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Sample records for gas distension technique

  1. Putrefactive rigor: apparent rigor mortis due to gas distension.

    PubMed

    Gill, James R; Landi, Kristen

    2011-09-01

    Artifacts due to decomposition may cause confusion for the initial death investigator, leading to an incorrect suspicion of foul play. Putrefaction is a microorganism-driven process that results in foul odor, skin discoloration, purge, and bloating. Various decompositional gases including methane, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen will cause the body to bloat. We describe 3 instances of putrefactive gas distension (bloating) that produced the appearance of inappropriate rigor, so-called putrefactive rigor. These gases may distend the body to an extent that the extremities extend and lose contact with their underlying support surface. The medicolegal investigator must recognize that this is not true rigor mortis and the body was not necessarily moved after death for this gravity-defying position to occur. PMID:20375836

  2. Distensibility and pain of the uterine cervix evaluated by novel techniques.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Hans; Hee, Lene; Liao, Donghua; Uldbjerg, Niels

    2016-07-01

    The article serves to review the literature on the human uterine cervix based on a new distension technology named functional luminal imaging probe. This technology was originally developed to study the biomechanical competence of the gastro-esophageal junction where it provides a geometric profile of the lumen during distension, which can be related to sensory data. We searched and reviewed publications on cervical distention from 2002. The functional luminal imaging probe technology has been used for studying the mechanical and mechano-sensory properties of the cervix in non-pregnant women. In early pregnant women and in term pregnant women, the technique provides geometric measurements from the whole cervical canal during distension, which changes dramatically during pregnancy. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the technique predicts the outcome of labor induction better than the Bishop score does. The functional luminal imaging probe technology has potential as a research tool as well as for clinical use in gynecology and obstetrics. PMID:26946059

  3. Increased distensibility in dependent veins following prolonged bedrest.

    PubMed

    Kölegård, Roger; Mekjavic, Igor B; Eiken, Ola

    2009-07-01

    Displacement of blood to the lower portion of the body that follows a postural transition from recumbent to erect is augmented by a prolonged period of recumbency (bedrest). Information is scarce as to what extent this augmented blood-volume shift to dependent veins is attributable to increased distensibility of the veins. Accordingly, we studied the effect of 5 weeks of horizontal bedrest on the pressure-distension relationship in limb veins. Elevation of venous distending pressure was induced by exposure of the body except the tested limb to supra-atmospheric pressure with the subject seated in a pressure chamber with one arm, or supine with a lower leg, protruding through a hole in the chamber door. Diameter changes in response to an increase of intravenous pressure (distensibility) from 60 to about 140 mmHg were measured in the brachial and posterior tibial veins using ultrasonographic techniques. Prior to bedrest, the distensibility was substantially less in the tibial than in the brachial vein. Bedrest increased (P < 0.01) pressure distension in the tibial vein by 86% from 7 +/- 3% before to 13 +/- 3% after bedrest. In the brachial vein, bedrest increased (P < 0.05) pressure distension by 36% from 14 +/- 5% before to 19 +/- 5% after bedrest. Thus, removal of the gravity-dependent pressure components that act along the blood vessels in erect posture increases the distensibility of dependent veins. PMID:19347352

  4. Rumen distension and contraction influence feed preference by sheep.

    PubMed

    Villalba, J J; Provenza, F D; Stott, R

    2009-01-01

    Distension of the rumen limits feed intake by livestock. Ruminal dysfunctions due to bloat, which causes distension by accumulation of excessive gas within the rumen, also reduce feeding. We hypothesized that excessive levels of rumen distension cause feed aversions and that preference increases for feeds eaten in association with recovery from bloat. To test these hypotheses, we determined whether 12 commercial crossbred lambs (average initial BW of 43 +/- 2 kg) could associate ingestion of specific feeds with the consequences of increased intraruminal pressure and its subsidence. Six of the lambs were fitted with rumen cannulas and offered ground alfalfa for 30 min after a rubber balloon was inserted into the rumen of each animal and distended with air to volumes of 1.8, 2.5, or 4.5 L. Subsequently, balloons were deflated and alfalfa was offered again for a second period of 30 min. Feed intake was not affected when the balloon was not distended (P = 0.45 to 0.93), but distension reduced feed intake (P < 0.001) in direct proportion to the magnitude of distension at all 3 volumes (R(2) = 0.70). Relief from distension promoted a compensatory increase in feed intake (P = 0.006). During conditioning to determine if lambs acquired a preference for a feed associated with recovery from distension, fistulated lambs were offered novel feeds: wheat bran (group 1; n = 3) and beet pulp (group 2; n = 3), and the balloon was distended for 30 min. Feeds were then switched and the balloons were deflated (recovery). Control lambs (n = 6) received the same feeding protocol without the balloons. Lambs formed strong aversions to feeds associated with distension and preferred feeds associated with recovery (P = 0.001 to P = 0.10). No preferences or avoidances were observed in control lambs conditioned without rumen distension (P = 0.17 to P = 0.87). Thus, rumen distension and recovery from distension induced feed aversions and preferences, respectively, which may be critical in

  5. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  6. Esophagogastric junction distensibility in hiatus hernia.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, C; McMahon, B P; Ejstrud, P; Ostapiuk, M A; Funch-Jensen, P; Drewes, A M

    2016-07-01

    Hiatus hernia is known to be an important risk factor for developing gastroesophageal reflux disease. We aimed to use the endoscopic functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) to evaluate the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. EndoFLIP assessments were made in 30 patients with hiatus hernia and Barrett's esophagus, and in 14 healthy controls. The EndoFLIP was placed straddling the esophagogastric junction and the bag distended stepwise to 50 mL. Cross-sectional areas of the bag and intra-bag pressures were recorded continuously. Measurements were made in the separate sphincter components and hiatus hernia cavity. EndoFLIP measured functional aspects such as sphincter distensibility and pressure of all esophagogastric junction components and visualized all hiatus hernia present at endoscopy. The lower esophageal sphincter in hiatus hernia patients had a lower pressure (e.g. 47.7 ± 13.0 vs. 61.4 ± 19.2 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the common esophagogastric junction in controls. In hiatus hernia patients, the crural diaphragm had a lower pressure (e.g. 29.6 ± 10.1 vs. 47.7 ± 13.0 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the lower esophageal sphincter. There was a significant association between symptom scores in patients and EndoFLIP assessment. Conclusively, EndoFLIP was a useful tool. To evaluate the presence of a hiatus hernia and to measure the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. Furthermore, EndoFLIP distinguished the separate esophagogastric junction components in hiatus hernia patients, and may help us understand the biomechanics of the esophagogastric junction and the mechanisms behind hiatal herniation. PMID:25789842

  7. Aortic Distensibility in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Evrim B.; Redheuil, Alban; Backlund, Jye-Yu C.; Small, Alexander C.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Lachin, John M.; Lima, Joao A.C.; Bluemke, David A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the relationship between long-term glycemia, traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, and ascending aortic stiffness in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eight hundred seventy-nine subjects in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study were evaluated. The stiffness/distensibility of the ascending thoracic aorta (AA) was measured with magnetic resonance imaging. Associations of AA distensibility and CVD risk factors, mean HbA1c, and cardiovascular complications including macroalbuminuria were assessed using multivariate linear regression models. RESULTS The mean age of the subjects was 50 ± 7 years (47% women, mean diabetes duration of 28 years). Over 22 years of follow-up, 27% of participants had cardiovascular complications. After adjusting for gender and cohort, AA distensibility was lower with increasing age, mean systolic blood pressure, LDL, and HbA1c measured over an average of 22 years (−26.3% per 10 years, −11.0% per 10 mmHg SBP, −1.8% per 10 mg/dL of LDL, and −9.3% per unit mean HbA1c [%], respectively). Patients with macroalbuminuria had 25% lower AA distensibility compared with those without (P < 0.0001). Lower AA distensibility also was associated with greater ratio of left ventricular mass to volume (−3.4% per 0.1 g/mL; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Our findings indicate strong adverse effects of hypertension, chronic hyperglycemia and macroalbuminuria on AA stiffness in type 1 diabetes in the DCCT/EDIC cohort. PMID:23474588

  8. Radioactive-gas separation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, R.; King, K. J.; Nellis, D. O.; Nisson, R. S.; Robling, P.; Womack, W.

    1977-01-01

    Cryogenic technique recovers gases inexpensively. Method uses differences in vapor pressures, melting points, and boiling points of components in gaseous mixture. Series of temperature and pressure variations converts gases independently to solid and liquid states, thereby simplifying separation. Apparatus uses readily available cryogen and does not require expensive refrigeration equipment.

  9. Uterine distension differentially affects remodelling and distensibility of the uterine vasculature in non-pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Osol, George; Barron, Carolyn; Mandalà, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    During pregnancy the mammalian uterine circulation undergoes significant expansive remodelling necessary for normal pregnancy outcome. The underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that myometrial stretch actively stimulates uterine vascular remodelling by developing a new surgical approach to induce unilateral uterine distension in non-pregnant rats. Three weeks after surgery, which consisted of an infusion of medical-grade silicone into the uterine lumen, main and mesometrial uterine artery and vein length, diameter and distensibility were recorded. Radial artery diameter, distensibility and vascular smooth muscle mitotic rate (Ki67 staining) were also measured. Unilateral uterine distension resulted in significant increases in the length of main uterine artery and vein and mesometrial segments but had no effect on vessel diameter or distensibility. In contrast, there were significant increases in the diameter of the radial arteries associated with the distended uterus. These changes were accompanied by reduced arterial distensibility and increased vascular muscle hyperplasia. In summary, this is the first report to show that myometrial stretch is a sufficient stimulus to induce significant remodelling of uterine vessels in non-pregnant rats. Moreover, the results indicate differential regulation of these growth processes as a function of vessel size and type. PMID:22781934

  10. A novel in vivo approach to assess radial and axial distensibility of large and intermediate pulmonary artery branches.

    PubMed

    Bellofiore, A; Henningsen, J; Lepak, C G; Tian, L; Roldan-Alzate, A; Kellihan, H B; Consigny, D W; Francois, C J; Chesler, N C

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary arteries (PAs) distend to accommodate increases in cardiac output. PA distensibility protects the right ventricle (RV) from excessive increases in pressure. Loss of PA distensibility plays a critical role in the fatal progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) toward RV failure. However, it is unclear how PA distensibility is distributed across the generations of PA branches, mainly because of the lack of appropriate in vivo methods to measure distensibility of vessels other than the large, conduit PAs. In this study, we propose a novel approach to assess the distensibility of individual PA branches. The metric of PA distensibility we used is the slope of the stretch ratio-pressure relationship. To measure distensibility, we combined invasive measurements of mean PA pressure with angiographic imaging of the PA network of six healthy female dogs. Stacks of 2D images of the PAs, obtained from either contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) or computed tomography digital subtraction angiography (CT-DSA), were used to reconstruct 3D surface models of the PA network, from the first bifurcation down to the sixth generation of branches. For each branch of the PA, we calculated radial and longitudinal stretch between baseline and a pressurized state obtained via acute embolization of the pulmonary vasculature. Our results indicated that large and intermediate PA branches have a radial distensibility consistently close to 2%/mmHg. Our axial distensibility data, albeit affected by larger variability, suggested that the PAs distal to the first generation may not significantly elongate in vivo, presumably due to spatial constraints. Results from both angiographic techniques were comparable to data from established phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ex vivo mechanical tests, which can only be used in the first branch generation. Our novel method can be used to characterize PA distensibility in PAH patients undergoing

  11. Severe gastric distension in seven patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Del Beccaro, M A; McLaughlin, J F; Polage, D L

    1991-10-01

    This is a report of two children who had severe recurrent gastric distension and vomiting, and five who experienced severe gastric distension without vomiting. Two of the five died during an episode of acute gastric distension. All had marked nutritional depletion, and severe spastic quadriplegia due to either cerebral palsy or acquired brain injury. None of the patients had significant gastroesophageal reflux. Positioning the patients in the left lateral decubitus position temporarily relieved their obstructions. Complete resolution of the distension and/or vomiting did not occur until after adequate weight gain. Loss of fat stores may lead to this type of recurrent gastric distension. PMID:1743416

  12. Pathologic aerophagia: a rare cause of chronic abdominal distension

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Cestari, Ana Beatriz C.S.S.; da Silva, Orli Carvalho; Fernandes, Marcia Antunes; Firme, Livia Honorato

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe an adolescent with pathologic aerophagia, a rare condition caused by excessive and inappropriate swallowing of air and to review its treatment and differential diagnoses. Case description: An 11-year-old mentally impaired blind girl presenting serious behavior problems and severe developmental delay with abdominal distension from the last 8 months. Her past history included a Nissen fundoplication. Abdominal CT and abdominal radiographs showed diffuse gas distension of the small bowel and colon. Hirschsprung's disease was excluded. The distention was minimal at the moment the child awoke and maximal at evening, and persisted after control of constipation. Audible repetitive and frequent movements of air swallowing were observed. The diagnosis of pathologic aerophagia associated to obsessive-compulsive disorder and developmental delay was made, but pharmacological treatment was unsuccessful. The patient was submitted to an endoscopic gastrostomy, permanently opened and elevated relative to the stomach. The distention was resolved, while maintaining oral nutrition. Comments: Pathologic aerophagia is a rare self-limiting condition in normal children exposed to high levels of stress and may be a persisting problem in children with psychiatric or neurologic disease. In this last group, the disease may cause serious complications. Pharmacological and behavioral treatments are ill-defined. Severe cases may demand surgical strategies, mainly decompressive gastrostomy. PMID:26100594

  13. Cylinder Fragmentation Using Gas Gun Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, T. F.; Reinhart, W. D.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Grady, D. E.; Wilson, L. T.

    2002-07-01

    In this study an experimental technique for study of cylinder fracture fragmentation characteristics has been developed on a two-stage light gas gun. This test method allows the study of cylinder fracture fragmentation in a laboratory environment under well-controlled loading conditions. Application of this technique allows measure of failure strain, strain rates, expansion velocity, and fragmentation toughness. Results of several experiments on Aermet steel are presented.

  14. New technique for calibrating hydrocarbon gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Puster, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration correction factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters is described. It is based on the Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion products of the test hydrocarbon, burned in oxygen-enriched air, with that in normal air. It is applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for a number of hydrocarbons. The calibration correction factors measured using this technique are in good agreement with the values obtained by other independent procedures. The technique is successfully applied to the measurement of differences as low as one percent of the effective hydrocarbon content of the natural gas test samples.

  15. Nebivolol increases arterial distensibility in vivo.

    PubMed

    McEniery, Carmel M; Schmitt, Matthias; Qasem, Ahmad; Webb, David J; Avolio, Alberto P; Wilkinson, Ian B; Cockcroft, John R

    2004-09-01

    Arterial stiffness is a key determinant of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. beta-Blockers appear to be less effective than other drugs in improving outcome in hypertensive patients, and a potential explanation may be that beta-blockers are less effective in reducing arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to assess the direct effect of beta-blockade on pulse wave velocity (PWV), a robust measure of arterial distensibility, using a local, ovine, hind-limb model. In addition, we hypothesized that the vasodilating beta-blocker nebivolol, but not atenolol, would increase arterial distensibility in vivo. All studies were conducted in anesthetized sheep. PWV was recorded in vivo using a dual pressure-sensing catheter placed in the common iliac artery. Intraarterial infusion of nebivolol reduced PWV by 6+/-3% at the higher dose (P<0.001), but did not alter mean arterial pressure (change of -1+/-3 mm Hg, P=0.1). In contrast, atenolol had no effect on PWV (P=0.11) despite a small drop in mean pressure (change of -5+/-3 mm Hg, P<0.01). Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate led to a dose-dependent fall in PWV, and 2 nmol/min produced a similar reduction in PWV to the higher dose of nebivolol (500 nmol/min). The effect of nebivolol on PWV was significantly attenuated during coinfusion of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (P=0.003) and also during coinfusion of butoxamine (P=0.02). These results demonstrate that nebivolol, but not atenolol, increases arterial distensibility. This effect of nebivolol is mediated through the release of NO via a beta2 adrenoceptor-dependent mechanism. Thus, nebivolol may be of benefit in conditions of increased large artery stiffness, such as isolated systolic hypertension. PMID:15262912

  16. Functional luminal imaging probe topography: an improved method for characterizing esophageal distensibility in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, Peter J.; Xiao, Yinglian; Nicodème, Frédéric; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Hirano, Ikuo; Pandolfino, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to develop a new method for analysis and presentation of esophageal distensibility data using high-resolution impedance planimetry recordings during a volume-controlled distention. Methods: Two control subjects and six patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) with stricture, narrow caliber or normal endoscopy according to EndoFLIP studies were included for analysis. Median filtering and pulse detection techniques were applied to the pressure signal and a wavelet decomposition technique was applied to the 16 channels of raw esophageal diameter data to reduce vascular artifact, respiratory effect and remove esophageal contraction interference. These data were used to generate a functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP) topography plot that describes regional variation of cross-sectional area (CSA). A previously developed computer program was used to calculate and model the CSA-pressure data to derive the slope of line fitting and distension plateau for each individual subject. The results were compared among the four endoscopic phenotypes. Results: Patients with EoE and normal endoscopy had similar esophageal distensibility parameters to those of normal controls whereas patients with EoE and stricture or narrow caliber had much lower distensibility than patients with EoE and normal endoscopy. The FLIP topography plots provided a global assessment of the esophageal distensibility along the axial plane of measurement that differentiated patients with varying degrees of endoscopic abnormality. Conclusions: New techniques can be leveraged to improve data analysis and presentation using EndoFLIP assessment of the esophageal body in EoE. These techniques may be helpful in defining clinically relevant phenotypes and guiding treatment strategies and should be helpful in structuring future outcome trials. PMID:23503784

  17. Arterial Stiffness, Distensibility, and Strain in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Esra Akyüz; Serin, Halil İbrahim; Khosroshahi, Hashem E.; Kılıç, Mahmut; Ekim, Meral; Beysel, Perihan; Geçit, U. Aliye; Domur, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that since asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, it could lead to the early development of atherosclerosis in childhood-onset asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate arterial stiffness, distensibility, and strain of different peripheral arteries, the parameters of which can be used to detect atherosclerosis in asthmatic children. Material/Methods We studied 22 pediatric patients with asthma and 18 healthy children. Fasting blood glucose and cholesterol levels were evaluated to exclude children with diabetes and hyperlipidemia, which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. Renal, carotid, and brachial arteries diameters were measured. Using the measured data, stiffness, distensibility, and strain of the arteries of all children were calculated. Results Pulse pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterols, and glucose levels of the obese individuals were similar to the controls. In carotid arteries there were no statistical differences regarding stiffness, distensibility, and strain. According to multiple ANCOVA analysis, distensibility and strain of right and left brachial arteries and right renal artery were higher, whereas right renal artery stiffness was lower in asthmatic children than in controls. Approximately one-fifth of the change in the left and right brachial arteries and right renal artery distensibility and strain and a small portion of the change in the right renal artery stiffness were associated with asthma. In contrast, left renal artery distensibility, strain, and stiffness were not associated with asthma. Conclusions Peripheral arteries had higher distensibility and strain, and lower stiffness in asthmatic children than in controls. PMID:26803723

  18. Mechanical ventilation causes airway distension with proinflammatory sequelae in mice.

    PubMed

    Nickles, Hannah T; Sumkauskaite, Migle; Wang, Xin; Wegner, Ingmar; Puderbach, Michael; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury has predominantly been attributed to overdistension or mechanical opening and collapse of alveoli, whereas mechanical strain on the airways is rarely taken into consideration. Here, we hypothesized that mechanical ventilation may cause significant airway distension, which may contribute to the pathological features of ventilator-induced lung injury. C57BL/6J mice were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated at tidal volumes of 6, 10, or 15 ml/kg body wt. Mice were imaged by flat-panel volume computer tomography, and central airways were segmented and rendered in 3D for quantitative assessment of airway distension. Alveolar distension was imaged by intravital microscopy. Functional dead space was analyzed in vivo, and proinflammatory cytokine release was analyzed in isolated, ventilated tracheae. CT scans revealed a reversible, up to 2.5-fold increase in upper airway volume during mechanical ventilation compared with spontaneous breathing. Airway distension was most pronounced in main bronchi, which showed the largest volumes at tidal volumes of 10 ml/kg body wt. Conversely, airway distension in segmental bronchi and functional dead space increased almost linearly, and alveolar distension increased even disproportionately with higher tidal volumes. In isolated tracheae, mechanical ventilation stimulated the release of the early-response cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. Mechanical ventilation causes a rapid, pronounced, and reversible distension of upper airways in mice that is associated with an increase in functional dead space. Upper airway distension is most pronounced at moderate tidal volumes, whereas higher tidal volumes redistribute preferentially to the alveolar compartment. Airway distension triggers proinflammatory responses and may thus contribute relevantly to ventilator-induced pathologies. PMID:24816486

  19. Response of canine lower esophageal sphincter to gastric distension.

    PubMed

    Franzi, S J; Martin, C J; Cox, M R; Dent, J

    1990-09-01

    The aim of this study was to localize the region of the stomach responsible for triggering distension-induced transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR). The canine stomach was partitioned into subsegments by a row of buttressed sutures. This separated either the fundus from the lesser curve or the proximal stomach from the antrum. After 1 mo each region was progressively distended while gastroesophageal pressures were monitored. At the time of the first TLESR, gastric wall tension was estimated from the bag pressure and volume. Distension of the intact stomach, lesser curve, or proximal stomach in 12 dogs produced a progressive increase in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, which was interrupted at low gastric wall tension (29, 35, and 40 mmHg.cm, respectively) by a superimposed TLESR. Background LES pressure fell progressively with distension of the antrum but was unchanged by distension of the fundus alone. Both the fundus and antrum had significantly higher thresholds for triggering TLESR (96 and 105 mmHg.cm). In another two dogs truncal vagotomy performed at the time of gastric partitioning prevented both the change in background LES pressure, and the triggering of TLESR, associated with proximal gastric and antral distension. We conclude that the subcardiac region of the stomach is primarily responsible for triggering TLESR induced by distension and that the effect on background LES pressure depends on the region distended. PMID:2399982

  20. Quantification of pulmonary arterial wall distensibility using parameters extracted from volumetric micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    1999-09-01

    Stiffening, or loss of distensibility, of arterial vessel walls is among the manifestations of a number of vascular diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension. We are attempting to quantify the mechanical properties of vessel walls of the pulmonary arterial tree using parameters derived from high-resolution volumetric x-ray CT images of rat lungs. The pulmonary arterial trees of the excised lungs are filled with a contrast agent. The lungs are imaged with arterial pressures spanning the physiological range. Vessel segment diameters are measured from the inlet to the periphery, and distensibilities calculated from diameters as a function of pressure. The method shows promise as an adjunct to other morphometric techniques such as histology and corrosion casting. It possesses the advantages of being nondestructive, characterizing the vascular structures while the lungs are imaged rapidly and in a near-physiological state, and providing the ability to associate mechanical properties with vessel location in the intact tree hierarchy.

  1. Feasibility of esophagogastric junction distensibility measurement during Nissen fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Ilczyszyn, A; Botha, A J

    2014-01-01

    Increased esophagogastric junction distensibility has been implicated in the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Previous authors have demonstrated a reduction in distensibility following anti-reflux surgery, but the changes during the operation are not clear. Our study aimed to ascertain the feasibility of measuring intraoperative distensibility changes and to assess if this would have potential to modify the operation. Seventeen patients with GERD were managed in a standardized manner consisting of preoperative assessment with symptom scoring, endoscopy, 24 hours pH studies, and manometry. Patients then underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication with intraoperative distensibility measurement using an EndoFLIP EF-325 functional luminal imaging probe (Crospon Ltd, Galway, Ireland). This device utilizes impedance planimetry technology to measure cross-sectional area and distensibility within a balloon-tipped catheter. This is inflated at the esophagogastric junction to fixed distension volumes. Thirty-second median cross-sectional area and intraballoon pressure measurements were recorded at 30 and 40 mL balloon distensions. Measurement time points were initially after induction of anesthesia, after pneumoperitoneum, after hiatal mobilization, after hiatal repair, after fundoplication, and finally pre-extubation. Postoperatively, patients continued on protocol and were discharged after a two-night stay tolerating a sloppy diet. Patients with a hiatus hernia on high-resolution manometry had a significantly higher initial esophagogastric junction distensibility index (DI) than those without. Hiatus repair and fundoplication resulted in a significant overall reduction in the median DI from the initial to final recordings (30 mL balloon distension reduction of 3.26 mm(2) /mmHg (P = 0.0087), 40 mL balloon distension reduction of 2.39 mm(2) /mmHg [P = 0.0039]). There was also a significant reduction in the DI after pneumoperitoneum, hiatus

  2. Hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry: Gas-phase ion chemistry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, Kent M.

    2014-03-21

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for the project "Hydrocarbon Radical Thermochemistry: Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Techniques." The objective of this project is to exploit gas-phase ion chemistry techniques for determination of thermochemical values for neutral hydrocarbon radicals of importance in combustion kinetics.

  3. Multum non multa: airway distensibility by forced oscillations.

    PubMed

    Mermigkis, Charalampos; Schiza, Sophia E; Panagou, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Airway distensibility although appears to be unaffected by airway smooth muscle tone probably related to airway remodelling, after bronchodilator treatment is significantly increased in subjects with asthma. We assessed airway distensibity and its first moment derivative in two patients with mild intermittent asthma and normal spirometry. The increase in airway distensibility after bronchodilation measured at the tidal volume range during quiet breathing by forced oscillations was not accompanied by a change in its first moment, while the latter showed a significant increase in a second patient after anti-inflammatory treatment. It appears that airway distensibility is sensitive to reduction of bronchial smooth muscle tone after bronchodilation, but in addition its first moment might provide information on a change of both bronchial smooth muscle tone and small airways inflammation. PMID:27374218

  4. A new technique for pumping hydrogen gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    A system for pumping hydrogen gas without isotopic fractionation has been developed. The pump contains uranium metal, which when heated to about 80??C reacts with hydrogen to form UH3. The UH3 is heated to above 500??C to decompose the hydride and regenerate the hydrogen. ?? 1970.

  5. Hyperpolarized Gas MRI: Technique and Applications

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Holman P.; Kaushik, S. Sivaram; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Functional imaging today offers a rich world of information that is more sensitive to changes in lung structure and function than traditionally obtained pulmonary function tests. Hyperpolarized helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) MR imaging of the lungs provided new sensitive contrast mechanisms to probe changes in pulmonary ventilation, microstructure and gas exchange. With the recent scarcity in the supply of 3He the field of hyperpolarized gas imaging shifted to the use of cheaper and naturally available 129Xe. Xenon is well tolerated and recent technical advances have ensured that the 129Xe image quality is on par with that of 3He. The added advantage of 129Xe is its solubility in pulmonary tissue, which allows exploring specific lung function characteristics involved in gas exchange and alveolar oxygenation. With a plethora of contrast mechanisms, hyperpolarized gases and 129Xe in particular, stands to be an excellent probe of pulmonary structure and function, and provide sensitive and non-invasive biomarkers for a wide variety of pulmonary diseases. PMID:25952516

  6. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  7. Technique for measuring gas conversion factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining hydrocarbon conversion factors for a flowmeter. A mixture of air, O2 and C sub x H sub y is burned and the partial paressure of O2 in the resulting gas is forced to equal the partial pressure of O2 in air. The flowrate of O2 flowing into the mixture is measured by flowmeter and the flowrate of C sub x H sub y flowing into the mixture is measured by the flowmeter conversion factor is to be determined. These measured values are used to calculate the conversion factor.

  8. GAS CURTAIN EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. KAMM; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative relationship of numerical simulation to the physical phenomena being modeled is of paramount importance in computational physics. If the phenomena are dominated by irregular (i. e., nonsmooth or disordered) behavior, then pointwise comparisons cannot be made and statistical measures are required. The problem we consider is the gas curtain Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability experiments of Rightley et al. (13), which exhibit complicated, disordered motion. We examine four spectral analysis methods for quantifying the experimental data and computed results: Fourier analysis, structure functions, fractal analysis, and continuous wavelet transforms. We investigate the applicability of these methods for quantifying the details of fluid mixing.

  9. Time reversal technique for gas leakage detection.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A O; Polovinka, Yu A

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic remote sensing of subsea gas leakage traditionally uses sonars as active acoustic sensors and hydrophones picking up the sound generated by a leak as passive sensors. When gas leaks occur underwater, bubbles are produced and emit sound at frequencies intimately related to their sizes. The experimental implementation of an acoustic time-reversal mirror (TRM) is now well established in underwater acoustics. In the basic TRM experiment, a probe source emits a pulse that is received on an array of sensors, time reversed, and re-emitted. After time reversal, the resulting field focuses back at the probe position. In this study, a method for enhancing operation of the passive receiving system has been proposed by using it in the regime of TRM. Two factors, the local character of the acoustic emission signal caused by the leakage and a resonant nature of the bubble radiation at their birth, make particularly effective scattering with the conjugate wave (CW). Analytical calculations are performed for the scattering of CW wave on a single bubble when CW is formed by bubble birthing wail received on an array, time reversed, and re-emitted. The quality of leakage detection depends on the spatio-temporal distribution of ambient noise. PMID:25920866

  10. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K - 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous Materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was limited by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/- 15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 mm to 400 mm in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen- oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used (a) for assessing the uncertainty in infering gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  11. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was United by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/-15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 microns to 400 microns in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used: (a) for assessing the uncertainty in inferring gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  12. Ethylene Trace-gas Techniques for High-speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Reichert, Bruce A.

    1994-01-01

    Three applications of the ethylene trace-gas technique to high-speed flows are described: flow-field tracking, air-to-air mixing, and bleed mass-flow measurement. The technique involves injecting a non-reacting gas (ethylene) into the flow field and measuring the concentration distribution in a downstream plane. From the distributions, information about flow development, mixing, and mass-flow rates can be dtermined. The trace-gas apparatus and special considerations for use in high-speed flow are discussed. A description of each application, including uncertainty estimates is followed by a demonstrative example.

  13. Developing a gas rocket performance prediction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, J. H.; Moon, L. F.; Stepien, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    A simple, semi-empirical performance correlation/prediction technique applicable to gaseous and liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. Excellent correlations were attained for over 100 test firings by adjusting the computation of the gaseous mixing of an unreactive, coaxial jet using a correlation factor, F, which resulted in prediction of the experimental combustion efficiency for each firing. Static pressure, mean velocity and turbulence intensity in the developing region of non-reactive coaxial jets, typical of those of coaxial injector elements were determined. Detailed profiles were obtained at twelve axial locations (extending from the nozzle exit for a distance of five diameters) downstream from a single element of the Bell Aerospace H2/O2 19-element coaxial injector. These data are compared with analytical predictions made using both eddy viscosity and turbulence kinetic energy mixing models and available computer codes. Comparisons were disappointing, demonstrating the necessity of developing improved turbulence models and computational techniques before detailed predictions of practical coaxial free jet flows are attempted.

