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Sample records for gas holdup bubble

  1. Gas holdup in cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobing; Zhu, Wei; Liu, Jiongtian; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Hongxiang; Deng, Xiaowei

    2016-04-01

    The present work has been carried out to investigate the effect of process variables on gas holdup and develop an empirical equation and a neural network model for online process control of the gas holdup based on the operating variables. In this study, the effect of process variables (nozzle diameter, circulation pressure, aeration rate, and frother dosage) on gas holdup in a cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column of an air/oily wastewater system was investigated. Gas holdup was estimated using a pressure difference method and an empirical equation was proposed to predict gas holdup. A general regression neural network (GRNN) model was also introduced to predict gas holdup for the cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column. The predictions from the empirical equation and the GRNN are in good agreement with the experiment data for gas holdup, while the GRNN provides higher accuracy and stability compared with that of the empirical equation. PMID:26293176

  2. Influences of suspended fine particles on gas holdup and mass transfer characteristics in a slurry bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    Sada, E.; Kumazawa, H.; Lee, C.H.

    1986-05-01

    In this work, slurries with suspended fine particles (whose size is smaller than 10 ..mu..m) of lower than 1 wt. % were used to provide an insight into the solid-bubble interaction in a bubble column. The liquid property and the gas sparging system as well as the particle size were varied; the effects of these variables on the gas holdup and the volumetric liquid-side mass transfer coefficient were determined experimentally and are here discussed quantitatively.

  3. Gas holdup and solids dispersion in a three-phase slurry bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Patel, S.A.; Daly, J.G. )

    1990-11-01

    Studies with three-phase systems in bubble columns have shown that the effect of solids on gas holdup depends on a variety of factors. Important among these are: liquid properties and particle properties such as density, size and concentration in the slurry, and wettability. Most of these studies have been made with cold flow systems; and the data at high temperatures and pressures, i.e., with systems of potential industrial importance, are rare. The objective of this paper is to obtain hydrodynamic data at elevated temperatures using a three-phase system of importance to FTS. In particular, the effects of solids type, size and concentration on gas holdup and axial solids dispersion were investigated. Two types of solids used, iron oxide and silica, simulate typical catalysts and supports, respectively, employed in FTS. A wider range of gas velocities (up to 0.12 m/s) than those used by Deckwer et al, ({lt}0.04 m/s) was employed in this study. Additionally, data were obtained from experiments conducted with slurry circulation (continuous mode of operation), whereas all the previous studies with molten waxes were conducted in the batch mode of operation (without liquid flow).

  4. Influence of electrolyte concentration on holdup, flow regime transition and local flow properties in a large scale bubble column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besagni, Giorgio; Inzoli, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the influence of the electrolyte concentration on holdup, flow regime transition and local flow properties in a large scale bubble column, with air and water as working fluids. The column is 0.24 m inner diameter, 5.3 m height and the air is introduced by a spider sparger up to a superficial gas velocity of 0.2 m/s. The influence of five NaCl concentrations are investigated by using gas holdup and optical probe measurements. The gas holdup measurements are used for analysing the flow regime transition between the homogeneous and the transition regime and the optical probe is used for studying the local flow characteristics at different radial positions. The presence of NaCl - up to a critical concentration - increases the gas holdup. The increase in the gas holdup is due to the inhibition of the coalescence between the bubbles and, thus, the extension of the homogeneous regime. The results are in agreement with the previous literature on smaller bubble columns.

  5. Bubble and bubble wake characteristics in a gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Kreischer, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    A light transmittance technique involving a dual optical fiber probe was used to measure the local solids holdup in a three-dimensional gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed. The bubble could be clearly identified in the same signal, thus permitting the simultaneous determination of the local solids holdup profile in the wake of a single bubble and the rise velocity and chord length of the bubble. The solids holdup behavior was studied in the wake of single bubbles rising in a liquid-solid fluidized bed for different liquid velocities, particle sizes, and bubble sizes. The wake solids holdup was found to decrease with decreasing mean solids holdup in the bed, to be essentially independent of the bubble Reynolds number over the range investigated in this study (4000 < Re{sub b} < 8000), and to decrease with increasing particle size. In freely bubbling bed at low gas holdups ({epsilon}{sub g} < 0.03), both the solids holdup in the wake and the particulate phase solids holdup were measured. The light transmittance probe developed for the single bubble system was also used for these measurements. Axial variations in the particulate solids holdup indicated that the relative wake solids holdup increased with axial distance from the distributor. The best agreement between the single bubble measurements and the measurements in the freely bubbling bed occurred in the bubble formation region. And finally, a simple model of the bubble wake was developed based on equations available in the literature for a spherical vortex to predict both the wake size and the relative wake solids holdup. The predictions showed good agreement with the experimentally observed values.

