Science.gov

Sample records for gas engines

  1. Small Gas Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    Instructional materials are provided for a small gas engine course. A list of objectives appears first, followed by a list of internal parts and skills/competencies related to those parts for engine work, ignition and electrical systems, fuel system, crankcase lubrication system, arc welding skills, and gas welding skills. Outlines are provided…

  2. Gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Roberts, II, William Byron

    2016-03-08

    A gas turbine engine with a compressor rotor having compressor impulse blades that delivers gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes a one or more aerodynamic ducts that each have a converging portion and a diverging portion for deceleration of the selected gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure oxidant containing gas to flameholders. The flameholders may be provided as trapped vortex combustors, for combustion of a fuel to produce hot pressurized combustion gases. The hot pressurized combustion gases are choked before passing out of an aerodynamic duct to a turbine. Work is recovered in a turbine by expanding the combustion gases through impulse blades. By balancing the axial loading on compressor impulse blades and turbine impulse blades, asymmetrical thrust is minimized or avoided.

  3. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, Edward

    2014-03-31

    The objective of the Cummins ARES program, in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE), is to develop advanced natural gas engine technologies that increase engine system efficiency at lower emissions levels while attaining lower cost of ownership. The goals of the project are to demonstrate engine system achieving 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) in three phases, 44%, 47% and 50% (starting baseline efficiency at 36% BTE) and 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx system out emissions (starting baseline NOx emissions at 2 – 4 g/bhp-hr NOx). Primary path towards above goals include high Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP), improved closed cycle efficiency, increased air handling efficiency and optimized engine subsystems. Cummins has successfully demonstrated each of the phases of this program. All targets have been achieved through application of a combined set of advanced base engine technologies and Waste Heat Recovery from Charge Air and Exhaust streams, optimized and validated on the demonstration engine and other large engines. The following architectures were selected for each Phase: Phase 1: Lean Burn Spark Ignited (SI) Key Technologies: High Efficiency Turbocharging, Higher Efficiency Combustion System. In production on the 60/91L engines. Over 500MW of ARES Phase 1 technology has been sold. Phase 2: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) System Key Technologies: Advanced Ignition System, Combustion Improvement, Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Base engine technologies intended for production within 2 to 3 years Phase 3: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust and Charge Air Waste Heat Recovery System Key Technologies: Lower Friction, New Cylinder Head Designs, Improved Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Intended for production within 5 to 6 years Cummins is committed to the launch of next generation of large advanced NG engines based on ARES technology to be commercialized worldwide.

  4. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Doris; Boucher, Cheryl

    2009-09-30

    Energy independence and fuel savings are hallmarks of the nation’s energy strategy. The advancement of natural gas reciprocating engine power generation technology is critical to the nation’s future. A new engine platform that meets the efficiency, emissions, fuel flexibility, cost and reliability/maintainability targets will enable American manufacturers to have highly competitive products that provide substantial environmental and economic benefits in the US and in international markets. Along with Cummins and Waukesha, Caterpillar participated in a multiyear cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy to create a 50% efficiency natural gas powered reciprocating engine system with a 95% reduction in NOx emissions by the year 2013. This platform developed under this agreement will be a significant contributor to the US energy strategy and will enable gas engine technology to remain a highly competitive choice, meeting customer cost of electricity targets, and regulatory environmental standard. Engine development under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) program was divided into phases, with the ultimate goal being approached in a series of incremental steps. This incremental approach would promote the commercialization of ARES technologies as soon as they emerged from development and would provide a technical and commercial foundation of later-developing technologies. Demonstrations of the Phase I and Phase II technology were completed in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Program tasks in Phase III included component and system development and testing from 2009-2012. Two advanced ignition technology evaluations were investigated under the ARES program: laser ignition and distributed ignition (DIGN). In collaboration with Colorado State University (CSU), a laser ignition system was developed to provide ignition at lean burn and high boost conditions. Much work has been performed in Caterpillar’s DIGN program under the ARES program. This work

  5. Small gas turbine engine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance of small gas turbine engines in the 250 to 1,000 horsepower size range is significantly lower than that of large engines. Engines of this size are typically used in rotorcraft, commutercraft, general aviation, and cruise missile applications. Principal reasons for the lower efficiencies of a smaller engine are well known: component efficients are lower by as much as 8 to 10 percentage points because of size effects. Small engines are designed for lower cycle pressures and temperatures because of smaller blading and cooling limitations. The highly developed analytical and manufacturing techniques evolved for large engines are not directly transferrable to small engines. Thus, it was recognized that a focused effort addressing technologies for small engies was needed and could significantly impact their performance. Recently, in-house and contract studies were undertaken at the NASA Lewis Research Center to identify advanced engine cycle and component requirements for substantial performance improvement of small gas turbines for projected year 2000 applications. The results of both in-house research and contract studies are presented. In summary, projected fuel savings of 22 to 42 percent could be obtained. Accompanying direct operating cost reductions of 11 to 17 percent, depending on fuel cost, were also estimated. High payoff technologies are identified for all engine applications, and recent results of experimental research to evolve the high payoff technologies are described.

  6. Gas turbine engine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A variable orifice system is described that is responsive to compressor inlet pressure and temperature, compressor discharge pressure and rotational speed of a gas-turbine engine. It is incorporated into a hydraulic circuit that includes a zero gradient pump driven at a speed proportional to the speed of the engine. The resulting system provides control of fuel rate for starting, steady running, acceleration and deceleration under varying altitudes and flight speeds.

  7. Variable cycle gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Foster, T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A technique, method, and apparatus were designed for varying the bypass ratio and modulating the flow of a gas turbine engine in order to achieve improved mixed mission performance. Embodiments include gas flow control system for management of core and bypass stream pressure comprising diverter valve means downstream of the core engine to selectively mix or separate the core and bypass exhaust streams. The flow control system may also include variable geometry means for maintaining the engine inlet airflow at a matched design level at all flight velocities. Earth preferred embodiment thus may be converted from a high specific thrust mixed flow cycle at supersonic velocities to a lower specific thrust separated flow turbofan system at subsonic velocities with a high degree of flow variability in each mode of operation.

  8. Hot gas engine heater head

    DOEpatents

    Berntell, John O.

    1983-01-01

    A heater head for a multi-cylinder double acting hot gas engine in which each cylinder is surrounded by an annular regenerator unit, and in which the tops of each cylinder and its surrounding regenerator are interconnected by a multiplicity of heater tubes. A manifold for the heater tubes has a centrally disposed duct connected to the top of the cylinder and surrounded by a wider duct connecting the other ends of the heater tubes with the regenerator unit.

  9. Gas engine heat recovery unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubasco, A. J.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of Gas Engine Heat Recovery Unit was to design, fabricate, and test an efficient, compact, and corrosion resistant heat recovery unit (HRU) for use on exhaust of natural gas-fired reciprocating engine-generator sets in the 50-500 kW range. The HRU would be a core component of a factory pre-packaged cogeneration system designed around component optimization, reliability, and efficiency. The HRU uses finned high alloy, stainless steel tubing wound into a compact helical coil heat exchanger. The corrosion resistance of the tubing allows more heat to be taken from the exhaust gas without fear of the effects of acid condensation. One HRU is currently installed in a cogeneration system at the Henry Ford Hospital Complex in Dearborn, Michigan. A second unit underwent successful endurance testing for 850 hours. The plan was to commercialize the HRU through its incorporation into a Caterpillar pre-packaged cogeneration system. Caterpillar is not proceeding with the concept at this time because of a downturn in the small size cogeneration market.

  10. Gas turbine engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idelchik, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A control system and method of controlling a gas turbine engine. The control system receives an error signal and processes the error signal to form a primary fuel control signal. The control system also receives at least one anticipatory demand signal and processes the signal to form an anticipatory fuel control signal. The control system adjusts the value of the anticipatory fuel control signal based on the value of the error signal to form an adjusted anticipatory signal and then the adjusted anticipatory fuel control signal and the primary fuel control signal are combined to form a fuel command signal.

  11. Integrated gas turbine engine-nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P.; Sargisson, D. F.; Stotler, C. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nacelle for use with a gas turbine engine is presented. An integral webbed structure resembling a spoked wheel for rigidly interconnecting the nacelle and engine, provides lightweight support. The inner surface of the nacelle defines the outer limits of the engine motive fluid flow annulus while the outer surface of the nacelle defines a streamlined envelope for the engine.

  12. Regenerator for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lewakowski, John J.

    1979-01-01

    A rotary disc-type counterflow regenerator for a gas turbine engine includes a disc-shaped ceramic core surrounded by a metal rim which carries a coaxial annular ring gear. Bonding of the metal rim to the ceramic core is accomplished by constructing the metal rim in three integral portions: a driving portion disposed adjacent the ceramic core which carries the ring gear, a bonding portion disposed further away from the ceramic core and which is bonded thereto by elastomeric pads, and a connecting portion connecting the bonding portion to the driving portion. The elastomeric pads are bonded to radially flexible mounts formed as part of the metal rim by circumferential slots in the transition portion and lateral slots extending from one end of the circumferential slots across the bonding portion of the rim.

  13. Integrated gas turbine engine-nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P.; Sargisson, D. F.; Stotler, C. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A nacelle for use with a gas turbine engine is provided with an integral webbed structure resembling a spoked wheel for rigidly interconnecting the nacelle and engine. The nacelle is entirely supported in its spacial relationship with the engine by means of the webbed structure. The inner surface of the nacelle defines the outer limits of the engine motive fluid flow annulus, while the outer surface of the nacelle defines a streamlined envelope for the engine.

  14. Baseline automotive gas turbine engine development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. E. (Editor); Pampreen, R. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Tests results on a baseline engine are presented to document the automotive gas turbine state-of-the-art at the start of the program. The performance characteristics of the engine and of a vehicle powered by this engine are defined. Component improvement concepts in the baseline engine were evaluated on engine dynamometer tests in the complete vehicle on a chassis dynamometer and on road tests. The concepts included advanced combustors, ceramic regenerators, an integrated control system, low cost turbine material, a continuously variable transmission, power-turbine-driven accessories, power augmentation, and linerless insulation in the engine housing.

  15. Control apparatus for hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A mean pressure power control system for a hot gas (Stirling) engine utilizing a plurality of supply tanks for storing a working gas at different pressures. During pump down operations gas is bled from the engine by a compressor having a plurality of independent pumping volumes. In one embodiment of the invention, a bypass control valve system allows one or more of the compressor volumes to be connected to the storage tanks. By selectively sequencing the bypass valves, a capacity range can be developed over the compressor that allows for lower engine idle pressures and more rapid pump down rates.

  16. Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

  17. F-1 Engine Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    The gas generator from an F-1 engine is test-fired at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., on Jan. 24, 2013. Data from the 30 second test will be used in the development of advance...

  18. Control for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.J.

    1992-08-04

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine having fuel metering means for delivering fuel to the engine and including means for controlling the fuel metering means including speed control means and slave-datum control responsive to a speed request signal and limit signal for limiting the fuel metering means for producing a signal that is integrated with respect to time for controlling the speed control means, and slave-datum limit control means for further limiting the slave-datum control so that its output is indicative of the maximum or minimum constraints of the engine during the engine's acceleration and deceleration modes of operation whereby the windup effect on the speed control means is eliminated, the output produced by the slave datum limit control means is a function of the formula: ((maximum constraint) [minus] (KOP [times] 'slave-datum'))/KP + speed feedback, where: maximum constraint is the surge limit of the gas turbine engine. KOP [times] 'slave-datum' is the scheduled engine operating point required for steady state engine operation, KP is the proportional gain of an engine governor, KIP is the slope of an engine operating line and speed feedback is indicative of the rotational speed of the gas turbine engine.

  19. More-Electric Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.

    1997-01-01

    A new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) thrust, the more-electric commercial engine, is creating significant interest in industry. This engine would have an integral starter-generator on the gas generator shaft and would be fully supported by magnetic bearings. The NASA/Army emphasis is on a high-temperature magnetic bearing for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of such engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times the rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used, resulting in a more efficient, more-electric engine.

  20. Gas turbine engines with particle traps

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.; Sumner, D. Warren; Sheoran, Yogendra; Judd, Z. Daniel

    1992-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) incorporates a particle trap (46) that forms an entrapment region (73) in a plenum (24) which extends from within the combustor (18) to the inlet (32) of a radial-inflow turbine (52, 54). The engine (10) is thereby adapted to entrap particles that originate downstream from the compressor (14) and are otherwise propelled by combustion gas (22) into the turbine (52, 54). Carbonaceous particles that are dislodged from the inner wall (50) of the combustor (18) are incinerated within the entrapment region (73) during operation of the engine (10).

  1. Improved automobile gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofskey, M. G.; Katsanis, T.; Roelke, R. J.; Mclallin, K. L.; Wong, R. Y.; Schumann, L. F.; Galvas, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Upgraded engine delivers 100 hp in 3500 lb vehicle. Improved fuel economy is due to combined effects of reduced weight, reduced power-to-weight ratio, increased turbine inlet pressure, and improved component efficiencies at part power.

  2. Gas turbine engine with recirculating bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions in a gas turbine engine are reduced by bleeding hot air from the engine cycle and introducing it back into the engine upstream of the bleed location and upstream of the combustor inlet. As this hot inlet air is recycled, the combustor inlet temperature rises rapidly at a constant engine thrust level. In most combustors, this will reduce carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions significantly. The preferred locations for hot air extraction are at the compressor discharge or from within the turbine, whereas the preferred reentry location is at the compressor inlet.

  3. Multi-cylinder hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1985-01-01

    A multi-cylinder hot gas engine having an equal angle, V-shaped engine block in which two banks of parallel, equal length, equally sized cylinders are formed together with annular regenerator/cooler units surrounding each cylinder, and wherein the pistons are connected to a single crankshaft. The hot gas engine further includes an annular heater head disposed around a central circular combustor volume having a new balanced-flow hot-working-fluid manifold assembly that provides optimum balanced flow of the working fluid through the heater head working fluid passageways which are connected between each of the cylinders and their respective associated annular regenerator units. This balanced flow provides even heater head temperatures and, therefore, maximum average working fluid temperature for best operating efficiency with the use of a single crankshaft V-shaped engine block.

  4. Gas Path Sealing in Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of gas path seals is presented with particular attention given to sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency. The effects on compressor pressure ratio and stall margin are pointed out. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are discussed qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperature is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  5. Natural Gas Engine Development Gaps (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Zigler, B.T.

    2014-03-01

    A review of current natural gas vehicle offerings is presented for both light-duty and medium- and heavy-duty applications. Recent gaps in the marketplace are discussed, along with how they have been or may be addressed. The stakeholder input process for guiding research and development needs via the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum (NGVTF) to the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission is reviewed. Current high-level natural gas engine development gap areas are highlighted, including efficiency, emissions, and the certification process.

  6. Mixer Assembly for a Gas Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Zhongtao (Inventor); Cohen, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Fotache, Catalin G. (Inventor); Smith, Lance L. (Inventor); Hautman, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine is provided, including a main mixer with fuel injection holes located between at least one radial swirler and at least one axial swirler, wherein the fuel injected into the main mixer is atomized and dispersed by the air flowing through the radial swirler and the axial swirler.

  7. Sealing technology for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Johnson, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental evaluation under simulated engine conditions revealed that conventional mainshaft seals have disadvantages of high gas leakage rates and wear. An advanced seal concept, the self-acting face seal, has a much lower gas leakage rate and greater pressure and speed capability. In endurance tests (150 hr) to 43,200 rpm the self-acting seal wear was not measurable, indicating that noncontact sealing operation was maintained even at this high rotative speed. A review of published data revealed that the leakage through gas path seals has a significant effect on thrust specific fuel consumption, stall margin, and engine maintenance. Reducing leakages by reducing seal clearances results in rubbing contact, and then the seal thermal response and wear determines the final seal clearances.

  8. Sealing technology for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Johnson, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental evaluation under simulated engine conditions revealed that conventional mainshaft seals have disadvantages of high gas leakage rates and wear. An advanced seal concept, the self-acting face seal, has a much lower gas leakage rate and greater pressure and speed capability. In endurance tests (150 hr) to 43 200 rpm the self-acting seal wear was not measurable, indicating noncontact sealing operation was maintained even at this high rotative speed. A review of published data revealed that the leakage through gas path seals has a significant effect on TSFC, stall margin and engine maintenance. Reducing leakages by reducing seal clearances results in rubbing contact, and then the seal thermal response and wear determines the final seal clearances. The control of clearances requires a material with the proper combination of rub tolerance (abradability) and erosion resistance. Increased rub tolerance is usually gained at the expense of reduced erosion resistance and vice versa.

  9. Gas engine driven chiller development and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, M.D.; Searight, E.F.; Panora, R.

    1986-03-01

    The TECOGEN Division of Thermo Electron Corporation has developed a nominal 150 ton engine driven chiller system under the sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute. The system incorporates an engine directly driving a screw compressor to produce about 130 tons of cooling capacity and a single effect absorption chiller driven by hot water recovered from engine heat to produce another 30 tons of cooling capacity. An economic analysis shows that it will be possible to recover the cost premium of engine driven chiller systems in most US cities in 3 years or less with the O and M savings of these systems when this cost premium is $30 per ton. 4 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  11. Gas turbine engine and composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Prewo, K.M.; Brennan, J.J.

    1988-04-19

    A gas turbine engine core engine component blade, vane, disk, side plate, seal, combustor liner, flap, burner case structure, or turbine case structure, is described comprising a silicon carbide fiber reinforced glass composite consisting essentially of about 30% to about 70% by volume silicon carbide fibers in a glass matrix selected from the group consisting of borosilicate glass, high silica content glass, aluminosilicate glass and mixtures thereof, the composite having a fracture toughness exemplified by a critical stress intensity factor above about 15,000 psi (inch)/sup 1/2/, high temperature strength, high temperature oxidation stability and insulating properties.

  12. Combustion research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Claus, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Research on combustion is being conducted at Lewis Research Center to provide improved analytical models of the complex flow and chemical reaction processes which occur in the combustor of gas turbine engines and other aeropropulsion systems. The objective of the research is to obtain a better understanding of the various physical processes that occur in the gas turbine combustor in order to develop models and numerical codes which can accurately describe these processes. Activities include in-house research projects, university grants, and industry contracts and are classified under the subject areas of advanced numerics, fuel sprays, fluid mixing, and radiation-chemistry. Results are high-lighted from several projects.

  13. Flameholder for gas turbine engine afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.C.; Gulati, A.

    1992-07-14

    This patent describes a flameholder for reducing screech in gas turbine engines. It comprises: an elongated V-shaped member having a pair of opposing elongated walls joined at one end and diverging to respective trailing edges, the apex of the elongated V-shaped member facing upstream; and a plurality of vortex creating members extending from each of the trailing edges in a downstream direction.