  14. Evaluating peripheral arterial volume distensibility by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Xu, Guan; Wei, Xinbin; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Stiffness of arteries, especially small arteries, is an important marker for many diseases and a good parameter to evaluate the risks of cardiovascular problems. In this research, we proposed a new method for measurement of local arterial distensibility by using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) technology. Taking advantages from its excellent sensitivity and high spatial resolution, PAM can evaluate the morphology and volume change of a small artery accurately without involving any contrast agent. When working in the linear elastic range of a vessel, measuring the initial and the distended diameters of the vessel before and after pressure change facilitates quantitative assessment of vessel distensibility. The preliminary experiment on well-controlled gel phantoms demonstrates the feasibility of this technology.

  15. Transitional Flow in an Arteriovenous Fistula: Effect of Wall Distensibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide adequate access for dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Transitional flow and the subsequent pressure and shear stress fluctuations are thought to be causative in the fistula failure. Since 50% of fistulae require surgical intervention before year one, understanding the altered hemodynamic stresses is an important step toward improving clinical outcomes. We perform numerical simulations of a patient-specific model of a functioning fistula reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans. Rigid wall simulations and fluid-structure interaction simulations using an in-house finite element solver for the wall deformations were performed and compared. In both the rigid and distensible wall cases, transitional flow is computed in fistula as evidenced by aperiodic high frequency velocity and pressure fluctuations. The spectrum of the fluctuations is much more narrow-banded in the distensible case, however, suggesting a partial stabilizing effect by the vessel elasticity. As a result, the distensible wall simulations predict shear stresses that are systematically 10-30% lower than the rigid cases. We propose a possible mechanism for stabilization involving the phase lag in the fluid work needed to deform the vessel wall. Support from an NIDDK R21 - DK08-1823.

  16. Active reactions of the rabbit ear artery to distension.

    PubMed

    Speden, R N

    1984-06-01

    Changes in the external diameter of active arteries, excised from the rabbit ear, were recorded following jumps in pressure within the arteries. The arteries were either spontaneously active or were constricted with noradrenaline. Active arteries dilated when the transmural pressure was jumped from 60 to 100 mmHg, but the dilatation was largely, sometimes completely, overcome by compensatory constriction within 1-2 min. Varying the constriction from 15 to 80% of the maximal constriction had no effect on the ability of the arteries to counteract distension. An average of 90 +/- 2% of the distension was overcome in 2 min and this was achieved against increases in stress (force/wall cross-sectional area) on the muscle of not less than 74%. Jumps in pressure rarely enhanced constriction and then only when constriction was slight (less than 15% of maximal). Restoring the transmural pressure to 60 from 100 mmHg produced a transient constriction when the initial constriction was less than 50% of the maximal constriction. The sequence of counteraction of distension and transient constriction on reversing the pressure jump was reproducible for many hours. Increasing constriction of the arteries first decreased and then, at maximal constriction, suppressed all transient changes in diameter. Smaller jumps in pressure produced less dilatation which was more readily prevented by increasing constriction. These results show that the wall of the ear artery possesses a pressure-sensitive, negative feed-back mechanism which minimized changes in diameter following jumps in pressure. PMID:6747877

  17. Airway distension promotes leukocyte recruitment in rat tracheal circulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lina H K; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2003-11-01

    Mechanical distortion of blood vessels is known to activate endothelial cells. Whether airway distension likewise activates the vascular endothelium within the airway wall is unknown. Using intravital microscopy in the rat trachea, we investigated if airway distention with the application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) caused leukocyte recruitment to the airway. Tracheal postcapillary venules were visualized and leukocyte kinetics monitored in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats (80 breaths/minute, 6 ml/kg VT, 1 cm H(2)O PEEP). Leukocyte rolling velocity (Vwbc) and the number of adherent cells were not altered with normal ventilation over the course of 2 hours. Ventilation with sustained PEEP (8 cm H(2)O for 1 hour reduced Vwbc and increased adhesion, reaching a maximum at 1 hour of PEEP. Intermittent (2x and 5x) 8 cm H(2)O PEEP also induced a similar reduction in Vwbc, accompanied by an increase in adhesion. However, leukocyte recruitment after airway distension is localized to the airways because increased PEEP did not induce leukocyte recruitment in the mesenteric microcirculation or when PEEP was applied to the lung distal to the site of measurement. Pretreatment with endothelin receptor and selectin inhibitors blocked the effects of distension on leukocyte recruitment, suggesting their involvement in the proinflammatory response. PMID:12869357

  18. Automated measurement of respiratory gas exchange by an inert gas dilution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    A respiratory gas analyzer (RGA) has been developed wherein a mass spectrometer is the sole transducer required for measurement of respiratory gas exchange. The mass spectrometer maintains all signals in absolute phase relationships, precluding the need to synchronize flow and gas composition as required in other systems. The RGA system was evaluated by comparison with the Douglas bag technique. The RGA system established the feasibility of the inert gas dilution method for measuring breath-by-breath respiratory gas exchange. This breath-by-breath analytical capability permits detailed study of transient respiratory responses to exercise.

  19. Does Measurement of Esophagogastric Junction Distensibility by EndoFLIP Predict Therapy-responsiveness to Endoluminal Fundoplication in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Fabiënne G M; Keszthelyi, Daniel; Bouvy, Nicole D; Masclee, Ad A M; Conchillo, José M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), an increased esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility has been described. Assessment of EGJ distensibility with the endoscopic functional luminal imaging probe (EndoFLIP) technique might identify patients responsive to transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF), whereas postoperative measurement of EGJ distensibility might provide insight into the antireflux mechanism of TIF. Therefore, we investigated the value of the EndoFLIP technique in GERD patients treated by TIF. Methods Forty-two GERD patients underwent EGJ distensibility measurement before TIF using the EndoFLIP technique. In a subgroup of 25 patients, EndoFLIP measurement was repeated both postoperative and at 6 months follow-up. Treatment outcome was assessed according to esophageal acid exposure time (AET; objective outcome) and symptom scores (clinical outcome) 6 months after TIF. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that preoperative EGJ distensibility (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.03–0.78; P = 0.023) and preoperative AET (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.42–0.90; P = 0.013) were independent predictors for objective treatment outcome but not for clinical outcome after TIF. The best cut-off value for objective outcome was 2.3 mm2/mmHg for preoperative EGJ distensibility and 11% for preoperative AET. EGJ distensibility decreased direct postoperative from 2.0 (1.2–3.3) to 1.4 (1.0–2.2) mm2/mmHg (P = 0.014), but increased to 2.2 (1.5–3.0) at 6 months follow-up (P = 0.925, compared to preoperative). Conclusions Preoperative EGJ distensibility and preoperative AET were independent predictors for objective treatment outcome but not for clinical outcome after TIF. According to our data, the EndoFLIP technique has no added value either in the preoperative diagnostic work-up or in the post-procedure evaluation of endoluminal antireflux therapy. PMID:25742904

  20. Inverse-dispersion technique for assessing lagoon gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques because of non-ideal wind conditions, such as those induced by trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and lagoons with dimensions too small to establish equilib...

  1. Extended electrode technique. [gas metal arc welding of metal plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaper, V. D.; Pollack, A.

    1972-01-01

    The extended electrode technique is a unique welding process which utilizes manual gas-metal-arc (GMAW) semi-automatic equipment and close, square butt joints to effectively produce a weld. The technique takes advantage of the resistance heating of the electode extension to effect the root pass. Weldments as large as 72-X30-X2-inch have been fabricated with this technique under normal shipyard welding conditions. Mechanical properties and explosion bulge tests indicate that satisfactory results are obtained with this process. Potential savings of approximately 50 percent can be achieved in flat welding and repair of heavy structural steel members.

  2. Determination of membrane tension during balloon distension of intestine.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, H; Kassab, G S; Fung, Y C

    2004-09-01

    During the last decades, it has become increasingly common to make balloons distension in visceral organs in vivo. In particular this is true for studies of gastrointestinal motor function and biomechanics. Balloon distension is often used for assessment of small intestinal compliance and tension based on Laplace's law for cylindrical pressure pipes. This commonly used law is valid only when the balloon-distended intestine is cylindrical. Experimentally, it is seen that the diameter of the balloon-distended intestine is not a constant, but variable in the axial direction. Hence, it is necessary to improve Laplace's law for intestinal investigation. In this paper we develop the framework for determination of the tension distribution in circumferential and longitudinal direction during balloon distension. When the radii of curvature are measured from a photograph of the intestinal profile, then the membrane stress resultants can be computed everywhere in the intestine in contact with the balloon from the equations of equilibrium. The experimental data were obtained from small intestinal segments from five pigs and three guinea pigs. Papaverine was injected before the animals were sacrificed to relax the intestinal smooth muscle. The segments were immersed in a bath with calcium-free Krebs solution with dextran and EGTA. A balloon was distended in the lumen with pressures up to 15 cmH2O in the pigs and 10 cmH2O in the guinea pigs and radii were measured along the z-axis. The tension in circumferential direction had its maximum approximately 25% away from the middle of the balloon. The circumferential tension was 2-3 times higher than the longitudinal tension. In conclusion when we know the shape of the intestine, we can compute the circumferential and longitudinal components of tension. The large variation in tensions along the z axis must be considered when performing balloon distension studies in the gastrointestinal tract for studying physiological and

  3. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  4. Perineal Distensibility Using Epi-no in Twin Pregnancies: Comparative Study with Singleton Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Kubotani, Juliana Sayuri; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Zanetti, Miriam Raquel Diniz; Soares, Vanessa Cardoso Marques; Elito Júnior, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare perineal distensibility between women with twin and singleton pregnancies and to correlate these women's perineal distensibility with anthropometric data. This prospective cross-sectional case-control study was conducted among nulliparous women, of whom 20 were pregnant with twins and 23 with a single fetus. Perineal distensibility was evaluated in the third trimester by means of Epi-no, which was introduced into the vagina and inflated up to the maximum tolerable limit. It was then withdrawn while inflated and its circumference was measured. The unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare perineal distensibility in the two groups and Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was used to correlate the pregnant women's perineal distensibility with their anthropometric data. There was no difference in perineal distensibility between the twin group (16.51 ± 2.05 cm) and singleton group (16.13 ± 1.67 cm) (P = 0.50). There was a positive correlation between perineal distensibility and abdominal circumference (r = 0.36; P = 0.01). The greater the abdominal circumference was, the greater the perineal distensibility was, regardless of whether the pregnancy was twin or singleton. PMID:25006476

  5. Gas Membrane Sensor Technique for Long Term Gas Measurements in Deep Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M.; Erzinger, J.; Kujawa, Chr.; Co2-Sink Group

    2009-04-01

    The direct determination of the gas composition in subsurface brines in deep boreholes is necessary for the characterization of existing fluids and the monitoring of changes of reservoir gases during industrial use. The conventional methods used for this purpose were mostly expensive and sophisticated techniques and typically involve the collection of discrete samples that are transported to a laboratory for analyses. Alternatively, the presented new gas membrane sensor technique allows for a permanent collection of gas in the subsurface and the continuous conduction of the gathered gas through a special borehole cable with subsequent real time analyses at the surface. The system is easy to handle, avoids complex mechanical components and therefore reduces costs. The main component of the gas sensor is a tube-shaped membrane, together with a piezoresistive pressure and temperature transmitter and two stainless steel capillaries embedded in a borehole cable for the gas transport to the surface. A filler material prevents the membrane from collapsing inwardly under pressures exceeding 200 bars. The practicability of our method was tested by comprehensive laboratory experiments at different pressures, temperatures and salt concentrations and by comparing the results with literature data on gas permeation coefficients and activation energies gained by the conventional "time-lag" method. By taking into account the permeability coefficient for carbon dioxide in the used polydimethylsiloxan membrane, the Henry-law coefficient and the salting out effect the quantification of dissolved carbon dioxide in deep borehole brines is possible. The described method was successful applied at the scientific carbon dioxide storage test site in Ketzin, Germany. Changes in the reservoir gas composition were monitored and the breakthrough of injected carbon dioxide and krypton gas tracer into the observation well were recorded.

  6. Noble Gas Measurement and Analysis Technique for Monitoring Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, William S

    1999-09-01

    An environmental monitoring technique using analysis of stable noble gas isotopic ratios on-stack at a reprocessing facility was developed. This technique integrates existing technologies to strengthen safeguards at reprocessing facilities. The isotopic ratios are measured using a mass spectrometry system and are compared to a database of calculated isotopic ratios using a Bayesian data analysis method to determine specific fuel parameters (e.g., burnup, fuel type, fuel age, etc.). These inferred parameters can be used by investigators to verify operator declarations. A user-friendly software application (named NOVA) was developed for the application of this technique. NOVA included a Visual Basic user interface coupling a Bayesian data analysis procedure to a reactor physics database (calculated using the Monteburns 3.01 code system). The integrated system (mass spectrometry, reactor modeling, and data analysis) was validated using on-stack measurements during the reprocessing of target fuel from a U.S. production reactor and gas samples from the processing of EBR-II fast breeder reactor driver fuel. These measurements led to an inferred burnup that matched the declared burnup with sufficient accuracy and consistency for most safeguards applications. The NOVA code was also tested using numerous light water reactor measurements from the literature. NOVA was capable of accurately determining spent fuel type, burnup, and fuel age for these experimental results. Work should continue to demonstrate the robustness of this system for production, power, and research reactor fuels.

  7. Unit vent airflow measurements using a tracer gas technique

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.; Lagus, P.L.; Fleming, K.M.

    1997-08-01

    An alternative method for assessing flowrates that does not depend on point measurements of air flow velocity is the constant tracer injection technique. In this method one injects a tracer gas at a constant rate into a duct and measures the resulting concentration downstream of the injection point. A simple equation derived from the conservation of mass allows calculation of the flowrate at the point of injection. Flowrate data obtained using both a pitot tube and a flow measuring station were compared with tracer gas flowrate measurements in the unit vent duct at the Callaway Nuclear Station during late 1995 and early 1996. These data are presented and discussed with an eye toward obtaining precise flowrate data for release rate calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also described. In those test situations for which many flowrate combinations are required, or in large area ducts, a tracer flowrate determination requires fewer man-hours than does a conventional traverse-based technique and does not require knowledge of the duct area. 6 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Impact of Airway Gas Exchange on the Multiple Inert Gas Elimination Technique: Theory

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joseph C.; Hlastala, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, V̇A/Q̇, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Q̇br. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: 1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and 2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of V̇A/Q̇ and Q̇br. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean V̇A, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed V̇A distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected. PMID:20336837

  9. Impact of airway gas exchange on the multiple inert gas elimination technique: theory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    The multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) provides a method for estimating alveolar gas exchange efficiency. Six soluble inert gases are infused into a peripheral vein. Measurements of these gases in breath, arterial blood, and venous blood are interpreted using a mathematical model of alveolar gas exchange (MIGET model) that neglects airway gas exchange. A mathematical model describing airway and alveolar gas exchange predicts that two of these gases, ether and acetone, exchange primarily within the airways. To determine the effect of airway gas exchange on the MIGET, we selected two additional gases, toluene and m-dichlorobenzene, that have the same blood solubility as ether and acetone and minimize airway gas exchange via their low water solubility. The airway-alveolar gas exchange model simulated the exchange of toluene, m-dichlorobenzene, and the six MIGET gases under multiple conditions of alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion, VA/Q, heterogeneity. We increased the importance of airway gas exchange by changing bronchial blood flow, Qbr. From these simulations, we calculated the excretion and retention of the eight inert gases and divided the results into two groups: (1) the standard MIGET gases which included acetone and ether and (2) the modified MIGET gases which included toluene and m-dichlorobenzene. The MIGET mathematical model predicted distributions of ventilation and perfusion for each grouping of gases and multiple perturbations of VA/Q and Qbr. Using the modified MIGET gases, MIGET predicted a smaller dead space fraction, greater mean VA, greater log(SDVA), and more closely matched the imposed VA distribution than that using the standard MIGET gases. Perfusion distributions were relatively unaffected. PMID:20336837

  10. Distensibility of the Esophagogastric Junction Assessed with the Functional Lumen Imaging Probe (FLIP™) in Achalasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfino, John E.; de Ruigh, Annemijn; Nicodème, Frédéric; Xiao, Yinglian; Boris, Lubomyr; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP), measures esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility (cross sectional area/luminal pressure) during volume-controlled distension. The aim of this study was to apply this tool to the assessment of the EGJ in untreated and treated achalasia patients and to compare EGJ distensibility with other diagnostic tools utilized in managing achalasia. Methods Findings from FLIP, high-resolution manometry (HRM), timed barium esophagram, and symptom assessment by Eckardt Score (ES) were compared in 54 achalasia patients (23 untreated, 31 treated). Twenty healthy volunteers underwent FLIP as a comparator group. The EGJ distensibility index (EGJ-DI) was defined at the ‘waist’ of the FLIP bag during volumetric distension, expressed in mm2/mmHg. The ES was used to gauge treatment outcome: good response < 3 or poor response ≥ 3. Key Results Of the 31 treated patients, 17 had good and 14 poor treatment response. The EGJ-DI was significantly different among groups, greatest in the control subjects and least in the untreated patients; patients with good treatment response had significantly greater EGJ-DI than untreated or patients with poor response. The correlations between EGJ-DI and ES and integrated relaxation pressure on HRM were significant. Conclusion The FLIP provided a useful measure of EGJ distensibility in achalasia patients that correlated with symptom severity. The measurement of EGJ distensibility was complementary to existing tests suggesting a potentially important role in the clinical management of achalasia. PMID:23413801

  11. New techniques will take the sting out of flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-08

    A discussion covers some new techniques for reducing NO/sub x/ and/or sulfur dioxide emissions from stack gases, including the installation by Champlin Petroleum Co. of Exxon Research and Engineering Co.'s catalyst-free DeNox system, which relies on ammonia addition, at its Wilmington, California, refinery; UOP Inc.'s demonstration of the Shell Flue Gas Desulfurization (and NO/sub x/ removal) process at a Tampa, Florida, coal-fired unit owned by Tampa Electric Co.; and Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd.'s and Mitsui and Co. Ltd.'s plans to use Bergbau-Forschung G.m.b.H. technology, which removes both NO/sub x/ and sulfur dioxide.

  12. TRIDENT flyer plate Impact technique: comparison to gas gun plate impact technique

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, Darcie D; Gray, III, George T; Luo, Sheng-Nian

    2009-03-01

    This report describes the details of a series of plate impact experiments that were conducted on a gas gun in an effort to validate a new technique for plate impact using the TRIDENT laser to launch thin flyers. The diagnostics fielded were VISAR and identical samples and impactors were used on both platforms. All experimenters agree that the VISAR results should have agreed between the two experimental platforms. The VISAR results did not agree across the platforms and experimenters offer explanations and implications for this outcome.

  13. Pressure distension in leg vessels as influenced by prolonged bed rest and a pressure habituation regimen.

    PubMed

    Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B; Kounalakis, Stylianos N; Kölegård, Roger

    2016-06-15

    Bed rest increases pressure distension in arteries, arterioles, and veins of the leg. We hypothesized that bed-rest-induced deconditioning of leg vessels is governed by the removal of the local increments in transmural pressure induced by assuming erect posture and, therefore, can be counteracted by intermittently increasing local transmural pressure during the bed rest. Ten men underwent 5 wk of horizontal bed rest. A subatmospheric pressure (-90 mmHg) was intermittently applied to one lower leg [pressure habituation (PH) leg]. Vascular pressure distension was investigated before and after the bed rest, both in the PH and control (CN) leg by increasing local distending pressure, stepwise up to +200 mmHg. Vessel diameter and blood flow were measured in the posterior tibial artery and vessel diameter in the posterior tibial vein. In the CN leg, bed rest led to 5-fold and 2.7-fold increments (P < 0.01) in tibial artery pressure-distension and flow responses, respectively, and to a 2-fold increase in tibial vein pressure distension. In the PH leg, arterial pressure-distension and flow responses were unaffected by bed rest, whereas bed rest led to a 1.5-fold increase in venous pressure distension. It thus appears that bed-rest-induced deconditioning of leg arteries, arterioles, and veins is caused by removal of gravity-dependent local pressure loads and may be abolished or alleviated by a local pressure-habituation regimen. PMID:27079693

  14. Effects of octreotide on responses to colorectal distension in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Su, X; Burton, M; Gebhart, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—It has been suggested that the analgesic effect of the somatostatin analogue octreotide in visceral pain involves peripheral mechanisms. We evaluated the effect of octreotide on responses to noxious colorectal distension in rats.
METHODS—In a behavioural study, pressor and electromyographic responses to colorectal distension were evaluated before and after intravenous or intrathecal administration of octreotide. In pelvic nerve afferent fibre recordings, responses of mechanosensitive fibres innervating the colon to noxious colorectal distension (80 mm Hg, 30 seconds) were tested before and after octreotide.
RESULTS—Octreotide was ineffective in attenuating responses to colorectal distension in either normal or acetic acid inflamed colon when administered intravenously but attenuated responses when given intrathecally. Administration of octreotide over a broad dose range (0.5 µg/kg to 2.4 mg/kg) did not alter responses of afferent fibres to noxious colorectal distension in untreated, or acetic acid or zymosan treated colons.
CONCLUSIONS—In the rat, octreotide has no peripheral (pelvic nerve) modulatory action in visceral nociception. The antinociceptive effect of octreotide in this model of visceral nociception is mediated by an action at central sites.


Keywords: octreotide; colorectal distension; electromyographic responses; afferent fibres; visceral pain; analgesic effect; rat PMID:11302968

  15. Hot gas stream application in micro-bonding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrijasevic, Daniela; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Smetana, Walter; Boehm, Stefan; Brenner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept for bonding micro-parts with dimensions in the range of 50 μm to 300 μm. Two different kinds of adhesives - polyurethane adhesive foil and hot melt glue - were applied to a basic substrate by different techniques. The focused and concentrated hot gas stream softened glue which had been applied in a solid state. Micro-parts were then embossed in the softened glue, or covered and shielded by it. In this way, a rigid and compact bond was obtained after cooling. For the positioning of micro-parts (optical fibers), it has been necessary to manufacture adequate V-grooves. Finite element analyses using the ANSYS TM program package were performed in order to evaluate parameters which govern the heat transfer to the adhesive and substrate respectively. Experimental results are in good agreement with results obtained by the numerical simulations. The advantages of this new approach are small system size, low capital costs, simple usage, applicability to many material combinations, easy integration into existing production lines, etc.

  16. Regional Variation of Distal Esophagus Distensibility Assessed Using the Functional Luminal Imaging Probe (FLIP)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiyue; Nicodème, Frédéric; Boris, Lubomyr; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variation of esophageal distensibility in normal subjects using a novel multichannel functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP). Methods Ten healthy subjects (4 male, age 21–49 years) were evaluated during endoscopy with a high-resolution impedance planimetry probe (FLIP) positioned through the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) and distal 10cm of the esophageal body. Stepwise bag distensions using 5 ml increments from 0 to 60 mL were conducted and simultaneous measurements of cross-sectional area (CSA) and the associated intrabag pressure from each subject were analyzed using a customized MATLAB™ program. The distensibility along the esophagus was determined and compared between the EGJ and interval locations at 2–5 cm and 6–10 cm above the EGJ. Results The pressure-CSA relationship was nearly linear among sites at lower pressures (0 to 7.5 mmHg) and reached a distension plateau at pressures ranging from 8 to 24 mmHg. The location of greatest distensibility was 4 cm above the EGJ. Although the CSAs of individual recording loci were not significantly different, there was a significant difference between the mean CSAs when comparing the region 2 to 5 cm proximal to EGJ to that 6 to 10 cm proximal to the EGJ. Conclusions There were significant regional differences in distensibility along the distal esophagus with lower values in the proximal part compared to more distal part. The greatest distensibility was noted to occur at about 4 cm above the EGJ in close proximity to the location of the contractile deceleration point and phrenic ampulla. PMID:23965159

  17. Peripheral venous distension elicits a blood pressure raising reflex in young and middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Evan L; Brian, Michael S; Coyle, Dana E; Edwards, David G; Stocker, Sean D; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2016-06-01

    Distension of peripheral veins in humans elicits a pressor and sympathoexcitatory response that is mediated through group III/IV skeletal muscle afferents. There is some evidence that autonomic reflexes mediated by these sensory fibers are blunted with increasing age, yet to date the venous distension reflex has only been studied in young adults. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the venous distension reflex would be attenuated in middle-aged compared with young adults. Nineteen young (14 men/5 women, 25 ± 1 yr) and 13 middle-aged (9 men/4 women, 50 ± 2 yr) healthy normotensive participants underwent venous distension via saline infusion through a retrograde intravenous catheter in an antecubital vein during limb occlusion. Beat-by-beat blood pressure, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and model flow-derived cardiac output (Q), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were recorded throughout the trial. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased during the venous distension in both young (baseline 83 ± 2, peak 94 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05) and middle-aged adults (baseline 88 ± 2, peak 103 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05). MSNA also increased in both groups [young: baseline 886 ± 143, peak 1,961 ± 242 arbitrary units (AU)/min; middle-aged: baseline 1,164 ± 225, peak 2,515 ± 404 AU/min; both P < 0.05]. TPR (P < 0.001), but not Q (P = 0.76), increased during the trial. However, the observed increases in blood pressure, MSNA, and TPR were similar between young and middle-aged adults. Additionally, no correlation was found between age and the response to venous distension (all P > 0.05). These findings suggest that peripheral venous distension elicits a pressor and sympathetic response in middle-aged adults similar to the response observed in young adults. PMID:27053648

  18. Comparison of gas chromatographic hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Nevado, J J Berzas; Martín-Doimeadios, R C Rodríguez; Krupp, E M; Bernardo, F J Guzmán; Fariñas, N Rodríguez; Moreno, M Jiménez; Wallace, D; Ropero, M J Patiño

    2011-07-15

    In this study, we evaluate advantages and disadvantages of three hyphenated techniques for mercury speciation analysis in different sample matrices using gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) and pyrolysis atomic fluorescence (GC-pyro-AFS) detection. Aqueous ethylation with NaBEt(4) was required in all cases. All systems were validated with respect to precision, with repeatability and reproducibility <5% RSD, confirmed by the Snedecor F-test. All methods proved to be robust according to a Plackett-Burnham design for 7 factors and 15 experiments, and calculations were carried out using the procedures described by Youden and Steiner. In order to evaluate accuracy, certified reference materials (DORM-2 and DOLT-3) were analyzed after closed-vessel microwave extraction with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). No statistically significant differences were found to the certified values (p=0.05). The suitability for water samples analysis with different organic matter and chloride contents was evaluated by recovery experiments in synthetic spiked waters. Absolute detection and quantification limits were in the range of 2-6 pg for GC-pyro-AFS, 1-4 pg for GC-MS, with 0.05-0.21 pg for GC-ICP-MS showing the best limits of detection for the three systems employed. However, all systems are sufficiently sensitive for mercury speciation in environmental samples, with GC-MS and GC-ICP-MS offering isotope analysis capabilities for the use of species-specific isotope dilution analysis, and GC-pyro-AFS being the most cost effective alternative. PMID:21641604

  19. A psychophysiological study in humans using phasic colonic distension as a noxious visceral stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ness, T J; Metcalf, A M; Gebhart, G F

    1990-12-01

    Psychophysiological experiments were performed in 9 humans using constant-pressure, phasic, graded distention (30 sec, 20-70 mm Hg) of the sigmoid colon as a visceral stimulus. Reliable cardiovascular (pressor), respiratory and visceromotor responses in addition to reports of pressure/pain sensations were evoked by colonic distension in 8 of the 9 subjects. The pressure/pain sensations were referred to the lower abdomen, lower back and perineum and their intensity quantified using a visual analogue scale. Responses to colonic distension were graded and increased with repeated distensions at the same intensity (60 mm Hg). The area of referral as indicated by subject drawings increased with repeated distensions as did the intensity of the subjects' sensory and affective descriptors of the sensation. Five of the subjects differentiated between 'pressure' and 'pain' sensations evoked by colonic distension; the intensity of the 'pain' sensation accelerated during the distending stimulus whereas the 'pressure' sensation was typically stable or adapting during the distending stimulus. PMID:2293146

  20. Effects of gastric distension and infusion of umami and bitter taste stimuli on vagal afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Charles C; Murat, Chloé; Rosazza, Matthew; Still, Liz

    2011-10-24

    Until recently, sensory nerve pathways from the stomach to the brain were thought to detect distension and play little role in nutritional signaling. Newer data have challenged this view, including reports on the presence of taste receptors in the gastrointestinal lumen and the stimulation of multi-unit vagal afferent activity by glutamate infusions into the stomach. However, assessing these chemosensory effects is difficult because gastric infusions typically evoke a distension-related vagal afferent response. In the current study, we recorded gastric vagal afferent activity in the rat to investigate the possibility that umami (glutamate, 150 mM) and bitter (denatonium, 10 mM) responses could be dissociated from distension responses by adjusting the infusion rate and opening or closing the drainage port in the stomach. Slow infusions of saline (5 ml over 2 min, open port) produced no significant effects on vagal activity. Using the same infusion rate, glutamate or denatonium solutions produced little or no effects on vagal afferent activity. In an attempt to reproduce a prior report that showed distention and glutamate responses, we produced a distension response by closing the exit port. Under this condition, response to the infusion of glutamate or denatonium was similar to saline. In summary, we found little or no effect of gastric infusion of glutamate or denatonium on gastric vagal afferent activity that could be distinguished from distension responses. The current results suggest that sensitivity to umami or bitter stimuli is not a common property of gastric vagal afferent fibers. PMID:21925651

  1. The clinical effect of hydraulic distension plus manual therapy on patients with frozen shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kwang-Il; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to develop a clinical protocol for the treatment of frozen shoulder using applied hydraulic distension plus manual therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups: 60 patients in group A were treated with hydraulic distension plus manual therapy, and 61 in group B were treated with hydraulic distension alone. Treatment effects were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (pain and satisfaction), and active range of motion of the shoulder (forward flexion, internal and external rotation) before treatments and at 2, 6, 12, 24 weeks, and 1 year after the last injections. [Results] Patients in group A achieved faster pain relief and better satisfaction than patients in group B during the 6 weeks after treatment. However, no significant difference in VAS was observed between the groups at final follow-up. AROM of the shoulder was improved at final follow-up in both groups. [Conclusion] Hydraulic distension plus manual therapy provided faster pain relief, a higher level of patient satisfaction, and an earlier improvement in AROM of the shoulder than hydraulic distension alone in patients with frozen shoulder.

  2. An analysis of oil and gas supply modeling techniques and a survey of offshore supply models

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This report surveys the literature on empirical oil and gas supply modeling techniques. These techniques are categorized as either geologic/engineering, econometric, or hybrid - the last being a combination of geologic and econometric techniques. The geologic/ engineering models are further disaggregated into play analysis models and discovery process models. The strengths and weaknesses of each of the models are discussed. The report concludes with a discussion of how these techniques have been applied to offshore oil and gas supply.