  6. Solids holdup in the wake of a single bubble in a liquid-solid fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Kreischer, B.; Moritomi, H.; Fan, L.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    The wake structure behind large bubbles rising in a three-dimensional fluidized bed was investigated through measurements of the local solids holdup. A dual light transmittance probe allowed the measurement of the local solids concentration both in the bed and immediately above the bed surface. 160, 326, 460, and 760 micron glass beads were used as the fluidized solids and the large single bubbles were of spherical-cap shape. The light transmittance probe proved effective in measuring the solids concentration profile behind a single bubble for both 160 and 326 micron glass bead systems. The solids holdup profile was found to depend on position within the wake relative to the central axis and a stable wake size could be identified. The ratio of the average solids holdup in the wake to the mean solids holdup was found to decrease with a decrease in the mean solids holdup in the liquid-solid fluidized bed, but this decrease was less extensive for beds of smaller size particles. Comparison of the in-bed wake solids holdup data with visual observation of the single bubble immediately above the bed surface show good agreement. Observed stable wake size data is in reasonable agreement with published data for two-dimensional fluidized beds.

  7. Gas Generation and Hold-Up in Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Process Streams Containing Anti-Foam Agent (AFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Poloski, Adam P.; Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2007-06-29

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify defense wastes stored at the DOE Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries that exhibit non-Newtonian rheological behavior. Such streams can accumulate hazardous quantities of thermally and radiolytically generated flammable gases. Experiments were performed in a bubble column to measure gas hold-up under various conditions to better understand flammable gas behavior in WTP processes. The two non-Newtonian slurries tested were kaolin-bentonite clay and a chemical surrogate of pretreated high-level waste (HLW) from Hanford Tank AZ-101. The addition of solutes, whether a salt or anti-foaming agent (AFA) decrease the bubble coalescence rate leading to smaller bubbles, lower bubble rise velocity and higher gas holdup. Gas holdup decreased with increasing yield stress and consistency. The impact of AFA on gas holdup in kaolin-bentonite clay was less than in simulated HLW, presumably because the AFA adsorbed onto the clay particles, rendering it unavailable to retard coalescence.

  8. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    Gas holdup tests performed in a small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing system at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were reported in 2006. The tests were for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101 and featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A Antifoam agent. Results indicated that this antifoam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter intuitively, that the holdup increased as the simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). These results raised questions about how the AFA might affect gas holdup in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs). And whether the WTP air supply system being designed would have the capacity to handle a demand for increased airflow to operate the sparger-PJM mixing systems should the AFA increase retention of the radiochemically generated flammable gases in the waste by making the gas bubbles smaller and less mobile, or decrease the size of sparger bubbles making them mix less effectively for a given airflow rate. A new testing program was developed to assess the potential effects of adding the DOW Corning Q2-3183A AFA to WTP waste streams by first confirming the results of the work reported in 2006 by Stewart et al. and then determining if the AFA in fact causes such increased gas holdup in a prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system, or if the increased holdup is just a feature of the small-scale agitation system. Other elements of the new program include evaluating effects other variables could have on gas holdup in systems with AFA additions such as catalysis from trace noble metals in the waste, determining mass transfer coefficients for the AZ-101 waste simulant, and determining whether other AFA compositions such as Dow Corning 1520-US could also increase gas holdup in Hanford waste. This new testing program was split into two investigations, prototypic sparger-PJM tests and modeling being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and small-scale agitation tests and evaluations of effects waste and AFA ingredients have on gas retention and mass transfer being conducted at SRNL. Only work conducted at SRNL is reported here. Key results are: (1) The unexpected gas holdup behavior reported in 2006 for a small-scale agitation system is confirmed. The gas holdup data from small-scale and bench-scale impeller-type mixing systems reported herein show very different trends than the behavior exhibited by the prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system tested in the PNNL APEL facility. Results obtained from testing this 1/4-scale prototypic mixing system will be reported by PNNL. The reason for this difference in holdup behavior between the two different mixing systems is not known at this time. Consequently, data from the small mechanical agitation systems should not be extrapolated to prototypic plant conditions. (2) Bench-scale and small-scale tests conducted with Dow Corning 1520-US AFA show it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA will, however, require significantly higher dosage (concentration) to perform the same antifoam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA. The Gas holdup is similar whether or not noble metals are present in the AZ-101 simulant. (4) Mass transfer tests were performed in a large (0.76 m diameter) bubble column filled to 1.3, 3.4, and 7.4 m elevations with water and the AZ-101 waste simulant. Mass transfer coefficients for air bubbles emanating from a prototypic 0.051 m diameter sparger were obtained from the transient decay of dissolved oxygen concentration in the initially saturated fluids. Adding AFA to water reduces the mass transfer coefficient slightly. AFA addition reduces the mass transfer coefficient for AZ-101 simulant more than it does for water because the shear strength of the simulant allows for larger bubble sizes, and larger bubbles have smaller surface area for mass transfer than small bubbles for the same void volume.

