of interest in laser ablated polymers. The initial composition of the laser ablated polymers was obtained by using an electron impact reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the possible structure of the fragments observed in the spectra was proposed based on the structure of the polymers.

  19. Use of headspace sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in herbal infusions.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2014-08-22

    A solvent-free method is described for the determination of 10 volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), considered as priority pollutants by the EU, in different herbal infusions using headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The parameters affecting both the extraction and thermal desorption steps in the HSSE were optimized by means of Plackett-Burman designs. Ten millilitres of the herbal infusion was submitted to the HSSE preconcentration in the presence of salt for 4h at 88 °C. The use of d(10)-phenanthrene as internal standard not only improved the repeatability of the method but allowed quantification of the samples against external aqueous standards. Detection limits ranged between 11 and 26 ng L(-1). PMID:25001331

  20. Application of capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to chemical characterization of radiation-induced base damage of DNA: implications for assessing DNA repair processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, M.

    1985-02-01

    The application of capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to the chemical characterization of radiation-induced base products of calf thymus DNA is presented. Samples of calf thymus DNA irradiated in N/sub 2/O-saturated aqueous solution were hydrolyzed with HCOOH, trimethylsilylated, and subjected to GC-MS analysis using a fused-silica capillary column. Hydrolysis conditions suitable for the simultaneous analysis of the radiation-induced products of all four DNA bases in a single run were determined. The trimethylsilyl derivatives of these products had excellent GC properties and easily interpretable mass spectra; an intense molecular ion (M+.) and a characteristic (M-CH/sub 3/)+ ion were observed. The complementary use of t-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives was also demonstrated. These derivatives provided an intense characteristic (M-57)+ ion, which appeared as either the base peak or the second most intense ion in the spectra. All mass spectra obtained are discussed.

  1. Identification of volatile degradation products from Baltic amber by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pastorelli, Gianluca; Glastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test and develop techniques for the detection and identification of volatile compounds released as degradation products by Baltic amber. During a preliminary investigation, the off-gassing of acidic volatiles was detected through the corrosion of lead coupons. The corrosive compounds released by the material were then identified as formic acid and acetic acid by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. During an advanced investigation, based on the use of artificial ageing to initiate degradation of model amber samples in different microclimates, the detected formic acid and acetic acid off-gassing appeared to be more intense in a dry environment with normal oxygen concentration. The release of formic and acetic acids by the amber was likely the result of radical reactions which should be investigated in further studies. PMID:21107974

  2. Rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nuts and seeds by microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Song, Shuang-Hong; Wu, Mei; He, Tian; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2013-12-15

    Based on microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation (MUED), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was proposed for rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nut and seed materials. Several critical experimental parameters for MUED, including reaction temperature, microwave power, amounts of catalyst and derivatisation reagent, have been optimised using response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and the content of total unsaturated fatty acids obtained with MUED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional method (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The MUED method simplified the handling steps compared to the conventional procedure, shortened the sample preparation time whilst improving the extraction and derivatisation efficiency of lipids, and reduced oxidisation and decomposition of the unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, robustness and practicality of this method highlighted its significant potential for application in the rapid analysis of fatty acids in natural food resource samples. PMID:23993615

  3. Determination of stable isotopic enrichment and concentration of glycerol in plasma via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the estimation of lipolysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Flakoll, P J; Zheng, M; Vaughan, S; Borel, M J

    2000-07-01

    Measuring glycerol's rate of appearance into the plasma compartment provides an excellent estimation of whole-body lipolysis. The glycerol rate of appearance can be calculated by estimating the plasma dilution of continuously infused stable or radioactive isotopes of glycerol. Previously, determination of glycerol stable isotopic enrichment has required either chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or electron impact ionization GC-MS in which a fragment containing only a portion of the glycerol molecule was measured. The present method uses tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (tBDMS) derivatization and electron impact ionization to measure a fragment including the entire glycerol molecule. The method determines concentration and enrichment of plasma glycerol in a simple, precise, and cost-efficient manner, providing a basis from which lipid homeostasis can be assessed. PMID:10985565

  4. Determination of cis-thymine glycol in DNA by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion recording and multiple reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Farooq, S; Bailey, E; Farmer, P B; Jukes, R; Lamb, J H; Hernández, H; Sram, R; Topinka, J

    1997-11-21

    A novel method for the determination of cis-thymine glycol in DNA has been developed, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion recording or multiple reaction monitoring. The procedure involves acidic hydrolysis of DNA in the presence of the internal standard cis-[2H3]thymine glycol, followed by derivatisation with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide. The method was validated on DNA that had been oxidatively modified in vitro by radiation treatment, and was then applied to determine cis-thymine glycol in human placental DNA. Background levels of 5.45+/-2.98 ng cis-thymine glycol/mg DNA were observed in the human samples. PMID:9449555

  5. Detection of VX contamination in soil through solid-phase microextraction sampling and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the VX degradation product bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide.

    PubMed

    Hook, Gary L; Kimm, Gregory; Koch, David; Savage, Paul B; Ding, Bangwei; Smith, Philip A

    2003-04-11

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) sampling and analysis method was developed for bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide (a degradation product of the nerve agent VX) in soil. A 30-min sampling time with a polydimethylsiloxane-coated fiber and high temperature alkaline hydrolysis allowed detection with 1.0 microg of VX spiked per g of agricultural soil. The method was successfully used in the field with portable GC-MS instrumentation. This method is relatively rapid (less than 1 h), avoids the use of complex preparation steps, and enhances analyst safety through limited use of solvents and decontamination of the soil before sampling. PMID:12735457

  6. Monitoring pesticide residues in greenhouse tomato by combining acetonitrile-based extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Melo, Armindo; Cunha, Sara C; Mansilha, Catarina; Aguiar, Ana; Pinho, Olívia; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2012-12-01

    A multiclass and multiresidue method for pesticide analysis in tomato was validated. Extraction and pre-concentration of the pesticide residues from acetonitrile extracts was performed by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique, followed by gas chromatography-mass detection. DLLME was performed using carbon tetrachloride as extractive solvent and acetonitrile extract as dispersive solvent, in order to increase enrichment factor of the extraction procedure. Validation parameters indicated the suitability of the method for routine analyses of thirty pesticides in a large number of samples. In general, pesticide recoveries ranged between 70% and 110% and repeatability ranged between 1% and 20%. The proposed method was applied to the monitoring of pesticides in tomatoes grown during winter in greenhouses. Among the compounds considered in this work, cyprodinil was found in tomato at concentrations of 0.33mg/kg, other pesticides like azoxystrobin, fenhexanid, tolyfluanid, λ-cyhalothrin and trifloxystrobin were also detected, but, not quantified. PMID:22953826

  7. Quantification of trans-1,4-polyisoprene in Eucommia ulmoides by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Shinya; Bamba, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Yoshihisa; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Okazawa, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Akio

    2008-04-01

    Commercial development of trans-1,4-polyisoprene from Eucommia ulmoides Oliver (EU-rubber) requires specific knowledge on selection of high-rubber-content lines and establishment of agronomic cultivation methods for achieving maximum EU-rubber yield. The development can be facilitated by high-throughput and highly sensitive analytical techniques for EU-rubber extraction and quantification. In this paper, we described an efficient EU-rubber extraction method, and validated that the accuracy was equivalent to that of the conventional Soxhlet extraction method. We also described a highly sensitive quantification method for EU-rubber by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (PyGC/MS). We successfully applied the extraction/quantification method for study of seasonal changes in EU-rubber content and molecular weight distribution. PMID:18499051

  8. Analysis of t-butylphenol acetylene condensed resin with methyl-methine linkages in vulcanized rubber by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Kim; Lee

    1999-01-01

    Methyl-methine linkages of Novolac, a commercially available t-butylphenol acetylene condensed (TBPA) resin, have been identified by recognition of pyrolysis pathways using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/mS) in vulcanized rubber. The diagnostic mass spectrum of t-butylphenol with methyl-methine linkages between phenolic rings was observed at m/z 192, corresponding to 4-t-butyl-2-ethyl-6-methylphenol. Other molecular ions were observed at m/z 178, 164, and 150 in the characteristic pyrolyzates. The ion at m/z 192 in the TBPA resin was observed to be characteristic for methyl-methine linkages between the phenolic groups, and the analytical pyrolysis-GC/mS method was thus able to identify the resin at low levels in vulcanized rubber. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10482900

  9. Determination of musty-odor compounds in water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with a needle-type sample-preparation device.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Ikuo; Mitsumori, Tomoki; Kawakubo, Susumu; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    The musty-odor compounds (MOCs) 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) and geosmin in water samples were determined by a purge-and-trap method using a needle-type extraction device followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. For the extraction of these compounds, a triple-layer-type extraction needle containing divinylbenzene and activated carbon particles as the particulate extraction media was introduced. Several experimental parameters, including the sample temperature during extraction, the addition of sodium chloride, and desorption conditions, were thoroughly optimized in this study. The detection limits for 2-MIB and geosmin were 1.0 and 0.5 ng L(-1), respectively. The method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of MOCs and other volatile organic compounds in tap-water samples. PMID:25312628

  10. A quasi non-destructive approach for amber geological provenance assessment based on head space solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, I D; Aresta, A; Truică, G I; Radu, G L; Palmisano, F; Sabbatini, L

    2014-02-01

    Head space (HS) solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to analyze the volatile fraction of ambers of different geological origin. In particular, Romanian (romanite) and Baltic (succinite) amber samples were studied. Both types of amber have nearly similar bulk chemical compositions and could probably reflect only some differences of paleobiological and/or diagenetic origin. The present study shows that amber head space fingerprint, obtained by SPME/GC-MS, can provide a simple and quasi non-destructive method capable of romanite/succinite differentiation. Among the numerous compounds present in the head space, a number of few informative variables could be selected that were able to differentiate the ambers as demonstrated by Principal Component and Cluster Analysis. PMID:24401437

  11. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles and Identification of Capping Agent Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karthick, V; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Govindaraju, K; Sinha, Sweta; Singaravelu, G

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using leaf extract of Syzygium jambolanum and capping agent has been explored. The synthesized AuNPs have been characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. The AuNPs show intense surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 528 nm and were found to be spherical and hexagonal in shape with particle size ranging from 20-30 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the surface morphology of synthesized AuNPs. The capping ligand has been evaluated using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. PMID:26369012

  12. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of products from on-line pyrolysis/silylation of plant gums used as binding media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiantore, Oscar; Riedo, Chiara; Scalarone, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    Plant gums are complex polysaccharides used in the field of cultural heritage especially as binding media. Classification of polysaccharides may be achieved on the basis of monosaccharides composition after cleavage of glycosidic bond. Characterization of plant gums in works of art is complicated by the necessity of to use a method minimally invasive and requiring a small mount of sample. Pyrolisys is an useful method to obtain polysaccharides decomposition and generally pyrolysis products can be identified by the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This paper describes a method where two plant gums, arabic and tragacanth, were pyrolized in presence of silylating agents (HMDS e BSTFA alone and with TMCS as catalyst) using an on-line Py-GC/MS apparatus. Some characteristic trimethylsilyl derivatives of monosaccharides were identified on the basis of mass spectra. The presence of characteristic pyrolysis products of sugars allows to distinguish the two gums.

  13. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromotagraphy analysis of the drug absorption characteristics in the buccal mucosa via a circulating device

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIN; LI, YUBO; XU, DAOQING; ZHOU, HONG; WANG, JINLEI; GUO, XUEJUN; ZHANG, YANJUN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics of Su Xiao Jiu Xin dripping pill absorption in the buccal mucosa of healthy volunteers. This pill is a traditional Chinese medicine that is widely used as an emergency treatment for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It is sublingually administered and can be absorbed in the buccal mucosa. In the present study, a method was developed to investigate the absorption characteristics in the buccal mucosa of healthy volunteers via a circulating device by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography. The five main efficacy components associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, which are borneol, isoborneol, ligustilide, n-butylphthalide and ferulic acid, were detected and rapidly absorbed. Among these components, four exhibited good absorption, thus confirming that the method developed is efficient for analysis of the absoption characteristics. PMID:25469246

  14. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profile of urinary organic acids of Wistar rats orally treated with ozonized unsaturated triglycerides and ozonized sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Jardines, Daniel; Correa, Teresa; Ledea, Oscar; Zamora, Zullyt; Rosado, Aristides; Molerio, Jesús

    2003-01-15

    The main products in the ozonolysis of unsaturated triglycerides or vegetable oils are peroxides, aldehydes, Criegee ozonides and carboxylic acids. Some of these compounds are present in different concentrations in the biological fluids. The aim of this work is to study, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), the organic acid excretion in urine of rats orally treated with ozonized sunflower oil (OSO), ozonized triolein or ozonized trilinolein. Oral administration of OSO to Wistar rats has produced changes in the urinary content of dicarboxylic organic acids. Among others heptanedioic (pimelic acid) and nonanedioic acids (azelaic acid) were the major increased dicarboxylic acids found. The urinary dicarboxylic acid profiles of rats which received ozonized triolein only showed an increase in heptanedioic and nonanedioic acids. However, when ozonized trilinolein is applied, the profile is similar to that obtained when OSO is administered. A biochemical mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of dicarboxylic acids from ozonated unsaturated triglycerides. PMID:12482495

  15. Identification of polar organic compounds in coal-gasification condensate water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of high-performance liquid chromatography fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.H.; King, C.J.

    1985-10-01

    A novel combination of analytical techniques was employed to identify polar organic compounds, including the first report of hydantoins, in condensate waters from a slagging fixed-bed coal-gasification process. The analytical technique consists of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of HPLC fractions. Entrainer distillation was used to concentrate the HPLC fractions and remove water before GC-MS analysis. Analyses of four samples accounted for 69-84% of the measured chemical oxygen demand (COD), including 1-6% of the COD as dimethylhydantoin. This compound is highly polar and difficult to remove by solvent extraction. Other identified compounds included phenols, di-hydroxybenzenes, methanol, acetone, and acetonitrile. Many of the unidentified compounds (16-31% of the COD) were difficult to extract, had low volatility relative to water, and contained organic nitrogen. Some chemical changes were observed during storage of condensate water samples.

  16. Metabolomic profiling of human follicular fluid from patients with repeated failure of in vitro fertilization using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lan; Zhao, Xiaoming; Sun, Yun; Hong, Yan; Gao, Yuping; Hu, Shuanggang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics method to compare the metabolites in the follicular fluid (FF) from patients with in vitro fertilization (IVF) and repeated IVF failure (RIF). Methods: A prospective study was employed in Center for Reprodutive Medcine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai, China, between January and October 2010. FF samples were collected from 13 patients with RIF and 15 patients who achieved pregnancy after the first IVF cycle. Results: Partial least squares (PLS) discriminant analysis of the PCA data revealed that the samples were scattered into two different regions. FF from the two groups differed with respect to 20 metabolites. FF from RIF group showed elevated levels of several amino acids (valine, threonine, isoleucine, cysteine, serine, proline, alanine, phenylalanine, lysine, methionine and ornithine), and reduced levels of dicarboxylic acids, cholesterol and some organic acids. Conclusions: The studies corroborated successful determination of the levels of metabolite in the FF. PMID:25400819

  17. Study of the precision in the purge-and-trap-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of volatile compounds in honey.

    PubMed

    Soria, Ana Cristina; Martínez-Castro, Isabel; Sanz, Jesús

    2009-04-10

    Data precision in the analysis by purge-and-trap coupled on-line to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (P&T-GC-MS) of honey volatiles has been studied by statistical analysis. The contribution of non-random factors to dispersion of quantitative results was proven by comparing several statistical parameters (correlation coefficients, principal component analysis (PCA) eigenvalues and loadings) from both experimental and simulated data. PCA was also useful for grouping volatiles with similar dispersion behaviour; these groups being generally related to compounds with common properties or structural features. The use of area ratios improves data precision for compounds within the same group. Results from this study could be used for a better selection of internal standards in quantitative analysis of volatiles by P&T-GC-MS. PMID:19203763

  18. Molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction for simultaneous determination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its main metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Nestić, Marina; Babić, Sandra; Pavlović, Dragana Mutavdžić; Sutlović, Davorka

    2013-09-10

    In presented paper analytical method based on solid-phase extraction using molecularly imprinted polymer and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed and validated for the confirmation of THC, THC-OH and THC-COOH in urine samples. Non-covalent molecularly imprinted polymers of THC-OH were prepared using different functional monomers (methacrylic acid, 4-vinylpyridine, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker and 2,2'-azobis-isobutyronitrile as an initiator of radical polymerization. Analytes were extracted from urine samples using prepared polymer sorbent with highest binding selectivity and capability. Before extraction, urine samples were hydrolyzed with alkaline. Elution was performed with chloroform:ethyl acetate (60:40, v/v). Dry extracts were silylated with BSTFA+1% TMCS. Detection and quantification were performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in single ion recording mode. The developed method was linear over the range from LOQ to 150 ng mL(-1) for all three analytes. For THC, THC-OH and THC-COOH LOD was 2.5, 1 and 1 ng mL(-1), and LOQ was 3, 2 and 2 ng mL(-1), respectively. The precision, accuracy, recovery and matrix effect were investigated at 5, 25 and 50 ng mL(-1). In the investigated concentration range recoveries were 71.9% for THC, 78.6% for THC-OH and 75.2% for THC-COOH. Matrix effect was not significant (<10%) for all analytes in the concentration range from 5 ng mL(-1) to 50 ng mL(-1). Extraction recovery on non-imprinted polymer was relatively high indicating high non-specific binding. Optimized and validated method was applied to 15 post-mortem urine samples. PMID:23890655

  19. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of a coal extract and its fractions separated by planar chromatography: correlation of structural features with molecular mass

    PubMed

    Islas; Suelves; Carter; Herod; Kandiyoti

    2000-01-01

    The structural characterisation of a coal liquefaction extract and its three fractions separated by planar chromatography has been described. Size exclusion chromatography showed the molecular mass distributions to become progressively larger with decreasing mobility on the plate. UV-fluorescence spectroscopy of the fractions indicated parallel increases in the sizes of polynuclear aromatic ring systems. Analysis by probe-mass spectrometry of the 'whole' coal extract showed the expected array of small polynuclear aromatic groups extending to m/z 450. The probe mass spectra of the lightest fraction ('mobile in pyridine and acetonitrile') showed similar features, except for effects due to vacuum drying to remove solvent. In sharp contrast, the two heaviest fractions ('mobile in pyridine and immobile in acetonitrile' and 'immobile in pyridine') showed no significant ions other than those from residual NMP solvent (m/z 98 and 99). Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of these two heaviest fractions showed only traces of aromatic compounds or fragments. The aromatic pyrolysis products of these fractions were too large and involatile to pass through the GC column. The major components observed in the pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the two heavy fractions were alkanes and alkenes, ranging between C10-C25. Since none of the samples contained free alkanes, alkenes or cycloalkanes before pyrolysis, they were generated during the pyrolysis step. The shifts of UV-fluorescence spectral intensity to shorter wavelengths with decreasing size indicated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) provide direct evidence of differences in structure with changing molecular mass. This evidence strongly suggests that species identified as being of large molecular mass in this extract sample are not composed of molecular aggregates. It remains difficult to establish whether and when it would be legitimate to invoke molecular aggregates to explain the large molecular masses (MMs) identified here and in other work. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:11006584

