Science.gov

Sample records for gas evaporation method

  1. Evaporation system and method for gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Jerome J.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for depositing thin films of materials such as metals, oxides and nitrides at low temperature relies on a supersonic free jet of inert carrier gas to transport vapor species generated from an evaporation source to the surface of a substrate. Film deposition vapors are generated from solid film precursor materials, including those in the form of wires or powders. The vapor from these sources is carried downstream in a low pressure supersonic jet of inert gas to the surface of a substrate where the vapors deposit to form a thin film. A reactant gas can be introduced into the gas jet to form a reaction product with the evaporated material. The substrate can be moved from the gas jet past a gas jet containing a reactant gas in which a discharge has been generated, the speed of movement being sufficient to form a thin film which is chemically composed of the evaporated material and reactant gases.

  2. Evaporation system and method for gas jet deposition of thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, J.J.; Halpern, B.L.

    1994-10-18

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for depositing thin films of materials such as metals, oxides and nitrides at low temperature relies on a supersonic free jet of inert carrier gas to transport vapor species generated from an evaporation source to the surface of a substrate. Film deposition vapors are generated from solid film precursor materials, including those in the form of wires or powders. The vapor from these sources is carried downstream in a low pressure supersonic jet of inert gas to the surface of a substrate where the vapors deposit to form a thin film. A reactant gas can be introduced into the gas jet to form a reaction product with the evaporated material. The substrate can be moved from the gas jet past a gas jet containing a reactant gas in which a discharge has been generated, the speed of movement being sufficient to form a thin film which is chemically composed of the evaporated material and reactant gases. 8 figs.

  3. Growth mechanism of ultrafine tellurium particles produced by the gas evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaito, Chihiro; Saito, Yoshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Ohtsuka, Kazushi; Chen, Fangyu; Nakamura, Masahiko

    1994-06-01

    Ultrafine particles of tellurium have been produced by evaporating tellurium powder from a quartz boat using the atmospheric temperature. Particles of 20-200 nm in size grew under low vapor pressure of tellurium. The shapes of the particles were sphere and hexagonal rod. Spherical amorphous particles also grew in the smoke. Hollow hexagonal rod particles grew under high vapor pressure of tellurium. The growth mechanism of these particles is discussed on the basis of atmospheric temperature and the vapor pressure of tellurium.

  4. Method of evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, Eugene R.

    1987-01-01

    Liquids, such as juices, milk, molten metal and the like are concentrated by forming uniformly-sized, small droplets in a precision droplet forming assembly and deploying the droplets in free fall downwardly as a central column within an evacuated column with cool walls. A portion of the solvent evaporates. The vapor flows to the wall, condenses, and usually flows down the wall as a film to condensate collector and drain. The vertical column of freely falling droplets enters the splash guard. The condensate can be collected, sent to other towers or recycled.

  5. A rapid method for simultaneously determining ethanol and methanol content in wines by full evaporation headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Lin, Neng-Biao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Zhong-Li; Barnes, Donald G

    2015-09-15

    This work reports on a full evaporation headspace gas chromatographic (FE HS-GC) method for simultaneously determining the ethanol (EtOH) and methanol (MeOH) content in wines. A small sample (10μL) was placed in a headspace sample vial, and a near-complete mass transfer of ethanol and methanol from the liquid sample to the vapor phase was obtained within three minutes at a temperature of 105°C, which allowed the measurement of the EtOH and MeOH content in the sample by GC. The results showed excellent precision and accuracy, as shown by the reproducibilities of 1.02% and 2.11% for EtOH and MeOH, respectively, and recoveries that ranged from 96.1% to 104% for both alcohols. The method is efficient, accurate and suitable for the determination of EtOH and MeOH in wine production and quality control. PMID:25863625

  6. Resonant gas oscillation with evaporation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Masashi; Yano, Takeru; Watanabe, Masao; Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2012-09-01

    Resonant gas oscillation in a closed tube bounded by an oscillating plate and a vaporliquid interface is theoretically analyzed by applying the asymptotic theory to the ES-BGK Boltzmann equation for the case of M2≃Kn≪1 and a small evaporation coefficient α = O(Kn), where M and Kn are the typical Mach number and the Knudsen number, respectively. As a result, we derive a nonlinear integro-differential equation for determining the wave profile with the evaporation and condensation in the form including α.

  7. The evaporative gas turbine (EGT) cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Horlock, J.H.

    1998-04-01

    Humidification of the flow through a gas turbine has been proposed in a variety of forms. The STIG plant involves the generation of steam by the gas turbine exhaust in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and its injection into or downstream of the combustion chamber. This increases the mass flow through the turbine and the power output from the plant, with a small increase in efficiency. In the evaporative gas turbine (or EGT) cycle, water is injected in the compressor discharge in a regenerative gas turbine cycle (a so-called CBTX plant--compressor [C], burner [B], turbine [T], heat exchanger [X]); the air is evaporatively cooled before it enters the heat exchanger. While the addition of water increases the turbine mass flow and power output, there is also apparent benefit in reducing the temperature drop in the exhaust stack. In one variation of the basic EGT cycle, water is also added downstream of the evaporative aftercooler, even continuously in the heat exchanger. There are several other variations on the basic cycle (e.g., the cascaded humidified advanced turbine [CHAT]). The present paper analyzes the performance of the EGT cycle. The basic thermodynamics are first discussed, and related to the cycle analysis of a dry regenerative gas turbine plant. Subsequently some detailed calculations of EGT cycles are presented. The main purpose of the work is to seek the optimum pressure ratio in the EGT cycle for given constraints (e.g., fixed maximum to minimum temperature). It is argued that this optimum has a relatively low value.

  8. On The Validity of the Assumed PDF Method for Modeling Binary Mixing/Reaction of Evaporated Vapor in GAS/Liquid-Droplet Turbulent Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bellan, J.

    1997-01-01

    An Investigation of the statistical description of binary mixing and/or reaction between a carrier gas and an evaporated vapor species in two-phase gas-liquid turbulent flows is perfomed through both theroetical analysis and comparisons with results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a two-phase mixing layer.

  9. Apparatus and method for evaporator defrosting

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Domitrovic, Ronald E.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for warm-liquid defrosting of the evaporator of a refrigeration system. The apparatus includes a first refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands refrigerant for cooling the evaporator, a second refrigerant expansion device that selectively expands the refrigerant after the refrigerant has passed through the evaporator, and a defrosting control for the first refrigerant expansion device and second refrigerant expansion device to selectively defrost the evaporator by causing warm refrigerant to flow through the evaporator. The apparatus is alternately embodied with a first refrigerant bypass and/or a second refrigerant bypass for selectively directing refrigerant to respectively bypass the first refrigerant expansion device and the second refrigerant expansion device, and with the defrosting control connected to the first refrigerant bypass and/or the second refrigerant bypass to selectively activate and deactivate the bypasses depending upon the current cycle of the refrigeration system. The apparatus alternately includes an accumulator for accumulating liquid and/or gaseous refrigerant that is then pumped either to a refrigerant receiver or the first refrigerant expansion device for enhanced evaporator defrosting capability. The inventive method of defrosting an evaporator in a refrigeration system includes the steps of compressing refrigerant in a compressor and cooling the refrigerant in the condenser such that the refrigerant is substantially in liquid form, passing the refrigerant substantially in liquid form through the evaporator, and expanding the refrigerant with a refrigerant expansion device after the refrigerant substantially passes through the evaporator.

  10. Non-destructive method for inward leakage detection of a plate evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribernik, Ales

    2007-05-01

    A new non-destructive method was developed for the detection of refrigerant leakage at an evaporator's inflow. Nitrogen and oxygen gas were successively blown through the evaporator. A gas analyser was applied at the outflow of the evaporator and the oxygen concentration measured. It was possible to detect any leakage by investigating the oxygen concentration-time history diagram.

  11. The Pristane Formation Index, a new molecular maturity parameter. A simple method to assess maturity by pyrolysis/evaporation-gas chromatography of unextracted samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, H.; Due, A.; de Leeuw, J. W.; van de Graaf, B.; Schenck, P. A.

    1988-05-01

    A set of eleven samples from the Handil borehole, Mahakam delta, Indonesia, has been analyzed to test the hypothesis that the Pristane Formation Index (PFI = [pristane]/{[pristane]+ [pristenes]}) can be used as a molecular maturation parameter. By pyrolysis/evaporation-gas chromatography (py/ev-GC) of unextracted samples the amounts of the product (pristane) and of the precursor(s) (measured as pristenes) of the pristane formation reaction(s) were measured simultaneously. PFI shows very high correlations with maturity parameters such as vitrinite reflectance, Carbon Preference Index (CPI), T-max and with burial depth. Calculation of the pseudo-kinetic parameters of the Arrhenius equation k = A exp(- E/RT) , using published values for effective time of burial ( teff) and temperature gradient, yields values of 59 kJ mol -1 and2.2∗10 -7 s -1 for E and A, respectively. The value of E is not very sensitive to variations in the assumed values of teff and temperature gradient; the value of A is extremely low in all cases. The values of the pseudo-kinetic parameters are much lower than those of the isomerization and aromatization reactions and thus offer interesting possibilities for the reconstruction of thermal histories of basins.

  12. Tracking Gas Phase Composition in Oil evaporation and Oxidation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Muñoz, O.; Zhang, H.; Misztal, P. K.; Worton, D.; Drozd, G.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Primary Organic Aerosol (POA) is emitted directly by anthropogenic or natural sources, whereas Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere through chemical reactions that result from conversion of more volatile species into lower volatility oxidized products and their subsequent condensation to the particulate phase. We studied SOA formation from evaporation of Macondo crude oil (MC 252) using a wind tunnel coupled to a flow tube oxidation reactor. Ozone, UV lights, and water vapor were used to make OH radicals. Organic compounds in the gas phase, both those evaporated from the wind tunnel and those formed in the flow tube oxidation experiments, were monitored using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-qMS and PTR-TOF-MS). We observed approximately 400 different species. Compounds with less than C10 were mostly evaporated in the first 5 hours when maximum SOA formation was also obtained. Hydrocarbons with carbon number (11-14) were still present in the oil after 12 h of continuous evaporation at wind speed of 2 m s-1. We will show the implications of these results for the production of SOA related to the range of evaporated chemical size and reactivity.

  13. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B. Jr.

    2003-10-23

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, remaining low activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation prior to being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide compounds, and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River Technology Center. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using EPA SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate and off-gas streams with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI ESP model is constrained by available literature data.

  14. Regulatory off-gas analysis from the evaporation of Hanford simulated waste spiked with organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi H; Calloway, T Bond; Ferrara, Daro M; Choi, Alexander S; White, Thomas L; Gibson, Luther V; Burdette, Mark A

    2004-10-01

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, the remaining low-activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation before being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile, and pesticide compounds and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River National Laboratory. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds (<220 degrees C BP, >1 mm Hg vapor pressure) in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program (licensed by OLI Systems, Inc.) evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate, and off-gas streams, with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI Environmental Simulation Program model is constrained by available literature data. PMID:15540577

  15. Infiltration and evaporation of small hydrocarbon spills at gas stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilpert, Markus; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2014-12-01

    Small gasoline spills frequently occur at gasoline dispensing stations. We have developed a mathematical model to estimate both the amount of gasoline that infiltrates into the concrete underneath the dispensing stations and the amount of gasoline that evaporates into the typically turbulent atmosphere. Our model shows that the fraction of infiltrated gasoline can exceed the fraction that evaporates from the sessile droplets. Infiltrated gasoline then evaporates and is slowly released to the atmosphere via slow diffusive transport in pores. Tentative experiments show that our theoretical approach captures observed experimental trends. Predictions based on independently estimated model parameters roughly describe the experimental data, except for the very slow vapor release at the end of Stage II evaporation. Our study suggests that, over the lifespan of a gas station, concrete pads underneath gas dispensing stations accumulate significant amounts of gasoline, which could eventually break through into underlying soil and groundwater. Our model also shows that lifetimes of spilled gasoline droplets on concrete surfaces are on the order of minutes or longer. Therefore contamination can be carried away by foot traffic or precipitation runoff. Regulations and guidelines typically do not address subsurface and surface contaminations due to chronic small gasoline spills, even though these spills could result in non-negligible human exposure to toxic and carcinogenic gasoline compounds.

  16. Gas assisted thin-film evaporation from confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Shankar

    A novel cooling mechanism based on evaporation of thin liquid films is presented for thermal management of confined heat sources, such as microprocessor hotspots, high power light emitting diodes and RF packages with a high operational frequency. A thin nanoporous membrane (˜1--5microm) is utilized to maintain microscopically thin liquid films (˜1--5microm) by capillary action, while providing a pathway for the vapor generated due to evaporation at the liquid-vapor interface. The vapor generated by evaporation is continuously removed by using a dry sweeping gas, keeping the membrane outlet dry. This thesis presents a detailed theoretical, computational and experimental investigation of the heat and mass transfer mechanisms that result in cooling the confined heat sources. Performance analysis of this cooling mechanism demonstrates heat fluxes over 600W/cm2 for sufficiently thin membrane and film thicknesses (˜1--5microm) and by using air jet impingement for advection of vapor from the membrane surface. Based on the results from this performance analysis, a monolithic micro-fluidic device is designed and fabricated incorporating micro and nanoscale features. This MEMS/NEMS device serves multiple functionalities of hotspot simulation, temperature sensing, and evaporative cooling. Subsequent experimental investigations using this microfluidic device demonstrate heat fluxes in excess of 600W/cm2 at 90 °C using water as the evaporating coolant. In order to further enhance the device performance, a comprehensive theoretical and computational analysis of heat and mass transfer at micro and nanoscales is carried out. Since the coolant is confined using a nanoporous membrane, a detailed study of evaporation inside a nanoscale cylindrical pore is performed. The continuum analysis of water confined within a cylindrical nanopore determines the effect of electrostatic interaction and Van der Waals forces in addition to capillarity on the interfacial transport

  17. COMPONENT LOSS DURING EVAPORATION-RECONSTITUTION OF ORGANIC ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES FOR GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard and sample solutions stored in borosilicate sample vials were allowed to evaporate to dryness at room temperature. The solutions were analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection before evaporation and after reconstitution to the original volume to determine...

  18. Multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling of a person employs an evaporative cooling liquid that changes phase from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The evaporative cooling liquid is absorbed into a superabsorbent material enclosed within the multilayer composite material. The multilayer composite material has a high percentage of the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix. The cooling effect can be sustained for an extended period of time because of the high percentage of phase change liquid that can be absorbed into the superabsorbent. Such a composite can be used for cooling febrile patients by evaporative cooling as the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix changes from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The composite can be made with a perforated barrier material around the outside to regulate the evaporation rate of the phase change liquid. Alternatively, the composite can be made with an imperveous barrier material or semipermeable membrane on one side to prevent the liquid from contacting the person's skin. The evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix can be recharged by soaking the material in the liquid. The multilayer composite material can be fashioned into blankets, garments and other articles.

  19. Modeling of two-layer liquid-gas flow with account for evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, O. N.; Rezanova, E. V.; Lyulin, Yu. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    Two-layer gas-liquid flows and evaporation intensity at the interface were studied. The influence of gas flow rate, longitudinal gradient of temperature, the Soret effect on the nature of flow and transfer processes was demonstrated. Experimental and theoretical results were compared; they show dependence of evaporation at the interface on gas flow rates.

  20. Control methods and systems for indirect evaporative coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Jason; Kozubal, Erik

    2015-09-22

    A control method for operating an indirect evaporative cooler to control temperature and humidity. The method includes operating an airflow control device to provide supply air at a flow rate to a liquid desiccant dehumidifier. The supply air flows through the dehumidifier and an indirect evaporative cooler prior to exiting an outlet into a space. The method includes operating a pump to provide liquid desiccant to the liquid desiccant dehumidifier and sensing a temperature of an airstream at the outlet of the indirect evaporative cooler. The method includes comparing the temperature of the airstream at the outlet to a setpoint temperature at the outlet and controlling the pump to set the flow rate of the liquid desiccant. The method includes sensing space temperature, comparing the space temperature with a setpoint temperature, and controlling the airflow control device to set the flow rate of the supply air based on the comparison.

  1. Method and apparatus for flash evaporation of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan

    1984-01-01

    A vertical tube flash evaporator for introducing a superheated liquid into a flash evaporation chamber includes a vertical inlet tube with a flared diffuser portion at its upper outlet end. A plurality of annular screens are positioned in axially spaced-apart relation to each other around the periphery of the vertical tube and below the diffuser portion thereof. The screens are preferably curved upward in a cup-shaped configuration. These flash evaporators are shown in an ocean thermal energy conversion unit designed for generating electric power from differential temperature gradients in ocean water. The method of use of the flash evaporators of this invention includes flowing liquid upwardly through the vertical tube into the diffuser where initial expansion and boiling occurs quite violently and explosively. Unvaporized liquid sheets and drops collide with each other to enhance surface renewal and evaporation properties, and liquid flowing over the outlet end of the diffuser falls onto the curved screens for further surface renewal and evaporation.

  2. Method and apparatus for flash evaporation of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, D.

    1984-01-01

    A vertical tube flash evaporator for introducing a super-heated liquid into a flash evaporation chamber includes a vertical inlet tube with a flared diffuser portion at its upper outlet end. A plurality of annular screens are positioned in axially spaced-apart relation to each other around the periphery of the vertical tube and below the diffuser portion thereof. The screens are preferably curved upward in a cup-shaped configuration. These flash evaporators are shown in an ocean thermal energy conversion unit designed for generating electric power from differential temperature gradients in ocean water. The method of use of the flash evaporators of this invention includes flowing liquid upwardly through the vertical tube into the diffuser where initial expansion and boiling occurs quite violently and explosively. Unvaporized liquid sheets and drops collide with each other to enhance surface renewal and evaporation properties, and liquid flowing over the outlet end of the diffuser falls onto the curved screens for further surface renewal and evaporation.

  3. Measuring the rate of local evaporation from the liquid surface under the action of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulin, Yu. V.; Feoktistov, D. V.; Afanas'ev, I. A.; Chachilo, E. S.; Kabov, O. A.; Kuznetsov, G. V.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of evaporation from the surface of a liquid layer under the action of a gas flow has been studied. Correlation dependences of the rate of liquid evaporation on the gas flow rate and temperature for the ethanol-air system have been obtained and compared to other published experimental data. It is established that, for the two-phase systems studied, the evaporation rate growth with increasing temperature exhibits an almost identical character independently of the thermal properties of particular liquids and gases. In contrast, the character of the evaporation rate growth with increasing gas flow velocity significantly depends on these properties.

  4. A predictive method for crude oil volatile organic compounds emission from soil: evaporation and diffusion behavior investigation of binary gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijing; Fischer, Thomas; Wieprecht, Wolfgang; Möller, Detlev

    2015-05-01

    Due to their mobility and toxicity, crude oil volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are representative components for oil pipeline contaminated sites detection. Therefore, contaminated location risk assessment, with airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) survey, in particular, requires ground-based determinative methods for oil VOCs, the interaction between oil VOCs and soil, and information on how they diffuse from underground into atmosphere. First, we developed a method for determination of crude oil VOC binary mixtures (take n-pentane and n-hexane as examples), taking synergistic effects of VOC mixtures on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers into consideration. Using this method, we further aim to extract VOCs from small volumes, for example, from soil pores, using a custom-made sampling device for nondestructive SPME fiber intrusion, and to study VOC transport through heterogeneous porous media. Second, specific surface Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis was conducted and used for estimation of VOC isotherm parameters in soil. Finally, two models were fitted for VOC emission prediction, and the results were compared to the experimental emission results. It was found that free diffusion mode worked well, and an empirical correction factor seems to be needed for the other model to adapt to our condition for single and binary systems. PMID:25572270

  5. Surface and gas-phase resistances to the evaporation of droplets.

    PubMed

    Zung, J T

    1975-01-01

    Attempt has been made to asses quantitatively the magnitudes of both the gas-phase resistance and the surface resistance to the evaporation of droplets and to determine the transition point at which the evaporation changes from a diffusion-controlled to a surface-controlled process. This transition point is strongly dependent upon the ambient pressure and the droplet size. It is found that at atmospheric pressure the particle radius at which the transition takes place is in the range of 1 - 10mu for water, 0.1mu for n-dibutylphthalate, 0.1 - 1.0mu for mercury, and 0.001mu for liquid helium. Furthermore, we have found that the surface resistance and the gas-phase resistance vary with the size of the droplet in opposite direction, leading to the existence of a maximum rate of evaporation at a certain value of the droplet radius, this radius being dependent upon the characteristics of the liquid concerned. This conclusion may be useful in the search for an optimum and most efficient method of combustion of fuel sprays in automotive engines, gas turbines, and oil-burning power plants. PMID:1149699

  6. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    used for routine evaluation of feed compatibility studies for the 242-A evaporator. One of the radionuclides that is volatile in the melter and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 (99Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentrations in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are 129I, 90Sr, 137Cs, and 241Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. At this time, these scoping tests did not evaluate the partitioning of the radionuclides to the evaporator condensate, since ample data are available separately from other experience in the DOE complex. Results from the evaporation testing show that the neutral SBS simulant first forms turbidity at ~7.5X concentration, while the alkaline-adjusted simulant became turbid at ~3X concentration. The major solid in both cases was Kogarkoite, Na3FSO4. Sodium and lithium fluorides were also detected. Minimal solids were formed in the evaporator bottoms until a substantial fraction of liquid was removed, indicating that evaporation could minimize storage volume issues. Achievable concentration factors without significant insoluble solids were 17X at alkaline pH, and 23X at neutral pH. In both runs, significant ammonia carried over and was captured in the condenser with the water condensate. Results also indicate that with low insoluble solids formation in the initial testing at neutral pH, the use of Reverse Osmosis is a potential alternate method for concentrating the solution, although an evaluation is needed to identify equipment that can tolerate insoluble solids. Most of the ammonia remains in the

  7. Rarefied gas flow between two cylinders caused by the evaporation and condensation on their surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramani Cumin, Liliana M.; Sharipov, Felix M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    1998-12-01

    The rarefied gas flow between two coaxial cylinders caused by the evaporation and condensation on their surfaces is investigated on the basis of the kinetic and hydrodynamical equations. It is assumed that the cylinders may rotate with equal angular velocity. The equilibrium is perturbed by the small density difference of evaporated particles on the inner cylinder. The hydrodynamical equation has been solved analytically and the kinetic equation has been solved by the discrete velocity method modified for the discontinuous distribution function. The fields of the density, the velocity and the temperature are presented for a wide range of the Knudsen number. An analysis of the influence of the rotation of the cylinders on the flow field is given.

  8. Simulation of Heterogeneous Atom Probe Tip Shapes Evolution during Field Evaporation Using a Level Set Method and Different Evaporation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Xu, Wei; Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Geiser, B. P.; Larson, David J.

    2015-04-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), accurate reconstruction of the spatial positions of field evaporated ions from measured detector patterns depends upon a correct understanding of the dynamic tip shape evolution and evaporation laws of component atoms. Artifacts in APT reconstructions of heterogeneous materials can be attributed to the assumption of homogeneous evaporation of all the elements in the material in addition to the assumption of a steady state hemispherical dynamic tip shape evolution. A level set method based specimen shape evolution model is developed in this study to simulate the evaporation of synthetic layered-structured APT tips. The simulation results of the shape evolution by the level set model qualitatively agree with the finite element method and the literature data using the finite difference method. The asymmetric evolving shape predicted by the level set model demonstrates the complex evaporation behavior of heterogeneous tip and the interface curvature can potentially lead to the artifacts in the APT reconstruction of such materials. Compared with other APT simulation methods, the new method provides smoother interface representation with the aid of the intrinsic sub-grid accuracy. Two evaporation models (linear and exponential evaporation laws) are implemented in the level set simulations and the effect of evaporation laws on the tip shape evolution is also presented.

  9. Convective Evaporation Of Sprayed Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical model developed to analyze behavior of both dense and dilute clusters of evaporating liquid drops in gas flows. Particularly useful in search for methods of controlling evaporation, ignition, and combustion of fuel sprays.

  10. System and method for cooling a combustion gas charge

    DOEpatents

    Massey, Mary Cecelia; Boberg, Thomas Earl

    2010-05-25

    The present invention relates to a system and method for cooling a combustion gas charge prior. The combustion gas charge may include compressed intake air, exhaust gas, or a mixture thereof. An evaporator is provided that may then receive a relatively high temperature combustion gas charge and discharge at a relatively lower temperature. The evaporator may be configured to operate with refrigeration cycle components and/or to receive a fluid below atmospheric pressure as the phase-change cooling medium.

  11. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  12. Cylindrical Couette flows of a rarefied gas with evaporation and condensation: Reversal and bifurcation of flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Aoki, Kazuo

    1999-02-01

    A rarefied gas between two coaxial circular cylinders made of the condensed phase of the gas is considered, where each cylinder is kept at a uniform temperature and is rotating at a constant angular velocity around its axis (cylindrical Couette flows of a rarefied gas with evaporation or condensation on the cylinders). The steady behavior of the gas, with special interest in bifurcation of a flow, is studied on the basis of kinetic theory from the continuum to the Knudsen limit. The solution shows profound variety: reversal of direction of evaporation-condensation with variation of the speed of rotation of the cylinders; contrary to the conventional cylindrical Couette flow without evaporation and condensation, bifurcation of a flow in a simple case where the state of the gas is circumferentially and axially uniform.