  9. Performance of the gas bubble column in molten salt systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sada, E.; Katoh, S.; Nakanishi, A.; Yamanishi, T.; Yoshii, H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental data on the gas holdup and the mean bubble size in a bubble column with a single nozzle was obtained for gas-molten salt systems of a eutectic mixture of LiCl (58 mol %)-KCl (42 mol %) and molten NaNO/sub 3/. The liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient K /SUB L/ was evaluated from the specific surface area a and the volumetric coefficient K /SUB L/ a data for oxygen and carbon dioxide absorption into molten NaNO/sub 3/. The dimensionless correlations of the performance of bubble columns for aqueous solutions can be extended to the gas-molten salt systems.

  10. Gas bubble detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Burchfield, David E. (Inventor); Hagey, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A gas bubble detector having a modulated IR source focused through a bandpass filter onto a venturi, formed in a sample tube, to illuminate the venturi with modulated filtered IR to detect the presence of gas bubbles as small as 0.01 cm or about 0.004 in diameter in liquid flowing through the venturi. Means are provided to determine the size of any detected bubble and to provide an alarm in the absence of liquid in the sample tube.

  11. Bubble size and gas-liquid interfacial area measurements using molten paraffin waxes in bubble columns

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Patel, S.A.; Daly, J.G.; Raphael, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in 0.05 m ID and 0.23 m ID by 3 m tall bubble columns with different types of molten waxes as the liquid medium and nitrogen as the gas, under processing conditions typical or Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron catalysts (i.e. gas velocities up to 0.15 m s, and temperatures between 200 and 270/sup 0/C) to estimate gas liquid interfacial area from measured values of average gas hold-up and Sauter mean bubble diameter. The gas hold-up was estimated from visual observations of the expanded and static liquid heights, and the Sauter was estimated from bubble size measurements obtained by photography and dynamic gas disengagement. The paraffin wax (FT-300) used in the authors' studies is non-coalescing and has a tendency to foam. The amount of foam is greater for runs conducted in the order of increasing gas velocities, than in runs with decreasing velocities. Thus, two values of hold-up are possible and the start-up procedure determines which one will be attained. At higher gas velocities (> 0.05 m/s) the foam disappears and a transition to the slug flow, churn-turbulent regime takes place. Reactor waxes are coalescing in nature and do not produce foam. Despite similar hold-ups for the different waxes at higher gas velocities, the Sauters are significantly different and this is reflected in the specific gas-liquid interfacial areas, with larger values obtained with the paraffin wax compared to values with reactor waxes.

  12. PARAMETRIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-FOAM COMPOSITION, SIMULANT PROPERTIES AND NOBLE METALS ON THE GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE OF A NON-NEWTONIAN WASTE SLURRY SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Charles Crawford, C; Mark Fowley, M

    2008-08-07

    Gas holdup tests were performed in bench-scale and small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing systems at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101. These featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A anti-foam agent. Results indicated that this anti-foam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter-intuitively, that the holdup increased as the non-newtonian simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). Such results raised the potential of increased flammable gas retention in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs) during a Design Basis Event (DBE). Additional testing was performed to determine the effects of simulant properties, composition of alternate AFAs, and presence of trace noble metals. Key results are that: (1) Increased gas holdup resulting from addition of Q2-3183A is due to a decrease in surface tension that supports small bubbles which have low rise velocities. (2) Dow Corning 1520-US AFA shows it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA, however, requires significantly higher dosage for the same anti-foam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA.

  13. Gas bubble disease: introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fickeisen, D.H.; Schneider, M.J.; Wedemeyer, G.A.

    1980-11-01

    In 1970, gas bubble disease was identified as a serious problem affecting salmonids in the Columbia and Snake river systems. The source of supersaturation was entrainment of air into water spilling over hydroelectric dams. Regional research projects focusing on tolerance bioassays were immediately implemented. Since then, the scope of gas bubble disease research has broadened to include problems in other aquatic systems, with other species. Emphasis has shifted from defining tolerance limits in bioassay systems to exploring behavioral and physiological aspects. Various methods of degasifying supersaturated water have been developed.

  14. Heated Gas Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Fluid Physics is study of the motion of fluids and the effects of such motion. When a liquid is heated from the bottom to the boiling point in Earth's microgravity, small bubbles of heated gas form near the bottom of the container and are carried to the top of the liquid by gravity-driven convective flows. In the same setup in microgravity, the lack of convection and buoyancy allows the heated gas bubbles to grow larger and remain attached to the container's bottom for a significantly longer period.