  20. Fast determination of octinoxate and oxybenzone uv filters in swimming pool waters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yılmazcan, Ö; Kanakaki, C; Izgi, B; Rosenberg, E

    2015-07-01

    A fast gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of the potential endocrine disrupters octinoxate and oxybenzone in swimming pool water samples based on the solvent-free solid-phase microextraction technique. The low-pressure gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method used for the fast identification of UV filter substances was compared to a conventional method in terms of sensitivity and speed. The fast method proposed resulted in 2 min runs, leading to an eightfold decrease in the total analysis time and a sevenfold improvement in detection limits. The main parameters affecting the solid-phase microextraction process were also studied in detail and the optimized conditions were as follows: fiber coating, polyacrylate; extraction mode, direct immersion; extraction temperature, 25°C; sample volume, 5 mL; extraction time 45 min; pH 6.5. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-25 μg/L with correlation coefficients in the range 0.990-0.999. The limits of detection were 0.17-0.29 μg/L, and the recoveries were 80-83%. Combined method uncertainty was assessed and found to be less than 7% for both analytes for concentrations equal to or higher than 5 μg/L. Pool water samples were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. Neither octinoxate nor oxybenzone were detected in the swimming pool water samples at concentrations above the respective limits of detection. PMID:25931007

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Bioactive Compounds from Aromatic Plants by Means of Dynamic Headspace Extraction and Multiple Headspace Extraction-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Omar, Jone; Olivares, Maitane; Alonso, Ibone; Vallejo, Asier; Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2016-04-01

    Seven monoterpenes in 4 aromatic plants (sage, cardamom, lavender, and rosemary) were quantified in liquid extracts and directly in solid samples by means of dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DHS-GC-MS) and multiple headspace extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MHSE), respectively. The monoterpenes were 1st extracted by means of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and analyzed by an optimized DHS-GC-MS. The optimization of the dynamic extraction step and the desorption/cryo-focusing step were tackled independently by experimental design assays. The best working conditions were set at 30 °C for the incubation temperature, 5 min of incubation time, and 40 mL of purge volume for the dynamic extraction step of these bioactive molecules. The conditions of the desorption/cryo-trapping step from the Tenax TA trap were set at follows: the temperature was increased from 30 to 300 °C at 150 °C/min, although the cryo-trapping was maintained at -70 °C. In order to estimate the efficiency of the SFE process, the analysis of monoterpenes in the 4 aromatic plants was directly carried out by means of MHSE because it did not require any sample preparation. Good linearity (r(2 ) > 0.99) and reproducibility (relative standard deviation % <12) was obtained for solid and liquid quantification approaches, in the ranges of 0.5 to 200 ng and 10 to 500 ng/mL, respectively. The developed methods were applied to analyze the concentration of 7 monoterpenes in aromatic plants obtaining concentrations in the range of 2 to 6000 ng/g and 0.25 to 110 μg/mg, respectively. PMID:26925555

  2. Triclosan and methyl-triclosan monitoring study in the northeast of Spain using a magnetic particle enzyme immunoassay and confirmatory analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantiani, Lina; Farré, Marinella; Asperger, Danijela; Rubio, Fernando; González, Susana; López de Alda, Maria J.; Petrović, Mira; Shelver, Weilin L.; Barceló, Damià

    2008-10-01

    SummaryFor the first time, the occurrence of triclosan and its metabolite methyl-triclosan was investigated in a typical Mediterranean area using a two-step methodology based on screening using a magnetic particle immunoassay (IA) and confirmatory analysis by solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In this study, 95 environmental samples were analyzed. A commercial immunoassay was assessed for use in the different types of water selected for this study. A large monitoring study was performed on the influent and the effluent of eight wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), water samples from Ebro and Llobregat rivers, and drinking water. All wastewater samples tested in this study (influents and effluents) showed the presence of triclosan, with concentrations for raw influents being high (10 μg/L as average value). The percentages of triclosan removal for the WWTPs were evaluated (30-70%) along the different treatment processes showing that the best removal rates were obtained by the processes equipped with membrane bioreactors (MBRs). However, important concentrations of triclosan were detected even after treatment by MBRs. The presence of this biocide was confirmed in 50% of the river samples analyzed. Twenty two drinking water samples from the Barcelona city area were investigated, and in this case no triclosan was detected. Due to its properties and the widespread usage of triclosan, there is a need for monitoring and controlling the amounts present in wastewater effluents, river water, drinking water catchments areas, and drinking water. To this end, we present a feasible methodology using a magnetic particle-based immunoassay as a screening, followed by confirmatory analysis using solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-MS).

  3. Chemical synthesis of dioxygen-18 labelled omega-/beta-oxidized cysteinyl leukotrienes: analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, D; Fauler, J; Frölich, J C

    1995-05-19

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (LT) C4, LTD4 and LTE4 are potent mediators of anaphylaxis and inflammation. LTE4 is extensively metabolized in man mainly by omega-oxidation followed by subsequent beta-oxidation to more polar and biologically inactive metabolites. This paper describes a method for the synthesis of [1,20-18O2]-carboxy-LTE4, [1,18-18O2]-carboxy-dinor-LTE4, and [1,16-18O2]-carboxy-14,15-dihydro-tetranor-LTE4 starting from the unlabelled dimethyl esters of 20-carboxy-LTA4, 18-carboxy-dinor-LTA4 and 16-carboxy-14,15-dihydro-tetranor-LTA4, respectively, by separate chemical conjugation with cysteine hydrochloride in H2-18O-methanol followed by alkaline hydrolysis with Li18OH. The isotopic purity of the isolated reaction products was 94% at 18O for all three preparations while only 0.3% remained unlabelled as confirmed by negative-ion chemical-ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-NICI-MS) after their catalytical reduction/desulphurization and derivatization. The 18O2-labelled compounds are demonstrated to be suitable internal standards for quantification by GC-NICI-MS and GC-NICI-tandem MS. We found by GC-NICI-tandem MS that the excretion rate of 20-carboxy-LTE4 is comparable to that of LTE4 (both in nmol/mol creatinine, mean +/- S.E.) in healthy children (26.7 +/- 4.7 vs. 32.0 +/- 6.0, n = 9) and adults (13.9 +/- 1.1 vs. 27.2 +/- 5.4, n = 3). PMID:7663693

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in diesel exhaust using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with programmed temperature vaporization and large volume injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira de Souza, Carolina; Corrêa, Sergio Machado

    2015-02-01

    Diesel engines are significant sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAHs) in urban atmospheres. These compounds are widely known for their carcinogenic potential and mutagenic properties. In this study, a method was developed for the analysis of 16 priorities PAHs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with programmable temperature vaporizer large volume injection (PTV-LVI), which allowed to be obtained detection limits below 2.0 ng mL-1. This method was evaluated in samples from stratified particulate matter and gas phase from the emissions of diesel vehicle employing diesel commercial S10 (sulfur 10 mg L-1) and B5 (biodiesel 5% v/v). A sampling system that does not employ exhaust products dilution was used to evaluate the PAHs gas-particle partition. Six PAHs were identified in extracts and gas-phase PAHs took percentage of 80% in the total PAHs emissions. The sampling system without dilution not caused a strong nucleation/condensation of the most volatile PAHs. PAHs size-particle distribution was found in higher levels in the accumulation mode.

  5. Identification of Bound Nitro Musk-Protein Adduct in Fish Liver By Gas Chromatography-Mass Sectrometry: Biotransformation, Dose-Response and Toxicokinetics of Nitro Musk Metabolites Protein Adducts in Trout Liver as Biomarker of Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ubiquitous occurrences of synthetic nitro musks are evident in the literature. The In vivo analysis of musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK) - protein adducts in trout liver have been performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selected ion monitoring (GC-SIM-MS). Bio...

  6. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM CHARCOAL BADGES BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY (RTI/ACS-AP-209-112)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This protocol provides guidelines for determining volatile organic hydrocarbons (VOCs) in air samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This method is for the analysis of VOCs in air by GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring mode (SIM). Charcoal badge samplers are ex...

  7. ON SITE SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION AND LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF ULTRA-TRACE SYNTHETIC MUSKS IN MUNICIPAL SEWAGE EFFLUENT USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY. FULL-SCAN MODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fragrance materials such as synthetic musks in aqueous samples, are normally determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode to provide maximum sensitivity after liquid-liquid extraction of I -L samples. Full-scan mass spectra are requ...

  8. ON-SITE SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION AND LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF ULTRA-TRACE SYNTHETIC MUSKS IN MUNICIPAL SEWAGE EFFLUENT USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY IN THE FULL-SCAN MODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fragrance materials such as synthetic musks in aqueous samples, are normally determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode to provide maximum sensitivity after liquid-liquid extraction of I -L samples. Full-scan mass spectra are requ...

  9. A METHOD FOR AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF 10 ML WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING ACIDIC, BASIC, AND NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILE COMPOUNDS LISTED IN USEPA METHOD 8270 BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented showing the progress made towards the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the single run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of acid, base and neutral compounds...

  10. Assessment of a new method for the analysis of decomposition gases of polymers by a combining thermogravimetric solid-phase extraction and thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duemichen, E; Braun, U; Senz, R; Fabian, G; Sturm, H

    2014-08-01

    For analysis of the gaseous thermal decomposition products of polymers, the common techniques are thermogravimetry, combined with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR) and mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). These methods offer a simple approach to the decomposition mechanism, especially for small decomposition molecules. Complex spectra of gaseous mixtures are very often hard to identify because of overlapping signals. In this paper a new method is described to adsorb the decomposition products during controlled conditions in TGA on solid-phase extraction (SPE) material: twisters. Subsequently the twisters were analysed with thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TDS-GC-MS), which allows the decomposition products to be separated and identified using an MS library. The thermoplastics polyamide 66 (PA 66) and polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) were used as example polymers. The influence of the sample mass and of the purge gas flow during the decomposition process was investigated in TGA. The advantages and limitations of the method were presented in comparison to the common analysis techniques, TGA-FTIR and TGA-MS. PMID:24929909

  11. Resolution of volatile fuel compound profiles from Ascocoryne sarcoides: a comparison by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Volatile hydrocarbon production by Ascocoryne sacroides was studied over its growth cycle. Gas-phase compounds were measured continuously with a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and at distinct time points with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using head space solid phase microextraction (SPME). The PTR-MS ion signal permitted temporal resolution of the volatile production while the SPME results revealed distinct compound identities. The quantitative PTR-MS results showed the volatile production was dominated by ethanol and acetaldehyde, while the concentration of the remainder of volatiles consistently reached 2,000 ppbv. The measurement of alcohols from the fungal culture by the two techniques correlated well. Notable compounds of fuel interest included nonanal, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-butanol, 3-methyl- and benzaldehyde. Abiotic comparison of the two techniques demonstrated SPME fiber bias toward higher molecular weight compounds, making quantitative efforts with SPME impractical. Together, PTR-MS and SPME GC-MS were shown as valuable tools for characterizing volatile fuel compound production from microbiological sources. PMID:22480438

  12. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ruan, E D; Aalhus, J L; Summerfelt, S T; Davidson, J; Swift, B; Juárez, M

    2013-12-20

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SBSE-TD-GCMS). MIB and GSM were solid phase extracted using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated stir bars, analyzed by gas chromatography, and detected in full scan mode of mass selective detector (MSD). Using this method, the calibration curves of MIB and GSM were linear in the range of 0.3-100ng/L, with a correlation coefficient above 0.999 and RSDs less than 4% (n=4). The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3, n=6) and limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N=10, n=6) of MIB and GSM were both ∼0.3 and 1ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of MIB and GSM were 22% and 29% by spike in 30ng/L standard compounds, 23% and 30% by spike-in 100ng/L standard compounds in salmon tissue samples with good precision (<8% of RSDs, n=6), respectively. The recoveries of MIB and GSM were better than reported methodologies using SPME fibres (<10%) in fish tissue samples. This method was successfully applied to monitor and characterize depurated salmon fillet samples (0, 3, 6 and 10 days). PMID:24252650

  13. Identification of odorants in frankincense (Boswellia sacra Flueck.) by aroma extract dilution analysis and two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Johannes; Buettner, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Frankincense has been known, traded and used throughout the ages for its exceptional aroma properties, and is still commonly used in both secular and religious settings to convey a pleasant odor. Surprisingly, the odoriferous principle(s) underlying its unique odor profile have never been published. In this study, resin samples of Boswellia sacra Flueck. from both Somalia and Oman were investigated by aroma extract dilution analysis. In a comprehensive, odor-activity guided approach both chemo-analytical and human-sensory parameters were used to identify odor active constituents of the volatile fraction of B. sacra. Among the key odorants found were α-pinene, β-myrcene, linalool, p-cresol and two unidentified sesquiterpenoids. Overall, a total of 23 odorants were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-olfactometry and heart-cut two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry. The majority of the identified odorant compounds were oxygenated monoterpenes, along with some relevant mono- and sesquiterpenes and only one diterpenoid substance. Several of these compounds were reported here for the first time as odorous constituents in B. sacra. Identifying bioactive compounds might support a better understanding with regard to the potential benefits of frankincense, for example in aromatherapy or ecclesial settings. PMID:25468535

  14. A Study on the Chemical Compositions of the Yinqiaosan (Lonicerae and Forsythiae Powder) at Different Time of Later-decoction by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yachun; Chen, Yajun; Qin, Kunming; Liu, Xiao; Cai, Baochang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Yinqiaosan (Lonicerae and Forsythiae Powder), as a famous prescription of Dr. Wu Jutong in Qing dynasty of China, has the effects of diaphoresis cooling, fire-purging, and detoxicaton. It is mainly used in the treatment of influenza, hand-foot-mouth disease, esophagitis, pneumonia, acute tonsillitis, mumps, and other viral infections. It is one of the widely used traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions with proven curative effects in clinical use. Objective: To research the material basis of Yinqiaosan decoction when decocting mint, herba schizonepetae in different length of later-decoction time, to find the influence on volatile components of Yinqiaosan decoction decocted later in different length of time, to lay the foundation to further clarify the after-decoction mechanism of Yinqiaosan, and the specification of Yinqiaosan decoction process. Materials and Methods: Gas chromatography mass spectrometry method is used to analyze the volatile components of Yinqiaosan decoction samples decocted for 0, 3, 5, 8, and 10 min. Results: Later-decocting mint and herba schizonepetae at different time when decocting Yinqiaosan had a significant influence on the volatile components of the solution. 54 different chemical components were identified: 25 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 3 min; 13 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 5 min; 11 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 8 min; 7 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 10 min; and 26 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 0 min. There were more volatile components in the sample after-decocted for 3 min. A total of 54 different chemical components were identified in different later-decocting solution samples. These components form the basis of the Yinqiaosan drug effect. Conclusions: The length of later-decoction time of mint and herba schizonepetae was confirmed to be 3 min when decocting Yinqiaosan. SUMMARY Later-decocting mint and herba schizonepetae at different time had a significant influence on the volatile components of the solutionFifty-four different chemical components were identified in different later-decocting solution samplesThere were more volatile components in the sample after-decocted for 3 minThe volatile components content was high. These components form the important basis of the Yinqiaosan drug effect.Total ion flow diagram of volatile oils in the Yinqiaosan sample with mint, herba schizonepetae after 3 min decoction. Abbreviations used: GC-MS: Gas chromatography mass spectrometry, TCM: Traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:27076750

  15. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  16. Precolumn sample-enrichment device for analysis of ambient volatile organics by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arnts, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC/MS) identification of air pollutants generally requires a preconcentration step to provide sufficient sample for analysis. Cryogenic trapping is often used to enrich the sample since nitrogen and oxygen are not condensed. It does, however, concentrate enormous quantities of water and carbon dioxide - enough to plug high-resolution narrow-bore capillary columns needed for separation of complex environmental samples. Whole-air samples were collected in stainless steel containers or Tedlar bags for analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC/FID). In order to provide identification of unknown peaks and confirmation of tentatively named peaks, the system described herein was designed and built to enrich samples for GC/MS analysis of volatile organics. The preconcentration system consists of a solid sorbent trap and a cryogenic trap used in sequence to collect organic vapors and focus them for analysis by GC/MS.

  17. GC-MS in the analysis of organic compounds in meteorites. [Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Romiez, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    The application of an analytical approach combining gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has shown that the amino acid composition of meteorite extracts is quite complex. A computer was used in the evaluation of the data obtained in the investigations. The computer programs developed have been concerned solely with the mass spectra of amino acids. Specialized programs have been written to determine the number of carbon atoms in an amino acid which is a member of any of three subclasses.

  18. Determination of boiling point of petrochemicals by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate regression analysis of structural activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Fakayode, Sayo O; Mitchell, Breanna S; Pollard, David A

    2014-08-01

    Accurate understanding of analyte boiling points (BP) is of critical importance in gas chromatographic (GC) separation and crude oil refinery operation in petrochemical industries. This study reported the first combined use of GC separation and partial-least-square (PLS1) multivariate regression analysis of petrochemical structural activity relationship (SAR) for accurate BP determination of two commercially available (D3710 and MA VHP) calibration gas mix samples. The results of the BP determination using PLS1 multivariate regression were further compared with the results of traditional simulated distillation method of BP determination. The developed PLS1 regression was able to correctly predict analytes BP in D3710 and MA VHP calibration gas mix samples, with a root-mean-square-%-relative-error (RMS%RE) of 6.4%, and 10.8% respectively. In contrast, the overall RMS%RE of 32.9% and 40.4%, respectively obtained for BP determination in D3710 and MA VHP using a traditional simulated distillation method were approximately four times larger than the corresponding RMS%RE of BP prediction using MRA, demonstrating the better predictive ability of MRA. The reported method is rapid, robust, and promising, and can be potentially used routinely for fast analysis, pattern recognition, and analyte BP determination in petrochemical industries. PMID:24881546

  19. High-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with glass capillary columns for the screening of natural products.