  14. Power control for hot gas engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macglashan, W. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A hot gas engine in which the expander piston of the engine is connected to an expander crankshaft. A displacer piston of the engine is connected to a separate displacer crankshaft which may or may not be coaxial with the expander crankshaft. A phase angle control mechanism used as a power control for changing the phase angle between the expander and displacer crankshaft is located between the two crankshafts. The phase angle control mechanism comprises a differential type mechanism comprised of a pair of gears, as for example, bevel gears, one of which is connected to one end of the expander crankshaft and the other of which is connected to the opposite end of the displacer crankshaft. A mating bevel gear is disposed in meshing engagement with the first two level gears to provide a phase angle control between the two crankshafts. Other forms of differential mechanisms may be used including conventional spur gears connected in a differential type arrangement.

  15. Asymmetric flameholder for gas turbine engine afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, A.; Bigelow, E.C.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes an afterburner flameholder for a gas turbine engine, the engine having an afterburner region including a central diffuser cone, a generally cylindrical outer shell and fuel spray means in the region between the shell and the cone. It comprises an annular member having an asymmetric V-shape in cross section, the annular member including a first and a second circular sidewall member, each sidewall member being joined together at one end forming an apex, the annular member adapted to be secured to the engine in the afterburner region with the apex facing upstream in an axial direction towards the fuel spray means, the annular member in cross section forming a V with unequal length sidewall members, the distance between the distal ends of the first and second circular members measured in the direction of the included angle bisector being approximately equal to the distance between the distal ends measured in a direction perpendicular to the bisector.

  16. Natural gas fueling of diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The focus of work performed by University of British Columbia researchers was on high-pressure (late cycle) injection of NG ignited by a pilot diesel-liquid injection(diesel/gas combustion). This was compared to the case of 100% liquid diesel (baseline diesel) fueling at the same load and speed. In typical direct-injected and conventionally fueled diesel engines, fuel is injected a few degrees before the end of the compression stroke into 750--900 K air in which it vaporizes, mixed with air, and auto ignites less than 2 ms after injection begins. The objectives of the researchers` work were to investigate the ignition delay and combustion duration of diesel/gas combustion by observing diesel and diesel/gas ignition sites and flame structure; determining ignition delay and combustion duration with pilot-diesel and natural gas injections; determining whether the pilot liquid flame is substantially influenced by the gas injection; and considering whether pilot-diesel/gas combustion is dominated by premixed or diffusion combustion.

  17. External combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Santanam, Chandran B.; Thomas, William H.; DeJulio, Emil R.

    1991-01-01

    An external combustor for a gas turbine engine has a cyclonic combustion chamber into which combustible gas with entrained solids is introduced through an inlet port in a primary spiral swirl. A metal draft sleeve for conducting a hot gas discharge stream from the cyclonic combustion chamber is mounted on a circular end wall of the latter adjacent the combustible gas inlet. The draft sleeve is mounted concentrically in a cylindrical passage and cooperates with the passage in defining an annulus around the draft sleeve which is open to the cyclonic combustion chamber and which is connected to a source of secondary air. Secondary air issues from the annulus into the cyclonic combustion chamber at a velocity of three to five times the velocity of the combustible gas at the inlet port. The secondary air defines a hollow cylindrical extension of the draft sleeve and persists in the cyclonic combustion chamber a distance of about three to five times the diameter of the draft sleeve. The hollow cylindrical extension shields the drive sleeve from the inlet port to prevent discharge of combustible gas through the draft sleeve.

  18. Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    DOEpatents

    Duffy, Kevin P.; Kieser, Andrew J.; Rodman, Anthony; Liechty, Michael P.; Hergart, Carl-Anders; Hardy, William L.

    2008-05-27

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

  19. Advanced bristle seals for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabe, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    A seven month proof-of-concept program was conducted for an advanced bristle seal, called a bush seal, for use in gas turbine engines. This program was performed as a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 1 project. Bush seal specimen and a full ring bush seal were designed, evaluated, and manufactured for testing. An analytical study of the potential of the bush seal relative to a labyrinth seal was conducted. Static and dynamic testing of the bush seal was performed to determine the behavior of the bristles under pressurization and during contact with a rotating labyrinth tooth. Stable behavior of the bristle elements was observed during static pressurization of a full ring bush seal. The dynamic testing of various configurations of bush seal against a rotating labyrinth tooth showed minimal wear of the bristles relative to a conventional labyrinth seal. The development and application of the bush seal concept to gas turbine engines has the potential of improving the engine's performance while decreasing the degradation of the seal performance over time.

  20. Gas turbine engine active clearance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveau, Paul J. (Inventor); Greenberg, Paul B. (Inventor); Paolillo, Roger E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Method for controlling the clearance between rotating and stationary components of a gas turbine engine are disclosed. Techniques for achieving close correspondence between the radial position of rotor blade tips and the circumscribing outer air seals are disclosed. In one embodiment turbine case temperature modifying air is provided in flow rate, pressure and temperature varied as a function of engine operating condition. The modifying air is scheduled from a modulating and mixing valve supplied with dual source compressor air. One source supplies relatively low pressure, low temperature air and the other source supplies relatively high pressure, high temperature air. After the air has been used for the active clearance control (cooling the high pressure turbine case) it is then used for cooling the structure that supports the outer air seal and other high pressure turbine component parts.

  1. Hot gas engine with dual crankshafts

    SciTech Connect

    McDougal, A.R.

    1981-03-01

    A hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine is described which comprises a displacer portion and an expander portion with a heat exchanger connected between them. The expander portion has a piston which is operatively connected to and rotates an expander crankshaft. In like manner, the displacer portion is provided with a piston which is also operatively connected to and rotates with a separate displacer crankshafts. The two crankshafts are synchronized with respect to each other preferably by means of an idler gear. Banks of displacer pistons can also be provided for operation on a common displacer crankshaft and banks of cooperating expander pistons also can be provided for operation on a common expander crankshaft. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  2. Hot gas engine with dual crankshafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine is described which comprises a displacer portion and an expander portion with a heat exchanger connected between them. The expander portion has a piston which is operatively connected to and rotates an expander crankshaft. In like manner, the displacer portion is provided with a piston which is also operatively connected to and rotates with a separate displacer crankshafts. The two crankshafts are synchronized with respect to each other preferably by means of an idler gear. Banks of displacer pistons can also be provided for operation on a common displacer crankshaft and banks of cooperating expander pistons also can be provided for operation on a common expander crankshaft.

  3. Mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/s (700 ft/sec), air pressures to 148 Newtons per square centimeter abs. (215 psia), and air temperatures to 412k(282 F). A radial face seal incorporating self-acting geometry for lift augmentation was evaluated. In addition, three conventional carbon seal types (face, circumferential segmented, and rotating ring) were run for comparison. Test results indicated that the conventional seals used in this evaluation may not be satisfactory in future advanced engines because of excessive air leakage. On the other hand, the self-acting face seal was shown to have the potential capability of limiting leakages to one-half that of the conventional face seals and one-fifth that of conventional ring seals. A 150-hour endurance test of the self-acting face seal was conducted.

  4. Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2013-02-19

    A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine. The combustor assembly includes a combustor device coupled to a main engine casing, a first fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner disposed radially inwardly from the flow sleeve. The first fuel injection system provides fuel that is ignited with the pressurized air creating first working gases. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct and defines a path for the first working gases to flow from the liner to the transition duct. An intermediate duct inlet portion is associated with a liner outlet and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the liner. An intermediate duct outlet portion is associated with a transition duct inlet section and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the transition duct.

  5. Fatigue Reliability of Gas Turbine Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of an investigation are described for fatigue reliability in engine structures. The description consists of two parts. Part 1 is for method development. Part 2 is a specific case study. In Part 1, the essential concepts and practical approaches to damage tolerance design in the gas turbine industry are summarized. These have evolved over the years in response to flight safety certification requirements. The effect of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods on these methods is also reviewed. Assessment methods based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, with regard to both crack initiation and crack growth, are outlined. Limit state modeling techniques from structural reliability theory are shown to be appropriate for application to this problem, for both individual failure mode and system-level assessment. In Part 2, the results of a case study for the high pressure turbine of a turboprop engine are described. The response surface approach is used to construct a fatigue performance function. This performance function is used with the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to determine the probability of failure and the sensitivity of the fatigue life to the engine parameters for the first stage disk rim of the two stage turbine. A hybrid combination of regression and Monte Carlo simulation is to use incorporate time dependent random variables. System reliability is used to determine the system probability of failure, and the sensitivity of the system fatigue life to the engine parameters of the high pressure turbine. 'ne variation in the primary hot gas and secondary cooling air, the uncertainty of the complex mission loading, and the scatter in the material data are considered.

  6. Gas Turbine Engine Inlet Wall Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florea, Razvan Virgil (Inventor); Matalanis, Claude G. (Inventor); Stucky, Mark B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has an inlet duct formed to have a shape with a first ellipse in one half and a second ellipse in a second half. The second half has an upstream most end which is smaller than the first ellipse. The inlet duct has a surface defining the second ellipse which curves away from the first ellipse, such that the second ellipse is larger at an intermediate location. The second ellipse is even larger at a downstream end of the inlet duct leading into a fan.

  7. Optical systems for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrigley, Mark

    1986-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a turbine-blade pyrometer transducer for in situ measurements of blade temperature in operating gas-turbine engines are described and illustrated with diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Consideration is given to the primary components (optical probe, fiber-optic cable, and electronics), the operating environment (extreme temperatures and pressures, vibration, EMI, and liquids), the design specifications, and specific fabrication techniques. It is pointed out that electrooptic transducers of this type reduce the measurement error to + or - 10 C, and that the same sensors can be used to measure blade-tip clearance and shaft speed or to detect flame-out.

  8. A Versatile Rocket Engine Hot Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a versatile rocket engine facility, located in the Rocket Laboratory at the NASA Lewis Research Center, are presented. The gaseous hydrogen/oxygen facility can be used for thermal shock and hot gas testing of materials and structures as well as rocket propulsion testing. Testing over a wide range of operating conditions in both fuel and oxygen rich regimes can be conducted, with cooled or uncooled test specimens. The size and location of the test cell provide the ability to conduct large amounts of testing in short time periods with rapid turnaround between programs.

  9. Two-tank working gas storage system for heat engine

    DOEpatents

    Hindes, Clyde J.

    1987-01-01

    A two-tank working gas supply and pump-down system is coupled to a hot gas engine, such as a Stirling engine. The system has a power control valve for admitting the working gas to the engine when increased power is needed, and for releasing the working gas from the engine when engine power is to be decreased. A compressor pumps the working gas that is released from the engine. Two storage vessels or tanks are provided, one for storing the working gas at a modest pressure (i.e., half maximum pressure), and another for storing the working gas at a higher pressure (i.e., about full engine pressure). Solenoid valves are associated with the gas line to each of the storage vessels, and are selectively actuated to couple the vessels one at a time to the compressor during pumpdown to fill the high-pressure vessel with working gas at high pressure and then to fill the low-pressure vessel with the gas at low pressure. When more power is needed, the solenoid valves first supply the low-pressure gas from the low-pressure vessel to the engine and then supply the high-pressure gas from the high-pressure vessel. The solenoid valves each act as a check-valve when unactuated, and as an open valve when actuated.

  10. Power control for hot gas engines

    SciTech Connect

    Frosch, R.A.; Macglashan, W.F.

    1980-10-21

    A hot gas engine is described in which the expander piston of the engine is connected to an expander crankshaft. A displacer piston of the engine is connected to a separate displacer crankshaft which may or may not be coaxial with the expander crankshaft. A phase angle control mechanism used as a power control for changing the phase angle between the expander and displacer crankshaft is located between the two crankshafts. The phase angle control mechanism comprises a differential-type mechanism comprised of a pair of gears, as for example, bevel gears, one of which is connected to one end of the expander crankshaft and the other of which is connected to the opposite end of the displacer crankshaft. A mating bevel gear is disposed in meshing engagement with the first two bevel gears to provide a phase-angle control between the two crankshafts. Other forms of differential mechanisms may be used including conventional spur gears connected in a differential type arrangement.

  11. Thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine and diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Bailey, M. Murray

    1989-01-01

    The present state of development of thin thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines and thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines is assessed. Although current thermal barrier coatings are flying in certain gas turbine engines, additional advances will be needed for future engines. Thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines have advanced to the point where they are being seriously considered for the next generation of engine. Since coatings for truck engines is a young field of inquiry, continued research and development efforts will be required to help bring this technology to commercialization.

  12. Power control system for a hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Berntell, John O.

    1986-01-01

    A power control system for a hot gas engine of the type in which the power output is controlled by varying the mean pressure of the working gas charge in the engine has according to the present invention been provided with two working gas reservoirs at substantially different pressure levels. At working gas pressures below the lower of said levels the high pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the control system, and at higher pressures the low pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the system, thereby enabling a single one-stage compressor to handle gas within a wide pressure range at a low compression ratio.

  13. Detail exterior view looking southwest of gas cooling system. Engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking southwest of gas cooling system. Engine house is shown in right background. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  14. Landfill gas application development of the Caterpillar G3600 spark-ignited gas engine

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, G.P.

    1995-10-01

    A G3600 engine was developed to operate on landfill gas to demonstrate engine performance and identify any operational problems caused by this application. Fuel system and engine performance development were completed using simulated landfill gas containing carbon dioxide and natural gas at the Caterpillar Technical Center. The engine was packaged as a generator set and has operated for 12,000 hours on landfill gas. Engine performance goals similar to those for G3600 natural gas applications were achieved during development and were attained during the field test. Development work and field test endurance results are presented in this paper.

  15. Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2015-04-28

    A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine includes a combustor device, a fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner surrounded by the flow sleeve. The fuel injection system provides fuel to be mixed with the pressurized air and ignited in the liner to create combustion products. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct so as to define a path for the combustion products to flow from the liner to the transition duct. The intermediate duct is associated with the liner such that movement may occur therebetween, and the intermediate duct is associated with the transition duct such that movement may occur therebetween. The flow sleeve includes structure that defines an axial stop for limiting axial movement of the intermediate duct.

  16. Casing for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J.; Little, David A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2016-07-12

    A casing for a can annular gas turbine engine, including: a compressed air section (40) spanning between a last row of compressor blades (26) and a first row of turbine blades (28), the compressed air section (40) having a plurality of openings (50) there through, wherein a single combustor/advanced duct assembly (64) extends through each opening (50); and one top hat (68) associated with each opening (50) configured to enclose the associated combustor/advanced duct assembly (64) and seal the opening (50). A volume enclosed by the compressed air section (40) is not greater than a volume of a frustum (54) defined at an upstream end (56) by an inner diameter of the casing at the last row of compressor blades (26) and at a downstream end (60) by an inner diameter of the casing at the first row of turbine blades (28).

  17. Dynamic and Structural Gas Turbine Engine Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Model the interactions between the structural dynamics and the performance dynamics of a gas turbine engine. Generally these two aspects are considered separate, unrelated phenomena and are studied independently. For diagnostic purposes, it is desirable to bring together as much information as possible, and that involves understanding how performance is affected by structural dynamics (if it is) and vice versa. This can involve the relationship between thrust response and the excitation of structural modes, for instance. The job will involve investigating and characterizing these dynamical relationships, generating a model that incorporates them, and suggesting and/or developing diagnostic and prognostic techniques that can be incorporated in a data fusion system. If no coupling is found, at the least a vibration model should be generated that can be used for diagnostics and prognostics related to blade loss, for instance.

  18. Heterogeneous reactions in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Lukachko, S. P.; Waitz, I. A.

    2002-05-01

    One-dimensional flow models and unity probability heterogeneous rate parameters are used to estimate the maximum effect of heterogeneous reactions on trace species evolution in aircraft gas turbines. The analysis includes reactions on soot particulates and turbine/nozzle material surfaces. Results for a representative advanced subsonic engine indicate the net change in reactant mixing ratios due to heterogeneous reactions is <10-6 for O2, CO2, and H2O, and <10-10 for minor combustion products such as SO2 and NO2. The change in the mixing ratios relative to the initial values is <0.01%. Since these estimates are based on heterogeneous reaction probabilities of unity, the actual changes will be even lower. Thus, heterogeneous chemistry within the engine cannot explain the high conversion of SO2 to SO3 which some wake models require to explain the observed levels of volatile aerosols. Furthermore, turbine heterogeneous processes will not effect exhaust NOx or NOy levels.

  19. Mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/sec, air pressures to 215 psia, and air temperatures to 412 K. A radial face seal incorporating self-acting geometry for lift augmentation was evaluated. In addition, three conventional carbon seal types (face, circumferential segmented, and rotating ring) were run for comparison. Test results indicated that the conventional seals used in this evaluation may not be satisfactory in future advanced engines because of excessive air leakage. On the other hand, the self-acting face seal was shown to have the potential capability of limiting leakages to one-half that of the conventional face seals and one-fifth that of conventional ring seals. A 150 hour endurance test of the self-action face seal was conducted at speeds to 145 m/sec, air pressures to 180 psia, and air temperatures to 408 K. The seal wear was not measurable.

  20. Solid fuel combustion system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, Colin; Mongia, Hukam C.

    1993-01-01

    A solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion system for a gas turbine engine includes a carbonizer outside of the engine for gasifying coal to a low Btu fuel gas in a first fraction of compressor discharge, a pressurized fluidized bed outside of the engine for combusting the char residue from the carbonizer in a second fraction of compressor discharge to produce low temperature vitiated air, and a fuel-rich, fuel-lean staged topping combustor inside the engine in a compressed air plenum thereof. Diversion of less than 100% of compressor discharge outside the engine minimizes the expense of fabricating and maintaining conduits for transferring high pressure and high temperature gas and incorporation of the topping combustor in the compressed air plenum of the engine minimizes the expense of modifying otherwise conventional gas turbine engines for solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion.

  1. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  2. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  3. Gas turbine engine and its associated air intake system

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, J.R.; Bennett, G.H.; Lee, L.A.

    1984-01-17

    A gas turbine engine and its associated air intake system are disclosed in which the air intake system comprises a generally horizontally extending duct through which an airflow is induced by an ejector pump powered by the engine. A portion of the air passing through the duct is directed through a second duct to the air inlet of the engine. The second duct is connected to the first duct in such a manner that the air directed to the engine air inlet is derived from a vertically upper region of the first duct. The arrangement is intended to reduce the amount of airborne particulate material ingested by the gas turbine engine.

  4. Organic acids emissions from natural-gas-fed engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, Efthimios; Tazerout, Mohand

    A natural-gas-fed spark-ignition engine, operating under lean conditions, is used for the study of the organic acids exhaust emissions. These pollutants are collected by passing a sample of exhaust gas into deionised water. The final solution is directly analysed by HPLC/UV at 204 nm. Only formic acid is emitted in detectable concentration under the experimental conditions used. Its concentration decreases with the three engine operating parameters studied: spark advance, volumetric efficiency and fuel/air equivalence ratio. Exhaust formic acid concentration is also linked with exhaust oxygen concentration and exhaust temperature. A comparison with other engines (SI engines fed with gasoline and compression ignition engines) from bibliographic data proves that natural-gas-fed engines emit less organic acids than the other two types of engines.