  3. Low Cost Gas Turbine Off-Design Prediction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinjako, Jeremy

    This thesis seeks to further explore off-design point operation of gas turbines and to examine the capabilities of GasTurb 12 as a tool for off-design analysis. It is a continuation of previous thesis work which initially explored the capabilities of GasTurb 12. The research is conducted in order to: 1) validate GasTurb 12 and, 2) predict off-design performance of the Garrett GTCP85-98D located at the Arizona State University Tempe campus. GasTurb 12 is validated as an off-design point tool by using the program to predict performance of an LM2500+ marine gas turbine. Haglind and Elmegaard (2009) published a paper detailing a second off-design point method and it includes the manufacturer's off-design point data for the LM2500+. GasTurb 12 is used to predict off-design point performance of the LM2500+ and compared to the manufacturer's data. The GasTurb 12 predictions show good correlation. Garrett has published specification data for the GTCP85-98D. This specification data is analyzed to determine the design point and to comment on off-design trends. Arizona State University GTCP85-98D off-design experimental data is evaluated. Trends presented in the data are commented on and explained. The trends match the expected behavior demonstrated in the specification data for the same gas turbine system. It was originally intended that a model of the GTCP85-98D be constructed in GasTurb 12 and used to predict off-design performance. The prediction would be compared to collected experimental data. This is not possible because the free version of GasTurb 12 used in this research does not have a module to model a single spool turboshaft. This module needs to be purchased for this analysis.

  4. Understanding soil-gas velocity leads to new sampling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, K.A.

    1989-12-01

    Predicting when periods of maximum vertical gas velocity occur for any geographic point mightily increases the sensitivity and reliability of detection. This article discusses sampling programs. Sampling programs can be completed during periods of maximum velocity, allowing field workers to collect the maximum amount of contaminant in trace-gas form per given unit of time.

  5. GRI-sponsored research tests gas measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, K.M.; Gregor, J.G. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the Gas Research Institute (GRI) which is managing a comprehensive research and development (R and D) program in gas flow measurement to improve gas metering accuracy and to reduce operation and maintenance costs. A portion of the program is centered on construction of a Metering Research Facility (MRF) and collecting experimental data over a range of Reynolds numbers to determine the effects of upstream flow conditions on orifice and turbine meters. In addition, GRI is sponsoring the development of new concepts for energy content and energy rate measurement: a low-cost, low-power electronic flow measurement device and accurate gas mixtures for use with gas chromatographs and calorimeters.

  6. A Safe and Efficient Technique for the Production of HCl/DCl Gas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Steven G.; Bard, Raymond R.; Cantrell, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    We present a safe and efficient technique to generate HCl/DCl gas for use in the classic physical chemistry experiment that introduces students to ro-vibrational spectroscopy. The reaction involves thionyl chloride and a mixture of water and deuterium oxide to produce HCl/DCl gas with SO[subscript 2] gas as a byproduct. The entire reaction is…

  7. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  8. Esophageal Distensibility as a Measure of Disease Severity in Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Nicodème, Frédéric; Hirano, Ikuo; Chen, Joan; Robinson, Kenika; Lin, Zhiyue; Xiao, Yinglian; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kwasny, Mary J; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims The aim of this study was to assess whether measurements of esophageal distensibility, made by high-resolution impedance planimetry, correlated with important clinical outcomes in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Methods Seventy patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (50 male, ages 18–68) underwent endoscopy with esophageal biopsy collection and high-resolution impedance planimetry using the functional lumen-imaging probe. The patients were followed prospectively for an average of 9.2 months (range 3–14 months), and the risk of food impaction, requirement for dilation; symptom severity during the follow-up period was determined from medical records. Esophageal distensibility metrics and the severity of mucosal eosinophilia at baseline were compared between patients presenting with and without food impaction and those requiring or not requiring esophageal dilation. Logistic regression and stratification assessments were used to assess the predictive value of esophageal distensibility metrics in assessing risk of food impaction, the need for dilation, and continued symptoms. Results Patients with prior food impactions had significantly lower distensibility plateau (DP) values than those with solid food dysphagia alone. Additionally, patients sustaining food impaction and requiring esophageal dilation during the follow-up period had significantly lower DP values than those who did not. The severity of mucosal eosinophilia did not correlate with risk for food impaction, the requirement for dilation during follow up, or DP values. Conclusions Reduced esophageal distensibility predicts risk for food impaction and the requirement for esophageal dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. The severity of mucosal eosinophilia was not predictive of these outcomes and had a poor correlation with esophageal distensibility. PMID:23591279

  9. Regional aortic distensibility and its relationship with age and aortic stenosis: a computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis T L; Narayan, Om; Leong, Darryl P; Bertaso, Angela G; Maia, Murilo G; Ko, Brian S H; Baillie, Timothy; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Worthley, Matthew I; Meredith, Ian T; Cameron, James D

    2015-06-01

    Aortic distensibility (AD) decreases with age and increased aortic stiffness is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The association of severe aortic stenosis (AS) with AD in different aortic regions has not been evaluated. Elderly subjects with severe AS and a cohort of patients without AS of similar age were studied. Proximal aortic cross-sectional-area changes during the cardiac cycle were determined using retrospective-ECG-gating on 128-detector row computed-tomography. Using oscillometric-brachial-blood-pressure measurements, the AD at the ascending-aorta (AA), proximal-descending-aorta (PDA) and distal-descending-aorta (DDA) was determined. Linear mixed effects modelling was used to determine the association of age and aortic stenosis on regional AD. 102 patients were evaluated: 36 AS patients (70-85 years), 24 AS patients (>85 years) and 42 patients without AS (9 patients <50 years, 20 patients between 51-70 years and 13 patients 70-85 years). When comparing patients 70-85 years, AA distensibility was significantly lower in those with AS compared to those without AS (0.9 ± 0.9 vs. 1.4 ± 1.1, P = 0.03) while there was no difference in the PDA (1.0 ± 1.1 vs. 1.0 ± 1.2, P = 0.26) and DDA (1.1 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.97). In patients without AS, AD decreased with age in all aortic regions (P < 0.001). The AA in patients <50 years were the most distensible compared to other aortic regions. There is regional variation in aortic distensibility with aging. Patients with aortic stenosis demonstrated regional differences in aortic distensibility with lower distensibility demonstrated in the proximal ascending aorta compared to an age-matched cohort. PMID:25855464

  10. Distensibility in human veins as affected by 5 weeks of repeated elevations of local transmural pressure.

    PubMed

    Kölegård, Roger; Eiken, Ola

    2011-12-01

    The objectives were to investigate the effects of repeated increments in local intravascular pressure (pressure training; PT) on (1) distensibility in two arm veins, and (2) pain in the arm induced by markedly increased intravascular pressure. Elevation of venous distending pressure (DP) in an arm was induced by placing the subject (n = 8) in a pressure chamber with one arm protruding to the outside via a port in the chamber door, and increasing chamber pressure. During 5 weeks, venous DP in one arm was repeatedly (3 × 40 min/week) increased (65-105 mmHg). Pressure-distension relationships were determined in the brachial and cephalic veins by measuring diameter changes by ultrasonography during stepwise increments in DP to 180 mmHg. In the brachial vein, the diameter change in response to an increase in DP from 30 to 180 mmHg (distensibility) was reduced (P < 0.05) in the pressure-trained arm (11%) compared to that in the control arm before (23%) and after (21%) PT. The cephalic vein showed a similar response with a reduced (P < 0.05) distensibility in the pressure-trained arm (20%) compared to that in the control arm before (29%) and after (25%) PT. At any given DP, arm pain was less (P < 0.05) in the pressure-trained arm than in the control arm before and after PT, presumably reflecting the reduced venous distensibility in the pressure-trained arm. The results support the concept that the distensibility of venous walls adapts to meet the demands imposed by the prevailing local transmural pressures. PMID:21461927

  11. Influence of trimebutine on inflammation- and stress-induced hyperalgesia to rectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Lacheze, C; Coelho, A M; Fioramonti, J; Buéno, L

    1998-08-01

    The effects of trimebutine and its major metabolite, N-desmethyltrimebutine on inflammation- and stress-induced rectal hyperalgesia have been evaluated in rats fitted with electrodes implanted in the longitudinal striated muscle of the abdomen. Intermittent rectal distension was performed before and 3 days after induction of rectal inflammation by local infusion of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (in ethanol). Stress consisted of 2h partial restraint and rectal distension was performed before and 30min after the end of the partial restraint session. The animals were treated intraperitoneally with trimebutine or desmethyltrimebutine (5, 10 or 20mgkg(-1)) or vehicle 15min before rectal distension. Naloxone (1mgkg(-1)) or saline was injected subcutaneously before trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine. Before treatment trimebutine at the highest dose (20mgkg(-1)) reduced the abdominal response to rectal distension for the highest volume of distension (1.6mL) whereas desmethyltrimebutine was inactive. After rectocolitis the abdominal response to rectal distension was enhanced and trimebutine at 5mgkg(-1) reduced and at 10 mgkg(-1) suppressed inflammation-induced hyperalgesia, an effect reversed by naloxone. Desmethyltrimebutine was inactive. Stress-induced hypersensitivity was attenuated or suppressed, or both, by trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine at doses of 5, 10 or 20mgkg(-l); greater efficacy was observed for desmethyltrimebutine and the effects were not reversed by naloxone. It was concluded that trimebutine and desmethyltrimebutine are active against inflammation- and stress-induced rectal hyperalgesia but act differently. The effect of trimebutine on inflammation-induced hyperalgesia is mediated through opioid receptors. PMID:9751458

  12. Lung distensibility and airway function in intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (Pi MZ).

    PubMed Central

    Tattersall, S F; Pereira, R P; Hunter, D; Blundell, G; Pride, N B

    1979-01-01

    We examined the role of intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency in predisposing to abnormalities of lung distensibility and airway function in 20 heterozygotes (Pi MZ) who were individually matched with a control Pi M subject of similar age, height, and smoking habits drawn from the same male, working population. There were no significant differences between the heterozygotes and their controls in the results of spirometry, maximum expiratory flow-volume curves (breathing air), single breath nitrogen test, arterialised capillary blood oxygen pressure, or single breath carbon monoxide transfer. Additional studies were made in 12 of the pairs of Pi MZ and Pi M subjects. Comparison of maximum expiratory flow-volume curves breathing air and 80% helium-20% oxygen showed no differences between the Pi MZ and Pi M subjects. Although airway function was similar in the two groups, four of 12 Pi MZ subjects showed abnormalities of the pressure-volume curve of the lung (reduction in lung recoil pressure, abnormal shape factor, increase in functional residual capacity). Abnormalities of washout of a helium-sulphur hexafluoride gas mixture, of a type previously described as characteristic of emphysema, were found in two of the men with abnormal pressure-volume curves. The results suggest that Pi MZ subjects have an increased susceptibility to alveolar abnormalities without increased abnormalities of airway function; this may explain the increased frequency of emphysema at necropsy despite many studies showing no predisposition to abnormal airway function in life. The functional changes we observed would be unlikely to cause symptoms. The risk of disablement from chronic lung disease appears to be only slightly enhanced by intermediate alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:316207

  13. Risk management technique for liquefied natural gas facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, O. H.; Parsons, W. N.

    1975-01-01

    Checklists have been compiled for planning, design, construction, startup and debugging, and operation of liquefied natural gas facilities. Lists include references to pertinent safety regulations. Methods described are applicable to handling of other hazardous materials.

  14. Renal clearance studies of effect of left atrial distension in the dog.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, M. J.; Discala, V. A.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the water diuresis of left atrial distension in 16 dogs on the basis of clearance studies employing hydration, chronic and acute salt loading, deoxycorticosterone (DOCA) in excess, and distal tubular nephron blockade with diuretics. The diuresis was found in hydrated and salt-loaded dogs and was independent of DOCA and presumed renin depletion. It was not found in five dogs after distal tubular blockade. No significant reproducible saluresis was ever documented. The water diuresis was always stopped by exogenous vasopressin (seven dogs). Antidiuretic hormone inhibition with distal tubular nephron water permeability changes appears to be the sole mechanism of the diuresis of left atrial distension in the dog.

  15. Spontaneous intradural disc herniation with focal distension of the subarachnoid space in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Barnoon, Itai; Chai, Orit; Srugo, Itai; Peeri, Dana; Konstantin, Lilach; Brenner, Ori; Shamir, Merav H.

    2012-01-01

    Myelo-computed tomography of a paraparetic 14-year-old dog revealed subarachnoid distension with an intradural filling defect above the T13–L1 disc space. T12–L1 hemilaminectomy followed by durotomy allowed removal of a large piece of degenerated disc material that compressed the spinal parenchyma. Full return to function was achieved 10 days post-surgery. The distension was likely secondary to the intradural herniation, and is a rare and distinct finding. PMID:23633713

  16. The interaction between noradrenaline activation and distension activation of the rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed

    Speden, R N; Warren, D M

    1986-06-01

    Excised, pressurized segments of the rabbit ear artery have been used to examine the interaction between the transmural pressure and constriction of arteries by extraluminal noradrenaline. The bath temperature was kept at 32-33 degrees C to suppress instability and spontaneity of constriction. Fast, reproducible jumps in pressure were obtained by using a microcomputer to control an electropneumatic transducer. The arteries did not react actively to transmural pressure changes unless already activated by noradrenaline. Active arteries responded to distension by a pressure jump with a reproducible compensatory constriction which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin. The counteraction of distension was due primarily to enhanced activation of the muscle. Distension activation decreased with increasing constriction. Utilization of the force-generating capacity of the arteries either remained unchanged at 20-30% or, in one experiment, increased slightly when constriction against a transmural pressure of 60 mmHg was increased from 20 to 75% of maximal by raising the noradrenaline concentration. When the transmural pressure was 90 mmHg, the 35-55% utilization of the force-generating capacity either remained constant or fell as constriction was increased. Most of the force-generating capacity was available for counteracting the distension of moderately constricted arteries (less than 40% of maximal) produced by a 60-90 mmHg jump. More than 78% of the maximum capacity was used in attempting to overcome the distension when it was maintained by computer-controlled increases in transmural pressure. The moderate constrictions were produced with noradrenaline concentrations which were 500-10,000 times lower than that used to maximally activate the arteries. The rabbit ear artery possesses a powerful, distension-sensitive mechanism that acts to minimize diameter changes initiated by transmural pressure jumps. The diameter of the active artery was determined by a combination of

  17. Experimental technique to investigate the interstellar gas - Preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, D. L.; Geiss, J.; Buehler, F.; Eugster, O.

    1993-01-01

    The Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) exposed thin metallic foils to collect neutral interstellar gas particles. These particles penetrate the solar system due to their motion relative to the sun. Thus, it was possible to entrap them in the collecting foils along with precipitating magnetospheric and perhaps some ambient atmospheric particles. For the entire duration of the Long Duration Exposure Facility mission, seven of these foils collected particles arriving from seven different directions as seen from the spacecraft. In the mass spectrometric analysis of the noble gas component of these particles, we have detected the isotopes of He-3, He-4, Ne-20, and Ne-22. In the foil analyses carried out so far, we find a distribution of particle arrival directions which shows that a significant part of the trapped particles are indeed interstellar atoms. The analysis needed to subtract the competing fluxes of magnetospheric and atmospheric particles is still in progress.

  18. Pulse pressure waveform estimation using distension profiling with contactless optical probe.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tânia; Santos, Inês; Oliveira, Tatiana; Vaz, Pedro; Pereira, Telmo; Santos, Helder; Pereira, Helena; Correia, Carlos; Cardoso, João

    2014-11-01

    The pulse pressure waveform has, for long, been known as a fundamental biomedical signal and its analysis is recognized as a non-invasive, simple, and resourceful technique for the assessment of arterial vessels condition observed in several diseases. In the current paper, waveforms from non-invasive optical probe that measures carotid artery distension profiles are compared with the waveforms of the pulse pressure acquired by intra-arterial catheter invasive measurement in the ascending aorta. Measurements were performed in a study population of 16 patients who had undergone cardiac catheterization. The hemodynamic parameters: area under the curve (AUC), the area during systole (AS) and the area during diastole (AD), their ratio (AD/AS) and the ejection time index (ETI), from invasive and non-invasive measurements were compared. The results show that the pressure waveforms obtained by the two methods are similar, with 13% of mean value of the root mean square error (RMSE). Moreover, the correlation coefficient demonstrates the strong correlation. The comparison between the AUCs allows the assessment of the differences between the phases of the cardiac cycle. In the systolic period the waveforms are almost equal, evidencing greatest clinical relevance during this period. Slight differences are found in diastole, probably due to the structural arterial differences. The optical probe has lower variability than the invasive system (13% vs 16%). This study validates the capability of acquiring the arterial pulse waveform with a non-invasive method, using a non-contact optical probe at the carotid site with residual differences from the aortic invasive measurements. PMID:25169470

  19. Large Volume Injection Techniques in Capillary Gas Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large volume injection (LVI) is a prerequisite of modern gas chromatographic (GC) analysis, especially when trace sample components have to be determined at very low concentration levels. Injection of larger than usual sample volumes increases sensitivity and/or reduces (or even eliminates) the need...

  20. Comparing and assessing different measurement techniques for mercury in coal systhesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.P.; Richardson, C.F.

    1995-11-01

    Three mercury measurement techniques were performed on synthesis gas streams before and after an amine-based sulfur removal system. The syngas was sampled using (1) gas impingers containing a nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide solution, (2) coconut-based charcoal sorbent, and (3) an on-line atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a gold amalgamation trap and cold vapor cell. Various impinger solutions were applied upstream of the gold amalgamation trap to remove hydrogen sulfide and isolate oxidized and elemental species of mercury. The results from these three techniques are compared to provide an assessment of these measurement techniques in reducing gas atmospheres.

  1. G tolerance vis-à-vis pressure-distension and pressure-flow relationships of leg arteries.

    PubMed

    Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor; Sundblad, Patrik; Kölegård, Roger

    2012-10-01

    During increased gravitoinertial (G) load in the head-to-foot direction, pressures in dependent vascular beds are commonly raised to levels capable of distending precapillary vessels, which, in turn, may reduce arterial pressure, and hence compromise the capacity to withstand G load (G tolerance). We hypothesized that distensibility in precapillary leg vessels would be lower in a group of subjects possessing high G tolerance (H; n = 7; relaxed G tolerance = 6.6 ± 0.8 G) than in a group with low G tolerance (L; n = 8; G tolerance = 3.9 ± 0.3 G). The groups were matched with regard to gender, age, weight, height, and resting arterial pressure. Arterial pressure-distension and pressure-flow experiments were performed with the subject supine in a pressure chamber with a lower leg protruding to the outside. Increased intravascular pressure in the blood vessels of the outside leg was accomplished by stepwise increasing chamber pressure to 240 mmHg. Diameter and flow in the posterior tibial artery were measured by ultrasonographic/Doppler techniques. Pressure-induced increments in arterial diameter and flow were more pronounced (p < 0.03) in the L (14.1 ± 4.2% and 32 ± 21 ml/min respectively) than in the H (1.7 ± 5.0% and 1.6 ± 25 ml/min) group, and the pressure thresholds at which these increments commenced were lower (by 52 and 48 mmHg, respectively) in the L than in the H group (p < 0.04). Negative correlations were observed between G tolerance and the increments in diameter and flow (p < 0.02). Thus, the wall stiffness of precapillary leg vessels is greater in individuals with high relaxed G tolerance; whether a causal relationship exists remains to be established. PMID:22350358

  2. Distension of the uterus induces HspB1 expression in rat uterine smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    White, B G; MacPhee, D J

    2011-11-01

    The uterine musculature, or myometrium, demonstrates tremendous plasticity during pregnancy under the influences of the endocrine environment and mechanical stresses. Expression of the small stress protein heat shock protein B1 (HspB1) has been reported to increase dramatically during late pregnancy, a period marked by myometrial hypertrophy caused by fetal growth-induced uterine distension. Thus, using unilaterally pregnant rat models and ovariectomized nonpregnant rats with uteri containing laminaria tents to induce uterine distension, we examined the effect of uterine distension on myometrial HspB1 expression. In unilaterally pregnant rats, HspB1 mRNA and Ser(15)-phosphorylated HspB1 (pSer(15) HspB1) protein expression were significantly elevated in distended gravid uterine horns at days 19 and 23 (labor) of gestation compared with nongravid horns. Similarly, pSer(15) HspB1 protein in situ was only readily detectable in the distended horns compared with the nongravid horns at days 19 and 23; however, pSer(15) HspB1 was primarily detectable in situ at day 19 in membrane-associated regions, while it had primarily a cytoplasmic localization in myometrial cells at day 23. HspB1 mRNA and pSer(15) HspB1 protein expression were also markedly increased in ovariectomized nonpregnant rat myometrium distended for 24 h with laminaria tents compared with empty horns. Therefore, uterine distension plays a major role in the stimulation of myometrial HspB1 expression, and increased expression of this small stress protein could be a mechanoadaptive response to the increasing uterine distension that occurs during pregnancy. PMID:21900647

  3. Assessment of local pulse wave velocity in arteries using 2D distension waveforms.

    PubMed

    Meinders, J M; Kornet, L; Brands, P J; Hoeks, A P

    2001-10-01

    The reciprocal of the arterial pulse wave velocity contains crucial information about the mechanical characteristics of the arterial wall but is difficult to assess noninvasively in vivo. In this paper, a new method to assess local pulse wave velocity (PWV) is presented. To this end, multiple adjacent distension waveforms are determined simultaneously along a short arterial segment, using a single 2D-vessel wall tracking system with a high frame rate (651 Hz). Each B-mode image consists of 16 echo lines spanning a total width of 15.86 mm. Dedicated software has been developed to extract the end-diastolic diameter from the B-mode image and the distension waveforms from the underlying radiofrequency (rf) information for each echo-line. The PWV is obtained by determining the ratio of the temporal and spatial gradient of adjacent distension velocity waveforms. The proposed method is verified in a phantom and in the common carotid artery (CCA) of humans. Phantom experiments show a high concordance between the PWV obtained from 2D distension velocity waveforms (4.21 +/- 0.02 m/s) and the PWV determined using two pressure catheters (4.26 +/- 0.02 m/s). Assuming linear spatial gradients, the PWV can also be obtained in vivo for CCA and averages to 5.5 +/- 1.5 m/s (intersubject variation, n = 23), which compares well to values found in literature. Furthermore, intrasubject PWV compares well with those calculated using the Bramwell-Hill equation. It can be concluded that the PWV can be obtained from the spatial and temporal gradient if the spatial gradient is linear over the observed length of the artery, i.e. the artery should be homogenous in diameter and distension and the influence of reflections must be small. PMID:12051275

  4. Solvent-free microextraction techniques in gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laaks, Jens; Jochmann, Maik A; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2012-01-01

    Microextraction techniques represent a major part of modern sample preparation in the analysis of organic micropollutants. This article provides a short overview of recent developments in solvent-free microextraction techniques. From the first open-tubular trap techniques in the mid-1980s to recent packed-needle devices, different implementations of in-needle packings for microextraction are discussed with their characteristic benefits, shortcomings and possible sampling modes. Special emphasis is placed on methods providing full automation and solvent exclusion. In this context, in-tube extraction and the needle trap are discussed, with an overview of current research on new sorbent materials, together with the requirements for more efficient method development. PMID:22057686

  5. Sensor Data Qualification Technique Applied to Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies a previously developed sensor data qualification technique to a commercial aircraft engine simulation known as the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (C-MAPSS40k). The sensor data qualification technique is designed to detect, isolate, and accommodate faulty sensor measurements. It features sensor networks, which group various sensors together and relies on an empirically derived analytical model to relate the sensor measurements. Relationships between all member sensors of the network are analyzed to detect and isolate any faulty sensor within the network.

  6. Comparing two micrometeorological techniques for estimating trace gas emissions from distributed sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring trace gas emission from distributed sources such as treatment lagoons, treatment wetlands, land spread of manure, and feedlots requires micrometeorological methods. In this study, we tested the accuracy of two relatively new micrometeorological techniques, vertical radial plume mapping (VR...

  7. Cooling techniques for gas turbine airfoils: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, D. E.

    1985-09-01

    A brief general background discussion of turbine heat transfer and cooling with compressor discharge air is given. Specific reference is made to a selection of current research areas for gas turbine engine cooling, including blade tip heat transfer, heat transfer in serpentine passages, multiple jet array impingement, heat transfer in pin fin arrays, disk heat transfer, and film cooling. An overview of various experimental methods used to acquire heat transfer data is also given, with an emphasis on newer methods used to acquire detailed local convection heat transfer information.

  8. Optimal sensor locations for the backward Lagrangian stochastic technique in measuring lagoon gas emission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the impact of gas concentration and wind sensor locations on the accuracy of the backward Lagrangian stochastic inverse-dispersion technique (bLS) for measuring gas emission rates from a typical lagoon environment. Path-integrated concentrations (PICs) and 3-dimensional (3D) wi...

  9. Offshore Adriatic marginal gas fields: An approach to the technique of reservoir development

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, A.; Bolelli, V.; Piccoli, G.

    1986-01-01

    The application of accelerated gas blowdown and wire line techniques in reservoir development and exploitation is presented for an off-shore Adriatic marginal gas field. The approach discussed in this paper utilizes selective completion, very low reserves/production ratio, sequential production, Through Tubing Bridge Plug and Through Tubing Perforation techniques to avoid the use of costly workover rigs and to allow economically convenient exploitation of a structure which otherwise would have been abandoned.

  10. Right internal jugular vein distensibility appears to be a surrogate marker for inferior vena cava vein distensibility for evaluating fluid responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Broilo, Fabiano; Meregalli, Andre; Friedman, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the respiratory variation of the inferior vena cava diameter (∆DIVC) and right internal jugular vein diameter (∆DRIJ) are correlated in mechanically ventilated patients. Methods This study was a prospective clinical analysis in an intensive care unit at a university hospital. Thirty-nine mechanically ventilated patients with hemodynamic instability were included. ∆DIVC and ∆DRIJ were assessed by echography. Vein distensibility was calculated as the ratio of (A) Dmax - Dmin/Dmin and (B) Dmax - Dmin/ mean of Dmax - Dmin and expressed as a percentage. Results ∆DIVC and ∆DRIJ were correlated by both methods: (A) r = 0.34, p = 0.04 and (B) r = 0.51, p = 0.001. Using 18% for ∆DIVC, indicating fluid responsiveness by method (A), 16 patients were responders and 35 measurements showed agreement (weighted Kappa = 0.80). The area under the ROC curve was 0.951 (95%CI 0.830 - 0.993; cutoff = 18.92). Using 12% for ∆DIVC, indicating fluid responsiveness by method (B), 14 patients were responders and 32 measurements showed agreement (weighted Kappa = 0.65). The area under the ROC curve was 0.903 (95%CI 0.765 - 0.973; cut-off value = 11.86). Conclusion The respiratory variation of the inferior vena cava and the right internal jugular veins are correlated and showed significant agreement. Evaluation of right internal jugular vein distensibility appears to be a surrogate marker for inferior vena cava vein distensibility for evaluating fluid responsiveness. PMID:26465243

  11. Validity of using backward Lagrangian Stochastic technique in measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates the accuracy of measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoons using backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) technique. The bLs technique was originally developed for relatively homogeneous terrains without any obstacles causing significant windflow disturbance. The errors ass...

  12. Evaluation of venous distension device: potential aid for intravenous cannulation.

    PubMed

    Hedges, J R; Weinshenker, E; Dirksing, R

    1986-05-01

    A device designed to augment venous filling by applying a vacuum to the upper extremity during tourniquet application was evaluated. Ten healthy adult male volunteers with clinical normovolemia were studied for changes in forearm volume and dorsal hand vein turgor during use of an elastic tubing tourniquet, a blood pressure cuff tourniquet, and a vacuum-assisted cuff tourniquet. Use of the device for 30 seconds was not associated with petechia formation and resulted in a significant increase in venous turgor, as measured by an ophthalmologic tonometer, in comparison to the other tourniquet techniques (P less than .005). Use for 60 seconds was associated with mild to moderate subjective discomfort in all volunteers and petechiae in all nine white volunteers. All petechiae resolved in three days. Venous engorgement as reflected by volume displacement was significantly greater for the vacuum device and blood pressure cuff tourniquet combination than other techniques at 30 and 60 seconds of tourniquet application (P less than .005). Brief application of a vacuum to the arm during tourniquet use increases venous turgor and engorgement in normovolemic volunteers. PMID:3963533

  13. Atrial distension of isolated rabbit hearts and release of atrial natriuretic factor

    SciTech Connect

    Synhorst, D.P.; Gutkowska, J. Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec )

    1988-08-01

    Interventions that increase atrial pressures in humans or laboratory animals release atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) into the circulation. The authors studied the relation between distension of the right or left atrium and release of ANF in retrograde-perfused isolated rabbit hearts. A fluid-filled balloon within the right or left atrium was inflated to a mean pressure of 5, 10, 15, or 20 mmHg, and ANF in the cardiac effluent was measured by radioimmunoassay. The slope of the regression line relating ANF release to atrial distending pressure was steeper for the left than right atrium, indicating that, at comparable increases in mean pressures, the left atrium releases more ANF than does the right atrium. Left atrial tissue concentration ANF was greater than right atrial. In contrast to previous studies showing right atrial dominance in rats, the left atria of isolated, perfused rabbit hearts contain more ANF and release more in response to atrial distension.