  13. Numerical Investigation of Evaporating Droplets with Direct Quadrature-Based Moments of Closure Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaly, Seyed Mohammad; Hasan Saidi, Mohammad; Ghafourian, Akbar

    2007-11-01

    In this study, due to the weaknesses of the models with Lagrangian approaches, an attempt has been made to model the spray flow with Eulerian approach. In this regard, the quadrature-based moment closure model for the spray equation, the so-called DQMOM, is applied. This method overcomes the shortcoming of other Eulerian methods while it is in good agreement with the Lagrangian methods. After that, the model has been developed to be able to deal with the evaporating droplets. Moreover, the feasibility of applying non-linear external forces, such as drag forces, and evaporation laws for the droplets are considered and implemented. The required order for the equations in this method has been studied thoroughly as well. Finally, the solution procedure for accurate computations of multi dimension problems is presented. In general, the proposed modified DQMOM method can consider and solve all kinds of spray flows with any desirable dimension for the problem. Here, assuming one-way coupling situation with the gas-phase in an axial engine, the spray phase equations are solved by the proposed method to account for evaporating droplets. Results are compared with the methods with Lagrangian approach and the computational costs and accuracies of the methods are compared as well.

  14. Preparation of drug nanoparticles by emulsion evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, Le Thi Mai; Chi, Nguyen Tai; Triet, Nguyen Minh; Thanh Nhan, Le Ngoc; Mau Chien, Dang

    2009-09-01

    Polymeric drug nanoparticles were prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method. In this study, prepared the polymeric drug nanoparticles consist of ketoprofen and Eudragit E 100. The morphology structure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interactions between the drug and polymer were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The size distribution was measured by means of Dynamic Light Scattering. The nanoparticles have an average size of about 150 nm. The incorporation ability of drugs in the polymeric nanoparticles depended on the integration between polymer and drug as well as the glass transition temperature of the polymer.

  15. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-03-28

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics. PMID:27036456

  16. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  17. Evaporative cooling of microscopic water droplets in vacuo: Molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic gas theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2016-03-22

    In the present study, we investigate the process of evaporative cooling of nanometer-sized droplets in vacuum using molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP4P/2005 water model. The results are compared to the temperature evolution calculated from the Knudsen theory of evaporation which is derived from kinetic gas theory. The calculated and simulation results are found to be in very good agreement for an evaporation coefficient equal to unity. Lastly, our results are of interest to experiments utilizing droplet dispensers as well as to cloud micro-physics.

  18. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.H.

    2001-03-28

    The purposes of this work were to: (1) develop preliminary operating data such as expected concentration endpoints for flow sheet development and evaporator design, and (2) examine the regulatory off-gas emission impacts from the evaporation of relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 Envelope C waste simulant containing 14 volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide organic compounds potentially present in actual Hanford RPP waste.

  19. Evaporation of liquids from cylindrical vessels under conditions of free concentrational convection in a gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Izmailov, Yu.G.; Pisarev, N.M.; Vyatkin, G.P.

    1995-12-01

    An analytical solution is obtained for the axisymmetric problem of free concentrational convection in a vapor-gas mixture with isothermal evaporation of liquids from open cylindrical vessels. Formulas are derived to calculate concentration fields, local and integral mass fluxes of vapor. A comparative analysis of the results of analytical and numerical simulation is carried out for the processes of the evaporation of liquids under the conditions of convective mass transfer.

  20. Effect of evaporation time on cellulose acetate membrane for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jami'an, W. N. R.; Hasbullah, H.; Mohamed, F.; Yusof, N.; Ibrahim, N.; Ali, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Throughout this decades, membrane technology has been the desirable option among the others gas separation technologies. However, few issues have been raised regarding the membrane gas separation application including the trade-off between its permeability and selectivity and also its effects towards environment. Therefore, for this research, a biopolymer membrane for gas separation application will be developed with reasonably high on both permeability and selectivity. The main objective of this research is to study the effect of solvent evaporation time on the flat sheet asymmetric membrane morphology and gas separation performance. The membranes were produced by a simple dry/wet phase inversion technique using a pneumatically controlled casting system. The dope solution for the membrane casting was prepared by dissolving the cellulose acetate (CA) polymer in N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and the solvent evaporation time was varied. Permeability and selectivity of the membrane was performed by using pure gases of carbon dioxide, CO2 and methane, CH4. The increase in solvent evaporation time had improved the membrane morphologies as the porosity of the membrane surface decrease and formation of a more mature skin layer. The gas permeation tests determined that increasing in solvent evaporation time had increased the selectivity of CO2/CH4 but reduce the permeability of both gases

  1. Water droplet evaporation in air during compression in a gas turbine engine. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Quandt, E.

    1996-04-01

    A water fog concept is being considered for evaporative cooling of the air as it is compressed in a ship gas turbine engine. The following analysis is presented to clarify the physics associated with liquid droplet evaporation in this situation, to understand the conditions affecting the cooling, and to identify any further information required to achieve such a concept. The vaporization of small liquid drops in a warm ideal gas is controlled by the outward motion of the vapor and the inward flow of heat to cause evaporation. Following the standard analysis of Spalding, as given in `Principles of Combustion` by Kuo, it is assumed that the process is `quasi steady.` This means that the conditions far removed from the drop are constant, and that there are no time varying terms in the Eulerian description of the mass and energy flows.

  2. Comparison of Total Evaporation (TE) and Direct Total Evaporation (DTE) methods in TIMS by using NBL CRMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasözbek, Altug; Mathew, Kattathu; Wegener, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The total evaporation (TE) is a well-established analytical method for safeguards measurement of uranium and plutonium isotope-amount ratios using the thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). High accuracy and precision isotopic measurements find many applications in nuclear safeguards, for e.g. assay measurements using isotope dilution mass spectrometry. To achieve high accuracy and precision in TIMS measurements, mass dependent fractionation effects are minimized by either the measurement technique or changes in the hardware components that are used to control sample heating and evaporation process. At NBL, direct total evaporation (DTE) method on the modified MAT261 instrument, uses the data system to read the ion signal intensity and its difference from a pre-determined target intensity, is used to control the incremental step at which the evaporation filament is heated. The feedback and control is achieved by proprietary hardware from SPECTROMAT that uses an analog regulator in the filament power supply with direct feedback of the detector intensity. Compared to traditional TE method on this instrument, DTE provides better precision (relative standard deviation, expressed as a percent) and accuracy (relative difference, expressed as a percent) of 0.05 to 0.08 % for low enriched and high enriched NBL uranium certified reference materials.

  3. Modelling of evaporation of a dispersed liquid component in a chemically active gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, V. G.; Naumov, V. I.; Kotov, V. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    A model has been developed to investigate evaporation of dispersed liquids in chemically active gas flow. Major efforts have been directed at the development of algorithms for implementing this model. The numerical experiments demonstrate that, in the boundary layer, significant changes in the composition and temperature of combustion products take place. This gives the opportunity to more correctly model energy release processes in combustion chambers of liquid-propellant rocket engines, gas-turbine engines, and other power devices.

  4. Evaporation from weighing precipitation gauges: impacts on automated gauge measurements and quality assurance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeper, R. D.; Kochendorfer, J.

    2015-06-01

    Evaporation from a precipitation gauge can cause errors in the amount of measured precipitation. For automated weighing-bucket gauges, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) suggests the use of evaporative suppressants and frequent observations to limit these biases. However, the use of evaporation suppressants is not always feasible due to environmental hazards and the added cost of maintenance, transport, and disposal of the gauge additive. In addition, research has suggested that evaporation prior to precipitation may affect precipitation measurements from auto-recording gauges operating at sub-hourly frequencies. For further evaluation, a field campaign was conducted to monitor evaporation and its impacts on the quality of precipitation measurements from gauges used at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) stations. Two Geonor gauges were collocated, with one gauge using an evaporative suppressant (referred to as Geonor-NonEvap) and the other with no suppressant (referred to as Geonor-Evap) to evaluate evaporative losses and evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. From June to August, evaporative losses from the Geonor-Evap gauge exceeded accumulated precipitation, with an average loss of 0.12 mm h-1. The impact of evaporation on precipitation measurements was sensitive to the choice of calculation method. In general, the pairwise method that utilized a longer time series to smooth out sensor noise was more sensitive to gauge evaporation (-4.6% bias with respect to control) than the weighted-average method that calculated depth change over a smaller window (<+1% bias). These results indicate that while climate and gauge design affect gauge evaporation rates, computational methods also influence the magnitude of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. This study can be used to advance quality insurance (QA) techniques used in other automated networks to mitigate the impact of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements.

  5. Evaporation determined by the energy-budget method for Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Buso, D.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Likens, G.E.; Sturrock, A.M., Jr.; Mau, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Evaporation was determined by the energy-budget method for Mirror Lake during the open water periods of 1982-1987. For all years, evaporation rates were low in spring and fall and highest during the summer. However, the times of highest evaporation rates varied during the 6 yr. Evaporation reached maximum rates in July for three of the years, in June for two of the years, and in August for one of the years. The highest evaporation rate during the 6-yr study was 0.46 cm d-1 during 27 May-4 June 1986 and 15-21 July 1987. Solar radiation and atmospheric radiation input to the lake and long-wave radiation emitted from the lake were by far the largest energy fluxes to and from the lake and had the greatest effect on evaporation rates. Energy advected to and from the lake by precipitation, surface water, and ground water had little effect on evaporation rates. In the energy-budget method, average evaporation rates are determined for energy-budget periods, which are bounded by the dates of thermal surveys of the lake. Our study compared evaporation rates calculated for short periods, usually ???1 week, with evaporation rates calculated for longer periods, usually ???2 weeks. The results indicated that the shorter periods showed more variability in evaporation rates, but seasonal patterns, with few exceptions, were similar.

  6. Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation During Evaporation of SiO2 in Vacuum and in H Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, H.; Young, E. D.; Hoering, T. C.; Mysen, B. O.

    1993-07-01

    Chondritic components, chondrules, CAIs, and some parts of the matrix are believed to have formed and/or thermally processed in the solar nebula. If this scenario is the case, they should be fractionated for major and minor elements and isotopes according to the formation temperature. This is true for major and trace elements, but is not the case for isotopes. Differences in oxygen isotopic composition among meteorite groups are interpreted to be the results of mixing of gas and dust from different oxygen reservoirs, and the effect of isotopic fractionation is negligible for most meteorites except for rare CAIs. Davis et al. [1] studied the isotopic fractionation of SiO2, MgO, and forsterite and showed that oxygen isotopic fractionation from solid materials is very small, but that from liquid is significant. Evaporation in the solar nebula should, however, be in hydrogen gas, which is reactive with silicates. Therefore, the effect of hydrogen gas on the evaporation behaviors of silicates, including mode of evaporation, evaporation rate, and compositional and isotopic fractionation, should be studied. Nagahara [2] studied the evaporation rate of SiO2 in equilibrium, in constant evacuation (free evaporation), and in hydrogen, and showed that the rate in hydrogen gas is orders of magnitude larger than that in vacuum; the mode of evaporation also differs from that in vacuum. Oxygen isotopic fractionation during evaporation of SiO2 in constant evacuation and in hydrogen gas at two different total pressures are studied in the present study. The starting material is a single crystal of natural quartz, which should transform into high cristobalite at experimental conditions. The powdered starting material was kept in a graphite capsule without a cap and set in a vacuum chamber with and without hydrogen gas flow. Experimental temperature was 1600 degrees C. Oxygen isotopic compositions (^18O/^16O) were measured with the CO2laser heating fluorination technique. Oxygen

  7. [Measurement and estimation methods and research progress of snow evaporation in forests].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Dong; Guan, De-Xin; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurement and estimation of snow evaporation (sublimation) in forests is one of the important issues to the understanding of snow surface energy and water balance, and it is also an essential part of regional hydrological and climate models. This paper summarized the measurement and estimation methods of snow evaporation in forests, and made a comprehensive applicability evaluation, including mass-balance methods (snow water equivalent method, comparative measurements of snowfall and through-snowfall, snow evaporation pan, lysimeter, weighing of cut tree, weighing interception on crown, and gamma-ray attenuation technique) and micrometeorological methods (Bowen-ratio energy-balance method, Penman combination equation, aerodynamics method, surface temperature technique and eddy covariance method). Also this paper reviewed the progress of snow evaporation in different forests and its influencal factors. At last, combining the deficiency of past research, an outlook for snow evaporation rearch in forests was presented, hoping to provide a reference for related research in the future. PMID:24697085

  8. Determination of methanol in pulp washing filtrates by desiccated full evaporation headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui-Chao; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2012-01-27

    This paper reports on a desiccated full evaporation headspace gas chromatographic (FE HS-GC) technique for determination of the methanol content in dilute mill effluents. Anhydrous K(2)CO(3) was selected as the preferred salt for eliminating the water in the sample in the headspace sample vial. The results showed that the addition of 12 g K(2)CO(3) made it possible to introduce a larger sample size (up to 1 mL) into the FE HS-GC measurement, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the technique. At the given equilibration temperature (105°C), a near-complete mass transfer of methanol from the liquid phase to vapor phase (headspace) was achieved within 10 min. Replicate samples showed that the relative standard deviation of the method was less than 1.5%. Further, the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.12 μg and the recovery ranged from 95 to 104%. The present method greatly improves the methanol detection sensitivity in the FE HS-GC method and has the added advantage of being simple, rapid and accurate. PMID:22209356

  9. Growth of In-Sb Fine Particles by Flowing-Gas Evaporation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwama, Saburo; Mihama, Kazuhiro

    Fine particles of the In-Sb system were prepared by the FGE technique (flowing-gas evaporation technique). The characteristic of the technique is that the formation of the vapor zone and particle growth zone along the flow of inert gas can be controlled by the inert-gas species and the flow velocity. From single-source evaporations, In fine islands grown on the amorphous carbon in the metal vapor zone showed a fiber structure with [111] and [001] fiber axes. In the particle growth zone In fine particles were formed, showing very frequently a characteristic contrast in them due to a lattice defect. Sb fine particles showed amorphous structure. These results may be attributed to the enhanced quenching effect of the FGE technique, already observed in the ordinary gas-evaporation technique. By coevaporation of In and Sb, granular film grew in the metal vapor zone, and fine particles were formed in the particle growth zone. The crystal structure was assigned to be the zincblende type including the wurtzite type of intermetallic compound InSb.

  10. Evaporation and heating of a single suspended coal-water slurry droplet in hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Shi-chune, Y.; Liu, L.

    1982-01-01

    The evaporation, heating, and burning of single coal-water slurry droplets are studied. The coal selected in this study is Pittsburgh Seam number 8 coal which is a medium volatile caking bituminous coal. The droplet is suspended on a microthermocouple and exposed to a hot gas stream. Temperature measurement and microscopic observation are performed in the parametric studies. The duration of water evaporation in CWS droplets decreases with the reduction of the droplet size, increasing of coal weight fraction, and increasing of gas temperature and velocity. The duration of heat-up is always significant due to the agglomeration. The CWS droplets are generally observed to swell like popcorn during heating. A model for the formation of the popped swelling is proposed and discussed.

  11. Evaporative depolarization and spin transport in a unitary trapped Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Meera M.; Huse, David A.

    2009-12-15

    We consider a partially spin-polarized atomic Fermi gas in a high-aspect-ratio trap, with a flux of predominantly spin-up atoms exiting the center of the trap. We argue that such a scenario can be produced by evaporative cooling, and we find that it can result in a substantially nonequilibrium polarization pattern for typical experimental parameters. We offer this as a possible explanation for the quantitative discrepancies in recent experiments on spin-imbalanced unitary Fermi gases.

  12. Growth behavior of gold nanoparticles synthesized in unsaturated fatty acids by vacuum evaporation methods.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Akito; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takaoka, Gikan H

    2016-02-21

    Physical vapor evaporation of metals on low vapor pressure liquids is a simple and clean method to synthesize nanoparticles and thin films, though only little work has been conducted so far. Here, gold nanoparticles were synthesized by vacuum evaporation (VE) methods in ricinoleic acid and oleic acid, two typical unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs). The two solvents formed black aggregates after deposition and then shrunk and finally disappeared with the progress of time. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, nanoparticles in ricinoleic acids formed aggregates and then dispersed by time, while in oleic acid big aggregates were not observed in all timescales. From TEM images and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, the mean size of the nanoparticles was about 4 nm in both ricinoleic and oleic acids. UV-Vis spectra were also taken as a function of time and the results were consistent with the growth behavior presumed by TEM images. Air exposure had an influence on the behavior of the sample triggering the nanoparticle formation in both solvents. From control experiments, we discovered that oxygen gas triggered the phenomenon and nanoparticles function as a catalyst for the oxidation of the UFAs. It stimulates the phenomenon and in ricinoleic acid, specifically, electrons are transferred from riconleic acid to the gold nanoparticles, enhancing the surface potential of the nanoparticles and the repulsive force between their electronic double layers. PMID:26821883

  13. Effects of intensive evaporative cooling on performance characteristics of land-based gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Utamura, Motoaki; Kuwahara, Takaaki; Murata, Hidetaro; Horii, Nobuyuki

    1999-07-01

    Injection of finely-atomized water droplets at inlet to compressor is demonstrated to increase the power and augment the efficiency of gas turbine using a 115MW simple cycle commercial power plant. Power-up mechanism of the present system is identified to be a composite of three existing methods. Design requirement on droplet diameter is discussed in view of blade erosion as well as evaporation efficiency within the compressor. Special spray nozzle to generate water droplets with sauter mean diameter of 10 {micro} m is developed and applied to demonstration test. Experiments show that injection of spray water of 1% to air mass ratio would increase power output by about 10% and thermal efficiency by 3% (relative) respectively. A newly introduced incremental efficiency defined as the ratio of incremental power to additional fuel energy is found to be in excess of 10% (absolute) over thermal efficiency in case without water injection and to be independent of spray amount. It is also revealed that the operation of water spraying suppresses dust deposition on compressor blades under proper control of water quality, which mitigates the deterioration of compressor adiabatic efficiency.

  14. Comparison of evaporation computation methods, Pretty Lake, Lagrange County, northeastern Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ficke, John F.

    1972-01-01

    The different methods, although poor, agree that evaporation when there is ice cover is generally small (less than 0.1 cm day" 1 ), but the evaporation rates during the few days just before freezeup or just after ice breakup are significant

  15. Numerical simulation and field test study of desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment through flue gas.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jia-Jia; Pan, Liang-Ming; Chen, De-Qi; Dong, Yu-Quan; Wang, Cheng-Mu; Liu, Hang; Kang, Mei-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at cost saving and pollution reduction, a novel desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment system (DWETS) for handling wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) wastewater of a coal-fired power plant was studied. The system's advantages include simple process, and less investment and space. The feasibility of this system has been proven and the appropriate position and number of nozzles, the spray droplet size and flue gas temperature limitation have been obtained by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The simulation results show that a longer duct, smaller diameter and higher flue gas temperature could help to increase the evaporation rate. The optimal DWETS design of Shangdu plant is 100 μm droplet sprayed by two nozzles located at the long duct when the flue gas temperature is 130 °C. Field tests were carried out based on the simulation results. The effects of running DWETS on the downstream devices have been studied. The results show that DWETS has a positive impact on ash removal efficiency and does not have any negative impact on the electrostatic precipitator (ESP), flue gas heat exchanger and WFGD. The pH values of the slurry of WFGD slightly increase when the DWETS is running. The simulation and field test of the DWETS show that it is a feasible future technology for desulfurization wastewater treatment. PMID:25325555

  16. Gas centrifuge purge method

    DOEpatents

    Theurich, Gordon R.

    1976-01-01

    1. In a method of separating isotopes in a high speed gas centrifuge wherein a vertically oriented cylindrical rotor bowl is adapted to rotate about its axis within an evacuated chamber, and wherein an annular molecular pump having an intake end and a discharge end encircles the uppermost portion of said rotor bowl, said molecular pump being attached along its periphery in a leak-tight manner to said evacuated chamber, and wherein end cap closure means are affixed to the upper end of said rotor bowl, and a process gas withdrawal and insertion system enters said bowl through said end cap closure means, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and end cap defining an upper zone at the discharge end of said molecular pump, said evacuated chamber, molecular pump and rotor bowl defining a lower annular zone at the intake end of said molecular pump, a method for removing gases from said upper and lower zones during centrifuge operation with a minimum loss of process gas from said rotor bowl, comprising, in combination: continuously measuring the pressure in said upper zone, pumping gas from said lower zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a first preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a second preselected value, said first preselected value being greater than said second preselected value, and continuously pumping gas from said upper zone from the time the pressure in said upper zone equals a third preselected value until the pressure in said upper zone is equal to a fourth preselected value, said third preselected value being greater than said first, second and fourth preselected values.

  17. Evaporation model for beam based additive manufacturing using free surface lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Alexander; Scharowsky, Thorsten; Körner, Carolin

    2014-07-01

    Evaporation plays an important role in many technical applications including beam-based additive manufacturing processes, such as selective electron beam or selective laser melting (SEBM/SLM). In this paper, we describe an evaporation model which we employ within the framework of a two-dimensional free surface lattice Boltzmann method. With this method, we solve the hydrodynamics as well as thermodynamics of the molten material taking into account the mass and energy losses due to evaporation and the recoil pressure acting on the melt pool. Validation of the numerical model is performed by measuring maximum melt depths and evaporative losses in samples of pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V molten by an electron beam. Finally, the model is applied to create processing maps for an SEBM process. The results predict that the penetration depth of the electron beam, which is a function of the acceleration voltage, has a significant influence on evaporation effects.

  18. Growth of CdTe smoke particles prepared by gas evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaito, Chihiro; Fujita, Kazuo; Shiojiri, Makoto

    1983-07-01

    CdTe smoke particles prepared by evaporating CdTe powder in Ar gas were studied by electron microscopy. The zinc-blende particles were formed in an atmosphere of Ar containing an excess Te vapor. The wurtzite particles were formed in an atmosphere of Ar containing an excess of Cd vapor. The lattice images of the CdTe crystal particles prepared by evaporating CdTe powder showed that the particles were composed of pure CdTe crystal. Tetrapod crystals with the wurtzite structure and with the zinc-blende structure grew from nuclei which have been identified to have the zinc-blende structure. A thin layer skin-like mechanism was observed on the particles formed by the excess Te vapor.

  19. Non-Absorbable Gas Behavior in the Absorber/Evaporator of a Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagamoto, Wataru; Sugiyama, Takahide

    A two-dimensional numerical study on non-absorbable gas behavior in the absorber/evaporator of an absorption chiller has been performed. In the present study, the effect of the pitch-to-diameter ratio of a cylinder bundle in the absorber was highlighted. From the results, a sudden decrease of the overall heat transfer coefficient of the absorber was observed at a certain mean concentration of non-absorbable gas for each pitch-to-diameter ratio. Such a critical concentration was also found to decrease as the pitch-to- diameter ratio increased. The sudden decrease occurs due to the sudden disappearance of recirculating region, which is formed between the absorber and the evaporator, and where most of non-absorbable gas stays when it exists. As the pitch-to-diameter ratio increases, the recirculating region becomes weak because the velocity of the high velocity region supporting the recirculating flow decreases. Then, the critical mean concentration of non-absorbable gas is found to decrease as pitch-to-ratio increases.

  20. Bénard instabilities in a binary-liquid layer evaporating into an inert gas.

    PubMed

    Machrafi, H; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P; Dauby, P C

    2010-09-01

    A linear stability analysis is performed for a horizontal layer of a binary liquid of which solely the solute evaporates into an inert gas, the latter being assumed to be insoluble in the liquid. In particular, a water-ethanol system in contact with air is considered, with the evaporation of water being neglected (which can be justified for a certain humidity of the air). External constraints on the system are introduced by imposing fixed "ambient" mass fraction and temperature values at a certain effective distance above the free liquid-gas interface. The temperature is the same as at the bottom of the liquid layer, where, besides, a fixed mass fraction of the solute is presumed to be maintained. Proceeding from a (quasi-)stationary reference solution, neutral (monotonic) stability curves are calculated in terms of solutal/thermal Marangoni/Rayleigh numbers as functions of the wavenumber for different values of the ratio of the gas and liquid layer thicknesses. The results are also presented in terms of the critical values of the liquid layer thickness as a function of the thickness of the gas layer. The solutal and thermal Rayleigh and Marangoni effects are compared to one another. For a water-ethanol mixture of 10wt.% ethanol, it appears that the solutal Marangoni effect is by far the most important instability mechanism. Furthermore, its global action can be described within a Pearson-like model, with an appropriately defined Biot number depending on the wavenumber. On the other hand, it is also shown that, if taken into account, water evaporation has only minor quantitative consequences upon the results for this predominant, solutal Marangoni mechanism. PMID:20557893

  1. A Ghost Fluid/Level Set Method for boiling flows and liquid evaporation: Application to the Leidenfrost effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda Villegas, Lucia; Alis, Romain; Lepilliez, Mathieu; Tanguy, Sébastien

    2016-07-01

    The development of numerical methods for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows with phase change, in the framework of interface capturing or interface tracking methods, is the main topic of this study. We propose a novel numerical method, which allows dealing with both evaporation and boiling at the interface between a liquid and a gas. Indeed, in some specific situations involving very heterogeneous thermodynamic conditions at the interface, the distinction between boiling and evaporation is not always possible. For instance, it can occur for a Leidenfrost droplet; a water drop levitating above a hot plate whose temperature is much higher than the boiling temperature. In this case, boiling occurs in the film of saturated vapor which is entrapped between the bottom of the drop and the plate, whereas the top of the water droplet evaporates in contact of ambient air. The situation can also be ambiguous for a superheated droplet or at the contact line between a liquid and a hot wall whose temperature is higher than the saturation temperature of the liquid. In these situations, the interface temperature can locally reach the saturation temperature (boiling point), for instance near a contact line, and be cooler in other places. Thus, boiling and evaporation can occur simultaneously on different regions of the same liquid interface or occur successively at different times of the history of an evaporating droplet. Standard numerical methods are not able to perform computations in these transient regimes, therefore, we propose in this paper a novel numerical method to achieve this challenging task. Finally, we present several accuracy validations against theoretical solutions and experimental results to strengthen the relevance of this new method.