  15. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, L.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Arm, S.T.; Guzman-Leong, C.E.; Jagoda, L.K.; Stewart, C.W.; Wells, B.E.; Yokuda, S.T.

    2008-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Previous testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was as much as 10 times higher than in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a 1/4-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas generation rates. Results from the 1/4-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, holdup in the chemical waste simulant with AFA was not so greatly increased compared to gas holdup in clay without AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions. (authors)

  16. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Mendoza, D.P.; Miller, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    Retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns regarding double-shell tanks (DSTs) containing waste slurries. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry that has settled at the bottom of the DST. However, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. In addition, the presence of retained gas bubbles is expected to affect the physical properties of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of these bubbles. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The objectives of this study are to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to gas bubble retention and release from sludge such as is in Tank 241-SY-101, understand how the bubbles affect the physical properties of the sludge, develop correlations of these physical properties to include in computer models, and collect experimental data on the physical properties of simulated sludges with bubbles. This report presents a theory and experimental observations of bubble retention in simulated sludge and gives correlations and new data on the effect of gas bubbles on sludge yield strength.

  17. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 8280

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Arm, Stuart T.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-06-03

    The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Prior testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was up to 10 times that in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a -scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas gen geration rates. Results from the -scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, gas holdup in clay without AFA is comparable to that in the chemical waste simulant with AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions.

  18. Study on bubble sizes in a down-flow liquid jet gas pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. L.; Xiang, Q. J.; Li, H.; Chen, S. X.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the liquid jet gas pump as an important gas-liquid contactor is investigated on bubble sizes. Its internal mixed effect is influenced by gas holdup, bubble size distribution and interfacial area. To improve the mixed effect, experiment investigations have been carried out in a modified down-flow liquid jet gas pump with special emphasis on gas distribution. The mixing tube and diffuser are made of transparent Perspex for visual observation. Bubble diameters in the diffuser have been measured by photographic and capillary method at different operating conditions. Under the same Reynolds number of orifice, about 80% of the bubble diameters range from 0.6 mm to 1.3 mm, which has no obvious effect on the gas-liquid flow rate ratio. The average bubble diameter increases by the decrease of Orifice Reynolds number at the same gas-liquid flow rate ratio (lower gas-liquid rate ratio), the maximal bubble size can reach 3 mm. With the decrease of gas-liquid flow rate ratio, gas gathers together in the wall and the stream appears non uniform, the sampling test shows that the bubble diameters have a small diminution. It is found experimentally that the bubble diameters are strongly dependent on Orifice Reynolds number and the bubble distribution is affected by gas-liquid flow rate ratio

  19. Gas-liquid distribution in a bubble column using industrial gamma-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mesquita, Carlos Henrique; de Sousa Carvalho, Diego Vergaas; Kirita, Rodrigo; Vasquez, Pablo Antonio S.; Hamada, Margarida Mizue

    2014-02-01

    A gas absorption column used as a simulator bubble column for industrial processes was evaluated, using the third-generation industrial computed tomography developed at the IPEN. Gamma ray tomography experiments were carried out, using the simulator column empty and filled with water plus gas bubbling. The tomographic measurements were taken at three positions relative to the point of generation of the bubbles: above 20 mm, 120 mm and 320 mm. The resulting images describe the liquid or gas phase holdup distributions for bubbles generated in a hole of ?=5 mm, located at 15 mm of the column wall. The developed third generation CT had a spatial resolution of 4.5 mm and a temporal resolution around 5 h/image. The trend of bubble dispersions, as they rise in the column, was shown.

  20. Shadow imaging in bubbly gas-liquid two-phase flow in porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altheimer, Marco; Hfeli, Richard; Wlchli, Carmen; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp

    2015-09-01

    Shadow imaging is used for the investigation of bubbly gas-liquid two-phase flow in a porous structure. The porous structure is made of Somos WaterShed XC 11122, a clear epoxy resin used in rapid prototyping. Optical access is provided by using an aqueous solution of sodium iodide and zinc iodide having the same refractive index as the structure material (). Nitrogen is injected into the continuous phase at volumetric transport fractions in the range of resulting in a hold-up of . The obtained images of overlapping bubble shadows are processed to measure the bubble dimensions. Therefore, a new processing sequence is developed to determine bubble dimensions from overlapping bubble shadows by ellipse fitting. The accuracy of the bubble detection and sizing routine is assessed processing synthetic images. It is shown that the developed technique is suitable for volumetric two-phase flow measurements. Important global quantities such as gas hold-up and total interfacial area can be measured with only one camera. Operation parameters for gas-liquid two-phase flows are determined to improve mass and heat transfer between the phases.