  14. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  15. Vigorous physical activity and carotid distensibility in young and mid-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Quan L; Blizzard, Christopher L; Raitakari, Olli; Sharman, James E; Magnussen, Costan G; Dwyer, Terence; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Venn, Alison J

    2015-05-01

    Although physical activity (PA) improves arterial distensibility, it is unclear which type of activity is most beneficial. We aimed to examine the association of different types of PA with carotid distensibility (CD) and the mechanisms involved. Data included 4503 Australians and Finns aged 26-45 years. Physical activity was measured by pedometers and was self-reported. CD was measured using ultrasound. Other measurements included resting heart rate (RHR), cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), blood pressure, biomarkers and anthropometry. Steps/day were correlated with RHR (Australian men r = -0.10, women r = - 0.14; Finnish men r = -0.15, women r = -0.11; P<0.01), CRF and biochemical markers, but not with CD. Self-reported vigorous leisure-time activity was more strongly correlated with RHR (Australian men r = -0.23, women r = -0.19; Finnish men r = -0.20, women r = -0.13; P < 0.001) and CRF, and was correlated with CD (Australian men r = 0.07; Finnish men r = 0.07, women r = 0.08; P < 0.05). This relationship of vigorous leisure-time activity with CD was mediated by RHR independently of potential confounders. In summary, vigorous leisure-time PA but not total or less intensive PA was associated with arterial distensibility in young to mid-aged adults. Promotion of vigorous PA is therefore recommended among this population. RHR was a key intermediary factor explaining the relationship between vigorous PA and arterial distensibility. PMID:25693850

  16. Submucosal reflexes: distension-evoked ion transport in the guinea pig distal colon.

    PubMed

    Frieling, T; Wood, J D; Cooke, H J

    1992-07-01

    Muscle-stripped segments of distal colon from guinea pigs were mounted in modified flux chambers to determine the effect of distension on mucosal secretion. Ion secretion was monitored as changes in short-circuit current (Isc). Distending forces were pressure gradients established by controlled reduction in liquid volume of the submucosal compartment of the chamber. Volume removal for 10 s or 5 min evoked a monophasic or biphasic increase in Isc, which returned to baseline within 5-20 min. The amplitude of the response correlated with the volume removed and was reduced by bumetanide and Cl-free solutions but not by tetraethylammonium or amiloride. Tetrodotoxin and atropine also suppressed the response. Neither the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine, the 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonist ICS 205-930, or the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor piroxicam altered the response. Addition of prostaglandin D2 to the submucosal bath significantly enhanced the response. The results suggest that distension of the colon evokes anion secretion by activation of reflex circuits with cholinergic neurons and muscarinic synapses. Prostaglandins and 5-hydroxytryptamine acting at 5-HT3 receptors appear not to be signal substances in the reflex pathway, which evokes the secretory response to distension. PMID:1636721

  17. Limb venous distension evokes sympathetic activation via stimulation of the limb afferents in humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; McQuillan, Patrick M; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2012-08-15

    We have recently shown that a saline infusion in the veins of an arterially occluded human forearm evokes a systemic response with increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure. In this report, we examined whether this response was a reflex that was due to venous distension. Blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate, and MSNA (microneurography) were assessed in 14 young healthy subjects. In the saline trial (n = 14), 5% forearm volume normal saline was infused in an arterially occluded arm. To block afferents in the limb, 90 mg of lidocaine were added to the same volume of saline in six subjects during a separate visit. To examine whether interstitial perfusion of normal saline alone induced the responses, the same volume of albumin solution (5% concentration) was infused in 11 subjects in separate studies. Lidocaine abolished the MSNA and blood pressure responses seen with saline infusion. Moreover, compared with the saline infusion, an albumin infusion induced a larger (MSNA: Δ14.3 ± 2.7 vs. Δ8.5 ± 1.3 bursts/min, P < 0.01) and more sustained MSNA and blood pressure responses. These data suggest that venous distension activates afferent nerves and evokes a powerful systemic sympathoexcitatory reflex. We posit that the venous distension plays an important role in evoking the autonomic adjustments seen with postural stress in human subjects. PMID:22707559

  18. Reduction of lung distensibility in acromegaly after suppression of growth hormone hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    García-Río, F; Pino, J M; Díez, J J; Ruíz, A; Villasante, C; Villamor, J

    2001-09-01

    Whether the growth of the lungs in acromegaly is due to alveolar hypertrophy or alveolar hyperplasia is a subject of debate. To discriminate these hypotheses, we compared pulmonary distensibility and diffusing capacity among 11 patients with active acromegaly and 11 matched control subjects, evaluating the response of pulmonary distensibility and diffusing capacity to suppression of growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion. We performed lineal and exponential analyses of quasistatic pressure-volume curves. Patients with active acromegaly had a greater TLC, lung compliance, and shape constant, K, than did normal subjects. We found no significant differences between the study groups in carbon monoxide diffusing capacity or diffusing capacity per unit of alveolar volume. After treatment, patients with inactive acromegaly showed a reduced TLC (6.95 +/- 1.40 [mean +/- SD] L versus 6.35 +/- 1.23 L), reduced lung compliance (3.61 +/- 0.90 L/kPa versus 2.36 +/- 0.79 L/ kPa), reduced K coefficient (2.62 +/- 0.65 kPa(-)(1) versus 1.35 +/- 0.40 kPa(-)(1)), and increased maximal recoil pressure (1.74 +/- 0.38 kPa versus 2.28 +/- 0.25 kPa). We conclude that the increased lung distensibility with normal diffusion capacity demonstrated in patients with active acromegaly, which was partly reversible after suppression of GH hypersecretion, suggests that lung growth in acromegaly may result from an increase in alveolar size. PMID:11549545

  19. Developing Repair Materials for Stress Urinary Incontinence to Withstand Dynamic Distension

    PubMed Central

    Hillary, Christopher J.; Roman, Sabiniano; Bullock, Anthony J.; Green, Nicola H; Chapple, Christopher R.; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Background Polypropylene mesh used as a mid-urethral sling is associated with severe clinical complications in a significant minority of patients. Current in vitro mechanical testing shows that polypropylene responds inadequately to mechanical distension and is also poor at supporting cell proliferation. Aims and Objectives Our objective therefore is to produce materials with more appropriate mechanical properties for use as a sling material but which can also support cell integration. Methods Scaffolds of two polyurethanes (PU), poly-L-lactic acid (PLA) and co-polymers of the two were produced by electrospinning. Mechanical properties of materials were assessed and compared to polypropylene. The interaction of adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) with the scaffolds was also assessed. Uniaxial tensiometry of scaffolds was performed before and after seven days of cyclical distension. Cell penetration (using DAPI and a fluorescent red cell tracker dye), viability (AlamarBlue assay) and total collagen production (Sirius red assay) were measured for ADSC cultured on scaffolds. Results Polypropylene was stronger than polyurethanes and PLA. However, polypropylene mesh deformed plastically after 7 days of sustained cyclical distention, while polyurethanes maintained their elasticity. Scaffolds of PU containing PLA were weaker and stiffer than PU or polypropylene but were significantly better than PU scaffolds alone at supporting ADSC. Conclusions Therefore, prolonged mechanical distension in vitro causes polypropylene to fail. Materials with more appropriate mechanical properties for use as sling materials can be produced using PU. Combining PLA with PU greatly improves interaction of cells with this material. PMID:26981860

  20. Leak testing of bubble-tight dampers using tracer gas techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; DuBois, L.J.; Fleming, K.M.

    1995-02-01

    Recently tracer gas techniques have been applied to the problem of measuring the leakage across an installed bubble-tight damper. A significant advantage of using a tracer gas technique is that quantitative leakage data are obtained under actual operating differential pressure conditions. Another advantage is that leakage data can be obtained using relatively simple test setups that utilize inexpensive materials without the need to tear ducts apart, fabricate expensive blank-off plates, and install test connections. Also, a tracer gas technique can be used to provide an accurate field evaluation of the performance of installed bubble-tight dampers on a periodic basis. Actual leakage flowrates were obtained at Zion Generating Station on four installed bubble-tight dampers using a tracer gas technique. Measured leakage rates ranged from 0.01 CFM to 21 CFM. After adjustment and subsequent retesting, the 21 CFM damper leakage was reduced to a leakage of 3.8 CFM. In light of the current regulatory climate and the interest in Control Room Habitability issues, imprecise estimates of critical air boundary leakage rates--such as through bubble-tight dampers--are not acceptable. These imprecise estimates can skew radioactive dose assessments as well as chemical contaminant exposure calculations. Using a tracer gas technique, the actual leakage rate can be determined. This knowledge eliminates a significant source of uncertainty in both radioactive dose and/or chemical exposure assessments.

  1. Absolutely Exponential Stability and Temperature Control for Gas Chromatograph System Under Dwell Time Switching Techniques.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi-Ming; Wang, Xue-Fang; Tan, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a design strategy for temperature control of the gas chromatograph. Usually gas chromatograph is modeled by a simple first order system with a time-delay, and a proportion integration (PI) controller is widely used to regulate the output of the gas chromatograph to the desired temperature. As the characteristics of the gas chromatograph varies at the different temperature range, the single-model based PI controller cannot work well when output temperature varies from one range to another. Moreover, the presence of various disturbance will further deteriorate the performance. In order to improve the accuracy of the temperature control, multiple models are used at the different temperature ranges. With a PI controller designed for each model accordingly, a delay-dependent switching control scheme using the dwell time technique is proposed to ensure the absolute exponential stability of the closed loop. Experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed switching technique. PMID:26316283

  2. Esophagogastric junction distensibility measurements during Heller myotomy and POEM for achalasia predict postoperative symptomatic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, Ezra N.; Soper, Nathaniel J.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Hirano, Ikuo; Boris, Lubomyr; Nicodème, Frédéric; Lin, Zhiyue; Hungness, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) is a novel diagnostic tool that can be used to measure esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility. In this study we performed intraoperative FLIP measurements during laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) and peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) for treatment of achalasia and evaluated the relationship between EGJ distensibility and postoperative symptoms. Methods Distensibility index (DI) (defined as the minimum cross-sectional area at the EGJ divided by distensive pressure) was measured with FLIP at two time points during LHM and POEM: 1) at baseline after induction of anesthesia, and 2) after operation completion. Results Measurements were performed in 20 patients undergoing LHM and 36 undergoing POEM. Both operations resulted in an increase in DI, although this increase was larger with POEM (7±3.1 vs. 5.1±3.4mm2/mmHg, p<.05). The two patients (both LHM) with the smallest increases in DI (1 and 1.6mm2/mmHg) both had persistent symptoms postoperatively and, overall, LHM patients with larger increases in DI had lower postoperative Eckardt scores. In the POEM group, there was no correlation between change in DI and symptoms; however, all POEM patients experienced an increase in DI of >3mm2/mmHg. When all patients were divided into thirds based on final DI, none in the lowest DI group (<6mm2/mmHg) had symptoms suggestive of reflux (i.e., GerdQ score >7), as compared with 20% in the middle third (6–9mm2/mmHg) and 36% in the highest third (>9mm2/mmHg). Patients within an “ideal” final DI range (4.5–8.5 mm2/mmHg) had optimal symptomatic outcomes (i.e. Eckardt≤1 and GerdQ≤7) in 88% of cases, compared with 47% in those with a final DI above or below that range (p<.05). Conclusions Intraoperative EGJ distensibility measurements with FLIP were predictive of postoperative symptomatic outcomes. These results provide initial evidence that FLIP has the potential to act as a useful calibration tool during operations

  3. Adenosine A1 receptors mediate the intracisternal injection of orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2016-03-15

    We have recently demonstrated that orexin acts centrally through the brain orexin 1 receptors to induce an antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats. Adenosine signaling is capable of inducing an antinociceptive action against somatic pain; however, the association between changes in the adenosinergic system and visceral pain perception has not been investigated. In the present study, we hypothesized that the adenosinergic system may be involved in visceral nociception, and thus, adenosine signaling may mediate orexin-induced visceral antinociception. Visceral sensation was evaluated based on the colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Subcutaneous (0.04-0.2mg/rat) or intracisternal (0.8-4μg/rat) injection of N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), an adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) agonist, increased the threshold volume of colonic distension-induced AWR in a dose-dependent manner, thereby suggesting that CPA acts centrally in the brain to induce an antinociceptive action against colonic distension. Pretreatment with theophylline, an adenosine antagonist, or 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine, an A1R antagonist, subcutaneously injected potently blocked the centrally injected CPA- or orexin-A-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. These results suggest that adenosinergic signaling via A1Rs in the brain induces visceral antinociception and that adenosinergic signaling is involved in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. PMID:26944127

  4. A Novel Repair Technique for the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Patel, Vipul; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2005-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the gas bubbles. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped gas bubbles to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The gas trap was designed to last for the entire lifetime of the ISS, and therefore was not designed to be repaired. However, repair of these gas traps is now a necessity due to contamination from the on-orbit ITCS fluid and other sources on the ground as well as a limited supply of flight gas traps. This paper describes a novel repair technique that has been developed that will allow the refurbishment of contaminated gas traps and their return to flight use.

  5. Multiple inert gas elimination technique by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry--a comparison with reference gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Schilling, Thomas; Vogt, Andreas; Rothen, Hans Ulrich; Borges, João Batista; Hachenberg, Thomas; Larsson, Anders; Baumgardner, James E; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2013-10-15

    The mismatching of alveolar ventilation and perfusion (VA/Q) is the major determinant of impaired gas exchange. The gold standard for measuring VA/Q distributions is based on measurements of the elimination and retention of infused inert gases. Conventional multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) uses gas chromatography (GC) to measure the inert gas partial pressures, which requires tonometry of blood samples with a gas that can then be injected into the chromatograph. The method is laborious and requires meticulous care. A new technique based on micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MMIMS) facilitates the handling of blood and gas samples and provides nearly real-time analysis. In this study we compared MIGET by GC and MMIMS in 10 piglets: 1) 3 with healthy lungs; 2) 4 with oleic acid injury; and 3) 3 with isolated left lower lobe ventilation. The different protocols ensured a large range of normal and abnormal VA/Q distributions. Eight inert gases (SF6, krypton, ethane, cyclopropane, desflurane, enflurane, diethyl ether, and acetone) were infused; six of these gases were measured with MMIMS, and six were measured with GC. We found close agreement of retention and excretion of the gases and the constructed VA/Q distributions between GC and MMIMS, and predicted PaO2 from both methods compared well with measured PaO2. VA/Q by GC produced more widely dispersed modes than MMIMS, explained in part by differences in the algorithms used to calculate VA/Q distributions. In conclusion, MMIMS enables faster measurement of VA/Q, is less demanding than GC, and produces comparable results. PMID:23869066

  6. Current Techniques of Growing Algae Using Flue Gas from Exhaust Gas Industry: a Review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanhua; Chen, Feng; Kuang, Yali; He, Huan; Qin, An

    2016-03-01

    The soaring increase of flue gas emission had caused global warming, environmental pollution as well as climate change. Widespread concern on reduction of flue gas released from industrial plants had considered the microalgae as excellent biological materials for recycling the carbon dioxide directly emitted from exhaust industries. Microalgae also have the potential to be the valuable feedback for renewable energy production due to their high growth rate and abilities to sequester inorganic carbon through photosynthetic process. In this review article, we will illustrate important relative mechanisms in the metabolic processes of biofixation by microalgae and their recent experimental researches and advances of sequestration of carbon dioxide by microalgae on actual industrial and stimulate flue gases, novel photobioreactor cultivation systems as well as the perspectives and limitations of microalgal cultivation in further development. PMID:26695777

  7. Growth of In-Sb Fine Particles by Flowing-Gas Evaporation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwama, Saburo; Mihama, Kazuhiro

    Fine particles of the In-Sb system were prepared by the FGE technique (flowing-gas evaporation technique). The characteristic of the technique is that the formation of the vapor zone and particle growth zone along the flow of inert gas can be controlled by the inert-gas species and the flow velocity. From single-source evaporations, In fine islands grown on the amorphous carbon in the metal vapor zone showed a fiber structure with [111] and [001] fiber axes. In the particle growth zone In fine particles were formed, showing very frequently a characteristic contrast in them due to a lattice defect. Sb fine particles showed amorphous structure. These results may be attributed to the enhanced quenching effect of the FGE technique, already observed in the ordinary gas-evaporation technique. By coevaporation of In and Sb, granular film grew in the metal vapor zone, and fine particles were formed in the particle growth zone. The crystal structure was assigned to be the zincblende type including the wurtzite type of intermetallic compound InSb.

  8. [A Detection Technique for Gas Concentration Based on the Spectral Line Shape Function].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mo; Yang, Bing-chu; Tao, Shao-hua

    2015-04-01

    The methods that can rapidly and precisely measure concentrations of various gases have extensive applications in the fields such as air quality analysis, environmental pollution detection, and so on. The gas detection method based on the tunable laser absorption spectroscopy is considered a promising technique. For the infrared spectrum detection techniques, the line shape function of an absorption spectrum of a gas is an important parameter in qualitative and quantitative analysis of a gas. Specifically, how to obtain the line shape function of an absorption spectrum of a gas quickly and accurately is a key problem in the gas detection fields. In this paper we analyzed several existing line shape functions and proposed a method to calculate precisely the line shape function of a gas, and investigated the relation between the gas concentration and the peak value of a line shape function. Then we experimentally measured the absorption spectra of an acetylene gas in the wavelength range of 1,515-1,545 nm with a tunable laser source and a built-in spectrometer. With Lambert-Beer law we calculated the peak values of the line shape function of the gas at the given frequencies, and obtained a fitting curve for the line shape function in the whole waveband by using a computer program. Comparing the measured results with the calculated results of the Voigt function, we found that there was a deviation-between the experimental results and the calculated results. And we found that the measured concentration of the acetylene gas by using the fitting curve of the line shape function was more accurate and compatible with the actual situation. Hence, the empirical formula for the line shape function obtained from the experimental results would be more suitable for the concentration measurement of a gas. As the fitting curve for the line shape function of the acetylene gas has been deduced from the experiment, the corresponding peak values of the spectral lines can be

  9. Gas analysis within remote porous targets using LIDAR multi-scatter techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Z. G.; Lewander, M.; Grönlund, R.; Lundberg, H.; Svanberg, S.

    2008-11-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) experiments are normally pursued for range resolved atmospheric gas measurements or for analysis of solid target surfaces using fluorescence of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. In contrast, we now demonstrate the monitoring of free gas enclosed in pores of materials, subject to impinging laser radiation, employing the photons emerging back to the surface laterally of the injection point after penetrating the medium in heavy multiple scattering processes. The directly reflected light is blocked by a beam stop. The technique presented is a remote version of the newly introduced gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) technique, which so far was pursued with the injection optics and the detector in close contact with the sample. Feasibility measurements of LIDAR-GASMAS on oxygen in polystyrene foam were performed at a distance of 6 m. Multiple-scattering induced delays of the order of 50 ns, which corresponds to 15 m optical path length, were observed. First extensions to a range of 60 m are discussed. Remote observation of gas composition anomalies in snow using differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) may find application in avalanche victim localization or for leak detection in snow-covered natural gas pipelines. Further, the techniques may be even more useful for short-range, non-intrusive GASMAS measurements, e.g., on packed food products.

  10. Contribution of multiple inert gas elimination technique to pulmonary medicine. 1. Principles and information content of the multiple inert gas elimination technique.

    PubMed Central

    Roca, J.; Wagner, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    This introductory review summarises four different aspects of the multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET). Firstly, the historical background that facilitated, in the mid 1970s, the development of the MIGET as a tool to obtain more information about the entire spectrum of VA/Q distribution in the lung by measuring the exchange of six gases of different solubility in trace concentrations. Its principle is based on the observation that the retention (or excretion) of any gas is dependent on the solubility (lambda) of that gas and the VA/Q distribution. A second major aspect is the analysis of the information content and limitations of the technique. During the last 15 years a substantial amount of clinical research using the MIGET has been generated by several groups around the world. The technique has been shown to be adequate in understanding the mechanisms of hypoxaemia in different forms of pulmonary disease and the effects of therapeutic interventions, but also in separately determining the quantitative role of each extrapulmonary factor on systemic arterial PO2 when they change between two conditions of MIGET measurement. This information will be extensively reviewed in the forthcoming articles of this series. Next, the different modalities of the MIGET, practical considerations involved in the measurements and the guidelines for quality control have been indicated. Finally, a section has been devoted to the analysis of available data in healthy subjects under different conditions. The lack of systematic information on the VA/Q distributions of older healthy subjects is emphasised, since it will be required to fully understand the changes brought about by diseases that affect the older population. PMID:8091330

  11. Measuring gas emissions from animal waste lagoons with an inverse-dispersion technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques due to non-ideal conditions such as trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and short fetch to establish equilibrated microclimate conditions within the water bo...

  12. Interferometric technique for determining the energy deposition in gas-flow nuclear-pumped lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulev, A A

    2001-06-30

    An interference technique is developed for determining the energy deposition in gas-flow lasers pumped by uranium fission fragments. It is shown that four types of interference patterns may be formed. Algorithms are presented for determining the type of interference and for enumerating the maxima in interference pattern. (lasers, active media)

  13. Accuracy of vertical radial plume mapping technique in measuring lagoon gas emission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) posted a ground-based optical remote sensing method on its website called OTM 10 for measuring fugitive gas emission flux from area sources such as closed landfills. The OTM 10 utilizes the vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM) technique to c...

  14. Mississippi exploration field trials using microbial, radiometrics, free soil gas, and other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.S.; Brown, L.R.; Thieling, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Mississippi Office of Geology has conducted field trials using the surface exploration techniques of geomicrobial, radiometrics, and free soil gas. The objective of these trials is to determine if Mississippi oil and gas fields have surface hydrocarbon expression resulting from vertical microseepage migration. Six fields have been surveyed ranging in depth from 3,330 ft to 18,500 ft. The fields differ in trapping styles and hydrocarbon type. The results so far indicate that these fields do have a surface expression and that geomicrobial analysis as well as radiometrics and free soil gas can detect hydrocarbon microseepage from pressurized reservoirs. All three exploration techniques located the reservoirs independent of depth, hydrocarbon type, or trapping style.

  15. Carotid artery intima-media thickness and distensibility in children and adolescents: reference values and role of body dimensions.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Anke; Kracht, Daniela; Bayazit, Aysun K; Deveci, Murat; Duzova, Ali; Krmar, Rafael T; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Niemirska, Anna; Oguz, Berna; Schmidt, Bernhard M W; Sözeri, Betul; Querfeld, Uwe; Melk, Anette; Schaefer, Franz; Wühl, Elke

    2013-09-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and carotid artery distensibility are reliable screening methods for vascular alterations and the assessment of cardiovascular risk in adult and pediatric cohorts. We sought to establish an international reference data set for the childhood and adolescence period and explore the impact of developmental changes in body dimensions and blood pressure (BP) on carotid wall thickness and elasticity. cIMT, the distensibility coefficient, the incremental modulus of elasticity, and the stiffness index β were assessed in 1155 children aged 6 to 18 years and sex-specific reference charts normalized to age or height were constructed from 1051 nonobese and nonhypertensive children. The role of body dimensions, BP, and family history, as well as the association between cIMT and distensibility, was investigated. cIMT increased and distensibility decreased with age, height, body mass index, and BP. A significant sex difference was apparent from the age of 15 years. Age- and height-normalized cIMT and distensibility values differed in children who are short or tall for their age. By stepwise multivariate analysis, standardized systolic BP and body mass index were independently positively associated with cIMT SD scores (SDS). Systolic BP SDS independently predicted all distensibility measures. Distensibility coefficient SDS was negatively and β SDS positively associated with cIMT SDS, whereas incremental modulus of elasticity was independent of cIMT. Morphological and functional aspects of the common carotid artery are particularly influenced by age, body dimensions, and BP. The reference charts established in this study allow to accurately compare vascular phenotypes of children with chronic conditions with those of healthy children. PMID:23817494

  16. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  17. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, G. W.; Navin, J. K.; Valadez, L.; Johánek, V.; Harrison, I.

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(Tg, Ts; ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, Tg, and surface temperature, Ts, can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with Tg = Ts = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(Tg, Ts; ϑ) measurements for which Tg ≠ Ts provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the Tg of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  18. Measuring Buffer-Gas Pressure in Sealed Glass Cells: An Assessment of the KSK Technique.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Travis; Huang, Michael; Camparo, James

    2016-07-01

    In alkali rf-discharge lamps used for optical pumping in atomic clocks and magnetometers, a buffer-gas (Kr or Xe) allows electrons to extract energy from an rf-field, and these energized electrons eventually produce alkali resonant light. Contrary to naïve intuition, rf-discharge lamps can lose their noble-gas buffer over time. Recently, we began a long-term experimental program to better understand the mechanism of noble-gas loss in rf-discharge lamps, and needed a nondestructive means of measuring buffer-gas pressure changes in sealed glass cells. For this purpose, we settled on the Kazantsev, Smirnova, and Khutorshchikov (KSK) technique, which is based on inferring buffer-gas pressure from the collision shift of an alkali ground-state hyperfine transition frequency νhfs. Here, we discuss the basic KSK technique and two modifications that we have implemented for its improvement: use of a diode laser for optical pumping, and extrapolation of νhfs to zero magnetic field. Testing our system's long-term performance with a very low pressure reference cell (i.e., 3.3 torr Xe), we find a reproducibility of 0.2% and an absolute accuracy of 5%. Further, our systematic drift is less than 1 mtorr/month. PMID:26529755

  19. Role of the gas flow parameters on the uniformity of films produced by PECVD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, R.; Macarico, A.; Ferreira, I.; Fortunato, E.

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present an analytical model able to interpret the experimental data of the dependence of film's uniformity on the discharge pressure, gas flow and temperature used during the production of thin films by the plasma enhancement chemical vapor deposition technique, under optimized electrode's geometry and electric field distribution. To do so, the gas flow is considered to be quasi-incompressible and inviscous leading to the establishment of the electro-fluid-mechanics equations able to interpret the film's uniformity over the substrate area, when the discharge process takes place in the low power regime.

  20. Stress and strain analysis of contractions during ramp distension in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian; Gregersen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated morphological and biomechanical remodeling in the intestine proximal to an obstruction. The present study aimed to obtain stress and strain thresholds to initiate contraction and the maximal contraction stress and strain in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments. Partial obstruction and sham operations were surgically created in mid-jejunum of male guinea pigs. The animals survived 2, 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. Animals not being operated on served as normal controls. The segments were used for no-load state, zero-stress state and distension analyses. The segment was inflated to 10 cmH2O pressure in an organ bath containing 37°C Krebs solution and the outer diameter change was monitored. The stress and strain at the contraction threshold and at maximum contraction were computed from the diameter, pressure and the zero-stress state data. Young’s modulus was determined at the contraction threshold. The muscle layer thickness in obstructed intestinal segments increased up to 300%. Compared with sham-obstructed and normal groups, the contraction stress threshold, the maximum contraction stress and the Young’s modulus at the contraction threshold increased whereas the strain threshold and maximum contraction strain decreased after 7 days obstruction (P<0.05 and 0.01). In conclusion, in the partially obstructed intestinal segments, a larger distension force was needed to evoke contraction likely due to tissue remodeling. Higher contraction stresses were produced and the contraction deformation (strain) became smaller. PMID:21632056

  1. Unusual well control techniques pay off. [Well drilling techniques in the Elgin gas condensate field, North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Idelovici, J.L.

    1993-07-01

    Well control and completion operations were seriously complicated by an unusual pressure phenomena encountered while drilling an appraisal well through Jurassic sandstones in a high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT), gas and condensate field located in the United Kingdom continental shelf. The HPHT sandstone reservoir is located in the Upper Jurassic Franklin formation. Unorthodox well-control techniques were used because it was determined that the abnormally high pressure was generated by a mechanical reaction of the rock under the effect of heavy mud and equivalent circulating density, rather than by entry into the wellbore of formation fluids. This paper reviews the complex drilling fluid control procedures which had to be utilized to maintain an open bore hole during drilling.

  2. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses of a bLS inverse-dispersion technique for measuring gas emissions from livestock operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) inverse-dispersion technique has been used to measure fugitive gas emissions from livestock operations. The accuracy of the bLS technique, as indicated by the percentages of gas recovery in various tracer-release experiments, has generally been within ± 10% o...

  3. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  4. Gelatin porous scaffolds fabricated using a modified gas foaming technique: characterisation and cytotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Poursamar, S Ali; Hatami, Javad; Lehner, Alexander N; da Silva, Cláudia L; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo; Antunes, A P M

    2015-03-01

    The current study presents an effective and simple strategy to obtain stable porous scaffolds from gelatin via a gas foaming method. The technique exploits the intrinsic foaming ability of gelatin in the presence of CO2 to obtain a porous structure stabilised with glutaraldehyde. The produced scaffolds were characterised using physical and mechanical characterisation methods. The results showed that gas foaming may allow the tailoring of the 3-dimensional structure of the scaffolds with an interconnected porous structure. To assess the effectiveness of the preparation method in mitigating the potential cytotoxicity risk of using glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker, direct and in-direct cytotoxicity assays were performed at different concentrations of glutaraldehyde. The results indicate the potential of the gas foaming method, in the preparation of viable tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:25579897

  5. Sabots, Obturator and Gas-In-Launch Tube Techniques for Heat Flux Models in Ballistic Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Wilder, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    For thermal protection system (heat shield) design for space vehicle entry into earth and other planetary atmospheres, it is essential to know the augmentation of the heat flux due to vehicle surface roughness. At the NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) ballistic range, a campaign of heat flux studies on rough models, using infrared camera techniques, has been initiated. Several phenomena can interfere with obtaining good heat flux data when using this measuring technique. These include leakage of the hot drive gas in the gun barrel through joints in the sabot (model carrier) to create spurious thermal imprints on the model forebody, deposition of sabot material on the model forebody, thereby changing the thermal properties of the model surface and unknown in-barrel heating of the model. This report presents developments in launch techniques to greatly reduce or eliminate these problems. The techniques include the use of obturator cups behind the launch package, enclosed versus open front sabot designs and the use of hydrogen gas in the launch tube. Attention also had to be paid to the problem of the obturator drafting behind the model and impacting the model. Of the techniques presented, the obturator cups and hydrogen in the launch tube were successful when properly implemented

  6. Fabrication of uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds using a gas-in-liquid templating technique.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takayuki; Aokawa, Ryuta; Shigemitsu, Takamasa; Kawakami, Koei; Yoshida, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Design of porous scaffolds in tissue engineering field was challenging. Uniform immobilization of cells in the scaffolds with high porosity was essential for homogeneous tissue formation. The present study was aimed at fabricating uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds with porosity >74% using the gas-in-liquid foam templating technique. To this end, we used gelatin, microbial transglutaminase and argon gas as a scaffold material, cross-linker of the protein and porogen of scaffold, respectively. We confirmed that a porosity of >74% could be achieved by increasing the gas volume delivered to a gelatin solution. Pore size in the scaffold could be controlled by stirring speed, stirring time and the pore size of the filter through which the gas passed. The foaming technique enabled us to uniformly immobilize a human hepatoblastoma cell line in scaffold. Engraftment efficiency of the cell line entrapped within the scaffold in nude mice was higher than that of cells in free-form. These results showed that the uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds were promising for tissue engineering. PMID:25912452

  7. High rate concentration measurement of molecular gas mixtures using a spatial detection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loriot, V.; Hertz, E.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.

    2010-05-01

    Concentration measurement in molecular gas mixtures using a snapshot spatial imaging technique is reported. The approach consists of measuring the birefringence of the molecular sample when field-free alignment takes place, each molecular component producing a signal with an amplitude depending on the molecular density. The concentration measurement is obtained on a single-shot basis by probing the time-varying birefringence through femtosecond time-resolved optical polarigraphy (FTOP). The relevance of the method is assessed in air.

  8. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques in the examination of engine oils.