  2. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  3. Correction of the heat loss method for calculating clothing real evaporative resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Zhang, Chengjiao; Lu, Yehu

    2015-08-01

    In the so-called isothermal condition (i.e., Tair [air temperature]=Tmanikin [manikin temperature]=Tr [radiant temperature]), the actual energy used for moisture evaporation detected by most sweating manikins was underestimated due to the uncontrolled fabric 'skin' temperature Tsk,f (i.e., Tsk,fevaporative resistance. In this study, correction of the real evaporative heat loss from the wet fabric 'skin'-clothing system was proposed and experimentally validated on a 'Newton' sweating manikin. The real evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles and the nude fabric 'skin' calculated by the corrected heat loss method was also reported and compared with that by the mass loss method. Results revealed that, depending on the types of tested clothing, different amounts of heat were drawn from the ambient environment. In general, a greater amount of heat was drawn from the ambient environment by the wet fabric 'skin'-clothing system in lower thermal insulation clothing than that in higher insulation clothing. There were no significant differences between clothing real evaporative resistances calculated by the corrected heat loss method and those by the mass loss method. It was therefore concluded that the correction method proposed in this study has been successfully validated. PMID:26267497

  4. Correlation between the dielectric constant and porosity of nanoporous silica thin films deposited by the gas evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, J. J.; Ono, H.; Uchida, K.; Nozaki, S.; Morisaki, H.; Itoh, N.

    2001-11-01

    Nanoporous silica thin films with low dielectric constants were deposited by gas evaporation of SiO2 nanoparticles in an argon atmosphere. With increasing gas pressure during the evaporation, the dielectric constant decreases, while the porosity increases. The correlation between the dielectric constant and porosity is well modeled by a serial connection of two capacitors, one with air and the other with SiO2 as the dielectric medium. This suggests that the dielectric constant of the nanoporous silica thin film using the gas evaporation technique is more effectively lowered by forming "uniformly" distributed voids of closed gaps than those of the nanoporous silica films with pores extending from the back to front surface. Therefore, the former nanoporous silica thin film requires less porosity to obtain a low dielectric constant and is regarded as an ideal low-k material.

  5. Comparison of 15 evaporation methods applied to a small mountain lake in the northeastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Winter, T.C.; Buso, D.C.; Likens, G.E.

    2007-01-01

    Few detailed evaporation studies exist for small lakes or reservoirs in mountainous settings. A detailed evaporation study was conducted at Mirror Lake, a 0.15 km2 lake in New Hampshire, northeastern USA, as part of a long-term investigation of lake hydrology. Evaporation was determined using 14 alternate evaporation methods during six open-water seasons and compared with values from the Bowen-ratio energy-budget (BREB) method, considered the standard. Values from the Priestley-Taylor, deBruin-Keijman, and Penman methods compared most favorably with BREB-determined values. Differences from BREB values averaged 0.19, 0.27, and 0.20 mm d-1, respectively, and results were within 20% of BREB values during more than 90% of the 37 monthly comparison periods. All three methods require measurement of net radiation, air temperature, change in heat stored in the lake, and vapor pressure, making them relatively data intensive. Several of the methods had substantial bias when compared with BREB values and were subsequently modified to eliminate bias. Methods that rely only on measurement of air temperature, or air temperature and solar radiation, were relatively cost-effective options for measuring evaporation at this small New England lake, outperforming some methods that require measurement of a greater number of variables. It is likely that the atmosphere above Mirror Lake was affected by occasional formation of separation eddies on the lee side of nearby high terrain, although those influences do not appear to be significant to measured evaporation from the lake when averaged over monthly periods. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of evaporation duct heights by an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvenot, R.; Fabbro, V.; Bourlier, C.; Saillard, J.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Essen, H.; Förster, J.

    2007-10-01

    The detection and tracking of naval targets, including low RCS objects like inflatable boats requires a thorough knowledge of the propagation properties of the maritime boundary layer. Models are in existence, which allow a prediction of the propagation factor using the parabolic equation algorithm. As a necessary input the refractive index of the atmosphere has to be known. This parameter, however, is strongly influenced by the actual atmospheric conditions, characterized mainly by air-sea temperature difference, humidity and air pressure. An approach was initiated to retrieve the vertical profile of the refractive index from sea clutter data. The method is based on the LS-SVM (Least-Squares Support Vector Machines) theory and has already been validated on simulated data. Here an inversion method to determine propagation factors is presented based upon data measured during the Vampira campaign conducted as a multinational approach over a transmission path across the Baltic Sea. As the propagation factor has been measured on two reference reflectors mounted onboard a naval vessel at different heights, the results can be combined in order to increase the accuracy of the inversion system. The paper discusses results achieved with the inversion method.

  7. Estimation of evaporation at ungauged sites by combining ANFIS and Kriging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C.; Chiang, Y.; Chang, F.

    2010-12-01

    Eevaporation is one of the most essential references to management of agricultural irrigation. In this study, a hybrid model for estimating evaporation at any ungauged site was developed by combining the artificial neural network and the Kriging method. Data measured at nineteen meteorological gauging stations covering whole Taiwan in the period of 2007-2009 were collected, in which data of sixteen stations were used for model training and validation while data of the other three stations were adopted for testing the model’s accuracy at ungauged sites. First of all, the Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model was established for the estimation of evaporation. Second, the error between observation and ANFIS output was used for calculating the residual at ungauged sites by using Kriging with spatial interpolation. Finally, the evaporation estimation at ungauged sites can be achieved by summing up the ANFIS output and residual obtained from Kriging. The results showed that the combination of ANFIS and Kriging effectively improved evaporation estimation at ungauged sites as compared with Penman-Monteith formula, and provided an improvement of 17.2%, 22.5%, and 12.4%at northern, central, and southern Taiwan, respectively, in terms of RMSE. The model proposed in this study demonstrates its applicability and reliability in estimating evaporation at ungauged sites.

  8. Evaporation in a Mediterranean environment by energy budget and Penman methods, Lake Baratz, Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giadrossich, F.; Niedda, M.; Cohen, D.; Pirastru, M.

    2015-05-01

    In Mediterranean environments, evaporation is a key component of lake water budgets. This applies to Lake Baratz in Sardinia, Italy, a closed lake that almost dried up in 2008 after a succession of years with low seasonal rainfall. We used the energy budget method and Penman's equation to estimate evaporation over Lake Baratz. We measured, using a raft station, water temperature at the surface, at 1, 2, 4, 6 m depth and at the bottom of the lake, as well as air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and net radiation over a period of 3 years. We also compared Penman's equation and the energy budget method in two other climatic zones using published data. Our results indicate that mean yearly evaporation over Lake Baratz was 950 mm. On an annual scale, evaporation estimated by Penman's method omitting heat storage as is usually done was 18% higher than by the energy budget method that included heat storage, with monthly differences ranging between -38 and +60%. Including the heat storage term in Penman's equation changed the monthly values but did not change the yearly value significantly. Solar radiation and heat storage were found to be the most important energy fluxes to and from the lake and had the greatest effect on evaporation rates for the energy budget method. The bias between the two methods has a seasonal cycle due to the storage and release of energy from the lake. Energy advected to and from the lake by precipitation, surface water and ground water had minor effect on evaporation rates. Lake Baratz, like other lakes in a Mediterranean environment, is particularly sensitive to the summer hot and dry climate. In contrast, we found that rates of evaporation estimated from Penman and the energy budget methods over tropical African lakes were nearly constant over the entire year and the difference between the two methods smaller. Difference between the two methods for North American lakes is also smaller probably owing to the ice-cover season and to

  9. Convective heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of a liquid into a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarshinov, B. F.; Volchkov, E. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    1985-10-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes associated with liquid evaporation are analyzed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic conditions. Experimental data are then presented on heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of water and ethyl alcohol from a porous surface. It is shown that heat and mass transfer under conditions of evaporation can be described by using expressions for flow past a 'dry' wall. A diagram is presented for determining the magnitudes of additional heat sources in the case of nonadiabatic evaporation. Finally, the effect of various factors, such as temperature, flow humidity, and liquid type, on heat and mass transfer during evaporation is analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows.

  10. Annatto Polymeric Microparticles: Natural Product Encapsulation by the Emulsion-Solvent Evaporation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Zaine; Duran, Nelson; Guterres, Silvia S.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, the extract from annatto seeds was encapsulated in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) particles by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The particles were washed and centrifuged to remove excess stabilizer and then freeze-dried. The main compound of annatto seeds, bixin, has antioxidant properties as well…

  11. Measuring sub-canopy evaporation in a forested wetland using an ensemble of methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. T.; Edwards, B.; Reba, M. L.; Keim, R.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation from the sub-canopy water surface is an integral but understudied component of the water balance in forested wetlands. Previous studies have used eddy covariance, energy balance approaches, and water-table fluctuations to assess whole-system evapotranspiration. However, partitioning evaporation from transpiration is necessary for modeling the system because of different controls over each process. Sub-canopy evaporation is a physically controlled process driven by relatively small gradients in residual energy transmitted through the canopy. The low-energy sub-canopy environment is characterized by a spatiotemporally varying light environment due to sunflecks, small and often inverse temperature and vapor gradients, and a high capacity for heat storage in flood water, which each present challenges to common evapotranspiration measurement techniques. Previous studies have examined wetland surface evaporation rates with small lysimeter experiments, but this approach does not encapsulate micrometeorological processes occurring at the scale of natural wetlands. In this study, we examine a one year time series of in situ sub-canopy flux measurements from a seasonally flooded cypress-tupelo swamp in southeast Louisiana. Our objective is to apply these data towards modeling sub-canopy energy flux responses to intra-annual hydrologic, phenologic, and climatic cycles. To assess and mitigate potential errors due to the inherent measurement challenges of this environment, we utilized multiple measurement approaches including eddy covariance, Bowen ratio energy balance (with both air to air gradients and water surface to air gradients) and direct measurement using a floating evaporation pan. Preliminary results show that Bowen ratio energy balance measurements are useful for constraining evaporation measurements when low wind speed conditions create a non-ideal setting for eddy covariance. However, Bowen ratios were often highly erratic due to the weak temperature

  12. Method of Liquifying a gas

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Klingler, Kerry M.

    2006-02-14

    A method of liquefying a gas is disclosed and which includes the steps of pressurizing a liquid; mixing a reactant composition with the pressurized liquid to generate a high pressure gas; supplying the high pressure gas to an expansion engine which produces a gas having a reduced pressure and temperature, and which further generates a power and/or work output; coupling the expansion engine in fluid flowing relation relative to a refrigeration assembly, and wherein the gas having the reduced temperature is provided to the refrigeration assembly; and energizing and/or actuating the refrigeration assembly, at least in part, by supplying the power and/or work output generated by the expansion engine to the refrigeration assembly, the refrigeration assembly further reducing the temperature of the gas to liquefy same.

  13. Estimation of evaporation from open water - A review of selected studies, summary of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers data collection and methods, and evaluation of two methods for estimation of evaporation from five reservoirs in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwell, Glenn R.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations responsible for the management of water resources, such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), are tasked with estimation of evaporation for water-budgeting and planning purposes. The USACE has historically used Class A pan evaporation data (pan data) to estimate evaporation from reservoirs but many USACE Districts have been experimenting with other techniques for an alternative to collecting pan data. The energy-budget method generally is considered the preferred method for accurate estimation of open-water evaporation from lakes and reservoirs. Complex equations to estimate evaporation, such as the Penman, DeBruin-Keijman, and Priestley-Taylor, perform well when compared with energy-budget method estimates when all of the important energy terms are included in the equations and ideal data are collected. However, sometimes nonideal data are collected and energy terms, such as the change in the amount of stored energy and advected energy, are not included in the equations. When this is done, the corresponding errors in evaporation estimates are not quantifiable. Much simpler methods, such as the Hamon method and a method developed by the U.S. Weather Bureau (USWB) (renamed the National Weather Service in 1970), have been shown to provide reasonable estimates of evaporation when compared to energy-budget method estimates. Data requirements for the Hamon and USWB methods are minimal and sometimes perform well with remotely collected data. The Hamon method requires average daily air temperature, and the USWB method requires daily averages of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation. Estimates of annual lake evaporation from pan data are frequently within 20 percent of energy-budget method estimates. Results of evaporation estimates from the Hamon method and the USWB method were compared against historical pan data at five selected reservoirs in Texas (Benbrook Lake, Canyon Lake, Granger Lake, Hords Creek Lake, and Sam

  14. Optimization of evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, C. A.; Bradley, C. C.; Hulet, R. G.

    1997-05-01

    Recent experiments have used forced evaporative cooling to produce Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases. The evaporative cooling process can be optimized to provide the maximum phase-space density with a specified number of atoms remaining. We show that this global optimization is approximately achieved by locally optimizing the cooling efficiency at each instant. We discuss how this method can be implemented, and present the results for our 7Li trap. The predicted behavior of the gas is found to agree well with experiment.

  15. ARE LARGE, COMETARY-SHAPED PROPLYDS REALLY (FREE-FLOATING) EVAPORATING GAS GLOBULES?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, R.; Guesten, R.; Morris, M. R.

    2012-12-20

    We report the detection of strong and compact molecular line emission (in the CO J = 3-2, 4-3, 6-5, 7-6, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, HCN, and HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 transitions) from a cometary-shaped object (Carina-frEGG1) in the Carina star-forming region (SFR) previously classified as a photoevaporating protoplanetary disk (proplyd). We derive a molecular mass of 0.35 M{sub Sun} for Carina-frEGG1, which shows that it is not a proplyd, but belongs to a class of free-floating evaporating gas globules (frEGGs) recently found in the Cygnus SFR by Sahai et al. Archival adaptive optics near-IR (Ks) images show a central hourglass-shaped nebula. The derived source luminosity (about 8-18 L{sub Sun }), the hourglass morphology, and the presence of collimated jets seen in Hubble Space Telescope images imply the presence of a jet-driving, young, low-mass star deeply embedded in the dust inside Carina-frEGG1. Our results suggest that the true nature of many or most such cometary-shaped objects seen in massive SFRs and previously labeled as proplyds has been misunderstood, and that these are really frEGGs.

  16. Structural and gas sensing properties of ex-situ oxidized Sn grown by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amutha, A.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sundaravel, B.; Prasad, A. K.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Thangadurai, P.

    2016-01-01

    SnO2 thin films were obtained by ex-situ oxidation of Sn metal film deposited by thermal evaporation. The oxidation of the Sn film was carried out at 600, 700 and 900 °C for 2 h in a controlled oxygen atmosphere. GIXRD confirmed the tetragonal rutile phase of SnO2 which was further confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The RBS measurements provided the thickness and chemical information of the film. Thickness of the film was in the range of 6-12 nm and the presence of Sn and oxygen in the films are shown. Scanning electron microscopy revealed spherical particles of different sizes for films annealed at different temperatures. The SnO2 thin film oxidized at 900 °C was tested for methane gas sensing. A sensing response of 78.46% for 100 ppm of methane at an operating temperature of 100 °C which is one of lowest reported was obtained.

  17. A comparison of methods for estimating open-water evaporation in small wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, Jason R.; Stannard, David I.

    2010-01-01

    We compared evaporation measurements from a floating pan, land pan, chamber, and the Priestley-Taylor (PT) equation. Floating pan, land pan, and meteorological data were collected from June 6 to July 21, 2005, at a small wetland in the Canadian River alluvium in central Oklahoma, USA. Evaporation measured with the floating pan compared favorably to 12 h chamber measurements. Differences between chamber and floating pan rates ranged from −0.2 to 0.3 mm, mean of 0.1 mm. The difference between chamber and land pan rates ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 mm, mean of 1.5 mm. The mean chamber-to-floating pan ratio was 0.97 and the mean chamber-to-land pan ratio was 0.73. The chamber-to-floating pan ratio of 0.97 indicates the use of a floating pan to measure evaporation in small limited-fetch water bodies is an appropriate and accurate method for the site investigated. One-sided Paired t-Tests indicate daily floating pan rates were significantly less than land pan and PT rates. A two-sided Paired t-Test indicated there was no significant difference between land pan and PT values. The PT equation tends to overestimate evaporation during times when the air is of low drying power and tends to underestimate as drying power increases.

  18. Combining Heat and Mass Flux Methods for Estimating Real-Time Evaporation from a Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, T. J.; Schladow, G.; Hook, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the heat and mass fluxes associated with evaporation from lakes and reservoirs is achallenge for hydrologists and water managers. This is in large part due to a lack of comprehensivemeasurement data for most systems, which is itself related to the inherent difficulties associated withmeasuring turbulent quantities. An alternative to direct measurement is to develop better models for theevaporative flux, based on the mean terms (as opposed to the turbulent terms) that drive evaporation.Algorithms for the evaporative heat and mass flux must reflect changes in heat storage in the system aswell as the other components of a mass balance (inflow, outflow, and precipitation). The energy budget basedapproach requires records of all the other energy fluxes across the air-water interface to separateout the latent heat component. Other approaches utilize the similarity between atmospheric velocity,temperature and humidity profiles. This study seeks to combine these approaches to build and calibrateheat flux models that can be used to accurately recreate a long-term record of mass storage changefrom a sub-set of meteorological data, lake surface temperature data, and hydrologic observations. Highfrequency lake level data are used to check that the mass balance is in fact achieved. Good agreement isshown between the heat flux methods and the mass balance results through comparison with a three-yearrecord of lake level. The results demonstrate that a combination of mass and heat flux approaches canbe used to generate accurate values of evaporation on daily or even sub-daily time-scales.

  19. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition ( T manikin = T a = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin.

  20. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin  = T a  = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. PMID:26542017

  1. High latitude gas in the β Pictoris system. A possible origin related to falling evaporating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beust, H.; Valiron, P.

    2007-04-01

    Context: The puzzling detection of Ca II ions at fairly high latitude (⪆ 30°) above the outer parts of the β Pictoris circumstellar disk was recently reported. Surprisingly, this detection does not extend to Na I atoms, in contradiction with our modelling of the emission lines in and out of the mid-plane of the disk. Aims: We propose that the presence of these off-plane Ca II ions (and to a lesser extent Fe I atoms), and the non-detection of off-plane Na I atoms, could be the consequence of the evaporation process of Falling Evaporating Bodies (FEBs), i.e., star-grazing planetesimals that evaporate in the immediate vicinity of the star. Methods: Our model is two-fold. Firstly, we show numerically and theoretically that in the star-grazing regime, the FEBs are subject to inclination oscillations up to 30-40°, and that most metallic species released during each FEB sublimation keep track of their initial orbital inclination while starting a free expansion away from the star, blown out by a strong radiation pressure. Secondly, the off-plane Ca II and Fe I species must be stopped prior to their detection at rest with respect to the star, about 100 AU away. We revisit the role of energetic collisional processes, and we investigate the possible influence of magnetic interactions. Results: This dynamical process of inclination oscillations explains the presence of off-plane Ca II (and Fe I). It also accounts for the absence of Na I because once released by the FEBs, these atoms are quickly photoionized and no longer undergo any significant radiation pressure. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that the deceleration of metallic ions can be achieved very efficiently if the ions encounter a dilute neutral gaseous medium. The required H I column density is reduced to ~ 1017 cm-2, one order of magnitude below present detection limits. We also investigate the possibility that the ions are slowed down magnetically. While the sole action of a magnetic field of the order

  2. A simple method to determine evaporation duct height in the sea surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson-Genon, Luc; Gauthier, Sylvie; Bruth, Eric

    1992-09-01

    A formulation to determine the evaporation duct height in the sea surface boundary layer is presented. This formulation is based upon the theory of similarity of Monin Obukhov by using analytical solutions currently used in the field of numerical weather prediction. The proposed solution is simple, coherent with the surface boundary layer parameterization used in the Meteo France and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts weather prediction models and gives good results when compared to more traditional methods.

  3. Evaporation and Vapor Formation of Graphite Suspensions Based on Water in a High-Temperature Gas Environment: an Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Anastasia G.; Piskunov, Maxim V.; Rybatskyy, Kirill A.

    2016-02-01

    We performed an experimental research on evaporation and vapor formation of water droplets containing large (2 mm in size) and small (0.05 mm and 0.2 mm in diameter) graphite inclusions, when heated in a high-temperature gas environment. We applied a high-speed (up to 104 fps) video recording to establish mechanisms of the processes considered. Moreover, we revealed the positive influence of addition of small graphite inclusions on intensifying the evaporation of heterogeneous suspension droplets. In addition, we made the assumption on the formation of vapor layer around the 10 and 15 μl suspension droplets, as well as its negative influence on the lifetimes of suspension droplets τh (increasing the times) in a high-temperature gas environment.

  4. Electron beam evaporated carbon doping of InGaAs layers grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Salokatve, A.; Toivonen, M.; Asonen, H.; Pessa, M.; Likonen, J.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have studied carbon doping of GaInAs grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. Graphite was used as a source material for carbon evaporation. GaInAs was studied due to its importance as a base layer in InP-based heterojunction bipolar transistors. They show that useful p-type acceptor concentrations can be achieved by evaporation from graphite source for GaInAs grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Van der Pauw Hall measurements were used to characterize the carbon and net acceptor concentrations of their GaInAs layers. The effect of rapid thermal annealing on acceptor concentrations and Hall mobilities was also studied.

  5. Metal-catalyzed growth of In2O3 nanotowers using thermal evaporation and oxidation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Liu; Shihua, Huang; Lü, He

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale In2O3 nanotowers with different cross sections were synthesized by a thermal evaporation and oxidation technique using metal as the catalyst. The morphologies and structural characterizations of In2O3 nanotowers are dependent on growth processes, such as different metal (Au, Ag or Sn) catalysts, the relative position of the substrate and evaporation source, growth temperature, gas flow rate, and growth time. In2O3 nanotowers cannot be observed using Sn as the catalyst, which indicates that metal liquid droplets play an important role in the initial stages of the growth of In2O3 nanotowers. The formation of an In2O3 nanotower is attributed to the competitive growth model between a lateral growth controlled by vapor-solid mechanism and an axial vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism mediated by metal liquid nanodroplets. The synthesized In2O3 nanostructures with novel tower-shaped morphology may have potential applications in optoelectronic devices and gas sensors. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61076055), the Open Project Program of Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key Laboratory) of Fudan University (No. KF2015_02), the Zhejiang Provincial Science and Technology Key Innovation Team (No. 2011R50012), and the Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory (No. 2013E10022).

  6. Gas-evaporation in low-gravity field (cogelation mechanism of metal vapors) (M-14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, N.

    1993-01-01

    When metal and alloy compounds are heated and vaporized in a rare gas such as helium, argon, or xenon, the vaporized substances diffused in the rare gas are supersaturated resulting in a smoke of fine particles of the material congealing as snow or fog. The gas vaporizing method is a fine particle generation method. Though the method has a variety of applications, the material vapor flow is disturbed by gravitational convection on Earth. The inability to elucidate the fine particle generation mechanism results in an obstruction to improving the method to mass production levels. As no convection occurs in microgravity in space, the fine particle generation mechanism influenced only by diffusion can be investigated. Investigators expect that excellent particles with homogeneous diameter distribution can be obtained. Experiment data and facts will assist in improving efficiency, quality, and scale or production processes including element processes such as vaporization, diffusion, and condensation. The objective of this experiment is to obtain important information related to the mechanism of particle formation in the gas atmosphere (smoke particles) and the production of submicron powders of extremely uniform size.

  7. Quantifying Evaporation and Evaluating Runoff Estimation Methods in a Permeable Pavement System - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies on quantifying evaporation in permeable pavement systems are limited to few laboratory studies that used a scale to weigh evaporative losses and a field application with a tunnel-evaporation gauge. A primary objective of this research was to quantify evaporation for a la...

  8. Full evaporation headspace gas chromatography for sensitive determination of high boiling point volatile organic compounds in low boiling matrices.

    PubMed

    Mana Kialengila, Didi; Wolfs, Kris; Bugalama, John; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2013-11-01

    Determination of volatile organic components (VOC's) is often done by static headspace gas chromatography as this technique is very robust and combines easy sample preparation with good selectivity and low detection limits. This technique is used nowadays in different applications which have in common that they have a dirty matrix which would be problematic in direct injection approaches. Headspace by nature favors the most volatile compounds, avoiding the less volatile to reach the injector and column. As a consequence, determination of a high boiling solvent in a lower boiling matrix becomes challenging. Determination of VOCs like: xylenes, cumene, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI), benzyl alcohol (BA) and anisole in water or water soluble products are an interesting example of the arising problems. In this work, a headspace variant called full evaporation technique is worked out and validated for the mentioned solvents. Detection limits below 0.1 μg/vial are reached with RSD values below 10%. Mean recovery values ranged from 92.5 to 110%. The optimized method was applied to determine residual DMSO in a water based cell culture and DMSO and DMA in tetracycline hydrochloride (a water soluble sample). PMID:24103808

  9. Intercomparison of methods for calculating potential evaporation in regional and global water balance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federer, C. A.; Vörösmarty, C.; Fekete, B.

    Five methods (Thornthwaite, Hamon, Jensen-Haise, Turc, and Penman) for estimating potential evaporation for a reference surface (PEr) were compared to four methods (Priestley-Taylor, McNaughton-Black, Penman-Monteith, and Shuttleworth-Wallace) for estimating surface-dependent potential evaporation (PEs) using three cover types at each of seven locations from Fairbanks, Alaska, to San Juan, Puerto Rico. For annual PE the PEs methods generally agreed with the PEr methods, but for many locations, differences among methods were hundreds of millimeters per year. No methods were consistently low or high. Three of the PEs methods depend strongly on maximum leaf conductance, for which Körner [1994] provided satisfactory values by cover type. Potential interception (PEi) can only be estimated appropriately for all cover types by the Shuttleworth-Wallace method. Use of 5-day or monthly input data did not greatly degrade results, so use of monthly data to generate PE estimates appears warranted in global water balance models.