  5. Airfoil for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2011-05-24

    An airfoil is provided for a turbine of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil comprises: an outer structure comprising a first wall including a leading edge, a trailing edge, a pressure side, and a suction side; an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced from the first wall and at least one intermediate wall; and structure extending between the first and second walls so as to define first and second gaps between the first and second walls. The second wall and the at least one intermediate wall define at least one pressure side supply cavity and at least one suction side supply cavity. The second wall may include at least one first opening near the leading edge of the first wall. The first opening may extend from the at least one pressure side supply cavity to the first gap. The second wall may further comprise at least one second opening near the trailing edge of the outer structure. The second opening may extend from the at least one suction side supply cavity to the second gap. The first wall may comprise at least one first exit opening extending from the first gap through the pressure side of the first wall and at least one second exit opening extending from the second gap through the suction side of the second wall.

  6. Fuel economy screening study of advanced automotive gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel economy potentials were calculated and compared among ten turbomachinery configurations. All gas turbine engines were evaluated with a continuously variable transmission in a 1978 compact car. A reference fuel economy was calculated for the car with its conventional spark ignition piston engine and three speed automatic transmission. Two promising engine/transmission combinations, using gasoline, had 55 to 60 percent gains over the reference fuel economy. Fuel economy sensitivities to engine design parameter changes were also calculated for these two combinations.

  7. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    DOEpatents

    Johansson, Lennart N.

    2004-06-29

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  8. Ceramic regenerator systems development program. [for automobile gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines. The results of 19,600 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate showed minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 6935 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 3510 hours at 982 C. Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  9. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the

  10. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  11. Integrated natural gas engine cooling jacket vapor compressor program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibella, F. A.

    1990-08-01

    A unique, alternative cogeneration system was designed that provides an industrial or commercial energy user with high pressure steam and electricity directly from a packaged cogeneration system. The Integrated Gas Engine Vapor Compression System concept includes an engine-generator set and a twin screw compressor that are mechanically integrated with the engine. The gas-fueled engine is ebulliently cooled, thus, allowing its water jacket heat to be recovered in the form of low-pressure steam. The steam is then compressed by the steam compressor to higher pressure, and when combined with the high pressure steam generated in the engine's exhaust gas boiler, it provides the end user with a more usable thermal energy source. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  12. Uncooled two-stroke gas engine for heat pump drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgley, Patrick; McNulty, Dave; Woods, Melvin

    This paper describes the design and analysis of a family of natural gas fueled, uncooled, two-stroke, lean burn, thermal-ignition engines. The engines were designed specifically to meet the requirements dictated by the commercial heat pump application. The engines have a power output ranging from 15 to 100 kW; a thermal efficiency of 36 percent; a mean time between failure greater than 3 years; and a life expectancy of 45,000 hours. To meet these specifications a family of very simple, uncooled, two-stroke cycle engines were designed which have no belts, gears or pumps. The engines utilize crankcase scavenging, lubrication, stratified fuel introduction to prevent raw fuel from escaping with the exhaust gas, and use of ceramic rolling contact bearings. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) is used for ignition to enable the engines to operate with a lean mixture and eliminate spark plug erosion.

  13. Uncooled two-stroke gas engine for heat pump drive

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.; McNulty, D.; Woods, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design and analysis of a family of natural gas fueled, uncooled, two-stroke, lean burn, thermal-ignition engines. The engines were designed specifically to meet the requirements dictated by the commercial heat pump application. The engines have a power output ranging from 15 to 100 kW; a thermal efficiency of 36 percent; a mean time between failure greater than 3 years; and a life expectancy of 45,000 hours. To meet these specifications a family of very simple, uncooled, two-stroke cycle engines were designed which have no belts, gears or pumps. The engines utilize crankcase scavenging, lubrication, stratified fuel introduction to prevent raw fuel from escaping with the exhaust gas, use of and ceramic rolling contact bearings. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) is used for ignition to enable the engines to operate with a lean mixture and eliminate spark plug erosion. 4 refs., 16 figs.

  14. Exhaust gas recirculation method for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanabe, T.; Kimura, K.; Asakura, M.; Shiina, T.

    1988-07-19

    This patent describes a method of controlling exhaust gas recirculation in an internal combustion engine having an exhaust passage, an intake passage, an exhaust gas recirculating passage communicating the exhaust passage with the intake passage, and exhaust gas recirculating valve; and a transmission having a shift lever. The valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve is controlled in response to operating conditions of the engine so as to regulate the amount of exhaust gas recirculation to values appropriate to the operating conditions of the engine. The method comprising the steps of (1) determining whether or not the engine is in at least one of a predetermined accelerating condition and a predetermined decelerating condition; (2) varying the valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve by a predetermined value when the engine is determined to be in at least one of the predetermined accelerating condition and the predetermined decelerating condition; (3) detecting a position of the shift lever of the transmission; and (4) correcting the predetermined value in accordance with the detected position of the shift lever so as to increase the valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve as the shift lever of the transmission is set to a higher speed position.

  15. Serial cooling of a combustor for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Abreu, Mario E.; Kielczyk, Janusz J.

    2001-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine uses compressed air to cool a combustor liner and uses at least a portion of the same compressed air for combustion air. A flow diverting mechanism regulates compressed air flow entering a combustion air plenum feeding combustion air to a plurality of fuel nozzles. The flow diverting mechanism adjusts combustion air according to engine loading.

  16. Curved centerline air intake for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruehr, W. C.; Younghans, J. L.; Smith, E. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inlet for a gas turbine engine was disposed about a curved centerline for the purpose of accepting intake air that is flowing at an angle to engine centerline and progressively turning that intake airflow along a curved path into alignment with the engine. This curved inlet is intended for use in under the wing locations and similar regions where airflow direction is altered by aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane. By curving the inlet, aerodynamic loss and acoustic generation and emission are decreased.

  17. The Combination of Internal-Combustion Engine and Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, K.

    1947-01-01

    While the gas turbine by itself has been applied in particular cases for power generation and is in a state of promising development in this field, it has already met with considerable success in two cases when used as an exhaust turbine in connection with a centrifugal compressor, namely, in the supercharging of combustion engines and in the Velox process, which is of particular application for furnaces. In the present paper the most important possibilities of combining a combustion engine with a gas turbine are considered. These "combination engines " are compared with the simple gas turbine on whose state of development a brief review will first be given. The critical evaluation of the possibilities of development and fields of application of the various combustion engine systems, wherever it is not clearly expressed in the publications referred to, represents the opinion of the author. The state of development of the internal-combustion engine is in its main features generally known. It is used predominantly at the present time for the propulsion of aircraft and road vehicles and, except for certain restrictions due to war conditions, has been used to an increasing extent in ships and rail cars and in some fields applied as stationary power generators. In the Diesel engine a most economical heat engine with a useful efficiency of about 40 percent exists and in the Otto aircraft engine a heat engine of greatest power per unit weight of about 0.5 kilogram per horsepower.

  18. Hydraulically actuated gas exchange valve assembly and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Thomas S.; Taylor, Gregory O.

    2002-09-03

    An engine comprises a housing that defines a hollow piston cavity that is separated from a gas passage by a valve seat. The housing further defines a biasing hydraulic cavity and a control hydraulic cavity. A gas valve member is also included in the engine and is movable relative to the valve seat between an open position at which the hollow piston cavity is open to the gas passage and a closed position in which the hollow piston cavity is blocked from the gas passage. The gas valve member includes a ring mounted on a valve piece and a retainer positioned between the ring and the valve piece. A closing hydraulic surface is included on the gas valve member and is exposed to liquid pressure in the biasing hydraulic cavity.

  19. Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2012-09-04

    A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

  20. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Scotto

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NO{sub x} emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of high-flammable content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions. The actual NO{sub x} reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammable content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NO{sub x} reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NO{sub x} emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  1. Evaluation of Reformer Produced Synthesis Gas for Emissions Reductions in Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

    2010-05-30

    Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) has developed a system that produces synthesis gas from air and natural gas. A near-term application being considered for this technology is synthesis gas injection into reciprocating engines for reducing NOx emissions. A proof of concept study using bottled synthesis gas and a two-stroke reciprocating engine showed that injecting small amounts of highflammables content synthesis gas significantly improved combustion stability and enabled leaner engine operation resulting in over 44% reduction in NOx emissions. The actual NOx reduction that could be achieved in the field is expected to be engine specific, and in many cases may be even greater. RRFCS demonstrated that its synthesis gas generator could produce synthesis gas with the flammables content that was successfully used in the engine testing. An economic analysis of the synthesis gas approach estimates that its initial capital cost and yearly operating cost are less than half that of a competing NOx reduction technology, Selective Catalytic Reduction. The next step in developing the technology is an integrated test of the synthesis gas generator with an engine to obtain reliability data for system components and to confirm operating cost. RRFCS is actively pursuing opportunities to perform the integrated test. A successful integrated test would demonstrate the technology as a low-cost option to reduce NOx emissions from approximately 6,000 existing two-stroke, natural gas-fired reciprocating engines used on natural gas pipelines in North America. NOx emissions reduction made possible at a reasonable price by this synthesis gas technology, if implemented on 25% of these engines, would be on the order of 25,000 tons/year.

  2. Development of a natural gas stratified charge rotary engine

    SciTech Connect

    Sierens, R.; Verdonck, W.

    1985-01-01

    A water model has been used to determine the positions of separate inlet ports for a natural gas, stratified charge rotary engine. The flow inside the combustion chamber (mainly during the induction period) has been registered by a film camera. From these tests the best locations of the inlet ports have been obtained, a prototype of this engine has been built by Audi NSU and tested in the laboratories of the university of Gent. The results of these tests, for different stratification configurations, are given. These results are comparable with the best results obtained by Audi NSU for a homogeneous natural gas rotary engine.

  3. Workshop on Aerosols and Particulates from Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chown Chou (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    In response to the National Research Council (NRC) recommendations, the Workshop on Aerosols and Particulates from Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines was organized by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held on July 29-30, 1997 at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio. The objective is to develop consensus among experts in the field of aerosols from gas turbine combustors and engines as to important issues and venues to be considered. Workshop participants' expertise included engine and aircraft design, combustion processes and kinetics, atmospheric science, fuels, and flight operations and instrumentation.

  4. Heat pipe gas combustion system endurance test for Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrle, P.

    1990-12-01

    Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc. has been developing a general purpose Heat Pipe Gas Combustion (HPGC) system suitable for use with the STM4-120 Stirling engine. The HPGC consists of a parallel plate recuperative preheater, a finned heat pipe evaporator, and a film-cooled gas combustor. The principal component is the heat pipe evaporator which collects and distributes the liquid sodium over the heat transfer surfaces. The liquid sodium evaporates and flows to the condensers where it delivers its latent heat. Given here are the test results of the endurance tests run on a Gas Fired Stirling Engine (GFSE).

  5. Gas Detector LCLS Engineering Specifications Document

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S

    2007-02-09

    There are two Gas Detectors, located upstream and downstream of the FEL attenuation materials, which provide a non-intrusive measure of the FEL pulse energy in the fundamental, in real-time, on a pulse-by-pulse basis. The FEL operators and the users will use this information to monitor the performance of the FEL and the Attenuator and to cross-calibrate other detectors. The Gas Detectors measure the FEL pulse energy by measuring the fluorescence induced in a small volume of N{sub 2} gas by the passage of the FEL.

  6. Turbofan gas turbine engine with variable fan outlet guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter John (Inventor); Zenon, Ruby Lasandra (Inventor); LaChapelle, Donald George (Inventor); Mielke, Mark Joseph (Inventor); Grant, Carl (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan gas turbine engine includes a forward fan section with a row of fan rotor blades, a core engine, and a fan bypass duct downstream of the forward fan section and radially outwardly of the core engine. The forward fan section has only a single stage of variable fan guide vanes which are variable fan outlet guide vanes downstream of the forward fan rotor blades. An exemplary embodiment of the engine includes an afterburner downstream of the fan bypass duct between the core engine and an exhaust nozzle. The variable fan outlet guide vanes are operable to pivot from a nominal OGV position at take-off to an open OGV position at a high flight Mach Number which may be in a range of between about 2.5-4+. Struts extend radially across a radially inwardly curved portion of a flowpath of the engine between the forward fan section and the core engine.

  7. Maximized thermal efficiency crank driven hot gas engine

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, A.P.

    1987-06-30

    A method is described for converting heat to mechanical shaft work in a reciprocating piston crank driven by a hot gas engine. The engine consists of a pair of hot and cold cylinders connected together with leak sealed flow paths. The flow paths have included valves and regenerator, the method comprising: (a) drawing the working gas into the cold cylinder; (b) compressing the gas in the cold cylinder with simultaneous removal of heat to keep the compression isothermal; (c) trapping the working gas in the cold cylinder during the isothermal compression, so that no working gas may enter or leave the cold cylinder during the isothermal compression; (d) setting the crank angular relationship between the hot and cold cylinder pistons such that the hot cylinder piston leads the cold cylinder piston by an angle determining the compression ratio of the engine; (e) transferring the gas from the cold cylinder to the hot cylinder, with addition of heat from the regenerator; (f) expanding the gas in the hot cylinder with the simultaneous addition of heat to keep the expansion isothermal; (g) trapping the working gas in the hot cylinder during the isothermal expansion, so that no working gas may enter or leave the hot cylinder during the isothermal expansion; (h) expelling gas from the hot cylinder to the working gas supply source with deposition of heat in the regenerator for addition to the compressed working gas of the next cycle; (i) selecting the hot and cold cylinder volumes to be approximately in the same ratio as the absolute temperatures of their respective isothermal processes such that the working gas transfers between them are isobaric.

  8. Stirling engines for gas fired micro-cogen and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, N.W.; Beale, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and performance of free-piston Stirling engine-alternators particularly suited for use as natural gas fired micro-cogen and cooling devices. Stirling based cogen systems offer significant potential advantages over internal combustion engines in efficiency, to maintain higher efficiencies at lower power levels than than combustion engines significantly expands the potential for micro-cogen. System cost reduction and electric prices higher than the U.S. national average will have a far greater effect on commercial success than any further increase in Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling engine efficiency. There exist niche markets where Stirling based cogen systems are competitive. Machines of this design are being considered for production in the near future as gas-fired units for combined heat and power in sufficiently large quantities to assure competitive prices for the final unit.

  9. Ceramic component development for the AGT101 gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, W. D.; Smith, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Under DOE/NASA sponsorship, a team is developing the AGT101, a highly efficient gas turbine engine for automotive application. The regenerated engine will operate at a maximum of 1370 C (2500 F) and 100,000 rpm, and will utilize a variety of Si3N4, SiC, lithium aluminum silicate and ceramic fiber insulation components. Engine design has been performed to consider the fabrication and material characteristics of these ceramic materials for both the static and rotating hot section components. Component fabrication has been performed, components have been screened in thermal and mechanical tests, and initial engine testing has been performed.

  10. Gas-Generator Augmented Expander Cycle Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, William D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An augmented expander cycle rocket engine includes first and second turbopumps for respectively pumping fuel and oxidizer. A gas-generator receives a first portion of fuel output from the first turbopump and a first portion of oxidizer output from the second turbopump to ignite and discharge heated gas. A heat exchanger close-coupled to the gas-generator receives in a first conduit the discharged heated gas, and transfers heat to an adjacent second conduit carrying fuel exiting the cooling passages of a primary combustion chamber. Heat is transferred to the fuel passing through the cooling passages. The heated fuel enters the second conduit of the heat exchanger to absorb more heat from the first conduit, and then flows to drive a turbine of one or both of the turbopumps. The arrangement prevents the turbopumps exposure to combusted gas that could freeze in the turbomachinery and cause catastrophic failure upon attempted engine restart.

  11. Ceramic Composite Development for Gas Turbine Engine Hot Section Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; VANrOODE, mARK

    2006-01-01

    The development of ceramic materials for incorporation into the hot section of gas turbine engines has been ongoing for about fifty years. Researchers have designed, developed, and tested ceramic gas turbine components in rigs and engines for automotive, aero-propulsion, industrial, and utility power applications. Today, primarily because of materials limitations and/or economic factors, major challenges still remain for the implementation of ceramic components in gas turbines. For example, because of low fracture toughness, monolithic ceramics continue to suffer from the risk of failure due to unknown extrinsic damage events during engine service. On the other hand, ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with their ability to display much higher damage tolerance appear to be the materials of choice for current and future engine components. The objective of this paper is to briefly review the design and property status of CMC materials for implementation within the combustor and turbine sections for gas turbine engine applications. It is shown that although CMC systems have advanced significantly in thermo-structural performance within recent years, certain challenges still exist in terms of producibility, design, and affordability for commercial CMC turbine components. Nevertheless, there exist some recent successful efforts for prototype CMC components within different engine types.

  12. Methods For Delivering Liquified Gas To An Engine

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; O'Brien, James E.; Siahpush, Ali S.; Brown, Kevin B.

    2005-10-11

    A liquified gas delivery system for a motorized platform includes a holding tank configured to receive liquified gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the tank to a valve device. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the tank to the valve device. Fluid coupled to the valve device is a vaporizer which is in communication with an engine. The valve device selectively withdraws either liquified gas or liquified gas vapor from the tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the tank. Various configurations of the delivery system can be utilized for pressurizing the tank during operation.

  13. Methods For Delivering Liquified Gas To An Engine

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; O'Brien, James E.; Siahpush, Ali S.; Brown, Kevin B.

    2003-09-16

    A liquified gas delivery system for a motorized platform includes a holding tank configured to receive liquified gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the tank to a valve device. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the tank to the valve device. Fluid coupled to the valve device is a vaporizer which is in communication with an engine. The valve device selectively withdraws either liquified gas or liquified gas vapor from the tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the tank. Various configurations of the delivery system can be utilized for pressurizing the tank during operation.

  14. Systems and method for delivering liquified gas to an engine

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; O'Brien, James E.; Siahpush, Ali S.; Brown, Kevin B.

    2002-01-01

    A liquified gas delivery system for a motorized platform includes a holding tank configured to receive liquified gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the tank to a valve device. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the tank to the valve device. Fluid coupled to the valve device is a vaporizer which is in communication with an engine. The valve device selectively withdraws either liquified gas or liquified gas vapor from the tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the tank. Various configurations of the delivery system can be utilized for pressurizing the tank during operation.