    PubMed

    dos, SantosPereirAlberto; Carbonell, Silvia Albero; de, AquinoNetoFranciscoRadler; do, AmaralAnaClaudiaFernandes; Barnes, Roderick A

    2002-02-22

    High-temperature high resolution gas chromatography (HT-HRGC) and HT-HRGC coupled to mass spectrometry (HT-HRGC-MS) are powerful but relatively unexplored tools for the analysis of crude extracts and fractions of natural products. To illustrate the scope of the technique the direct characterization of several compounds, present in crude extracts of leaves and stems of Croton hemiargyreus Muell. Arg. var. hemiargyreus was undertaken, without derivatization or clean-up procedures. Both practical aspects and limitations of HT-HRGC and HT-HRGC-MS were evaluated resulting in a simple, straightforward and extremely powerful technique for the analysis of complex mixtures. PMID:11883659

  20. Screening of steroids in horse urine and plasma by using electron impact and chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Gordon, B; Hewetson, D; Granley, K; Ashraf, M; Mishra, U; Dombrovskis, D

    1989-10-01

    Gas chromatography with chemical ionization mass spectrometry and selected-ion monitoring provided a sensitive method for the screening and confirmation of steroids in horse urine and plasma. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry was more sensitive than the electron impact ionization mass spectrometry for most of the steroids except for testosterone, prednisone-metabolite-2 and prednisolone-metabolite-2. The chromatographic conditions used in this study provided clean separation of different natural and synthetic steroids. Approximately 75-85% of the steroids added to plasma and approximately 65-70% of the steroids added to urine were recovered by the extraction procedure used in this study. PMID:2808600

  1. Determination of volatile organic compound patterns characteristic of five unifloral honey by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled to chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Baroni, María Verónica; Nores, María Laura; Díaz, María del Pilar; Chiabrando, Gustavo Alberto; Fassano, Juan Pablo; Costa, Cristina; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto

    2006-09-20

    We report the evaluation of the floral origin of honey by analysis of its volatile organic compounds (VOCs) profile, joined with the use of combined pattern recognition techniques. Honey samples, from five floral origins, were analyzed by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, selecting 35 VOCs out of the entire profiles, which were analyzed by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), stepwise discriminant analysis (SDA), and K-nearest-neighbor (KNN). Both HCA and SDA were used as exploratory tools to select a group of VOCs representing similitude and differences among studied origins. Thus, six out of 35 VOCs were selected, verifying their discriminating power by KNN, which afforded 93% correct classification. Therefore, we drastically reduced the amount of compounds under consideration but kept a good differentiation between floral origins. Selected compounds were identified as octanal, benzeneacetaldehyde, 1-octanol, 2-methoxyphenol, nonanal, and 2-H-1-benzopyran-2-one. The analysis of VOC profiles, coupled to HCA, SDA, and KNN, provides a feasible alternative to evaluate the botanical source of honey. PMID:16968088

  2. Concurrent quantification of light and heavy sulphur volatiles in wine by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fedrizzi, Bruno; Magno, Franco; Moser, Sergio; Nicolini, Giorgio; Versini, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    A new method based on headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS) to analyse 13 light and heavy volatile sulphur compounds in the same run was established. For the successful application of the procedure, various adsorption process parameters were optimised. In particular the nature of the adsorptive phase, the temperature, the ionic strength of the sample solutions and the equilibration time were considered. The best extraction conditions, in terms of the maximum signal obtainable for each compound, were obtained with a carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (CAR-PDMS-DVB) 2 cm long coating fibre. The choice of suitable internal standards and the matrix effect were studied and the proposed method was validated by determining linearity, precision and accuracy, evaluating the critical, detection and quantification limits. This method is fast, sensitive and precise and easy to transfer to wine quality control. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the determination of the aforementioned sulphur compounds in 32 red and white wines. PMID:17279596

  3. Identification and characterization of vinylpyrrolidone-vinylimidazolium chloride copolymers in cosmetic products by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Gmahl, E; Ruess, W

    1993-04-01

    Synopsis Commercially available copolymers of 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone and 1-vinyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, known as 'Luviquat' types in the cosmetic industry, were analysed for their composition using a combination of pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. This is a report on the determined pyrolytic products and the fast identification of the analysed polymers both in raw materials and cosmetic products. Calibration with defined material ensures the determination of monomer ratios with good reproducibility. Résumé Les copolymères de chlorure de 1-vinyle-2-pyrolidone et de 1-vinyle-3-methylimidazolium disponibles dans le commerce, connus dans l'industrie cosmétique sous la dénomination de copolymères de vinyle, ont été analysés à laide d'une méthode combinant la pyrolyse, la spectrométrie de mass et la chromatographie en phase gazeuse. Cet article constitue un rapport sur les produits déterminés par pyrolyse et sur la rapidité d'identification des polymères analysés à la fois dans des matières premières et dans des produits cosmétiques. Le calibrage avec un matériel défini assure une bonne détermination des taux de monomères dotés d'une reproductibilité. PMID:19272122

  4. Quantitative solid phase microextraction - gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis of the pesticides lindane, heptachlor and two heptachlor transformation products in groundwater.

    PubMed

    McManus, Sarah-Louise; Coxon, Catherine E; Richards, Karl G; Danaher, Martin

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a method for the determination of lindane, heptachlor and two heptachlor transformation products (exo- and endo-heptachlor epoxide) in groundwater. Samples were extracted using a simple solid phase microextraction (SPME) method with a polyacrylate fibre prior to detection by gas chromatography mass spectrometry in electron impact ionisation mode (GC-EI-MS). The linearity of the method ranged from 0.015 to 5.0 μg L(-1), with correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. Recoveries ranged from 96 to 101% at several fortification levels with all coefficients of variation (CV%) less than 10.5%. The method was validated to the permitted limits laid down in the European Union drinking water directive (98/83/EC). The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 0.015 μg L(-1) in groundwater samples. Samples had to be analysed within 24h of collection otherwise degradation occurred and disposable SPME polyacrylate fibres lasted up to 51 injections. Both endo-heptachlor epoxide and lindane were detected in groundwater samples with concentrations ranging between 0.033 and 0.048 μg L(-1). PMID:23466207

  5. Determination of bisphenol A in water by micro liquid-liquid extraction followed by silylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez-Casado, A; Navas, N; del Olmo, M; Vlchez, J L

    1998-11-01

    A method for the determination of bisphenol A according to the European Union guideline, which establishes a limit of 0.1 ng/mL for organic pollutants in water, is proposed. The method involves a micro liquid-liquid extraction using dichloromethane followed by a silylation step. Identification and quantitation are performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, using an HP-5MS column. The retention time is 7.02 min. Quantitation is carried out using single-ion monitoring (SIM) at m/z 73, 357, and 372. A clean-up is not necessary using SIM mode. Deuterated anthracene (2H10-anthracene) is used as an internal standard. The method is applied to the determination of bisphenol A at very low concentration levels (10.0-250.0 ng/L) in different types of natural water samples. The detection limit obtained is 0.4 ng/L. Recovery efficiencies are close to 100% in all cases. PMID:9812391

  6. Application of SiO(2) hollow fibers for sorptive microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of organochlorine pesticides in herbal matrices.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2010-10-01

    A method involving simultaneous extraction and sample clean-up procedure: hollow fiber sorptive microextraction, coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometric detection for quantification of seven organochlorine pesticides in Radix et Rhizoma Rhei is described. SiO(2) hollow fiber with porous structure was synthesized for the first time. The internal diameter of SiO(2) hollow fiber is 380 microm and average wall thickness is 100 microm. Aggregated SiO(2) particles deposited on the surface of the hollow fiber in a regular array lead to porous structure. SiO(2) hollow fiber was applied to the determination of organochlorine pesticides in Radix et Rhizoma Rhei to avoid sample clean-up and minimize the matrix effects. Extraction solvent, extraction temperature and equilibration time were optimized. Fiber to fiber repeatability over the concentration ranges were less than 10%. Recoveries were satisfactory (between 63% and 115%) for most of organochlorine pesticides at spiking levels. Furthermore, the proposed method was also applied to determine seven organochlorine pesticides in 43 commercial Radix et Rhizoma Rhei samples, in which the selected pesticides were found in eight samples. The results have been further confirmed by solvent extraction methods according to China Pharmacopoeia (2005). PMID:20661729

  7. Monitoring multi-class pesticide residues in fresh grape by hollow fibre sorptive extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2011-07-15

    A fast and sensitive multi-residue analysis method is reported for simultaneous determination of 25 pesticides of chemical classes which are spiked into fresh grape. The sample pretreatment method involves extraction and clean-up in one step with SiO(2) hollow fibre from 1.0mL fresh grape slurry to minimise the matrix effects, and determination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selective ion monitoring mode. The validation of the optimised method in terms of linearity, precision, recovery and repeatability showed that the proposed procedure is sensitive (the limits of detection were in the range of 0.0009-0.0084?gmL(-1) for 25 pesticides), precise and repeatable (average recoveries were between 61% and 108% with relative standard deviations from 4.0% to 12.4 %). The proposed method was also applied to the analysis of these groups of pesticides in fresh grape sample purchased from the local markets of Lanzhou (China), while no residues of the selected pesticides were detected in the sample. PMID:23140736

  8. Automated resolution of chromatographic signals by independent component analysis-orthogonal signal deconvolution in comprehensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Almenara, Xavier; Perera, Alexandre; Ramírez, Noelia; Brezmes, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) provides a different perspective in metabolomics profiling of samples. However, algorithms for GC×GC-MS data processing are needed in order to automatically process the data and extract the purest information about the compounds appearing in complex biological samples. This study shows the capability of independent component analysis-orthogonal signal deconvolution (ICA-OSD), an algorithm based on blind source separation and distributed in an R package called osd, to extract the spectra of the compounds appearing in GC×GC-MS chromatograms in an automated manner. We studied the performance of ICA-OSD by the quantification of 38 metabolites through a set of 20 Jurkat cell samples analyzed by GC×GC-MS. The quantification by ICA-OSD was compared with a supervised quantification by selective ions, and most of the R(2) coefficients of determination were in good agreement (R(2)>0.90) while up to 24 cases exhibited an excellent linear relation (R(2)>0.95). We concluded that ICA-OSD can be used to resolve co-eluted compounds in GC×GC-MS. PMID:27208528

  9. Ion and gas chromatography mass spectrometry investigations of organophosphates in lithium ion battery electrolytes by electrochemical aging at elevated cathode potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Waldemar; Wagner, Ralf; Streipert, Benjamin; Kraft, Vadim; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    The electrochemical aging of commercial non-aqueous lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6)/organic carbonate solvent based lithium ion battery electrolyte has been investigated in view of the formation of ionic and non-ionic alkylated phosphates. Subject was a solvent mixture of ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate EC:EMC (1:1, by wt.) with 1 M LiPF6 (LP50 Selectilyte™, BASF). The analysis was carried out by ion chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for ionic compounds and (headspace) gas chromatography mass spectrometry ((HS)-GC-MS) for non-ionic compounds. The electrochemical aging was performed by galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling and potentiostatic experiments with LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LMNO) as cathode material at increased cut-off potentials (>4.5 V vs. Li/Li+). A strong dependence of the formation of organophosphates on the applied electrode potential was observed and investigated by quantitative analysis of the formed phosphates. In addition, new possible "fingerprint" compounds for describing the electrolyte status were investigated and compared to existing compounds.

  10. Enzymatic Digestion and Selective Quantification of Underivatised Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cocaine in Human Hair Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Breidi, Salah Eddine; Barker, James; Petróczi, Andrea; Naughton, Declan P.

    2012-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods for drug analysis routinely employ derivatising reagents. The aim of this paper was to develop a method for the analysis of two recreational drugs, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cocaine in hair samples using GC-MS, without prior derivatisation, thus allowing the sample to be reanalysed in its original form. An enzymatic digestion technique was also developed. Ten hair samples, that were known positive for either Δ9-THC and/or cocaine, were enzymatically digested, extracted, and then analysed by GC-MS. All samples measured contained Δ9-THC and one sample contained cocaine. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 ng/mg and 0.05 ng/mg, respectively, for cocaine and 0.015 ng/mg and 0.02 ng/mg, respectively, for Δ9-THC. The wide detection window, ease of direct analysis by GC-MS, lower detection limits of underivatised samples, and the stability of drugs using this technique may offer an improved method of analysis. PMID:22567573

  11. Analysis of furan in coffee of different provenance by head-space solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: effect of brewing procedures.

    PubMed

    La Pera, Lara; Liberatore, Alfredo; Avellone, Giuseppe; Fanara, Serena; Dugo, Giacomo; Agozzino, Pasquale

    2009-06-01

    A simple, sensitive and accurate method for the analysis of furan in roasted coffee has been used based on headspace-solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The extraction was performed using 75-microm carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber. Ionic strength, extraction time and temperature, and desorption time were assessed as the most important parameters affecting the HS-SPME procedure and d(4)-furan was used as the internal standard. The linearity range was in the range 0.0075-0.486 ng g(-1); the LOD and LOQ calculated using the signal-to-noise ratio approach were 0.002 and 0.006 ng g(-1), respectively. The inter- and intra-day precision was 8 and 10%, respectively. The concentration of furan found in batches of roasted coffee powder different producing countries ranged from 57.3 to 587.3 ng g(-1). The mean reduction in furan levels observed when brewing coffee by either infusion, using a moka pot or an expresso machine was 57, 67.5 and 63.3%, respectively. PMID:19680951

  12. Development and validation of an analytical method for total amitraz in fruit and honey with quantification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Caldow, Marianne; Fussell, Richard J; Smith, Frankie; Sharman, Matthew

    2007-03-01

    The EU maximum residue limit (MRL) definition for amitraz is 'the sum of amitraz plus all its metabolites containing the 2,4-aniline moiety, expressed as amitraz'. A rapid and sensitive method has been developed and validated in-house for the determination of total amitraz in pears, strawberries, oranges and honey. Samples were hydrolysed (under acidic followed by alkaline conditions) to convert amitraz to 2,4-dimethyaniline, which was then partitioned into 2,2,4-trimethylpentane prior to quantification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was validated at 0.02 and 0.1 mg kg(-1) amitraz (well below MRL requirements) with a lowest calibrated level (LCL) for 2,4-dimethylaniline of 0.002 mg kg(-1) (equivalent to 0.0024 mg kg(-1) amitraz). A single partition step yielded recoveries of approximately 60% (with % CV values in the range 3.3-8.2), which is satisfactory for screening purposes. A second partition increased recoveries by 10-20%, making the method suitable for the quantification of residues. PMID:17364930

  13. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of human mesenchymal stem cell metabolism during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation under different oxygen tensions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Nathalie; Kim, Junho; Liu, Yijun; Logan, Timothy M; Ma, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are the primary cell type in bone tissue engineering, and their life span during osteogenic differentiation is associated with changes in oxygen tension. As a ubiquitous regulator of cellular metabolic activity, oxygen tension influences the profiles of metabolites in the entire metabolic network and plays an important role in hMSC survival, function, and osteogenic differentiation. In the current study, we hypothesize that hMSC have a metabolic phenotype that supports growth in low oxygen environments and that this phenotype changes upon differentiation, leading to differential responses to oxygen tension. We developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolic profiling approach to analyze the metabolic fate of (13)C-glucose in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) in undifferentiated hMSC and hMSC-derived osteoblasts (hMSC-OS) in response to perturbation in oxygen tension; specifically we compared changes induced by culture under 20% vs. 2% O2. The isotope enrichments in the metabolites were calculated and used to infer activities of specific metabolic enzymes and the associated pathways. The results revealed contrasting metabolic profiles for hMSC and the hMSC-OS in both 20% and 2% O2 states, with the most significant differences involving coupling of glycolysis to the TCA cycle, glutaminolysis, and the malate-aspartate shuttle. The results have important implications in defining the optimal culture conditions for hMSC expansion and osteogenic differentiation. PMID:24269895

  14. Rapid and effective sample clean-up based on magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes for the determination of pesticide residues in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaojuan; Guo, Qianjin; Chen, Xiaoping; Xue, Tao; Wang, Hui; Yao, Pei

    2014-02-15

    In this work, amine-functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MNPs/MWCNTs) composites were synthesised by a simple method and applied as an adsorbent for rapid clean-up of acetonitrile extracts of tea samples prior to analysing eight pesticide residues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Several parameters affecting the sampling and treatment efficiency were investigated, including extraction solvent, sonication time, weight ratio of MWCNTs to MNPs in the composites, amount of adsorbent, clean-up time and washing solution. Under the optimised conditions, the recoveries obtained for each pesticide ranged from 72.5% to 109.1% with relative standard deviations lower than 12.6%. Limit of quantification ranged from 0.02 to 0.08 mg kg⁻¹. The established method was successfully applied to the analysis of pesticide residues in real tea samples. The results indicated that the use of MNPs/MWCNTs composites allowed the simple and expeditious clean-up of complex tea samples for subsequent determination of pesticide residues. PMID:24128556

  15. Determination of pyrimethanil and kresoxim-methyl in green groceries by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Navalón, Alberto; Prieto, Avismelsi; Araujo, Lilia; Vílchez, José Luis

    2002-11-01

    A method for determination of trace amounts of the fungicides pyrimethanil and kresoxim-methyl in green groceries, previous headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME), was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and selected ion monitoring (GC-MS, SIM). Both fungicides were extracted with a fused-silica fiber coated with 85 microm polyacrylate. The effects of pH, ionic strength, extraction and desorption times as well as the extraction temperature were studied. The linear concentration range of application was 12.5-250 ng g(-1) for both compounds, with detection limits of 1.8-2.0 ng g(-1) for pyrimethanil and 2.8-3.1 ng g(-1) for kresoxim-methyl. SPME/GC-MS analysis yielded good reproducibility (RSD between 7.4 and 15.0%). It was applied to check the eventual existence of pyrimethanil and kresoxim-methyl above the detection limits on grapes, strawberries, tomatoes and ketchup samples. The method validation was completed with spiked matrix samples. It can be applied as a monitoring tool in grapes, strawberries, tomatoes and ketchup samples. PMID:12456089

  16. Combination of direct infusion mass spectrometry and gas chromatography mass spectrometry for toxicometabolomic study of red blood cells and serum of mice Mus musculus after mercury exposure.