    PubMed

    Fall, Jacek; Voelkel, Adam

    2002-09-01

    The emerging market of engine oils consists of a number of products from different viscosity and quality classes. Determination of the base oil used in manufacturing of the final product (engine oil) as well as estimation of mutual miscibility of oils and their solubility could be crucial problems. Inverse gas chromatography and other chromatographic techniques are presented as an interesting and fruitful extension of normalised standard analytical methods used in the oil industry. PMID:12385390

  9. Towards the development of rapid screening techniques for shale gas core properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Mark R.; Vane, Christopher; Kemp, Simon; Harrington, Jon; Cuss, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Shale gas has been produced for many years in the U.S.A. and forms around 8% of total their natural gas production. Recent testing for gas on the Fylde Coast in Lancashire UK suggests there are potentially large reserves which could be exploited. The increasing significance of shale gas has lead to the need for deeper understanding of shale behaviour. There are many factors which govern whether a particular shale will become a shale gas resource and these include: i) Organic matter abundance, type and thermal maturity; ii) Porosity-permeability relationships and pore size distribution; iii) Brittleness and its relationship to mineralogy and rock fabric. Measurements of these properties require sophisticated and time consuming laboratory techniques (Josh et al 2012), whereas rapid screening techniques could provide timely results which could improve the efficiency and cost effectiveness of exploration. In this study, techniques which are portable and provide rapid on-site measurements (X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Infra-red (IR) spectroscopy) have been calibrated against standard laboratory techniques (Rock-Eval 6 analyser-Vinci Technologies) and Powder whole-rock XRD analysis was carried out using a PANalytical X'Pert Pro series diffractometer equipped with a cobalt-target tube, X'Celerator detector and operated at 45kV and 40mA, to predict properties of potential shale gas material from core material from the Bowland shale Roosecote, south Cumbria. Preliminary work showed that, amongst various mineralogical and organic matter properties of the core, regression models could be used so that the total organic carbon content could be predicted from the IR spectra with a 95 percentile confidence prediction error of 0.6% organic carbon, the free hydrocarbons could be predicted with a 95 percentile confidence prediction error of 0.6 mgHC/g rock, the bound hydrocarbons could be predicted with a 95 percentile confidence prediction error of 2.4 mgHC/g rock, mica content

  10. Direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Sakurai, Hiromu; Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Günther, Detlef

    2015-09-01

    An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique was applied to the direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in ambient air. The ultra-trace semiconductor gases such as arsine (AsH3) and phosphine (PH3) were converted to particles by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonia (NH3) gases within a gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The converted particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS through a gas exchange device (GED), which could penetrate the particles as well as exchange to Ar from either non-reacted gases such as an air or remaining gases of O3 and NH3. The particle size distribution of converted particles was measured by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the results supported the elucidation of particle agglomeration between the particle converted from semiconductor gas and the particle of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which was produced as major particle in GPD. Stable time-resolved signals from AsH3 and PH3 in air were obtained by GPD-GED-ICPMS with continuous gas introduction; however, the slightly larger fluctuation, which could be due to the ionization fluctuation of particles in ICP, was observed compared to that of metal carbonyl gas in Ar introduced directly into ICPMS. The linear regression lines were obtained and the limits of detection (LODs) of 1.5 pL L(-1) and 2.4 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, were estimated. Since these LODs revealed sufficiently lower values than the measurement concentrations required from semiconductor industry such as 0.5 nL L(-1) and 30 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, the GPD-GED-ICPMS could be useful for direct and high sensitive analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in air. PMID:26388365

  11. Adaptive polynomial chaos techniques for uncertainty quantification of a gas cooled fast reactor transient

    SciTech Connect

    Perko, Z.; Gilli, L.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.

    2013-07-01

    Uncertainty quantification plays an increasingly important role in the nuclear community, especially with the rise of Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty methodologies. Sensitivity analysis, surrogate models, Monte Carlo sampling and several other techniques can be used to propagate input uncertainties. In recent years however polynomial chaos expansion has become a popular alternative providing high accuracy at affordable computational cost. This paper presents such polynomial chaos (PC) methods using adaptive sparse grids and adaptive basis set construction, together with an application to a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor transient. Comparison is made between a new sparse grid algorithm and the traditionally used technique proposed by Gerstner. An adaptive basis construction method is also introduced and is proved to be advantageous both from an accuracy and a computational point of view. As a demonstration the uncertainty quantification of a 50% loss of flow transient in the GFR2400 Gas Cooled Fast Reactor design was performed using the CATHARE code system. The results are compared to direct Monte Carlo sampling and show the superior convergence and high accuracy of the polynomial chaos expansion. Since PC techniques are easy to implement, they can offer an attractive alternative to traditional techniques for the uncertainty quantification of large scale problems. (authors)

  12. Esophagogastric junction distensibility measurements during hydraulic dilation therapy in achalasia patients.

    PubMed

    Kappelle, Wouter F W; Bogte, Auke; Siersema, Peter D

    2016-02-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility is predictive of long-term clinical success after achalasia treatment. A new commercially available hydraulic dilation balloon is capable of measuring EGJ opening diameters whilst simultaneously dilating the EGJ. Deployed alongside the endoscope under direct visualization, it is used for dilation of the lower esophageal sphincter in patients with achalasia. Impedance measurement electrodes are incorporated in the catheter shaft in the dilation balloon, which allows measuring the diameter of the EGJ and displaying it in real time before, during and after dilation. This obviates the need for fluoroscopy during the dilation procedure. The extent of recoil of the EGJ after dilation potentially provides a measurement that could be incorporated into a clinical rule for predicting therapeutic success after dilation. PMID:26679629

  13. Model for vocalization by a bird with distensible vocal cavity and open beak.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Neville H; Riede, Tobias; Suthers, Roderick A

    2006-02-01

    Some birds make use of a distensible oral cavity to produce nearly pure-tone song. Songbirds such as the Northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) have a muscularly distended oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity between the top of the trachea and the open beak. The present paper analyzes the acoustics of this vocal system. It is shown that the resonance of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity, vented through the beak, introduces a dominant peak in the radiation efficiency, the frequency of which can be adjusted by varying the volume of the cavity, the beak gape, and perhaps the position of the tongue in the mouth. To produce nearly pure-tone song, the bird adjusts the frequency of this peak to coincide with the fundamental of the syringeal oscillation. The present paper provides the acoustical analysis underlying this behavior. PMID:16521762

  14. Nitric oxide synthase promotes distension-induced tracheal venular leukocyte adherence.

    PubMed

    Moldobaeva, Aigul; Rentsendorj, Otgonchimeg; Jenkins, John; Wagner, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    The process of leukocyte recruitment to the airways in real time has not been extensively studied, yet airway inflammation persists as a major contributor to lung pathology. We showed previously in vivo, that neutrophils are recruited acutely to the large airways after periods of airway distension imposed by the application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Given extensive literature implicating products of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in lung injury after ventilatory over-distension, we questioned whether similar mechanisms exist in airway post-capillary venules. Yet, endothelial nitric oxide has been shown to be largely anti-inflammatory in other systemic venules. Using intravital microscopy to visualize post-capillary tracheal venules in anesthetized, ventilated mice, the number of adherent leukocytes was significantly decreased in eNOS-/- mice under baseline conditions (2±1 cell/60 min observation) vs wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice (7±2 cells). After exposure to PEEP (8 cmH2O for 1 min; 5 times), adherent cells increased significantly (29±5 cells) in WT mice while eNOS-/- mice demonstrated a significantly decreased number of adherent cells (11±4 cells) after PEEP. A similar response was seen when thrombin was used as the pro-inflammatory stimulus. In addition, mouse tracheal venular endothelial cells studied in vitro after exposure to cyclic stretch (18% elongation) or thrombin both demonstrated increased p-selectin expression that was significantly attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) and excess BH4. In vivo treatment with the ROS inhibitor NACA or co-factor BH4 abolished completely the PEEP-induced leukocyte adherence. These results suggest that pro-inflammatory stimuli cause leukocyte recruitment to tracheal endothelium in part due to eNOS uncoupling. PMID:25181540

  15. Nitric Oxide Synthase Promotes Distension-Induced Tracheal Venular Leukocyte Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Moldobaeva, Aigul; Rentsendorj, Otgonchimeg; Jenkins, John; Wagner, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of leukocyte recruitment to the airways in real time has not been extensively studied, yet airway inflammation persists as a major contributor to lung pathology. We showed previously in vivo, that neutrophils are recruited acutely to the large airways after periods of airway distension imposed by the application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Given extensive literature implicating products of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in lung injury after ventilatory over-distension, we questioned whether similar mechanisms exist in airway post-capillary venules. Yet, endothelial nitric oxide has been shown to be largely anti-inflammatory in other systemic venules. Using intravital microscopy to visualize post-capillary tracheal venules in anesthetized, ventilated mice, the number of adherent leukocytes was significantly decreased in eNOS-/- mice under baseline conditions (2±1 cell/60 min observation) vs wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice (7±2 cells). After exposure to PEEP (8 cmH2O for 1 min; 5 times), adherent cells increased significantly (29±5 cells) in WT mice while eNOS-/- mice demonstrated a significantly decreased number of adherent cells (11±4 cells) after PEEP. A similar response was seen when thrombin was used as the pro-inflammatory stimulus. In addition, mouse tracheal venular endothelial cells studied in vitro after exposure to cyclic stretch (18% elongation) or thrombin both demonstrated increased p-selectin expression that was significantly attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) and excess BH4. In vivo treatment with the ROS inhibitor NACA or co-factor BH4 abolished completely the PEEP-induced leukocyte adherence. These results suggest that pro-inflammatory stimuli cause leukocyte recruitment to tracheal endothelium in part due to eNOS uncoupling. PMID:25181540

  16. Daily assessment of arterial distensibility in a pediatric population before and after smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Bassareo, Pier Paolo; Fanos, Vassilios; Crisafulli, Antonio; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cigarette smoking is an important modifiable cardiovascular risk factor associated with increased stiffness of the large arteries in adulthood. This study aimed to 1) evaluate arterial distensibility and echocardiographic measures in adolescent smokers before and after participation in a successful smoking cessation program and to 2) compare the findings obtained with data from a control population of healthy non-smokers. METHODS: A total of 31 young smoking subjects (58.1% male; range: 11-18 years old; mean: 16.5±1.4 years old; mean tobacco consumption: 2.6±0.6 years) were examined before commencing and after taking part for at least 1 year in a smoking cessation program (mean: 1.4±0.3 years). Arterial stiffness was measured using the previously validated QKd100-60 method. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and transthoracic echocardiography were also performed. RESULTS: (Smokers before abuse cessation vs. smokers after abuse cessation) systolic blood pressure: p<0.004; diastolic blood pressure: p<0.02; mean blood pressure: p<0.01; QKd100-60 value: 183±5 vs. 196±3 msec, p<0.009; p = ns for all echocardiographic parameters. (Smokers after abuse cessation vs. controls) systolic blood pressure: p<0.01; diastolic blood pressure: p<0.03; mean blood pressure: p<0.02; QKd100-60 value: 196±3 vs. 203±2 msec, p<0.04; p<0.02, p<0.01, and p<0.05 for the interventricular septum, posterior wall, and left ventricular mass, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite successful participation in a smoking cessation program, arterial distensibility improved but did not normalize. This finding underlines the presence of the harmful effect of arterial rigidity in these individuals, despite their having quit smoking and their young ages, thus resulting in the subsequent need for a lengthy follow-up period. PMID:24714828

  17. [Carbon monoxide gas detection system based on mid-infrared spectral absorption technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Lin; Dong, Ming; Song, Nan; Song, Fang; Zheng, Chuan-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2014-10-01

    Based on infrared spectral absorption technique, a carbon monoxide (CO) detection system was developed using the fundamental absorption band at the wavelength of 4.6 μm of CO molecule and adopting pulse-modulated wideband incandescence and dual-channel detector. The detection system consists of pulse-modulated wideband incandescence, open ellipsoid light-collec- tor gas-cell, dual-channel detector, main-control and signal-processing module. By optimizing open ellipsoid light-collector gas- cell, the optical path of the gas absorption reaches 40 cm, and the amplitude of the electrical signal from the detector is 2 to 3 times larger than the original signal. Therefore, by using the ellipsoidal condenser, the signal-to-noise ratio of the system will be to some extent increased to improve performance of the system. With the prepared standard CO gas sample, sensing characteris- tics on CO gas were investigated. Experimental results reveal that, the limit of detection (LOD) is about 10 ppm; the relative er- ror at the LOD point is less than 14%, and that is less than 7. 8% within the low concentration range of 20~180 ppm; the maxi- mum absolute error of 50 min long-term measurement concentration on the 0 ppm gas sample is about 3 ppm, and the standard deviation is as small as 0. 18 ppm. Compared with the CO detection systems utilizing quantum cascaded lasers (QCLs) and dis- tributed feedback lasers (DFBLs), the proposed sensor shows potential applications in CO detection under the circumstances of coal-mine and environmental protection, by virtue of high performance-cost ratio, simple optical-path structure, etc. PMID:25739235

  18. Geophysical gas monitoring using optical techniques: volcanoes, geothermal fields and mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, S.

    2002-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy provides powerful means for studying geophysical gas emissions. An extensive research program in this field has been performed by Swedish researchers in collaboration with European partners during the last 10 years, and a review of the activities and results is given. The techniques suitable for geophysical gas monitoring include the differential absorption lidar (DIAL), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), diode laser spectroscopy and gas correlation imaging. Field experiments regarding atomic mercury emissions from geothermal fields were performed with a mobile lidar laboratory in Iceland and in Italy. The atomic mercury concentrations and fluxes from mercury mines were also determined at Abbadia S. Salvatore (Italy) and Almadén (Spain). The volcanic emissions of sulfur dioxide were studied in four ship-borne campaigns concerning the three Italian volcanoes Mt. Etna, Stromboli and Vulcano. Comparisons between the results from the DIAL and passive techniques (DOAS and correlation spectroscopy) were performed. Infrared spectroscopy for geophysical applications is now being developed and will also be discussed.

  19. New seismic reflection techniques applied to gas recognition in the Rharb Basin, Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Jabour, H.; Dakki, M. )

    1994-07-01

    The Rharb basin in Morocco is a Tertiary foreland filled by clastic series during the Miocene and Pliocene. This terrigenous influx, derived from the prerif to the northeast and the Meseta to the south, is characterized by a sandy episode during much of the Messinian and the Tortonian. The sand deposits were probably related to the uplift and major erosion of a part of the prerif during the sliding of an olistostrome (prerif nappe). Although most of the wells drilled in the basin have encountered biogenic gas accumulations, the problem still facing exploration in the area is seismic resolution and thin-bed tuning analysis. Recent studies using high seismic resolution techniques have permitted the authors to gain a deep insight into the stratigraphy and depositional environment of the thin sand reservoirs and their fluid content. AVO stratigraphy, inversion of seismic traces into acoustic impedance traces and seismic attributes calculation, and computing provide a remarkable example of the possibilities of depicting the lateral and vertical evolution of reservoir facies and localizing biogenic gas accumulations. Out of five recent exploratory wells drilled based on this new technique, three encountered gas-bearing sands with economic potential. Fifty-three amplitude anomalies have been identified and await processing.

  20. [Application of near-infrared absorption spectrum scanning techniques in gas quantitative measurement].

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Liang, Jian-Qi; Cui, Jun-Hong; Wu, Xiang-Nan; Li, Xian-Li

    2010-03-01

    A practical gas sensing system utilizing absorption spectrum scanning techniques was developed. Using the narrow-band transmission of a fiber tunable filter (TOF) and wavelength modulation technique, the so-called cross-sensing effects of the traditional spectrum absorption based gas sensor were reduced effectively and thus the target gas was detected sensitively and selectively. In order to reduce the effects of nonlinearity of TOF on the measurement results and improve the system stability in operation, the reflection spectrum of a reference FBG was monitored and employed to control the modulation region and center of TOF wavelength precisely. Moreover, a kind of weak signal detecting circuits was developed to detect the weak response signal of the system with high sensitivity. The properties of the proposed system were demonstrated experimentally by detection of acetylene. Approximate linear relationships between the system responses and the input acetylene concentrations were demonstrated by experiments. The minimum detectable acetylene of 5 x 10(-6), with signal-noise ratio of 3, was also achieved by experiments. PMID:20496683

  1. Estimating the gas and dye quantities for modified tracer technique measurements of stream reaeration coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Measuring the reaeration coefficient of a stream with a modified tracer technique has been accomplished by injecting either ethylene or ethylene and propane together and a rhodamine-WT dye solution into the stream. The movement of the tracers through the stream reach after injection is described by a one-dimensional diffusion equation. The peak concentrations of the tracers at the downstream end of the reach depend on the concentrations of the tracers in the stream at the injection site, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, the mean water velocity, the length of the reach, and the duration of the injection period. The downstream gas concentrations also depend on the gas desorption coefficients of the reach. The concentrations of the tracer gases in the stream at the injection site depend on the flow rates of the gases through the injection diffusers, the efficiency of the gas absorption process, and the stream discharge. The concentration of dye in the stream at the injection site depends on the flow rate of the dye solution, the concentration of the dye solution, and the stream discharge. Equations for estimating the gas flow rates, the quantities of the gases, the dye concentration, and the quantity of dye together with procedures for determining the variables in these equations are presented. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Techniques for Equation-of-State Measurements on a Three-Stage Light-Gas Gun

    SciTech Connect

    REINHART,WILLIAM D.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; THORNHILL,T.G.

    2000-09-14

    Understanding high pressure behavior materials is necessary in order to address the physical processes associated with hypervelocity impact events related to space science applications including orbital debris impact and impact lethality. Until recently the highest-pressure states in materials have been achieved from impact loading techniques from two-stage light gas guns with velocity limitations of approximately 81cm/s. In this paper, techniques that are being developed and implemented to obtain the needed shock loading parameters (Hugoniot states) for material characterization studies, namely shock velocity and particle velocity, will be described at impact velocities up to 11 kds. The determination of equation-of-state (EOS) and thermodynamic states of materials in the regimes of extreme high pressures is now attainable utilizing the three-stage launcher. What is new in this report is that these techniques are being implemented for use at engagement velocities never before attained utilizing two-stage light-gas gun technology. The design and test methodologies used to determine Hugoniot states are described in this paper.

  3. The seismic method in the search for oil and gas: Current techniques and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhout, A.J.

    1986-08-01

    In applying seismic echo techniques to oil and gas exploration, the underground is ''illuminated'' from the surface by acoustic waves. The incident wavefield is reflected at the geologic layer boundaries and is registered at the surface, yielding detailed information on earth's upper structure. An important aspect of the seismic method is that an unprocessed seismic image does not represent the actual picture. Each reflection has been distorted during its propagation through earth. These distortions have to be corrected before an accurate picture can be developed. This is in most cases accomplished by ''seismic inversion.'' In this paper, current seismic techniques for oil and gas search, and their further development, are reviewed, with emphasis on seismic inversion. It is shown that important new developments in theory, software, and hardware have yielded significant improvements in wave theory solutions. Most research results presented are general and apply equally well to other echo technique applications, such as ultrasonic medical imaging, nondestructive testing, acoustic microscopy, sonar, and ground radar.

  4. An acoustic levitation technique for the study of nonlinear oscillations of gas bubbles in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. A.; Crum, L. A.

    1983-08-01

    A technique of acoustic levitation was developed for the study of individual gas bubbles in a liquid. Isopropyl alcohol and a mixture of glycerine and water (33-1/3% glycerine by volume) were the two liquids used in this research. Bubbles were levitated near the acoustic pressure antinode of an acoustic wave in the range of 20-22 kHz. Measurements were made of the levitation number as a function of the normalized radius of the bubbles. The levitation number is the ratio of the hydrostatic pressure gradient to the acoustic pressure gradient. These values were then compared to a nonlinear theory. Results were very much in agreement except for the region near the n=2 harmonic. An explanation for the discrepancy between theory and experiment appears to lie in the polytropic exponent associated with the gas in the interior of the bubble.

  5. Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Andrew Douglas

    Gas atomized magnesium powders are critical for the production of a wide variety of flares, tracer projectiles, and other munitions for the United States military, along with a growing number of applications in both alloying and powder metallurgy. Gas atomization of magnesium is performed by numerous companies worldwide, but represents a single point failure within the United States as there is only one domestic producer. These powders are pyrophoric and must be handled carefully and kept dry at all times. Recent studies have explored the ability of certain fluorine containing cover gases to protect molten magnesium in casting operations from excessive vaporization and burning by modifying the native oxide (MgO) through interaction with these gas atmospheres. The present study sought to adapt this melt protection strategy for use as an in-situ passivation technique that could be employed to form a protective reaction film during gas atomization of magnesium powders. This fluorinated oxide shell was intended to provide superior coverage and adherence to the underlying metal, which may improve the ability of powders to resist ignition at elevated temperatures and during powder handling. Two candidate gases were tested in this research, SF6 and NF3, and reaction films of both were produced on miniature melt samples in a controlled environment and characterized using auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultimately, SF6 was chosen to conduct a small scale magnesium atomization experiment for verification of the fluorination reaction and to experimentally test the ignition temperature of these coated particles compared to other magnesium powders available today. This novel passivation technique was found to be far superior to magnesium's native oxide at resisting ignition and, thus, to reduce the hazard associated with handling and transport of magnesium powders for defense applications. If fully commercialized, this passivation method also

  6. Sounding rocket thermal analysis techniques applied to GAS payloads. [Get Away Special payloads (STS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Simplified analytical techniques of sounding rocket programs are suggested as a means of bringing the cost of thermal analysis of the Get Away Special (GAS) payloads within acceptable bounds. Particular attention is given to two methods adapted from sounding rocket technology - a method in which the container and payload are assumed to be divided in half vertically by a thermal plane of symmetry, and a method which considers the container and its payload to be an analogous one-dimensional unit having the real or correct container top surface area for radiative heat transfer and a fictitious mass and geometry which model the average thermal effects.

  7. Evaluation of corrosion testing techniques for selection of corrosion resistant alloys for sour gas service

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Hibner, E.L.

    1996-08-01

    Slow strain rate (SSR) and C-ring stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests have historically been used to screen alloys for sour gas environments. The relevance of these testing techniques in predicting actual field corrosion behavior was evaluated for age-hardenable nickel base alloy 925 (UNS N09925) and alloy 718 (UNS N07718). While SSR testing provides an acceptable accelerated screening tool for ranking alloys in sour oil field environments, C-ring SCC testing ranks alloys higher in sour environments than SSR testing.

  8. Systematic comparison of static and dynamic headspace sampling techniques for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Andreas; Jochmann, Maik A; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-09-01

    Six automated, headspace-based sample preparation techniques were used to extract volatile analytes from water with the goal of establishing a systematic comparison between commonly available instrumental alternatives. To that end, these six techniques were used in conjunction with the same gas chromatography instrument for analysis of a common set of volatile organic carbon (VOC) analytes. The methods were thereby divided into three classes: static sampling (by syringe or loop), static enrichment (SPME and PAL SPME Arrow), and dynamic enrichment (ITEX and trap sampling). For PAL SPME Arrow, different sorption phase materials were also included in the evaluation. To enable an effective comparison, method detection limits (MDLs), relative standard deviations (RSDs), and extraction yields were determined and are discussed for all techniques. While static sampling techniques exhibited sufficient extraction yields (approx. 10-20 %) to be reliably used down to approx. 100 ng L(-1), enrichment techniques displayed extraction yields of up to 80 %, resulting in MDLs down to the picogram per liter range. RSDs for all techniques were below 27 %. The choice on one of the different instrumental modes of operation (aforementioned classes) was thereby the most influential parameter in terms of extraction yields and MDLs. Individual methods inside each class showed smaller deviations, and the least influences were observed when evaluating different sorption phase materials for the individual enrichment techniques. The option of selecting specialized sorption phase materials may, however, be more important when analyzing analytes with different properties such as high polarity or the capability of specific molecular interactions. Graphical Abstract PAL SPME Arrow during the extraction of volatile analytes from the headspace of an aqueous sample. PMID:27526093

  9. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. As a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.

  10. New alnico magnets fabricated from pre-alloyed gas-atomized powder through diverse consolidation techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tang, W.; Zhou, L.; Kassen, A. G.; Palasyuk, A.; White, E. M.; Dennis, K. W.; Kramer, M. J.; McCallum, R. W.; Anderson, I. E.

    2015-05-25

    Fine Alnico 8 spherical powder produced by gas atomization was consolidated through hot pressing (HP), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and compression molding and subsequent sintering (CMS) techniques. The effects of different fabrication techniques and processing parameters on microstructure and magnetic properties were analyzed and compared. The HP, HIP, and CMS magnets exhibited different features in microstructures and magnetic properties. Magnetically annealed at 840°C for 10 min and subsequently tempered at 650°C for 5h and 580°C for 15h, the HIP sample achieved the best coercivity (Hcj =1845 Oe) due to spinodally decomposed (SD) phases with uniform and well-faceted mosaic morphology. Asmore » a result, the CMS sample had a lower Hcj than HIP and HP samples, but a higher remanence and thus the best energy product (6.5 MGOe) due to preferential grain alignment induced by abnormal grain growth.« less

  11. NOTE: Investigation of a copper etching technique to fabricate metallic gas diffusion media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-Yuan; Prasad, Ajay K.; Advani, Suresh G.

    2006-11-01

    A new fabrication technique based on etching is employed to convert a copper foil into a porous structure with an array of micron size pores. The motivation stems from the need to develop a more efficient and controllable gas diffusion medium for fuel cell applications. The influence of mask shape, mask width and etching time was investigated experimentally. A correlation to predict trench width with etching time was derived; normalizing by mask width allows one to collapse the data. The etching rates to obtain micro-scale features, which are of the order of 1 2 µm min 1, are mainly dominated by the mask width due to mass-transport resistance. It is possible to control the pore dimensions, porosity and pore size distributions with this technique.

  12. Studying gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Azzopardi, Barry

    2013-11-01

    High-speed LIF-technique is applied to study gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with 161 mm width. Instantaneous distributions of film thickness resolved in both longitudinal and transverse coordinates were obtained with a frequency of 10 kHz and spatial resolution from 0.125 mm to 0.04 mm. Processes of generation of fast and slow ripples by disturbance waves are the same as described in literature for downwards annular pipe flow. Disturbance waves are often localized by transverse coordinate and may have curved or slanted fronts. Fast ripples, covering disturbance waves, are typically horseshoe-shaped and placed in staggered order. Their characteristic transverse size is of order 1 cm and it decreases with gas velocity. Entrainment of liquid from film surface can also be visualized. Mechanisms of ripple disruption, known as ``bag break-up'' and ``ligament break-up,'' were observed. Both mechanisms may occur on the same disturbance waves. Various scenarios of droplet deposition on the liquid film are observed, including the impact, slow sinking and bouncing, characterized by different outcome of secondary droplets or entrapped bubbles. Number and size of bubbles increase greatly inside the disturbance waves. Both quantities increase with gas and liquid flow rates. EPSRC Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1), and Roll-Royce UTC (Nottingham, for access to flow facility).

  13. Understanding Methane Emission from Natural Gas Activities Using Inverse Modeling Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdioskouei, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas (NG) has been promoted as a bridge fuel that can smooth the transition from fossil fuels to zero carbon energy sources by having lower carbon dioxide emission and lower global warming impacts in comparison to other fossil fuels. However, the uncertainty around the estimations of methane emissions from NG systems can lead to underestimation of climate and environmental impacts of using NG as a replacement for coal. Accurate estimates of methane emissions from NG operations is crucial for evaluation of environmental impacts of NG extraction and at larger scale, adoption of NG as transitional fuel. However there is a great inconsistency within the current estimates. Forward simulation of methane from oil and gas operation sites for the US is carried out based on NEI-2011 using the WRF-Chem model. Simulated values are compared against measurements of observations from different platforms such as airborne (FRAPPÉ field campaign) and ground-based measurements (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory). A novel inverse modeling technique is used in this work to improve the model fit to the observation values and to constrain methane emission from oil and gas extraction sites.

  14. Use of tracer gas technique for industrial exhaust hood efficiency evaluation--where to sample?

    PubMed

    Hampl, V; Niemelä, R; Shulman, S; Bartley, D L

    1986-05-01

    A tracer gas technique using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was developed for the evaluation of industrial exhaust hood efficiency. In addition to other parameters, accuracy of this method depends on proper location of the sampling probe. The sampling probe should be located in the duct at a minimum distance from the investigated hood where the SF6 is dispersed uniformly across the duct cross section. To determine the minimum sampling distance, the SF6 dispersion in the duct in fully developed turbulent flow was studied at four duct configurations frequently found in industry: straight duct, straight duct-side branch, straight duct-one elbow, and straight duct-two elbows combinations. Based on the established SF6 dispersion factor, the minimum sampling distances were determined as follows: for straight duct, at least 50 duct diameters; for straight duct-side branch combination, at least 25 duct diameters; for straight duct-one elbow combination, 7 duct diameters; and for straight duct-two elbow combination, 4 duct diameters. Sampling at (or beyond) these distances minimizes the error caused by the non-homogeneous dispersion of SF6 in the duct and contributes to the accuracy of the tracer gas technique. PMID:3717012

  15. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H[sub 2]O[sub 2], and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H[sub 2]O[sub 2] injection as an oxygenation technique.

  16. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} injection as an oxygenation technique.

  17. RESOLVE Survey Photometry and Volume-limited Calibration of the Photometric Gas Fractions Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Hoversten, Erik A.

    2015-09-01

    We present custom-processed ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry for the REsolved Spectroscopy of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey, a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass within two subvolumes of the nearby universe (RESOLVE-A and RESOLVE-B). RESOLVE is complete down to baryonic mass ˜ {10}9.1-9.3 {M}⊙ , probing the upper end of the dwarf galaxy regime. In contrast to standard pipeline photometry (e.g., SDSS), our photometry uses optimal background subtraction, avoids suppressing color gradients, and employs multiple flux extrapolation routines to estimate systematic errors. With these improvements, we measure brighter magnitudes, larger radii, bluer colors, and a real increase in scatter around the red sequence. Combining stellar mass estimates based on our optimized photometry with the nearly complete H i mass census for RESOLVE-A, we create new z = 0 volume-limited calibrations of the photometric gas fractions (PGF) technique, which predicts gas-to-stellar mass ratios (G/S) from galaxy colors and optional additional parameters. We analyze G/S-color residuals versus potential third parameters, finding that axial ratio is the best independent and physically meaningful third parameter. We define a “modified color” from planar fits to G/S as a function of both color and axial ratio. In the complete galaxy population, upper limits on G/S bias linear and planar fits. We therefore model the entire PGF probability density field, enabling iterative statistical modeling of upper limits and prediction of full G/S probability distributions for individual galaxies. These distributions have two-component structure in the red color regime. Finally, we use the RESOLVE-B 21 cm census to test several PGF calibrations, finding that most systematically under- or overestimate gas masses, but the full probability density method performs well.

  18. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

  19. EVALUATION OF THE BASIC GC/MS (GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC/MASS SPECTROMETRIC) COMPUTER ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR POLLUTANT ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The basic gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric/computer technique for the analysis of vapor-phase organic compounds collected on a solid sorbent was evaluated. Emphasis was placed on the assessment of performance and improvement in techniques in the following areas: (1) wide-bo...