  15. Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-02-01

    Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

  16. Performance Benefits for Wave Rotor-Topped Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.; Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The benefits of wave rotor-topping in turboshaft engines, subsonic high-bypass turbofan engines, auxiliary power units, and ground power units are evaluated. The thermodynamic cycle performance is modeled using a one-dimensional steady-state code; wave rotor performance is modeled using one-dimensional design/analysis codes. Design and off-design engine performance is calculated for baseline engines and wave rotor-topped engines, where the wave rotor acts as a high pressure spool. The wave rotor-enhanced engines are shown to have benefits in specific power and specific fuel flow over the baseline engines without increasing turbine inlet temperature. The off-design steady-state behavior of a wave rotor-topped engine is shown to be similar to a conventional engine. Mission studies are performed to quantify aircraft performance benefits for various wave rotor cycle and weight parameters. Gas turbine engine cycles most likely to benefit from wave rotor-topping are identified. Issues of practical integration and the corresponding technical challenges with various engine types are discussed.

  17. SMALL SCALE BIOMASS FUELED GAS TURBINE ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWe) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The n...

  18. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  19. Gas-turbine engine steady-state behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnock, Barry

    A set of graphics with explanations illustrating gas turbine engine steady state behavior are presented. Typical combinations of compressors and nozzles which occur in a gas turbine engine are shown. The basic effect of a nozzle is explained by considering a compressor on a test rig: typical compressor, fan, and turbine characteristics are illustrated. The following are discussed: the degrees of freedom of an aeroengine (the flow and the power); the 'working lines' of components (the locus of the off design steady state operating points of a component plotted on a chart of that components characteristics); bleed and whirl; offtakes; P1 effects (performance changes which modify the basic nondimensional behavior an engine (caused by the effect on Reynolds number levels and on engine mechanical configuration of basic engine inlet pressure level)), and T1 effects (performance changes which modify the basic nondimensional behavior of an engine and are caused by the effects of engine inlet temperature level on Reynolds number level, on engine mechanical configuration and on specific heat level); variable nozzles; and turbojet matching.

  20. Field test comparison of natural gas engine exhaust valves

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, W.B.; Hay, S.C.; Shade, W.N.; Statler, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    As part of a product improvement program, an extensive spark-ignited, turbocharged, natural gas engine exhaust valve test program was conducted using laboratory and field engines. Program objectives were to identify a valve and seat insert combination that increased mean time between overhauls (MTBO) while reducing the risk of premature valve cracking and failure. Following a thorough design review, a large number of valve and seat insert configurations were tested in a popular 900 RPM, 166 BHP (0.123 Mw) per cylinder industrial gas engine series. Material, head geometry, seat angle and other parameters were compared. Careful in-place measurements and post-test inspections compared various configurations and identified optimal exhaust valving for deployment in new units and upgrades of existing engines.

  1. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas-Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padture, Nitin P.; Gell, Maurice; Jordan, Eric H.

    2002-04-01

    Hundreds of different types of coatings are used to protect a variety of structural engineering materials from corrosion, wear, and erosion, and to provide lubrication and thermal insulation. Of all these, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have the most complex structure and must operate in the most demanding high-temperature environment of aircraft and industrial gas-turbine engines. TBCs, which comprise metal and ceramic multilayers, insulate turbine and combustor engine components from the hot gas stream, and improve the durability and energy efficiency of these engines. Improvements in TBCs will require a better understanding of the complex changes in their structure and properties that occur under operating conditions that lead to their failure. The structure, properties, and failure mechanisms of TBCs are herein reviewed, together with a discussion of current limitations and future opportunities.

  2. Gas engines provide cogeneration service for Fantoni MDF plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chellini, R.

    1996-12-01

    A large MDF (medium density fiberboard) plant recently started industrial production at the headquarters of Fantoni, in Osoppo (UDINE) Italy. Providing electric power and thermal energy to the process is a cogeneration plant based on four large spark-ignited gas engines. The new Osoppo MDF plant processes 800 m{sup 3} of finished boards per day in a manufacturing line that combines the most advanced technologies available from several European equipment manufacturers. The cogeneration plant features four type 12VA32G spark-ignited gas engines from Fincantieri`s Diesel Engine Division, driving 50Hz, 6.3 kV, 5400 kVA Ansaldo generators at 750 r/min. The turbocharged and intercooled engines are a spark-ignited version of the company`s A32 diesel. They feature 12 Vee-arranged cylinders with 320 mm bore and 390 mm stroke. 5 figs.

  3. Control means for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beitler, R. S.; Sellers, F. J.; Bennett, G. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A means is provided for developing a signal representative of the actual compressor casing temperature, a second signal representative of compressor inlet gas temperature, and a third signal representative of compressor speed. Another means is provided for receiving the gas temperature and compressor speed signals and developing a schedule output signal which is a representative of a reference casing temperature at which a predetermined compressor blade stabilized clearance is provided. A means is also provided for comparing the actual compressor casing temperature signal and the reference casing temperature signal and developing a clearance control system representative of the difference. The clearance control signal is coupled to a control valve which controls a flow of air to the compressor casing to control the clearance between the compressor blades and the compressor casing. The clearance control signal can be modified to accommodate transient characteristics. Other embodiments are disclosed.

  4. Optimal Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Ray, Asok

    2004-01-01

    This report presents an application of the recently developed theory of optimal Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control that is based on a signed real measure of regular languages. The DES control techniques are validated on an aircraft gas turbine engine simulation test bed. The test bed is implemented on a networked computer system in which two computers operate in the client-server mode. Several DES controllers have been tested for engine performance and reliability.

  5. Fundamental heat transfer research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, D. E. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven experts from industry and the universities joined 24 NASA Lewis staff members in an exchange of ideas on trends in aeropropulsion research and technology, basic analyses, computational analyses, basic experiments, near-engine environment experiments, fundamental fluid mechanics and heat transfer, and hot technology as related to gas turbine engines. The workshop proceedings described include pre-workshop input from participants, presentations of current activity by the Lewis staff, reports of the four working groups, and a workshop summary.

  6. Advanced controls for airbreathing engines, volume 3: Allison gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bough, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The application of advanced control concepts to airbreathing engines may yield significant improvements in aircraft/engine performance and operability. Screening studies of advanced control concepts for airbreathing engines were conducted by three major domestic aircraft engine manufacturers to determine the potential impact of concepts on turbine engine performance and operability. The purpose of the studies was to identify concepts which offered high potential yet may incur high research and development risk. A target suite of proposed advanced control concepts was formulated and evaluated in a two-phase study to quantify each concept's impact on desired engine characteristics. To aid in the evaluation specific aircraft/engine combinations were considered: a Military High Performance Fighter mission, a High Speed Civil Transport mission, and a Civil Tiltrotor mission. Each of the advanced control concepts considered in the study are defined and described. The concept potential impact on engine performance was determined. Relevant figures of merit on which to evaluate the concepts are determined. Finally, the concepts are ranked with respect to the target aircraft/engine missions. A final report describing the screening studies was prepared by each engine manufacturer. Volume 3 of these reports describes the studies performed by the Allison Gas Turbine Division.

  7. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, Tim; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation consists of viewgraph which review the test program and the results of the tests for the Gas Generator (GG) component for the Fastrac Engine. Included are pictures of the Fastrac (MC-1) Engine and the GG, diagrams of the flight configuration, and schematics of the LOX, and the RP-1 systems and the injector assembly. The normal operating parameters are reviewed, as are the test instrumentation. Also shown are graphs of the hot gas temperature, and the test temperature profiles. The results are summarized.

  8. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for commercial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Sheffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the short history, current status, and future prospects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines. Particular attention is given to plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized (7 wt pct Y2O3) zirconia systems. Recent advances include improvements in the spallation life of thermal barrier coatings, improved bond coat composition and spraying techniques, and improved component design. The discussion also covers field experience, life prediction modeling, and future directions in ceramic coatings in relation to gas turbine engine design.

  9. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of... exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? (a) If an engine meets all the... natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas. (2) The engine must have maximum engine power at or above 250...

  10. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of... exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? (a) If an engine meets all the... natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas. (2) The engine must have maximum engine power at or above 250...

  11. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of... exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? (a) If an engine meets all the... natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas. (2) The engine must have maximum engine power at or above 250...

  12. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of... exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? (a) If an engine meets all the... natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas. (2) The engine must have maximum engine power at or above 250...

  13. 40 CFR 1048.620 - What are the provisions for exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? 1048.620 Section 1048.620 Protection of... exempting large engines fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas? (a) If an engine meets all the... natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas. (2) The engine must have maximum engine power at or above 250...

  14. A Stirling engine analysis method based upon moving gas nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    A Lagrangian nodal analysis method for Stirling engines (SEs) is described, validated, and applied to a conventional SE and an isothermalized SE (with fins in the hot and cold spaces). The analysis employs a constant-mass gas node (which moves with respect to the solid nodes during each time step) instead of the fixed gas nodes of Eulerian analysis. The isothermalized SE is found to have efficiency only slightly greater than that of a conventional SE.

  15. Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-08-01

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A remarkable gain in fuel efficiency is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in efficiency.

  16. Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas.

    PubMed

    Geyko, V I; Fisch, N J

    2014-08-01

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A remarkable gain in fuel efficiency is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in efficiency. PMID:25215720

  17. Enhanced Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines By Employing Spinning Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-27

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A gain in fuel efficiency of several percent is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in the efficiency.

  18. Internal combustion engine for natural gas compressor operation

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Christopher L.; Babbitt, Guy; Turner, Christopher; Echter, Nick; Weyer-Geigel, Kristina

    2016-04-19

    This application concerns systems and methods for compressing natural gas with an internal combustion engine. In a representative embodiment, a system for compressing a gas comprises a reciprocating internal combustion engine including at least one piston-cylinder assembly comprising a piston configured to travel in a cylinder and to compress gas in the cylinder in multiple compression stages. The system can further comprise a first pressure tank in fluid communication with the piston-cylinder assembly to receive compressed gas from the piston-cylinder assembly until the first pressure tank reaches a predetermined pressure, and a second pressure tank in fluid communication with the piston-cylinder assembly and the first pressure tank. The second pressure tank can be configured to receive compressed gas from the piston-cylinder assembly until the second pressure tank reaches a predetermined pressure. When the first and second pressure tanks have reached the predetermined pressures, the first pressure tank can be configured to supply gas to the piston-cylinder assembly, and the piston can be configured to compress the gas supplied by the first pressure tank such that the compressed gas flows into the second pressure tank.

  19. Full hoop casing for midframe of industrial gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Gerald A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2015-12-01

    A can annular industrial gas turbine engine, including: a single-piece rotor shaft spanning a compressor section (82), a combustion section (84), a turbine section (86); and a combustion section casing (10) having a section (28) configured as a full hoop. When the combustion section casing is detached from the engine and moved to a maintenance position to allow access to an interior of the engine, a positioning jig (98) is used to support the compressor section casing (83) and turbine section casing (87).

  20. Single shaft automotive gas turbine engine characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automotive gas turbine incorporating a single stage centrifugal compressor and a single stage radial inflow turbine is described. Among the engine's features is the use of wide range variable geometry at the inlet guide vanes, the compressor diffuser vanes, and the turbine inlet vanes to achieve improved part load fuel economy. The engine was tested to determine its performance in both the variable geometry and equivalent fixed geometry modes. Testing was conducted without the originally designed recuperator. Test results were compared with the predicted performance of the nonrecuperative engine based on existing component rig test maps. Agreement between test results and the computer model was achieved.

  1. Micro-combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Scott M.

    2010-11-30

    An improved gas turbine combustor (20) including a basket (26) and a multiplicity of micro openings (29) arrayed across an inlet wall (27) for passage of a fuel/air mixture for ignition within the combustor. The openings preferably have a diameter on the order of the quenching diameter; i.e. the port diameter for which the flame is self-extinguishing, which is a function of the fuel mixture, temperature and pressure. The basket may have a curved rectangular shape that approximates the shape of the curved rectangular shape of the intake manifolds of the turbine.

  2. Gas turbine engine with radial diffuser and shortened mid section

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Richard C.; Montgomery, Matthew D.

    2015-09-08

    An industrial gas turbine engine (10), including: a can annular combustion assembly (80), having a plurality of discrete flow ducts configured to receive combustion gas from respective combustors (82) and deliver the combustion gas along a straight flow path at a speed and orientation appropriate for delivery directly onto the first row (56) of turbine blades (62); and a compressor diffuser (32) having a redirecting surface (130, 140) configured to receive an axial flow of compressed air and redirect the axial flow of compressed air radially outward.

  3. Nickel base alloy. [for gas turbine engine stator vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy for use at temperatures of 2000 F (1095 C) to 2200 F (1205 C) was developed for use as stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines. The alloy has a nominal composition in weight percent of 16 tungsten, 7 aluminum, 1 molybdenum, 2 columbium, 0.3 zirconium, 0.2 carbon and the balance nickel.

  4. Light weight gas turbine engine fuel pumping technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kassel, J.M.; Birdsall, J.

    1989-01-01

    The paper discusses the use of a single high speed centrifugal fuel pump as the only pump in a gas turbine engine fuel system. The characteristics and requirements of the high speed centrifugal fuel pump system are compared with a more traditional fuel pump system. The application of composite technology to the high speed centrifugal pump concept is also reviewed.

  5. Compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin

    2015-03-24

    The present application provides a compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine. The compressive stress system may include a first bucket attached to a rotor, a second bucket attached to the rotor, the first and the second buckets defining a shank pocket therebetween, and a compressive stress spring positioned within the shank pocket.

  6. Performance of Gas-Engine Driven Heat Pump Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Abdi Zaltash; Randy Linkous; Randall Wetherington; Patrick Geoghegan; Ed Vineyard; Isaac Mahderekal; Robert Gaylord

    2008-09-30

    Air-conditioning (cooling) for buildings is the single largest use of electricity in the United States (U.S.). This drives summer peak electric demand in much of the U.S. Improved air-conditioning technology thus has the greatest potential impact on the electric grid compared to other technologies that use electricity. Thermally-activated technologies (TAT), such as natural gas engine-driven heat pumps (GHP), can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. GHP offers an attractive opportunity for commercial building owners to reduce electric demand charges and operating expenses. Engine-driven systems have several potential advantages over conventional single-speed or single-capacity electric motor-driven units. Among them are variable speed operation, high part load efficiency, high temperature waste heat recovery from the engine, and reduced annual operating costs (SCGC 1998). Although gas engine-driven systems have been in use since the 1960s, current research is resulting in better performance, lower maintenance requirements, and longer operating lifetimes. Gas engine-driven systems are typically more expensive to purchase than comparable electric motor-driven systems, but they typically cost less to operate, especially for commercial building applications. Operating cost savings for commercial applications are primarily driven by electric demand charges. GHP operating costs are dominated by fuel costs, but also include maintenance costs. The reliability of gas cooling equipment has improved in the last few years and maintenance requirements have decreased (SCGC 1998, Yahagi et al. 2006). Another advantage of the GHP over electric motor-driven is the ability to use the heat rejected from the engine during heating operation. The recovered heat can be used to supplement the vapor compression cycle during heating or to supply other process loads, such as water heating. The use of the engine waste heat results in greater

  7. Gas Path On-line Fault Diagnostics Using a Nonlinear Integrated Model for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng; Huang, Jin-quan; Ji, Chun-sheng; Zhang, Dong-dong; Jiao, Hua-bin

    2014-08-01

    Gas turbine engine gas path fault diagnosis is closely related technology that assists operators in managing the engine units. However, the performance gradual degradation is inevitable due to the usage, and it result in the model mismatch and then misdiagnosis by the popular model-based approach. In this paper, an on-line integrated architecture based on nonlinear model is developed for gas turbine engine anomaly detection and fault diagnosis over the course of the engine's life. These two engine models have different performance parameter update rate. One is the nonlinear real-time adaptive performance model with the spherical square-root unscented Kalman filter (SSR-UKF) producing performance estimates, and the other is a nonlinear baseline model for the measurement estimates. The fault detection and diagnosis logic is designed to discriminate sensor fault and component fault. This integration architecture is not only aware of long-term engine health degradation but also effective to detect gas path performance anomaly shifts while the engine continues to degrade. Compared to the existing architecture, the proposed approach has its benefit investigated in the experiment and analysis.

  8. Power recovery from turbine and gas engine exhausts

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, G.L.

    1985-02-01

    Due to the energy consciousness of the United States and to the ever increasing cost of engine fuels, power recovery from turbine and gas engine exhausts has come of age. The addition of waste recovery systems to these exhausts increases the thermal efficiencies of typical systems from the range of 21% to 39% up to the range of 28% to 49%. The new ''expander'' type power recovery system includes a waste heat recovery exchanger which will transfer heat from the engine exhaust into any of numerous thermal fluids. The recovered heat energy now in the thermal fluid medium can, in turn, be used to produce power for any desired application (i.e. gas compression, process refrigeration, electrical power generation, etc.). The particular systems put forth in this paper concentrate on the use of expansion fluids (other than steam) driving ''expanders'' as motive devices.

  9. Systems for delivering liquified natural gas to an engine

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; O'Brien, James E.; Siahpush, Ali S.; Brown, Kevin B.

    2000-01-01

    A fuel delivery system includes a fuel tank configured to receive liquid natural gas. A first conduit extends from a vapor holding portion of the fuel tank to an economizer valve. A second conduit extends from a liquid holding portion of the fuel tank to the economizer valve. Fluid coupled to the economizer valve is a vaporizer which is heated by coolant from the engine and is positioned below the fuel tank. The economizer valve selectively withdraws either liquid natural gas or vaporized natural gas from the fuel tank depending on the pressure within the vapor holding portion of the fuel tank. A delivery conduit extends from the vaporizer to the engine. A return conduit having a check valve formed therein extends from the delivery conduit to the vapor holding portion of the fuel tank for pressurizing the fuel tank.

  10. The open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine - Some engineering considerations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. F.; Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Iwanczyk, L. C.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary design study of a conceptual 6000-MW open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine system was made. The engine has a thrust of 44,200 lb and a specific impulse of 4400 sec. The nuclear fuel is uranium-235 and the propellant is hydrogen. Critical fuel mass was calculated for several reactor configurations. Major components of the reactor (reflector, pressure vessel) and the waste heat rejection system were considered conceptually and were sized.

  11. Engineering computer graphics in gas turbine engine design, analysis and manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopatka, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A time-sharing and computer graphics facility designed to provide effective interactive tools to a large number of engineering users with varied requirements was described. The application of computer graphics displays at several levels of hardware complexity and capability is discussed, with examples of graphics systems tracing gas turbine product development, beginning with preliminary design through manufacture. Highlights of an operating system stylized for interactive engineering graphics is described.

  12. Thermal barrier coating on high temperature industrial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N.; Stoner, B. L.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal barrier coating used was a yttria stabilized zirconia material with a NiCrAlY undercoat, and the base engine used to establish improvements was the P&WA FT50A-4 industrial gas turbine engine. The design benefits of thermal barrier coatings include simplified cooling schemes and the use of conventional alloys in the engine hot section. Cooling flow reductions and improved heating rates achieved with thermal barrier coating result in improved performance. Economic benefits include reduced power production costs and reduced fuel consumption. Over the 30,000 hour life of the thermal barrier coated parts, fuel savings equivalent to $5 million are projected and specific power (megawatts/mass of engine airflow) improvements on the order of 13% are estimated.