    PubMed

    García-Sevillano, M A; García-Barrera, T; Navarro, F; Abril, N; Pueyo, C; López-Barea, J; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2015-03-15

    Although mercury (Hg) is an important environmental and occupational pollutant, its toxicological effects, especially in serum and red blood cells (RBCs), have been scarcely studied. A toxicometabolomics workflow based on high resolution mass spectrometry approaches has been applied to investigate the toxicological effects of Hg in Mus musculus mice after subcutaneous injection for 10 days, which produced inflammation and vacuolization, steatosis and karyolysis in the hepatic tissue. To this end, direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) of polar and lipophilic extracts from serum and RBCs, using positive and negative mode of acquisition (ESI+/ESI-), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used. A quantitative analysis of reversible oxidized thiols in serum proteins demonstrated a strong oxidative stress induction in the liver of Hg-exposed mice. Endogenous metabolites alterations were identified by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Mercury-exposed mice show perturbations in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, membrane phospholipid breakdown and oxidative stress-related metabolites in serum along the exposure. This work reports for the first time the effects of Hg-exposure on RBCs metabolic pathways, and reveals disturbances in glycolysis, membrane turnover, glutathione and ascorbate metabolisms. PMID:25660718

  17. Determination of volatile nitrosamines in meat products by microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Martínez-Castillo, Nelson; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2011-04-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were evaluated for use in the extraction and preconcentration of volatile nitrosamines in meat products. Parameters affecting MAE, such as the extraction solvent used, and DLLME, including the nature and volume of the extracting and disperser solvents, extraction time, salt addition and centrifugation time, were optimized. In the MAE method, 0.25g of sample mass was extracted in 10mL NaOH (0.05M) in a closed-vessel system. For DLLME, 1.5mL of methanol (disperser solvent) containing 20μL of carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) was rapidly injected by syringe into 5mL of the sample extract solution (previously adjusted to pH 6), thereby forming a cloudy solution. Phase separation was performed by centrifugation, and a volume of 3μL of the sedimented phase was analyzed by GC-MS. The enrichment factors provided by DLLME varied from 220 to 342 for N-nitrosodiethylamine and N-nitrosopiperidine, respectively. The matrix effect was evaluated for different samples, and it was concluded that sample quantification can be carried out by aqueous calibration. Under the optimized conditions, detection limits ranged from 0.003 to 0.014ngmL(-1) for NPIP and NMEA, respectively (0.12-0.56ngg(-1) in the meat products). PMID:21376329

  18. Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

    2013-02-01

    Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 %C2%B0C. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (%236 and %2310), one commercially available formulation (%2321), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl %2310 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl %2310 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

  19. Nanoscale-supported heteropoly acid as a new fiber coating for solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemi, Mir Mahdi; Hassani, Sona; Rafiee, Ezzat; Yousefi, Vahid

    2015-02-13

    In the present study, 12-tungstophosphoric (PW) acid as heteropoly acid, supported on silica-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs), was used as a new fiber coating for solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The γ-Fe2O3@SiO2-PW nanocomposite with high surface area was synthesized and characterized by SEM and FT-IR. The prepared nanocomposite was immobilized on a stainless steel wire for fabrication of the SPME fiber. The fiber was evaluated for the extraction of some phenolic compounds (PCs) from water sample in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A one-at-a-time optimization strategy was applied for optimizing the important extraction parameters such as extraction temperature, extraction time, ionic strength, stirring rate, pH, and desorption temperature and time. In optimum conditions, the repeatability for one fiber (n=3), expressed as relative standard deviation (R.S.D. %), was between 4.8% and 9.6% for the test compounds. The detection limits for the studied compounds were between 0.004 and 0.05 pg mL(-1). The developed method offers the advantage of being simple to use, with shorter analysis time, lower cost of equipment, thermal stability of fiber and high relative recovery in comparison to conventional methods of analysis. PMID:25618361

  20. Development and validation of a sensitive thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method for the determination of phosgene in air samples.

    PubMed

    Juillet, Y; Dubois, C; Bintein, F; Dissard, J; Bossée, A

    2014-08-01

    A new rapid, sensitive and reliable method was developed for the determination of phosgene in air samples using thermal desorption (TD) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The method is based on a fast (10 min) active sampling of only 1 L of air onto a Tenax® GR tube doped with 0.5 mL of derivatizing mixture containing dimercaptotoluene and triethylamine in hexane solution. Validation of the TD-GC-MS method showed a low limit of detection (40 ppbv), acceptable repeatability, intermediate fidelity (relative standard deviation within 12 %) and excellent accuracy (>95%). Linearity was demonstrated for two concentration ranges (0.04 to 2.5 ppmv and 2.5 to 10 ppmv) owing to variation of derivatization recovery between low and high concentration levels. Due to its simple on-site implementation and its close similarity with recommended operating procedure (ROP) for chemical warfare agents vapour sampling, the method is particularly useful in the process of verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention. PMID:24817348

  1. Microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization for rapid analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Mou, Zhao-Li; Hao, Shuang-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2012-11-01

    A rapid and practical microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization (MAED) method was developed for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine. Several critical experimental parameters for MAED, including reaction temperature, microwave power and the amount of derivatization reagent (methanol), were optimized with response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and total unsaturated fatty acids content obtained with MAED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional Soxhlet or microwave extraction and then derivatization method. The investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of the derivatization reaction revealed that microwave assistance could reduce activation energy and increase the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor. The MAED method simplified the sample preparation procedure, shortened the reaction time, but improved the extraction and derivatization efficiency of lipids and reduced ingredient losses, especially for the oxidization and isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, speed and practicality of this method indicates great potential for high throughput analysis of fatty acids in natural medicinal samples. PMID:22968083

  2. High concentration capacity sample preparation techniques to improve the informative potential of two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: application to sensomics.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Cagliero, Cecilia; Liberto, Erica; Nicolotti, Luca; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Sgorbini, Barbara; Bicchi, Carlo

    2013-11-29

    This study reports and critically discusses the results of a systematic investigation on the effectiveness of different and complementary sampling approaches, based on either sorption and adsorption, treated as a further dimension of a two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analytical platform for sensomics. The focus is on the potentials of a group of high concentration capacity (HCC) sample preparation (Solid Phase Microextraction, SPME, Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction, SBSE and Headspace Sorptive Extraction, HSSE) and Dynamic Headspace (D-HS) techniques investigated to provide information useful for fingerprinting and profiling studies of food aroma. Volatiles and semi-volatiles contributing to define whole and nonfat dry milk aroma have been successfully characterized thanks to the combination of effective and selective sampling by HCC and D-HS techniques, high separation and detection power of GC×GC-MS and suitable data elaboration (i.e., Comprehensive Template Matching Fingerprinting - CTMF). Out of the sample preparation techniques investigated, HSSE and SBSE have shown to be really effective for sensomics studies because of their high concentration factors, providing highly representative profiles as well as analyte recovery suitable for GC-Olfactometry even with high odor threshold (OT) markers or potent odorants in sub-trace amounts. PMID:24144305

  3. Simultaneous analysis of phthalates, adipate and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in edible oils using isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oh, Min-Seok; Lee, Seon-Hwa; Moon, Myeong Hee; Lee, Dong Soo; Park, Hyun-Mee

    2014-01-01

    A method for simultaneous determination of 12 priority phthalates, adipate and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in edible oils by isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (ID-GC-MS) was developed for fast, accurate and trace analysis. The extraction and clean-up procedures were optimised, and using stable isotope-labelled internal standards for each analyte, relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.92-10.6% and spiked sample recoveries of 80.6-97.8% were obtained. Limits of detection for PAHs were in the range of 0.15-0.77 µg/kg and those for phthalates were in the range of 4.6-10.0 µg/kg. The calibration curves exhibited good linearities with regression coefficients of R(2) ≥ 0.99. Twelve edible oils were examined to evaluate the efficiency of this method. Among the 12 analytes, dibutyl phthalates (DBP), diethylhexyl phthalates (DEHP), diethylhexyl adipate (DEHA), benzo[a]anthracene (B[a]A), chrysene (Chry) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F) were detected in the range of 1.17-806 µg/kg. PMID:25029399

  4. Comparison of the sensitivity of different aroma extraction techniques in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to detect minor aroma compounds in wine.

    PubMed

    Gamero, Amparo; Wesselink, Wilma; de Jong, Catrienus

    2013-01-11

    MicroVinification platforms are used for screening purposes to study aroma development in wine. These high-throughput methodologies require flavor analysis techniques that allow fast detection of a high number of aroma compounds which often appear in very low concentrations (μg/l). In this work, a selection of aroma extraction techniques in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were evaluated to detect minor wine aroma compounds in low sample volume. The techniques evaluated were headspace (HS), headspace solid-phase dynamic extraction (HS-SPDE), headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME), stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and monolithic material sorptive extraction (MMSE). DI-SPME showed the highest sensitivity as expressed by detection of the highest percentage of total aroma compounds at concentrations around 0.1 μg/l. SBSE and MMSE followed DI-SPME in terms of sensitivity. HS-SPME was less sensitive but considered sensitive enough for detection of most of the volatile compounds present in highly aromatic wines. Matrix effect was shown to strongly affect aroma extraction and therefore the sensitivity of the different extraction methods. PMID:23245586

  5. [Rapid determination of pesticide multiresidues in vegetables and fruits by accelerated solvent extraction coupled with online gel permeation chromatography-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yunfu; Tang, Hongbing; Wu, Ying; Li, Guiying

    2012-07-01

    A novel method was developed for the rapid determination of 22 representative pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) coupled with online gel permeation chromatography-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GPC-GC-MS). The sample was extracted by accelerated solvent extraction with dichloromethane-acetone (1:1, v/v) and purified with a carbon/NH2 column, evaporated to dryness by nitrogen, then dissolved in cyclohexane-acetone (7:3, v/v), and finally identified and quantified by GPC-GC-MS system in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The results showed that the linearities of the 22 pesticides were good in their linear ranges. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) were 0.3-1.8 microg/kg. The limits of quantification (S/N = 10) ranged from 1-6 microg/kg. The recoveries for all at three spiked levels in Chinese cabbages and apples ranged from 70.5% to 107.5% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.1%-8.7%. The proposed method is accurate, sensitive and highly efficient in the extraction, and can be used for the quick determination of the pesticide multiresidues in vegetables and fruits. PMID:23189658

  6. [Quality assurance/quality control for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phthalate esters in soils using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifei; Huang, Yeru; Shi, Shuangxin; Zhou, Li; Dong, Liang; Zhang, Ting; Zeng, Liangzi; Mi, Fangzhuo; Shao, Dingding

    2010-05-01

    A method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phthalate esters (PAEs) in soil samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. After extracted by accelerated solvent extraction or ultrasonic extraction by dichloromethane-hexane (1:1, v/v) and dichloromethane-acetone (1:1, v/v), respectively, the extracts were cleaned up by solid phase extraction and/or gel permeation chromatography. Quality control and quality assurance procedures were carried out with the methods of whole procedure blank, blank spike recovery, clean soil matrix spike recovery, and the comparison with reference materials. The method detection limits were 0.13-2.2 microg/kg and 0.19-0.52 microg/kg and the average recoveries were 41.5%-116.9% 90.7%-107.1% for the PAHs and the PAEs, respectively. The results showed that the method can meet the technical requirements on the soil sample test and analysis in the national survey of soil pollution. PMID:20812622

  7. Analysis of cantharidin in false blister beetles (Coleoptera: Oedemeridae) by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mehdinia, Ali; Asiabi, Mina; Jabbari, Ali; Abtahi, S Mohammad

    2011-10-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed to determine a type of terpenoid named as cantharidin in the false blister beetles, family Oedemeridae. The experimental parameters for HS-SPME method were optimized. Six commercial fibers for HS-SPME method development were tested and the divinylbenzene/carboxene/polydimethylsiloxane fiber was selected to provide the best detection of analyzed compound. The calibration curve showed linearity in the range of 0.1-50 μg mL(-1), correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.992), limit of detection (0.01 ng mL(-1)) and quantitation (0.04 ng mL(-1)) were obtained for the proposed method. The relative standard deviations of intra-day and inter-day assays were 7.8 and 3.4%, respectively. The recovery values, obtained after spiking the beetle samples by three concentration levels of standard solution, were higher than 87%. The results indicated the successful application of the proposed method on the analysis of cantharidin from the false blister beetles. PMID:21907641

  8. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in milk.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiujuan; Zhao, Aijun; Zhang, Aina; Liu, Huanqiang; Xiao, Wenjing; Wang, Chengjun; Wang, Xuedong

    2011-05-01

    An effective multi-residue pretreatment technique, solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), was proposed for the trace analysis of 14 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in milk samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Interesting analytes in milk samples were extracted with hexane after protein precipitation. The hexane extracts were loaded on an LC-Florisil column to isolate analytes from the milk matrix. The elutes were dried and dissolved in acetone, which was used as the disperser solvent in subsequent DLLME procedures. The effects of several important parameters on the extraction efficiency were evaluated. Under the optimized conditions, a linear relationship was obtained in the range of 0.02-10.00 μg/L (PCBs) and 0.5-100.00 μg/L (PBDEs). The LOD (S/N=3) and relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) for all analytes were 0.01-0.4 μg/L and 0.6-8.5%, respectively. The recoveries of the standards added to raw bovine milk samples were 74.0-131.8%, and the repeatabilities of the analysis results were 1.12-17.41%. This method has been successfully applied to estimating PCBs and PBDEs in milk samples. PMID:21394909

  9. [Determination of 28 organochlorine and pyrethroid pesticides in pine nuts using solid-phase extraction and on-line gel permeation chromatography-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Kang, Qinghe; Wu, Yan; Gao, Kaiyang; Li, Zhibin

    2009-03-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of 28 organochlorine pesticides and pyrethroid pesticides in pine nuts. The sample was extracted With acetonitrile-water (4:1, v/v) as the extraction solution by means of high-speed homogenization. The crude extract was purified by an Aluminium-N solid phase extraction column to remove most of the fat and sterols in the sample, then on-line gel permeation chromatography-gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GPC-GC/MS) analysis was performed. The recoveries for the most of pesticides in the sample spiked with the standards of 0.05 mg/kg were 70%-120%, and the relative standard deviations were less than 15%. The limits of detection of 28 organochlorine pesti- and pyrethroid pesticides were 0.002-0.05 mg/kg. The linear relationship and the recovery results were satisfactory. The method is rapid, accurate, highly senstive, and can be used for the simultaneous determination of pesticide residues in pine nuts. PMID:19626845

  10. Analysis of tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol in decomposed skeletal tissues following acute and repeated tramadol exposure by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Treena R; Watterson, James H

    2014-09-01

    Decomposed bone and plasma samples of rats exposed to tramadol (TRAM) under different dosing patterns were analyzed. Wistar rats received TRAM as one acute dose (n=4, 45 mg/kg, i.p.) or three doses (n=4, 15 mg/kg, i.p.), 40 min apart. Perimortem heart blood was collected, rats were euthanized and placed outdoors to decompose to skeleton. Recovered bone was ground and subjected to methanolic extraction. Bone extracts and plasma samples underwent solid phase extraction and were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Levels of TRAM and the primary metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (ODMT) were expressed as mass normalized response ratios (RR/m). Levels (RR/m) for TRAM and ODMT did not differ significantly between exposure types in any of the bone types examined or for the pooled bone comparisons (Mann-Whitney, p>0.05). However, ratios of analyte levels (RRTRAM/RRODMT) differed significantly between exposure patterns for tibial and skull bone as well as for pooled bone comparisons (Mann-Whitney, p<0.05). Levels of TRAM and ODMT, as well as ratios of analyte levels (RRTRAM/RRODMT), differed significantly in plasma between exposure patterns. Bone TRAM and ODMT levels were poorly correlated to corresponding plasma levels (TRAM: r=0.33-0.57; ODMT: r=-0.35-0.23). PMID:25112198

  11. Rapid determination of caffeine in one drop of beverages and foods using drop-to-drop solvent microextraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2007-11-01

    A simple and rapid sample cleanup and preconcentration method for the quantitative determination of caffeine in one drop of beverages and foods by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been proposed using drop-to-drop solvent microextraction (DDSME). The best optimum experimental conditions for DDSME were: chloroform as the extraction solvent, 5 min extraction time, 0.5 microL exposure volume of the extraction phase and no salt addition at room temperature. The optimized methodology exhibited good linearity between 0.05 and 5.0 microg/mL with correlation coefficient of 0.980. The relative standard deviation (RSD) and limits of detection (LOD) of the DDSME/GC/MS method were 4.4% and 4.0 ng/mL, respectively. Relative recovery of caffeine in beverages and foods were found to be 96.6-101%, which showing good reliability of this method. This DDSME excludes the major disadvantages of conventional method of caffeine extraction, like large amount of organic solvent and sample consumption and long sample pre-treatment process. So, this approach proves that the DDSME/GC/MS technique can be applied as a simple, fast and feasible diagnosis tool for environmental, food and biological application for extremely small amount of real sample analysis. PMID:17904565

  12. Studies on the human metabolism and the toxicologic detection of the cough suppressant dropropizine in urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Staack, Roland F; Theobald, Denis S; Maurer, Hans H

    2004-08-01

    Studies are described on the metabolism and the toxicologic analysis of the nonopioid cough suppressant dropropizine [R,S-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperazinyl)1,2-propandiol, DRO] in human urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The metabolism studies showed that DRO was metabolized in humans mainly by hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, by N-dealkylation of the parent drug and of the hydroxyl-metabolite to the corresponding N-phenylpiperazines, and by degradation of the piperazine moiety. The authors' systematic toxicologic analysis (STA) procedure using full-scan GC-MS after acid hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and microwave-assisted acetylation allowed the unambiguous detection of DRO and its above-mentioned metabolites in human urine up to about 32 hours after intake of a single common therapeutic dose. The target analytes were found to be the parent compound DRO (earlier phase of excretion) and the hydroxylated metabolite para-hydroxy-DRO (later phase of excretion). Both allowed unambiguous detection of an intake of DRO and also differentiation from other phenylpiperazine derivatives. PMID:15257075

  13. Ancient wood of the Acqualadrone rostrum: materials history through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and sulfur X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frank, Patrick; Caruso, Francesco; Caponetti, Eugenio

    2012-05-15

    In 2008 the rostrum from an ancient warship was recovered from the Mediterranean near Acqualadrone, Sicily. To establish its provenance and condition, samples of black and brown rostrum wood were examined using sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). GC/MS of pyrolytic volatiles yielded only guaiacyl derivatives, indicating construction from pinewood. A derivatized extract of black wood yielded forms of abietic acid and sandaracopimaric acid consistent with pine pitch waterproofing. Numerical fits to the sulfur K-edge XAS spectra showed that about 65% of the endogenous sulfur consisted of thiols and disulfides. Elemental sulfur was about 2% and 7% in black and brown wood, respectively, while pyritic sulfur was about 12% and 6%. About 2% of the sulfur in both wood types was modeled as trimethylsulfonium, possibly reflecting biogenic (dimethylsulfonio)propionate. High-valent sulfur was exclusively represented by sulfate esters, consistent with bacterial sulfotransferase activity. Traces of chloride were detected, but no free sulfate ion. In summary, the rostrum was manufactured of pine wood and subsequently waterproofed with pine pitch. The subsequent 2300 years included battle, foundering, and marine burial followed by anoxia, bacterial colonization, sulfate reduction, and mobilization of transition metals, which produced pyrite and copious appended sulfur functionality. PMID:22545724