  20. Smooth muscle in human bronchi is disposed to resist airway distension.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Morgan; Henry, Cyndi; Couture, Christian; Marsolais, David; King, Gregory G; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Bossé, Ynuk

    2016-07-15

    Studying airway smooth muscle (ASM) in conditions that emulate the in vivo environment within which the bronchi normally operate may provide important clues regarding its elusive physiological function. The present study examines the effect of lengthening and shortening of ASM on tension development in human bronchial segments. ASM from each bronchial segment was set at a length approximating in situ length (Linsitu). Bronchial tension was then measured during a slow cyclical strain (0.004Hz, from 0.7Linsitu to 1.3Linsitu) in the relaxed state and at graded levels of activation by methacholine. In all cases, tension was greater at longer ASM lengths, and greater during lengthening than shortening. The threshold of methacholine concentration that was required for ASM to account for bronchial tension across the entire range of ASM lengths tested was on average smaller by 2.8 logs during lengthening than during shortening. The length-dependency of ASM tension, together with this lower threshold of methacholine concentration during lengthening versus shortening, suggest that ASM has a greater ability to resist airway dilation during lung inflation than to narrow the airways during lung deflation. More than serving to narrow the airway, as has long been thought, these data suggest that the main function of ASM contraction is to limit airway wall distension during lung inflation. PMID:27095271

  1. Effects of Wall Distensibility in Hemodynamic Simulations of an Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    McGah, Patrick M.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Beach, Kirk W.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide adequate access for dialysis patients suffering from end-stage renal disease. It has long been hypothesized that the rapid blood vessel remodeling occurring after fistula creation is in part a process to restore the mechanical stresses to some preferred level, i.e. mechanical homeostasis. The current study presents fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations of a patient-specific model of a mature arteriovenous fistula reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans. The FSI results are compared with previously published data of the same model but with rigid walls. Ultrasound-derived wall motion measurements are also used to validate the FSI simulations of the wall motion. Very large time-averaged shear stresses, 10–15 Pa, are calculated at the fistula anastomosis in the FSI simulations, values which are much larger than what is typically thought to be the normal homeostatic shear stress in the peripheral vasculature. Although this result is systematically lower by as much as 50% compared to the analogous rigid-walled simulations, the inclusion of distensible vessel walls in hemodynamic simulations does not reduce the high anastomotic shear stresses to “normal” values. Therefore, rigid-walled analyses may be acceptable for identifying high shear regions of arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:24037281

  2. Comparison of microbial and sorbed soil gas surgace geochemical techniques with seismic surveys from the Southern Altiplano, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect

    Aranibar, O.R.; Tucker, J.D.; Hiltzman, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos (YPFB) undertook a large seismic evaluation in the southern Altiplano, Bolivia in 1994. As an additional layer of information, sorbed soil gas and Microbial Oil Survey Technique (MOST) geochemical surveys were conducted to evaluate the hydrocarbon microseepage potential. The Wara Sara Prospect had 387 sorbed soil gas samples, collected from one meter depth, and 539 shallow soil microbial samples, collected from 15 to 20 centimeter depth. The sorbed soil gas samples were collected every 500 meters and microbial samples every 250 meters along geochemical traverses spaced 1 km apart. The presence of anmalous hydrocarbon microseepage is indicated by (1) a single hydrocarbon source identified by gas crossplots, (2) the high gas values with a broad range, (3) the high overall gas average, (4) the clusters of elevated samples, and (5) the right hand skewed data distributions.

  3. Application of a new multiple fracturing technique to enhance gas production in Devonian shale

    SciTech Connect

    Cuderman, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A new multiple fracturing technology has been applied in stimulating a Devonian shale gas well. In this new technique, propellants are used to obtain controlled pressurization of the wellbore to produce multiple fractures. The pressurization is controlled by suitable choice of propellants having different burn rates. The pressure risetime is the most important parameter governing fracture behavior. Methods are presented for specifying both the risetime and propellants to achieve it for Devonian shales. The Devonian shale stimulation was conducted in a 1040 m deep well in Meigs Co., Ohio. The experimental installation and hardware used are described together with results which include an increase in production from 190 m/sup 3//day to 623 m/sup 3//day. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  4. Unusual high Bs for Fe-based amorphous powders produced by a gas-atomization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Bito, M.; Kageyama, J.; Shimizu, Y.; Abe, M.; Makino, A.

    2016-05-01

    Fe-based alloy powders with a high Fe content of about 81 at.% were produced by a gas-atomization technique. Powders of Fe81Si1.9B5.7P11.4 (at.%) alloy showed a good glass forming ability and exhibited unusual high saturation magnetic flux density of 1.57 T. The core-loss property at a frequency of 100 kHz for the compacted core made of the Fe81Si1.9B5.7P11.4 powder is evaluated to be less than 500 kW/m3 under a maximum induction of 100 mT. Moreover, good DC-superposition characteristic of the core was also confirmed. These results suggest that the present Fe-based alloy powder is promising for low-loss magnetic-core materials and expected to contribute in miniaturization of electric parts in the near future.

  5. Interferometric technique for the calibration of the helium gas jet spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, R. R.; Scott, W. R.; Ehrenfeuchter, P. A.

    An interferometric technique is described for making absolute measurements of the frequency spectrum of the stress waves produced in an Al cylinder by an He jet which is a candidate for calibration instrument for acoustic emission (AE) NDE. A stabilized heterodyne interferometer (SHI) is employed to measure the surface displacements in the face of the Al cylinder opposite the He jet. The measured waveforms were analyzed by Fourier transformations and stored for comparisons with previous findings by McBride (1976). The gas jet, although lacking the characteristics of a white broadband noise spectrum, was found to be reproducible. The spectrum was determined to be controlled by the Al cylinder, implying that alternate, tailored spectra that includes white noise could be obtained with an appropriate choice of materials.

  6. Techniques for the protection of gas-insulated substation to cable interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, N.; Croall, S.J.; Foty, S.M. )

    1988-10-01

    Line-to-ground faults in gas-insulated substations (GIS) generate fast nanosecond risetime transients which cause sparkovers across the insulated flange of high pressure oil filled cable/GIS interfaces. The ionized path formed by the sparkovers creates a low-impedance path for power frequency fault current, resulting in flange damage with potentially serious consequences. Various techniques for protecting the insulating flange from such damage are investigated and discussed, both in terms of new designs and in terms of retrofits for existing installations. In order to be effective, each protection scheme must adequately deal with the fast transients generated by breakdown in the GIS. As the frequencies of these transients are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than for ''conventional'' power system transients, special considerations are necessary in the protection scheme chosen.

  7. Modulation techniques and applications in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC).

    PubMed

    Pursch, Matthias; Sun, Kefu; Winniford, Bill; Cortes, Hernan; Weber, Andy; McCabe, Terry; Luong, Jim

    2002-07-01

    More than a decade after Phillips' first published work this article reviews recent developments in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC). Special attention is devoted to the further development and diversity of modulation devices. These include heated sweepers, cryofocused modulators, and a variety of diaphragm valve-switching strategies. It is demonstrated that all modulation approaches can be very well suited to GC x GC, depending on the particular application. Diaphragm-valve modulation is very powerful for volatile organic compounds. Slotted heater and cryofocused modulation are preferred for samples that contain non-volatile components. Applications ranging from petroleum to environmental and biological samples are illustrated. Extension of the technique to GC x GC-mass spectrometry (MS) is also discussed and trends for future research activity are pointed out. PMID:12172670

  8. Simulation Based on Negative ion pair Techniques of Electric propulsion In Satellite Mission Using Chlorine Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    R.Bakkiyaraj,Assistant professor,Government college of Engineering ,Bargur,Tamilnadu. *C.Sathiyavel, PG Student and Department of Aeronautical Engineering/Branch of Avionics, PSN college of Engineering and Technology,Tirunelveli,India. Abstract: Ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because of their stimulated of low propellant, Design of repulsive between negative ions with low electric power and high efficiency. A Negative ion pair of ion propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work .Negative Ion Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.ionization chamber 2. Repulsion force and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negatively gas are produced by attachment of the gas ,such as chlorine with electron emitted from a Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a cl- ion, it releases energy of 349 kJ/mol or 3.6 eV/atom. It is said to have an electron affinity of -349 kJ/mol ,the negative sign indicating that energy is released during this process .The distance between negative ions pair is important for the evaluation of the rocket thrust and is also determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. The mass flow rate of ions is related to the ion beam current. Accelerate the Negative ions to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction with a significantly intense grids and the exhaust of negative ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we have found that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with low electric power for simulating the ion propulsion rocket system

  9. Experimental technique for observing free oscillation of a spherical gas bubble in highly viscous liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Takehiro; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-01

    An experimental technique is developed to observe free oscillations of a spherical gas bubble in highly viscous liquids. It is demonstrated that focusing a nanosecond laser pulse of wavelength 532 nm and energy up to 1.5 mJ leads to the formation of a spherical gaseous bubble, not a vaporous bubble (quickly condensed back to the liquid), whose equilibrium radius is up to 200 microns in glycerin saturated with gases at room temperature. The subsequent free oscillations of the spherical gas bubble is visualized using a high-speed camera. Since the oscillation periods are short enough to ignore bubble translation under gravity and mass transfer out of the bubble, the observed bubble dynamics can be compared to nonlinear and linearized Reyleigh-Plesset-type calculations that account for heat conduction and acoustic radiation as well as the liquid viscosity. In this presentation, we report on the measurements with varying the viscosity and comparisons to the theory to quantify damping mechanisms in the bubble dynamics.

  10. Development of a technique for mercury speciation and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Barshick, C.M.; Britt, P.F.; Vance, M.A.; Duckworth, D.C.

    1997-07-01

    One element of concern to DOE is mercury. Mercury was used extensively at the DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee from 1950 to 1963 in the process of making lithium deuteride, a component of nuclear weapons. Although both the inorganic and organometallic forms of mercury are toxic to humans, the organic compounds are often more toxic. Since the toxicity of mercury is a function of its chemical form, an understanding of the interactions between commercially discharged mercury, naturally occurring mercury, and the environment in which they are present is vital. In this report, the authors have been investigating gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the analysis of both the organometallic and inorganic forms of mercury in the same environmental sample (e.g., solutions, soils, and sludges). Although gas chromatography is the classical technique for analyzing organic molecules, (e.g., organometallic compounds) little has been done on the analysis of inorganic compounds. In a previous publication, the authors described how a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber could be used to sample organomercurials from aqueous samples. An alkylation reaction was then carried out to transform chemically mercury nitrate into dimethylmercury; subsequent GC/MS analysis of this compound permitted quantification of the inorganic constituent. Subsequently, several different alkylation reagents have been synthesized that methylate any inorganic mercury compound to methylmercury iodide. Here, the authors report results on alkylation reaction time and the effect of pH on the population of the product.

  11. Technique for harvesting unicellular algae using colloidal gas aphrons. [Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, S.S.; Wallis, D.A.; Sebba, F.

    1983-01-01

    A novel technique using colloidal gas aphron (CGA) dispersions has been investigated for harvesting Chlorella vulgaris, a unicellular green algae, from dilute suspension. CGA are very small gas bubbles, on the order of 25 ..mu..m in diameter, that are each encapsulated in an aqueous shell of surfactant solution. The process is based on the technology of CGA flotation, which involves the formation of algae-bubble complexes and their subsequent flotation to the surface. At neutral pH, the efficiency of algae removal was maximized when a cationic surfactant (lauryl pyridinium chloride) was used for CGA generation. At pH 10, both the cationic and anionic (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) CGA dispersions yielded comparable removals. Addition of small quantities of alum (to 10/sup -4/M) improved removals using the cationic CGA, and at pH 10 this combination yielded the maximum removals that were achieved: 52.1% removal after a single application of CGA dispersion (1 to 1, dispersion to sample volume ratio), and 89.2% removal after an additional application. 12 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  12. Moomba Lower Daralingie Beds (LDB) gas storage project: Reservoir management using a novel numerical simulation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jamal, F.G.

    1994-12-31

    Engineers managing underground gas storage projects are often faced with challenges involving gas migration, inventory variance, gas quality and inventory-pressures. This paper discusses a unique underground gas storage project where sales gas and ethane are stored in two different but communicating regions of the same reservoir. A commercially available reservoir simulator was used to model the fluid flow behavior in this reservoir, hence, providing a tool for better management and use of the existing gas storage facilities.

  13. Micro-CT image-derived metrics quantify arterial wall distensibility reduction in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2000-04-01

    We developed methods to quantify arterial structural and mechanical properties in excised rat lungs and applied them to investigate the distensibility decrease accompanying chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Lungs of control and hypertensive (three weeks 11% O2) animals were excised and a contrast agent introduced before micro-CT imaging with a special purpose scanner. For each lung, four 3D image data sets were obtained, each at a different intra-arterial contrast agent pressure. Vessel segment diameters and lengths were measured at all levels in the arterial tree hierarchy, and these data used to generate features sensitive to distensibility changes. Results indicate that measurements obtained from 3D micro-CT images can be used to quantify vessel biomechanical properties in this rat model of pulmonary hypertension and that distensibility is reduced by exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mechanical properties can be assessed in a localized fashion and quantified in a spatially-resolved way or as a single parameter describing the tree as a whole. Micro-CT is a nondestructive way to rapidly assess structural and mechanical properties of arteries in small animal organs maintained in a physiological state. Quantitative features measured by this method may provide valuable insights into the mechanisms causing the elevated pressures in pulmonary hypertension of differing etiologies and should become increasingly valuable tools in the study of complex phenotypes in small-animal models of important diseases such as hypertension.

  14. Alternative Techniques for Injecting Massive Quantities of Gas for Plasma Disruption Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, Steven J; Caughman, John B; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Fehling, Dan T; Foust, Charles R; Jernigan, Thomas C; McGill, James M; Parks, P. B.; Rasmussen, David A

    2010-01-01

    Injection of massive quantities of noble gases or D2 has proven to be effective at mitigating some of the deleterious effects of disruptions in tokamaks. Two alternative methods that might offer some advantages over the present technique for massive gas injection are shattering massive pellets and employing closecoupled rupture disks. Laboratory testing has been carried out to evaluate their feasibility. For the study of massive pellets, a pipe gun pellet injector cooled with a cryogenic refrigerator was fitted with a relatively large barrel (16.5 mm bore), and D2 and Ne pellets were made and were accelerated to speeds of ~600 and 300 m/s, respectively. Based on the successful proof-of-principle testing with the injector and a special double-impact target to shatter pellets, a similar system has been prepared and installed on DIII-D, with preliminary experiments already carried out. To study the applicability of rupture disks for disruption mitigation, a simple test apparatus was assembled in the lab. Commercially available rupture disks of 1 in. nominal diameter were tested at conditions relevant for the application on tokamaks, including tests with Ar and He gases and rupture pressures of ~54 bar. Some technical and practical issues of implementing this technique on a tokamak are discussed.

  15. Monitoring the convergence and the stability of high-pressure gas storage cavities by echometric techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Denzau, H.; Erhardt, S.; Wierczeyco, E.

    1988-01-01

    To demonstrate the stability of high-pressure gas storage cavities and to monitor cavity convergence, a fully computerized echometric sonar technique was developed in the early eighties. Cavity surveys made by this technique at regular intervals in accordance with requirements imposed by mining authorities are necessary to monitor the stability of cavities as well as to predict cavity life and the effect of cavity convergence on the surface. Unlike conventional methods determining overall cavity closure, the new echometric sonar method allows the calculation of convergence as a function of depth by an intercomparison of data from different surveys. The first operation in the interpretation process is a numerical comparison of the data of vertical and horizontal cross-sections of two successive surveys. This operation will identify changes in the shape of a cavity which may occur if the cavity is leached in a steep-sloped salt dome. Following a verification of the computerized interpretation of the data, the volume of fall is calculated and cross-checked against the volume of rock deposited on the bottom of the cavity.

  16. Increased carotid intima-media thickness and reduced distensibility in human class III obesity: independent and differential influences of adiposity and blood pressure on the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Moore, Xiao L; Michell, Danielle; Lee, Sabrina; Skilton, Michael R; Nair, Rajesh; Dixon, John B; Dart, Anthony M; Chin-Dusting, Jaye

    2013-01-01

    Carotid intima-media-thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility), structural and functional properties of carotid arteries respectively, are early markers, as well as strong predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The characteristic of these two parameters in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) (Class III obesity), however, are largely unknown. The present study was designed to document cIMT and distensibility in this population and to relate these to other factors with established association with CVD in obesity. The study included 96 subjects (65 with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) and 31, age- and gender-matched, with BMI of 18.5 to 30.0 kg/m(2)). cIMT and distensibility were measured by non-invasive high resolution ultrasonography, circulatory CD133(+)/KDR(+) angiogenic cells and endothelial microparticles (EMP) by flow cytometry, and plasma levels of adipokines, growth factors and cytokines by Luminex immunoassay kits. The study results demonstrated increased cIMT (0.62±0.11 mm vs. 0.54±0.08 mm, P = 0.0002) and reduced distensibility (22.52±10.79 10(-3)kpa(-1)vs. 29.91±12.37 10(-3)kpa(-1), P<0.05) in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). Both cIMT and distensibility were significantly associated with traditional CVD risk factors, adiposity/adipokines and inflammatory markers but had no association with circulating angiogenic cells. We also demonstrated, for the first time, elevated plasma EMP levels in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). In conclusion, cIMT is increased and distensibility reduced in Class III obesity with the changes predominantly related to conventional CVD risk factors present in this condition, demonstrating that both cIMT and distensibility remain as CVD markers in Class III obesity. PMID:23342053

  17. Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Reduced Distensibility in Human Class III Obesity: Independent and Differential Influences of Adiposity and Blood Pressure on the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Xiao L.; Michell, Danielle; Lee, Sabrina; Skilton, Michael R.; Nair, Rajesh; Dixon, John B.; Dart, Anthony M.; Chin-Dusting, Jaye

    2013-01-01

    Carotid intima-media-thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility), structural and functional properties of carotid arteries respectively, are early markers, as well as strong predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The characteristic of these two parameters in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m2 (Class III obesity), however, are largely unknown. The present study was designed to document cIMT and distensibility in this population and to relate these to other factors with established association with CVD in obesity. The study included 96 subjects (65 with BMI>40.0 kg/m2 and 31, age- and gender-matched, with BMI of 18.5 to 30.0 kg/m2). cIMT and distensibility were measured by non-invasive high resolution ultrasonography, circulatory CD133+/KDR+ angiogenic cells and endothelial microparticles (EMP) by flow cytometry, and plasma levels of adipokines, growth factors and cytokines by Luminex immunoassay kits. The study results demonstrated increased cIMT (0.62±0.11 mm vs. 0.54±0.08 mm, P = 0.0002) and reduced distensibility (22.52±10.79 10−3kpa−1 vs. 29.91±12.37 10−3kpa−1, P<0.05) in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m2. Both cIMT and distensibility were significantly associated with traditional CVD risk factors, adiposity/adipokines and inflammatory markers but had no association with circulating angiogenic cells. We also demonstrated, for the first time, elevated plasma EMP levels in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m2. In conclusion, cIMT is increased and distensibility reduced in Class III obesity with the changes predominantly related to conventional CVD risk factors present in this condition, demonstrating that both cIMT and distensibility remain as CVD markers in Class III obesity. PMID:23342053

  18. Effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on colorectal distension-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Baskın, Veysel; Bilge, S. Sırrı; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Akyüz, Bahar; Ağrı, Arzu Erdal; Güzel, Hasan; İlkaya, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs effectiveness in colorectal distension (CRD)-induced visceral pain model. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague–Dawley (250–300 g) rats were anesthetized with ketamine (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) and chlorpromazine (25 mg/kg, i.p.). Two bipolar Teflon-coated Ni/Cr wire electrodes (80-M diameter) were placed in the abdominal external oblique muscle for the recording of electromyography. Jugular vein catheter was placed for the administration of drugs. CRD method was applied to evaluate of visceral pain. All drugs (paracetamol, meloxicam, metamizole, and dexketoprofen) administered intravenously. Results: Paracetamol 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg did not change the visceromotor response (VMR) when compare with the control group. Meloxicam 2 and 4 mg/kg showed no effect but at doses of 6 mg/kg meloxicam significantly ([51.9 ± 6.4%] [P < 0.001]) decreased VMR compared with the control group. Metamizole 200 mg/kg did not change responses but dose of 400 and 600 mg/kg metamizole reduced VMR. Dexketoprofen 2 and 4 mg/kg did not cause a change in VMR but 6 mg/kg dose significantly reduced response compared with the control group ([43.9 ± 3.9%, 36.8 ± 2.8%, 34.8 ± 2.5%, 42.1 ± 4.8%, 40.7 ± 3.5%, 36.4 ± 2.7%, and 26.1 ± 2.2%]; from 10 min to 70 min, respectively, [P < 0.05]). Conclusion: Metamizole, dexketoprofen and meloxicam show antinociceptive effect with different duration of action on CRD-induced visceral pain model. This condition can be explained due to different chemical structures and different mechanisms which play a role in modulation of pain. PMID:27114637

  19. Innovations in high-pressure liquid injection technique for gas chromatography: pressurized liquid injection system.

    PubMed

    Luong, Jim; Gras, Ronda; Tymko, Richard

    2003-01-01

    In gas chromatography (GC), highly volatile liquefied hydrocarbons are commonly injected using devices such as high-pressure syringes, piston valves, liquid rotary sampling valves, or vaporizing regulators. Although these techniques are adequate in some cases, there are known deficiencies. A new generation of sampling valve has been recently innovated and commercialized. Some of the highlights of the pressurized liquid injection system (PLIS) include compact size, the capability to directly couple to an injection port without the need for preinjection vaporization and transfer lines, and sample sizes ranging from 0.2 to 2.0 micro L. Although the valve has a specification of helium leak-free rating of 82.7 bar (1200 psig), the valve passes a hydrostatic pressure test of up to 414 bar (6000 psig). In the unheated version of PLIS, vaporization of solutes occur mainly because of the sheering effect of carrier gas in combination with thermal energy drawn from an injection port or a heated adaptor. This was found to be adequate for solutes with high to medium volatility of up to nC14 hydrocarbon. A higher molecular weight range of up to nC44 hydrocarbon can be achieved with the implementation of a heated version of PLIS, in which the channel of the shaft can be resistively heated at a rate of up to 400 degrees C/s. With its first introduction in May 2002, PLIS has gained acceptance amongst practitioners in GC because it addresses a key unarticulated need in sample introduction/enrichment and by specifically targeting many deficiencies encountered in contemporary high-pressure injection devices. In this paper, the design and performance of the various valve systems of PLIS, as well as industrial chromatographic applications, is presented. PMID:14629794

  20. Use of the gas-filled-magnet technique for particle identification at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.K.; Jiang, C.L.; Paul, M.

    1995-08-01

    Reaction studies of interest to astrophysics with radioactive ion beams will be done mainly in inverse reaction kinematics, i.e., heavy particles bombarding a hydrogen target. The low energy of the outgoing heavy reaction products makes particle identification with respect to mass and nuclear charge a major challenge. For the planned {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}) experiment one expects five different types of particles in the outgoing channels: {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O (from elastic scattering of {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O on {sup 12}C), {sup 15}O and {sup 15}N (from the {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O induced (p,{alpha}) reactions) and {sup 12}C recoils from the polypropylene target. While mass determination can be achieved easily by time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, a determination of the nuclear charge presents a challenge, especially if the energy of the particles is below 500 keV/u. We studied the gas-filled magnet technique for Z-identification of light ions between Z = 6-9. In a gas-filled magnet the particles move with an average charge state {bar q} which in one parameterization is given by {bar q} = Z ln(avZ{sup {alpha}})/ln(bZ{sup {beta}}) where Z is the nuclear charge of the ions and v their velocity. Introducing into the expression for the magnetic rigidity B{rho} = mv/{bar q} results in a Z dependence of B{rho} which is valid to very low velocities. As a magnet we used the Enge split-pole spectrograph which was filled with nitrogen gas at a pressure of 0.5 Torr. The particles were detected in the focal plane with a 50 x 10 cm{sup 2} parallel-grid-avalanche counter which measured TOF and magnetic rigidity. The mass and Z separation was tested with {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O beams at energies of about 600 keV/u and recoil particles ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 19}F. The Z-separation obtained at these energies was {triangle}Z/Z = 0.28 which is sufficient to separate individual elements for Z < 10.

  1. Determination of water in hydrogen chloride gas by a condensation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, E.; Herold, C.; Murray, D.; Thompson, S.R.

    1986-07-01

    The determination of trace amounts of water in gaseous hydrogen chloride has been of considerable interest to manufacturers of semiconductor materials. Many different methods have been postulated in the detection of water in hydrogen chloride, including Karl Fischer titrations, infrared spectrometric techniques, and gravimetric procedures using desiccants. Despite varying degrees of success at high-moisture concentration ranges, 1000 ppm (v/v) and up, these methods become tedious and unreliable for measuring water in hydrogen chloride in the 1-1000 ppm range. We have found a method for moisture in hydrogen chloride, analogous to dew point determinations used for inert gases, that is rapid and reproducible. A calibration curve of parts per million (v/v) water in hydrogen chloride vs. condensation temperature was constructed by dynamically blending a low part per million moisture balance nitrogen standard with dried hydrogen chloride gas. In addition, variation of the condensation temperature was monitored as the dried hydrogen chloride was diluted with dried gaseous nitrogen.

  2. Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mastalerz, Maria; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Rupp, John A

    2012-01-01

    Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (<2 nm) size distribution. Micropore and mesopore volumes correlate with organic matter content in the samples. Accessibility of pores in coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

  3. Structural, morphological and gas sensing study of palladium doped tin oxide nanoparticles synthesized via hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Davender; Kundu, Virender Singh; Maan, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this article pure and Pd-doped SnO2 (Pd:SnO2) nanoparticles with various mol% Pd have been synthesized by hydrothermal technique. To characterize the morphology, crystallinity, and structure of the SnO2 and Pd:SnO2 X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies were used. XRD analysis reveal that all nanoparticles of different doping concentration are highly polycrystalline in nature. Pd-doped SnO2 crystals existed mainly as tetragonal rutile structure. The particle size of the nanoparticles was calculated by using the Scherrer formula and was found in the range of 8-27 nm. The SEM images of the studied nanoparticles confirms the existence of very small, homogeneously distributed, spherical and extremely crystalline nanoparticles. EDX analysis confirms the presence of palladium. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study confirmed the formation of Sn-O phase and hydrous nature of the pure and Pd-doped SnO2 nanoparticles. The gas sensing response of SnO2 and Pd:SnO2 nanoparticles was studied towards different reducing gases at different operating temperatures. Among all samples under study, 0.20% Pd-doped SnO2 exhibits best response towards different gases. 0.20% Pd-doped SnO2 shows maximum response 88% to ethanol, 80% to CO and 78% to H2 at concentration of 100 ppm respectively at different operating temperature within the measurement limit.

  4. Rumen fermentation and degradability in buffalo and cattle using the in vitro gas production technique.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, S; Moniello, G; Piccolo, V; Bovera, F; Infascelli, F; Tudisco, R; Cutrignelli, M I

    2008-06-01

    An in vitro trial was conducted to investigate the effect of different inoculum sources (buffalo vs. cattle) on rumen fermentation and degradability. Incubations were carried out using rumen fluid obtained from buffalo or cattle fed the same diet [60% grass hay and 40% concentrate; 18 kg dry matter (DM)/day]. The fermentation kinetics of eight feeds commonly used in ruminant nutrition (alfalfa hay, barley meal, beet pulp, corn meal and silage, ryegrass hay and silage and soya bean meal s.e.) were studied with the in vitro gas production technique and rumen fermentation parameters (substrate disappearance, pH and volatile fatty acids production) were determined after 120 h of incubation. The linear relationship indicates that the microbial metabolic pathways of the two inocula for all the substrates were qualitatively similar, albeit often quantitatively different. In this in vitro study, a significant influence of rumen inoculum (buffalo vs. cow) on fermentation and degradability of the examined substrates was found. The differences in buffalo and cattle rumen fermentation can be explained with a different microbial activity of the two ruminant species, because of different amount of microbial population or microbial population constituted by different species of bacteria and protozoa. PMID:18477317

  5. Gas-phase thermal dissociation of uranium hexafluoride: Investigation by the technique of laser-powered homogeneous pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; McCulla, W.H.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1987-04-01

    In the gas-phase, uranium hexafluoride decomposes thermally in a quasi-unimolecular reaction to yield uranium pentafluoride and atomic fluorine. We have investigated this reaction using the relatively new technique of laser-powered homogeneous pyrolysis, in which a megawatt infrared laser is used to generate short pulses of high gas temperatures under strictly homogeneous conditions. In our investigation, SiF/sub 4/ is used as the sensitizer to absorb energy from a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser and to transfer this energy by collisions with the reactant gas. Ethyl chloride is used as an external standard ''thermometer'' gas to permit estimation of the unimolecular reaction rate constants by a relative rate approach. When UF/sub 6/ is the reactant, CF/sub 3/Cl is used as reagent to trap atomic fluorine reaction product, forming CF/sub 4/ as a stable indicator which is easily detected by infrared spectroscopy. Using these techniques, we estimate the UF/sub 6/ unimolecular reaction rate constant near the high-pressure limit. In the Appendix, we describe a computer program, written for the IBM PC, which predicts unimolecular rate constants based on the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory. Parameterization of the theoretical model is discussed, and recommendations are made for ''appropriate'' input parameters for use in predicting the gas-phase unimolecular reaction rate for UF/sub 6/ as a function of temperature and gas composition and total pressure. 85 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. A new technique to estimate volcanic gas composition: plume measurements with a portable multi-sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi

    2005-05-01

    A portable multi-sensor system was developed to measure volcanic plumes in order to estimate the chemical composition and temperature of volcanic gases. The multi-sensor system consists of a humidity-temperature sensor, SO 2 electrochemical sensor, CO 2 IR analyzer, pump and flow control units, pressure sensor, data logger, and batteries; the whole system is light (˜5 kg) and small enough to carry in a medium-size backpack. Volcanic plume is a mixture of atmosphere and volcanic gas; therefore volcanic gas composition and temperature can be estimated by subtracting the atmospheric gas background from the plume data. In order to obtain the contrasting data of the plume and the atmosphere, measurements were repeated in and out of the plume. The multi-sensor technique was applied to measure the plume of Tarumae, Tokachi, and Meakan volcanoes, Hokkaido, Japan. Repeated measurements at each volcano gave a consistent composition with ±10-30% errors, depending on the stability of the background atmospheric conditions. Fumarolic gas samples were also collected at the Tokachi volcano by a conventional method, and we found a good agreement (the difference <10%) between the composition estimated by the multi-sensor technique and conventional method. Those results demonstrated that concentration ratios of major volcanic gas species (i.e., H 2O, CO 2, and SO 2) and temperature can be estimated by the new technique without any complicated chemical analyses even for gases emitted from an inaccessible open vent. Estimation of a more detailed gas composition can be also achieved by the combination of alkaline filter techniques to measure Cl/F/S ratios in the plume and other sensors for H 2S and H 2.