  13. High density fuel qualification for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Macleod, J.D.; Orbanski, B.; Hastings, P.R. Standard Aero, Ltd., Winnipeg, DND, Ottawa, )

    1992-01-01

    A program for the evaluation of gas turbine engine performance, carried out in the Engine Laboratory of the National Research Council of Canada, is described. Problems under consideration include performance alteration between JP-4 fuel and a high energy density fuel, called strategic military fuel (SMF); performance deterioration during the accelerated endurance test; and emission analysis. The T56 fuel control system is found to be capable of operation on the higher energy density fuel with no detrimental effects regarding control of the engine's normal operating regime. The deterioration of the engine performance during 150-hour endurance tests on SMF was very high, which was caused by an increase in turbine nozzle effective flow area and turbine blade untwist. The most significant performance losses during the endurance tests were on corrected output power, fuel flow, specific fuel consumption and compressor and turbine presure ratio. 9 refs.

  14. Oil cooling system for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A.; Kast, H. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas turbine engine fuel delivery and control system is provided with means to recirculate all fuel in excess of fuel control requirements back to aircraft fuel tank, thereby increasing the fuel pump heat sink and decreasing the pump temperature rise without the addition of valving other than that normally employed. A fuel/oil heat exchanger and associated circuitry is provided to maintain the hot engine oil in heat exchange relationship with the cool engine fuel. Where anti-icing of the fuel filter is required, means are provided to maintain the fuel temperature entering the filter at or above a minimum level to prevent freezing thereof. Fluid circuitry is provided to route hot engine oil through a plurality of heat exchangers disposed within the system to provide for selective cooling of the oil.

  15. Exhaust gas cleaning device of internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenoya, Y.; Ishida, Y.

    1984-03-06

    An exhaust gas cleaning device of an internal combustion engine, comprising a secondary-air supply system connected to exhaust ports to supply the secondary air for cooling the exhaust gas, and reed valve devices installed in the secondary-air supply system and adapted to be opened and closed by the pulsating pressure generated in the exhaust ports when the engine is in operation. The reed valve devices are mounted on the side surface of the cylinder block, each of which has a reed valve chamber and a reed valve that divides the reed valve chamber into an upstream chamber and a downstream chamber and that is adapted to be opened and closed by the pulsating exhaust gas. The upstream chamber is communicated with the open air via a secondary-air intake pipe, and the downstream chamber is connected to the exhaust port via a secondary-air supply passage. The exhaust gas cleaning device is simply constructed so that its maintenance is easy and the presence of the device does not hinder maintenance operation for the internal combustion engine such as replacement of spark plugs, adjustment of tappets, and the like.

  16. Wave-Rotor-Enhanced Gas Turbine Engine Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack; Synder, Philip H.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Rolls-Royce Allison are working collaboratively to demonstrate the benefits and viability of a wave-rotor-topped gas turbine engine. The self-cooled wave rotor is predicted to increase the engine overall pressure ratio and peak temperature by 300% and 25 to 30%. respectively, providing substantial improvements in engine efficiency and specific power. Such performance improvements would significantly reduce engine emissions and the fuel logistics trails of armed forces. Progress towards a planned demonstration of a wave-rotor-topped Rolls-Royce Allison model 250 engine has included completion of the preliminary design and layout of the engine, the aerodynamic design of the wave rotor component and prediction of its aerodynamic performance characteristics in on- and off-design operation and during transients, and the aerodynamic design of transition ducts between the wave rotor and the high pressure turbine. The topping cycle increases the burner entry temperature and poses a design challenge to be met in the development of the demonstrator engine.

  17. Exhaust gas purification system for lean burn engine

    DOEpatents

    Haines, Leland Milburn

    2002-02-19

    An exhaust gas purification system for a lean burn engine includes a thermal mass unit and a NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit downstream of the thermal mass unit. The NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit includes at least one catalyst section. Each catalyst section includes a catalytic layer for converting NO.sub.x coupled to a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger portion of the catalyst section acts to maintain the catalytic layer substantially at a desired temperature and cools the exhaust gas flowing from the catalytic layer into the next catalytic section in the series. In a further aspect of the invention, the exhaust gas purification system includes a dual length exhaust pipe upstream of the NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit. The dual length exhaust pipe includes a second heat exchanger which functions to maintain the temperature of the exhaust gas flowing into the thermal mass downstream near a desired average temperature.

  18. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  19. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

  20. Variable cycle stirling engine and gas leakage control system therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Otters, J.

    1984-12-25

    An improved thermal engine of the type having a displacer body movable between the hot end and the cold end of a chamber for subjecting a fluid within that chamber to a thermodynamic cycle and having a work piston driven by the fluid for deriving a useful work output. The work piston pumps a hydraulic fluid and a hydraulic control valve is connected in line with the hydraulic output conduit such that the flow of hydraulic fluid may be restricted to any desired degree or stopped altogether. The work piston can therefore be controlled by means of a controller device independently from the movement of the displacer such that a variety of engine cycles can be obtained for optimum engine efficiency under varying load conditions. While a Stirling engine cycle is particularly contemplated, other engine cycles may be obtained by controlling the movement of the displacer and work pistons. Also disclosed are a working gas recovery system for controlling leakage of working gas from the displacer chamber, and a compound work piston arrangement for preventing leakage of hydraulic fluid around the work piston into the displacer chamber.

  1. Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Leto, Anthony

    1983-01-01

    A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

  2. Study of compressor systems for a gas-generator engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sather, Bernard I; Tauschek, Max J

    1950-01-01

    Various methods of providing compressor-capacity and pressure-ratio control in the gas-generator type of compound engine over a range of altitudes from sea level to 50,000 feet are presented. The analytical results indicate that the best method of control is that in which the first stage of compression is carried out in a variable-speed supercharger driven by a hydraulic slip coupling. The constant-speed second stage could be either a mixed-flow rotary compressor or a piston-type compressor. A variable-area turbine nozzle is shown to be unnecessary for cruising operation of the engine.

  3. New trends in combustion research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Research on combustion is being conducted to provide improved analytical models of the complex flow and chemical reaction processes which occur in the combustor of gas turbine engines, in order to enable engine manufacturers to reduce the development time of these concepts. The elements of the combustion fundamentals program is briefly discussed with examples of research projects described more fully. Combustion research will continue to emphasize the development of analytical models and the support of these models with fundamental flow experiments to assess the models accuracy and shortcomings.

  4. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep; Pfefferle, William

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines

  5. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Zweig, H.R.; Fischler, S.; Wagner, W.R. )

    1993-01-15

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  6. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweig, Herbert R.; Fischler, Stanley; Wagner, William R.

    1993-01-01

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  7. Exhaust gas recirculation system for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, S.; Nomoto, Y.; Oda, T.; Yokooku, K.

    1984-09-18

    An internal combustion engine is provided with an exhaust gas recirculating passage for communicating the intake passage and the exhaust passage thereof. The recirculating passage is provided with a valve for controlling the amount of recirculated exhaust gas. A fundamental air-fuel ratio control value for regulating the air-fuel ratio of the intake gas to a predetermined value is corrected by an operating condition correction value according to the operating condition of the engine. The operating condition correction value is successively changed to an optimal value by comparing the actually obtained air-fuel ratio with a predetermined value. The operating condition correction value for correcting the fundamental air-fuel ratio control value when the exhaust gas recirculation is carried out is changed independently from the same for correcting the fundamental air-fuel ratio correction value when the exhaust gas recirculation is not carried out. The initial values of the former correction value and the latter correction value are compared with each other, while the present values of the former correction value and the latter correction value are compared with each other. The comparison value of the initial values and the comparison value of the present values are compared with each other to detect clogging of the recirculating passage. When clogging is detected, the valve is controlled to compensate for the clogging.

  8. The Applications Of Fibre Optics In Gas Turbine Engine Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davinson, Ian

    1984-08-01

    Instrumentation in Gas Turbines must operate in extremely harsh environments. Electro-optical methods are being increasingly used to measure such variables as displacement, temperature and gas flow and fibre optics are often required to enable sensitive electronic components to be placed remote from the hostile region. This paper reviews applications of fibre optics in Rolls-Royce up to the present. In addition the case for using fibre optic sensors for the measurement of other parameters in future will be presented, along with a discussion of the prospects for fibre optic data transmission on the next generation of digitally controlled engines.

  9. Operation of gas turbine engines in volcanic ash clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.G.; Baran, A.J.; Miatech, J.

    1996-10-01

    Results are reported for a technology program designed to determine the behavior of gas turbine engines when operating in particle-laden clouds. There are several ways that such clouds may be created, i.e., explosive volcanic eruption, sand storm, military conflict, etc. The response of several different engines, among them the Pratt and Whitney JT3D turbofan, the Pratt and Whitney J57 turbojet, a Pratt and Whitney engine of the JT9 vintage, and an engine of the General Electric CF6 vintage has been determined. The particular damage mode that will be dominant when an engine experiences a dust cloud depends upon the particular engine (the turbine inlet temperature at which the engine is operating when it encounters the dust cloud), the concentration of foreign material in the cloud, and the constituents of the foreign material (the respective melting temperature of the various constituents). Further, the rate at which engine damage will occur depends upon all of the factors given above, and the damage is cumulative with continued exposure. An important part of the Calspan effort has been to identify environmental warning signs and to determine which of the engine parameters available for monitoring by the flight crew can provide an early indication of impending difficulty. On the basis of current knowledge, if one knows the location of a particle-laden cloud, then that region should be avoided. However, if the cloud location is unknown, which is generally the case, then it is important to know how to recognize when an encounter has occurred and to understand how to operate safely, which is another part of the Calspan effort.

  10. Ceramic bearings for use in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1988-01-01

    Three decades of research by U.S. industry and government laboratories have produced a vast body of data related to the use of ceramic rolling element bearings and bearing components for aircraft gas turbine engines. Materials such as alumina, silicon carbide, titanium carbide, silicon nitride, and a crystallized glass ceramic have been investigated. Rolling-element endurance tests and analysis of full-complement bearings have been performed. Materials and bearing design methods have continuously improved over the years. This paper reviews a wide range of data and analyses with emphasis on how early NASA contributions as well as more recent data can enable the engineer or metallurgist to determine just where ceramic bearings are most applicable for gas turbines.

  11. Ceramic bearings for use in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.

    1989-01-01

    Three decades of research by U.S. industry and government laboratories have produced a vast body of data related to the use of ceramic rolling element bearings and bearing components for aircraft gas turbine engines. Materials such as alumina, silicon carbide, titanium carbide, silicon nitride, and a crystallized glass ceramic have been investigated. Rolling-element endurance tests and analysis of full-complement bearings have been performed. Materials and bearing design methods have continuously improved over the years. This paper reviews a wide range of data and analyses with emphasis on how early NASA contributions as well as more recent data can enable the engineer or metallurgist to determine just where ceramic bearings are most applicable for gas turbines.

  12. Sensor and Actuator Needs for More Intelligent Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Schadow, Klaus; Horn, Wolfgang; Pfoertner, Hugo; Stiharu, Ion

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the controls and diagnostics technologies, that are seen as critical for more intelligent gas turbine engines (GTE), with an emphasis on the sensor and actuator technologies that need to be developed for the controls and diagnostics implementation. The objective of the paper is to help the "Customers" of advanced technologies, defense acquisition and aerospace research agencies, understand the state-of-the-art of intelligent GTE technologies, and help the "Researchers" and "Technology Developers" for GTE sensors and actuators identify what technologies need to be developed to enable the "Intelligent GTE" concepts and focus their research efforts on closing the technology gap. To keep the effort manageable, the focus of the paper is on "On-Board Intelligence" to enable safe and efficient operation of the engine over its life time, with an emphasis on gas path performance

  13. 46 CFR 118.420 - Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fixed Fire Extinguishing and Detecting Systems § 118.420 Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems. (a) A pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing system must: (1) Be... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems....

  14. 46 CFR 181.420 - Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fixed Fire Extinguishing and Detecting Systems § 181.420 Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems. (a) A pre-engineered fixed gas fire... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems....

  15. 46 CFR 118.420 - Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fixed Fire Extinguishing and Detecting Systems § 118.420 Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems. (a) A pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing system must: (1) Be... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems....

  16. Efficient, Low Pressure Ratio Propulsor for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Monzon, Byron R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, and a propulsor that is coupled to be driven by the turbine through the spool. A gear assembly is coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extends from the hub. The row includes no more than 20 of the propulsor blades.

  17. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

    2005-09-30

    This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

  18. FUEL INTERCHANGEABILITY FOR LEAN PREMIXED COMBUSTION IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Don Ferguson; Geo. A. Richard; Doug Straub

    2008-06-13

    In response to environmental concerns of NOx emissions, gas turbine manufacturers have developed engines that operate under lean, pre-mixed fuel and air conditions. While this has proven to reduce NOx emissions by lowering peak flame temperatures, it is not without its limitations as engines utilizing this technology are more susceptible to combustion dynamics. Although dependent on a number of mechanisms, changes in fuel composition can alter the dynamic response of a given combustion system. This is of particular interest as increases in demand of domestic natural gas have fueled efforts to utilize alternatives such as coal derived syngas, imported liquefied natural gas and hydrogen or hydrogen augmented fuels. However, prior to changing the fuel supply end-users need to understand how their system will respond. A variety of historical parameters have been utilized to determine fuel interchangeability such as Wobbe and Weaver Indices, however these parameters were never optimized for today’s engines operating under lean pre-mixed combustion. This paper provides a discussion of currently available parameters to describe fuel interchangeability. Through the analysis of the dynamic response of a lab-scale Rijke tube combustor operating on various fuel blends, it is shown that commonly used indices are inadequate for describing combustion specific phenomena.

  19. Evaluation of ceramics for stator application: Gas turbine engine report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trela, W.; Havstad, P. H.

    1978-01-01

    Current ceramic materials, component fabrication processes, and reliability prediction capability for ceramic stators in an automotive gas turbine engine environment are assessed. Simulated engine duty cycle testing of stators conducted at temperatures up to 1093 C is discussed. Materials evaluated are SiC and Si3N4 fabricated from two near-net-shape processes: slip casting and injection molding. Stators for durability cycle evaluation and test specimens for material property characterization, and reliability prediction model prepared to predict stator performance in the simulated engine environment are considered. The status and description of the work performed for the reliability prediction modeling, stator fabrication, material property characterization, and ceramic stator evaluation efforts are reported.

  20. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  1. Oil cooling system for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A.; Kast, H. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas turbine engine fuel delivery and control system is provided with means to recirculate all fuel in excess fuel control requirements back to the aircraft fuel tank. This increases the fuel pump heat sink and decreases the pump temperature rise without the addition of valving other than normally employed. A fuel/oil heat exchanger and associated circuitry is provided to maintain the hot engine oil in heat exchange relationship with the cool engine fuel. Where anti-icing of the fuel filter is required, means are provided to maintain the fuel temperature entering the filter at or above a minimum level to prevent freezing thereof. In one embodiment, a divider valve is provided to take all excess fuel from either upstream or downstream of the fuel filter and route it back to the tanks, the ratio of upstream to downstream extraction being a function of fuel pump discharge pressure.

  2. Acoustic Pyrometry Applied to Gas Turbines and Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1999-01-01

    Internal gas temperature is one of the most fundamental parameters related to engine efficiency and emissions production. The most common methods for measuring gas temperature are physical probes, such as thermocouples and thermistors, and optical methods, such as Coherent Anti Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) or Rayleigh scattering. Probes are relatively easy to use, but they are intrusive, their output must be corrected for errors due to radiation and conduction, and their upper use temperature is limited. Optical methods are nonintrusive, and they measure some intrinsic property of the gas that is directly related to its temperature (e.g., lifetime or the ratio of line strengths). However, optical methods are usually difficult to use, and optical access is not always available. Lately, acoustic techniques have been receiving some interest as a way to overcome these limitations.

  3. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2004-09-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis, are being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and ring-design concepts have been explored, and engine experiments have been done on a full-scale Waukesha VGF F18 in-line 6 cylinder power generation engine rated at 370 kW at 1800 rpm. Current accomplishments include designing and testing ring-packs using a subtle top-compression-ring profile (skewed barrel design), lowering the tension of the oil-control ring, employing a negative twist to the scraper ring to control oil consumption. Initial test data indicate that piston ring-pack friction was reduced by 35% by lowering the oil-control ring tension alone, which corresponds to a 1.5% improvement in fuel efficiency. Although small in magnitude, this improvement represents a first step towards anticipated aggregate improvements from other strategies. Other ring-pack design strategies to lower friction have been identified, including reduced axial distance between the top two rings, tilted top-ring groove. Some of these configurations have been tested and some await further evaluation. Colorado State University performed the tests and Waukesha Engine Dresser, Inc. provided technical support. Key elements of the continuing work include optimizing the engine piston design, application of surface and material developments in conjunction with improved lubricant properties, system modeling and analysis, and continued technology

  4. Metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples for gas turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Tougas, Ian M; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J

    2013-01-01

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples. PMID:24217356

  5. Metallic and Ceramic Thin Film Thermocouples for Gas Turbine Engines

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, Ian M.; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J.

    2013-01-01

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples. PMID:24217356

  6. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley

    2003-08-28

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. A detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and concepts have been explored, and engine experiments will validate these concepts. An iterative process of experimentation, simulation and analysis, will be followed with the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. As planned, MIT has developed guidelines for an initial set of low-friction piston-ring-pack designs. Current recommendations focus on subtle top-piston-ring and oil-control-ring characteristics. A full-scale Waukesha F18 engine has been installed at Colorado State University and testing of the baseline configuration is in progress. Components for the first design iteration are being procured. Subsequent work includes examining the friction and engine performance data and extending the analyses to other areas to evaluate opportunities for further friction improvement and the impact on oil consumption/emission and wear, towards demonstrating an optimized reduced-friction engine system.

  7. Emission and Performance Comparison of the Natural Gas C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Trucks: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lyford-Pike, E. J.

    2003-04-01

    Subcontractor report details results of on-road development and emissions characteristics of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy duty trucks. The objective of this project was to develop, on road and in service, a natural gas truck/bus engine (the C-Gas Plus) with higher horsepower, lower cost, and better performance and diagnostics than the previous C8.3G natural gas engine. The engine was to have an advanced engine management control system to enable implementation of proven technologies that improve engine performance and power density (hp/L). The C-Gas Plus engine was designed to meet the following objectives: (1) Higher engine ratings (280 hp and 850 ft-lb torque for the C-Gas Plus) than the C8.3G natural gas engine; (2) Lower capital cost than the C8.3G engine; and (3) Low emission standards: California Air Resources Board (CARB) low-NO{sub x} (oxides of nitrogen) (2.0 g/bhp-h) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Fuel Fleet Program ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) emission certifications.