  10. NMR as a method to determine water content changes in the upper soil layer during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Steffen; Pohlmeier, Andreas; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Water exchange between bare soil and atmosphere is controlled by evaporation. In the topmost soil layer moisture content and hydraulic conductivity may change strongly and capillary film flow (stage I) from saturated regions to the surface discontinues. Evaporation is now mainly driven by vapor diffusion through a dry layer (stage II). Water vaporizes in the unsaturated zone inside the soil what strongly reduces the evaporation rate and also soil surface temperature to a considerable amount. The dynamics of the transition from stage I to stage II as well as film flow and vapor diffusion at low water contents have received little attention. In this study we investigated water content changes in the uppermost soil layer with high spatial resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). NMR is a feasible noninvasive method where the received signal of hydrogen protons allows conclusions on moisture and pore size distribution. The overall aim is to apply a mobile nuclear magnetic resonance surface sensor (NMR-MOUSE) directly for field measurements. This sensor has a max. measurement depth of 25 mm and operates at a Larmor frequency of 13.4 MHz. The general challenges of NMR in soils are the inherent fast transversal relaxation times of the soil matrix especially next to the residual moisture content. Therefore, as a first step of validation we applied and compared NMR-MOUSE measurements with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an initially saturated sand column. The column was evaporated over 67 days and water content profiles were recorded by 1D-T2 relaxation measurements using the NMR-MOUSE as well as different 3D-MRI sequences during drying. Firstly, we report on the sensitivities and limits of the different devices and measurement sequences. Considering these data, we could monitor that over a period of 58 days the moisture decreased rather uniform until the onset of stage II. Thereafter, a dry surface layer developed and a retreating drying front was observed.

  11. Double-layered target and identification method of individual target correlated with evaporation residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, D.; Morimoto, K.

    2015-08-01

    A double-layered target system and an identification method (target ID) for individual targets mounted on a rotating wheel using correlation with evaporation residues were newly developed for the study of superheavy elements (SHE). The target system can be used in three modes: conventional single-layered mode, double-layered mode, and energy-degrader mode. The target ID method can be utilized for masking a target, measuring an excitation function without changing the beam energy from the accelerator, and searching for SHE nuclides using multiple targets during a single irradiation.

  12. Preparation of superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O films by a reactive plasma evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Kazuo; Eguchi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Toyonobu; Akashi, Kazuo

    1988-04-01

    Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting films were prepared by a reactive plasma evaporation method, in which mixed powders were coevaporated in a thermal RF Ar + O2 plasma, and the ternary-composition controlled high-temperature metallic vapors were codeposited onto a substrate. The deposition rate was much more than 10 micron/min, which is several orders of magnitude higher than those reported for other methods. The structure of the prepared films was identified as an orthorhombic oxygen-deficient perovskite phase, and some films showed the preferred orientation of (001). The as-deposited film without postannealing showed a superconducting transition temperature Tcm (midpoint) of 94 K.

  13. Full evaporation dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for uniform enrichment of odor compounds in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    A method for analysis of a wide range of odor compounds in aqueous samples at sub-ng mL⁻¹ to μg mL⁻¹ levels was developed by full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compared to conventional DHS and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), FEDHS provides more uniform enrichment over the entire polarity range for odor compounds in aqueous samples. FEDHS at 80°C using 3 L of purge gas allows complete vaporization of 100 μL of an aqueous sample, and trapping and drying it in an adsorbent packed tube, while providing high recoveries (85-103%) of the 18 model odor compounds (water solubility at 25°C: log0.54-5.65 mg L⁻¹, vapor pressure at 25°C: 0.011-3.2 mm Hg) and leaving most of the low volatile matrix behind. The FEDHS-GC-MS method showed good linearity (r²>0.9909) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.21-5.2 ng mL⁻¹) for the model compounds even with the scan mode in the conventional MS. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analyses of key odor compounds including hydrophilic and less volatile characteristics in beverages (whiskey and green tea). In a single malt whiskey sample, phenolic compounds including vanillin could be determined in the range of 0.92-5.1 μg mL⁻¹ (RSD<7.4%, n=6). For a Japanese green tea sample, 48 compounds including 19 potent odorants were positively identified from only 100 μL of sample. Heat-induced artifact formation for potent odorants was also examined and the proposed method does not affect the additional formation of thermally generated compounds. Eighteen compounds including 12 potent odorants (e.g. coumarin, furaneol, indole, maltol, and pyrazine congeners) were determined in the range of 0.21-110 ng mL⁻¹ (RSD<10%, n=6). PMID:22542289

  14. Preparation of polymeric microspheres by the solvent evaporation method using sucrose stearate as a droplet stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, N; Baykara, T

    1997-01-01

    Polymeric microspheres containing nicardipine hydrochloride (HCl) as a reference drug were prepared with the acrylic polymers Eudragit RS and L by the solvent evaporation method. Different concentrations of sucrose stearate as a droplet stabilizer were used. Sucrose stearate affected the diffusion rate of the solvent from the preliminary emulsion droplets to the outer phase for the formation of microspheres. Increasing concentrations of sucrose stearate in the formulations caused increasing porosity on the surface of the microspheres. However, a correlation between the concentrations of sucrose stearate and diameters of microspheres could not be assessed. From this point of view, during processing, applied stirring rate was important. PMID:9394253

  15. CO (J = 1-0) Observation of the cD Galaxy of AWM 7: Constraints on the Evaporation of Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Tosaki, Tomoka; Nakamichi, Akika; Kuno, Nario

    2000-04-01

    We have searched for molecular gas in the cD galaxy of a poor cluster of galaxies, AWM 7, using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. We did not detect CO emission in the galaxy. Our limit of molecular gas in the inner 7.5 kpc is M_H_2< 4times 108 MO . We estimate the total mass of molecular gas left in the cD galaxy when the gas deposited by a cooling flow once becomes molecular gas and the molecular gas is continuously evaporated by the ambient hot gas. The observational limit of molecular gas requires f>~ 10-3, where f is the ratio of the heat conduction rate to that of Spitzer. However, this contradicts recent X-ray observations showing f<10-5. Thus, the non-detection of CO cannot be explained by evaporation, and most of the cooled gas predicted by a cooling flow model may not change into molecular gas in the cD galaxy. Moreover, we estimate the evaporation time of molecular clouds brought to a cD galaxy through the capture of gas-rich galaxies and find that these clouds should not be evaporated if f<~ 10-3-10-4. Therefore, the non-detection of CO in a cD galaxy could constrain the total mass of the molecular clouds brought into it.

  16. Method and apparatus for fuel gas moisturization and heating

    DOEpatents

    Ranasinghe, Jatila; Smith, Raub Warfield

    2002-01-01

    Fuel gas is saturated with water heated with a heat recovery steam generator heat source. The heat source is preferably a water heating section downstream of the lower pressure evaporator to provide better temperature matching between the hot and cold heat exchange streams in that portion of the heat recovery steam generator. The increased gas mass flow due to the addition of moisture results in increased power output from the gas and steam turbines. Fuel gas saturation is followed by superheating the fuel, preferably with bottom cycle heat sources, resulting in a larger thermal efficiency gain compared to current fuel heating methods. There is a gain in power output compared to no fuel heating, even when heating the fuel to above the LP steam temperature.

  17. Analytical study of bifurcation of a flow of a gas between coaxial circular cylinders with evaporation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Yoshio; Doi, Toshiyuki

    2000-10-01

    Time-independent behavior of a gas between two coaxial circular cylinders made of the condensed phase of the gas, where the cylinders are rotating around their common axis and evaporation or condensation is taking place, is considered with special attention given to bifurcation of the flow. The problem is studied analytically for small values of the speeds of rotation of the cylinders and the Knudsen number on the basis of the Boltzmann equation, and the solution is obtained explicitly. The bifurcation of flow occurs even in a simple case where the gas is axially symmetric and uniform (or the flow field depends only on the radial coordinate). The comprehensive feature of the bifurcation of flow is clarified with the explicit forms of solutions and the bifurcation diagram.

  18. The preparation of accelerator targets by the evaporation of acetate-organic solutions in the presence of NH/sub 3/ gas

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, S.Y.; Ghiorso, A.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1987-03-01

    The chemical methods described in this paper have been developed for preparation of isotopic targets for bombardment by accelerator-produced ions. Three systems are compared: nitrate-, chloride-, and acetate-organic solutions. The best method was found to be the metallic acetate-organic solution system, evaporated onto the substrate in the presence of ammonia gas. A detailed procedure is given for this method. The targets obtained by the acetate-organic solution system are uniform and adherent. The hydroxide forms fine crystals of good quality for target thicknesses from a few ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ to several mg/cm/sup 2/. Thicknesses up to 5 mg/cm/sup 2/ of Eu as the oxide were obtained by this method. The process is simple and fast. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Dissociation of temperature-gradient and evaporative heat loss during cold gas hyperventilation in cold-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Ingenito, E; Solway, J; Lafleur, J; Lombardo, A; Drazen, J M; Pichurko, B

    1988-09-01

    We examined temperature-gradient and evaporative energy losses during cold gas inhalation challenges in patients with exercise-induced asthma by using gases with similar water-carrying capacities but significantly different volume heat capacities. Seven subjects were asked to hyperventilate mixtures of 80% helium/20% oxygen (HeO2) or 80% sulfur hexafluoride/20% oxygen (SF6O2) for 5 min at a fixed target minute ventilation of 20 x FEV1 and an inspired gas temperature of 0 degrees C. Each subject equilibrated his or her lungs with the appropriate gas mixture prior to testing: PETCO2 and FIO2 were monitored and maintained at constant values (CO2 = 0.05; O2 = 0.20) by CO2 scrubbing and addition of compressed gas to the system. Gas composition, inspired and expired flow rates, and gas temperatures at the airway opening were recorded in real time using a computer-based data collection system that calculated respiratory heat loss on a per breath basis. Bronchoconstriction was quantitated using specific airway conductance measured before and serially after each challenge. The degree of bronchoconstriction correlated closely with evaporative respiratory heat loss (r = 0.658 p less than 0.05), but poorly with both temperature-gradient (r = 0.114, p greater than 0.20) and total (r = 0.268, p greater than 0.15) heat loss. These findings suggest that total respiratory heat loss is not the primary stimulus in exercise-induced asthma, and further suggest that total water loss, or focal heat/water loss, may be important in inducing bronchospasm in this subset of asthmatics. PMID:3202410

  20. Development, characterization and solubility study of solid dispersions of Cefuroxime Axetil by the solvent evaporation method

    PubMed Central

    Arora, S. C.; Sharma, P. K.; Irchhaiya, Raghuveer; Khatkar, Anurag; Singh, Neeraj; Gagoria, Jagbir

    2010-01-01

    Cefuroxime Axetil (Poorly water soluble drug), when prepared as solid dispersion showed improved solubility and dissolution. Therefore, the main purpose of this investigation was to increase the solubility and dissolution rate of Cefuroxime Axetil by the preparation of its solid dispersion with urea, using the solvent evaporation method. Physical mixtures and solid dispersions of Cefuroxime Axetil were prepared by using urea as a water-soluble carrier in various proportions (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4, 1:5, 1:6, and 1:7 by weight), by employing the solvent evaporation method. The drug release profile was studied and it was found that the dissolution rate and the dissolution parameters of the drug from the physical mixture as well as solid dispersion were higher than those of the intact drug. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed no chemical incompatibility between the drug and urea. Drug-polymer interactions were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD). PMID:22247865

  1. DEVELOPMENT, CHARACTERIZATION AND SOLUBILITY STUDY OF SOLID DISPERSIONS OF AZITHROMYCIN DIHYDRATE BY SOLVENT EVAPORATION METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Arora, S.C.; Sharma, P.K.; Irchhaiya, Raghuveer; Khatkar, Anurag; Singh, Neeraj; Gagoria, Jagbir

    2010-01-01

    Azithromycin Dihydrate (Poorly water soluble drug), when prepared as solid dispersion showed improved solubility and dissolution. So the main purpose of this investigation was to increase the solubility and dissolution rate of Azithromycin Dihydrate by the preparation of its solid dispersion with urea using solvent evaporation method. Physical mixtures and solid dispersions of Azithromycin Dihydrate were prepared by using urea as water-soluble carrier in various proportions (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4, 1:5, 1:6, 1:7 by weight), by employing solvent evaporation method. The drug release profile was studied and it was found that the dissolution rate and the dissolution parameters of the drug from the physical mixture as well as solid dispersion were higher than those of the intact drug. FT- IR spectra revealed no chemical incompatibility between drug and urea. Drug-polymer interactions were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD). PMID:22247849

  2. Mucosal fluid evaporation is not the method of heat dissipation from fourth-degree laryngopharyngeal burns

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiang-bo; Zhang, Guo-an; Qiu, Yu-xuan; Wen, Chun-quan; Fu, Tai-ran

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to explore whether mucosal fluid evaporation represents a method of heat dissipation from thermal air inhalation injury and to assess laryngopharyngeal tissue damage according to heat quantity changes of dry air and vapour. Fifteen adult male beagles were divided into five groups to inhale heated air or vapour for 10 min as follows: control group (ordinary air), group I (91–110 °C heated air), group II (148–175 °C heated air), group III (209–227 °C heated air), and group IV (96 °C saturated vapour). The heat quantity changes of the dry air and vapour were calculated via thermodynamic formulas. The macroscopic and histological features of the laryngopharynxes were examined and assessed by various tissue damage grading systems. Group IV exhibited the most serious laryngopharyngeal damage, including cilia exfoliation, submucosal thrombosis, glandular atrophy, and chondrocyte degeneration, which is indicative of fourth-degree injury. The quality, heat quantity, and proportional reduction of heat quantity of vapour in group IV were all higher than those in the other groups. Furthermore, we found that mucosal fluid evaporation is not the method of heat dissipation from thermal air inhalation injury used by the airways. Laryngopharyngeal tissue damage depends chiefly on the heat quantity of vapour in the air. PMID:27349685

  3. Mucosal fluid evaporation is not the method of heat dissipation from fourth-degree laryngopharyngeal burns.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiang-Bo; Zhang, Guo-An; Qiu, Yu-Xuan; Wen, Chun-Quan; Fu, Tai-Ran

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to explore whether mucosal fluid evaporation represents a method of heat dissipation from thermal air inhalation injury and to assess laryngopharyngeal tissue damage according to heat quantity changes of dry air and vapour. Fifteen adult male beagles were divided into five groups to inhale heated air or vapour for 10 min as follows: control group (ordinary air), group I (91-110 °C heated air), group II (148-175 °C heated air), group III (209-227 °C heated air), and group IV (96 °C saturated vapour). The heat quantity changes of the dry air and vapour were calculated via thermodynamic formulas. The macroscopic and histological features of the laryngopharynxes were examined and assessed by various tissue damage grading systems. Group IV exhibited the most serious laryngopharyngeal damage, including cilia exfoliation, submucosal thrombosis, glandular atrophy, and chondrocyte degeneration, which is indicative of fourth-degree injury. The quality, heat quantity, and proportional reduction of heat quantity of vapour in group IV were all higher than those in the other groups. Furthermore, we found that mucosal fluid evaporation is not the method of heat dissipation from thermal air inhalation injury used by the airways. Laryngopharyngeal tissue damage depends chiefly on the heat quantity of vapour in the air. PMID:27349685

  4. Reviving the Bowen Ratio method for Actual Evaporation with Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxemburg, W. M. J.; Euser, T.; Everson, C. S.; Mengistu, M. G.; Clulow, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    We have used the technique of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with a fiber optic cable to determine actual evaporation over land. The results were compared with measurements using a surface layer scintilometer, surface renewal and eddy covariance techniques. Dry and wetted sections of a fiber optic cable were suspended from a six meter high tower in a sugar beet trial in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. From the principle of a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapor pressure and temperature at 0.20 m intervals of a vertical column of air above the field could be derived. Subsequently it allowed accurate determination of the ratio of sensible and latent heat, i.e. the Bowen ratio over time and in the vertical. Using measurements of the net radiation, soil heat flux and the Bowen ratio sensible heat flux, the actual evaporation could be determined as the residual of the shortened energy balance equation. The advantage of the DTS method over the traditional Bowen ratio method is that one and the same sensor (the fiber optic cable) is used, with sufficient accuracy to discriminate small differences in temperature and vapor pressure respectively, hence giving numerous gradient measurements over the vertical. The traditional Bowen ratio method relies on only a few sensors that require careful calibration to detect the real differences of temperature and vapor pressure. Comparing the improved method with the traditional Bowen Ratio method, shows that the improved method gives more stable and constant results than the standard method. The DTS data were reliable, provided that water blown by strong wind from the wetted cable does not affect the temperature of air at the location of the dry cable. Under these conditions the vertical air temperature was not representative for the air temperature over the fetch of the crop. The experiments were carried out in South Africa, in November 2011 (summer) under varying radiation conditions. In this way it was

  5. Gas-phase saturation and evaporative cooling effects during wet compression of a fuel aerosol under RCM conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsborough, S.S.; Johnson, M.V.; Zhu, G.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-15

    Wet compression of a fuel aerosol has been proposed as a means of creating gas-phase mixtures of involatile diesel-representative fuels and oxidizer + diluent gases for rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments. The use of high concentration aerosols (e.g., {proportional_to}0.1 mL{sub fuel}/L{sub gas}, {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 9} droplets/L{sub gas} for stoichiometric fuel loading at ambient conditions) can result in droplet-droplet interactions which lead to significant gas-phase fuel saturation and evaporative cooling during the volumetric compression process. In addition, localized stratification (i.e., on the droplet scale) of the fuel vapor and of temperature can lead to non-homogeneous reaction and heat release processes - features which could prevent adequate segregation of the underlying chemical kinetic rates from rates of physical transport. These characteristics are dependent on many factors including physical parameters such as overall fuel loading and initial droplet size relative to the compression rate, as well as fuel and diluent properties such as the boiling curve, vaporization enthalpy, heat capacity, and mass and thermal diffusivities. This study investigates the physical issues, especially fuel saturation and evaporative cooling effects, using a spherically-symmetric, single-droplet wet compression model. n-Dodecane is used as the fuel with the gas containing 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}. An overall compression time and compression ratio of 15.3 ms and 13.4 are used, respectively. It is found that smaller droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 2-3 {mu}m) are more affected by 'far-field' saturation and cooling effects, while larger droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 14 {mu}m) result in greater localized stratification of the gas-phase due to the larger diffusion distances for heat and mass transport. Vaporization of larger droplets is more affected by the volumetric compression process since evaporation requires more time to be completed

  6. Verifying the distributed temperature sensing Bowen ratio method for measuring evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilperoort, Bart; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Luxemburg, Willem; Cisneros Vaca, César; Ucer, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Evaporation is an important process in the hydrological cycle, therefore measuring evaporation accurately is essential for water resource management, hydrological management and climate change models. Current techniques to measure evaporation, like eddy covariance systems, scintillometers, or lysimeters, have their limitations and therefore cannot always be used to estimate evaporation correctly. Also the conventional Bowen ratio surface energy balance method has as drawback that two sensors are used, which results in large measuring errors. In Euser et al. (2014) a new method was introduced, the DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS), that overcomes this drawback. It uses a distributed temperature sensing technique (DTS) whereby a fibre optic cable is placed vertically, going up and down along a measurement tower. One stretch of the cable is dry, the other wrapped with cloth and kept wet, akin to a psychrometer. Using this, the wet and dry bulb temperatures are determined every 12.5 cm over the height, from which the Bowen ratio can be determined. As radiation and wind have an effect on the cooling and heating of the cable's sheath as well, the DTS cables do not necessarily always measure dry and wet bulb temperature of the air accurately. In this study the accuracy in representing the dry and wet bulb temperatures of the cable are verified, and evaporation observations of the BR-DTS method are compared to Eddy Covariance (EC) measurements. Two ways to correct for errors due to wind and solar radiation warming up the DTS cables are presented: one for the dry cable and one for the wet cable. The measurements were carried out in a pine forest near Garderen (The Netherlands), along a 46-meter tall scaffold tower (15 meters above the canopy). Both the wet (Twet) and dry (Tdry) temperature of the DTS cable were compared to temperature and humidity (from which Twet is derived) observations from sensors placed along the height of the tower. Underneath the canopy, where there was

  7. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  8. Method for hot gas conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Paisley, Mark A.

    1996-02-27

    A method for cracking and shifting a synthesis gas by the steps of providing a catalyst consisting essentially of alumina in a reaction zone; contacting the catalyst with a substantially oxygen free mixture of gases comprising water vapor and hydrocarbons having one or more carbon atoms, at a temperature between about 530.degree. C. (1000.degree. F.) to about 980.degree. C. (1800.degree. F.); and whereby the hydrocarbons are cracked to form hydrogen, carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide and the hydrogen content of the mixture increases with a corresponding decrease in carbon monoxide, and carbon formation is substantially eliminated.

  9. Determination of clothing evaporative resistance on a sweating thermal manikin in an isothermal condition: heat loss method or mass loss method?

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Gao, Chuansi; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar

    2011-08-01

    This paper addresses selection between two calculation options, i.e heat loss option and mass loss option, for thermal manikin measurements on clothing evaporative resistance conducted in an isothermal condition (T(manikin) = T(a) = T(r)). Five vocational clothing ensembles with a thermal insulation range of 1.05-2.58 clo were selected and measured on a sweating thermal manikin 'Tore'. The reasons why the isothermal heat loss method generates a higher evaporative resistance than that of the mass loss method were thoroughly investigated. In addition, an indirect approach was applied to determine the amount of evaporative heat energy taken from the environment. It was found that clothing evaporative resistance values by the heat loss option were 11.2-37.1% greater than those based on the mass loss option. The percentage of evaporative heat loss taken from the environment (H(e,env)) for all test scenarios ranged from 10.9 to 23.8%. The real evaporative cooling efficiency ranged from 0.762 to 0.891, respectively. Furthermore, it is evident that the evaporative heat loss difference introduced by those two options was equal to the heat energy taken from the environment. In order to eliminate the combined effects of dry heat transfer, condensation, and heat pipe on clothing evaporative resistance, it is suggested that manikin measurements on the determination of clothing evaporative resistance should be performed in an isothermal condition. Moreover, the mass loss method should be applied to calculate clothing evaporative resistance. The isothermal heat loss method would appear to overestimate heat stress and thus should be corrected before use. PMID:21669906

  10. Gas cleaning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Richard Allen

    2006-06-06

    A gas cleaning system for removing at least a portion of contaminants, such as halides, sulfur, particulates, mercury, and others, from a synthesis gas (syngas). The gas cleaning system may include one or more filter vessels coupled in series for removing halides, particulates, and sulfur from the syngas. The gas cleaning system may be operated by receiving gas at a first temperature and pressure and dropping the temperature of the syngas as the gas flows through the system. The gas cleaning system may be used for an application requiring clean syngas, such as, but not limited to, fuel cell power generation, IGCC power generation, and chemical synthesis.

  11. Single crystal growth of MgB 2 by evaporating Mg-flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei; Xu, Huizhong; Zhang, Hongbin; Xu, Dong; Wang, Xinqiang; Hou, Xianqin; Wu, Yongzhong; Jiang, Fuyi; Qin, Lianjie

    2006-04-01

    Well hexagonal plate-shaped single crystal of magnesium diboride (MgB 2) with the size of 100 μm has been grown at ambient pressure by evaporating Mg-flux method which is a new practice to grow MgB 2 single crystal. The superconducting transition of as-prepared crystals was measured to be at about 33.7 K by superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) magnetometer. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) confirmed the MgB 2 phase, and the electron diffraction patterns measured by using high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) confirmed the structure of MgB 2 single crystal. The single crystal images were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and metallographic microscope (MM). The micromechanism of crystal growth is also proposed through the investigations of SEM and MM.

  12. Optical Properties of CdS Nanobelts and Nanosaws Synthesized by Thermal Evaporation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhi-wei; Zou, Bing-suo

    2012-04-01

    By a simple one-step H2-assisted thermal evaporation method, high quality CdS nanostructures have been successfully fabricated on Au coated Si substrates in large scale. The as-synthesized CdS nanostructures consisted of sword-like nanobelts and toothed nanosaws with a single-crystal hexagonal wurtzite structure. The deposition temperature played an important role in determining the size and morphology of the CdS nanostructures. A combination of vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-solid growth mechanisms were proposed to interpret the formation of CdS nanostructures. Photoluminescence measurement indicated that the nanobelts and nanosaws have a prominent green emission at about 512 nm, which is the band-to-band emission of CdS. The waveguide characteristics of both types of CdS nanostructures were observed and discussed.

  13. Improvement of the gamma radioactivity measurements in water by the evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J.; Serradell, V.; Gallardo, S.; Ballesteros, L.; Zarza, I.

    2007-09-01

    Frequently to measure gamma radioactivity in water, the water is poured in a tray covered with a plastic film and dried in an oven. Then, the film is folded and introduced in a Petri box to be measured in a Ge(HP) detector. The present paper studies the effect, that an irregular deposition of the residue left on the plastic film when evaporating the water, introduces in the results of the measurement. The quantitative analyses of gamma radioactivity imply a previous calibration of the instrument. Calibration samples are prepared in the same way as any other, then the calibration process becomes affected by the same previously mentioned effect. The study evaluates the maximum discrepancies that can be expected from this irregular deposition of the residue. Monte Carlo program MCNP is used to simulate the experimental measurements carried out, that easily allows to study intermediate situations. Lastly, a method to avoid this type of systematic error is recommended.

  14. Uranium and Calcium Isotope Ratio Measurements using the Modified Total Evaporation Method in TIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Kuehn, H.; Berglund, M.; Hennessy, C.