  14. The application of directly suspended droplet microextraction for the evaluation of phthalic acid esters in cow's milk by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Min, Shungeng; Ping, Hua; Song, Xiangzhong

    2016-04-22

    A simple and rapid method was developed for evaluating 16 phthalic acid esters (PAEs) at the μg/kg level in a complex milk matrix using directly suspended droplet microextraction-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (DSDME-GC-MS). The different parameters for extraction and for the DSDME experiment were optimized, including You are free to submit the revised manuscript at a later date as a new submission. 10g/L trichloroacetic acid concentration, 100μL cyclohexane micro-droplet organic solvent, 1100rpm stirring speed, 10min extraction time and no salt amount. Validation experiments showed good linearity (γ>0.9878, 0.002-0.4μg/mL), satisfactory precision (RSD<11%), and good accuracy (relative recovery of 70.2-108%) when analyzing milk samples using the optimized method. The limits of detection (LODs) ranged between 0.001 and 0.2μg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged between 0.003 and 0.7μg/L for 15 PAEs. Dinonyl phthalate (DINP) had a low response and did not have good linearity. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of PAEs in real milk samples. PMID:27025790

  15. Stir bar sorptive extraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of resveratrol, piceatannol and oxyresveratrol isomers in wines.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2013-11-01

    A simple and highly sensitive procedure based on stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry by means of a thermal desorption unit (SBSE-TD-GC-MS) has been optimized for the determination of cis/trans isomers of resveratrol, piceatannol and oxyresveratrol in wine samples. Quantification of the cis-isomers was carried out by generating the standards from the corresponding trans-species once they had been preconcentrated on the SBSE extracting phase. The optimization of the acetylation derivatization, SBSE extraction and thermal desorption steps was investigated using Plackett-Burman designs, taking into account the high number of variables to be considered. The use of bisphenol F as internal standard allowed quantification of the samples against aqueous standards. Repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation of 10 successive analyses was between 5% and 9%, confirming the high precision attained under the optimized conditions. Satisfactory recovery values of between 79% and 109% were obtained for spiked samples in the 0.2-1.0 μgL(-1) concentration range, depending on the compound. The main compound determined in the analyzed samples was trans-resveratrol, with concentrations in the range of 3-230 μgL(-1), depending on the type of wine. PMID:24075014

  16. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Whole Water by Continuous Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 69 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on aquatic organisms in wastewater. This method also is useful for evaluating the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are indicators of wastewater or have endocrine-disrupting potential. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Wastewater compounds in whole-water samples were extracted using continuous liquid-liquid extractors and methylene chloride solvent, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 0.5 microgram per liter averaged 72 percent ? 8 percent relative standard deviation. The concentration of 21 compounds is always reported as estimated because method recovery was less than 60 percent, variability was greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation, or standard reference compounds were prepared from technical mixtures. Initial method detection limits averaged 0.18 microgram per liter. Samples were preserved by adding 60 grams of sodium chloride and stored at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory established a sample holding-time limit prior to sample extraction of 14 days from the date of collection.

  17. Determination of atrazine and its major degradation products in soil pore water by solid-phase extraction, chemical derivatization, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a method for the determination of atrazine, desethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, didealkylatrazine, and hydroxyatrazine from soil pore waters by use of solid-phase extractionfollowed by chemical derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The analytes are isolated from the pore-water matrix byextraction onto a graphitized carbon-black cartridge. The cartridge is dried under vacuum, and adsorbed analytes are removed by elution with ethyl acetate followed by dichloromethane/methanol (7:3, volume/volume). Water is removed from the ethyl acetate fraction on an anhydrous sodium sulfate column. The combined fractions are solvent exchanged into acetonitrile, evaporated by use of a nitrogen stream, and derivatized by use of N- methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)- trifluoroacetamide. The derivatized extracts are analyzed by capillary-column gaschromatography/electron-impact mass spectrometry in the scan mode. Estimated method detection limits range from 0.03 to 0.07 micrograms per liter. The mean recoveries of all analytes and surrogates determined at 0.74 to 0.82 micrograms per liter in reagent water in soil pore water were 94 percent and 98 percent, respectively. The mean recoveries of all analytes and surrogates determined at 7.4 to 8.2 micrograms per liter in reagent water and in soil pore water were 96 percent and 97 percent,respectively. Recoveries were 90 percent or higher, regardless of analyte concentration or matrix composition, for all compounds excepthydroxyatrazine, whose recoveries were slightly lower (77 percent) at the low concentration.

  18. Determination of dissolved-phase pesticides in surface water from the Yakima River basin, Washington, using the Goulden large-sample extractor and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, G.D.; Gates, Paul M.; Foreman, W.T.; McKenzie, S.W.; Rinella, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of pesticides in the dissolved phase of surface water samples from the Yakima River basin, WA, were determined using preconcentration in the Goulden large-sample extractor (GLSE) and gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Sample volumes ranging from 10 to 120 L were processed with the GLSE, and the results from the large-sample analyses were compared to those derived from 1-L continuous liquid-liquid extractions. Few of the 40 target pesticides were detected in 1-L samples, whereas large-sample preconcentration in the GLSE provided detectable levels for many of the target pesticides. The number of pesticides detected in GLSE processed samples was usually directly proportional to sample volume, although the measured concentrations of the pesticides were generally lower at the larger sample volumes for the same water source. The GLSE can be used to provide lower detection levels relative to conventional liquid-liquid extraction in GC/MS analysis of pesticides in samples of surface water. ?? 1993 American Chemical Society.

  19. Precautions for in-injection port thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) as applied to aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Ting Ng, Louisa Pan; Kwok, Yuk; Ho, K. F.; Cao, Junji

    2011-03-01

    In-injection port thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) allows for analysis for >130 non-polar organic compounds on small quartz-fiber filter samples without extraction chemicals. TD-GC/MS has been applied to samples from long-term U.S. networks since it is cost effective and less labor intensive. However, analysis of large numbers of samples results in sensitivity reductions over time. Instrument sensitivity and reproducibility were examined after 100, 200, and 500 sample analyses. Analyses of standards between batches of heavily loaded samples from China and Japan showed signal decreases of 28-78% for major organic classes. In the GC injection port, residues can accumulate on the gold-plated seal resulting in analyte adsorption as well as elevating signal background. Decreases in signal response were 28-43% for n-alkanes, 33-45% for hopanes and steranes, 28-56% for PAHs, and 38-78% for phthalates when the gold-plated seal was not replaced after 500 TD-GC/MS sample analyses. Limits of detection (LODs) also increased by 14-76% for the targeted non-polar organic compounds. Residues trapped in the capillary column head can cause peak broadening and overlap. The GC/MS system, including the injection port and gold seal, the column head (where the eluted sample is pre-concentrated), and the ion source should be cleaned after every batch of 50-100 samples.

  20. Simultaneous determination of 2-naphthol and 1-hydroxypyrene in fish and shellfish contaminated with crude oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Hee; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method of l-hydroxypyrene (1-HOP) and 2-naphthol (2-NAP) in fish and shellfish. Alkali hydrolysis method in this study was chosen and optimized to the reaction condition for 90 min at 90°C in a 2.0M KOH solution. For five independent determinations at 0.2 and 1.0 μg/kg, the coefficient of variation was less than 5.1%. This method was used to assess the long-term influence of spilled crude oil on marine ecosystems and analyze fifty-two shellfish samples taken in the near of the accident region of the Hebei Spirit oil spill. 2-NAP and 1-HOP were detected in the mean concentration range of 0.09-12.42 and 0.03-0.06 μg/kg, respectively. 2-NAP was detected in a high concentration range in shellfishes gathered in 2 months after the accident and it decreased rapidly to 6 months after that. The results showed that 2-NAP might be an important biomarker in biota contaminated with crude oil. PMID:23411178

  1. Pyrolysis kinetic and product analysis of different microalgal biomass by distributed activation energy model and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuewei; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Juan; Geng, Shu; Cheng, Jay Jiayang; Sun, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    To assess the energy potential of different microalgae, Chlorella sorokiniana and Monoraphidium were selected for studying the pyrolytic behavior at different heating rates with the analytical method of thermogravimetric analysis (TG), distributed activation energy model (DAEM) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Results presented that Monoraphidium 3s35 showed superiority for pyrolysis at low heating rate. Calculated by DAEM, during the conversion rate range from 0.1 to 0.7, the activation energies of C. sorokiniana 21 were much lower than that of Monoraphidium 3s35. Both C. sorokiniana 21 and Monoraphidium 3s35 can produce certain amount (up to 20.50%) of alkane compounds, with 9-Octadecyne (C18H34) as the primary compound. Short-chain alkanes (C7-C13) with unsaturated carbon can be released in the pyrolysis at 500°C for both microalgal biomass. It was also observed that the pyrolysis of C. sorokiniana 21 released more alcohol compounds, while Monoraphidium 3s35 produced more saccharides. PMID:24835746

  2. Rapid and simple determination of psychotropic phenylalkylamine derivatives in human hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using micro-pulverized extraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Shin, Soon Ho; Lee, Jae Il; In, Moon Kyo

    2010-03-20

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of five psychotropic phenylalkylamine derivatives (amphetamine, AP; methamphetamine, MA; 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, MDA; 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA; norketamine, NKT) in human hair. Hair samples (10mg) were washed with distilled water and acetone, mechanically pulverized for 1.5 min with a bead mill, and then incubated in 1 mL of methanol under ultrasonication at 50 degrees C for 1h. The resulting solutions were evaporated to dryness, derivatized using heptafluorobutyric anhydride (HFBA) at 50 degrees C for 30 min, and analyzed by GC-MS. The linear ranges were 0.1-20.0 ng/mg for AP and MA and 0.05-20.0 ng/mg for MDA, MDMA, and NKT, with the coefficients of determination (r(2)>0.9982). The intra-day and inter-day precisions were within 11.5% and 12.8%, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day accuracies were -4.1% to 5.8% and -6.6% to 4.2%, respectively. The limits of detections (LODs) for each compound were lower than 0.028 ng/mg. The recoveries were in the range of 78.9-101.2%. Based on these results, the method proved to be effective for the rapid and simple determination of phenylalkylamine derivatives in hair specimens. PMID:20060242

  3. Graphene oxide-based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with in situ derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of acidic pharmaceuticals in water.

    PubMed

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-12-24

    A fast and low-cost sample preparation method of graphene based dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis, was developed. The procedure involves an initial extraction with water-immiscible organic solvent, followed by a rapid clean-up using amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide as sorbent. Simple and fast one-step in situ derivatization using trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide was subsequently applied on acidic pharmaceuticals serving as model analytes, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ketoprofen and diclofenac, before GC-MS analysis. Extraction parameters affecting the derivatization and extraction efficiency such as volume of derivatization agent, effect of desorption solvent, effect of pH and effect of ionic strength were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method demonstrated good limits of detection ranging from 1 to 16ngL(-1), linearity (from 0.01 to 50 and 0.05 to 50μgL(-1), depending on the analytes) and satisfactory repeatability of extractions (relative standard deviations, below 13%, n=3). PMID:26684593

  4. Thermal extraction-two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with heart-cutting for nitrogen heterocyclics in biomass burning aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yilin; Hays, Michael D

    2008-07-25

    A thermal extraction-two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE-GC-GC-MS) method with heart-cutting is developed for quantitatively assessing nitrogen (N)-bearing organic species (e.g., pyrrole, pyridine, nitriles, and amines) in aerosols emitted from agricultural fires. Pyrolysis of the constituents in the crop residue is a likely formation pathway for these compounds. An evaluation of the TE-GC-GC-MS method proficiency for them confirms low carryover (<1%), adequate recovery (84-100%), high reproducibility (<9% RSD), picogram method detection limits, and a linear dynamic range spanning four orders of magnitude. The 14 substances for which quantitative results are available are primarily heterocyclic aromatic N compounds that comprise 0.7% (w/w) of the total fine aerosol mass. The benefits of TE-GC-GC-MS versus conventional GC-MS methods for organic N species in aerosols may depend on the matrix and the target N analyte concentration in that matrix; for the biomass burning aerosol examined in this study, the former approach reduces the unresolved complex mixture and detects organic N species not seen with GC-MS. We show another advantage of TE-GC-GC-MS is that it adequately resolves the anhydro-sugar (e.g., levoglucosan), alkanoic acid, and substituted phenol molecules in the biomass burning aerosol without the use of methylation or trimethyl-silyl derivatizing agents. PMID:18571186

  5. Application of porous membrane protected micro-solid-phase-extraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of estrogens in ovarian cyst fluid samples.

    PubMed

    Kanimozhi, Sivarajan; Basheer, Chanbasha; Narasimhan, Kothandaraman; Liu, Lin; Koh, Stephen; Xue, Feng; Choolani, Mahesh; Lee, Hian Kee

    2011-02-14

    A cost effective and environmentally friendly extraction technique using porous membrane protected micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) is described for the extraction of estrogens in cyst fluid samples obtained from cancer patients. A sorbent (ethylsilane (C2) modified silica) (20 mg) was packed in a porous polypropylene envelope (2 cm×1.5 cm) whose edges were heat sealed to secure the contents. The μ-SPE device was conditioned with acetone and placed in a stirred (1:5) diluted cyst fluid sample solution (10 mL) to extract estrogens for 60 min. After extraction, the analytes were desorbed and simultaneously derivatized with a 5:1 mixture of acetone and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide. The extract (2 μL) was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Various extraction, desorption and derivatization conditions were optimized for μ-SPE. With this simple technique, low limits of detection of between 9 and 22 ng L(-1) and linear range from the detection limits up to 50 μg L(-1) were achieved. The optimized method was used to extract estrogens from cyst fluid samples obtained from patients with malignant and benign ovarian tumors. PMID:21241846

  6. Investigation of bioaccumulation profile of oestrogens in zebrafish liver by hollow fibre protected liquid phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Kanimozhi, Sivarajan; Basheer, Chanbasha; Neveliappan, Shanmugam; Ang, Kelvin; Xue, Feng; Lee, Hian Kee

    2012-11-15

    The applicability of hollow fibre protected liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) for the determination of three oestrogens, namely estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) from individual zebrafish liver samples, in a bioaccumulation study on these organisms, is reported. The oestrogens were extracted from single, mechanically crushed and minced livers from fish that were heaved in tubes containing water spiked at low concentration of the analytes. Extraction was performed with ∼3 μL of toluene contained in the hollow fibre. In order to achieve high extraction efficiency, the parameters that could affect the effectiveness of HF-LPME were optimized, i.e. the extracting organic solvent, extraction time, stirring speed and pH of the aqueous phase. For gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis, injection port derivatization of the oestrogens with bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide was conducted. Under the most favourable extraction and derivatization conditions, enrichment factors of 158-279 were obtained. Linearity of the HF-LPME-GC/MS method was evaluated from 1 to 50 μg/L and the coefficient of determination (r²) ranged from 0.9687 to 0.9926. The LODs were between 0.017 and 0.033 μg/L (at a signal to noise ratio of 3) with relative standard deviations (RSDs, analytes spiked at 5 μg/L) of between 15 and 17% (n=3). PMID:23153642

  7. Detection of Stimulants and Narcotics by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Sports Doping Control.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Brian D; Kucherova, Yulia; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Sports drug testing laboratories are required to detect several classes of compounds that are prohibited at all times, which include anabolic agents, peptide hormones, growth factors, beta-2 agonists, hormones and metabolic modulators, and diuretics/masking agents. Other classes of compounds such as stimulants, narcotics, cannabinoids, and glucocorticoids are also prohibited, but only when an athlete is in competition. A single class of compounds can contain a large number of prohibited substances and all of the compounds should be detected by the testing procedure. Since there are almost 70 stimulants on the prohibited list it can be a challenge to develop a single screening method that will optimally detect all the compounds. We describe a combined liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing method for detection of all the stimulants and narcotics on the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Urine for LC-MS/MS testing does not require sample pretreatment and is a direct dilute and shoot method. Urine samples for the GC-MS method require a liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride. PMID:26660193

  8. Analysis of phthalate acid esters in environmental water by magnetic graphene solid phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Liu, Linhai; Chen, Zhongbao; Hong, Liming

    2014-02-14

    In this work, magnetic graphene composites were synthesized via a simple hydrothermal reaction. The as-prepared composites were successfully applied as an effective adsorbent for the preconcentration of seven phthalate acid esters (PAEs) in environmental water samples prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The magnetic graphene composites had a unique structure in which magnetite particles were deposited on graphene sheets. This unique structure not only provided strong magnetic responsiveness for the separation but also prevented the self-aggregation of graphene. The magnetic graphene composites had several advantages, such as large surface area, fast separation ability, and high peak intensity for aromatic analytes; these properties are attributed to the distinct structure of magnetic graphene composites, which comprises p-conjugated networks with a highly exposed surface. Various parameters, including eluting solvent and volume, absorbent amount, extraction time and elution time, were optimized. Validation experiments showed that the optimized method presented good linearity (r>0.997), satisfactory precision (RSD<8.5%), and high recovery (88-110%). The limits of detection were from 0.010μg/L to 0.056μg/L, and the limits of quantification were from 0.035μg/L to 0.19μg/L. The proposed method had these advantages of simplicity, good sensitivity, and high efficiency. Finally, the proposed was successfully applied to the analysis of PAEs in real water samples. PMID:24418236

  9. Analysis of the volatile organic matter of engine piston deposits by direct sample introduction thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diaby, M; Kinani, S; Genty, C; Bouchonnet, S; Sablier, M; Le Negrate, A; El Fassi, M

    2009-12-01

    This article establishes an alternative method for the characterization of volatiles organic matter (VOM) contained in deposits of the piston first ring grooves of diesel engines using a ChromatoProbe direct sample introduction (DSI) device coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The addition of an organic solvent during thermal desorption leads to an efficient extraction and a good chromatographic separation of extracted products. The method was optimized investigating the effects of several solvents, the volume added to the solid sample, and temperature programming of the ChromatoProbe DSI device. The best results for thermal desorption were found using toluene as an extraction solvent and heating the programmable temperature injector from room temperature to 300 degrees C with a temperature step of 105 degrees C. With the use of the optimized thermal desorption conditions, several components have been positively identified in the volatile fraction of the deposits: aromatics, antioxidants, and antioxidant degradation products. Moreover, this work highlighted the presence of diesel fuel in the VOM of the piston deposits and gave new facts on the absence of the role of diesel fuel in the deposit formation process. Most importantly, it opens the possibility of quickly performing the analysis of deposits with small amounts of samples while having a good separation of the volatiles. PMID:19894696

  10. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method optimized using response surface modeling for the quantitation of fungal off-flavors in grapes and wine.