  1. Characterization of gas transfer and mixing in a bubble column equipped with a rubber membrane diffuser

    PubMed

    Poulsen; Iversen

    1998-06-20

    Gas transfer and mixing were characterized in a 32-L bubble column reactor equipped with a commercially available rubber membrane diffuser. The performance of the membrane diffuser indicates that the slits in the membrane are best described as holes with elastic lids, acting as valves cutting off bubbles from the gas stream. The membrane diffuser thus functions as a one-way valve preventing backflow of liquid. Our design of the bottom plate of the reactor enabled us to optimize the aeration by changing the tension of the membrane. We thereby achieved mass transfer coefficients higher than those previously reported in bubble columns. A strong dependence of mass transfer on gas holdup and bubble size was indicated by estimates based on these two variables. The microalga, Rhodomonas sp. , sensitive to chemical and physical stress, was maintained for 8 months in continuous culture with a productivity identical to cultures grown in stirred tank reactors. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099301

  2. Inferring bubble size distributions from resistance probe measurements in gas-liquid, gas-slurry and three phase systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.N.; Seiss, R.; Turton, R.

    1988-01-01

    Resistance probes measure the presence or absence of a conducting fluid at a point in multiphase flows. Although resistance probes are often used to determine local gas holdup in gas-liquid, gas-slurry and gas-liquid-solid flows, they are seldom used to find the bubble size distribution in the flow. This is due to the fact that the distribution of time intervals measured by the probe due to the passage of bubbles is not readily translated into a bubble size distribution. Even if a bubble rise velocity is known, the resulting distribution of bubble chord lengths cut by the probe has a lower mean and wider range than the size distribution. However, with enough data and a knowledge of the bubble shape it is possible to back transform to a size distribution. The current work deals with the case when the bubble shape is not a constant but changes with bubble size. Shape descriptors have been obtained from photographs of bubbles in water. Using these descriptors and probability density functions, a forward transform is developed to yield an expected chord length distribution for a given distribution of bubble sizes. The more important backward transform is accomplished numerically through a triangular matrix solution. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate the correctness of this approach and are also used to show that the back transform can be unstable if too few data or too many size divisions in the matrix are used. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  4. Holdup of the liquid slug in two phase intermittent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Barnea, D.; Brauner, N.

    1985-01-01

    A physical model for the prediction of gas holdup in liquid slugs in horizontal and vertical two phase pipe slug flow is presented. This model can also be used to yield the transitio between elongated bubbles and slug flow within the intermittent flow pattern. In addition a previously published model for predicting the stable slug length in vertical upward slug flow is extended here for the case of horizontal slug flow.

  5. A Method of Calculating the Second Dimension Hold-up Time for Comprehensive Two-dimensional Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Imhoi; Zhao, Yaping; Zhang, Jun; Kim, Seongho; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    A method of calculating the second dimension hold-up time for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic (GCGC) data was developed by incorporating the temperature information of the second dimension column into the calculation model. The model was developed by investigating the relationship between the coefficients in each of six literature reported nonlinear models and the relationship between each coefficient and the second dimension column temperature. The most robust nonlinear function was selected and further used to construct the new model for calculation of the second dimension retention time, in which the coefficients that have significant correlation with the column temperature are replaced with expressions of column temperature. An advantage of the proposed equation is that eight parameters could explain the second dimension hold-up time as well as retention time corresponding to n-alkanes and column temperature in the entire chromatographic region, including the chromatographic region not bounded by the retention times of n-alkanes. To optimize the experimental design for collecting the isothermal data of n-alkanes to create the second dimension hold-up time model, the column temperature difference and the number of isothermal experiments should be considered simultaneously. It was concluded that a total of 5 or 6 isothermal experiments with temperature difference of 40 or 50 C are enough to generate an accurate model. The test mean squared error (MSE) of those conditions ranges from 0.0428 to 0.0532 for calculation of the second dimension hold-up time for GCGC data. PMID:22964052

  6. [Gas bubble disease of fish].

    PubMed

    Bohl, M

    1997-05-01

    Gas bubble disease (GBD), a non-infectious, environmentally/physically induced trauma, is caused by an increase in the dissolved gas pressure above the ambient air pressure (supersaturation). Frequently the cause is an increased partial pressure of nitrogen-especially in spring-/groundwater. All fish species as well as amphibians and aquatic invertebrates are susceptible. Fish species and age groups are different sensitive; swim up fry is very endangered. The disease may occur in a chronic form at approximately 103% and in an acute form at above 110/115% total gas pressure (TGP). Fish, especially fry, with the chronic form die slowly without symptoms. The clinical symptoms of the acute form are disorientation, subcutaneous emphysema, embolism, exophthalmus mostly only on one side, swimming near the water surface with darkened skin, haemorrhages and high mortality. Losses increase with increased TGP. Generally, mortality in the chronic form increases by secondary infections of emphysematous tissue. As technical processes may be the cause for an increased total gas pressure, such as water pumping, heating water or mixing cold with warm water, in this context we could speak from a "technopathy". The following "therapeutic" measurement is recommended: avoid causal factors, transfer damaged fish in expanded water, turn off the cause, compensate the pressure in deeper water, if possible. PMID:9289892