    2010-12-01

    A new version of the "modified total evaporation" (MTE) method for isotopic analysis by multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), with high analytical performance and designed in a more user-friendly and routinely applicable way, is described in detail. It is mainly being used for nuclear safeguards measurements of U and Pu and nuclear metrology, but can readily be applied to other scientific tasks in geochemistry, e.g. for Sr, Nd and Ca, as well. The development of the MTE method was organized in collaboration of several "key nuclear mass spectrometry laboratories", namely the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (now Safeguards Analytical Services, SGAS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), with IRMM taking the leading role. The manufacturer of the TRITON TIMS instrument, Thermo Fisher Scientific, integrated this method into the software of the instrument. The development has now reached its goal to become a user-friendly and routinely useable method for uranium isotope ratio measurements with high precision and accuracy. Due to the use of the “total evaporation” (TE) method the measurement of the "major" uranium isotope ratio 235U/238U is routinely being performed with a precision of 0.01% to 0.02%. The use of a (certified) reference material measured under comparable conditions is emphasized to achieve an accuracy at a level of 0.02% - depending on the stated uncertainty of the certified value of the reference material. In contrast to the total evaporation method (TE), in the MTE method the total evaporation sequence is interrupted on a regular basis to allow for correction for background from peak tailing, internal calibration of a secondary electron multiplier (SEM) detector versus the Faraday cups, and ion source re-focusing. Therefore, the most significant improvement using the

  15. Evaluation of the energy budget method of determining evaporation at Williams Lake, Minnesota, using alternative instrumentation and study approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Sturrock, A.M.; Winter, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    Best estimates of evaporation were determined by the energy budget method using optimum sensors and optimum placement of sensors. For most of the data substitutions that affected the Bowen ratio, new values of evaporation differed little from best estimates. The three data substitution methods that caused the largest deviations from the best evaporation estimates were (1) using changes in the daily average surface water temperature as an indicator of the lake heat storage term, (2) using shortwave radiation, air temperature, and atmospheric vapor pressure data from a site 110 km away, and (3) using an analog surface water temperature probe. Recalculations based on these data substitutions resulted in differences from the best estimates as much as 89%, 21% and 10%, respectively. The data substitution method that provided evaporation values that most closely matched the best estimates was measurement of the lake heat storage term at one location in the lake, rather than at 16 locations. Evaporation values resulting from this substitution method usually were within 2% of the best estimates. -from Authors

  16. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  17. Kinetic boundary layers in gas mixtures: Systems described by nonlinearly coupled kinetic and hydrodynamic equations and applications to droplet condensation and evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, M.E.; Titulaer, U.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors consider a mixture of heavy vapor molecules and a light carrier gas surrounding a liquid droplet. The vapor is described by a variant of the Klein-Kramers equation; the gas is described by the Navier-Stokes equations; the droplet acts as a heat source due to the released heat of condensation. The exchange of momentum and energy between the constituents of the mixture is taken into account by force terms in the kinetic equation and source terms in the Navier-Stokes equations. These are chosen to obtain maximal agreement with the irreversible thermodynamics of a gas mixture. The structure of the kinetic boundary layer around the sphere is determined from the self-consistent solution of this set of coupled equations with appropriate boundary conditions at the surface of the sphere. The kinetic equation is rewritten as a set of coupled moment equations. A complete set of solutions of these moment equations is constructed by numerical integration inward from the region far away from the droplet, where the background inhomogeneities are small. A technique developed earlier is used to deal with the numerical instability of the moment equations. The solutions obtained for given temperature and pressure profiles in the gas are then combined linearly such that they obey the boundary conditions at the droplet surface; from this solution source terms for the Navier-Stokes equation of the gas are constructed and used to determine improved temperature and pressure profiles for the background gas. For not too large temperature differneces between the droplet and the gas at infinity, self-consistency is reached after a few iterations. The method is applied to the condensation of droplets from a supersaturated vapor as well as to strong evaporation of droplets under the influence of an external heat source, where corrections of up to 40% are obtained.

  18. A flux-limited treatment for the conductive evaporation of spherical interstellar gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, William W.; Balbus, Steven A.

    1993-01-01

    In this work, we present and analyze a new analytic solution for the saturated (flux-limited) thermal evaporation of a spherical cloud. This work is distinguished from earlier analytic studies by allowing the thermal conductivity to change continuously from a diffusive to a saturated form, in a manner usually employed only in numerical calculations. This closed form solution will be of interest as a computational benchmark. Using our calculated temperature profiles and mass-loss rates, we model the thermal evaporation of such a cloud under typical interstellar medium (ISM) conditions, with some restrictions. We examine the ionization structure of the cloud-ISM interface and evaluate column densities of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, and silicon ions toward the cloud. In accord with other investigations, we find that ionization equilibrium is far from satisfied under the assumed conditions. Since the inclusion of saturation effects in the heat flux narrows the thermal interface relative to its classical structure, we also find that saturation effects tend to lower predicted column densities.

  19. Concerning the Velocity of Evaporation of Small Droplets in a Gas Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, N.

    1947-01-01

    The evaporation velocity of liquid droplets under various conditions is theoretically calculated and a number of factors are investigated which are neglected in carrying out the fundamental equation of Maxwell. It is shown that the effect of these factors at the small drop sizes and the small weight concentrations ordinarily occurring in fog can be calculated by simple corrections. The evaporation process can be regarded as quasi-stationary in most cases. The question at hand, and also the equivalent question of the velocity of growth of droplets in a supersaturated atmosphere, is highly significant in meteorology and for certain industrial purposes. Since the literature concerning this is very insufficient and many important aspects either are not considered at all or are reported incorrectly, it seems that a short discussion is not superfluous. A special consideration will be given to the various assumptions and neglections that are necessary in deriving the fundamental equation of Maxwell. The experimental work available, which is very insufficient and in part poorly dependable, can be used as an accurate check on the theory only in very few cases.

  20. Synthesis gas method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2013-01-08

    A method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas product having one or more oxygen transport membrane elements thermally coupled to one or more catalytic reactors such that heat generated from the oxygen transport membrane element supplies endothermic heating requirements for steam methane reforming reactions occurring within the catalytic reactor through radiation and convention heat transfer. A hydrogen containing stream containing no more than 20 percent methane is combusted within the oxygen transport membrane element to produce the heat and a heated combustion product stream. The heated combustion product stream is combined with a reactant stream to form a combined stream that is subjected to the reforming within the catalytic reactor. The apparatus may include modules in which tubular membrane elements surround a central reactor tube.

  1. Synthesis gas method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2015-11-06

    A method and apparatus for producing a synthesis gas product having one or more oxygen transport membrane elements thermally coupled to one or more catalytic reactors such that heat generated from the oxygen transport membrane element supplies endothermic heating requirements for steam methane reforming reactions occurring within the catalytic reactor through radiation and convention heat transfer. A hydrogen containing stream containing no more than 20 percent methane is combusted within the oxygen transport membrane element to produce the heat and a heated combustion product stream. The heated combustion product stream is combined with a reactant stream to form a combined stream that is subjected to the reforming within the catalytic reactor. The apparatus may include modules in which tubular membrane elements surround a central reactor tube.

  2. Soil Evaporation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil evaporation can significantly influence energy flux partitioning of partially vegetated surfaces, ultimately affecting plant transpiration. While important, quantification of soil evaporation, separately from canopy transpiration, is challenging. Techniques for measuring soil evaporation exis...

  3. Alternative Methods for the Reduction of Evaporation: Practical Exercises for the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schouten, Peter; Putland, Sam; Lemckert, Charles J.; Parisi, Alfio V.; Downs, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Across the world, freshwater is valued as the most critically important natural resource, as it is required to sustain the cycle of life. Evaporation is one of the primary environmental processes that can reduce the amount of quality water available for use in industrial, agricultural and household applications. The effect of evaporation becomes…

  4. Evaporation of stationary alcohol layer in minichannel under air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Ilya; Orlova, Evgenija; Feoktistov, Dmitriy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of effect of the gas flow rate moving parallel to the stationary liquid layer on the evaporation rate under the conditions of formation of a stable plane "liquid-gas" interface. The average evaporation flow rate of liquid layer (ethanol) by the gas flow (air) has been calculated using two independent methods. Obtained results have been compared with previously published data.

  5. High latitude gas in the : beta Pic system -- A possible origin related to Falling Evaporating Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beust, H.; Valiron, P.

    2007-07-01

    Transient spectral events towards the southern star Beta pictoris have been attributed to the sublimation of transiting star-grazers planetesimals (Falling Evaporating Bodies, or FEBs). The FEBs are supposed to originate from mean-motion resonances with a massive planet. In 2004, spectral emission in Ca II and Fe II was detected at 100 AU away from the star, but above the midplane of the disk (Brandeker et al. 2004). We show that the presence of off-plane ions can be explained in the frame of the FEB scenario, as due to inclination oscillations caused by the resonance (Beust & Valiron 2007) in the high eccentricity regime. The ions released by the FEBS in this regime keep track of their inclination and start evolving out of the plane. Their are stopped at 100 AU from the star probably by some dense medium.

  6. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  7. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  8. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Evaporation-capillary instability in a deep vapour-gas cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoev, F. Kh

    1994-02-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of an instability of a molten metal surface on the walls of a deep vapour—gas cavity or crater when this surface absorbs a uniform flux of the energy of laser radiation. The instability is due to the growth of perturbations on the free surface of the melt. This growth is maintained by an associated space—time modulation of the evaporation pressure. The dispersion equation for weak hydrodynamic perturbations is derived and investigated. This equation allows for the dependence of the instability increment on the laser radiation and phase transition parameters, and also on the material constants of the medium. Quantitative estimates are obtained of the conditions for the realisation of the investigated instability mechanism.

  9. A Study for Health Hazard Evaluation of Methylene Chloride Evaporated from the Tear Gas Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun-Kyo; Yi, Gwang-Yong; Chung, Kwang-Jae; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, In-Seop

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the health hazard of those exposed to methylene chloride by assessing its atmospheric concentration when a tear gas mixture was aerially dispersed. The concentration of methylene chloride ranged from 311.1-980.3 ppm (geometric mean, 555.8 ppm), 30 seconds after the dispersion started. However, the concentration fell rapidly to below 10 ppm after dispersion was completed. The concentration during the dispersion did not surpass the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 'immediately dangerous to life or health' value of 2,300 ppm, but did exceed the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists excursion limit of 250 ppm. Since methylene chloride is highly volatile (vapor pressure, 349 mmHg at 20℃), the postdispersion atmospheric concentration can rise instantaneously. Moreover, the o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile formulation of tear gas (CS gas) is an acute upper respiratory tract irritant. Therefore, tear gas mixtures should be handled with delicate care. PMID:22953168

  10. Could CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b be remnants of evaporated gas or ice giants?

    PubMed Central

    Leitzinger, M.; Odert, P.; Kulikov, Yu.N.; Lammer, H.; Wuchterl, G.; Penz, T.; Guarcello, M.G.; Micela, G.; Khodachenko, M.L.; Weingrill, J.; Hanslmeier, A.; Biernat, H.K.; Schneider, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present thermal mass loss calculations over evolutionary time scales for the investigation if the smallest transiting rocky exoplanets CoRoT-7b (∼1.68REarth) and Kepler-10b (∼1.416REarth) could be remnants of an initially more massive hydrogen-rich gas giant or a hot Neptune-class exoplanet. We apply a thermal mass loss formula which yields results that are comparable to hydrodynamic loss models. Our approach considers the effect of the Roche lobe, realistic heating efficiencies and a radius scaling law derived from observations of hot Jupiters. We study the influence of the mean planetary density on the thermal mass loss by placing hypothetical exoplanets with the characteristics of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus to the orbital location of CoRoT-7b at 0.017 AU and Kepler-10b at 0.01684 AU and assuming that these planets orbit a K- or G-type host star. Our findings indicate that hydrogen-rich gas giants within the mass domain of Saturn or Jupiter cannot thermally lose such an amount of mass that CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b would result in a rocky residue. Moreover, our calculations show that the present time mass of both rocky exoplanets can be neither a result of evaporation of a hydrogen envelope of a “Hot Neptune” nor a “Hot Uranus”-class object. Depending on the initial density and mass, these planets most likely were always rocky planets which could lose a thin hydrogen envelope, but not cores of thermally evaporated initially much more massive and larger objects. PMID:21969736

  11. Could CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b be remnants of evaporated gas or ice giants?

    PubMed

    Leitzinger, M; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Lammer, H; Wuchterl, G; Penz, T; Guarcello, M G; Micela, G; Khodachenko, M L; Weingrill, J; Hanslmeier, A; Biernat, H K; Schneider, J

    2011-10-01

    We present thermal mass loss calculations over evolutionary time scales for the investigation if the smallest transiting rocky exoplanets CoRoT-7b (∼1.68REarth) and Kepler-10b (∼1.416REarth) could be remnants of an initially more massive hydrogen-rich gas giant or a hot Neptune-class exoplanet. We apply a thermal mass loss formula which yields results that are comparable to hydrodynamic loss models. Our approach considers the effect of the Roche lobe, realistic heating efficiencies and a radius scaling law derived from observations of hot Jupiters. We study the influence of the mean planetary density on the thermal mass loss by placing hypothetical exoplanets with the characteristics of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus to the orbital location of CoRoT-7b at 0.017 AU and Kepler-10b at 0.01684 AU and assuming that these planets orbit a K- or G-type host star. Our findings indicate that hydrogen-rich gas giants within the mass domain of Saturn or Jupiter cannot thermally lose such an amount of mass that CoRoT-7b and Kepler-10b would result in a rocky residue. Moreover, our calculations show that the present time mass of both rocky exoplanets can be neither a result of evaporation of a hydrogen envelope of a "Hot Neptune" nor a "Hot Uranus"-class object. Depending on the initial density and mass, these planets most likely were always rocky planets which could lose a thin hydrogen envelope, but not cores of thermally evaporated initially much more massive and larger objects. PMID:21969736

  12. Conventional slow evaporation and Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method grown diglycine zinc chloride (DGZC) single crystal and its comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Pandian, M.; Ramasamy, P.

    2010-01-01

    Diglycine zinc chloride, a semi-organic nonlinear optical crystal was grown by conventional slow evaporation and Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method. By employing this unidirectional method, diglycine zinc chloride single crystals of diameters 10, 30 and length up to 60 mm were grown. The growth conditions have been optimized. A maximum growth rate of 1.5 mm per day was realized. A comparative damage threshold analysis made on the diglycine zinc chloride crystals by conventional and unidirectional method shows that the crystal grown by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method has higher damage threshold. The conventional and Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method grown diglycine zinc chloride crystals were also characterized by chemical etching, UV-vis analysis, dielectric constant, dielectric loss, Vicker's microhardness analysis and the results were compared. The present study indicates that the crystal quality of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method grown diglycine zinc chloride is good compared to conventional slow evaporation method grown crystal.

  13. A comparison of short-term measurements of lake evaporation using eddy correlation and energy budget methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stannard, D.I.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    1991-01-01

    Concurrent short-term measurements of evaporation from a shallow lake, using eddy correlation and energy budget methods, indicate that sensible and latent heat flux between lake and atmosphere, and energy storage in the lake, may vary considerably across the lake. Measuring net radiation with a net radiometer on the lake appeared to be more accurate than measuring incoming radiation nearby and modeling outgoing radiation. Short-term agreement between the two evaporation measurements was obtained by using an energy storage term that was weighted to account for the area-of-influence of the eddy correlation sensors. Relatively short bursts of evaporation were indicated by the eddy correlation sensors shortly after midnight on two of three occasions. ?? 1991.

  14. Cellular uptake of beta-carotene from protein stabilized solid lipid nano-particles prepared by homogenization-evaporation method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a homogenization-evaporation method, beta-carotene (BC) loaded nano-particles were prepared with different ratios of food-grade sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), or soy protein isolate (SPI) to BC and evaluated for their physiochemical stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and cel...

  15. The mixing of evaporating micron-size particles with a cross stream of gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkusha, V. I.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Naberezhnova, G. V.; Stasenko, A. L.

    1982-06-01

    An analysis is presented of the dynamics and heat and mass transfer of micron-size particles with a known initial mass distribution, injected into a supersonic gas flow (such as that found in a gasdynamic laser). As an example, numerical results are presented on the acceleration of micron-size particles of carbonic acid by hydrogen. The obtained results make it possible to formulate a variational problem concerning the determination of the set of conditions (i.e., initial mass distribution of dispersed particles, gas parameters in the subsonic section of the nozzle, the angle at which the particles are injected into the gas flow, etc.) assuring the extremum of a certain functional of the physical parameters entailed in the mixing of high-speed two-phase flows.

  16. Low temperature and self catalytic growth of ultrafine ITO nanowires by electron beam evaporation method and their optical and electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R. Rakesh; Rao, K. Narasimha; Rajanna, K.; Phani, A.R.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • ITO nanowires were grown by e-beam evaporation method. • ITO nanowires growth done at low substrate temperature of 350 °C. • Nanowires growth was carried out without use of catalyst and reactive oxygen gas. • Nanowires growth proceeds via self catalytic VLS growth. • Grown nanowires have diameter 10–20 nm and length 1–4 μm long. • ITO nanowire films have shown good antireflection property. - Abstract: We report the self catalytic growth of Sn-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires (NWs) over a large area glass and silicon substrates by electron beam evaporation method at low substrate temperatures of 250–400 °C. The ITO NWs growth was carried out without using an additional reactive oxygen gas and a metal catalyst particle. Ultrafine diameter (∼10–15 nm) and micron long ITO NWs growth was observed in a temperature window of 300–400 °C. Transmission electron microscope studies confirmed single crystalline nature of the NWs and energy dispersive spectroscopy studies on the NWs confirmed that the NWs growth proceeds via self catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism. ITO nanowire films grown on glass substrates at a substrate temperature of 300–400 °C have shown ∼2–6% reflection and ∼70–85% transmission in the visible region. Effect of deposition parameters was systematically investigated. The large area growth of ITO nanowire films would find potential applications in the optoelectronic devices.

  17. Drag reduction method for gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Lowther, F.E.

    1990-09-25

    This patent describes a method of reducing drag for a gas flowing in a pipeline between a first point and a second point. It comprises: inputting gas at a constant pressure into the pipeline at the first point to establish gas flow in the pipeline between the first and second points; injecting a drag reducer into the gas flow at the first point; monitoring the flowrate of the gas at the second point; and adjusting the injection rate of the drag reducer at the first point until a maximum flowrate of the gas is reached at the second point.

  18. Biocompatible and Antibacterial SnO2 Nanowire Films Synthesized by E-Beam Evaporation Method.

    PubMed

    Prasad, R G S V; Phani, A R; Rao, K N; Kumar, R Rakesh; Prasad, S; Prabhakara, G; Sheeja, M S; Salins, C P; Endrino, J L; Raju, D B

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the biocompatibility and antibacterial activities of novel SnO2 nanowire coatings prepared by electron-beam (E-Beam) evaporation process at low temperatures were studied. The nanowire coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity and cell proliferation assays suggested that the SnO2 nanowire coatings were nontoxic and promoted the proliferation of C2C12 and L929 cells (> 90% viability). Cellular activities, cell adhesion, and lactate dehydrogenase activities were consistent with the superior biocompatibility of the nanowire materials. Notably, the nanowire coating showed potent antibacterial activity against six different bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity of the SnO2 material was attributed to the photocatalytic nature of SnO2. The antibacterial activity and biocompatibility of the newly developed SnO2 nanowire coatings may enable their use as coating materials for biomedical implants. PMID:26353584

  19. Effect of O-vacancies on magnetic properties of bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by solution evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, A. M.; Umair, M.; Dastgeer, G.; Rizwan, M.; Yaqoob, M. Z.; Rashid, R.; Munir, H. S.

    2016-02-01

    Bismuth ferrite is a multiferroic material which shows high magnetization and polarization at room temperature. In present work, the effect of Oxygen (O) vacancies on magnetic properties of bismuth ferrite nanoparticles is studied. Bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (BiFeO3) were synthesized by solution evaporation method (SEM) at room temperature. The sample was annealed under two different atmospheres such as in air and oxygen, to check the effect of O-vacancies on magnetic properties. The average crystallite size of Bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) as calculated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) falls in the range of 23-32 nm and 26-39 nm for the case of air and oxygen respectively. The crystallite size of bismuth ferrite nanoparticles increases as the temperature was varied from 450 °C to 650 °C. Further the influence of annealing temperature on the magnetic properties of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles was also observed. It was concluded that the magnetic properties of Bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are directly interconnected to annealing atmosphere and annealing temperature. The magnetic properties were increased in the case of oxygen annealing, which actually leads in our case to an improvement of the crystallinity.

  20. Water retention curves of loamy-sandy soils: Transient evaporation method versus steady-state tension and pressure techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, G.; Eberhard, E.; Fank, J.; Birk, S.

    2009-12-01

    Water retention curves of loamy-sandy soils at the agricultural test site Wagna (Austria) were measured using both the simplified evaporation method according to Schindler (Arch. Acker- u. Pflanzenbau u. Bodenkd. Berlin 24, 1-7, 1980) and steady-state tension and pressure techniques. The soil was sampled with 250-ccm and 100-ccm steel pipes for the evaporation method and the steady-state technique, respectively. In the transient evaporation method two tensiometers with a measurement range between 0 and 850 hPa are installed at a depth of 1.25 cm and 3.75 cm in a sample of 5 cm in height; the mean values of the two tensiometers and the water contents measured by weighing are used to obtain the water retention curve. The steady-state method employs a tension table (sand box) at tensions below 100 hPa and a pressure extractor at tensions between 300 hPa and 15,000 hPa; the water content is measured by weighing after the sample has equilibrated at the tension value set on the table or plate. First results of both methods suggest that the soil samples release water over the entire tension range measured. In particular, the release of water at very low tension values may suggest the presence of macropores. Despite the generally good agreement between the two methods, the values appear to deviate systematically close to saturation. This is potentially caused by the large relative error of the tension measurement close to saturation. Alternatively, the different size of the samples used for the evaporation experiment (250 ccm) and the steady-state method (100 ccm) might play a role. Because of the limited measurement range of the tensiometers used for the evaporation method, the measured curve must be extrapolated between 850 hPa and 15,000 hPa to allow comparison with the steady-state method. To this end, it was attempted to match the Brooks-Corey, the Van-Genuchten, and a bimodal Van-Genuchten retention function to the data from the evaporation experiments. This involves

  1. Alternative methods for the reduction of evaporation: practical exercises for the science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, Peter; Putland, Sam; Lemckert, Charles J.; Parisi, Alfio V.; Downs, Nathan

    2012-03-01

    Across the world, freshwater is valued as the most critically important natural resource, as it is required to sustain the cycle of life. Evaporation is one of the primary environmental processes that can reduce the amount of quality water available for use in industrial, agricultural and household applications. The effect of evaporation becomes intensified especially during conditions of drought, particularly in traditionally arid and semi-arid regions, such as those seen in a number of countries over the past ten years. In order to safeguard against the influence of droughts and to save water from being lost to the evaporative process, numerous water saving mechanisms have been developed and tested over the past century. Two of the most successful and widely used mechanisms have included floating hard covers and chemical film monolayers. This article describes a laboratory based project developed for senior high school and first year university classes, which has been designed to introduce students to the concepts of evaporation, evaporation modelling and water loss mitigation. Specifically, these ideas are delivered by simulating the large scale deployment of both monolayers and floating hard covers on a small water tank under numerous user defined atmospheric and hydrodynamic conditions, including varying surface wind speeds and underwater bubble plumes set to changing flow rates.

  2. Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, David S.; Noufi, Rommel

    2015-06-09

    Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating a thin film device comprises: providing a semiconductor film comprising indium (In) and selenium (Se) upon a substrate; heating the substrate and the semiconductor film to a desired temperature; and performing a mass transport through vapor transport of a copper chloride vapor and se vapor to the semiconductor film within a reaction chamber.

  3. Time-dependent Marangoni-Bénard instability of an evaporating binary-liquid layer including gas transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, H.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dauby, P. C.

    2013-08-01

    We are here concerned with Bénard instabilities in a horizontal layer of a binary liquid, considering as a working example the case of an aqueous solution of ethanol with a mass fraction of 0.1. Both the solvent and the solute evaporate into air (the latter being insoluble in the liquid). The system is externally constrained by imposing fixed "ambient" pressure, humidity, and temperature values at a certain effective transfer distance above the liquid-gas interface, while the ambient temperature is also imposed at the impermeable rigid bottom of the liquid layer. Fully transient and horizontally homogeneous solutions for the reference state, resulting from an instantaneous exposure of the liquid layer to ambient air, are first calculated. Then, the linear stability of these solutions is studied using the frozen-time approach, leading to critical (monotonic marginal stability) curves in the parameter plane spanned by the liquid layer thickness and the elapsed time after initial contact. This is achieved for different ratios of the liquid and gas thicknesses, and in particular yields critical times after which instability sets in (for given thicknesses of both phases). Conversely, the analysis also predicts a critical thickness of the liquid layer below which no instability ever occurs. The nature of such critical thickness is explained in detail in terms of mass fraction profiles in both phases, as it indeed appears that the most important mechanism for instability onset is the solutal Marangoni one. Importantly, as compared to the result obtained previously under the quasi-steady assumption in the gas phase [H. Machrafi, A. Rednikov, P. Colinet, and P. C. Dauby, Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 192, 71 (2011)], 10.1140/epjst/e2011-01361-y, it is shown that relaxing this assumption may yield essentially lower values of the critical liquid thickness, especially for large gas-to-liquid thickness ratios. A good-working analytical model is developed for the description of such

  4. A new method dealing with hawking effects of evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Dai, X. )

    1992-06-28

    This paper reports that, both the location and the temperature of event horizons of evaporating black holes can be easily given if one proposes the Klein-Gordon equation approaches the standard form of wave equation near event horizons by using tortoise-type coordinates.

  5. Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

    2014-12-02

    A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

  6. Instrumentation for measuring lake and reservoir evaporation by the energy-budget and mass-transfer methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturrock, A.M., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumentation currently used by the U.S. Geological Survey in studies of lake and reservoir evaporation is described in this paper. This instrumentation is used for the measurement of solar and terrestrial energy necessary to apply the mass-transfer or energy budget methods. The energy budget requires a quantative determination of all form of energy entering or leaving the lake as well as determination of the change in storage of energy within the lake. (USGS)

  7. Laboratory simulation of processes of evaporation, condensation, and sputtering taking place on the surface of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusinov, M. D.; Kochnev, V. A.; Chernyak, Y. B.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Kosolapov, A. I.; Yakovlev, O. I.

    1974-01-01

    Study of evaporation, condensation and sputtering on the moon can provide information on the same processes on other planets, and reveal details of the formation of the lunar regolith. Simulation methods include vacuum evaporation, laser evaporation, and bubbling gas through melts.