    PubMed

    Sadoughi, Navideh; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Antalick, Guillaume; Blackman, John W; Steel, Christopher C

    2015-03-25

    An optimized method for the quantitation of volatile compounds responsible for off-aromas, such as earthy odors, found in wine and grapes was developed. The method involved a fast and simple headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) for simultaneous determination of 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 3-octanone, fenchone, 1-octen-3-one, trans-2-octen-1-ol, fenchol, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-methylisoborneol, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, geosmin, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole, and pentachloroanisole. The extraction of the temperature and time were optimized using response surface methodology in both wine base (WB) and grape base (GB). Low limits of detection (0.1-5 ng/L in WB and 0.05-1.6 in GB) and quantitation (0.3-17 in WB and 0.2-6.2 in GB) with good recoveries (83-131%) and repeatability [4.3-9.8% coefficient of variation (CV) in WB and 5.1-11.1% CV in GB] and reproducibility (3.6-10.2 in WB and 1.9-10.9 in GB) indicate that the method has excellent sensitivity and is suitable for the analysis of these off-flavor compounds in wine and grape juice samples. PMID:25703150

  11. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of earthy-musty odorous compounds in waters by two phase hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction using polyvinylidene fluoride fibers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengbing; Xiao, Qin; Zhu, Binghui; Zhong, Xiuhua; Xu, Yinghua; Su, Guangning; Chen, Min

    2014-02-14

    A rapid and sensitive method for the determination of earthy-musty odorous compounds, 2-methylisoborneol, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxy pyrazine, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, 2,3,6-trichloroanisole, and geosmin, in water samples has been developed. The method was based on coupling a new polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction system with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The PVDF hollow fibers have high porosity and an enhanced solvent compatibility for extraction of the target analytes. Experimental conditions were optimized by investigating the type of extraction solvent, sample pH, sodium chloride concentration, stirring speed, extraction time, and GC-MS conditions. Under optimized conditions, the earthy-musty odorous compounds exhibited good linearity (R>0.995) in the concentration range of 6.2-250ng/L. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method were lower than 6.8% and 9.8%, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification values were lower than 2.0 and 6.2ng/L, respectively. The analysis of different water samples such as tap, pond, rive and waste water indicated minimal matrix effects. Analyte recoveries for real samples spiked at different concentrations were between 84.4% and 117.5%. PMID:24456707

  12. Determination of tributyltin in environmental water matrices using stir bar sorptive extraction with in-situ derivatisation and large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Neng, N R; Santalla, R P; Nogueira, J M F

    2014-08-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction with in-situ derivatization using sodium tetrahydridoborate (NaBH4) followed by liquid desorption and large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection under the selected ion monitoring mode (SBSE(NaBH4)in-situ-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) was successfully developed for the determination of tributyltin (TBT) in environmental water matrices. NaBH4 proved to be an effective and easy in-situ speciation agent for TBT in aqueous media, allowing the formation of adducts with enough stability and suitable polarity for SBSE analysis. Assays performed on water samples spiked at the 10.0μg/L, yielded convenient recoveries (68.2±3.0%), showed good accuracy, suitable precision (RSD<9.0%), low detection limits (23ng/L) and excellent linear dynamic range (r(2)=0.9999) from 0.1 to 170.0µg/L, under optimized experimental conditions. By using the standard addition method, the application of the present methodology to real surface water samples allowed very good performance at the trace level. The proposed methodology proved to be a feasible alternative for routine quality control analysis, easy to implement, reliable and sensitive to monitor TBT in environmental water matrices. PMID:24881528

  13. Determination of E,E-farnesol in Makgeolli (rice wine) using dynamic headspace sampling and stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jaeho; Wang, Yiru; Jang, Hyejin; Seog, Homoon; Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analysed the volatile and semi-volatile compounds, including E,E-farnesol in Makgeolli which is a traditional type of Korean fermented rice wines. Forty-one compounds including alcohols, 1-butanol-3-methyl acetate, E,E-farnesol, stearol, and phytane, were separated and quantified by dynamic headspace sampling (DHS) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. SBSE has been found to be an effective method for analysing E,E-farnesol levels in Makgeolli. The experimental parameters related to the extraction efficiency of the SBSE method, such as ethanol concentration and filtration, were studied and optimised. The linear dynamic range of the SBSE method for E,E-farnesol ranged from 0.02 to 200ngml(-1) with R(2)=0.9974. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of the SBSE method were 0.02 and 0.05ngml(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation of intra- and inter-day reproducibility was less than 6.2% and 9.9%, respectively. PMID:24001815

  14. Determination of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite in biological specimens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A case of poisoning by roundup herbicide.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yasushi; Fujisawa, Manami; Shimada, Kenji; Hirose, Yasuo

    2003-04-01

    In Japan, poisonings by the glyphosate (GLYP)-containing herbicide Roundup and the gluphosinate (GLUF)-based herbicide BASTA have been increasing since about 1987. We applied the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method of analysis, on which we have already reported in regard to the determination of the blood serum level of GLUF and its metabolite, for the determination of serum and urinary levels of GLYP and its metabolite aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). Derivatization using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide was completed at a temperature of 80 degrees C after 30 min, and the detection limit of GLYP was 10 pg using m/z 454 and that of AMPA was 1 pg using m/z 396. The full mass spectra of 100 pg GLYP and of 10 pg AMPA were obtained easily. In extractions for which the Isolute HAX cartridge was employed, the mean recovery rate of GLYP and AMPA added to serum to yield concentrations of 10-0.1 microg/mL (n = 5) was 91.6 +/- 10.6% (or better), whereas that of GLYP and AMPA added to urine to yield concentrations of 100-1.0 microg/mL (n = 10) was 93.3 +/- 6.6% (or better), both of which were good rates. Also, using this method of analysis, the presence of GLYP was identified in the full mass spectra obtained from the serum of a patient who may or may not have ingested Roundup. PMID:12731658

  15. Preparation of Fe3O4@C@PANI magnetic microspheres for the extraction and analysis of phenolic compounds in water samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jiaoran; Shi, Chenyi; Wei, Biwen; Yu, Wenjia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2011-05-20

    In this work, core-shell structure Fe(3)O(4)@C@polyaniline magnetic microspheres were synthesized using simple hydrothermal reactions. The carbon-coated magnetic microspheres (Fe(3)O(4)@C) were first synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction, and then aniline was polymerized on the magnetic core via another hydrothermal reaction. Then, the obtained Fe(3)O(4)@C@polyaniline magnetic microspheres were applied as magnetic adsorbents for the extraction of aromatic molecules due to π-π interactions between polyaniline shell and aromatic compounds. In our study, five kinds of phenols including phenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP) and bisphenol A (BPA) were selected as the model analytes to verify the extraction ability of Fe(3)O(4)@C@PANI microspheres. After derivatization, the phenols were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The dominant parameters affecting enrichment efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method was evaluated, and applied to the analysis of phenols in real water samples. The results demonstrated that our proposed method based on Fe(3)O(4)@C@polyaniline magnetic microspheres had good linearity (r(2)>0.991), and limits of quantification (2.52-29.7 ng/mL), high repeatability (RSD<13.1%) and good recovery (85.3-110.6%). PMID:21492861

  16. Development of a simultaneous multiple solid-phase microextraction-single shot-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method and application to aroma profile analysis of commercial coffee.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changgook; Lee, Younghoon; Lee, Jae-Gon; Buglass, Alan J

    2013-06-21

    A simultaneous multiple solid-phase microextraction-single shot-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (smSPME-ss-GC/MS) method has been developed for headspace analysis. Up to four fibers (50/30 μm DVB/CAR/PDMS) were used simultaneously for the extraction of aroma components from the headspace of a single sample chamber in order to increase sensitivity of aroma extraction. To avoid peak broadening and to maximize resolution, a simple cryofocusing technique was adopted during sequential thermal desorption of multiple SPME fibers prior to a 'single shot' chromatographic run. The method was developed and validated on a model flavor mixture, containing 81 known pure components. With the conditions of 10 min of incubation and 30 min of extraction at 50 °C, single, dual, triple and quadruple SPME extractions were compared. The increase in total peak area with increase in the number of fibers showed good linearity (R(2)=0.9917) and the mean precision was 12.0% (RSD) for the total peak sum, with quadruple simultaneous SPME extraction. Using a real sample such as commercial coffee granules, aroma profile analysis was conducted using single, dual, triple and quadruple SPME fibers. The increase in total peak intensity again showed good linearity with increase in the number of SPME fibers used (R(2)=0.9992) and the precision of quadruple SPME extraction was 9.9% (RSD) for the total peak sum. PMID:23672978

  17. Selection of Taste Markers Related to Lactic Acid Bacteria Microflora Metabolism for Chinese Traditional Paocai: A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Zhang, Chuchu; Yang, Qin; Guo, Zhuang; Yang, Bo; Lu, Wenwei; Li, Dongyao; Tian, Fengwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-03-23

    Traditional paocai brine (PB) is continuously propagated by back-slopping and contains numerous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains. Although PB is important for the quality of paocai (Chinese sauerkraut), the taste features, taste-related compounds of PB-paocai and the effects of LAB communities from PB on the taste compounds remain unclear. An electronic tongue was used to evaluate the taste features of 13 PB-paocai samples. Umami, saltiness, bitterness, sweetness, and aftertaste astringency were the main taste features of PB-paocai. A total of 14 compounds were identified as discriminant taste markers for PB-paocai via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based multimarker profiling. A LAB co-culture (Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus buchneri, and Pediococcus ethanoliduran) from PB could significantly increase glutamic acid (umami), sucrose (sweetness), glycine (sweetness), lactic acid (sourness), and γ-aminobutyric acid in PB-paocai, which would endow it with important flavor features. Such features could then facilitate starter screening and fermentation optimization to produce paocai-related foods with better nutritional and sensory qualities. PMID:26915389

  18. Determination of the alkylpyrazine composition of coffee using stable isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SIDA-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Pickard, Stephanie; Becker, Irina; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Richling, Elke

    2013-07-01

    A stable isotope dilution analysis based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (SIDA-GC-MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of 12 alkylpyrazines found in commercially available coffee samples. These compounds contribute to coffee flavor. The accuracy of this method was tested by analyzing model mixtures of alkylpyrazines. Comparisons of alkylpyrazine-concentrations suggested that water as extraction solvent was superior to dichloromethane. The distribution patterns of alkylpyrazines in different roasted coffees were quite similar. The most abundant alkylpyrazine in each coffee sample was 2-methylpyrazine, followed by 2,6-dimethylpyrazine, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-6-methylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine, respectively. Among the alkylpyrazines tested, 2,3-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-3-methylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine, and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine revealed the lowest concentrations in roasted coffee. By the use of isotope dilution analysis, the total concentrations of alkylpyrazines in commercially available ground coffee ranged between 82.1 and 211.6 mg/kg, respectively. Decaffeinated coffee samples were found to contain lower amounts of alkylpyrazines than regular coffee samples by a factor of 0.3-0.7, which might be a result of the decaffeination procedure. PMID:23745606

  19. Screening for and validated quantification of phenethylamine-type designer drugs and mescaline in human blood plasma by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Habrdova, Vilma; Peters, Frank T; Theobald, Denis S; Maurer, Hans H

    2005-06-01

    In recent years, several newer designer drugs of the so-called 2C series such as 2C-D, 2C-E, 2C-P, 2C-B, 2C-I, 2C-T-2, and 2C-T-7 have entered the illicit drug market as recreational drugs. Some fatal intoxications involving 2C-T-7 have been reported. Only scarce data have been published about analyses of these substances in human blood and/or plasma. This paper describes a method for screening and simultaneous quantification of the above-mentioned compounds and their analog mescaline in human blood plasma. The analytes were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected-ion monitoring mode, after mixed-mode solid-phase extraction (HCX) and derivatization with heptafluorobutyric anhydride. The method was fully validated according to international guidelines. Validation data for 2C-T-2 and 2C-T-7 were unacceptable. For all other analytes, the method was linear from 5 to 500 microg/L and the data for accuracy (bias) and precision (coefficient of variation) were within the acceptance limits of +/-15% and <15%, respectively (within +/-20% and <20% near the limit of quantification of 5 microg/L). PMID:15827969

  20. Rapid determination of C6-aldehydes in tomato plant emission by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Li, Ning; Zhu, Weimin; Qian, Ji; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2005-02-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive, and solvent-free method was developed for determination of plant-signalling compounds, the three C6-aldehydes hexanal, (Z)-3-hexenal, and (E)-2-hexenal, in tomato plant emission by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with on-fiber derivatization. In this method, O-2,3,4,5,6-(pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) in aqueous solution was first headspace adsorbed onto a 65 microm poly(dimethylsiloxane)/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fiber at 25 degrees C for 5 min, and then the fiber with adsorbed PFBHA was used for headspace extraction of tomato plant emission at 25 degrees C for 6 min. Finally, the resulting oximes adsorbed on the fiber were desorbed and analyzed by GC-MS. Extraction conditions and method validation were studied. The proposed method had low detection limit values for the three aldehydes from 0.1 to 0.5 ng/L and good precision (RSD less than 10%). In this work, the method was applied to investigation of tomato plant defense response to Helicoverpa armigera. PMID:15754825

  1. Simultaneous detection and quantification of select nitromusks, antimicrobial agent, and antihistamine in fish of grocery stores by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Foltz, James; Abdul Mottaleb, M; Meziani, Mohammed J; Rafiq Islam, M

    2014-07-01

    Continually detected biologically persistent nitromusks; galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN) and musk ketone (MK), antimicrobial triclosan (TCS), and antihistamine diphenhydramine (DPH) were examined for the first time in edible fillets originating from eight fish species grown in salt- and fresh-water. The sampled fish collected from local grocery stores were homogenized, extracted, pre-concentrated and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using selected ion monitoring (SIM). The presence of the target compounds in fish extracts was confirmed based on similar mass spectral features and retention behavior with standards. Internal standard based calibration plots were used for quantification. The HHCB, AHTN, TCS and DPH were consistently observed with concentration of 0.163-0.892, 0.068-0.904, 0.189-1.182, and 0.942-7.472 ng g(-1), respectively. These values are at least 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than those obtained in environmental fish specimens. The MK was not detected in any fish. PMID:24377446

  2. Diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency by urinary metabolite ratios using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis: Reference values for neonates and infants.

    PubMed

    Kamrath, Clemens; Hartmann, Michaela F; Boettcher, Claudia; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Wudy, Stefan A

    2016-02-01

    One major issue of newborn screening programs for 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD) is the high rate of false-positive results, especially in preterm neonates. Urinary steroid metabolite analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is suitable as a confirmatory diagnostic tool. The objective of this study was to analyze retrospectively diagnostic metabolite ratios in neonates and infants with and without 21OHD using GC-MS with emphasis on glucocorticoid metabolism, and to develop reference values for the steroid metabolite ratios for the diagnosis of 21OHD. We retrospectively analyzed urinary steroid hormone metabolites determined by GC-MS of 95 untreated neonates and infants with 21OHD (1-148 days), and 261 neonates and infants (100 preterms) without 21OHD (0-217 days). Metabolites of 17α-hydroxyprogesterone showed specificities below 98%, whereas the 21-deoxycortisol metabolite pregnanetriolone clearly separated 21OHD from non-21OHD subjects. The best diagnostic ratio for 21OHD was pregnanetriolone to 6α-hydroxy-tetrahydrocortisone. The lowest value of this ratio in the 21OHD group (0.47) was at least eight times higher than the highest values in the non-21OHD group (0.055). We have given appropriate reference values for steroid metabolite ratios in the largest 21OHD cohort so far described. Consideration of glucocorticoid metabolism, especially the use of typical neonatal 6α-hydroxylates metabolites, leads to improvement of diagnostic metabolite ratios. PMID:26493852

  3. Determination of aromatic amines in hair dye and henna samples by ion-pair extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akyüz, Mehmet; Ata, Sevket

    2008-05-12

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method has been proposed for the determination of carcinogenic and toxic aromatic amines in hair dye, henna and dyed hair samples. The method includes ion-pair extraction of aromatic amines from aqueous samples with bis-2-ethylhexylphosphate (BEHPA) released after solving the samples in acidic solution followed by sonication, derivatisation of compounds with isobutyl chloroformate (IBCF) and their GC-MS analysis in both electron impact (EI) and positive and negative ion chemical ionisation (PNICI) mode as their isobutyloxycarbonyl (isoBOC) derivatives. The obtained recoveries of aromatic amines ranged from 92.2 to 98.4% and the precision of this method, as indicated by the relative standard deviations (RSDs) was within the range of 0.7-4.2%. The detection limits obtained from calculations by using GC-MS results based on signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)=3 were within the range from 0.02 to 0.20 ng/g. In the present study, the commercially available 54 permanent hair dye, 35 modified or natural henna and 15 dyed hair samples were analysed for the aromatic amines by the proposed method and the method was shown to be suitable to determine the aromatic amine ingredients and metabolites of these commercial products. PMID:18280687

  4. Quantification of 11-Carboxy-Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in Meconium Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Davis, Brehon; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Maternal substance abuse is an ongoing concern and detecting drug use during pregnancy is an important component of neonatal care when drug abuse is suspected. Meconium is the preferred specimen for drug testing because it is easier to collect than neonatal urine and it provides a much broader time frame of drug exposure. We describe a method for quantifying 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in meconium. After adding a labeled internal standard (THC-COOH D9) and acetonitrile, samples are sonicated to release both free and conjugated THC-COOH. The acetonitrile/aqueous layer is removed and mixed with a strong base to hydrolyze the conjugated THC-COOH. The samples are then extracted with an organic solvent mixture as part of a sample "cleanup." The organic solvent layer is discarded and the remaining aqueous sample is acidified. Following extraction with a second organic mixture, the organic layer is removed and concentrated to dryness. The resulting residue is converted to a trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. PMID:26660178

  5. Rapid determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in grilled meat using microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kamankesh, Marzieh; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Hosseini, Hedayat; Modarres Tehrani, Zohreh

    2015-05-01

    A simple and rapid analytical tech nique for the simultaneous determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in grilled meat was developed using microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (MAE-DLLME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effective parameters in DLLME process were optimized. Good linear relationships were obtained for 16 PAHs in a range of 1-200 ng g(-1), with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) higher than 0.98. Limits of detection and limits of quantification were 0.15-0.3 ng g(-1) and 0.47-1 ng g(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD%) for seven analyses were less than 9%. The recoveries of those compounds in grilled meat were obtained from 85% to 104%. Low consumption of the solvent, high recovery, short extraction time, no matrix interference and good merit figures compared to other methods are advantages of the proposed method. The performance of the present method was evaluated for the determination of PAHs in various types of real grilled meat samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:25618021