  7. An extended proximal esophageal myotomy is necessary to normalize EGJ distensibility during Heller myotomy for achalasia, but not POEM

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, Ezra N.; Soper, Nathaniel J.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Boris, Lubomyr; Nicodème, Frédéric; Lin, Zhiyue; Hungness, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Background For laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM), the optimal myotomy length proximal to the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is unknown. In this study, we used a functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) to measure EGJ distensibility changes resulting from variable proximal myotomy lengths during LHM and peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM). Methods Distensibility index (DI) (defined as the minimum cross-sectional area at the EGJ divided by pressure) was measured with FLIP after each operative step. During LHM and POEM, each patient’s myotomy was performed in two stages: first, a myotomy ablating only the EGJ complex was created (EGJ-M), extending from 2cm proximal to the EGJ, to 3cm distal to it. Next, the myotomy was lengthened 4cm further cephalad to create an extended proximal myotomy (EP-M). Results Measurements were performed in 12 patients undergoing LHM and 19 undergoing POEM. LHM resulted in an overall increase in DI (1.6 ±1 vs. 6.3 ±3.4 mm2/mmHg, p<.001). Creation of an EGJ-M resulted in a small increase (1.6 to 2.3 mm2/mmHg, p<.01) and extension to an EP-M resulted in a larger increase (2.3 to 4.9 mm2/mmHg, p<.001). This effect was consistent, with 11 (92%) patients experiencing a larger increase after EP-M than after EGJ-M. Fundoplication resulted in a decrease in DI and deinsufflation an increase. POEM resulted in an increase in DI (1.3 ±1 vs. 9.2 ±3.9 mm2/mmHg, p<.001). Both creation of the submucosal tunnel and performing an EGJ-M increased DI, whereas lengthening of the myotomy to an EP-M had no additional effect. POEM resulted in a larger overall increase from baseline than LHM (7.9 ±3.5 vs. 4.7 ±3.3 mm2/mmHg, p<.05). Conclusions During LHM, an extended proximal myotomy was necessary to normalize distensibility, whereas during POEM, a myotomy confined to the EGJ complex was sufficient. In this cohort, POEM resulted in a larger overall increase in EGJ distensibility. PMID:24853854

  8. Study on Indirect Measuring Technology of EAF Steelmaking Decarburization Rate by Off-gas Analysis Technique in Hot State Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kai; Liu, Wenjuan; Zhu, Rong

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, measurement method of EAF Steelmaking decarburization rate is studied. Because of the fuel gas blown and air mixed, the composition of hot temperature off-gas is measurand unreally, and the flow rate is unknown too, the direct measurement of EAF decarburization rate by furnace gas analysis is unrealized. Firstly, the off-gas generation process is discussed. After that, dynamic concentration of CO2, CO, and O2 in off-gas and EAF oxygen supply rate are monitored in real time. Finally, the concentration and volume flow rate of off-gas are obtained to measure the EAF decarburization rate indirectly. The results of the hot state experiments show that the decarburization rate in oxidization step can reach up to about 0.53 mol/s, and the forecasting carbon concentration is 1.14% corresponding to the average carbon concentration (1.43%) in finial metal samples. The measurement of decarburization rate by off-gas analysis technique can be reasonable in EAF production process.

  9. Visualization and velocity measurement of unsteady flow in a gas generator using cold-flow technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppa, Subrahmanyam

    1990-08-01

    Modeling of internal flow fields with hot, compressible fluids and sometimes combustion using cold flow techniques is discussed. The flow in a gas generator was modeled using cold air. The experimental set up was designed and fabricated to simulate the unsteady flow with different configurations of inlet tubes. Tests were run for flow visualization and measurement of axial velocity at different frequencies ranging from 5 to 12 Hz. Flow visualization showed that the incoming flow was a complex jet flow confined to a cylindrical enclosure, while the outgoing flow resembled the venting of a pressurized vessel. The pictures show a complex flow pattern due to the angling of the jet towards the wall for the bent tube configurations and straightened flows with straight tube and other configurations with straighteners. Velocity measurements were made at an inlet Re of 8.1 x 10(exp 4) based on maximum velocity and inlet diameter. Phase averaged mean velocities were observed to be well defined during charging and diminished during venting inside the cylinder. For the straight tube inlet comparison with a steady flow measurement of sudden expansion flow showed a qualitative similarity of the mean axial velocity distribution and centerline velocity decay during the charging phases. For the bent tube inlet case the contour plots showed the flow tendency towards the wall. Two cells were seen in the contours for the 8 and 12 Hz cases. The deviation of the point of occurrence of maximum velocity in a radial profile was found to be about 6.5 degrees. Entrance velocity profiles showed symmetry for the straight tube inlet but were skewed for the bent tube inlet. Contour plots of the phase averaged axial turbulence intensity for bent tube cases showed higher values in the core and near the wall in the region of impingement. Axial turbulence intensity measured for the straight tube case showed features as observed in an axisymmetric sudden expansion flow.

  10. Chemometric Profile of Root Extracts of Rhodiola imbricata Edgew. with Hyphenated Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometric Technique

    PubMed Central

    Tayade, Amol B.; Dhar, Priyanka; Kumar, Jatinder; Sharma, Manu; Chauhan, Rajinder S.; Chaurasia, Om P.; Srivastava, Ravi B.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodiola imbricata Edgew. (Rose root or Arctic root or Golden root or Shrolo), belonging to the family Crassulaceae, is an important food crop and medicinal plant in the Indian trans-Himalayan cold desert. Chemometric profile of the n-hexane, chloroform, dichloroethane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and 60% ethanol root extracts of R. imbricata were performed by hyphenated gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique. GC/MS analysis was carried out using Thermo Finnigan PolarisQ Ion Trap GC/MS MS system comprising of an AS2000 liquid autosampler. Interpretation on mass spectrum of GC/MS was done using the NIST/EPA/NIH Mass Spectral Database, with NIST MS search program v.2.0g. Chemometric profile of root extracts revealed the presence of 63 phyto-chemotypes, among them, 1-pentacosanol; stigmast-5-en-3-ol, (3β,24S); 1-teracosanol; 1-henteracontanol; 17-pentatriacontene; 13-tetradecen-1-ol acetate; methyl tri-butyl ammonium chloride; bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate; 7,8-dimethylbenzocyclooctene; ethyl linoleate; 3-methoxy-5-methylphenol; hexadecanoic acid; camphor; 1,3-dimethoxybenzene; thujone; 1,3-benzenediol, 5-pentadecyl; benzenemethanol, 3-hydroxy, 5-methoxy; cholest-4-ene-3,6-dione; dodecanoic acid, 3-hydroxy; octadecane, 1-chloro; ethanone, 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl); α-tocopherol; ascaridole; campesterol; 1-dotriacontane; heptadecane, 9-hexyl were found to be present in major amount. Eventually, in the present study we have found phytosterols, terpenoids, fatty acids, fatty acid esters, alkyl halides, phenols, alcohols, ethers, alkanes, and alkenes as the major group of phyto-chemotypes in the different root extracts of R. imbricata. All these compounds identified by GC/MS analysis were further investigated for their biological activities and it was found that they possess a diverse range of positive pharmacological actions. In future, isolation of individual phyto-chemotypes and subjecting them to biological activity will definitely prove fruitful results in

  11. Levodopa acts centrally to induce an antinociceptive action against colonic distension through activation of D2 dopamine receptors and the orexinergic system in the brain in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2016-02-01

    Levodopa possesses antinociceptive actions against several somatic pain conditions. However, we do not know at this moment whether levodopa is also effective to visceral pain. The present study was therefore performed to clarify whether levodopa is effective to visceral pain and its mechanisms. Visceral sensation was evaluated by colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Subcutaneously (80 mg/rat) or intracisternally (2.5 μg/rat) administered levodopa significantly increased the threshold of colonic distension-induced AWR in conscious rats. The dose difference to induce the antinociceptive action suggests levodopa acts centrally to exert its antinociceptive action against colonic distension. While neither sulpiride, a D2 dopamine receptor antagonist, nor SCH23390, a D1 dopamine receptor antagonist by itself changed the threshold of colonic distension-induced AWR, the intracisternally injected levodopa-induced antinociceptive action was significantly blocked by pretreatment with subcutaneously administered sulpiride but not SCH23390. Treatment with intracisternal SB334867, an orexin 1 receptor antagonist, significantly blocked the subcutaneously administered levodopa-induced antinociceptive action. These results suggest that levodopa acts centrally to induce an antinociceptive action against colonic distension through activation of D2 dopamine receptors and the orexinergic system in the brain. PMID:26883457

  12. Direct Experimental Evaluation of the Grain Boundaries Gas Content in PWR fuels: New Insight and Perspective of the ADAGIO Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pontillon, Y.; Noirot, J.; Caillot, L.

    2007-07-01

    Over the last decades, many analytical experiments (in-pile and out-of-pile) have underlined the active role of the inter-granular gases on the global fuel transient behavior under accidental conditions such as RIA and/or LOCA. In parallel, the improvement of fission gas release modeling in nuclear fuel performance codes needs direct experimental determination/validation regarding the local gas distribution inside the fuel sample. In this context, an experimental program, called 'ADAGIO' (French acronym for Discriminating Analysis of Accumulation of Inter-granular and Occluded Gas), has been initiated through a joint action of CEA, EDF and AREVA NP in order to develop a new device/technique for quantitative and direct measurement of local fission gas distribution within an irradiated fuel pellet. ADAGIO technique is based on the fact that fission gas inventory (intra and inter-granular parts) can be distinguished by controlled fuel oxidation, since grain boundaries oxidize faster than the bulk. The purpose of the current paper is to present both the methodology and the associated results of the ADAGIO program performed at CEA. It has been divided into two main parts: (i) feasibility (UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels), (ii) application on high burn up UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

  13. Measurement techniques investigated for detection of hydrogen chloride gas in ambient air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nine basic techniques are discussed, ranging from concentration (parts per million) to dosage only (parts per million-seconds) measurement techniques. Data for each technique include lower detection limit, response time, instrument status, and in some cases, specificity. Several techniques discussed can detect ambient hydrogen chloride concentrations below 1 part per million with a response time of seconds.

  14. Pore Scale and Continuum Modeling for Gas Flow Pattern obtained by Multi-Scale Optical Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazik, D.; Samani, S.; Geistlinger, H.

    2008-12-01

    A multi-scale optical imaging technique was developed allowing for the 2D observation of two phase flow in porous media at two different scales simultaneously: Using two coupled camera systems a 2D flow cell (0.5 x 0.5 m²) is recorded entirely at the bench scale and at the pore scale with a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm and 0.01 mm respectively. The technique is applied to study channelized gas flow in saturated 0.5mm glass beads. We analyze the phase distribution at the pore scale and derive a pixel-based method for the measurement of saturation at the larger scale. Pore-Scale-Models: Both a grain-size- and flow rate-dependent transition are observed in the gas flow pattern. Standard quasi-static criteria do not explain the experimental results, since they do not take into account the competition between stabilizing friction forces and destabilizing capillary and gravitational forces. Conceptualizing the steady state tortuous gas flow as core-annular flow and applying Hagen-Poiseuille flow for a straight capillary, we propose a flow rate and grain-size-dependent stability criterion (coherence condition) that accounts for the experimental results. Continuum Scale Models: The main objective of this paper is to test the validity of the continuum approach for two-fluid flow for macroscopic homogeneous media. Using a reasonable log-normal distribution of capillary radii that led to a matrix potential that fits the experimental steady-state capillary pressure, the continuum model (TOUGH2) was able to describe the functional form of the dynamical gas volume, an integral flow property, as a function of the flow rate for the 0.5mm glass beads. On the other hand, the continuum model fails to describe the spatial-temporal distribution of the gas flow. For the first time, we were able to quantify the plateau-like gas distribution using optical tomography. This result is in strong contradiction to the Gaussian-like distribution obtained from the continuum model. Both

  15. Comparison of inert-gas-fusion and modified Kjeldahl techniques for determination of nitrogen in niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, E. J.; Graab, J. W.; Davis, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    This report compares results obtained for the determination of nitrogen in a selected group of niobium-base alloys by the inert-gas-fusion and the Kjeldahl procedures. In the inert-gas-fusion procedure the sample is heated to approximately 2700 C in a helium atmosphere in a single-use graphite crucible. A platinum flux is used to facilitate melting of the sample. The Kjeldahl method consisted of a rapid decomposition with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid, phosphoric acid, and potassium chromate; distillation in the presence of sodium hydroxide; and highly sensitive spectrophotometry with nitroprusside-catalyzed indophenol. In the 30- to 80-ppm range, the relative standard deviation was 5 to 7 percent for the inert-gas-fusion procedure and 2 to 8 percent for the Kjeldahl procedure. The agreement of the nitrogen results obtained by the two techniques is considered satisfactory.

  16. Correlation between the dielectric constant and porosity of nanoporous silica thin films deposited by the gas evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, J. J.; Ono, H.; Uchida, K.; Nozaki, S.; Morisaki, H.; Itoh, N.

    2001-11-01

    Nanoporous silica thin films with low dielectric constants were deposited by gas evaporation of SiO2 nanoparticles in an argon atmosphere. With increasing gas pressure during the evaporation, the dielectric constant decreases, while the porosity increases. The correlation between the dielectric constant and porosity is well modeled by a serial connection of two capacitors, one with air and the other with SiO2 as the dielectric medium. This suggests that the dielectric constant of the nanoporous silica thin film using the gas evaporation technique is more effectively lowered by forming "uniformly" distributed voids of closed gaps than those of the nanoporous silica films with pores extending from the back to front surface. Therefore, the former nanoporous silica thin film requires less porosity to obtain a low dielectric constant and is regarded as an ideal low-k material.

  17. Per-fluorinated sulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer studied by positron annihilation lifetime and gas permeation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Hamdy F. M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Ohira, A.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of gas permeation in per-fluorinated sulfonic acid/PTFE copolymer Fumapem® membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been investigated from the viewpoint of free volume. Three different samples, Fumapem® F-950, F-1050 and F-14100 membranes with ion exchange capacity (IEC) = 1.05, 0.95 and 0.71 meq/g, respectively were used after drying. Free volume was quantified using the positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) technique and gas permeabilities were measured for O2 and H2 as function of temperature. Good linear correlation between the logarithm of the permeabilities at different temperatures and reciprocal free volume indicate that gas permeation in dry Fumapem® is governed by the free volume. Nevertheless permeabilities are much smaller than the corresponding flexible chain polymer with a similar free volume size due to stiff chains of the perfluoroethylene backbone.

  18. Nitriding molybdenum: Effects of duration and fill gas pressure when using 100-Hz pulse DC discharge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; R., Ahmad; Shafiq, M.; Saleem, S.; S. Shah, M.; Hussain, T.; A. Khan, I.; K., Abbas; S. Abbas, M.

    2014-10-01

    Molybdenum is nitrided by a 100-Hz pulsed DC glow discharge technique for various time durations and fill gas pressures to study the effects on the surface properties of molybdenum. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used for the structural and morphological analysis of the nitrided layers. Vickers' microhardness tester is utilized to investigate surface microhardness. Phase analysis shows the formation of more molybdenum nitride molecules for longer nitriding durations at fill gas pressures of 2 mbar and 3 mbar (1 bar = 105 Pa). A considerable increase in surface microhardness (approximately by a factor of 2) is observed for longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar pressure. Longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar fill gas pressure favors the formation of homogeneous, smooth, hard layers by the incorporation of more nitrogen.

  19. Influence of gas microsensor mounting technique on its temperature time constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziarz, Wojciech; Pisarkiewicz, Tadeusz

    2006-10-01

    Metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors with modulated working temperature should reveal small thermal time constant in comparison to the time constants of chemical reactions between gas atmosphere and sensitive layer. In such case analyzed sensor response is dominated with specific phenomena originated from these reactions. A way the sensors are mounted has big influence on the sensor thermal time constants. In experiments authors used gas sensors with ceramic and micromachined silicon substrates glued to the case or suspended on thin wires. Although mechanical stability and durability of glued sensors are better, the lower power consumption and lower time constants are possible with sensors mounted using thin wires.

  20. New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned

  1. Simplified soil-gas sensing techniques for plume mapping and remediation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; Ostendorf, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Soil gas measurements were taken in a beach sand matrix of the unsaturated zone above a ground water plume contaminated from a spill near 35,000 gallons of aviation gasoline. The soil gas sampling and analysis strategy provided required information for mapping the plume and vertical profile measurements with a minimal expenditure of resources and work time. Analysis of a calibration gas and replicate sampling showed that the apparatus used gave reasonably correct soil gas contituent measurements. Boundaries of the plume were defined and a hot spot was located downgradient from the original spill location. Elevated carbon dioxide above the contaminated capillary fringe indicated microbial respiration activity. A biodegradation model developed from the vertical profile data predicted very low oxygen at the water table and little or no loss of hydrocarbon emissions to the atmosphere.

  2. A technique for administering xenon gas anesthesia during surgical procedures in mice.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Arne Mathias; Schmidt, Michaela; Ludiro, Alessia; Riva, Marco A; Gass, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Carrying out invasive procedures in animals requires the administration of anesthesia. Xenon gas offers advantages as an anesthetic agent compared with other agents, such as its protection of the brain and heart from hypoxia-induced damage. The high cost of xenon gas has limited its use as an anesthetic in animal experiments, however. The authors designed and constructed simple boxes for the induction and maintenance of xenon gas and isoflurane anesthesia in small rodents in order to minimize the amount of xenon gas that is wasted. While using their anesthesia delivery system to anesthetize pregnant mice undergoing caesarean sections, they measured the respiratory rates of the anesthetized mice, the survival of the pups and the percentages of oxygen and carbon dioxide within the system to confirm the system's safety. PMID:25333593

  3. Analysis of chemical signals in red fire ants by gas chromatography and pattern recognition techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The combination of gas chromatography and pattern recognition (GC/PR) analysis is a powerful tool for investigating complicated biological problems. Clustering, mapping, discriminant development, etc. are necessary to analyze realistically large chromatographic data sets and to seek meaningful relat...

  4. A Technique to Measure Energy Partitioning and Absolute Gas Pressures of Strombolian Explosions Using Doppler Radar at Erebus Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerst, A.; Hort, M.; Kyle, P. R.; Voege, M.

    2008-12-01

    In 2005/06 we deployed three 24GHz (K-Band) continuous wave Doppler radar instruments at the crater rim of Erebus volcano in Antarctica. At the time there was a ~40 m wide, ~1000°C hot convecting phonolite lava lake, which was the source of ~0-6 Strombolian gas bubble explosions per day. We measured the velocities of ~50 explosions using a sample rate of 1-15 Hz. Data were downloaded in real-time through a wireless network. The measurements provide new insights into the still largely unknown mechanism of Strombolian eruptions, and help improve existing eruption models. We present a technique for a quasi in-situ measurement of the absolute pressure inside an eruption gas bubble. Pressures were derived using a simple eruption model and measured high resolution bubble surface velocities during explosions. Additionally, this technique allows us to present a comprehensive energy budget of a volcanic explosion as a time series of all important energy terms (i.e. potential, kinetic, dissipative, infrasonic, surface, seismic and thermal energy output). The absolute gas pressure inside rising expanding gas bubbles rapidly drops from ~3-10 atm (at the time when the lake starts to bulge) to ~1 atm before the bubble bursts, which usually occurs at radii of ~15-20m. These pressures are significantly lower than previously assumed for such explosions. The according internal energy of the gas agrees well with the observed total energy output. The results show that large explosions released about 109 to 1010 J each (equivalent to about 200-2000 kg of TNT), at a peak discharge rate frequently exceeding 109 W (the power output of a typical nuclear power plant). This dynamic output is mainly controlled by the kinetic and potential energy of the exploding magma shell, while other energy types were found to be much smaller (with the exception of thermal energy). Remarkably, most explosions at Erebus show two distinct surface acceleration peaks separated by ~0.3 seconds. This suggests

  5. A simple technique for continuous measurement of time-variable gas transfer in surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Harvey, Judson W.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Tobias, Craig R.

    2009-01-01

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in streams, lakes, and rivers serve as the basis for estimating wholeecosystem rates for various biogeochemical processes. Rates of gas exchange between water and the atmosphere are important and error-prone components of these models. Here we present a simple and efficient modification of the SF6 gas tracer approach that can be used concurrently while collecting other dissolved gas samples for dissolved gas mass balance studies in streams. It consists of continuously metering SF6-saturated water directly into the stream at a low rate of flow. This approach has advantages over pulse injection of aqueous solutions or bubbling large amounts of SF6 into the stream. By adding the SF6 as a saturated solution, we minimize the possibility that other dissolved gas measurements are affected by sparging and/or bubble injecta. Because the SF6 is added continuously we have a record of changing gas transfer velocity (GTV) that is contemporaneous with the sampling of other nonconservative ambient dissolved gases. Over a single diel period, a 30% variation in GTV was observed in a second-order stream (Sugar Creek, Indiana, USA). The changing GTV could be attributed in part to changes in temperature and windspeed that occurred on hourly to diel timescales.

  6. A simple technique for continuous measurement of time-variable gas transfer in surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tobias, C.R.; Böhlke, J.K.; Harvey, J.W.; Busenberg, E.

    2009-01-01

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in streams, lakes, and rivers serve as the basis for estimating wholeecosystem rates for various biogeochemical processes. Rates of gas exchange between water and the atmosphere are important and error-prone components of these models. Here we present a simple and efficient modification of the SF6 gas tracer approach that can be used concurrently while collecting other dissolved gas samples for dissolved gas mass balance studies in streams. It consists of continuously metering SF 6-saturated water directly into the stream at a low rate of flow. This approach has advantages over pulse injection of aqueous solutions or bubbling large amounts of SF6 into the stream. By adding the SF 6 as a saturated solution, we minimize the possibility that other dissolved gas measurements are affected by sparging and/or bubble injecta. Because the SF6 is added continuously we have a record of changing gas transfer velocity (GTV) that is contemporaneous with the sampling of other nonconservative ambient dissolved gases. Over a single diel period, a 30% variation in GTV was observed in a second-order stream (Sugar Creek, Indiana, USA). The changing GTV could be attributed in part to changes in temperature and windspeed that occurred on hourly to diel timescales.

  7. Formation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in Ar and nitrogen gas atmosphere by using laser furnace technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Asai, N.; Kataura, H.; Achiba, Y.

    2007-07-01

    The formation of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by using laser vaporization technique in different ambient gas atmosphere was investigated. SWNTs were prepared with Rh/Pd (1.2/1.2 atom%)-carbon composite rod in Ar and nitrogen gas atmosphere, respectively. Raman spectra of raw carbon materials including SWNTs and photoluminescence mapping of dispersed SWNTs in a surfactant solution demonstrate that the diameter distribution of SWNTs prepared in Ar atmosphere is narrower than those obtained by using CVD technique (e.g. HiPco nanotube), even when the ambient temperature is as high as 1150 ?C. It was also found that nitrogen atmosphere gives wider diameter distribution of SWNTs than that obtained with Ar atmosphere. Furthermore, the relative yield of fullerenes (obtained as byproducts) is investigated by using HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) technique. It was found that the relative yield of higher fullerenes becomes lower, when nitrogen is used as an ambient gas atmosphere. Based on these experimental findings, a plausible formation mechanism of SWNTs is discussed.

  8. A novel ultrasound technique to study the biomechanics of the human esophagus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Torahiko; Kassab, Ghassan; Liu, Jianmin; Puckett, James L; Mittal, Rishi R; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2002-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to validate a novel ultrasound technique and to use it to study the circumferential stress-strain properties of the human esophagus in vivo. A manometric catheter equipped with a high-compliance bag and a high-frequency intraluminal ultrasonography probe was used to record esophageal pressure and images. Validation studies were performed in vitro followed by in vivo studies in healthy human subjects. Esophageal distensions were performed with either an isovolumic (5-20 ml of water) or with an isobaric (10-60 mmHg) technique. Sustained distension was also performed for 3 min in each subject. The circumferential wall stress and strain were calculated. In vitro studies indicate that the ultrasound technique can make measurements of the esophageal wall with an accuracy of 0.01 mm. The in vivo studies provide the necessary data to compute the Kirchhoff's stress, Green's strain, and Young's elastic modulus during esophageal distensions. The stress-strain relationship revealed a linear shape, the slope of which corresponds to the Young's modulus. During sustained distensions, we found dynamic changes of stress and strain during the period of distension. We describe and validate a novel ultrasound technique that allows measurement of biomechanical properties of the esophagus in vivo in humans. PMID:11960775

  9. Investigation into the determination of trimethylarsine in natural gas and its partitioning into gas and condensate phases using (cryotrapping)/gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and liquid/solid sorption techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, E. M.; Johnson, C.; Rechsteiner, C.; Moir, M.; Leong, D.; Feldmann, J.

    2007-09-01

    Speciation of trialkylated arsenic compunds in natural gas, pressurized and stable condensate samples from the same gas well was performed using (Cryotrapping) Gas Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The major species in all phases investigated was found to be trimethylarsine with a highest concentration of 17.8 ng/L (As) in the gas phase and 33.2 μg/L (As) in the stable condensate phase. The highest amount of trimethylarsine (121 μg/L (As)) was found in the pressurized condensate, along with trace amounts of non-identified higher alkylated arsines. Volatile arsenic species in natural gas and its related products cause concern with regards to environment, safety, occupational health and gas processing. Therefore, interest lies in a fast and simple field method for the determination of volatile arsenicals. Here, we use simple liquid and solid sorption techniques, namely absorption in silver nitrate solution and adsorption on silver nitrate impregnated silica gel tubes followed by total arsenic determination as a promising tool for field monitoring of volatile arsenicals in natural gas and gas condensates. Preliminary results obtained for the sorption-based methods show that around 70% of the arsenic is determined with these methods in comparison to volatile arsenic determination using GC-ICP-MS. Furthermore, an inter-laboratory- and inter-method comparison was performed using silver nitrate impregnated silica tubes on 14 different gas samples with concentrations varying from below 1 to 1000 μg As/m 3 natural gas. The results obtained from the two laboratories differ in a range of 10 to 60%, but agree within the order of magnitude, which is satisfactory for our purposes.

  10. Measuring Humidity in Methane and Natural Gas with a Microwave Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavioso, R. M.; Madonna Ripa, D.; Benyon, R.; Gallegos, J. G.; Perez-Sanz, F.; Corbellini, S.; Avila, S.; Benito, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    The results of microwave measurements with a quasi-spherical resonator in humid methane samples realized under laboratory conditions at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM) and under industrial conditions in a natural gas sample made available at the facilities of the Technical Manager of the Spanish Gas System and main supplier of natural gas in Spain (ENAGAS) are reported. Measurements at INRiM included vapor phase and condensation tests on methane samples prepared with amount fractions of water between 600 ppm and 5000 ppm at temperatures between 273 K and 295 K and pressures between 150 kPa and 1 MPa. ENAGAS measurements were performed at ambient temperature, 750 kPa on natural gas sampled from the pipeline and successively humidified at amount fractions of water between 140 ppm and 250 ppm for completeness of the comparison with several humidity sensors and instrumentation based on different technologies. To enhance the sensitivity of the microwave method at low humidity, an experimental procedure based on the relative comparison of the dielectric permittivity of the humid gas sample before and after being subject to a chemical drying process was conceived and implemented. The uncertainty budget and the final sensitivity of this procedure are discussed.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Frantz; K.E. Brown

    2003-02-01

    There are four primary goals of contract DE-FG26-99FT40703: (1) We seek to better understand how and why two damage mechanisms--(1) inorganic precipitants, and (2) hydrocarbons and organic residues, occur at the reservoir/wellbore interface in gas storage wells. (2) We plan on testing potential prevention and remediation strategies related to these two damage mechanisms in the laboratory. (3) We expect to demonstrate in the field, cost-effective prevention and remediation strategies that laboratory testing deems viable. (4) We will investigate new technology for the gas storage industry that will provide operators with a cost effective method to reduce non-darcy turbulent flow effects on flow rate. For the above damage mechanisms, our research efforts will demonstrate the diagnostic technique for determining the damage mechanisms associated with lost deliverability as well as demonstrate and evaluate the remedial techniques in the laboratory setting and in actual gas storage reservoirs. We plan on accomplishing the above goals by performing extensive lab analyses of rotary sidewall cores taken from at least two wells, testing potential remediation strategies in the lab, and demonstrating in the field the applicability of the proposed remediation treatments. The benefits from this work will be quantified from this study and extrapolated to the entire storage industry. The technology and project results will be transferred to the industry through DOE dissemination and through the industry service companies that work on gas storage wells. Achieving these goals will enable the underground gas storage industry to more cost-effectively mitigate declining deliverability in their storage fields. Work completed to date includes the following: (1) Solicited potential participants from the gas storage industry; (2) Selected one participant experiencing damage from inorganic precipitates; (3) Developed laboratory testing procedures; (4) Collected cores from National Fuel Gas

  12. Removal of H2S from gas stream using combined plasma photolysis technique at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Xia, Lanyan; Ge, Xiaoxue; Jing, Hengye; Dong, Wenbo; Hou, Huiqi

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, H(2)S in gas stream was successfully decomposed at atmospheric pressure by dielectric barrier discharge plasma and VUV-UV radiation from a combined plasma photolysis reactor (CDBD). In comparison with DBD, CDBD enhanced H(2)S removal efficiency significantly at the same applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency was determined as a function of Kr pressure, applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration, and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency could reach as high as 93% at inlet H(2)S concentration of 27.1 mg m(-3), residence time of 0.4 s, and applied voltage of 7.5 kV. The main products were discerned as H(2)O and SO(4)(2-) based on FTIR and IC analysis. PMID:22436586

  13. Development and trial of microwave techniques for measurement of multiphase flow of oil, water and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, S.L.; Cutmore, N.G.; Roach, G.J.; Watt, J.S.; Zastawny, H.W.; McEwan, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    A prototype microwave and gamma-ray MFM has been developed for measurement of oil, water and gas flowrates on production pipelines and has been successfully trialed at the Thevenard island oil production facility. The microwave and gamma-ray MFM determined the oil and water flow rates with errors of 5.4 and 5.9% relative respectively for the wide range of wells and flow conditions during the trial period. A prototype non-intrusive microwave MFM is being developed for measurement of oil, water and gas flow rates on production pipelines. The microwave MFM will be trialed on the West Kingfish platform in Bass Strait in late 1994.

  14. Application of Condition-Based Monitoring Techniques for Remote Monitoring of a Simulated Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, David A; Henkel, James J; Whitaker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents research into the adaptation of monitoring techniques from maintainability and reliability (M&R) engineering for remote unattended monitoring of gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) for international safeguards. Two categories of techniques are discussed: the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for diagnostic monitoring, and sequential Monte Carlo (SMC or, more commonly, particle filtering ) for prognostic monitoring. Development and testing of the application of condition-based monitoring (CBM) techniques was performed on the Oak Ridge Mock Feed and Withdrawal (F&W) facility as a proof of principle. CBM techniques have been extensively developed for M&R assessment of physical processes, such as manufacturing and power plants. These techniques are normally used to locate and diagnose the effects of mechanical degradation of equipment to aid in planning of maintenance and repair cycles. In a safeguards environment, however, the goal is not to identify mechanical deterioration, but to detect and diagnose (and potentially predict) attempts to circumvent normal, declared facility operations, such as through protracted diversion of enriched material. The CBM techniques are first explained from the traditional perspective of maintenance and reliability engineering. The adaptation of CBM techniques to inspector monitoring is then discussed, focusing on the unique challenges of decision-based effects rather than equipment degradation effects. These techniques are then applied to the Oak Ridge Mock F&W facility a water-based physical simulation of a material feed and withdrawal process used at enrichment plants that is used to develop and test online monitoring techniques for fully information-driven safeguards of GCEPs. Advantages and limitations of the CBM approach to online monitoring are discussed, as well as the potential challenges of adapting CBM concepts to safeguards applications.

  15. Estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water treatment ponds in Uintah Basin oil and gas field using modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H.; Mansfield, M. L.; Lyman, S. N.; O'Neil, T.; Jones, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions from produced-water treatment ponds are poorly characterized sources in oil and gas emission inventories that play a critical role in studying elevated winter ozone events in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S. Information gaps include un-quantified amounts and compositions of gases emitted from these facilities. The emitted gases are often known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which, beside nitrogen oxides (NOX), are major precursors for ozone formation in the near-surface layer. Field measurement campaigns using the flux-chamber technique have been performed to measure VOC emissions from a limited number of produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah. Although the flux chamber provides accurate measurements at the point of sampling, it covers just a limited area of the ponds and is prone to altering environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure). This fact raises the need to validate flux chamber measurements. In this study, we apply an inverse-dispersion modeling technique with evacuated canister sampling to validate the flux-chamber measurements. This modeling technique applies an initial and arbitrary emission rate to estimate pollutant concentrations at pre-defined receptors, and adjusts the emission rate until the estimated pollutant concentrations approximates measured concentrations at the receptors. The derived emission rates are then compared with flux-chamber measurements and differences are analyzed. Additionally, we investigate the applicability of the WATER9 wastewater emission model for the estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water ponds in the Uintah Basin. WATER9 estimates the emission of each gas based on properties of the gas, its concentration in the waste water, and the characteristics of the influent and treatment units. Results of VOC emission estimations using inverse-dispersion and WATER9 modeling techniques will be reported.