  8. Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2012-09-04

    A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

  9. A sensor-based energy balance method for the distributed estimation of evaporation over the North American Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, K. J.; Kerkez, B.; Gronewold, A.; Lenters, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a novel energy balance method to estimate evaporation across large lakes using real-time data from moored buoys and mobile, satellite-tracked drifters. Our work is motivated by the need to improve our understanding of the water balance of the Laurentian Great Lakes basin, a complex hydrologic system that comprises 90% of the United States' and 20% of the world's fresh surface water. Recently, the lakes experienced record-setting water level drops despite above-average precipitation, and given that lake surface area comprises nearly one third of the entire basin, evaporation is suspected to be the primary driver behind the decrease in water levels. There has historically been a need to measure evaporation over the Great Lakes, and recent hydrological phenomena (including not only record low levels, but also extreme changes in ice cover and surface water temperatures) underscore the urgency of addressing that need. Our method tracks the energy fluxes of the lake system - namely net radiation, heat storage and advection, and Bowen ratio. By measuring each of these energy budget terms and combining the results with mass-transfer based estimates, we can calculate real-time evaporation rates on sub-hourly timescales. To mitigate the cost prohibitive nature of large-scale, distributed energy flux measurements, we present a novel approach in which we leverage existing investments in seasonal buoys (which, while providing intensive, high quality data, are costly and sparsely distributed across the surface of the Great Lakes) and then integrate data from less costly satellite-tracked drifter data. The result is an unprecedented, hierarchical sensor and modeling architecture that can be used to derive estimates of evaporation in real-time through cloud-based computing. We discuss recent deployments of sensor-equipped buoys and drifters, which are beginning to provide us with some of the first in situ measurements of overlake evaporation from Earth's largest lake

  10. A theoretical study of a radiowave characterization method of the evaporation duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douchin, N.; Bolioli, S.; Christophe, F.; Combes, P.

    1992-02-01

    The aim in this study is to consider the possibility of identifying the evaporation duct parameters from a fluctuation analysis of a near the horizon satellite-ship path. The latter is split in two different parts and reciprocity is applied. Thus, we get two different field distributions on a connecting interface which has to be suitable for a good calculation of the coupling between both of them. Then, the model is used with the intention of evaluating the fluctuations of the received signal due to the movement of the satellite and their sensitivity to the parameters of the propagation medium: sea roughness, height, and strength of the evaporation duct; and presence of horizontal gradients in the refractive index distribution. Obviously, sensitivity to these parameters is examined for several values of the frequency.

  11. Method and apparatus for shale gas recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, D.H.

    1990-05-29

    This patent describes a method for the in situ recovery of natural gas from an undisturbed shale bed formation in a condition ready for transmission through a gas pipeline to end users and substantially without the formation of liquid products. It comprises: forming a heater assembly having an elongated substantially cylindrical outer housing; providing the elongated heater assembly with an interior containing a fuel gas burner there within joined to an upwardly extending fuel gas supply line and including in the interior an upwardly extending product gas line disposed adjacent an upwardly extending combustion air line; drilling a borehole into a subterranean shale bed formation; and lowering the heater assembly into the borehole to a position surrounded by the shale bed formation with the borehole having been drilled to define a diameter relative the heater assembly housing insuring a close fit therebetween while providing a gas space therebetween.

  12. Drag reduction method for gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.H.

    1991-06-04

    This paper describes a method for reducing dray on a gas flowing in a gas pipeline. It comprises: injecting a drag reducer into the gas pipeline wherein the drag reducer is selected from a class of chemical compounds which are comprised of molecules having a polar group forming one end thereof which bonds with the inner wall of the pipeline and a non-polar group forming the other end which smoothes the gas-solid interface between the wall and the flowing gas thereby reducing gas turbulence therebetween wherein the drag reducer is a fatty acid amine and wherein the polar group is comprised of an amine and the non-polar group is comprised of a long-chain hydrocarbon.

  13. Comparative analysis of electrophysical properties of ceramic tantalum pentoxide coatings, deposited by electron beam evaporation and magnetron sputtering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, N.; Mateev, E.; Safonov, V.; Zykova, A.; Yakovin, S.; Kolesnikov, D.; Sudzhanskaya, I.; Goncharov, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2014-12-01

    Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have been deposited on glass substrates by e-beam evaporation and magnetron sputtering methods. For the magnetron sputtering process Ta target was used. X-ray diffraction measurements show that these coatings are amorphous. XPS survey spectra of the ceramic Ta2O5 coatings were obtained. All spectra consist of well-defined XPS lines of Ta 4f, 4d, 4p and 4s; O 1s; C 1s. Ta 4f doublets are typical for Ta2O5 coatings with two main peaks. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images of the e-beam evaporated and magnetron sputtered Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have revealed a relatively flat surface with no cracks. The dielectric properties of the tantalum pentoxide coatings have been investigated in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 1 MHz. The electrical behaviour of e-beam evaporated and magnetron sputtered Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have also been compared. The deposition process conditions principally effect the structure parameters and electrical properties of Ta2O5 ceramic coatings. The coatings deposited by different methods demonstrate the range of dielectric parameters due to the structural and stoichiometric composition changes

  14. Method for dismantling a natural gas holder

    SciTech Connect

    Settlemier, B.R.; Bone, S.R.; Tolivaisa, J.; Nugent, J.E.

    1990-10-30

    This patent describes a method of dismantling a natural gas holder. The holder has vertical support columns disposed around the periphery of the holder to which the enclosure shell of the holder is attached.

  15. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2012-12-25

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO2 nanocrystals doped with In2O3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  16. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2014-07-15

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals doped with In.sub.2O.sub.3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  17. Use of GC/MS and Microtome Techniques as Methods to Evaluate ODC Free Cleaner Diffusion and Evaporation in Insulation and Phenolic Case Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegert, L. L.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) many chlorinated solvents used in the aerospace industry are being phased out. Replacement of the ODC (ozone-depleting chemicals) with less volatile, non-ozone depleting cleaners has been extensively studied over the past seven years at Thiokol Propulsion, a Division of Cordant Technologies, Inc. The down selection of ODC replacement cleaners has been based on several factors including the diffusion evaporation of the cleaners in selected substrates. Methodologies were developed to evaluate the cleaner content in substrates. Methods of cutting thin slices of material (microtoming) were combined with GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy) analysis. Substrates evaluated in this study include potential solid rocket motor materials: ASNBR (asbestos-filled nitrile butadiene rubber) and CFEPDM (carbon-filled ethylene propylene dimonomer) insulation and glass (GCP), carbon (CCP) and silica (SCP) cloth phenolic substrates with fibers either parallel (0 deg) or perpendicular (90 deg) to the surface. Residue profiles indicate both cleaner and substrate composition affect the diffusion and subsequent evaporation of the cleaner from the substrate surface.

  18. Micrometeorological methods for assessing greenhouse gas flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micrometeorological methods for measuring carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide provide an opportunity for large-scale, long-term monitoring of greenhouse gas flux without the limitations imposed by chamber methods. Flux gradient and eddy covariance methods have been used for several decades to monitor g...

  19. A RP-LC method with evaporative light scattering detection for the assay of simethicone in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Moore, Douglas E; Liu, Tina X; Miao, William G; Edwards, Alison; Elliss, Russell

    2002-09-01

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method has been developed and validated for the determination of the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) component of Simethicone, which is used as an anti-foaming agent in pharmaceutical formulations. The method involves acidification to neutralise antacid components of the formulation, then a single extraction of the PDMS with dichloromethane. This is followed by separation with a reversed-phase column using an acetonitrile-chloroform solvent gradient, and quantification by an evaporative light scattering detector. An assay precision of 3% was achieved in intraday and interday determinations. No interference was found from the aluminium and magnesium hydroxide components of antacid formulations. PMID:12191712

  20. Structural, morphological, gas sensing and photocatalytic characterization of MoO3 and WO3 thin films prepared by the thermal vacuum evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, A.; Touihri, S.; Mhamdi, A.; Labidi, A.; Manoubi, T.

    2015-12-01

    Thin films of molybdenum trioxide and tungsten trioxide were deposited on glass substrates using a simplified thermal evaporation under vacuum method monitored by heat treatment in flowing oxygen at 500 °C for 1 h. The structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the films of MoO3 and WO3 were well crystallized in orthorhombic and monoclinic phase respectively with the crystallites preferentially oriented toward (2 0 0) direction parallel a-axis for both samples. In literature, we have shown in previous papers that structural and surface morphology of metal thin films play an important role in the gas detection mechanism. In this article, we have studied the response evolution of MoO3 and WO3 thin films sensors ethanol versus time, working temperature and the concentration of the ethanol. It was found that these films had high sensitivity to ethanol, which made them as a good candidate for the ethanol sensor. Finally, the photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated with respect to the degradation reaction of a wastewater containing methylene blue (MB) under UV-visible light irradiation. The molybdenum trioxide exhibits a higher degradation rate than the tungsten trioxide thin films under similar experimental conditions.

  1. Effect of argon gas flow rate on properties of film electrodes prepared by thermal vacuum evaporation from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} source

    SciTech Connect

    Sabli, Nordin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hilal, Hikmat S.; Fujii, Masatoshi

    2014-03-05

    This work describes a new technique to enhance photoresponse of metal chalcogenide-based semiconductor film electrodes deposited by thermal vacuum evaporation under argon gas flow from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} sources. SnSe formation with Cu-doped was obtained under higher argon gas flow rate (V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min). Higher value of photoresponse was observed for films deposited under V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min which was 9.1%. This finding indicates that Cu atoms inside the SnSe film were important to increase carrier concentrations that promote higher photoresponse.

  2. Consistent simulation of droplet evaporation based on the phase-field multiphase lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Hesameddin; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2014-09-01

    In the present article, we extend and generalize our previous article [H. Safari, M. H. Rahimian, and M. Krafczyk, Phys. Rev. E 88, 013304 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.013304] to include the gradient of the vapor concentration at the liquid-vapor interface as the driving force for vaporization allowing the evaporation from the phase interface to work for arbitrary temperatures. The lattice Boltzmann phase-field multiphase modeling approach with a suitable source term, accounting for the effect of the phase change on the velocity field, is used to solve the two-phase flow field. The modified convective Cahn-Hilliard equation is employed to reconstruct the dynamics of the interface topology. The coupling between the vapor concentration and temperature field at the interface is modeled by the well-known Clausius-Clapeyron correlation. Numerous validation tests including one-dimensional and two-dimensional cases are carried out to demonstrate the consistency of the presented model. Results show that the model is able to predict the flow features around and inside an evaporating droplet quantitatively in quiescent as well as convective environments.

  3. Method of producing a high pressure gas

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.

    2006-07-18

    A method of producing a high pressure gas is disclosed and which includes providing a container; supplying the container with a liquid such as water; increasing the pressure of the liquid within the container; supplying a reactant composition such as a chemical hydride to the liquid under pressure in the container and which chemically reacts with the liquid to produce a resulting high pressure gas such as hydrogen at a pressure of greater than about 100 pounds per square inch of pressure; and drawing the resulting high pressure gas from the container.

  4. Evaporation-based method for preparing gelatin foams with aligned tubular pore structures.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Shane D; Srubar, Wil V

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin-based foams with aligned tubular pore structures were prepared via liquid-to-gas vaporization of tightly bound water in dehydrated gelatin hydrogels. This study elucidates the mechanism of the foaming process by investigating the secondary (i.e., helical) structure, molecular interactions, and water content of gelatin films before and after foaming using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. Experimental data from gelatin samples prepared at various gelatin-to-water concentrations (5-30 wt.%) substantiate that resulting foam structures are similar in pore diameter (approximately 350 μm), shape, and density (0.05-0.22 g/cm(3)) to those fabricated using conventional methods (e.g., freeze-drying). Helical structures were identified in the films but were not evident in the foamed samples after vaporization (~150 °C), suggesting that the primary foaming mechanism is governed by the vaporization of water that is tightly bound in secondary structures (i.e., helices, β-turns, β-sheets) that are present in dehydrated gelatin films. FTIR and TGA data show that the foaming process leads to more disorder and reduced hydrogen bonding to hydroxyl groups in gelatin and that no thermal degradation of gelatin occurs before or after foaming. PMID:26952448

  5. EVAPORATION: a new vapor pressure estimation method for organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-04-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules needing only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: carbonyls, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  6. Utility of Penman-Monteith, Priestley-Taylor, reference evapotranspiration, and pan evaporation methods to estimate pasture evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.; Jacobs, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) was measured at 30-min resolution over a 19-month period (September 28, 2000-April 23, 2002) from a nonirrigated pasture site in Florida, USA, using eddy correlation methods. The relative magnitude of measured ETa (about 66% of long-term annual precipitation at the study site) indicates the importance of accurate ET a estimates for water resources planning. The time and cost associated with direct measurements of ETa and the rarity of historical measurements of ETa make the use of methods relying on more easily obtainable data desirable. Several such methods (Penman-Monteith (PM), modified Priestley-Taylor (PT), reference evapotranspiration (ET 0), and pan evaporation (Ep)) were related to measured ETa using regression methods to estimate PM bulk surface conductance, PT ??, ET0 vegetation coefficient, and Ep pan coefficient. The PT method, where the PT ?? is a function of green-leaf area index (LAI) and solar radiation, provided the best relation with ET a (standard error (SE) for daily ETa of 0.11 mm). The PM method, in which the bulk surface conductance was a function of net radiation and vapor-pressure deficit, was slightly less effective (SE=0.15 mm) than the PT method. Vegetation coefficients for the ET0 method (SE=0.29 mm) were found to be a simple function of LAI. Pan coefficients for the Ep method (SE=0.40 mm) were found to be a function of LAI and Ep. Historical or future meteorological, LAI, and pan evaporation data from the study site could be used, along with the relations developed within this study, to provide estimates of ETa in the absence of direct measurements of ETa. Additionally, relations among PM, PT, and ET0 methods and ETa can provide estimates of ETa in other, environmentally similar, pasture settings for which meteorological and LAI data can be obtained or estimated. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Thin films' thickness uniformity associated with the method of electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhilin; Xue, Yiyu; Guo, Peitao; Li, Zhangwang

    2009-08-01

    Coating material has been considered as being made up of a lot of small tablets. These tablets have plane surface during the whole film preparation process. Based on the assumption that a column etching pit will form in coating material when electron beam is used for heating, influences of the etching pit's dimension and the internal structure of the vacuum chamber on films thickness uniformity have been investigated. Results reflect that the appearance of etching pit does not always cause negative influence on films thickness uniformity. The negative impact of etching on films thickness uniformity can be reduced by optimizing the internal structure of the vacuum chamber and preparation technical parameters. But, it is difficult to achieve the beneficial action. This investigation is useful to help us understand physical meaning of the emission characteristics of the evaporation particle and design experimental scheme.

  8. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, Charles L.; He, Bo X.

    1990-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from when it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel.

  9. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    DOEpatents

    Kusik, C.L.; He, B.X.

    1990-11-13

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from where it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel. 4 figs.

  10. Gas transfer - A gas tension method for studying equilibration across a gas-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Meredith L.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    1992-11-01

    New strategies are required in the study of gas exchange under energetic and changeable conditions where current techniques are limited, especially in their ability to represent the contribution of injected bubbles. We have developed a gas tension device (GTD) that uses a solid-state differential pressure sensor to make continuous in situ measurements of the difference between pressure of dissolved gas (gas tension, for succinctness) and pressure of gas in the gas phase above a water parcel. This information allows the determination of the rate of approach to a dynamic equilibrium and of the degree of water phase saturation at steady state. The method is demonstrated in the lab by following the invasion of CO2 into seawater with bubble injection. The GTD introduces a new and versatile measurement method for the study of gas transfer across air-water interfaces, one which avoids many of the sampling and bias problems of traditional approaches.

  11. A Simple Evaporation Method for Large-Scale Production of Liquid Crystalline Lipid Nanoparticles with Various Internal Structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Lim, Sora; Shim, Jongwon; Song, Ji Eun; Chang, Jong Soo; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Cho, Eun Chul

    2015-09-16

    We present a simple and industrially accessible method of producing liquid crystalline lipid nanoparticles with various internal structures based on phytantriol, Pluronic F127, and vitamin E acetate. Bilayer vesicles were produced when an ethanolic solution dissolving the lipid components was mixed with deionized water. After the evaporation of ethanol from the aqueous mixture, vesicles were transformed into lipid-filled liquid crystalline nanoparticles with well-defined internal structures such as hexagonal lattices (mostly inverted cubic Pn3m), lined or coiled pattern (inverted hexagonal H2), and disordered structure (inverse microemulsion, L2), depending on the compositions. Further studies suggested that their internal structures were also affected by temperature. The internal structures were characterized from cryo-TEM and small-angle X-ray scattering results. Microcalorimetry studies were performed to investigate the degree of molecular ordering/crystallinity of lipid components within the nanostructures. From the comparative studies, we demonstrated the present method could produce the lipid nanoparticles with similar characteristics to those made from a conventional method. More importantly, the production only requires simple tools for mixing and ethanol evaporation and it is possible to produce 10 kg or so per batch of aqueous lipid nanoparticles dispersions, enabling the large-scale production of the liquid crystalline nanoparticles for various biomedical applications. PMID:26305487

  12. A shortcut through the Coulomb gas method for spectral linear statistics on random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelan Cunden, Fabio; Facchi, Paolo; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, spectral linear statistics on large dimensional random matrices have attracted significant attention. Within the physics community, a privileged role has been played by invariant matrix ensembles for which a two-dimensional Coulomb gas analogy is available. We present a critical revision of the Coulomb gas method in random matrix theory (RMT) borrowing language and tools from large deviations theory. This allows us to formalize an equivalent, but more effective and quicker route toward RMT free energy calculations. Moreover, we argue that this more modern viewpoint is likely to shed further light on the interesting issues of weak phase transitions and evaporation phenomena recently observed in RMT.

  13. Preparation of uniform-sized PLA microcapsules by combining Shirasu porous glass membrane emulsification technique and multiple emulsion-solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Ma, Guanghui; Meng, Fan-Tao; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2005-03-01

    Relatively Uniform-sized biodegradable poly(lactide) (PLA) microcapsules were successfully prepared by combining a Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG) membrane emulsification technique and multiple emulsion-solvent evaporation method. An aqueous phase containing lysozyme was used as the internal water phase (w1), and PLA and Arlacel 83 were dissolved in a mixture solvent of dichloromethane (DCM) and toluene which was used as the oil phase (o). These two solutions were emulsified by a homogenizer to form a w1/o primary emulsion. The primary emulsion was permeated through the uniform pores (5.25 microm) of an SPG membrane into the external water phase by the pressure of nitrogen gas to form the uniform w1/o/w2 droplets. Then, the solid polymer microcapsules were obtained by simply evaporating the solvent. It is necessary to avoid the phase separation of primary emulsion during the SPG membrane emulsification. It was found that when the density difference of the internal water phase and oil phase was reduced to nearly zero and Arlacel 83 was used as the oil emulsifier, the phase separation was not observed within 24 h. The w1/o/w2 emulsion with uniform diameter was obtained only when Arlaecl 83 concentration was limited below 2.5 wt.% based on oil phase. The drug encapsulation efficiency was found to be related to several factors including PLA molecular weight, additive type and its concentration in the internal water phase, the emulsifier type and concentration in the oil phase, the NaCl concentration and the pH value in the external water phase. Comparing with the stirring method, it was found that the size was more uniform and the drug encapsulation efficiency was much higher when the microcapsules were prepared by SPG membrane emulsification technique and the highest drug encapsulation efficiency of 92.20% was obtained. This is the first study to prepare PLA microcapsules by combining an SPG membrane emulsification technique and multiple emulsion-solvent evaporation method

  14. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.

    1995-01-01

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node #1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node #2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred.

  15. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.

    1995-04-11

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

  16. A simple method to make an electrical connection between ZnO microwire and substrate through nanoscale metal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hakseong; Lee, Jinkyung; Yun, Hoyeol; Lee, Sang; Nano Electonics and Nano Mechanics Team

    2013-03-01

    We developed a simple method to make an electrical connection with nanoscale electrodes on microscale wire using suspended Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) strings. Less than 90 nm height of Ti/Au made a complete electrical connection on the ZnO microwires of which diameter is around 2 μm. A cross linked PMMA string was bridged between ZnO microwire and substrate for making good electrical connection. The contact resistance of ZnO microwire fabricated by this method was much lower than that of device fabricated by standard E-beam lithography and evaporation. This fabrication method is readily extendible to prepare nano scale electrodes on various micro sized materials and serves as a pathway for studying their mesoscopic transport phenomena. This work is supported by WCU, BK21 and NRF.

  17. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  18. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  19. Hydrogen gas sensor and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McKee, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the pressure of hydrogen gas in a nuclear reactor, and method of manufacturing the same. The sensor comprises an elongated tube of hydrogen permeable material which is connected to a pressure transducer through a feedthrough tube which passes through a wall at the boundary of the region in which hydrogen is present. The tube is pressurized and flushed with hydrogen gas at an elevated temperature during the manufacture of the sensor in order to remove all gasses other than hydrogen from the device.

  20. Nonaqueous Dispersion Formed by an Emulsion Solvent Evaporation Method Using Block-Random Copolymer Surfactant Synthesized by RAFT Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, Naofumi; Watanabe, Yoshifumi; Mori, Hideharu

    2015-10-27

    As surfactants for preparation of nonaqueous microcapsule dispersions by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, three copolymers composed of stearyl methacrylate (SMA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) with different monomer sequences (i.e., random, block, and block-random) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Despite having the same comonomer composition, the copolymers exhibited different functionality as surfactants for creating emulsions with respective dispersed and continuous phases consisting of methanol and isoparaffin solvent. The optimal monomer sequence for the surfactant was determined based on the droplet sizes and the stabilities of the emulsions created using these copolymers. The block-random copolymer led to an emulsion with better stability than obtained using the random copolymer and a smaller droplet size than achieved with the block copolymer. Modification of the epoxy group of the GMA unit by diethanolamine (DEA) further decreased the droplet size, leading to higher stability of the emulsion. The DEA-modified block-random copolymer gave rise to nonaqueous microcapsule dispersions after evaporation of methanol from the emulsions containing colored dyes in their dispersed phases. These dispersions exhibited high stability, and the particle sizes were small enough for application to the inkjet printing process. PMID:26421355

  1. Conversion method for gas streams containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Mallinson, Richard G.; Lobban, Lance; Liu, Chang-jun

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method of using the apparatus are provided for converting a gas stream containing hydrocarbons to a reaction product containing effluent molecules having at least one carbon atom, having at least one interior surface and at least one exterior surface, a first electrode and a second electrode with the first and second electrodes being selectively movable in relation to each other and positioned within the housing so as to be spatially disposed a predetermined distance from each other, a plasma discharge generator between the first and second electrodes, gas stream introducer and a collector for collecting the reaction product effluent produced by the reaction of the gas stream containing hydrocarbons with the plasma discharge between the first and second electrodes.

  2. Low NOx gas burner apparatus and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.E.; Napier, S.O.; Jones, A.P.

    1993-08-24

    An improved gas burner apparatus is described for discharging a mixture of fuel gas and air into a furnace space wherein said mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO[sub x] content are formed therefrom comprising: a housing having an open end attached to said furnace space; means for introducing a controlled flow rate of said air into said housing attached thereto; a refractory burner tile attached to the open end of said housing having a base portion, an opening formed in said base portion for allowing air to pass there through and having a wall portion surrounding said opening which extends into said furnace space, the exterior sides of said wall portion being slanted towards said opening and the interior sides thereof being spaced from the periphery of said opening whereby a ledge is provided within the interior of said wall portion; at least one passage formed in said burner tile for conducting primary fuel gas and flue gases from the exterior of said wall portion to the interior thereof; means for forming a fuel gas jet in said passage and drawing flue gases there through adapted to be connected to a source of fuel gas and positioned with respect to said passage whereby a mixture of primary fuel gas and flue gases from said furnace space is discharged from said passage to within the interior of said wall portion; and at least one nozzle adapted to be connected to a source of fuel gas positioned outside said wall portion of said burner tile adjacent the intersection of an exterior slanted side of said wall portion with the surface of said base portion for discharging secondary fuel gas adjacent said external slanted side of said wall portion whereby said secondary fuel gas mixes with flue gases and air in said furnace space. A method is also described for discharging a mixture of fuel gas and air into a furnace space wherein said mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO[sub x] content are formed therefrom.