  6. The Occurrence of Propyl Lactate in Chinese Baijius (Chinese Liquors) Detected by Direct Injection Coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jihong; Zheng, Yang; Sun, Baoguo; Sun, Xiaotao; Sun, Jiyuan; Zheng, Fuping; Huang, Mingquan

    2015-01-01

    As one of the oldest distillates in the world, flavor compounds of Chinese Baijiu (Chinese liquor) were extremely complex. Propyl lactate was ?rstly detected by direct injection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in 72 Chinese Baijius. The objectives were to detect the contents of propyl lactate and evaluate its contribution to the aroma of Chinese Baijiu based on odor activity values (OAVs). The levels of propyl lactate in these distillates were determined by internal standard method and selective ion monitoring (SIM), which ranged from 0.050 to 1.900 mg?L(-1) under investigation. Its detection threshold was determined by Three-Alternative Forced-Choice (3-AFC) and curve fitting (CF), which was 0.740 mg?L(-1) in 38% ethanol solution. The contribution of propyl lactate on the aroma of these distillate drinks was evaluated by their odor activity values (OAVs), which varied from 0.066 to 4.440. The OAVs of propyl lactate were found to exceed 1 in 13 Chinese Baijius, including 50 Jingzhi Guniang 5 years (4.440), 52 Jingzhi Guniang 10 years (3.024), Jingyanggang (2.568), Xianghe Ronghe Shaofang (2.313), and 1956 Laolang (1.431), which indicated that propyl lactate was one of odor-active components in these Chinese Baijius. PMID:26492228

  7. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following microwave distillation and headspace solid-phase microextraction for fast analysis of essential oil in dry traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Deng, Chunhui; Li, Yan; Ye, Hao; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2006-11-10

    In this paper, a novel method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following microwave distillation-headspace solid-phase microextraction (MD-HS-SPME) was developed for the determination of essential oil in dry traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). TCM is dried before being preserved and used, there is too little water to absorb microwave energy and heat the TCM samples. In the work, carbonyl iron powders (CIP) was added and mixed with the dried TCM sample, which was used as microwave absorption solid medium for dry distillation of the TCM. At the same time, SPME was used for the extraction and concentration of essential oil after MD. The dry rhizomes of Atractylodes lancea DC was used as the model TCM, and used in the study. The MD-HS-SPME parameters including fiber coating, microwave power, irradiation time, and the amount of added CIP, were studied. To demonstrate the method feasibility, the conventional HS-SPME method was also used for the analysis of essential oil in the TCM. Experimental results show that more compounds were isolated and identified by MD-HS-SPME than those by HS-SPME. Compared to conventional HS-SPME, the advantages of the proposed method are: short extraction time and high extraction efficiency. All experimental results show that the proposed method is an alternative tool for fast analysis of essential oils in dry TCMs. PMID:16950328

  8. A simple and sensitive single-step method for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of fipronil and its metabolites in sugarcane juice, jaggery and sugar.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, Thirumalaiandi; Paramasivam, Mariappan; Jayanthi, Ramabhadran; Chandrasekaran, Subramaniam

    2014-05-01

    A simple and sensitive single-step method for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of fipronil and its metabolites viz., fipronil desulfinyl, fipronil sulphide and fipronil sulphone in sugarcane juice, jaggery and sugar has been developed. Acetonitrile was superior to ethyl acetate in terms of selectivity, though they were on par with each other in terms of recoveries. This method does not require any cleanup as the PSA-based cleanup was on par with no-cleanup treatment. Interestingly, the recoveries of fipronil and its metabolites decreased with increased amounts of C18 from 10 to 50mg/g of matrix. Matrix effects were insignificant and the limit of quantification was 0.005μg/g. The recoveries of fipronil and its metabolites varied between 87.5% and 108.5% with the RSD of 0.2-5.3% for all the three matrices studied. This method has also been validated by monitoring fipronil and its metabolites in the retail outlet samples of sugarcane juice, jaggery and sugar. PMID:24360469

  9. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Volatile Components of Zhengtian Pills Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry and Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Ting; Zhang, Min; Yan, Ping; Liu, Hai-Chan; Liu, Xing-Yun; Zhan, Ruo-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Zhengtian pills (ZTPs) are traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) which have been commonly used to treat headaches. Volatile components of ZTPs extracted by ethyl acetate with an ultrasonic method were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Twenty-two components were identified, accounting for 78.884% of the total components of volatile oil. The three main volatile components including protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid, and ligustilide were simultaneously determined using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection (UHPLC-DAD). Baseline separation was achieved on an XB-C18 column with linear gradient elution of methanol-0.2% acetic acid aqueous solution. The UHPLC-DAD method provided good linearity (R (2) ? 0.9992), precision (RSD < 3%), accuracy (100.68-102.69%), and robustness. The UHPLC-DAD/GC-MS method was successfully utilized to analyze volatile components, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid, and ligustilide, in 13 batches of ZTPs, which is suitable for discrimination and quality assessment of ZTPs. PMID:26904360

  10. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Volatile Components of Zhengtian Pills Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry and Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cui-ting; Zhang, Min; Yan, Ping; Liu, Hai-chan; Liu, Xing-yun; Zhan, Ruo-ting

    2016-01-01

    Zhengtian pills (ZTPs) are traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) which have been commonly used to treat headaches. Volatile components of ZTPs extracted by ethyl acetate with an ultrasonic method were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Twenty-two components were identified, accounting for 78.884% of the total components of volatile oil. The three main volatile components including protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid, and ligustilide were simultaneously determined using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection (UHPLC-DAD). Baseline separation was achieved on an XB-C18 column with linear gradient elution of methanol-0.2% acetic acid aqueous solution. The UHPLC-DAD method provided good linearity (R2 ≥ 0.9992), precision (RSD < 3%), accuracy (100.68–102.69%), and robustness. The UHPLC-DAD/GC-MS method was successfully utilized to analyze volatile components, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid, and ligustilide, in 13 batches of ZTPs, which is suitable for discrimination and quality assessment of ZTPs. PMID:26904360

  11. Acetone-activated polyimide electrospun nanofiber membrane for thin-film microextraction and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of phenols in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenghong; Wu, Dapeng; Yan, Xiaohui; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-09-11

    In this work, a polyimide nanofiber membrane was electrospun and applied as sorbent for thin film microextraction (TFME). After TFME of phenols in water samples, direct thermal desorption of the sorbent at 300C followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (TD-GC-MS) analysis was carried out. The extraction efficiency of TFME was enhanced by 6-12 times for phenols after activation with acetone. The positive effect of acetone activation was correlated to the increased hydrophilicity of the membrane. Extraction parameters, including mass of nanofiber membrane, pH value, NaCl concentration and extraction time, were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the LODs and LOQs for analysis of phenols in spiked purified water were 0.0006-0.008 and 0.002-0.025?gL(-1), respectively. The linearity range was more than two orders of magnitude (R>0.99). The RSDs of intra-batch and inter-batch were 4.3-7.4% and 2.7-10.6% (n=3). Finally the method was applied to real samples, including tap water, sea water, and waste water. These results indicate that the polyimide nanofiber membrane is a promising candidate as TFME sorbent for determination of polar analytes in water samples coupled with TD-GC-MS. PMID:26277026

  12. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples by large volume injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using the through oven transfer adsorption desorption interface.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Álvaro; Toledano, Rosa M; Vázquez, Ana; Villén, Jesús; Cortés, José M

    2015-07-01

    A new procedure for the determination of 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples by large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS) using the Through Oven Transfer Adsorption Desorption (TOTAD) interface with nitrogen for solvent elimination is developed and validated. Up to 75mL of aqueous samples were injected to be sure that good solvent elimination were achieved, although 500µL were sufficient to achieve the required sensitivity.The performance of the developed method can be considered good: the relative standard deviation (RSD), (n=3) was lower than 13.8% for all the target analytes, the concentration of each PAH being 0.25μgL(-1), the limit of detection and limit of quantitation ranged from 21.5 to 211.0 ng L(-1) and from 71.7 to 703.3ngL(-1) respectively, and the correlation coefficients (R(2)) were all higher than 0.9764 in the 1-16μgL(-1) range. PMID:25882400

  13. Analysis of ifosfamide, 4-hydroxyifosfamide, N2-dechloroethylifosfamide, N3-dechloroethylifosfamide and iphosphoramide mustard in plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, J J; Chan, K K

    1995-12-15

    A sensitive and specific method for the simultaneous quantitation of ifosfamide (IF), 4-hydroxylifosfamide (4-OHIF), N2-dechloroethylifosfamide (N2D), N3-dechloroethylifosfamide (N3D) and iphosphoramide mustard (IPM) has been developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with an ion-trap mass spectrometer. Deuterium labeled analogues for each of these analytes were synthesized as the internal standards. The labile 4-OHIF in plasma was first converted to the more stable cyanohydrin adducts before dichloromethane extraction. IPM was extracted by C18 reversed-phase resin. All analytes were converted to their silyl derivatives before GC-MS analysis. The sensitivity limits ranged from 0.1 to 0.5 microgram/ml when 100 microliters of plasma was used. This method was validated with within-run coefficients of variation less than 5% (n = 8) and between-run coefficients of variation less than 12% (n = 6). The method was applied to the determination of plasma levels of IF and metabolites in the rat. PMID:8788150

  14. A Statistical Analysis of the Effects of Urease Pre-treatment on the Measurement of the Urinary Metabolome by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Kim, Young-Mo; Zink, Erika M.; Hallaian, Katherine A.; Zhang, Qibin; Madupu, Ramana; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Urease pre-treatment of urine has been utilized since the early 1960s to remove high levels of urea from samples prior to further processing and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Aside from the obvious depletion or elimination of urea, the effect, if any, of urease pre-treatment on the urinary metabolome has not been studied in detail. Here, we report the results of three separate but related experiments that were designed to assess possible indirect effects of urease pre-treatment on the urinary metabolome as measured by GC-MS. In total, 235 GC-MS analyses were performed and over 106 identified and 200 unidentified metabolites were quantified across the three experiments. The results showed that data from urease pre-treated samples 1) had the same or lower coefficients of variance among reproducibly detected metabolites, 2) more accurately reflected quantitative differences and the expected ratios among different urine volumes, and 3) increased the number of metabolite identifications. Overall, we observed no negative consequences of urease pre-treatment. In contrast, urease pretreatment enhanced the ability to distinguish between volume-based and biological sample types compared to no treatment. Taken together, these results show that urease pretreatment of urine offers multiple beneficial effects that outweigh any artifacts that may be introduced to the data in urinary metabolomics analyses. PMID:25254001

  15. Headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of volatile compounds in different varieties of African star apple fruit (Chrysophillum albidum).

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Ola; Khatib, Alfi; Juhari, Hanisah; Patiram, Parveen; Lasekan, Seye

    2013-12-01

    The volatile compounds in four selected African star apple fruit (Chrysophyllum albidum) varieties were isolated and identified using the headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 59 compounds were identified. Application of the aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) to the aroma distillates from the fruits revealed 45 odour-active compounds in the flavour dilution (FD) factor range of 4-128. Among them, the highest odour activities (FD factors) were determined for methylhexanoate, acetophenone and ethyl dodecanoate. Moreover, aroma lipophilicity appears to reflect molecular conformation. Further analysis of the similarities and differences between the fruit varieties in terms of the key odourants by the application of PLS-DA and PLS-regression coefficient showed strong positive correlation between the very sweet/sweet varieties and 10 key odourants. The odourants included ethyl acetate, acetyl methyl carbinol, methylhexanoate, sabinene, p-cymene, methylbenzoate, ethylbenzoate, geraniol, cis-α-bergomotene, acetophenone, and ethyl dodecanoate. PMID:23870932

  16. Trace-level determination of polar flavour compounds in butter by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Adahchour, M; Vreuls, R J; van der Heijden, A; Brinkman, U A

    1999-06-01

    Volatile compounds are responsible for the aromas of butter. A simple technique for the determination of these components is described which is based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) after melting of the butter and separation of the aqueous phase from the fat. Volatile flavours present in the water fraction are collected by off-line SPE on cartidges packed with a copolymer sorbent. After desorption with 500 microliters of methyl acetate, 1-microliter aliquots are quantified and/or identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The procedure was tested with respect to recovery, linearity and limit of detection in real-life samples using five polar model analytes. It allows the characterisation of polar flavour compounds in butter prior to and after heat treatment at 170 degrees C. From the five model compounds, vanillin, traces of diacetyl and maltol were found to be present in the butter samples. After heat treatment 500-1000-fold increased concentration of maltol, and substantial amounts of furaneol were detected. PMID:10399332

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine ("Tetramine") Spiked into Beverages by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Validation by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J; Hok, S; Alcaraz, A; Koester, C

    2008-11-13

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine, commonly known as tetramine, is a highly neurotoxic rodenticide (human oral LD{sub 50} = 0.1 mg/kg) used in hundreds of deliberate food poisoning events in China. Here we describe a method for quantitation of tetramine spiked into beverages, including milk, juice, tea, cola, and water and cleaned up by C8 solid phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was based upon fragmentation of m/z 347 to m/z 268. The method was validated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in SIM mode for ions m/z 212, 240, and 360. The limit of quantitation was 0.10 {micro}g/mL by LC/MS/MS versus 0.15 {micro}g/mL for GC/MS. Fortifications of the beverages at 2.5 {micro}g/mL and 0.25 {micro}g/mL were recovered ranging from 73-128% by liquid-liquid extraction for GC/MS analysis, 13-96% by SPE and 10-101% by liquid-liquid extraction for LC/MS/MS analysis.

  18. [Determination of ultraviolet filters in environmental aqueous samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with online derivatization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Xu, Lanying; Xue, Shuwen; Xu, Li

    2014-10-01

    A method of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with online derivatization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the determination of benzophenone-type ultraviolet (UV) filers (BPs) in environmental aqueous samples. It is found that the online derivatization was superior to the off-line derivatization with its simplicity, high reaction efficiency and less consumption of potential poisonous reagents. The influential factors for online derivatization, including the temperature of the injection port, the splitless time, the proportion of derivatization reagent and sample solution, were initially optimized. In addition, the influential factors for DLLME, including the type of the extractant and dispersing solvent, the proportion of the extractant and the dispersing solvent, the volume of sample solution, the pH and the salt concentration of the sample solution were individually optimized in detail. Under the optimized derivatization and DLLME conditions, the limits of detection for the six BPs, benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, oxybenzone, 4- hydroxybenzophenone, octabenzone and 2,2'-dihydroxy-4,4'-dimethoxybenzophenone, ranged from 0.011 to 0.15 μg/L. The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations varied from 0.7% to 16.6%. The method was applied to the analysis of lake and river water with good recoveries. It is cost effective, reliable, easy to operate, environment-friendly and promising in the real applications. PMID:25739276

  19. Gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry studies on the metabolism of the synthetic phenylacetylindole cannabimimetic JWH-250, the psychoactive component of smoking mixtures.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Andrej; Melnik, Aleksandra; Savchuk, Sergey; Simonov, Anton; Rozhanets, Vladimir

    2011-09-01

    Prohibition of some synthetic cannabimimetics (e.g., JWH-018, JWH-073 and CP 47497) in a number of countries has led to a rise in new compounds in herbal mixtures that create marijuana-like psychotropic effects when smoked. The cannabimimetic JWH-250 (1-pentyl-3-(2-methoxyphenylacetyl)indole) was identified in May 2009 by the German Federal Criminal Police as an new ingredient in herbal smoking mixtures. The absence or low presence of the native compound in urine samples collected from persons who had consumed JWH-250 necessitates a detailed identification of their metabolites, which are excreted with urine and present in blood. Using gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and LC-MS/MS), we identified a series of metabolites in urine samples and serum sample from humans and urine samples from rats that were products of the following reactions: (a) mono- and dihydroxylation of aromatic and aliphatic residues of the parent compound, (b) trihydroxylation and dehydration of the N-alkyl chain, (c) N-dealkylation and (d) N-dealkylation and monohydroxylation. The prevailing urinary metabolites in humans were the monohydroxylated forms, while N-dealkylated and N-dealkyl monohydroxylated forms were found in rats. The detection of the mono- and dihydroxylated metabolites of JWH-250 in urine and serum samples by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS proved to be effective in determining consumption of this drug. PMID:21803006

  20. Improvement of a headspace solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the analysis of wheat bread volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; Carcea, Marina; Castagna, Claudia; Magrì, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    An improved method based on headspace solid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS) was proposed for the semi-quantitative determination of wheat bread volatile compounds isolated from both whole slice and crust samples. A DVB/CAR/PDMS fibre was used to extract volatiles from the headspace of a bread powdered sample dispersed in a sodium chloride (20%) aqueous solution and kept for 60min at 50°C under controlled stirring. Thirty-nine out of all the extracted volatiles were fully identified, whereas for 95 other volatiles a tentative identification was proposed, to give a complete as possible profile of wheat bread volatile compounds. The use of an array of ten structurally and physicochemically similar internal standards allowed to markedly improve method precision with respect to previous HS-SPME/GC-MS methods for bread volatiles. Good linearity of the method was verified for a selection of volatiles from several chemical groups by calibration with matrix-matched extraction solutions. This simple, rapid, precise and sensitive method could represent a valuable tool to obtain semi-quantitative information when investigating the influence of technological factors on volatiles formation in wheat bread and other bakery products. PMID:26118802

  1. Determination of glutaraldehyde in water samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2,2,2-trifluoroethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye-In; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2016-05-27

    A simple and convenient headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was described for the determination of glutaraldehyde in water. Glutaraldehyde in water reacted with 2,2,2-trifluoroethylhydrazine (TFEH) in a headspace vial and the formed TFEH derivatives were vaporized and adsorbed onto a fiber. The optimal HS-SPME conditions were achieved with a 50/30μm-divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane fiber, 0.06% 2,2,2-TFEH, 25% salt, an extraction/derivatization temperature of 80°C, a heating time of 30min, and a pH of 6.5. The desorption was performed for 1min at 240°C. Under the established conditions, the lowest limits of detection were 0.3μg/L and 0.1μg/L in 6.0mL of surface water and drinking water, respectively, and the intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation was less than 9.1% at concentrations of 50, 100 and 500μg/L. The calibration curve showed good linearity with R=0.9995 and R=0.9993 in surface water and drinking water, respectively. This method is simple, amenable to automation and environmentally friendly. PMID:27130584

  2. Determination of residues of cyromazine and its metabolite, melamine, in animal-derived food by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with derivatization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinle; Wang, Shuhuai; Liu, Qi; Xu, Qian; Xu, Shixin; Chen, Huilan