  16. Investigation Of A Mercury Speciation Technique For Flue Gas Desulfurization Materials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to bene...

  17. Velocity field measurement in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with use of PIV and neutron radiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Mishima, K; Tobita, Y; Suzuki, T; Matsubayashi, M

    2004-10-01

    To establish reasonable safety concepts for the realization of commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactors, it is indispensable to demonstrate that the release of excessive energy due to re-criticality of molten core could be prevented even if a severe core damage accident took place. Two-phase flow due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture in the molten core pool has a larger liquid-to-gas density ratio and higher surface tension in comparison with those of ordinary two-phase flows such as air-water flow. In this study, to investigate the effect of the recirculation flow on the bubble behavior, visualization and measurement of nitrogen gas-molten lead bismuth in a rectangular tank was performed by using neutron radiography and particle image velocimetry techniques. Measured flow parameters include flow regime, two-dimensional void distribution, and liquid velocity field in the tank. The present technique is applicable to the measurement of velocity fields and void fraction, and the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. PMID:15246418

  18. Coating integrity survey using DC voltage gradient technique at Korea Gas Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.B.; Park, K.W.; Jeon, K.S.; Song, H.S.; Won, D.S.; Lee, S.M.; Kho, Y.T.

    1996-12-31

    The reliability and applicability of various coating defect detecting techniques are investigated utilizing mock pipe. It is shown that both close interval potential survey and dc voltage gradient methods are impertinent as field techniques: They require considerable cathodic polarization in order to effectively locate the coating defects. DC voltage gradient with current interruption technique is recommended as a viable field method in that it is able to precisely locate the defects irrespective of CP condition. Utilizing the method field survey was undertaken for the KGC`s pipeline of 120 km and 106 assumed defects were located.

  19. A new technique for measuring gas conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters was developed. It was applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for hydrocarbon gases. The values of conversion factors for two common hydrocarbons measured using this technique are in good agreement with the empirical values cited by the manufacturer. Similar agreements can be expected for all other hydrocarbons. The technique is based on Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion product gases with that in normal air. It is simple, quick and relatively safe--particularly for toxic/poisonous hydrocarbons.

  20. Yb-doped large-mode-area laser fiber fabricated by halide-gas-phase-doping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Kun; Wang, Yuying; Ni, Li; Wang, Zhen; Gao, Cong; Zhan, Huan; Wang, Jianjun; Jing, Feng; Lin, Aoxiang

    2015-06-01

    In this manuscript, we designed a rare-earth-halide gas-phase-doping setup to fabricate a large-mode-area fiber for high power laser applications. YbCl3 and AlCl3 halides are evaporated, carried respectively and finally mixed with usual host gas material SiCl4 at the hot zone of MCVD system. Owing to the all-gas-phasing reaction process and environment, the home-made Yb-doped fiber preform has a homogeneous large core and modulated refractive index profile to keep high beam quality. The drawn fiber core has a small numerical aperture of 0.07 and high Yb concentration of 9500 ppm. By using a master oscillator power amplifier system, nearly kW-level (951 W) laser output power was obtained with a slope efficiency of 83.3% at 1063.8 nm, indicating the competition and potential of the halide-gas-phase-doping technique for high power laser fiber fabrication.

  1. Estimating fermentation characteristics and nutritive value of ensiled and dried pomegranate seeds for ruminants using in vitro gas production technique

    PubMed Central

    Taher-Maddah, M.; Maheri-Sis, N.; Salamatdoustnobar, R.; Ahmadzadeh, A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition and estimation of fermentation characteristics and nutritive value of ensiled and dried pomegranate seeds using in vitro gas production technique. Samples were collected, mixed, processed (ensiled and dried) and incubated in vitro with rumen liquor taken from three fistulated Iranian native (Taleshi) steers at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 h. The results showed that ensiling lead to significant increase in gas production of pomegranate seeds at all incubation times. The gas volume at 24 h incubation, were 25.76 and 17.91 ml/200mg DM for ensiled and dried pomegranate seeds, respectively. The gas production rate (c) also was significantly higher for ensiled groups than dried (0.0930 vs. 0.0643 ml/h). The organic matter digestibility (OMD), metabolizable energy (ME), net energy for lactation (NEL) and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) of ensiled pomegranate seeds were significantly higher than that of dried samples (43.15%, 6.37 MJ/kg DM, 4.43 MJ/kg DM, 0.5553 mmol for ensiled samples vs. 34.62%, 5.10 MJ/kg DM, 3.56 MJ/kg DM, 0.3680 mmol for dried samples, respectively). It can be concluded that ensiling increases the nutritive value of pomegranate seeds. PMID:26623290

  2. A transient liquid crystal thermography technique for gas turbine heat transfer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekkad, Srinath V.; Han, Je-Chin

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents in detail the transient liquid crystal technique for convective heat transfer measurements. A historical perspective on the active development of liquid crystal techniques for convective heat transfer measurement is also presented. The experimental technique involves using a thermochromic liquid crystal coating on the test surface. The colour change time of the coating at every pixel location on the heat transfer surface during a transient test is measured using an image processing system. The heat transfer coefficients are calculated from the measured time responses of these thermochromic coatings. This technique has been used for turbine blade internal coolant passage heat transfer measurements as well as turbine blade film cooling heat transfer measurements. Results can be obtained on complex geometry surfaces if visually accessible. Some heat transfer results for experiments with jet impingement, internal cooling channels with ribs, flow over simulated TBC spallation, flat plate film cooling, cylindrical leading edge and turbine blade film cooling are presented for demonstration.

  3. Laser Frequency Stabilization for Coherent Lidar Applications using Novel All-Fiber Gas Reference Cell Fabrication Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meras, Patrick, Jr.; Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Chang, Daniel H.; Levin, Jason; Spiers, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Compact hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF)gas frequency reference cell was constructed using a novel packaging technique that relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to a mechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers. The use of this gas cell for laser frequency stabilization was demonstrated by locking a tunable diode laser to the center of the P9 line from the (nu)1+(nu)3 band of acetylene with RMS frequency error of 2.06 MHz over 2 hours. This effort was performed in support of a task to miniaturize the laser frequency stabilization subsystem of JPL/LMCT Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS) instrument.

  4. Synthesis and size control of luminescent ZnSe nanocrystals by a microemulsion-gas contacting technique.

    PubMed

    Karanikolos, Georgios N; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Itskos, Grigorios; Petrou, Athos; Mountziaris, T J

    2004-02-01

    A scalable method for controlled synthesis of luminescent compound semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) using microemulsion-gas contacting at room temperature is reported. The technique exploits the dispersed phase of a microemulsion to form numerous identical nanoreactors. ZnSe quantum dots were synthesized by reacting hydrogen selenide gas with diethylzinc dissolved in the heptane nanodroplets of a microemulsion formed by self-assembly of a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) amphiphilic block copolymer in formamide. A single nanocrystal is grown in each nanodroplet, thus allowing good control of particle size by manipulation of the initial diethylzinc concentration in the heptane. The ZnSe nanocrystals exhibit size-dependent luminescence and excellent photostability. PMID:15773072

  5. Chemical composition and the nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (in situ degradation and in vitro gas production techniques)

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshizadeh, Somayeh; Taghizadeh, Akbar; Janmohammadi, Hossein; Alijani, Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    The nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (PE) was evaluated by in situ and in vitro techniques. Chemical analysis indicated that PE was high in crude protein (11.30%) and low in neutral detergent fiber (26.20%). Total phenols, total tannins, condensed tannins and hydrolysable tannins contents in PE were 8.29%, 4.48%, 0.49% and 3.79%, respectively. Ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation after 48 hr incubation were 75.21% and 82.52%, respectively. The gas production volume at 48 hr for PE was 122.47 mL g-1DM. As a whole, adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) to PE increased (p < 0.05) gas production volumes, organic matter digestibility and the metabolizable energy that illustrated inhibitory effect of phenolics on rumen microbial fermentation and the positive influence of PEG on digestion PE. The results showed that PE possessed potentials to being used as feed supplements. PMID:25568691

  6. Solid phase micro extraction - A new technique coupled with gas chromatograph for chloroethene analysis from aqueous samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, N.; Sewell, G.W.

    1996-10-01

    Once the chloroethenes (tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene) contamination occurs in the subsurface environment, they tend to retain and form a Pollution plum in the aquifer because of their recalcitrance to aerobic oxidation. Currently, the most promising bioremediation method for chlorinated compounds is through anaerobic reductive biotransformation, in which each chlorine is replaced by a hydrogen. To study the biodegradation process, it is essential to monitor tetrachloroethene and its degradation daughter products frequently. An analytical method has been modified for chloroethene analysis by gas chromatography. Solid Phase Micro Extraction technique has been used to extract aqueous sample onto a fiber and then to desorb the sample directly into a gas chromatograph injection port. The total run time is less than 17 minutes.

  7. Planar Zeolite Film-Based Potentiometric Gas Sensors Manufactured by a Combined Thick-Film and Electroplating Technique

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Isabella; Reiß, Sebastian; Hagen, Gunter; Moos, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Zeolites are promising materials in the field of gas sensors. In this technology-oriented paper, a planar setup for potentiometric hydrocarbon and hydrogen gas sensors using zeolites as ionic sodium conductors is presented, in which the Pt-loaded Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is applied using a thick-film technique between two interdigitated gold electrodes and one of them is selectively covered for the first time by an electroplated chromium oxide film. The influence of the sensor temperature, the type of hydrocarbons, the zeolite film thickness, and the chromium oxide film thickness is investigated. The influence of the zeolite on the sensor response is briefly discussed in the light of studies dealing with zeolites as selectivity-enhancing cover layers. PMID:22164042

  8. Measuring fuel contamination using high speed gas chromatography and cone penetration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, S.P.; Bratton, W.L.; Akard, M.L.

    1995-10-01

    Decision processes during characterization and cleanup of hazardous waste sites are greatly retarded by the turnaround time and expense incurred through the use of conventional sampling and laboratory analyses. Furthermore, conventional soil and groundwater sampling procedures present many opportunities for loss of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by exposing sample media to the atmosphere during transfers between and among sampling devices and containers. While on-site analysis by conventional gas chromatography can reduce analytical turnaround time, time-consuming sample preparation procedures are still often required, and the potential for loss of VOC is not reduced. This report describes the development of a high speed gas chromatography and cone penetration testing system which can detect and measure subsurface fuel contamination in situ during the cone penetration process.

  9. multiplex gas chromatography: A novel analytical technique for future planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.; Carle, G. C.; Phillips, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Determination of molecular species comprised of the biogenic elements in the atmospheres of planets and moons of the solar system is one the foremost requirements of the exobiologist studying chemical evolution and the origin of life. Multiplex chromatography is a technique where many samples are pseudo-randomly introduced to the chromatograph without regard to elution of preceding components. The resulting data are then reduced using mathematical techniques such as cross correlation or Fourier Transforms. To demonstrate the utility of this technique for future solar system exploration, chemical modulators were developed. Several advantages were realized from this technique in combination with these modulators: improvement in detection limits of several orders of magnitude, improvement in the analysis of complex mixtures by selectively modulating some of the components present in the sample, increase in the number of analyses that can be conducted in a given period of time, and reduction in the amount of expendables needed to run an analysis. In order to apply this technique in a real application, methane in ambient air was monitored continuously over a period of one week. By using ambient air as its own carrier all expendables beyond power were eliminated.

  10. Application of capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry/computer techniques to synoptic survey of organic material in bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Pereira, W.E.; Johnson, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A bed sediment sample taken from an area impacted by heavy industrial activity was analyzed for organic compounds of environmental significance. Extraction was effected on a Soxhlet apparatus using a freeze-dried sample. The Soxhlet extract was fractionated by silica gel micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic compounds was accomplished by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. More than 50 compounds were identified; these include saturated hydrocarbons, olefins, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as aldehydes and ketones. The role of bed sediments as a source or sink for organic pollutants is discussed. ?? 1981.

  11. The German collaborative project SUGAR Utilization of a natural treasure - Developing innovative techniques for the exploration and production of natural gas from hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeckel, M.; Bialas, J.; Wallmann, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrates occur in nature at all active and passive continental margins as well as in permafrost regions, and vast amounts of natural gas are bound in those deposits. Geologists estimate that twice as much carbon is bound in gas hydrates than in any other fossil fuel reservoir, such as gas, oil and coal. Hence, natural gas hydrates represent a huge potential energy resource that, in addition, could be utilized in a CO2-neutral and therefore environmentally friendly manner. However, the utilization of this natural treasure is not as easy as the conventional production of oil or natural gas and calls for new and innovative techniques. In the framework of the large-scale collaborative research project SUGAR (Submarine Deposits of Gas Hydrates - Exploration, Production and Transportation), we aim to produce gas from methane hydrates and to sequester carbon dioxide from power plants and other industrial sources as CO2 hydrates in the same host sediments. Thus, the SUGAR project addresses two of the most pressing and challenging topics of our time: development of alternative energy strategies and greenhouse gas mitigation techniques. The SUGAR project is funded by two federal German ministries and the German industry for an initial period of three years. In the framework of this project new technologies starting from gas hydrate exploration techniques over drilling technologies and innovative gas production methods to CO2 storage in gas hydrates and gas transportation technologies will be developed and tested. Beside the performance of experiments, numerical simulation studies will generate data regarding the methane production and CO2 sequestration in the natural environment. Reservoir modelling with respect to gas hydrate formation and development of migration pathways complete the project. This contribution will give detailed information about the planned project parts and first results with focus on the production methods.

  12. Investigation of 2D-Trace Gas Field Reconstruction Techniques From Tomographic AMAX-DOAS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laepple, T.; Heue, K.; Friedeburg, C. V.; Wang, P.; Knab, V.; Pundt, I.

    2002-12-01

    Tomographic-Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectroscopy (Tom-DOAS) is a new application of the DOAS method designed to measure 2-3-dimensional concentration fields of different trace gases (e.g. NO2, HCHO, Ozone) in the troposphere. Numerical reconstruction techniques are used to obtain spatially resolved data from the slant column densities provided by DOAS instruments. We discuss the detection of emission plumes by AMAX (Airborne Multi AXis) DOAS Systems which measure sunlight by telescopes pointing in different directions. 2D distributions are reconstructed from slant columns by using airmass factor matrices and inversion techniques. We discuss possibilities and limitations of this technique gained with the use of simulated test fields. Therefore the effect of the parameter choice (e.g. flight track, algorithm changes) and measurement errors is investigated. Further, first results from the Partenavia aircraft measurements over Milano (Italy) during the European FORMAT campaign will be presented.

  13. A Remote Sensing Technique For Combustion Gas Temperature Measurement In Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charagundla, S. R.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    A remote sensing technique, based on the principles of emission spectroscopy, is being developed for temperature measurements in black liquor recovery boilers. Several tests have been carried out, both in the laboratory and at a number of recovery boilers, to characterize the emission spectra in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 800 nm. These tests have pointed out the potential for temperature measurements using the line intensity ratio technique based on a pair of emission lines at 404.4 nm and 766.5 nm observed in the recovery boiler combustion zone; these emission lines are due to potassium, a common constituent found in all the black liquors. Accordingly, a fiber optics based four-color system has been developed. This in-situ, nonintrusive temperature measurement technique, together with some of the more recent results, is described in this paper.

  14. Optical diagnostics of gas-dynamic flows using advanced laser measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence to probe nitrogen flows seeded with small amounts of nitric oxide, simultaneous measurements of all three thermodynamic scalar quantities temperature, density, and pressure, were demonstrated in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. Instrumental uncertainty is 1% for temperature and 2% for density and pressure, making the techniques suitable for measurements of turbulent fluctuations. This technology is currently being transferred to an experimental program designed to use these optical techniques in conjunction with traditional methods to make measurements in turbulent flowfields that were not possible before. A detailed descritpion of the research progress and pertinent results are presented.

  15. Estimation of gas permeability of a zeolite membrane, based on a molecular simulation technique and permeation model

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigejirou; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Yamaguchi, Takeo; Nakao, Shinichi

    2000-03-09

    A method for estimating gas permeability through a zeolite membrane, using a molecular simulation technique and a theoretical permeation model, is presented. The estimate of permeability is derived from a combination of an absorption isotherm and self-diffusion coefficient based on the adsorption-diffusion model. The adsorption isotherm and self-diffusion coefficients needed for the estimation were calculated using conventional Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated self-diffusion coefficient was converted to the mutual diffusion coefficient and the permeability estimated using the Fickian equation. The method was applied to the prediction of permeabilities of methane and ethylene in silicalite at 301 K. Calculated permeabilities were larger than the experimental values by more than an order of magnitude. However, the anisotropic permeability was consistent with the experimental data and the results obtained using a grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics technique (Pohl et al., Mol.Phys. 1996, 89(6), 1725--1731).

  16. A Gas Dynamics Method Based on The Spectral Deferred Corrections (SDC) Time Integration Technique and The Piecewise Parabolic Method (PPM)

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Y. Kadioglu

    2011-12-01

    We present a computational gas dynamics method based on the Spectral Deferred Corrections (SDC) time integration technique and the Piecewise Parabolic Method (PPM) finite volume method. The PPM framework is used to define edge averaged quantities which are then used to evaluate numerical flux functions. The SDC technique is used to integrate solution in time. This kind of approach was first taken by Anita et al in [17]. However, [17] is problematic when it is implemented to certain shock problems. Here we propose significant improvements to [17]. The method is fourth order (both in space and time) for smooth flows, and provides highly resolved discontinuous solutions. We tested the method by solving variety of problems. Results indicate that the fourth order of accuracy in both space and time has been achieved when the flow is smooth. Results also demonstrate the shock capturing ability of the method.

  17. Viability of Applying Curie Point Pyrolysis/Gas Chromatography Techniques for Characterization of Ammonium Perchlorate Based Propellants

    SciTech Connect

    BARNETT, JAMES L.; MONTOYA, BERTHA M.

    2002-07-01

    Curie Point pyrolysis-gas chromatography was investigated for use as a tool for characterization of aged ammonium perchlorate based composite propellants (1). Successful application of the technique will support the surveillance program for the Explosives Materials and Subsystems Department (1). Propellant samples were prepared by separating the propellant into reacted (oxidated) and unreacted zones. The experimental design included the determination of system reliability followed by, reproducibility, sample preparation and analysis of pyrolysis products. Polystyrene was used to verify the reliability of the system and showed good reproducibility. Application of the technique showed high variation in the data. Modifications to sample preparation did not enhance the reproducibility. It was determined that the high concentration of ammonium perchlorate in the propellant matrix was compromising the repeatability of the analysis.

  18. A high-resolution numerical technique for inviscid gas-dynamic problems with weak solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    The shock resolution of Harten's (1982) second-order explicit method for one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation laws is investigated for a two-dimensional gas-dynamic problem. The possible extension to a high resolution implicit method for both one- and two-dimensional problems is also investigated. Applications of Harten's method to the quasi-one-dimensional nozzle problem with two nozzle shapes (divergent and convergent-divergent) and the two-dimensional shock-reflection problem resulted in high shock resolution steady-state numerical solutions.

  19. Experiences with a new soil gas technique for detecting petroleum pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Mazac, O.; Landa, I.; Rohde, J.R.; Kelly, W.E.; Blaha, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents field experiences obtained with a new technology for detecting petroleum pollution in soil and ground water based on in situ determination of hydrocarbon concentrations in soil air. Ecoprobe is a new soil gas device from RS-Dynamics in the Czech Republic. The rugged waterproof device is equipped with a built-in computer-controlled semiconductor sensor. Three case histories are presented that demonstrate the use of the equipment under typical conditions. Two case histories present the use of the device under typical field conditions; the third case history compares results from the Ecoprobe and a commercial photoionization detector (PID) device.

  20. Production of ultra clean gas-atomized powder by the plasma heated tundish technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tingskog, T.A.; Andersson, V.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes the improvements in cleanliness for different types of gas atomized powders produced by holding the melt in a Plasma Heated Tundish (PHT) before atomization. The cleanliness is measured on Hot Isostatically Pressed (HIP) or extruded samples. Significant improvements in slag levels and material properties have been achieved. On extruded powder metallurgy stainless steel and nickel alloy tubes, the rejection rate in ultra-sonic testing was reduced drastically. Tool steels and high speed steels have greatly improved ductility and bend strength.

  1. Investigation of solid polymer electrolyte gas sensor with different electrochemical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelczyk, A.; Jasinski, G.; Chachulski, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) amperometric sulphur dioxide sensor is investigated. Nafion was used as a membrane electrode and 1M sulphuric acid as an internal electrolyte. Sensor response to sulphur dioxide was measured. Besides traditional constant voltage amperometry also different electrochemical techniques were used. Results obtained by these methods are compared.

  2. Non-destructive evaluation techniques, high temperature ceramic component parts for gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, H.; Hirsekorn, S.; Lottermoser, J.; Goebbels, K.

    1984-01-01

    This report concerns studies conducted on various tests undertaken on material without destroying the material. Tests included: microradiographic techniques, vibration analysis, high-frequency ultrasonic tests with the addition of evaluation of defects and structure through analysis of ultrasonic scattering data, microwave tests and analysis of sound emission.

  3. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles Obtained by Four Different Techniques from Salvia rosifolia Sm. and Evaluation for Biological Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile constituents from the aerial parts of Salvia rosifolia Sm. (Lamiaceae), endemic to Turkey, were obtained by four different isolation techniques and then analyzed by gas chromatography (GC/FID) and gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods. Also in scope of the present work, the...

  4. Realization of a multipath ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on transit-time technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Weihua; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-01-01

    A microcomputer-based ultrasonic gas flowmeter with transit-time method is presented. Modules of the flowmeter are designed systematically, including the acoustic path arrangement, ultrasound emission and reception module, transit-time measurement module, the software and so on. Four 200 kHz transducers forming two acoustic paths are used to send and receive ultrasound simultaneously. The synchronization of the transducers can eliminate the influence caused by the inherent switch time in simple chord flowmeter. The distribution of the acoustic paths on the mechanical apparatus follows the Tailored integration, which could reduce the inherent error by 2-3% compared with the Gaussian integration commonly used in the ultrasonic flowmeter now. This work also develops timing modules to determine the flight time of the acoustic signal. The timing mechanism is different from the traditional method. The timing circuit here adopts high capability chip TDC-GP2, with the typical resolution of 50 ps. The software of Labview is used to receive data from the circuit and calculate the gas flow value. Finally, the two paths flowmeter has been calibrated and validated on the test facilities for air flow in Shaanxi Institute of Measurement & Testing. PMID:23809902

  5. Calculational technique to predict combustible gas generation in sealed radioactive waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, J.E.; Fujita, A.; Deltete, C.P.; Quinn, G.J.

    1986-05-01

    Certain forms of nuclear waste, when subjected to ionizing radiation, produce combustible mixtures of gases. The production of these gases in sealed radioactive waste containers represents a significant safety concern for the handling, shipment and storage of waste. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) acted on this safety concern in September 1984 by publishing an information notice requiring waste generators to demonstrate, by tests or measurements, that combustible mixtures of gases are not present in radioactive waste shipments; otherwise the waste must be vented within 10 days of shipping. A task force, formed by the Edison Electric Institute to evaluate these NRC requirements, developed a calculational method to quantify hydrogen gas generation in sealed containers. This report presents the calculational method along with comparisons to actual measured hydrogen concentrations from EPICOR II liners, vented during their preparation for shipment. As a result of this, the NRC recently altered certain waste shipment Certificates-Of-Compliance to allow calculations, as well as tests and measurements, as acceptable means of determining combustible gas concentration. This modification was due in part to work described herein.

  6. Barostat or Dynamic Balloon Distention Test: Which Technique is Best Suited for Esophageal Sensory Testing?

    PubMed Central

    Remes-Troche, Jose M.; Attaluri, Ashok; Chahal, Premjit; Rao, Satish S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal sensation is commonly assessed by barostat-assisted balloon distension (BBD) or dynamic balloon distension (DBD) technique, but their relative merits are unknown. Our aim was to compare the usefulness and tolerability of both techniques. Methods Sixteen healthy volunteers (M/F= 6/10) randomly underwent graded esophageal balloon distensions, using either BBD (n=8) or DBD (n=8). BBD was performed by placing a 5 cm long highly compliant balloon attached to a barostat, and DBD by placing a 5 cm long balloon attached to a leveling container. Intermittent phasic balloon distensions were performed in increments of 6 mm Hg. Sensory thresholds and biomechanical properties were assessed and compared. Key Results Sensory thresholds for first perception (mean ± SD; 21 ± 6 vs. 21.2 ± 5, mm Hg, p=0.9), discomfort (38 ± 8 vs. 35 ± 9, p=0.5), and pain (44 ± 4 vs. 45 ± 3, p=0.7) were similar with BBD and DBD techniques. However, more subjects tolerated DBD (7/8, 88%) when compared to BBD (4/8, 50 %). Forceful expulsion of balloon into stomach (n=4), pulling around the mouth (n=4), chest discomfort (n=2) and retching (n=2) were overlapping reasons for intolerance with BBD. Esophageal wall distensibility was similar with both techniques. Conclusions Both techniques provided comparable data on biomechanical properties. However, DBD was better tolerated than BBD for evaluation of esophageal sensation. Hence, we recommend DBD for performing esophageal balloon distension test. PMID:22168228

  7. CdS QDs-chitosan microcapsules with stimuli-responsive property generated by gas-liquid microfluidic technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanjun; Yao, Rongyi; Wang, Yifeng; Chen, Ming; Qiu, Tong; Zhang, Chaocan

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a straightforward gas-liquid microfluidic approach to generate uniform-sized chitosan microcapsules containing CdS quantum dots (QDs). CdS QDs are encapsulated into the liquid-core of the microcapsules. The sizes of the microcapsules can be conveniently controlled by gas flow rate. QDs-chitosan microcapsules show good fluorescent stability in water, and exhibit fluorescent responses to chemical environmental stimuli. α-Cyclodextrin (α-CD) causes the microcapsules to deform and even collapse. More interestingly, α-CD induces obvious changes on the fluorescent color of the microcapsules. However, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) has little influence on the shape and fluorescent color of the microcapsules. Based on the results of scanning electron microscopy, the possible mechanism about the effects of α-CD on the chitosan microcapsules is analyzed. These stimuli-responsive microcapsules are low-cost and easy to be prepared by gas-liquid microfluidic technique, and can be applied as a potential micro-detector to chemicals, such as CDs. PMID:25460598

  8. Isotopic and Geochemical Investigation of Two Distinct Mars Analog Environments Using Evolved Gas Techniques in Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jennifer Claire; Mcadam, Amy Catherine; Ten Kate, Inge L.; Bish, David L.; Blake, David F.; Morris, Richard V.; Bowden, Roxane; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Glamoclija, Mihaela; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Steele, Andrew; Amundsen, Hans E. F.

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two distinct geologic settings on Svalbard, using methodologies and techniques to be deployed on Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). AMASErelated research comprises both analyses conducted during the expedition and further analyses of collected samples using laboratory facilities at a variety of institutions. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL includes pyrolysis ovens, a gas-processing manifold, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), several gas chromatography columns, and a Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). An integral part of SAM development is the deployment of SAM-like instrumentation in the field. During AMASE 2010, two parts of SAM participated as stand-alone instruments. A Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis- Mass Spectrometer (EGA-QMS) system represented the EGA-QMS component of SAM, and a Picarro Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (EGA-CRDS), represented the EGA-TLS component of SAM. A field analog of CheMin, the XRD/XRF on MSL, was also deployed as part of this field campaign. Carbon isotopic measurements of CO2 evolved during thermal decomposition of carbonates were used together with EGA-QMS geochemical data, mineral composition information and contextual observations made during sample collection to distinguish carbonates formation associated with chemosynthetic activity at a fossil methane seep from abiotic processes forming carbonates associated with subglacial basaltic eruptions. Carbon and oxygen isotopes of the basalt-hosted carbonates suggest cryogenic carbonate formation, though more research is necessary to clarify the history of these rocks.

  9. Isotopic and geochemical investigation of two distinct Mars analog environments using evolved gas techniques in Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jennifer C.; McAdam, Amy C.; Ten Kate, Inge L.; Bish, David L.; Blake, David F.; Morris, Richard V.; Bowden, Roxane; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Glamoclija, Mihaela; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Steele, Andrew; Amundsen, Hans E. F.

    2013-06-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two distinct geologic settings on Svalbard, using methodologies and techniques to be deployed on Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). AMASE-related research comprises both analyses conducted during the expedition and further analyses of collected samples using laboratory facilities at a variety of institutions. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL includes pyrolysis ovens, a gas-processing manifold, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), several gas chromatography columns, and a Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). An integral part of SAM development is the deployment of SAM-like instrumentation in the field. During AMASE 2010, two parts of SAM participated as stand-alone instruments. A Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-QMS) system represented the EGA-QMS component of SAM, and a Picarro Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (EGA-CRDS), represented the EGA-TLS component of SAM. A field analog of CheMin, the XRD/XRF on MSL, was also deployed as part of this field campaign. Carbon isotopic measurements of CO2 evolved during thermal decomposition of carbonates were used together with EGA-QMS geochemical data, mineral composition information and contextual observations made during sample collection to distinguish carbonates formation associated with chemosynthetic activity at a fossil methane seep from abiotic processes forming carbonates associated with subglacial basaltic eruptions. Carbon and oxygen isotopes of the basalt-hosted carbonates suggest cryogenic carbonate formation, though more research is necessary to clarify the history of these rocks.

  10. Separation of heavy metals from salts in multicomponent gas by a two-stage dust collection technique.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Nishimoto, Kaoru

    2013-06-15

    A Pb and Zn separation method from salts (Na, K, and Cl) in a simulated multicomponent gas generated by the incineration fly ash melting is studied. The heavy metals are separated using a two-stage dust collection technique. A standard reagents mixture is volatilized by heating in a lab-scale reactor to generate the simulated multicomponent gas. The volatilized salts in the gas are condensed and collected by a filter at a high temperature (600-800 °C), allowing Pb and Zn to pass through the filter as gaseous species. The gaseous heavy metals are condensed by lowering their temperature to 100 °C and collected. The metal separation is promoted by elevating the temperature used in the first-stage dust collection to 800 °C and maintaining a reductive atmosphere in the reactor. Subsequently, a sequential chemical extraction is performed on the obtained materials to evaluate the metals leaching characteristics from the materials. In the separated salts to be landfilled, a portion of toxic metals such as Pb, Cd, As, and Cr remain as water-soluble compounds. The separated Pb and Zn, to be extracted and recovered with precipitation for the metal enrichment, can be extracted using water, acid (pH 3), or CH₃COONH₄ solution (1M). PMID:23611806