  3. Preparation of Nonionic Vesicles Using the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reverse Phase Evaporation Method and Analysis of Their Solution Properties.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Koji; Sakai, Kenichi; Abe, Masahiko; Sakai, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported a new preparation method for liposomes using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a solvent, referred to as the supercritical carbon dioxide reverse phase evaporation (scRPE) method. In our previous work, addition of ethanol to scCO2 as a co-solvent was needed, because lipid molecules had to be dissolved in scCO2 to form liposomes. In this new study, niosomes (nonionic surfactant vesicles) were prepared from various nonionic surfactants using the scRPE method. Among the nonionic surfactants tested were polyoxyethylene (6) stearylether (C18EO6), polyoxyethylene (5) phytosterolether (BPS-5), polyoxyethylene (6) sorbitan stearylester (TS-106V), and polyoxyethylene (4) sorbitan stearylester (Tween 61). All these surfactants have hydrophilic-lipophilic balance values (HLBs) around 9.5 to 9.9, and they can all form niosomes using the scRPE method even in the absence of ethanol. The high solubility of these surfactants in scCO2 was shown to be an important factor in yielding niosomes without ethanol addition. The niosomes prepared with the scRPE method had higher trapping efficiencies than those prepared using the conventional Bangham method, since the scRPE method gives a large number of unilamellar vesicles while the Bangham method gives multilamellar vesicles. Polyoxyethylene-type nonionic surfactants with HLB values from 9.5 to 9.9 were shown to be optimal for the preparation of niosomes with the scRPE method. PMID:26666274

  4. Influence of process parameters on the size distribution of PLA microcapsules prepared by combining membrane emulsification technique and double emulsion-solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Ma, Guang-Hui; Wan, Yin-Hua; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2005-11-10

    Relatively uniform-sized biodegradable poly(lactide) (PLA) microcapsules with various sizes were successfully prepared by combining a glass membrane emulsification technique and water-in-oil-in-water (w1/o/w2) double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. A water phase was used as the internal water phase, a mixture solvent of dichloromethane (DCM) and toluene dissolving PLA and Arlacel 83 was used as the oil phase (o). These two solutions were emulsified by a homogenizer to form a w1/o primary emulsion. The primary emulsion was permeated through the uniform pores of a glass membrane into the external water phase by the pressure of nitrogen gas to form the uniform w1/o/w2 double emulsion droplets. Then, the solid polymer microcapsules were obtained by simply evaporating solvent. The influence of process parameters on the size distribution of PLA microcapsules was investigated, with an emphasis on the effect of oil-soluble emulsifier. A unique phenomenon was found that a large part of emulsifier could adsorb on the interface of internal water phase and oil phase, which suppressed its adsorption on the surface of glass membrane, and led to the successful preparation of uniform-sized double emulsion. Finally, by optimizing the process parameters, PLA microcapsules with various sizes having coefficient of variation (CV) value under 14.0% were obtained. Recombinant human insulin (rhI), as a model protein, was encapsulated into the microcapsules with difference sizes, and its encapsulation efficiency and cumulative release were investigated. The result suggested that the release behavior could be simply adjusted just by changing precisely the diameters of microcapsule, benefited from the membrane emulsification technique. PMID:16198091

  5. Direct numerical simulation of evaporation-induced particle motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hochan; Son, Gihun

    2015-11-01

    A sharp-interface level-set (LS) method is presented for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of evaporation-induced particle motion. The liquid surface is tracked by the LS function, which is defined as a signed distance from the liquid-gas interface. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy for the liquid and gas phases and vapor mass fraction for the gas phase are solved accurately imposing the coupled temperature and vapor fraction conditions at the evaporating liquid-gas interface. A dynamic contact angle model is also incorporated into the LS method to account for the change between advancing and receding contact angles at the liquid-gas-solid contact line. The solid surface is tracked by another LS function, which is defined as a signed distance from the fluid-solid interface. The conservation equations for multiphase flows are extended to treat the solid particle as a high-viscosity non-evaporating fluid phase. The velocity inside the solid domain is modified to enforce the rigid body motion using the translational velocity and angular velocity of the particle centroid. The DNS results demonstrate the particle accumulation near the evaporating interface and the contact line pinning and stick-slip motion near the evaporating contact line.

  6. Dynamics of vapor plume in transient keyhole during laser welding of stainless steel: Local evaporation, plume swing and gas entrapment into porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Shao, Xinyu; Gong, Shuili; Xiao, Jianzhong

    2016-07-01

    In order to better understand the local evaporation phenomena of keyhole wall, vapor plume swing above the keyhole and ambient gas entrapment into the porosity defects, the 3D time-dependent dynamics of the metallic vapor plume in a transient keyhole during fiber laser welding is numerically investigated. The vapor dynamical parameters, including the velocity and pressure, are successfully predicted and obtain good agreements with the experimental and literature data. It is found that the vapor plume flow inside the keyhole has complex multiple directions, and this various directions characteristic of the vapor plume is resulted from the dynamic evaporation phenomena with variable locations and orientations on the keyhole wall. The results also demonstrate that because of this dynamic local evaporation, the ejected vapor plume from the keyhole opening is usually in high frequency swinging. The results further indicate that the oscillation frequency of the plume swing angle is around 2.0-8.0 kHz, which is of the same order of magnitude with that of the keyhole depth (2.0-5.0 kHz). This consistency clearly shows that the swing of the ejected vapor plume is closely associated with the keyhole instability during laser welding. Furthermore, it is learned that there is usually a negative pressure region (several hundred Pa lower than the atmospheric pressure) of the vapor flow around the keyhole opening. This pressure could lead to a strong vortex flow near the rear keyhole wall, especially when the velocity of the ejected metallic vapor from the keyhole opening is high. Under the effect of this flow, the ambient gas is involved into the keyhole, and could finally be entrapped into the bubbles within a very short time (<0.2 ms) due to the complex flow inside the keyhole.

  7. Simulation of temporal and spatial distribution of required irrigation water by crop models and the pan evaporation coefficient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan-min; Yang, Yonghui; Han, Shu-min; Hu, Yu-kun

    2009-07-01

    Hebei Plain is the most important agricultural belt in North China. Intensive irrigation, low and uneven precipitation have led to severe water shortage on the plain. This study is an attempt to resolve this crucial issue of water shortage for sustainable agricultural production and water resources management. The paper models distributed regional irrigation requirement for a range of cultivated crops on the plain. Classic crop models like DSSAT- wheat/maize and COTTON2K are used in combination with pan-evaporation coefficient method to estimate water requirements for wheat, corn, cotton, fruit-trees and vegetables. The approach is more accurate than the static approach adopted in previous studies. This is because the combination use of crop models and pan-evaporation coefficient method dynamically accounts for irrigation requirement at different growth stages of crops, agronomic practices, and field and climatic conditions. The simulation results show increasing Required Irrigation Amount (RIA) with time. RIA ranges from 5.08×109 m3 to 14.42×109 m3 for the period 1986~2006, with an annual average of 10.6×109 m3. Percent average water use by wheat, fruit trees, vegetable, corn and cotton is 41%, 12%, 12%, 11%, 7% and 17% respectively. RIA for April and May (the period with the highest irrigation water use) is 1.78×109 m3 and 2.41×109 m3 respectively. The counties in the piedmont regions of Mount Taihang have high RIA while the central and eastern regions/counties have low irrigation requirement.

  8. Comparison of soil moisture retention characteristics obtained by the extended evaporation method and the pressure plate/sand box apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Hasan S.; Durner, Wolfgang; Haghverdi, Amir; Walter, Birgit

    2013-04-01

    The water retention curve (WRC) characterizes the capacity of soil to hold water at specified soil matric potentials. It is a key property in any soil hydrologic application. To determine water retention data accurately and in turn use them to draw the whole curve by optimizing parameters of a proper soil hydraulic equation, it is of crucial importance to choose a suitable measurement procedure. For many years, the sand box-pressure plate apparatus are widely accepted as a reference laboratory procedure. To overcome shortcomings of the pressure plate, the evaporation method was introduced, besides many others. The method is not dependent on hydrostatic equilibrium conditions, thus allowing much quicker measurements, and yields the WRC in very high resolution. The method furthermore enables to quantify the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function. We investigated a set of 40 fine-textured soils with both methods. The samples were packed from aggregated, dried and sieved material. Eight (-5, -10, -33, -100, -400, -700,-1000 and -1500kPa) water retention data points were obtained from sand box-pressure plate apparatus. Evaporation measurements were performed with the commercial apparatus HYPROP by UMS GmbH, Munich, applying the extended method, which yields water retention data in the range from 0 to -500kPa. We found that the sand box-pressure plate method lead to immediate drainage of water, whereas in HYPROP water started to drain only after reaching an air-entry point of pF 1.2-1.3. Accordingly, HYPROP gave higher water contents until pF 2, compared to the sand box/pressure plate apparatus, but from this point on both curves begin to be close and around the field capacity (pF 2.5) they overlap. Both methods show that the textural pore system starts to drain much later, around pF 3.5. We hypothesize that the reason for the different drainage behaviour of the interaggrate pore system lies in the saturation procedure. For HYPROP, samples were saturated under

  9. Modelling of the solvent evaporation method for the preparation of controlled release acrylic microspheres using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, N; Türkoglu, M; Baykara, T

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to model the solvent evaporation procedure for the preparation of acrylic microspheres by using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to obtain an understanding of the selected preparative variables. Three preparative variables, the concentration of the dispersing agent (sucrose stearate), the stirring rate of emulsion system, and the ratio of polymers (Eudragit RS-L) were studied, each at different levels, as input variables. The response (output) variables examined to characterize microspheres and drug release were the size of the microspheres and T63.2%, the time at which 63.2% of drug is released. The results were also analysed by the multiple linear regression (MLR) to provide a comparison with the ANN methodology. Although both ANN and MLR methods were found to be similar in characterizing the process studied, the results showed that an ANN method gave a better prediction than the MLR method. For the size values of the microspheres, the predictability of the ANN model was quite high (R2 = 0.9602) based on the input variables. A relationship between these variables and size values of microspheres was also obtained by the MLR model (R2 = 0.9050). The performances of both models for the release data from microspheres based on the same input variables were at the level of 53%. According to the results, the ANN methodology can provide an alternative to the traditional regression methods, as a flexible and accurate method to study process and formulation factors. PMID:11038114

  10. Growth of negative solubility lithium sulfate monohydrate crystal by slow evaporation and Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathi, K.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2012-04-01

    Single crystals of negatively soluble lithium sulfate monohydrate (LSMH) have been grown by conventional and Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) methods. A negatively soluble material has been grown for the first time by the SR method. The size of the grown crystal is 40 mm length and 15 mm diameter. The solubility of the material has been found at different temperatures. The grown crystals were subjected to high resolution X-ray diffraction studies, UV-vis analysis, dielectric measurements, Vickers micro-hardness, piezoelectric measurements, laser damage threshold and second harmonic generation studies. Crystalline perfection of the grown crystals was analyzed using HRXRD. The grown crystals were found to be transparent in the entire visible region. The SR method grown crystal has higher hardness, lower dielectric loss, higher piezoelectric charge coefficient and higher laser stability compared to the conventional method grown crystal. The powder Kurtz method confirms that LSMH has SHG efficiency.

  11. Collisional electron spectroscopy method for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanova, M. S.; Pramatarov, P. M.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Peyeva, R. A.; Patrikov, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, based on identification of gas impurities by registration of groups of nonlocal fast electrons released by Penning ionization of the impurity particles by helium metastable atoms, is verified experimentally. Detection and identification of atoms and molecules of gas impurities in helium at pressures of 14 - 90 Torr with small admixtures of Ar, Kr, CO2, and N2 are carried out. The nonlocal negative glow plasma of short dc microdischarge is used as most suitable medium. Records of the energy spectra of penning electrons are performed by means of an additional electrode - sensor, located at the boundary of the discharge volume. Maxima appear in the electron energy spectra at the characteristic energies corresponding to Penning ionization of the impurity particles by helium metastable atoms.

  12. Method and apparatus for producing synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Hemmings, John William; Bonnell, Leo; Robinson, Earl T.

    2010-03-03

    A method and apparatus for reacting a hydrocarbon containing feed stream by steam methane reforming reactions to form a synthesis gas. The hydrocarbon containing feed is reacted within a reactor having stages in which the final stage from which a synthesis gas is discharged incorporates expensive high temperature materials such as oxide dispersed strengthened metals while upstream stages operate at a lower temperature allowing the use of more conventional high temperature alloys. Each of the reactor stages incorporate reactor elements having one or more separation zones to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing feed to support combustion of a fuel within adjacent combustion zones, thereby to generate heat to support the endothermic steam methane reforming reactions.

  13. Evaporating firewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In this note, we begin by presenting an argument suggesting that large AdS black holes dual to typical high-energy pure states of a single holographic CFT must have some structure at the horizon, i.e. a fuzzball/firewall, unless the procedure to probe physics behind the horizon is state-dependent. By weakly coupling the CFT to an auxiliary system, such a black hole can be made to evaporate. In a case where the auxiliary system is a second identical CFT, it is possible (for specific initial states) that the system evolves to precisely the thermofield double state as the original black hole evaporates. In this case, the dual geometry should include the "late-time" part of the eternal AdS black hole spacetime which includes smooth spacetime behind the horizon of the original black hole. Thus, if a firewall is present initially, it evaporates. This provides a specific realization of the recent ideas of Maldacena and Susskind that the existence of smooth spacetime behind the horizon of an evaporating black hole can be enabled by maximal entanglement with a Hawking radiation system (in our case the second CFT) rather than prevented by it. For initial states which are not finely-tuned to produce the thermofield double state, the question of whether a late-time infalling observer experiences a firewall translates to a question about the gravity dual of a typical high-energy state of a two-CFT system.

  14. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  15. A method to determine photosynthetic activity from oxygen microsensor data in biofilms subjected to evaporation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Podola, Björn; de Beer, Dirk; Melkonian, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Phototrophic biofilms are widely distributed in nature and their ecological importance is well recognized. More recently, there has been a growing interest in using artificial phototrophic biofilms in innovative photobioreactors for production of microalgal biomass in biotechnological applications. To study physiological processes within these biofilms, microsensors have been applied in several studies. Here, the 'light-dark shift method' relies on measurement of photosynthetic activity in terms of light-induced oxygen production. However, when applied to non-submerged biofilms that can be found in numerous locations in nature, as well as in some types of photobioreactors, limitations of this approach are obvious due to rapid removal of gaseous species at the biofilm surface. Here, we introduce a mathematical correction to recover the distribution of the actual photosynthetic activity along the depth gradient in the biofilm, based on a numerical solution of the inversed diffusion equation of oxygen. This method considers changes in mass transport during the measurement period as can found on biofilms possessing a thin flow/mass transfer boundary layer (e. g., non-submerged biofilms). Using both simulated and real microsensor data, the proposed method was shown to be much more accurate than the classical method, which leads to underestimations of rates near the biofilm surface. All test profiles could be recovered with a high fit. According to our simulated microsensor measurements, a depth resolution of ≤20 μm is recommended near the surface. We conclude that our method strongly improves the quality of data acquired from light-dark measurements of photosynthetic activity in biofilms. PMID:26232709

  16. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  17. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Analysis of the climate variability on Lake Nasser evaporation based on the Bowen ratio energy budget method.

    PubMed

    Elsawwaf, Mohamed; Willems, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Variations in lake evaporation have a significant impact on the energy and water budgets of lakes. Understanding these variations and the role of climate is important for water resources management as well as predicting future changes in lake hydrology as a result of climate change. This study presents a comprehensive, 10-year analysis of seasonal, intraseasonal, and interannual variations in lake evaporation for Lake Nasser in South Egypt. Meteorological and lake temperature measurements were collected from an instrumented platform (Raft floating weather station) at 2 km upstream ofthe Aswan High Dam. In addition to that, radiation measurements at three locations on the lake: Allaqi, Abusembel and Arqeen (respectively at 75, 280 and 350 km upstream of the Aswan High Dam) are used. The data were analyzed over 14-day periods from 1995 to 2004 to provide bi-weekly energy budget estimates of evaporation rate. The mean evaporation rate for lake Nasser over the study period was 5.88 mm day(-1), with a coefficient of variation of 63%. Considerable variability in evaporation rates was found on a wide range of timescales, with seasonal changes having the highest coefficient of variation (32%), followed by the intraseasonal (28%) and interannual timescales (11.6%; for summer means). Intraseasonal changes in evaporation were primarily associated with synoptic weather variations, with high evaporation events tending to occur during incursions of cold, dry air (due, in part, to the thermal lag between air and lake temperatures). Seasonal variations in evaporation were largely driven by temperature and net energy advection, but are out-of-phase with changes in wind speed. On interannual timescales, changes in summer evaporation rates were strongly associated with changes in net energy advection and showed only moderate connections to variations in temperature or humidity. PMID:23424853

  19. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  20. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Nerney, S. F.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of heating near the top of streamers in ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models, where the plasma is weakly contained by the magnetic field. Heating causes slow opening of field lines and release of new solar wind. It was discovered in simulations and, due to the absence of loss mechanisms, the ultimate end point is the complete evaporation of the streamer. Of course streamers do not behave in this way because there are losses by thermal conduction and radiation. Physically, heating is also expected to depend on ambient conditions. We use our global MHD model with thermal conduction to examine the effect of changing the heating scale height. We also apply and extend an analytic model of streamers developed by Pneuman (1968) to show that steady streamers are unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than approximately 2 x 10(exp 6) K.

  1. The robustness and flexibility of an emulsion solvent evaporation method to prepare pH-responsive microparticles.

    PubMed

    Nilkumhang, Suchada; Basit, Abdul W

    2009-07-30

    A microparticle preparation method based on an emulsion of ethanol in liquid paraffin stabilised using sorbitan sesquioleate which produces enteric microparticles of excellent morphology, size and pH-sensitive drug release was assessed for its robustness to changes in formulation and processing parameters. Prednisolone and methacrylic acid and methyl methacrylate copolymer (Eudragit S) were the drug and polymer of choice. Emulsion solvent evaporation procedures are notoriously sensitive to changes in methodology and so emulsion stirring speed, drug loading, polymer concentration and surfactant (emulsifier) concentration were varied; microparticle size, encapsulation efficiency, yield and in vitro dissolution behaviour were assessed. The yield and encapsulation efficiency remained high under all stirring speeds, drug loadings and polymer concentrations. This suggests that the process is flexible and efficiency can be maintained. Surfactant concentration was an important parameter; above an optimum concentration resulted in poorly formed particles. All processing parameters affected particle size but this did not alter the acid resistance of the microparticles. At high pH values the smaller microparticles had the most rapid drug release. In conclusion, the microparticle preparation method was resistant to many changes in processing, although surfactant concentration was critical. Manipulation of particle size can be used to modify the drug release profiles without adversely affecting the gastro-resistant properties of these pH-responsive microparticles. PMID:19515519

  2. A new method using evaporation for high-resolution measurements of soil thermal conductivity at changing water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markert, A.; Trinks, S.; Facklam, M.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of soils is a key parameter to know if their use as heat source or sink is planned. It is required to calculate the efficiency of ground-source heat pump systems in combination with soil heat exchangers. Apart from geothermal energy, soil thermal conductivity is essential to estimate the ampacity for buried power cables. The effective thermal conductivity of saturated and unsaturated soils, as a function of water transport, water vapour transport and heat conduction, mainly depends on the soil water content, its bulk density and texture. The major objectives of this study are (i) to describe the thermal conductivity of soil samples with a non-steady state measurement at changing water contents and for different bulk densities. Based on that it is (ii) tested if available soil thermal conductivity models are able to describe the measured data for the whole range of water contents. The new method allows a continuous measurement of thermal conductivity for soil from full water saturation to air-dryness. Thermal conductivity is measured with a thermal needle probe in predefined time intervals while the change of water content is controlled by evaporation. To relate the measured thermal conductivity to the current volumetric water content, the decrease in weight of the sample, due to evaporation, is logged with a lab scale. Soil texture of the 11 soil substrates tested in this study range between coarse sand and silty clay. To evaluate the impact of the bulk density on heat transport processes, thermal conductivity at 20°C was measured at 1.5g/cm3; 1.7g/cm3 and 1.9g/cm3 for each soil substrate. The results correspond well to literature values used to describe heat transport in soils. Due to the high-resolution and non-destructive measurements, the specific effects of the soil texture and bulk density on thermal conductivity could be proved. Decreasing water contents resulted in a non-linear decline of the thermal conductivity for all samples

  3. Cylinder Fragmentation Using Gas Gun Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, Tom; Reinhart, William; Chhabildas, Lalit; Grady, Dennis; Wilson, Leonard

    2001-06-01

    An experimental technique for investigating fracture and fragmentation characteristics of materials has been developed for use on the gas guns. In this method the candidate material is in the cylindrical form. This technique involves the precision alignment of the candidate cylinder, and symmetric impact of a stationary cylinder plug with the moving projectile from the gun. This test method allows the study of cylinder fragmentation in a laboratory environment under well-controlled loading conditions. In this presentation, results of several experiments on Aermet steel will be presented. The fragmentation toughness of the material can be estimated through knowledge of the material strain-rate and mean fragment size derived from the statistical distribution of the fragments. The values for fragmentation toughness will be compared with those obtained from other experimental methods such as explosives loading or ball on plate impact methods. Future developments and directions in test geometry, test methods and diagnostics will also be reported. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  5. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  6. Development of a method to control the water evaporation of hatching eggs during incubation.

    PubMed

    Ohi, A; Inoue, N; Furuta, H; Sugawara, M; Ohta, Y

    2010-03-01

    Three experiments were conducted to develop methods to control the amount of water loss and to evaluate the metabolic effects of water condition in the White Leghorn breeder eggs during incubation. One hundred twenty, 54, and 90 Julia strain White Leghorn breeder eggs were incubated at 37.8 degrees C, 60% RH in experiments 1, 2, and 3. In experiment 1, eggs were drilled with various bore diameters of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm on the blunt end of the eggshell. In experiment 2, 4 x 4 mm(2) windows were cut into the eggs or the eggs were drilled with 5 holes of bore diameter 2 mm on the blunt end of eggshell. In experiment 3, eggs were drilled with 1, 3, 5, and 7 holes of diameter 2 mm on the blunt end of eggshell. Eggs were treated on d 3 of each experiment and the amount of water loss was recorded on d 19 of incubation. Embryo growth was evaluated in experiments 2 and 3. In addition, the livers of embryos were collected in the 0-, 1-, 3-, and 5-hole treatment groups after weighing eggs to determine 3-hydroxy acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase activity. In experiment 1, although higher water loss was observed in all windowed eggs than in control, there were no differences in amount of water loss among all bore diameters. Accordingly, that was not successful to control amount of water loss. In experiment 2, higher water loss was observed in drilled eggs at the same levels in windowed eggs as in control. Drilling holes was a more useful treatment to control amount of water loss on incubated eggs than windowing. In experiment 3, amount of water loss increased linearly with increasing number of holes on the blunt end of eggshell. Hepatic 3-hydroxy acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase activity increased with increasing the number of drilled holes. PMID:20181873

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Water Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuki; Usui, Kota; Bonn, Mischa

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation is the process by which water changes from a liquid to a gas or vapor, and is a key step in Earth's water cycle. At the molecular level, evaporation requires breaking at least one very strong intermolecular bond between two water molecules at the interface. Despite the importance of this process the molecular mechanism by which an evaporating water molecule gains sufficient energy to escape from the surface has remained elusive. Here, we show, using molecular dynamics simulations at the water-air interface with polarizable classical force field models, that the high kinetic energy of the evaporated water molecule is enabled by a well-timed making and breaking of hydrogen bonds involving at least three water molecules at the interface, the recoil of which allows one of the molecules to escape. The evaporation of water is thus enabled by concerted, ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics of interfacial water, and follows one specific molecular pathway.

  8. Cryogenic neon matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy of evaporated ionic liquids: geometrical structure of cation-anion 1:1 pair in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Akai, Nobuyuki; Parazs, David; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2009-04-01

    Low-temperature infrared spectra of thermally evaporated ionic liquids, 1-ethyl- and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide have been measured in a cryogenic Ne matrix. The experimental IR spectrum of bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide can be reproduced theoretically by not B3LYP/6-31G* but MP2/6-31G* calculation, which suggests that the vibrational analysis for ionic liquids composed of bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion would be more successfully performed using the MP2 calculation. By comparison of the matrix-isolation spectra of the ionic liquids with the MP2 calculation, their geometrical structures in the gas phase are determined to be of C(2-position)-H(+)...N(-) interaction structure, which corresponds to the geometry of the energetically second-lowest ion-pair structure. The present study may provide a valuable clue to understand a vaporization mechanism of ionic liquid. PMID:19281187

  9. Quantitative fuel vapor/air mixing imaging in droplet/gas regions of an evaporating spray flow using filtered Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Allison, Patton M; McManus, Thomas A; Sutton, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-15

    This Letter demonstrates the application of filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) for quantitative two-dimensional fuel vapor/air mixing measurements in an evaporating hydrocarbon fuel spray flow. Using the FRS approach, gas-phase measurements are made in the presence of liquid-phase droplets without interference. Effective suppression of the liquid-phase droplet scattering using FRS is enabled by the high spectral purity of the current Nd:YAG laser system. Simultaneous Mie-scattering imaging is used to visualize the droplet field and illustrate the droplet loading under which the FRS imaging is applied in the current spray flows. The initial quantification of the FRS imaging is based on calibration measurements from a flow cell of known fuel vapor/air mixtures, while future work targets the utilization of a Rayleigh-Brillouin spectral model for quantification of the FRS signals. PMID:26977637

  10. Systematic development of a group quantification method using evaporative light scattering detector for relative quantification of ginsenosides in ginseng products.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwang Jin; Shin, Byong-Kyu; Yu, Yun-Hyun; Ahn, Jongsung; Kwon, Sung Won; Park, Jeong Hill

    2016-09-01

    The determination for the contents of multi-components in ginseng products has come to the fore by demands of in-depth information, but the associated industries confront the high cost of securing pure standards for the continuous quality evaluation of the products. This study aimed to develop a prospective high-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD) method for relative quantification of ginsenosides in ginseng products without a considerable change from the conventional gradient analysis. We investigated the effects of mobile phase composition and elution bandwidth, which are potential variables affecting the ELSD response in the gradient analysis. Similar ELSD response curves of nine major ginsenosides were obtained under the identical flow injection conditions, and the response increased as the percentage of organic solvent increased. The nine ginsenosides were divided into three groups to confirm the effect of elution bandwidth. The ELSD response significantly decreased in case of the late eluted ginsenoside in the individual groups under the isocratic conditions. With the consideration of the two important effects, stepwise changes of the gradient condition were carried out to reach a group quantification method. The inconsistent responses of the nine ginsenosides were reconstituted to three normalized responses by the stepwise changes of the gradient condition, and this result actualized relative quantification in the individual groups. The availability was confirmed by comparing the ginsenoside contents in a base material of ginseng products determined by the direct and group quantification method. The largest difference in the determination results from the two methods was 8.26%, and the difference of total contents was only 0.91%. PMID:27262109

  11. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  12. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

    1990-11-13

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

  13. Study of a Novel Method for the Thermolysis of Solutes in Aqueous Solution Using a Low Temperature Bubble Column Evaporator.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Xue, Xinkai; Fan, Chao; Ninham, Barry W; Pashley, Richard M

    2015-06-25

    An enhanced thermal decomposition of chemical compounds in aqueous solution has been achieved at reduced solution temperatures. The technique exploits hitherto unrecognized properties of a bubble column evaporator (BCE). It offers better heat transfer efficiency than conventional heat transfer equipment. This is obtained via a continuous flow of hot, dry air bubbles of optimal (1-3 mm) size. Optimal bubble size is maintained by using the bubble coalescence inhibition property of some salts. This novel method is illustrated by a study of thermal decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) and potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) in aqueous solutions. The decomposition occurs at significantly lower temperatures than those needed in bulk solution. The process appears to work via the continuous production of hot (e.g., 150 °C) dry air bubbles, which do not heat the solution significantly but produce a transient hot surface layer around each rising bubble. This causes the thermal decomposition of the solute. The decomposition occurs due to the effective collision of the solute with the surface of the hot bubbles. The new process could, for example, be applied to the regeneration of the ammonium bicarbonate draw solution used in forward osmosis. PMID:26067442

  14. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of Cu0.87Se thin films coated by electron beam evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneswari, P. V.; Ramamurthi, K.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2015-09-01

    Copper selenide powder was synthesized adopting a two-step chemical route. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the synthesized material consists of mixed phases of Cu3Se2, Cu7Se4 and Cu0.87Se. Synthesized material was used to deposit thin films at the substrate temperature of 200, 300, 400 and 500 °C by electron beam evaporation method. The substrate temperature of 200 °C yielded amorphous film, whereas the substrate temperature of 300, 400 and 500 °C produced Cu0.87Se single-phase thin film. Atomic force microscopic studies showed that the film coated at 400 °C possesses relatively lower average roughness. The direct band gap of Cu0.87Se varies from 1.67 to 1.81 eV. Thin film coated at 400 °C shows the minimum resistivity of 5.2 × 10-4 Ω cm, whereas the film coated at 300 °C possesses the maximum mobility of 8.2 cm2/Vs.