  8. Alternative systems for fuel gas boosters for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Henry B.

    1992-04-01

    The study was done to investigate alternative technologies for fuel gas boosters for gas turbine engines under 5 MW output. The goal was to identify concepts which would significantly reduce the overall life cycle cost of these boosters. In a broad review of alternative systems, centrifugal compressors were found to be most promising. Electrically driven centrifugals, either direct drive or gear driven, were found to be quite limited in speed. Therefore they require many stages for these applications, and no cost advantage was indicated. Considerable promise was indicated for centrifugals driven by bleed air from the engine compressor, using turbocompressor units which are conversions of existing turbochargers for internal combustion engines. A first cost advantage of 30 to 80 percent was indicated for applications with an annual market size of at least ten units. Considerable savings in installation and maintenance costs are expected in addition.

  9. ACID GAS REMOVAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CORONA RADICAL SHOWER SYSTEM FOR A TREATMENT OF STATIONARY ENGINE FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid gas removal experiments are carried out in large bench scale corona radical shower reactor. A simulated engine flue gas is air mixed with NO, SO2 and CH4. Optimums for acid gas removal rate have been conducted in terms of the ammonia to acid gas molar ratio, the applied volt...

  10. Organic positive ions in aircraft gas-turbine engine exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Andrey; Arnold, Frank

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) represent a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosol. However the role of organic species emitted by aircraft (as a consequence of the incomplete combustion of fuel in the engine) in nucleation of new volatile particles still remains rather speculative and requires a much more detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. Measurements in aircraft exhaust plumes have shown the presence of both different non-methane VOCs (e.g. PartEmis project) and numerous organic cluster ions (MPIK-Heidelberg). However the link between detected organic gas-phase species and measured mass spectrum of cluster ions is uncertain. Unfortunately, up to now there are no models describing the thermodynamics of the formation of primary organic cluster ions in the exhaust of aircraft engines. The aim of this work is to present first results of such a model development. The model includes the block of thermodynamic data based on proton affinities and gas basicities of organic molecules and the block of non-equilibrium kinetics of the cluster ions evolution in the exhaust. The model predicts important features of the measured spectrum of positive ions in the exhaust behind aircraft. It is shown that positive ions emitted by aircraft engines into the atmosphere mostly consist of protonated and hydrated organic cluster ions. The developed model may be explored also in aerosol investigations of the background atmosphere as well as in the analysis of the emission of fine aerosol particles by automobiles.

  11. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2005-09-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

  12. High-Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are the subject of a new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army thrust with significant industry participation, and coordination with other Government agencies. The NASA/Army emphasis is on high-temperature applications for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of these engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used--resulting in a more efficient, "more electric" engine. Finally, the Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program, a joint Department of Defense/industry program, identified a need for a hightemperature (as high as 1200 F) magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in a phase III engine. This magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. It has a laminated rotor and stator made of cobalt steel. Wound around the stator are a series of electrical wire coils that form a series of electric magnets around the circumference. The magnets exert a force on the rotor. A probe senses the position of the rotor, and a feedback controller keeps it in the center of the cavity. The engine rotor, bearings, and case form a flexible structure that contains a large number of modes. The bearing feedback controller, which could cause some of these modes to become unstable, could be adapted to varying flight conditions to minimize seal clearances and monitor the health of the system. Cobalt steel has a curie point greater than 1700 F, and copper wire has a melting point beyond that. Therefore, practical limitations associated with the maximum magnetic field strength in the cobalt steel and the stress in the rotating components limit the temperature to about 1200 F. The objective of this effort is to determine the limits in temperature and speed of a magnetic bearing operating in an engine. Our approach is to use our in

  13. System Modeling of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Mahderekal, Isaac; Shen, Bo; Vineyard, Edward

    2012-01-01

    To improve the system performance of the GHP, modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated by using ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Software, which is used to predict steady-state heating and cooling performance of variable-speed vapor compression air-to-air heat pumps for a wide range of operational variables. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine, the SHR can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% in rated operating conditions.

  14. Object-oriented approach for gas turbine engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.; Felder, James L.

    1995-01-01

    An object-oriented gas turbine engine simulation program was developed. This program is a prototype for a more complete, commercial grade engine performance program now being proposed as part of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulator (NPSS). This report discusses architectural issues of this complex software system and the lessons learned from developing the prototype code. The prototype code is a fully functional, general purpose engine simulation program, however, only the component models necessary to model a transient compressor test rig have been written. The production system will be capable of steady state and transient modeling of almost any turbine engine configuration. Chief among the architectural considerations for this code was the framework in which the various software modules will interact. These modules include the equation solver, simulation code, data model, event handler, and user interface. Also documented in this report is the component based design of the simulation module and the inter-component communication paradigm. Object class hierarchies for some of the code modules are given.

  15. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  16. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there typically exist hot areas in the combustor exit plane. These hot areas limit the operating temperature at the turbine inlet and thus constrain performance and efficiency. Finally, it is necessary to optimize the fuel-air ratio and flame temperature throughout the combustor to minimize the production of pollutants. In recent years, there has been considerable activity addressing Active Combustion Control. NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Combustion Control Technology effort aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines. Analysis and experiments are tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. Considerable progress has been shown in demonstrating technologies for Combustion Instability Control, Pattern Factor Control, and Emissions Minimizing Control. Future plans are to advance the maturity of active combustion control technology to eventual demonstration in an engine environment.

  17. Development of a gas engine-driven chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panora, R.; Koplow, M.; Gehret, J.; Morgan, J.

    1990-05-01

    A development of a natural gas engine-driven chiller with a nominal capacity of 150 tons and an optional engine and exhaust waste-heat recovery system totaling approximately 700,000 Btu/hr is described. The design is based on a conventional vapor-compression cycle, which uses an oil-flooded twin-screw compressor. Three program phases are presented: (1) initial development of the product and assessment of its market viability; (2) final laboratory development and field experiment of an early prototype; and (3) a nationwide field test of 7 production prototypes. The reliability and serviceability of the chiller have met expectations and have proven to be within the bounds of acceptability for this type of equipment.

  18. NDE of titanium alloy MMC rings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Percival, Larry D.; Yancey, Robert N.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in the processing and fabrication of metal matrix composites (MMC's) requires appropriate mechanical and nondestructive testing methods. These methods are needed to characterize properties, assess integrity, and predict the life of engine components such as compressor rotors, blades, and vanes. Capabilities and limitations of several state-of-the-art nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are investigated for characterizing titanium MMC rings for gas turbine engines. The use of NDE technologies such as x-ray computed tomography, radiography, and ultrasonics in identifying fabrication-related problems that caused defects in components is examined. Acousto-ultrasonics was explored to assess degradation of material mechanical properties by using stress wave factor and ultrasonic velocity measurements before and after the burst testing of the rings.

  19. Hydrogen Gas as a Fuel in Direct Injection Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanasekaran, Chinnathambi; Mohankumar, Gabriael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problem caused by the greenhouse gases, for protecting environment and saving conventional fuels. In this study, a dual fuel engine of hydrogen and diesel was investigated. Hydrogen was conceded through the intake port, and simultaneously air and diesel was pervaded into the cylinder. Using electronic gas injector and electronic control unit, the injection timing and duration varied. In this investigation, a single cylinder, KIRLOSKAR AV1, DI Diesel engine was used. Hydrogen injection timing was fixed at TDC and injection duration was timed for 30°, 60°, and 90° crank angles. The injection timing of diesel was fixed at 23° BTDC. When hydrogen is mixed with inlet air, emanation of HC, CO and CO2 decreased without any emission (exhaustion) of smoke while increasing the brake thermal efficiency.

  20. Experimental study on engine gas-path component fault monitoring using exhaust gas electrostatic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianzhong; Zuo, Hongfu; Liu, Pengpeng; Wen, Zhenhua

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the recent development in engine gas-path components health monitoring using electrostatic sensors in combination with signal-processing techniques. Two ground-based engine electrostatic monitoring experiments are reported and the exhaust gas electrostatic monitoring signal-based fault-detection method is proposed. It is found that the water washing, oil leakage and combustor linear cracking result in an increase in the activity level of the electrostatic monitoring signal, which can be detected by the electrostatic monitoring system. For on-line health monitoring of the gas-path components, a baseline model-based fault-detection method is proposed and the multivariate state estimation technique is used to establish the baseline model for the electrostatic monitoring signal. The method is applied to a data set from a turbo-shaft engine electrostatic monitoring experiment. The results of the case study show that the system with the developed method is capable of detecting the gas-path component fault in an on-line fashion.

  1. Fabrication of ceramic components for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, F.; Solidum, E.

    1985-01-01

    The AGT101 ceramic gas turbine engine feasibility study has made use of the slip casting of silicon or silicon nitride powders to produce either reaction-bonded or sintered components such as turbine rotors, turbine shrouds, and inner and outer diffusers. Attention is given to the effects of processing parameters on the microstructure and properties of the finished components; the parameters encompass powder particle size distribution, casting slip viscosity, pH, and solid content fraction. The green slip cast components were consolidated by nitriding, sintering, or sinter/HIPping.

  2. Fuel premixing module for gas turbine engine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Jushan (Inventor); Rizk, Nader K. (Inventor); Razdan, Mohan K. (Inventor); Marshall, Andre W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fuel-air premixing module is designed to reduce emissions from a gas turbine engine. In one form, the premixing module includes a central pilot premixer module with a main premixer module positioned thereround. Each of the portions of the fuel-air premixing module include an axial inflow swirler with a plurality of fixed swirler vanes. Fuel is injected into the main premixer module between the swirler vanes of the axial inflow swirler and at an acute angle relative to the centerline of the premixing module.

  3. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Research and development into thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines is reviewed critically. The type of coating systems developed for aircraft applications are found to be preferred for clear fuel electric utility applications. These coating systems consists of a layer of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria ceramic over a layer of MCrAly bond coat. They are not recommended for use when molten salts are presented. Efforts to understand coating degradation in dirty environments and to develop corrosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  4. Multivariable synthesis with transfer functions. [applications to gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peczkowski, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A transfer function design theory for multivariable control synthesis is highlighted. The use of unique transfer function matrices and two simple, basic relationships - a synthesis equation and a design equation - are presented and illustrated. This multivariable transfer function approach provides the designer with a capability to specify directly desired dynamic relationships between command variables and controlled or response variables. At the same time, insight and influence over response, simplifications, and internal stability is afforded by the method. A general, comprehensive multivariable synthesis capability is indicated including nonminmum phase and unstable plants. Gas turbine engine examples are used to illustrate the ideas and method.

  5. Aircraft Engine Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: Public Benchmarking Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Borguet, Sebastien; Leonard, Olivier; Zhang, Xiaodong (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem has been created and made publicly available. This software tool, referred to as the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDiMES), has been constructed based on feedback provided by the aircraft EHM community. It provides a standard benchmark problem enabling users to develop, evaluate and compare diagnostic methods. This paper will present an overview of ProDiMES along with a description of four gas path diagnostic methods developed and applied to the problem. These methods, which include analytical and empirical diagnostic techniques, will be described and associated blind-test-case metric results will be presented and compared. Lessons learned along with recommendations for improving the public benchmarking processes will also be presented and discussed.

  6. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2006-03-31

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. This represents a substantial (30-40%) reduction of the ringpack friction alone. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. Further improvements via piston, lubricant, and surface designs offer additional opportunities. Tests of low-friction lubricants are in progress and preliminary results are very promising. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction

  7. Cascading Tesla Oscillating Flow Diode for Stirling Engine Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger

    2012-01-01

    Replacing the mechanical check-valve in a Stirling engine with a micromachined, non-moving-part flow diode eliminates moving parts and reduces the risk of microparticle clogging. At very small scales, helium gas has sufficient mass momentum that it can act as a flow controller in a similar way as a transistor can redirect electrical signals with a smaller bias signal. The innovation here forces helium gas to flow in predominantly one direction by offering a clear, straight-path microchannel in one direction of flow, but then through a sophisticated geometry, the reversed flow is forced through a tortuous path. This redirection is achieved by using microfluid channel flow to force the much larger main flow into this tortuous path. While microdiodes have been developed in the past, this innovation cascades Tesla diodes to create a much higher pressure in the gas bearing supply plenum. In addition, the special shape of the leaves captures loose particles that would otherwise clog the microchannel of the gas bearing pads.

  8. Methods of Si based ceramic components volatilization control in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John; Dion Ouellet, Noemie

    2016-09-06

    A method of controlling volatilization of silicon based components in a gas turbine engine includes measuring, estimating and/or predicting a variable related to operation of the gas turbine engine; correlating the variable to determine an amount of silicon to control volatilization of the silicon based components in the gas turbine engine; and injecting silicon into the gas turbine engine to control volatilization of the silicon based components. A gas turbine with a compressor, combustion system, turbine section and silicon injection system may be controlled by a controller that implements the control method.

  9. Evaluation of Methods for the Determination of Black Carbon Emissions from an Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines consist of nanometer size black carbon (BC) particles plus gas-phase sulfur and organic compounds which undergo gas-to-particle conversion downstream of the engine as the plume cools and dilutes. In this study, four BC measurement ...

  10. Sand effects on thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walock, Michael; Barnett, Blake; Ghoshal, Anindya; Murugan, Muthuvel; Swab, Jeffrey; Pepi, Marc; Hopkins, David; Gazonas, George; Kerner, Kevin

    Accumulation and infiltration of molten/ semi-molten sand and subsequent formation of calcia-magnesia-alumina-silicate (CMAS) deposits in gas turbine engines continues to be a significant problem for aviation assets. This complex problem is compounded by the large variations in the composition, size, and topology of natural sands, gas generator turbine temperatures, thermal barrier coating properties, and the incoming particulate's momentum. In order to simplify the materials testing process, significant time and resources have been spent in the development of synthetic sand mixtures. However, there is debate whether these mixtures accurately mimic the damage observed in field-returned engines. With this study, we provide a direct comparison of CMAS deposits from both natural and synthetic sands. Using spray deposition techniques, 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings are deposited onto bond-coated, Ni-superalloy discs. Each sample is coated with a sand slurry, either natural or synthetic, and exposed to a high temperature flame for 1 hour. Test samples are characterized before and after flame exposure. In addition, the test samples will be compared to field-returned equipment. This research was sponsored by the US Army Research Laboratory, and was accomplished under Cooperative Agreement # W911NF-12-2-0019.

  11. Dynamic Control of Aerodynamic Instabilities in Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greitzer, E. M.; Epstein, A. H.; Guenette, G. R.; Gysling, D. L.; Haynes, J.; Hendricks, G. J.; Paduano, J.; Simon, J. S.; Valavani, L.

    1992-01-01

    This lecture discusses the use of closed loop control at the component level to enhance the performance of gas turbine engines. The general theme is the suppression of flow instabilities (rotating stall and surge) through use of feedback, either actively or by means of the aeromechanical coupling provided by tailored structures. The basic concepts that underlie active control of turbomachinery instability, and their experimental demonstration, are first described for a centrifugal compressor. It is shown that the mechanism for stabilization is associated with damping of unsteady perturbations in the compression system, and the steady-state performance can thus remain virtually unaltered. Control of instability using a tailored structure is then discussed, along with experimental results illustrating the flow range extension achievable using this technique. A considerably more complex problem is presented by active control or rotating stall where the multi-dimensional features mean that distributed sensing and actuation are required. In addition, there are basic questions concerning unsteady fluid mechanics; these imply the need to resolve issues connected with identification of suitable signals as well as with definition of appropriate wave launchers for implementing the feedback. These issues are discussed and the results of initial successful demonstrations of active control of rotating stall in a single-stage and a three-stage axial compressor are presented. The lecture concludes with suggestions for future research on dynamic control of gas turbine engines.

  12. Catalytic combustion for the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.; Mroz, T. S.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel injectors to provide a premixed prevaporized fuel-air mixture are studied. An evaluation of commercial catalysts was performed as part of a program leading to the demonstration of a low emissions combustor for an automotive gas turbine engine. At an inlet temperature of 800 K, a pressure of 500,000 Pa and a velocity of 20 m/s a multiple-jet injector produced less than + or - 10 percent variation in Jet-A fuel-air ratio and 100 percent varporization with less than 0.5 percent pressure drop. Fifteen catalytic reactors were tested with propane fuel at an inlet temperature of 800 K, a pressure of 300,000 Pa and inlet velocities of 10 to 25 m/s. Seven of the reactors had less than 2 percent pressure drop while meeting emissions goals of 13.6 gCO/kg fuel and 1.64 gHC/kg fuel at the velocities and exit temperatures required for operation in an automotive gas turbine engine. NO sub x emissions at all conditions were less than 0.5 ppm. All tests were performed with steady state conditions.

  13. A study of external fuel vaporization. [for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Chiappetta, L.; Baker, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate external vaporizer designs for an aircraft gas turbine engine are evaluated with respect to fuel thermal stability, integration of the vaporizer system into the aircraft engine, engine and vaporizer dynamic response, startup and altitude restart, engine performance, control requirements, safety, and maintenance. The selected concept is shown to offer potential gains in engine performance in terms of reduced specific fuel consumption and improved engine thrust/weight ratio. The thrust/weight improvement can be traded against vaporization system weight.

  14. Combustion gas properties of various fuels of interest to gas turbine engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.; Trout, A. M.; Wear, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A series of computations were made using the gas property computational schemes of Gordon and McBride to compute the gas properties and species concentration of ASTM-Jet A and dry air. The computed gas thermodynamic properties in a revised graphical format which gives information which is useful to combustion engineers is presented. A series of reports covering the properties of many fuel and air combinations will be published. The graphical presentation displays on one chart of the output of hundreds of computer sheets. The reports will contain microfiche cards, from which complete tables and graphs can be obtained. The extent of the planned effort and is documented samples of the many tables and charts that will be available on the microfiche cards are presented.

  15. Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbine Engines

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to test and substantiate erosion-resistant (ER) nanocoatings for application on compressor airfoils for gas turbine engines in both industrial gas turbines and commercial aviation.

  16. Computational thermo-fluid dynamics contributions to advanced gas turbine engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rohlik, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The design practices for the gas turbine are traced throughout history with particular emphasis on the calculational or analytical methods. Three principal components of the gas turbine engine will be considered: namely, the compressor, the combustor and the turbine.

  17. Catalyst durability evaluation for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, G. C.; Pessagno, S. L.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion has demonstrated the ability to provide low NO(x) emissions while maintaining high combustion efficiency. Recently, under joint NASA Lewis, EPA, and Acurex sponsorship, a catalytic reactor was tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate durability in combustion environments representative of advanced automotive gas turbine engines. At a 740K air preheat temperature and a propane fuel/air ratio of 0.028 by mass, the adiabatic flame temperature was held at about 1700K. The graded cell monolithic reactor measured 5 cm in diameter by 10.2 cm in length and was operated at a reference velocity of 13.4 m/s at 1 atmosphere pressure. Measured NO(x) levels remained below 5 ppm while unburned hydrocarbon concentrations registered near zero and carbon monoxide levels were nominally below 20 ppm. The durability test included several parametric turndown studies and ended with a series of on/off cycling tests to further characterize reactor performance.