  7. Validation of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography for quantitative gas holdup measurements in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, Andr; Schfer, Thomas; Neumann, Martin; Hampel, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the capability of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography (HireCT) for quantitative gas-liquid phase distribution measurements in commercially available industrial pumps is experimentally investigated. The object of interest thereby operates under two-phase flow conditions. HireCT System comprises a collimated 137Cs isotopic source, a radiation detector arc with a multi-channel signal processing unit, and a rotary unit enabling CT scans of objects with diameters of up to 700?mm. The accuracy of gas holdup measurements was validated on a sophisticated modular test mockup replicating defined gas-liquid distributions, which are expected in impeller chambers of industrial centrifugal pumps under two-phase operation. Stationary as well as rotation-synchronized CT scanning techniques have been analyzed, which are both used to obtain sharply resolved gas phase distributions in rotating structures as well as non-rotating zones. A measuring accuracy of better than 1% absolute for variously distributed static gas holdups in the rotating frame has been verified with the modular test mockup using HireCT.

  8. Plasma formation in underwater gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, B. S.; Foster, J. E.

    2014-02-01

    The generation of plasma in underwater gas bubbles offers the potential to produce large volume plasma in water while minimizing electrode erosion. Such attributes are desirable for the design of plasma-based water purification systems. In this work, gas bubbles of diameter 0.4-0.7 mm were trapped in the node of a 26.4 kHz underwater acoustic standing wave and pulsed with voltages in the range 10-14 kV. Plasma formation in trapped, isolated bubbles was observed to occur through two separate pathways: (1) plasma generated in the bubble through impact by a liquid streamer and (2) plasma generated in the bubble due solely to the applied electric field. The former case demonstrates the mechanism of so-called streamer hopping in which the discharge transitions from a water streamer to a gaseous surface streamer. Perturbations of the bubble's fluid boundary due to the streamer are also discussed.

  9. BUBBLE DYNAMICS AT GAS-EVOLVING ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Paul J.

    1980-12-01

    Nucleation of bubbles, their growth by diffusion of dissolved gas to the bubble surface and by coalescence, and their detachment from the electrode are all very fast phenomena; furthermore, electrolytically generated bubbles range in size from ten to a few hundred microns; therefore, magnification and high speed cinematography are required to observe bubbles and the phenomena of their growth on the electrode surface. Viewing the action from the front side (the surface on which the bubbles form) is complicated because the most important events occur close to the surface and are obscured by other bubbles passing between the camera and the electrode; therefore, oxygen was evolved on a transparent tin oxide "window" electrode and the events were viewed from the backside. The movies showed that coalescence of bubbles is very important for determining the size of bubbles and in the chain of transport processes; growth by diffusion and by coalescence proceeds in series and parallel; coalescing bubbles cause significant fluid motion close to the electrode; bubbles can leave and reattach; and bubbles evolve in a cycle of growth by diffusion and different modes of coalescence. An analytical solution for the primary potential and current distribution around a spherical bubble in contact with a plane electrode is presented. Zero at the contact point, the current density reaches only one percent of its undisturbed value at 30 percent of the radius from that point and goes through a shallow maximum two radii away. The solution obtained for spherical bubbles is shown to apply for the small bubbles of electrolytic processes. The incremental resistance in ohms caused by sparse arrays of bubbles is given by {Delta}R = 1.352 af/kS where f is the void fraction of gas in the bubble layer, a is the bubble layer thickness, k is the conductivity of gas free electrolyte, and S is the electrode area. A densely populated gas bubble layer on an electrode was modeled as a hexagonal array of dielectric spheres. Accurately machined lucite spheres were placed one at a time in one end of a hexagonal cell which simulated the unit cell of such an array. The resistance as a function of gas bubble layer packing density sharply increased as close packing was approached. Because the interaction of the fields around bubbles closely spaced in the direction perpendicular to the current dominates the added resistance, and because there is a tri-modal distribution of bubble sizes in a bubble layer, the Distribution Model of Meredith and Tobias (16), derived for three dimensional gas dispersions, approximately predicted the conductivity of a bubble layer at void fractions greater than 0.3. At moderate-to-high current densities, the bubble layer in a cell having an interelectrode gap of half a centimeter could increase the ohmic resistance by as much as 20 percent.