  15. Efficiency of methods for Karl Fischer determination of water in oils based on oven evaporation and azeotropic distillation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, William; Jalbert, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Roland; Cedergren, Anders

    2003-03-15

    The efficiency of azeotropic distillation and oven evaporation techniques for trace determination of water in oils has recently been questioned by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), on the basis of measurements of the residual water found after the extraction step. The results were obtained by volumetric Karl Fischer (KF) titration in a medium containing a large excess of chloroform (> or = 65%), a proposed prerequisite to ensure complete release of water from the oil matrix. In this work, the extent of this residual water was studied by means of a direct zero-current potentiometric technique using a KF medium containing more than 80% chloroform, which is well above the concentration recommended by NIST. A procedure is described that makes it possible to correct the results for dilution errors as well as for chemical interference effects caused by the oil matrix. The corrected values were found to be in the range of 0.6-1.5 ppm, which should be compared with the 12-34 ppm (uncorrected values) reported by NIST for the same oils. From this, it is concluded that the volumetric KF method used by NIST gives results that are much too high. PMID:12659179

  16. Effect of different dispersing agents on the characteristics of Eudragit microspheres prepared by a solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Horoz, B B; Kiliçarslan, M; Yüksel, N; Baykara, T

    2004-03-01

    Eudragit RS microspheres containing verapamil HCl for oral use were prepared using three different dispersing agents: aluminium tristearate, magnesium stearate and sucrose stearate, by a solvent evaporation method. The effects of the type and concentration of the dispersing agents and the inner phase polymer concentration on the size and T63.2%, (the time at which 63.2% of the drug is released) of microspheres were determined by multiple linear regression analysis. The morphology of microspheres was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The surface of microspheres prepared with sucrose stearate was smoother and non-porous and the drug release from these microspheres was the fastest. When aluminium tristearate or magnesium stearate were used as dispersing agents, the particle size of microspheres became smaller. Increasing amounts of these two dispersing agents led to the accumulation of their free particles onto the surfaces of the microspheres. The drug release from the microspheres was slower than that of the microspheres from sucrose stearate depending on their hydrophobic structures. According to the results of the multiple linear regression analysis among the dispersing agents used, aluminium tristearate showed the best correlation between the examined input (dispersing agent and polymer concentrations) and output (T63.2%. and particle size) variables. PMID:15198430

  17. Multiresidue determination of 256 pesticides in lavandin essential oil by LC/ESI/sSRM: advantages and drawbacks of a sampling method involving evaporation under nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Fillâtre, Yoann; Rondeau, David; Daguin, Antoine; Jadas-Hecart, Alain; Communal, Pierre-Yves

    2014-02-01

    The determination of 256 multiclass pesticides in lavandin essential oil has been performed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry using the scheduled selected reaction monitoring mode available on a quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer. With the aim of improving the limits of quantification (LOQs) of the target molecules, a sampling step based on evaporation of the essential oil under a nitrogen flow assisted by controlled heating was tested. The LOQs determined in this case were compared with the values obtained with the classic dilution preparation method. With sampling by dilution, 247 pesticides were detected and quantified at low concentration, with 74 % of the pesticides having LOQs of 10 μg L(-1) or less. With the evaporation method, a global improvement of the LOQs was observed, with lower LOQs for 92 active substances and LOQs of 10 μg L(-1) or less for 82.8 % of the pesticides. Almost twice as many active substances had an LOQ of 1 μg L(-1) or less when the evaporation method was used. Some pesticides exhibited poor recovery or high variance caused by volatilization or degradation during the evaporation step. This behavior was evidenced by the case of thiophanate-methyl, which is degraded to carbendazim. PMID:24366405

  18. Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction

    DOEpatents

    Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

    1975-11-18

    An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

  19. Simple gas chromatographic method for furfural analysis.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Elvira M S M; Lopes, João F

    2009-04-01

    A new, simple, gas chromatographic method was developed for the direct analysis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), 2-furfural (2-F) and 5-methylfurfural (5-MF) in liquid and water soluble foods, using direct immersion SPME coupled to GC-FID and/or GC-TOF-MS. The fiber (DVB/CAR/PDMS) conditions were optimized: pH effect, temperature, adsorption and desorption times. The method is simple and accurate (RSD<8%), showed good recoveries (77-107%) and good limits of detection (GC-FID: 1.37 microgL(-1) for 2-F, 8.96 microgL(-1) for 5-MF, 6.52 microgL(-1) for 5-HMF; GC-TOF-MS: 0.3, 1.2 and 0.9 ngmL(-1) for 2-F, 5-MF and 5-HMF, respectively). It was applied to different commercial food matrices: honey, white, demerara, brown and yellow table sugars, and white and red balsamic vinegars. This one-step, sensitive and direct method for the analysis of furfurals will contribute to characterise and quantify their presence in the human diet. PMID:18976770

  20. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    DOEpatents

    Bechtel, Thomas F.; Parsons, Jr., Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  1. Method of testing a cold gas for the presence of a hazardous gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kutta, H.W.; Morrison, O.C.

    1988-12-20

    This patent describes a method for testing a gas at a temperature below about -10 degrees F for the presence of a hazardous gas. The method consists of: (a) passing a quantity of the gas through a tubing positioned in a garment and near the inner surface of the garment so that body heat of a wearer of the garment is transferred to the gas flowing through the tubing to heat the quantity of gas with the body heat of the wearer of the garment; and (b) analyzing a portion of the heated quantity of gas for the presence of the hazardous gas.

  2. System and method for detecting gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Oscar Ken; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Miller, Jacob Andrew

    2010-03-16

    A system to detect a presence of a specific gas in a mixture of gaseous byproducts comprising moisture vapor is disclosed. The system includes an electrochemical cell, a transport to deliver the mixture of gaseous byproducts from the electrochemical cell, a gas sensor in fluid communication with the transport, the sensor responsive to a presence of the specific gas to generate a signal corresponding to a concentration of the specific gas, and a membrane to prevent transmission of liquid moisture, the membrane disposed between the transport and the gas sensor.

  3. Method for mapping a natural gas leak

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Luong, Amy Khai; Kulp, Thomas J.; Devdas, Sanjay

    2009-02-03

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formatted into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimposed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  4. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Laug, Matthew T.

    1996-01-01

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

  5. Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1996-12-17

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

  6. Method and apparatus for preventing overspeed in a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Walker, William E.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for preventing overspeed in a gas turbine in response to the rapid loss of applied load is disclosed. The method involves diverting gas from the inlet of the turbine, bypassing the same around the turbine and thereafter injecting the diverted gas at the turbine exit in a direction toward or opposing the flow of gas through the turbine. The injected gas is mixed with the gas exiting the turbine to thereby minimize the thermal shock upon equipment downstream of the turbine exit.

  7. Solutal Marangoni instability in a binary liquid layer evaporating into air: the importance of transients in the gas for highly unstable cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, Hatim; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Dauby, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    This study considers an evaporating horizontal binary-liquid layer (aqueous solution of ethanol; mass fraction 0.1) in contact with air with an imposed transfer distance. Fully transient and horizontally homogeneous solutions for the reference state are first calculated. Then, the linear stability of these solutions is studied using the frozen-time approach. Solutal and thermal Rayleigh-Bénard-Marangoni instabilities are taken into account together with the Soret effect, although the solutal Marangoni mechanism appeared to be the most important one. Considering several gas-to-liquid thickness ratios (H) , we calculate the critical times for the instability onset in a liquid layer of a given thickness. We also uncover the minimum liquid thicknesses under which no instability can ever occur. We subsequently observe that two distinctly different types of minimum thicknesses exist depending on H, examining each one of them. Then a closed-form analysis of the instability at small times has been developed. Finally, it has also been observed that, regardless of the gas-to-liquid thickness ratio, an asymptotic value of the critical time exists as the liquid layer increases, this critical time being approximately 1 μs.

  8. Gas stream cleaning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kunchal, S. Kumar; Erck, Louis J.; Harris, Harry A.

    1979-04-13

    An oil mist and solid particle laden gas from an oil shale retorting operation is initially treated with a temperature controlled oil spray and then by a coalescer to reduce the quantity of oil mist and remove most of the solid particle content of the gas stream and then finally treated by an electrostatic precipitator to essentially remove the oil mist remaining in the gas.

  9. Partial solubility parameters of lactose, mannitol and saccharose using the modified extended Hansen method and evaporation light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Peña, M A; Daali, Y; Barra, J; Bustamante, P

    2000-02-01

    The modified extended Hansen method was tested for the first time to determine partial solubility parameters of non-polymeric pharmaceutical excipients. The method was formerly tested with drug molecules, and is based upon a regression analysis of the logarithm of the mole fraction solubility of the solute against the partial solubility parameters of a series of solvents of different chemical classes. Two monosaccharides and one disaccharide (lactose monohydrate, saccharose and mannitol) were chosen. The solubility of these compounds was determined in a series of solvents ranging from nonpolar to polar and covering a wide range of the solubility parameter scale. Sugars do not absorb at the UV-vis region, and the saturated solutions were assayed with a recent chromatographic technique coupled to an evaporative light scattering detector. This technique was suitable to determine the concentration dissolved in most solvents. The modified extended Hansen method provided better results than the original approach. The best model was the four parameter equation, which includes the dispersion delta d, dipolar delta p, acidic delta a and basic delta b partial solubility parameters. The partial solubility parameters obtained, expressed as MPa1/2, were delta d = 17.6, delta p = 28.7, delta h = 19, delta a = 14.5, delta b = 12.4, delta T = 32.8 for lactose, delta d = 16.2, delta p = 24.5, delta h = 14.6, delta a = 8.7, delta b = 12.2, delta T = 32.8 for mannitol and delta d = 17.1, delta p = 18.5, delta h = 13, delta a = 11.3, delta b = 7.6, delta T = 28.4 for saccharose. The high total solubility parameters delta T obtained agree with the polar nature of the sugars. The dispersion parameters delta d are quite similar for the three sugars indicating that the polar delta p and hydrogen bonding parameters (delta h, delta a, delta b) are responsible for the variation in the total solubility parameters delta T obtained, as also found for drugs. The results suggest that the method

  10. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A. H.; Wu, Shi T.; Nerney, S.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of slow plasma heating near the tops of streamers where the plasma is only weakly contained by the magnetic field. The form it takes is the slow opening of field lines at the top of the streamer and transient formation of new solar wind. It was discovered in polytropic model calculations, where due to the absence of other energy loss mechanisms in magnetostatic streamers, its ultimate endpoint is the complete evaporation of the streamer. This takes, for plausible heating rates, weeks to months in these models. Of course streamers do not behave this way, for more than one reason. One is that there are losses due to thermal conduction to the base of the streamer and radiation from the transition region. Another is that streamer heating must have a characteristic time constant and depend on the ambient physical conditions. We use our global Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model with thermal conduction to examine a few examples of the effect of changing the heating scale height and of making ad hoc choices for how the heating depends on ambient conditions. At the same time, we apply and extend the analytic model of streamers, which showed that streamers will be unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than about 2xl0(exp 6) K. Slow solar wind is observed to come from streamers through transient releases. A scenario for this that is consistent with the above physical process is that heating increases the near-cusp temperature until field lines there are forced open. The subsequent evacuation of the flux tubes by the newly forming slow wind decreases the temperature and heating until the flux tubes are able to reclose. Then, over a longer time scale, heating begins to again refill the flux tubes with plasma and increase the temperature until the cycle repeats itself. The calculations we report here are first steps towards quantitative evaluation of this scenario.

  11. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine activation energies for the catalyst-assisted systems. PMID:22408484

  12. A method of determining combustion gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bon Tempi, P. J.

    1968-01-01

    Zirconium oxide coating enables the determination of hot gas flow patterns on liquid rocket injector face and baffle surfaces to indicate modifications that will increase performance and improve combustion stability. The coating withstands combustion temperatures and due to the coarse surface and coloring of the coating, shows the hot gas patterns.

  13. Olive mill wastewater evaporation management using PCA method Case study of natural degradation in stabilization ponds (Sfax, Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Jarboui, Raja; Sellami, Fatma; Azri, Chafai; Gharsallah, Néji; Ammar, Emna

    2010-04-15

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) evaporation ponds management was investigated in five serial evaporation open-air multiponds of 50 ha located in Sfax (Tunisia). Physico-chemical parameters and microbial flora evolution were considered. Empirical models describing the OMW characteristic changes with the operation time were established and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) described the correlation between physico-chemical and biological parameters. COD, BOD, total solids, polyphenols and electrical conductivity exhibited first-order models. Four groups exhibited high correlations. The first included temperature, density, COD, TSS, TS, BOD, VS, TOC, TKN, polyphenols and minerals. The second group was made up of yeasts and moulds. The third group was established with phenolic compounds, total sugars, fats, total phosphorous, NH(4)(+) and pH. The fourth group was constituted by exclusively aerobic bacteria. Bacterial-growth toxic effect was exhibited by high organic load, ash content and polyphenols, whereas moulds and yeasts were more adapted to OMW. During the storage, all the third group parameter values decreased and were inversely related to the others. In the last pond, COD, BOD, TS and TSS rates were reduced by 40%, 50%, 50% and 75% respectively. The evaporation and the biological activity were the main processes acting, predicting the OMW behavior during evaporation in air-open ponds. PMID:20036054

  14. Spark discharge method of liquid rare-gas purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokachalov, S. G.; Kirsanov, M. A.; Kruglov, A. A.; Obodovski, I. M.

    1993-03-01

    The spark disharge method of liquid rare-gas purification is describe. The method is sufficiently more simple than those widely used. Physical aspects of the method are discussed, and examples of its application are presented.

  15. A numerical method for integrating the kinetic equations of droplet spectra evolution by condensation/evaporation and by coalescence/breakup processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emukashvily, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    An extension of the method of moments is developed for the numerical integration of the kinetic equations of droplet spectra evolution by condensation/evaporation and by coalescence/breakup processes. The number density function n sub k (x,t) in each separate droplet packet between droplet mass grid points (x sub k, x sub k+1) is represented by an expansion in orthogonal polynomials with a given weighting function. In this way droplet number concentrations, liquid water contents and other moments in each droplet packet are conserved and the problem of solving the kinetic equations is replaced by one of solving a set of coupled differential equations for the number density function moments. The method is tested against analytic solutions of the corresponding kinetic equations. Numerical results are obtained for different coalescence/breakup and condensation/evaporation kernels and for different initial droplet spectra. Also droplet mass grid intervals, weighting functions, and time steps are varied.

  16. Rapid gas-liquid chromatographic method for determination of sulfathiazole in swine feed.

    PubMed

    Munns, R K; Roybal, J E

    1983-03-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) method for determining residues of sulfathiazole (STZ) in swine feed has been developed. Feed is extracted first with acetone and then with ammonia-acetone. STZ is isolated from other feed extractives on a Sephadex LH-20 column with methanol-toluene. The sulfa residues are methylated with diazomethane, and the eluate is evaporated to dryness. A solution containing an internal standard of methyl sulfasymazine is used to dilute the sample before injection onto an OV-25 GLC column. The precision of the method was determined by assaying 10 sets of feed spiked at 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 ppm STZ. The mean recoveries and coefficients of variation were 90.2 (5.90), 89.5 (4.67), 87.4 (5.62), and 87.7% (4.29), respectively. The critical steps of the method, including the stability of STZ, were also determined. PMID:6853414

  17. Size exclusion chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection as a method for speciation analysis of polydimethylsiloxanes. II. Validation of the method for analysis of pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the size exclusion chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (SEC-ELSD) method in the identification and quantitative analysis of polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS). The process of validation for the method was conducted, and the values obtained were compared with the acceptance criteria. Particularly important was the conclusion that SEC-ELSD method showed a high specificity for PDMS. PDMS is an organosilicon polymer and for this reason, it does not exist as a concrete chemical species. Depending on the length of the chain, PDMS can be toxic for organism. So far, the SEC-ELSD method has not been applied for the control of pharmaceutical products containing such PDMS as dimeticone or simeticone. The safety of use and effectiveness of such pharmaceutical products relies on the control of their quality. Therefore, the analytical methods and procedures that meet acceptance criteria for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the PDMS should be used. In the case of the analysis of pharmaceutical products, the acceptance criteria are established and recommended by, for example, the Pharmacopoeias, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The progress of knowledge, however, requires the development of new analytical tools which are able to solve incoming problems. In the case of pharmaceutical formulations containing PDMS, which are used not only by adults but also by children, it is necessary to use analytical methods which are characterized by a high specificity. PMID:21840148

  18. DWPF RECYCLE EVAPORATOR FLOWSHEET EVALUATION (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-30

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the high level waste slurries stored at the Savannah River Site into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. The vitrification process results in the generation of approximately five gallons of dilute recycle streams for each gallon of waste slurry vitrified. This dilute recycle stream is currently transferred to the H-area Tank Farm and amounts to approximately 1,400,000 gallons of effluent per year. Process changes to incorporate salt waste could increase the amount of effluent to approximately 2,900,000 gallons per year. The recycle consists of two major streams and four smaller streams. The first major recycle stream is condensate from the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), and is collected in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT). The second major recycle stream is the melter offgas which is collected in the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT). The four smaller streams are the sample flushes, sump flushes, decon solution, and High Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME) dissolution solution. These streams are collected in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) or the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). All recycle streams are currently combined in the RCT and treated with sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide prior to transfer to the tank farm. Tank Farm space limitations and previous outages in the 2H Evaporator system due to deposition of sodium alumino-silicates have led to evaluation of alternative methods of dealing with the DWPF recycle. One option identified for processing the recycle was a dedicated evaporator to concentrate the recycle stream to allow the solids to be recycled to the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the condensate from this evaporation process to be sent and treated in the Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). In order to meet process objectives, the recycle stream must be concentrated to 1/30th of the feed volume during the evaporation process. The concentrated stream

  19. Measurement of Leaf Hydraulic Conductance and Stomatal Conductance and Their Responses to Irradiance and Dehydration Using the Evaporative Flux Method (EFM)

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Lawren; Scoffoni, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Water is a key resource, and the plant water transport system sets limits on maximum growth and drought tolerance. When plants open their stomata to achieve a high stomatal conductance (gs) to capture CO2 for photosynthesis, water is lost by transpiration1,2. Water evaporating from the airspaces is replaced from cell walls, in turn drawing water from the xylem of leaf veins, in turn drawing from xylem in the stems and roots. As water is pulled through the system, it experiences hydraulic resistance, creating tension throughout the system and a low leaf water potential (Ψleaf). The leaf itself is a critical bottleneck in the whole plant system, accounting for on average 30% of the plant hydraulic resistance3. Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf = 1/ leaf hydraulic resistance) is the ratio of the water flow rate to the water potential gradient across the leaf, and summarizes the behavior of a complex system: water moves through the petiole and through several orders of veins, exits into the bundle sheath and passes through or around mesophyll cells before evaporating into the airspace and being transpired from the stomata. Kleaf is of strong interest as an important physiological trait to compare species, quantifying the effectiveness of the leaf structure and physiology for water transport, and a key variable to investigate for its relationship to variation in structure (e.g., in leaf venation architecture) and its impacts on photosynthetic gas exchange. Further, Kleaf responds strongly to the internal and external leaf environment3. Kleaf can increase dramatically with irradiance apparently due to changes in the expression and activation of aquaporins, the proteins involved in water transport through membranes4, and Kleaf declines strongly during drought, due to cavitation and/or collapse of xylem conduits, and/or loss of permeability in the extra-xylem tissues due to mesophyll and bundle sheath cell shrinkage or aquaporin deactivation5-10. Because Kleaf can

  20. SEWAGE DISPOSAL BY EVAPORATION-TRANSPIRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the methods for on-site disposal of wastewater from individual homes is by evaporation. Two types of evaporative disposal systems have been investigated in this study; evapo-transpiration (ET) beds and mechanical evaporation units. Twenty nine test lysimeters of 0.22 cubic...

  1. Effect of gas flow swirling on coating deposition by the cold gas-dynamic spray method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, S. P.; Kiselev, V. P.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of gas flow swirling on the process of coating deposition onto a target by the cold gas-dynamic spray method is studied experimentally and numerically. Flow swirling is found to change the gas flow field and to reduce the gas flow rate under typical conditions of cold gas-dynamic spray. In a non-swirled flow, the shape of the deposited spot is similar to a sharp cone. In contrast, the deposited spot in a swirled flow is shaped as a crater without particles at the center of this crater. It is found that this effect is caused by centrifugal forces acting on particles in a swirled gas flow.

  2. Thickness and annealing effects on thermally evaporated InZnO thin films for gas sensors and blue, green and yellow emissive optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugumaran, Sathish; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Bellan, Chandar Shekar; Sivaraj, Manoj

    2016-08-01

    Indium zinc oxide (InZnO) thin films with thicknesses of 100 nm and 200 nm were deposited on glass plate by thermal evaporation technique. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed a strong metal-oxide bond. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed amorphous nature for as-deposited film whereas polycrystalline structure for annealed films. Scanning electron microscope images showed a uniform distribution of spherical shape grains. Grain size was found to be higher for 200 nm film than 100 nm film. The presence of elements (In, Zn and O) was confirmed from energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Photoluminescence study of 200 nm film showed a blue, blue-green and blue-yellow emission whereas 100 nm film showed a broad green and green-yellow emissions. Both 100 nm and 200 nm films showed good oxygen sensitivity from room temperature to 400 °C. The observed optical and sensor results indicated that the prepared InZnO films are highly potential for room temperature gas sensor and blue, green and yellow emissive opto-electronic devices.

  3. Growth of (CH 3) 2NH 2CuCl 3 single crystals using evaporation method with different temperatures and solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. M.; Tao, W.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Li, Q. J.; Ke, W. P.; Wang, X. M.; Liu, X. G.; Fan, C.; Sun, X. F.

    2010-10-01

    The bulk single crystals of low-dimensional magnet (CH 3) 2NH 2CuCl 3 (DMACuCl 3 or MCCL) are grown by a slow evaporation method with different kinds of solvents, different degrees of super-saturation of solution and different temperatures of solution, respectively. Among three kinds of solvent, methanol, alcohol and water, alcohol is found to be the best one for growing MCCL crystals because of its structural similarity to the raw materials and suitable evaporation rate. The best growth temperature is in the vicinity of 35 °C. The problem of the crystals deliquescing in air has been solved through recrystallization process. The crystals are characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, specific heat and magnetic susceptibility.

  4. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  5. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  6. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  7. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  8. Energy requirements for methods improving gas detection by modulating physical properties of resistive gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawka, M.; Kotarski, M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important disadvantage of resistive gas sensors is their limited gas selectivity. Therefore, various methods modulating their physical properties are used to improve gas detection. These methods are usually limited to temperature modulation or UV light irradiation for the layers exhibiting photocatalytic effect. These methods cause increased energy consumption. In our study we consider how much energy has to be supplied to utilize such methods and what kind of additional information can be gathered. We present experimental results of selected resistive gas sensors, including commercial and prototype constructions, and practical solutions of modulating their physical properties.

  9. Rapid gas-liquid chromatographic method for determination of sulfamethazine in swine feed.

    PubMed

    Munns, R K; Roybal, J E

    1982-09-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic method is described for the quantitative determination of trace amounts of sulfamethazine in swine feed. Sulfamethazine is extracted in ammoniated acetone and isolated from other extractants on a Sephadex LH-20 column. The eluate is methylated with diazomethane and evaporated to dryness. The residue is dissolved in a solvent containing an internal standard of methyl sulfasymazine before being injected onto an OV-25 GLC column. An estimation of precision was established by assaying 10 sets of swine feed fortified with 0.5, 1,2, and 5 ppm SMZ. Mean recoveries were 96.0, 94.3, 93.5, and 94.0%, respectively, with an average coefficient of variation of 3.07%. The critical steps and ruggedness of the method were also determined. PMID:7130074

  10. Method and apparatus for pressurizing a liquefied gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Dennis N.

    2005-07-26

    Apparatus providing at least one thermoelectric device for pressurizing a liquefied gas container and methods employing same are disclosed. A thermoelectric device including a heating surface and a cooling surface is used for pressurizing a container by vaporizing liquefied gas within the container by transferring heat energy from a portion of the liquefied gas in contact with the cooling surface to another portion of the liquefied gas in contact with the heating surface of the thermoelectric device to convert some of the liquefied gas to a vapor state. Liquefied gas vapor and/or liquid phase may be supplied by disclosed apparatus and methods. The apparatus may also be used as a vapor pump or a liquid pump, or fluid pump. Methods of operation are also disclosed.