  18. Fuel injection assembly for gas turbine engine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candy, Anthony J. (Inventor); Glynn, Christopher C. (Inventor); Barrett, John E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injection assembly for a gas turbine engine combustor, including at least one fuel stem, a plurality of concentrically disposed tubes positioned within each fuel stem, wherein a cooling supply flow passage, a cooling return flow passage, and a tip fuel flow passage are defined thereby, and at least one fuel tip assembly connected to each fuel stem so as to be in flow communication with the flow passages, wherein an active cooling circuit for each fuel stem and fuel tip assembly is maintained by providing all active fuel through the cooling supply flow passage and the cooling return flow passage during each stage of combustor operation. The fuel flowing through the active cooling circuit is then collected so that a predetermined portion thereof is provided to the tip fuel flow passage for injection by the fuel tip assembly.

  19. Gas turbine engine combustor can with trapped vortex cavity

    DOEpatents

    Burrus, David Louis; Joshi, Narendra Digamber; Haynes, Joel Meier; Feitelberg, Alan S.

    2005-10-04

    A gas turbine engine combustor can downstream of a pre-mixer has a pre-mixer flowpath therein and circumferentially spaced apart swirling vanes disposed across the pre-mixer flowpath. A primary fuel injector is positioned for injecting fuel into the pre-mixer flowpath. A combustion chamber surrounded by an annular combustor liner disposed in supply flow communication with the pre-mixer. An annular trapped dual vortex cavity located at an upstream end of the combustor liner is defined between an annular aft wall, an annular forward wall, and a circular radially outer wall formed therebetween. A cavity opening at a radially inner end of the cavity is spaced apart from the radially outer wall. Air injection first holes are disposed through the forward wall and air injection second holes are disposed through the aft wall. Fuel injection holes are disposed through at least one of the forward and aft walls.

  20. Cooled highly twisted airfoil for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kildea, R.J.

    1988-04-19

    This patent describes a cooled highly twisted airfoil for use in a gas turbine engine. The airfoil has a first cooling air cavity adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil, and a second cooling air cavity, separated from the first cavity by a wall. The second cavity provides cooling air to the first cavity by means of cooling holes provided in the wall. The improvement is characterized by: the wall comprising an integrally formed, continuous warped wall, defined as a surface of revolution about an axis, the axis determined such that the axis intersects the plane of a section close to a desired centerline of a series of impingement holes aligned in opposition to the leading edge, whereby cooling air is directed relatively precisely to the leading edge of the highly twisted airfoil through the impingement holes.

  1. Free-piston regenerative hot gas hydraulic engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A displacer piston which is driven pneumatically by a high-pressure or low-pressure gas is included in a free-piston regenerative hydraulic engine. Actuation of the displacer piston circulates the working fluid through a heater, a regenerator and a cooler. The present invention includes an inertial mass such as a piston or a hydraulic fluid column to effectively store and supply energy during portions of the cycle. Power is transmitted from the working fluid to a hydraulic fluid across a diaphragm or lightweight piston to achieve a hydraulic power out-put. The displacer piston of the present invention may be driven pneumatically, hydraulically or electromagnetically. In addition, the displacer piston and the inertial mass of the present invention may be positioned on the same side of the diaphragm member or may be separated by the diaphragm member.

  2. Axially staged combustion system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Bland, Robert J.

    2009-12-15

    An axially staged combustion system is provided for a gas turbine engine comprising a main body structure having a plurality of first and second injectors. First structure provides fuel to at least one of the first injectors. The fuel provided to the one first injector is adapted to mix with air and ignite to produce a flame such that the flame associated with the one first injector defines a flame front having an average length when measured from a reference surface of the main body structure. Each of the second injectors comprising a section extending from the reference surface of the main body structure through the flame front and having a length greater than the average length of the flame front. Second structure provides fuel to at least one of the second injectors. The fuel passes through the one second injector and exits the one second injector at a location axially spaced from the flame front.

  3. Fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J.

    2012-10-09

    A fuel injector in a combustor apparatus of a gas turbine engine. An outer wall of the injector defines an interior volume in which an intermediate wall is disposed. A first gap is formed between the outer wall and the intermediate wall. The intermediate wall defines an internal volume in which an inner wall is disposed. A second gap is formed between the intermediate wall and the inner wall. The second gap receives cooling fluid that cools the injector. The cooling fluid provides convective cooling to the intermediate wall as it flows within the second gap. The cooling fluid also flows through apertures in the intermediate wall into the first gap where it provides impingement cooling to the outer wall and provides convective cooling to the outer wall. The inner wall defines a passageway that delivers fuel into a liner downstream from a main combustion zone.

  4. Engineering a new material for hot gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Doraiswamy, L.K.; Constant, K.

    2000-03-01

    The engineering development of a promising sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas was initiated and preliminary results are presented. The sorbent is calcium-based and is designed to be regenerated and reused repeatedly. It is prepared by pelletizing powdered limestone in a rotating drum pelletizer followed by the application of a coating which becomes a strong, porous shell upon further treatment. The resulting spherical pellets combine the high reactivity of lime with the strength of an inert protective shell. Preliminary work indicates that a satisfactory shell material is comprised of a mixture of ultrafine alumina powder, somewhat coarser alumina particles, and pulverized limestone which upon heating to 1,373 K (1,100 C) becomes a coherent solid through the mechanism of particle sintering. Several batches of core-in-shell pellets were prepared and tested with encouraging results.

  5. Combustor for a low-emissions gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Glezer, Boris; Greenwood, Stuart A.; Dutta, Partha; Moon, Hee-Koo

    2000-01-01

    Many government entities regulated emission from gas turbine engines including CO. CO production is generally reduced when CO reacts with excess oxygen at elevated temperatures to form CO2. Many manufactures use film cooling of a combustor liner adjacent to a combustion zone to increase durability of the combustion liner. Film cooling quenches reactions of CO with excess oxygen to form CO2. Cooling the combustor liner on a cold side (backside) away from the combustion zone reduces quenching. Furthermore, placing a plurality of concavities on the cold side enhances the cooling of the combustor liner. Concavities result in very little pressure reduction such that air used to cool the combustor liner may also be used in the combustion zone. An expandable combustor housing maintains a predetermined distance between the combustor housing and combustor liner.

  6. Airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-12-21

    An airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine is provided. The airfoil comprises a main body comprising a wall structure defining an inner cavity adapted to receive a cooling air. The wall structure includes a first diffusion region and at least one first metering opening extending from the inner cavity to the first diffusion region. The wall structure further comprises at least one cooling circuit comprising a second diffusion region and at least one second metering opening extending from the first diffusion region to the second diffusion region. The at least one cooling circuit may further comprise at least one third metering opening, at least one third diffusion region and a fourth diffusion region.

  7. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies

  8. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models useful for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. TBC spalling was attributed to a combination of mechanisms such as metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress concentrations at free surfaces due to dissimilar materials, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by local radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, transient temperature gradients across the ceramic layer and component design features. TBC spalling life analytical models were developed based on observations of TBC failure modes and plausible failure theories. TBC failure was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceeded the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  9. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1997-03-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas tur-bine engines are presented. Electron beam/physical vapor-deposited and plasma-sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: (1) metal oxidation at the ceramic/metal interface, (2) ceramic/metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and inter-face roughness, (3) material properties and mechanical behavior, (4) component design features, (5) tem-perature gradients, (6) ceramic/metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, and (7) object impact damage. Analytical models for TBC spalling life are proposed based on observations of TBC spall-ing and plausible failure theories. Spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic/metal interface). Knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimen-tal evidence and analytical understanding of TBC failure are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC spalling failure trends.

  10. Ducted fan type gas turbine engine power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Balzer, R.L.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes a ducted fan type power plant which is cable of generating reverse thrust. It comprises: a gas turbine engine; a fan driven by the engine; an elongated bypass duct which is open at its front and rear ends and surrounds the fan, the bypass duct having a fixed forward section and a rear section which can be translated away from the fixed section as the pitch of the fan blades is reversed to reverse the flow of air through the bypass duct and generate a thrust directed from the front toward the rear of the power plant, thereby allowing air to be induced into the bypass duct through the downstream end thereof and also through the annular gap between the fixed and translated, rear sections of the bypass duct; means for generating a supply of high velocity fluid; means for injecting the high velocity fluid into the bypass duct from a locus to the rear means for delivering the high velocity fluid from the generating means to the injecting means.

  11. LES of an ignition sequence in a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Boileau, M.; Staffelbach, G.; Cuenot, B.; Poinsot, T.; Berat, C.

    2008-07-15

    Being able to ignite or reignite a gas turbine engine in a cold and rarefied atmosphere is a critical issue for many manufacturers. From a fundamental point of view, the ignition of the first burner and the flame propagation from one burner to another are phenomena that are usually not studied. The present work is a large eddy simulation (LES) of these phenomena. To simulate a complete ignition sequence in an annular chamber, LES has been applied to the full 360 geometry, including 18 burners. This geometry corresponds to a real gas turbine chamber. Massively parallel computing (700 processors on a Cray XT3 machine) was essential to perform such a large calculation. Results show that liquid fuel injection has a strong influence on the ignition times. Moreover, the rate of flame progress from burner to burner is much higher than the turbulent flame speed due to a major effect of thermal expansion. This flame speed is also strongly modified by the main burner aerodynamics due to the swirled injection. Finally, the variability of the combustor sectors and quadrant ignition times is highlighted. (author)

  12. Development of a Gas-Fed Pulse Detonation Research Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Hutt, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In response to the growing need for empirical data on pulse detonation engine performance and operation, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and placed into operation a low-cost gas-fed pulse detonation research engine. The guiding design strategy was to achieve a simple and flexible research apparatus, which was inexpensive to build and operate. As such, the engine was designed to operate as a heat sink device, and testing was limited to burst-mode operation with run durations of a few seconds. Wherever possible, maximum use was made of standard off-the-shelf industrial or automotive components. The 5-cm diameter primary tube is about 90-cm long and has been outfitted with a multitude of sensor and optical ports. The primary tube is fed by a coaxial injector through an initiator tube, which is inserted directly into the injector head face. Four auxiliary coaxial injectors are also integrated into the injector head assembly. All propellant flow is controlled with industrial solenoid valves. An automotive electronic ignition system was adapted for use, and spark plugs are mounted in both tubes so that a variety of ignition schemes can be examined. A microprocessor-based fiber-optic engine control system was developed to provide precise control over valve and ignition timing. Initial shakedown testing with hydrogen/oxygen mixtures verified the need for Schelkin spirals in both the initiator and primary tubes to ensure rapid development of the detonation wave. Measured pressure wave time-of-flight indicated detonation velocities of 2.4 km/sec and 2.2 km/sec in the initiator and primary tubes, respectively. These values implied a fuel-lean mixture corresponding to an H2 volume fraction near 0.5. The axial distribution for the detonation velocity was found to be essentially constant along the primary tube. Time-resolved thrust profiles were also acquired for both underfilled and overfilled tube conditions. These profiles are consistent with previous time

  13. Counter-Rotatable Fan Gas Turbine Engine with Axial Flow Positive Displacement Worm Gas Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A counter-rotatable fan turbine engine includes a counter-rotatable fan section, a worm gas generator, and a low pressure turbine to power the counter-rotatable fan section. The low pressure turbine maybe counter-rotatable or have a single direction of rotation in which case it powers the counter-rotatable fan section through a gearbox. The gas generator has inner and outer bodies having offset inner and outer axes extending through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes and extending radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. A combustor section extends through at least a portion of the second section.

  14. 46 CFR 181.420 - Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-engineered fixed gas fire extinguishing systems. 181.420 Section 181.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fixed Fire Extinguishing and Detecting Systems § 181.420 Pre-engineered fixed gas...

  15. Assessment of gas engine drives for CNG compressors at NGV fueling stations. Final technical report, June 1993-April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Keder, J.; Darrow, K.G.

    1995-06-01

    This report assesses the technical and economic issues associated with the use of gas engine drives for gas compressors at natural gas vehicle (NGV) fueling stations. The use of gas engine drives and electric motor drives is compared for typical time fill, fast fill, and combined fill applications. NGV fueling station equipment is described with an emphasis on gas engine and electric motor drives, their installation, operation, and maintenance. The economic benefits of gas engine drives and electric motor drives are compared using sensitivity and operating cost analyses. A perspective of the current market for gas engine drives is also presented, as well as several case histories.

  16. Optical measurement of gas turbine engine soot particle effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Litchford, R.J.; Sun, F.; Few, J.D.; Lewis, J.W.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses optical-based techniques for measuring soot particulate loading in the exhaust stream of gas turbine engines. The multi-angle scattering and multi-wavelength extinction of light beams by ensembles of submicrometer soot particles was investigated as a diagnostic means of inferring particle field characteristics. That is, the particle size distribution function and particle number density were deduced using an innovative downhill simplex inversion algorithm for fitting the deconvolved Mie-based scattering/extinction integral to the measured scattering/extinction signals. In this work, the particle size distribution was characterized by the widely accepted two-parameter log-normal distribution function, which is fully defined with the specification of the mean particle diameter and the standard deviation of the distribution. The accuracy and precision of the algorithm were evaluated for soot particle applications by applying the technique to noise-perturbed synthetic data in which the signal noise component is obtained by Monte Carlo sampling of Gaussian distributed experimental errors of 4, 6, and 10%. The algorithm was shown to yield results having an inaccuracy of less than 10% for the highest noise levels and an imprecision equal to or less than the experimental error. Multi-wavelength extinction experiments with a laboratory bench-top burner yielded a mean particle diameter of 0.039 {micro}m and indicated that molecular absorption by organic vapor-phase molecules in the ultraviolet region should not significantly influence the measurements. A field demonstration test was conducted on one of the JT-12D engines of a Sabre Liner jet aircraft. This experiment yielded mean diameters of 0.040 {micro}m and 0.036 {micro}m and standard deviations of 0.032 {micro}m for scattering and extinction methods, respectively. The total particulate mass flow rate at idle was estimated to be 0.54 kg/h.

  17. Determination of cycle configuration of gas turbines and aircraft engines by an optimization procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuijikawa, Y.; Nagaoka, M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analyses and optimization of simple and sophisticated cycles, particularly for various gas turbine engines and aero-engines (including the scramjet engine) to achieve maximum performance. The optimization of such criteria as thermal efficiency, specific output, and total performance for gas turbine engines, and overall efficiency, nondimensional thrust, and specific impulse for aero-engines has been performed by the optimization procedure with the multiplier method. Comparison of results with analytical solutions establishes the validity of the optimization procedure.

  18. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  19. Computer code for estimating installed performance of aircraft gas turbine engines. Volume 1: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    A computerized method which utilizes the engine performance data is described. The method estimates the installed performance of aircraft gas turbine engines. This installation includes: engine weight and dimensions, inlet and nozzle internal performance and drag, inlet and nacelle weight, and nacelle drag.

  20. Computer code for estimating installed performance of aircraft gas turbine engines. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    A computerized method which utilizes the engine performance data and estimates the installed performance of aircraft gas turbine engines is presented. This installation includes: engine weight and dimensions, inlet and nozzle internal performance and drag, inlet and nacelle weight, and nacelle drag. A user oriented description of the program input requirements, program output, deck setup, and operating instructions is presented.

  1. Engineering gas turbines for best value over time

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.

    1998-07-01

    Operation and Maintenance (O and M) and availability are increasingly important in power plant economics. The life-cycle cost of a combined cycle power plant is dominated by fuel cost, which exceeds capital and O and M costs combined. As economic and technological factors have reduced fuel and capital costs, O and M has become a larger fraction of total life-cycle cost. Furthermore, uncertainty on O and M cost impacts purchase decisions, being equivalent to 1% in levelized cost of electricity or a 1.5% improvement in heat rate. For a typical base-loaded, high-efficiency plant, a 1% change in availability is equivalent to 11--14 $/kW (depending on fuel cost) in equivalent capital value. Designing for multiple objectives. The design of gas turbines has always involved considering and balancing multiple requirements, a challenge that has grown increasingly complex as applications have become more varied, operating requirements more demanding, and technological options more numerous. Today, advanced analytic techniques, such as Quality Function Deployment (QFD) help assure that all customer requirements are weighed, and the most appropriate and effective technologies are applied to meet them. An example is presented in this paper. Remote monitoring and diagnostics of operating GE gas turbines are now being used to optimize output and efficiency, schedule maintenance, and warn of potential impending problems. Multiple sensors on operating machines continually measure key operating parameters and communicate data to the GE Power Answer Center in Schenectady, where actual operating conditions are compared with baseline standards derived from design conditions and field experience. Trends are tracked, and GE engineers immediately contact the customer regarding any potential anomalous conditions that may require attention.

  2. Apparatus for sensor failure detection and correction in a gas turbine engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spang, H. A., III; Wanger, R. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A gas turbine engine control system maintains a selected level of engine performance despite the failure or abnormal operation of one or more engine parameter sensors. The control system employs a continuously updated engine model which simulates engine performance and generates signals representing real time estimates of the engine parameter sensor signals. The estimate signals are transmitted to a control computational unit which utilizes them in lieu of the actual engine parameter sensor signals to control the operation of the engine. The estimate signals are also compared with the corresponding actual engine parameter sensor signals and the resulting difference signals are utilized to update the engine model. If a particular difference signal exceeds specific tolerance limits, the difference signal is inhibited from updating the model and a sensor failure indication is provided to the engine operator.

  3. An overview of aerospace gas turbine technology of relevance to the development of the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. G.; Miller, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Technology areas related to gas turbine propulsion systems with potential for application to the automotive gas turbine engine are discussed. Areas included are: system steady-state and transient performance prediction techniques, compressor and turbine design and performance prediction programs and effects of geometry, combustor technology and advanced concepts, and ceramic coatings and materials technology.

  4. High temperature strain gage technology for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtel, Edward J.; McDaniel, Amos D.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a six month study that addressed specific issues to transfer the Pd-13Cr static strain sensor to a gas turbine engine environment. The application issues that were addressed include: (1) evaluation of a miniature, variable potentiometer for use as the ballast resistor, in conjunction with a conventional strain gage signal conditioning unit; (2) evaluation of a metal sheathed, platinum conductor leadwire assembly for use with the three-wire sensor; and (3) subjecting the sensor to dynamic strain cyclic testing to determine fatigue characteristics. Results indicate a useful static strain gage system at all temperature levels up to 1350 F. The fatigue characteristics also appear to be very promising, indicating a potential use in dynamic strain measurement applications. The procedure, set-up, and data for all tests are presented in this report. This report also discusses the specific strain gage installation technique for the Pd-13Cr gage because of its potential impact on the quality of the output data.