    2009-12-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was established for the determination of cyromazine and its metabolite, melamine, in animal-derived food. Chicken and tilapia muscle samples were spiked with (15)N(3)-melamine, extracted with an acidic acetonitrile/water solution, and defatted with dichloromethane. Egg and milk samples were directly extracted with 3% trichloroacetic acid. The extracts were purified using mixed cation-exchange cartridges, derived with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, and detected by GC-MS. Cyromazine and melamine were quantified by external standard methods except for the determination of melamine in animal muscle, which used an internal standard method. Recoveries ranged from 75.0 to 110.0%, and relative standard deviations were <15.0%. In animal muscle the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 20 microg/kg and the limits of detection (LODs) were 10 microg/kg for cyromazine and melamine. In milk and eggs the LOQs were 10 microg/kg and the LODs were 5 microg/kg for both analytes. PMID:19899757

  3. Molecularly-imprinted microspheres for selective extraction and determination of melamine in milk and feed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Zhang, Liying; Meng, Zihui; Wang, Zongyi; Wu, Hui

    2010-09-01

    Molecularly-imprinted polymers in the form of microspheres were synthesized using the dispersion polymerization protocol; cyromazine was used as dummy template, while methacrylic acid, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and acetonitrile (MeCN) were used as functional monomer, cross-linker, and porogen, respectively. When compared with the non-imprinted polymer, the molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) showed outstanding affinity toward melamine in MeCN with a maximum binding concentration (B(max)) of 53.20 nmol mg(-1) MIPs, imprinting effect of 4.6, and a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 90.45 microM. After optimization of the molecularly-imprinted solid-phase extraction conditions, a new method was developed to determine the melamine in milk and feed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The performance of this method has been evaluated in the tainted milk and feed in terms of recovery, precision, linearity, the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ). Recovery ranged in samples from 93.1 to 101.3% with intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviation values below 5.34%. The LOD and LOQ of melamine in milk and feed were 0.01 microg mL(-1) (microg g(-1)) and 0.05 microg mL(-1) (microg g(-1)), respectively. PMID:20674520

  4. [Determination of 46 plasticizers in food contact polyvinyl chloride packaging materials and their migration into food simulants by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunhai; Bo, Haibo; Duan, Wenzhong; Jia, Haitao; Chen, Ruichun; Ma, Yusong; Ai, Lianfeng

    2011-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 46 plasticizers in food contact polyvinyl chloride (PVC) packaging materials and their migration into food simulants, i. e. water, 3% acetic acid, 10% ethanol and olive oil. Plasticizers in the PVC packaging materials, aqueous food simulants and olive oil food simulants were extracted by the dissolution-precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) approaches, respectively. The extracts were analyzed by GC-MS in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode and quantified using the external standard method. The cal-ibration curves were linear in the ranges of 0.1-2.0 mg/L with the correlation coefficients of 0.9910-0. 999 9. The limits of detection were from 0. 005 mg/kg to 0. 05 mg/kg ( S/N = 5 ). The recoveries at 3 spiked levels were 69.51%-107. 21% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs n = 6) ranged from 3.53% to 18.95%. These results show that this method is fast, sensitive and accurate for the qualitative and quantitative determination of plasticizers in food contact plastic products and 4 types of food simulants. PMID:21574398

  5. Application of an automatic thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in airborne particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Gil-Moltó, J; Varea, M; Galindo, N; Crespo, J

    2009-02-27

    The application of the thermal desorption (TD) method coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to the analysis of aerosol organics has been the focus of many studies in recent years. This technique overcomes the main drawbacks of the solvent extraction approach such as the use of large amounts of toxic organic solvents and long and laborious extraction processes. In this work, the application of an automatic TD-GC-MS instrument for the determination of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is evaluated. This device offers the advantage of allowing the analysis of either gaseous or particulate organics without any modification. Once the thermal desorption conditions for PAH extraction were optimised, the method was verified on NIST standard reference material (SRM) 1649a urban dust, showing good linearity, reproducibility and accuracy for all target PAHs. The method has been applied to PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected on quartz fibre filters with low volume samplers, demonstrating its capability to quantify PAHs when only a small amount of sample is available. PMID:19150718

  6. Sequential extraction of inorganic arsenic compounds and methyl arsenate in human urine using mixed-mode monolithic silica spin column coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Namera, Akira; Takeuchi, Akito; Saito, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Shota; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Saruwatari, Tatsuro; Nagao, Masataka

    2012-09-01

    A sequential analytical method was developed for the detection of arsenite, arsenate, and methylarsenate in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The combination of a derivatization of trivalent arsenic compounds by 2,3-dithio-1-propanol (British antilewisite; BAL) and a reduction of pentavalent arsenic compounds (arsenate and methylarsenate) were accomplished to carry out the analysis of arsenic compounds in urine. The arsenic derivatives obtained using BAL were extracted in a stepwise manner using a monolithic spin column and analyzed by GC-MS. A linear curve was observed for concentrations of arsenic compounds of 2.0 to 200 ng/mL, where the correlation coefficients of calibration curves were greater than 0.996 (for a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio >10). The detection limits were 1 ng/mL (S/N > 3). Recoveries of the targets in urine were in the range 91.9-106.5%, and RSDs of the intra- and interday assay for urine samples containing 5, 50, and 150 ng/mL of arsenic compounds varied between 2.95 and 13.4%. The results from real samples obtained from a patient suspected of having ingested As containing medications using this proposed method were in good agreement with those obtained using high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. PMID:22930573

  7. Microwave accelerated selective Soxhlet extraction for the determination of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides in ginseng with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Xiao, Xiaohua; Li, Gongke

    2012-07-01

    Microwave accelerated selective Soxhlet extraction (MA-SSE), a novel selective extraction technique, was investigated in this study. A Soxhlet extraction system containing a glass filter was designed as an extractor. During the procedure of MA-SSE, both the target analytes and the interfering components were extracted from the sample into the extraction solvent enhanced by microwave irradiation. After the solvent flowed though the sorbent, the interfering components were adsorbed by the sorbent, and the target analytes remaining in the solvent were collected in the extraction bottle. No cleanup or filtration was required after extraction. The efficiency of the MA-SSE approach was demonstrated in the determination of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticide residues in ginseng by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Under the optimized conditions, low limits of detection (0.050-0.50 μg/kg) were obtained. The recoveries were in the range of 72.0-110.1% with relative standard deviations less than 7.1%. Because of the effect of microwave irradiation, MA-SSE showed significant advantage compared with other extraction techniques. The sorbent used in this study showed good cleanup ability. The mechanism of MA-SSE was demonstrated to be based on the rupture of the cell walls according to the structural changes of ginseng samples. On the basis of the results, MA-SSE as a simple and effective sample preparation technique for the analysis of pesticide residues in complex matrixes shows great promise. PMID:22686368

  8. Headspace solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization for the determination of aldehydes in algae by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiping; Xiao, Ronghui; Li, Jinhua; Li, Jie; Shi, Benzhang; Liang, Yanjuan; Lu, Wenhui; Chen, Lingxin

    2011-06-01

    A simple, fast, sensitive and cost-effective method based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with on-fiber derivatization coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of six typical aldehydes, 2E-hexenal, heptanal, 2E-heptenal, 2E,4E-heptadienal, 2E-decenal and 2E,4E-decadienal in laboratory algae cultures. As derivatization reagent, O-2,3,4,5,6-(pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride, was loaded onto the poly(dimethylsiloxane)/divinylbenzene fiber for aldehydes on-fiber derivatization prior to HS-SPME. Various influence factors of extraction efficiency were systematically investigated. Under optimized extraction conditions, excellent method performances for all the six aldehydes were attained, such as satisfactory extraction recoveries ranging from 67.1 to 117%, with the precision (relative standard deviation) within 5.3-11.1%, and low detection limits in the range of 0.026-0.044 μg/L. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of the aldehydes in two diatoms (Skeletonema costatum and Chaetoceros muelleri), two pyrrophytas (Prorocentrum micans and Scrippsiella trochoidea) and Calanus sinicus eggs (feeding on the two diatoms above). PMID:21567947

  9. Volatile composition in raspberry cultivars grown in the Pacific Northwest determined by stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malowicki, Sarah M M; Martin, Robert; Qian, Michael C

    2008-06-11

    Twenty-nine volatile compounds in 'Chilliwack', 'Tulameen', 'Willamette', 'Yellow Meeker', and 'Meeker' raspberries were quantified using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) paired with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Good correlation coefficients were obtained with most aroma-active compounds in raspberry, with quantification limits of 1 microg/kg. However, poor recoveries were observed for raspberry ketone and zingerone. Quantitative data showed that volatile concentrations varied for different cultivars. Large variations for alpha-ionone, beta-ionone, geraniol, linalool, and ( Z)-3-hexenol were observed in different raspberry cultivars. In addition, the volatile compositions in 'Meeker' raspberry grown at different locations also varied. The chiral isomeric ratios of raspberry ketone, alpha-ionone, alpha-pinene, linalool, terpinen-4-ol, delta-octalactone, delta-decalactone, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol were studied using a CyclosilB column. alpha-Ionone, alpha-pinene, delta-octalactone, and delta-decalactone had strong chiral isomeric preference, with more than 96% for one isomeric form. Much weaker chiral isomeric preference was observed for terpinen-4-ol, while linalool was almost a racemic mixture. Both growing locations and cultivars affect the isomeric ratio of linalool with a range of 37-51% for ( R)-linalool. PMID:18473468

  10. Discrimination of Chinese vinegars based on headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography mass spectrometry of volatile compounds and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Dai, Shuiping; Niu, Yunwei; Yu, Haiyan; Zhu, Jiancai; Tian, Huaixiang; Gu, Yongbo

    2011-10-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied for the determination of the characteristic volatile profiles of Chinese vinegars. Multivariate statistical techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA), were used to characterize the different Chinese vinegars by types, fermentation method, and production area. A total of 56 volatile compounds were identified, including 15 esters, 10 aldehydes, 5 acids, 12 alcohols, 5 ketones, 4 volatile phenols, 2 pyrazines, and 3 miscellaneous compounds. The major compounds in Chinese vinegars were furfural, acetic acid, ethyl acetate, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 3-methyl-1-butanol, isopentyl acetate, benzaldehyde, phenylethyl alcohol. The PCA results showed that characterizing the Chinese vinegars by HS-SPME-GC-MS was highly related to their type, fermentation method, and production area, and all these influencing factors were not independent. The CA results indicated that the fermentation method had a greater effect than vinegar type and production area. The results showed that HS-SPME-GC-MS together with chemometrics could provide practical reference for characterization of Chinese vinegars. Practical Application:  HS-SPME coupled with GC-MS was applied for the determination of the characteristic volatile profiles of Chinese vinegars. The major compounds in Chinese vinegars were furfural, acetic acid, ethyl acetate, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 3-methyl-1-butanol, isopentyl acetate, benzaldehyde, phenylethyl alcohol. HS-SPME-GC-MS together with chemometrics was an efficient tool for evaluating vinegar authenticity. PMID:22417575

  11. Determination of volatile organic compounds in the dried leaves of Salvia species by solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Rosaria; Ramezani, Sadrollah; Martignetti, Antonella; Mari, Angela; Piacente, Sonia; De Giulio, Beatrice

    2016-04-01

    Salvia spp. are used throughout the world both for food and pharmaceutical purposes. In this study, a method involving headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed, to establish the volatiles profile of dried leaves of four Iranian Salvia spp.: Salvia officinalis L., Salvia leriifolia Benth, Salvia macrosiphon Boiss. and two ecotypes of Salvia reuterana Boiss. A total of 95 volatiles were identified from the dried leaves of the five selected samples. Specifically, α-thujone was the main component of S. officinalis L. and S. macrosiphon Boiss. (34.40 and 17.84%, respectively) dried leaves, S. leriifolia Benth was dominated by β-pinene (27.03%), whereas α-terpinene was the major constituent of the two ecotypes of S. reuterana Boiss. (21.67 and 13.84%, respectively). These results suggested that the proposed method can be considered as a reliable technique for isolating volatiles from aromatic plants, and for plant differentiation based on the volatile metabolomic profile. PMID:26305878

  12. Optimization of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method with methyl chloroformate derivatization for quantification of amino acids in plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Vancompernolle, Bram; Croes, Kim; Angenon, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Rapid, easy and reliable quantification of amino acids is crucial in research on plant amino acid metabolism and nutritional improvement of crops via enrichment of essential amino acids. A recently reported analysis method, based on solid phase extraction (SPE), derivatization with methyl chloroformate and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was optimized and tested on three-week-old Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissues. Optimization of the SPE cleanup yielded recovery rates of minimum 95% for all amino acids (except arginine). Variations in accuracy and precision did not exceed 12.5%, except for cysteine, histidine and tryptophane, which were excluded from analysis. Quantification of overlapping peaks for isoleucine/threonine and proline/asparagine was possible by selection of two specific fragment ions for each amino acid. Of the 16 selected amino acids, 14 were quantified successfully in at least 75% of the samples, while methionine and tyrosine were only quantifiable in 6% and 42%, respectively. A case study on the aspartate super pathway confirmed the applicability of the optimized method on wild type and genetically modified plants: external supplementation of methionine or lysine yielded a 146-fold or 27-fold increase in the respective absolute amino acid levels compared with the control treatment. Induced expression of dhdps-r1 (a mutated lysine biosynthesis gene encoding a feedback insensitive enzyme) caused an 83-fold increase in absolute lysine levels. PMID:26994331

  13. Rapid analysis of essential oil from Fructus Amomi by pressurized hot water extraction followed by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Wang, Aiqin; Shen, Shun; Fu, Daxi; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2005-06-15

    In this paper, a simple, rapid, solvent-free and low-cost method of pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) followed by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil in a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) of the dried ripe fruit of Fructus Amomi (Sha Ren). The essential oil in the TCM (0.050 g) was extracted by water at 50 bar and 150 degrees C, followed by extraction and concentration by SPME fibers at 80 degrees C for 15min and analysis by GC-MS. The PHWE and HS-SPME parameters were optimized. Thirty-five compounds in the TCM were identified by PHWE-HS-SPME. Among them, camphor, an active compound, in the TCM samples was quantitatively analyzed. The proposed method required little time to prepare the sample. Moreover, little sample mass and no organic solvent was needed. The precision of the present method was found to be good (R.S.D. <10.0%). It is shown that PHWE-SPME-GC-MS is an alternative method for the determination of volatile components in TCMs and can be used as a powerful tool for TCM quality assessment. PMID:15925226

  14. Metabolic Profiling with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Carbon-Nitrogen Status of Tobacco Leaves Across Different Planting Areas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jieyu; Zhao, Yanni; Hu, Chunxiu; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Lili; Zeng, Jun; Peng, Xiaojun; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism can reflect plant growth status and environmental factors. Little is known regarding the connections between C-N metabolism and growing regions under field conditions. To comprehensively investigate the relationship in mature tobacco leaves, we established metabolomics approaches based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS). Approximately 240 polar metabolites were determined. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the growing region greatly influenced the metabolic profiles of tobacco leaves. A metabolic correlation network and related pathway maps were used to reveal the global overview of the alteration of C-N metabolism across three typical regions. In Yunnan, sugars and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates were closely correlated with amino acid pools. Henan tobacco leaves showed positive correlation between the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates and C-rich secondary metabolism. In Guizhou, the proline and asparagine had significant links with TCA cycle intermediates and urea cycle, and antioxidant accumulation was observed in response to drought. These results demonstrate that combined analytical approaches have great potential to detect polar metabolites and provide information on C-N metabolism related to planting regional characteristics. PMID:26784525

  15. Membrane assisted solvent extraction coupled to large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for trace analysis of synthetic musks in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Posada-Ureta, O; Olivares, M; Navarro, P; Vallejo, A; Zuloaga, O; Etxebarria, N

    2012-03-01

    This work describes the optimisation, validation and application of membrane assisted solvent extraction (MASE) together with a large volume injection (LVI) in a programmable temperature vaporisation (PTV) injector coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the quantification of ten synthetic musk fragrances (musks) in surface and wastewater samples. Regarding the MASE, musks were extracted from 150 mL of aqueous samples to 200 ?L of n-hexane hold in home-made low density polyethylene (LDPE) bags. The extraction took 240 min and the performance of the method made possible the direct analysis of the extracts by LVI-PTV-GC-MS without needing any further treatment and avoiding losses of analytes. During the optimisation of LVI-PTV set-up, the response surfaces of every analyte signal against the cryo-focussing temperature, injection speed and vent time were built. Finally, the figures of merit of the whole procedure allowed the analysis of most of the musks owing to the low method detection limits (between 4 and 25 ng L?) and good precisions (<20%). In fact, this method was successfully applied to the analysis of musks in surface and wastewater samples. Galaxolide and tonalide are the main two synthetic musks observed in most of the analysed environmental water samples. PMID:22265174

  16. Two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, physical property modeling and automated production of component maps to assess the weathering of pollutants.

    PubMed

    Antle, Patrick M; Zeigler, Christian D; Livitz, Dimitri G; Robbat, Albert

    2014-10-17

    Local conditions influence how pollutants will weather in subsurface environments and sediment, and many of the processes that comprise environmental weathering are dependent upon these substances' physical and chemical properties. For example, the effects of dissolution, evaporation, and organic phase partitioning can be related to the aqueous solubility (SW), vapor pressure (VP), and octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW), respectively. This study outlines a novel approach for estimating these physical properties from comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC/MS) retention index-based polyparameter linear free energy relationships (LFERs). Key to robust correlation between GC measurements and physical properties is the accurate and precise generation of retention indices. Our model, which employs isovolatility curves to calculate retention indices, provides improved retention measurement accuracy for families of homologous compounds and leads to better estimates of their physical properties. Results indicate that the physical property estimates produced from this approach have the same error on a logarithmic-linear scale as previous researchers' log-log estimates, yielding a markedly improved model. The model was embedded into a new software program, allowing for automated determination of these properties from a single GC×GC analysis with minimal model training and parameter input. This process produces component maps that can be used to discern the mechanism and progression of how a particular site weathers due to dissolution, organic phase partitioning, and evaporation into the surrounding environment. PMID:25223613

  17. Analysis of dextromethorphan and dextrorphan in decomposed skeletal tissues by microwave assisted extraction, microplate solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (MAE-MPSPE-GCMS).

    PubMed

    Fraser, Candice D; Cornthwaite, Heather M; Watterson, James H

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of decomposed skeletal tissues for dextromethorphan (DXM) and dextrorphan (DXT) using microwave assisted extraction (MAE), microplate solid-phase extraction (MPSPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. Rats (n = 3) received 100 mg/kg DXM (i.p.) and were euthanized by CO2 asphyxiation roughly 20 min post-dose. Remains decomposed to skeleton outdoors and vertebral bones were recovered, cleaned, and pulverized. Pulverized bone underwent MAE using methanol as an extract