  5. An Overview of Magnetic Bearing Technology for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Daniel J.; Jansen, Mark J.; Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of the magnetic bearing and its use in exotic applications has been conceptualized for many years, over a century, in fact. Patented, passive systems using permanent magnets date back over 150 years. More recently, scientists of the 1930s began investigating active systems using electromagnets for high-speed ultracentrifuges. However, passive magnetic bearings are physically unstable and active systems only provide proper stiffness and damping through sophisticated controllers and algorithms. This is precisely why, until the last decade, magnetic bearings did not become a practical alternative to rolling element bearings. Today, magnetic bearing technology has become viable because of advances in micro-processing controllers that allow for confident and robust active control. Further advances in the following areas: rotor and stator materials and designs which maximize flux, minimize energy losses, and minimize stress limitations; wire materials and coatings for high temperature operation; high-speed micro processing for advanced controller designs and extremely robust capabilities; back-up bearing technology for providing a viable touchdown surface; and precision sensor technology; have put magnetic bearings on the forefront of advanced, lubrication free support systems. This paper will discuss a specific joint program for the advancement of gas turbine engines and how it implies the vitality of magnetic bearings, a brief comparison between magnetic bearings and other bearing technologies in both their advantages and limitations, and an examination of foreseeable solutions to historically perceived limitations to magnetic bearing.

  6. Low NO(x) potential of gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to correlate emission levels of gas turbine engines. The predictions of NO(x) emissions are based on a review of the literature of previous low NO(x) combustor programs and analytical chemical kinetic calculations. Concepts included in the literature review consisted of lean-premixed-prevaporized (LPP), rich burn/quick quench/lean burn (RQL), and direct injection. The NO(x) emissions were found to be an exponential function of adiabatic combustion temperature over a wide range of inlet temperatures, pressures and (lean) fuel-air ratios. A simple correlation of NO(x) formation with time was not found. The LPP and direct injection (using gaseous fuels) concepts have the lowest NO(x) emissions of the three concepts. The RQL data has higher values of NO(x) than the LPP concept, probably due to the stoichiometric temperatures and NO(x) production that occur during the quench step. Improvements in the quick quench step could reduce the NO(x) emissions to the LPP levels. The low NO(x) potential of LPP is offset by the operational disadvantages of its narrow stability limits and its susceptibility to autoignition/flashback. The Rich-Burn/Quick-Quench/Lean-Burn (RQL) and the direct injection concepts have the advantage of wider stability limits comparable to conventional combustors.

  7. Friction damping of flutter in gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis investigates the feasibility of using friction dampers to control flutter in gas turbine engine rotor stages. First, the stabilizing effects of blade-to-ground dampers were studied on the basis of a single degree of freedom model of an isolated blade. To simulate aerodynamic instability, the viscous damping associated with each blade was taken to be negative. The following issues were addressed: the range of initial conditions over which the response is stable; the maximum negative damping that can be stabilized; the effect of external excitation; and the determination of optimum damper parameters. Secondly, the physical concepts and mathematical techniques required to analyze and understand the effects of friction dampers on aerodynamically unstable rotor stages were developed. A lumped parameter model was chosen for the rotor stage and the viscous damping associated with each blade is again taken to be negative. Results for 3, 4, and 5 bladed disks are discussed. Lastly, the influence of friction on the torsional blade flutter is examined, using Whitehead's model of incompressible fluid flow. On the basis of the results for 3, 6, 9, and 12 bladed disks, the use of friction dampers in controlling flutter appears promising.

  8. Counterrotatable booster compressor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniz, Thomas Ory (Inventor); Orlando, Robert Joseph (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A counterrotatable booster compressor assembly for a gas turbine engine having a counterrotatable fan section with a first fan blade row connected to a first drive shaft and a second fan blade row axially spaced from the first fan blade row and connected to a second drive shaft, the counterrotatable booster compressor assembly including a first compressor blade row connected to the first drive shaft and a second compressor blade row interdigitated with the first compressor blade row and connected to the second drive shaft. A portion of each fan blade of the second fan blade row extends through a flowpath of the counterrotatable booster compressor so as to function as a compressor blade in the second compressor blade row. The counterrotatable booster compressor further includes a first platform member integral with each fan blade of the second fan blade row at a first location so as to form an inner flowpath for the counterrotatable booster compressor and a second platform member integral with each fan blade of the second fan blade row at a second location so as to form an outer flowpath for the counterrotatable booster compressor.

  9. Advanced solidification processing of an industrial gas turbine engine component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Mei Ling; Price, Allen; Bellows, Richard S.

    2003-03-01

    This paper will describe the efforts of the Advanced Turbine Airfoil Manufacturing Technology Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Howmet Research Corporation. The purpose of the program is to develop single-crystal and directionally solidified casting technologies to benefit Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) industrial and utility gas turbine engines. The focus is on defining and implementing advanced Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace enhancements that provide precise control of mold temperatures during solidification. Emphasis was placed on increasing the total magnitude of thermal gradients while minimizing the difference in maximum and minimum gradients produced during the solidification process. Advanced VIM casting techniques were applied to Solar Turbines Incorporated’s Titan 130 First Stage High Pressure Turbine Blade under the ATS program. A comparison of the advanced VIM casting process to the conventional Bridgeman casting process will be presented as it pertains to the thermal gradients achieved during solidification, microstructure, elemental partitioning characterization, and solution heat treat response.

  10. High temperature strain gage technology for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Edward J.; Mcdaniel, Amos D.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a six month study that addressed specific issues to transfer the Pd-13Cr static strain sensor to a gas turbine engine environment. The application issues that were addressed include: (1) evaluation of a miniature, variable potentiometer for use as the ballast resistor, in conjunction with a conventional strain gage signal conditioning unit; (2) evaluation of a metal sheathed, platinum conductor leadwire assembly for use with the three-wire sensor; and (3) subjecting the sensor to dynamic strain cyclic testing to determine fatigue characteristics. Results indicate a useful static strain gage system at all temperature levels up to 1350 F. The fatigue characteristics also appear to be very promising, indicating a potential use in dynamic strain measurement applications. The procedure, set-up, and data for all tests are presented in this report. This report also discusses the specific strain gage installation technique for the Pd-13Cr gage because of its potential impact on the quality of the output data.

  11. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  12. Thermophysical problems of the application freezing fuels for the aircraft gas-turbine engines (AGTE)

    SciTech Connect

    Janovsky, L.S.; Mitin, M.B.; Antonov, A.N.; Abashina, L.W.

    1996-12-31

    Authors of this paper analyzed results of mathematical researches of thermophysical problems of freezing and cryogenic fuels application for the aircraft gas-turbine engines (AGTE). These fuels are derived from hydrogen, propane, natural gas (methane) and oil gas (freezing mixture of hydrocarbons C{sub 2}-C{sub 10}). At present use of alternative fuels in AGTE is of great interest.

  13. Development of the next generation medium-duty natural gas engine

    SciTech Connect

    Podnar, D.J.; Kubesh, J.T.

    2000-02-28

    This report summarizes the work done under this subcontract in the areas of System Design, System Fabrication, and Experimental Program. The report contains the details of the engine development process for achieving throttleless stratified charge spark ignition (SI) engine operation as well as advanced turbocharging strategies. Engine test results showing the potential of the direct-injection stratified charge combustion strategy for increasing part-load engine efficiency on a John Deere 8.1-liter natural gas engine are also included in this report. In addition, steady state and step transient engine data are presented that quantify the performance of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) as well as a modified waste-gated turbocharger on the engine. The benefits of the technologies investigated during this project will be realized in the form of increased drive-cycle efficiency to diesel-like levels, while retaining the low emissions characteristics of a lean-burn natural gas engine.

  14. Gas core nuclear thermal rocket engine research and development in the former USSR

    SciTech Connect

    Koehlinger, M.W.; Bennett, R.G.; Motloch, C.G.; Gurfink, M.M.

    1992-09-01

    Beginning in 1957 and continuing into the mid 1970s, the USSR conducted an extensive investigation into the use of both solid and gas core nuclear thermal rocket engines for space missions. During this time the scientific and engineering. problems associated with the development of a solid core engine were resolved. At the same time research was undertaken on a gas core engine, and some of the basic engineering problems associated with the concept were investigated. At the conclusion of the program, the basic principles of the solid core concept were established. However, a prototype solid core engine was not built because no established mission required such an engine. For the gas core concept, some of the basic physical processes involved were studied both theoretically and experimentally. However, no simple method of conducting proof-of-principle tests in a neutron flux was devised. This report focuses primarily on the development of the. gas core concept in the former USSR. A variety of gas core engine system parameters and designs are presented, along with a summary discussion of the basic physical principles and limitations involved in their design. The parallel development of the solid core concept is briefly described to provide an overall perspective of the magnitude of the nuclear thermal propulsion program and a technical comparison with the gas core concept.

  15. 46 CFR 11.510 - Service requirements for national endorsement as chief engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. 11.510 Section 11.510 Shipping COAST GUARD... endorsement as chief engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas turbine-propelled vessels. (a) The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for endorsement as chief engineer of steam, motor, and/or gas...

  16. ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K. Constant

    2001-06-30

    The overall objective of this project is the engineering development of a reusable calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas. A two-step pelletization method has been employed to produce relatively strong, ''core-in-shell,'' spherical pellets. Each pellet consists of a highly reactive core surrounded by a strong, inert, porous shell. A suitable core is composed largely of CaO which reacts with H{sub 2}S to form CaS. Pellet cores have been prepared by pelletizing either pulverized limestone or plaster of Paris, and shells have been made of various materials. The most suitable shell material has been formed from a mixture of alumina and limestone particles. The core-in-shell pellets require treatment at high temperature to convert the core material to CaO and to partially sinter the shell material. Pellet cores derived from plaster of Paris have proved superior to those derived from limestone because they react more rapidly with H{sub 2}S and their reactivity does not seem to decline with repeated loading and regeneration. The rate of reaction of H{sub 2}S with CaO derived from either material is directly proportional to H{sub 2}S concentration. The rate of reaction does not appear to be affected significantly by temperature in the range of 1113 K (840 C) to 1193 K (920 C) but decreases markedly at 1233 K (960 C). The rate is not affected by shell thickness within the range tested, which also provides adequate compressive strength.

  17. CMC Technology Advancements for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    CMC research at NASA Glenn is focused on aircraft propulsion applications. The objective is to enable reduced engine emissions and fuel consumption for more environmentally friendly aircraft. Engine system studies show that incorporation of ceramic composites into turbine engines will enable significant reductions in emissions and fuel burn due to increased engine efficiency resulting from reduced cooling requirements for hot section components. This presentation will describe recent progress and challenges in developing fiber and matrix constituents for 2700 F CMC turbine applications. In addition, ongoing research in the development of durable environmental barrier coatings, ceramic joining integration technologies and life prediction methods for CMC engine components will be reviewed.

  18. Multi-dimensional combustor flowfield analyses in gas-gas rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuei, Hsin-Hua; Merkle, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the present research are to improve design capabilities for low thrust rocket engines through understanding of the detailed mixing and combustions processes. Of particular interest is a small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thruster which is considered as a coordinated part of an on-going experimental program at NASA LeRC. Detailed computational modeling requires the application of the full three-dimensional Navier Stokes equations, coupled with species diffusion equations. The numerical procedure is performed on both time-marching and time-accurate algorithms and using an LU approximate factorization in time, flux split upwinding differencing in space. The emphasis in this paper is focused on using numerical analysis to understand detailed combustor flowfields, including the shear layer dynamics created between fuel film cooling and the core gas in the vicinity on the nearby combustor wall; the integrity and effectiveness of the coolant film; three-dimensional fuel jets injection/mixing/combustion characteristics; and their impacts on global engine performance.

  19. Performance Evaluation of Hybrid Gas Turbine Engine Embedded with Pulse Detonation Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jun-Xiang; Yan, Chuan-Jun; Zheng, Long-Xi; Huang, Xi-Qiao

    2011-09-01

    The numerical investigations of performance evaluation of a hybrid gas turbine engine embedded with a pulse detonation combustor (PDC) were performed to examine the improvement of the performance of the hybrid propulsion system. The calculation model and method were described. The architecture, configuration and size of detonation tubes were investigated in the calculation. Two models of detonation tube exit temperature were utilized. Eight configuration choices for the PDC based on the calculation model were designed. Specific fuel consumption of a hybrid gas turbine engine was compared with that of the baseline engine at the condition of the same engine net thrust. The experimental research of a PDC interacted with a radial flow turbine of a turbocharger was conducted. The numerical results show that if the net thrust of hybrid PDC engine is matched to that of baseline engine, specific fuel consumption of hybrid PDC engine is 20-25% less than that of baseline engine. The total volume of the hybrid engine combustor is reduced. The incorporation of PDC into gas turbine engine can improve the performance of hybrid PDC engine, decrease the combustor weight, and increase the thrust-weight ratio. The experimental results show that the fully developed detonation waves are achieved in the experimental apparatus.

  20. An engineered Axl 'decoy receptor' effectively silences the Gas6-Axl signaling axis

    SciTech Connect

    Kariolis, Mihalis S.; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Jones, Douglas S.; Kapur, Shiven; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Giaccia, Amato J.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2014-09-21

    Aberrant signaling through the Axl receptor tyrosine kinase has been associated with a myriad of human diseases, most notably metastatic cancer, identifying Axl and its ligand Gas6 as important therapeutic targets. Using rational and combinatorial approaches, we engineered an Axl ‘decoy receptor’ that binds Gas6 with high affinity and inhibits its function, offering an alternative approach from drug discovery efforts that directly target Axl. Four mutations within this high affinity Axl variant caused structural alterations in side chains across the Gas6/Axl binding interface, stabilizing a conformational change on Gas6. When reformatted as an Fc-fusion, the engineered decoy receptor bound to Gas6 with femtomolar affinity, an 80-fold improvement compared to the wild-type Axl receptor, allowing effective sequestration of Gas6 and specific abrogation of Axl signaling. Additionally, increased Gas6 binding affinity was critical and correlative with the ability of decoy receptors to potently inhibit metastasis and disease progression in vivo.

  1. A summary of computational experience at GE Aircraft Engines for complex turbulent flows in gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, Ronald D.; Prakash, Chander

    1995-03-01

    This viewgraph presentation summarizes some CFD experience at GE Aircraft Engines for flows in the primary gaspath of a gas turbine engine and in turbine blade cooling passages. It is concluded that application of the standard k-epsilon turbulence model with wall functions is not adequate for accurate CFD simulation of aerodynamic performance and heat transfer in the primary gas path of a gas turbine engine. New models are required in the near-wall region which include more physics than wall functions. The two-layer modeling approach appears attractive because of its computational complexity. In addition, improved CFD simulation of film cooling and turbine blade internal cooling passages will require anisotropic turbulence models. New turbulence models must be practical in order to have a significant impact on the engine design process. A coordinated turbulence modeling effort between NASA centers would be beneficial to the gas turbine industry.

  2. ADVANCED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR STATIONARY GAS TURBINE ENGINES. VOLUME IV. COMBUSTOR VERIFICATION TESTING. ADDENDUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reports describe an exploratory development program to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate dry techniques for significantly reducing NOx from stationary gas turbine engines. Volume 4 describes an additional series of tests to evaluate the performance of the combustor on heavy...

  3. The applications of fibre optics in gas turbine engine instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, I.

    1984-05-01

    Fiber optic instrumentation in aircraft engines is reviewed. Data transmission, endoscopy, flame detection, radiation pyrometry, laser anemometry, blade tip clearance sensors, and pinhole cameras are described.

  4. Optimization of heat transfer in cooled shell elements of gas-turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, N. G.; Grinkrug, M. S.

    1985-08-01

    A theoretical solution is presented for the problem of finding an optimum distribution of the coefficients of heat transfer from the coolant in the shell structures of gas-turbine engines. The approach proposed here provides a way to efficiently use the mechanical properties of materials, to optimize coolant distribution over the shell surface, and, ultimately to improve the economy and performance of gas-turbine engines.

  5. Gas Turbine Engine Having Fan Rotor Driven by Turbine Exhaust and with a Bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a core engine incorporating a core engine turbine. A fan rotor is driven by a fan rotor turbine. The fan rotor turbine is in the path of gases downstream from the core engine turbine. A bypass door is moveable from a closed position at which the gases from the core engine turbine pass over the fan rotor turbine, and moveable to a bypass position at which the gases are directed away from the fan rotor turbine. An aircraft is also disclosed.

  6. Computer code for estimating installed performance of aircraft gas turbine engines. Volume 3: Library of maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    A computerized method which utilizes the engine performance data and estimates the installed performance of aircraft gas turbine engines is presented. This installation includes: engine weight and dimensions, inlet and nozzle internal performance and drag, inlet and nacelle weight, and nacelle drag. The use of two data base files to represent the engine and the inlet/nozzle/aftbody performance characteristics is discussed. The existing library of performance characteristics for inlets and nozzle/aftbodies and an example of the 1000 series of engine data tables is presented.

  7. Thermal stress analysis of a graded zirconia/metal gas path seal system for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    A ceramic/metallic aircraft gas turbine outer gas path seal designed to enable improved engine performance is studied. Flexible numerical analysis schemes suitable for the determination of transient temperature profiles and thermal stress distributions in the seal are outlined. An estimation of the stresses to which a test seal is subjected during simulated engine deceleration from sea level takeoff to idle conditions is made. Experimental evidence has indicated that the surface layer of the seal is probably subjected to excessive tensile stresses during cyclic temperature loading. This assertion is supported by the analytical results presented. Brief consideration is given to means of mitigating this adverse stressing.

  8. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  9. Geometry and Simulation Results for a Gas Turbine Representative of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W.; Beach, Tim; Turner, Mark; Hendricks, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the geometry and simulation results of a gas-turbine engine based on the original EEE engine developed in the 1980s. While the EEE engine was never in production, the technology developed during the program underpins many of the current generation of gas turbine engines. This geometry is being explored as a potential multi-stage turbomachinery test case that may be used to develop technology for virtual full-engine simulation. Simulation results were used to test the validity of each component geometry representation. Results are compared to a zero-dimensional engine model developed from experimental data. The geometry is captured in a series of Initial Graphical Exchange Specification (IGES) files and is available on a supplemental DVD to this report.

  10. Gas absorption/desorption temperature-differential engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1981-01-01

    Continuously operating compressor system converts 90 percent of gas-turbine plant energy to electricity. Conventional plants work in batch mode, operating at 40 percent efficiency. Compressor uses metal hydride matrix on outside of rotating drum to generate working gas, hydrogen. Rolling valve seals allow continuous work. During operation, gas is absorbed, releasing heat, and desorbed with heat gain. System conserves nuclear and fossil fuels, reducing powerplant capital and operating costs.