  10. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, A.; Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-01

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2γ/R, with γ the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  11. Gas Exchange by Bubbles in Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xian-chu; Liu, Chun-rong

    1998-03-01

    A simple and feasible model for the calculation of the gas transfer by bubble clouds is proposed in this article. N2, O2, and CO2 transfered by bubble clouds are obtained. At wind speed of 10 m/s, the calculated supersaturation of dissolved oxygen is 1.92-3.89% in agreement with the measurement.

  12. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A. Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2?/R, with ? the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1?nm and below.

  13. Gas bubble dynamics in soft materials.

    PubMed

    Solano-Altamirano, J M; Malcolm, John D; Goldman, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Epstein and Plesset's seminal work on the rate of gas bubble dissolution and growth in a simple liquid is generalized to render it applicable to a gas bubble embedded in a soft elastic solid. Both the underlying diffusion equation and the expression for the gas bubble pressure were modified to allow for the non-zero shear modulus of the medium. The extension of the diffusion equation results in a trivial shift (by an additive constant) in the value of the diffusion coefficient, and does not change the form of the rate equations. But the use of a generalized Young-Laplace equation for the bubble pressure resulted in significant differences on the dynamics of bubble dissolution and growth, relative to an inviscid liquid medium. Depending on whether the salient parameters (solute concentration, initial bubble radius, surface tension, and shear modulus) lead to bubble growth or dissolution, the effect of allowing for a non-zero shear modulus in the generalized Young-Laplace equation is to speed up the rate of bubble growth, or to reduce the rate of bubble dissolution, respectively. The relation to previous work on visco-elastic materials is discussed, as is the connection of this work to the problem of Decompression Sickness (specifically, "the bends"). Examples of tissues to which our expressions can be applied are provided. Also, a new phenomenon is predicted whereby, for some parameter values, a bubble can be metastable and persist for long times, or it may grow, when embedded in a homogeneous under-saturated soft elastic medium. PMID:25382720

  14. Hydrodynamic studies of Fischer-Tropsch bubble-column systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gupte, K.; Kuo, J.C.W.; Leib, T.M.; Smith, J.

    1984-08-01

    Scoping hydrodynamic studies of slurry Fischer-Tropsch bubble-column reactors were performed using small hot-flow non-reacting bubble-columns. Various liquid mediums were studied including actual reactor-waxes from our pilot plant runs. Results indicate that different waxes can produce vastly different gas holdups under similar conditions. The type of gas distributor has a major effect on holdup and bubble size in certain waxes and photographs are presented to illustrate this. The effect of pressure and gas type are negligible.

  15. Inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Xiao; Smith, Roger; Kenny, S. D.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe is examined using a combination of static energy minimisation, molecular dynamics and barrier searching methods with empirical potentials. Static energy minimisation techniques indicate that for small Ar and Xe bubbles, the preferred gas to vacancy ratio at 0 K is about 1:1 for Ar and varies between 0.5:1 and 0.9:1 for Xe. In contrast to interstitial He atoms and small He interstitial clusters, which are highly mobile in the lattice, Ar and Xe atoms prefer to occupy substitutional sites and any interstitials present in the lattice soon displace Fe atoms and become substitutional. If a pre-existing bubble is present then there is a capture radius around a bubble which extends up to the 6th neighbour position. Collision cascades can also enlarge an existing bubble by the capture of vacancies. Ar and Xe can diffuse through the lattice through vacancy driven mechanisms but with relatively high energy barriers of 1.8 and 2.0 eV respectively. This indicates that Ar and Xe bubbles are much harder to form than bubbles of He and that such gases produced in a nuclear reaction would more likely be dispersed at substitutional sites without the help of increased temperature or radiation-driven mechanisms.

  16. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    From observations of a stream of gas bubbles rising through a liquid, a two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. The bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they arise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  17. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  18. Spontaneous gas bubbling in microporous oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Karichev, Z R; Muler, A L; Vishnevsky, M E

    1999-10-01

    During operation of the microporous membrane oxygenators at some conditions, gas microbubbles penetrate into the blood. This effect, so-called spontaneous bubbling, takes place even when the blood pressure is higher than the gas pressure. This phenomenon was confirmed experimentally both in a model cell with hydrophobic microporous hollow fibers being used in the oxygenators and in in vitro tests on the actual microporous hollow fiber oxygenator. We proposed a mechanism of spontaneous gas bubbling into liquid that contains dissolved gases. Because of a partial pressure gradient, the dissolved gases and water vapors are transported from blood into the gas pore. This causes Stefans gas flow directed from the liquid-gas interface. Because of the high hydraulic resistance of the micropores, gas pressure at the meniscus increases up to gas bubbling. A mishandled priming of the oxygenator as well as the blood pressure pulsation caused by the roller pump operation contribute to spontaneous gas bubbling in the microporous oxygenators. The flow and pressure in the hydrophobic pores were calculated for various gases. PMID:10564288

  19. Heat transfer and bubble dynamics in bubble and slurry bubble columns with internals for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of clean alternative fuels and chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagumba, Moses Odongo O.

    Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2 obtained from coal, natural gas and biomass are increasingly becoming reliable sources of clean synthetic fuels and chemicals and via Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis process. Slurry bubble column reactor is the reactor of choice for the commercialization of the F-T synthesis. Even though the slurry bubble column reactors and contactors are simple in structures, their design, scale-up, operation, and performance prediction are still challenging and not well understood due to complex interaction of phases. All the studies of heat transfer have been performed without simultaneously investigating the bubble dynamics adjacent to the heat transfer surfaces, particularly in slurry with dense internals. This dissertation focuses on enhancing the understanding of the role of local and overall gas holdup, bubble passage frequency, bubble sizes and bubble velocity on the heat transfer characteristics by means of a hybrid measurement technique comprising an advanced four-point optical probe and a fast response heat transfer probe used simultaneously, in the presence and absence of dense internals. It also seeks to advance a mechanistic approach for estimating the needed parameters for predicting the heat transfer rate in two phase and three phase systems. The results obtained suggest that the smaller diameter internals gives higher heat transfer coefficient, higher local and overall gas holdup, bubble passage frequency and specific interfacial area but smaller bubble sizes and lower axial bubble velocities. The presence of dense internals enhances the heat transfer coefficient in both the large and smaller columns, while increased column diameter increases the heat transfer coefficient, axial bubble velocity, local and overall gas holdup, bubble chord lengths and specific interfacial area. Addition of solids (glass beads) leads to increased bubble chord lengths and increase in axial bubble velocity, but a decrease in local and overall gas holdup, a decrease in bubble passage frequency and decrease in the heat transfer coefficient. Further, a mechanistic assessment of the dependence of the heat transfer coefficient on the bubble dynamics shows that the contact time needed in the heat transfer coefficient estimation is indeed a function of the bubble passage frequency and local gas holdup. Hence the variation of the heat transfer coefficient with contact time is via bubble passage frequency and local gas phase holdup, which are related with sizes and velocity.

  20. Mathematical model of gas bubble evolution in a straight tube.

    PubMed

    Halpern, D; Jiang, Y; Himm, J F

    1999-10-01

    Deep sea divers suffer from decompression sickness (DCS) when their rate of ascent to the surface is too rapid. When the ambient pressure drops, inert gas bubbles may form in blood vessels and tissues. The evolution of a gas bubble in a rigid tube filled with slowly moving fluid, intended to simulate a bubble in a blood vessel, is studied by solving a coupled system of fluid-flow and gas transport equations. The governing equations for the fluid motion are solved using two techniques: an analytical method appropriate for small nondeformable spherical bubbles, and the boundary element method for deformable bubbles of arbitrary size, given an applied steady flow rate. A steady convection-diffusion equation is then solved numerically to determine the concentration of gas. The bubble volume, or equivalently the gas mass inside the bubble for a constant bubble pressure, is adjusted over time according to the mass flux at the bubble surface. Using a quasi-steady approximation, the evolution of a gas bubble in a tube is obtained. Results show that convection increases the gas pressure gradient at the bubble surface, hence increasing the rate of bubble evolution. Comparing with the result for a single gas bubble in an infinite tissue, the rate of evolution in a tube is approximately twice as fast. Surface tension is also shown to have a significant effect. These findings may have important implications for our understanding of the mechanisms of inert gas bubbles in the circulation underlying decompression sickness. PMID:10529918

  1. In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen B.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25 demolition project. The combined review of the HMS software algorithms and supporting field measurements lead to the conclusion that the majority of process gas pipe measurements are adequately corrected for source self-attenuation using HMS4. While there will be instances where the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup mass presents an infinitely thick deposit to the NaI-HMS4 system these situations are expected to be infrequent. This work confirms that the HMS4 system can quantify UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup, in its current configuration (deposition, enrichment, and geometry), below the DQO levels for the K-25 building decommissioning and demolition project. For an area measurement of process gas pipe in the K-25 building, if an infinitely thick UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposit is identified in the range of enrichment of {approx}4-40%, the holdup quantity exceeds the corresponding DQO established for the K-25 building demolition project.

  2. Enhancement of Oxygen Mass Transfer and Gas Holdup Using Palm Oil in Stirred Tank Bioreactors with Xanthan Solutions as Simulated Viscous Fermentation Broths

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sauid, Suhaila; Huey Ling, Tan; Veluri, Murthy V. P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) is an important parameter in bioreactors handling viscous fermentations such as xanthan gum production, as it affects the reactor performance and productivity. Published literatures showed that adding an organic phase such as hydrocarbons or vegetable oil could increase the kLa. The present study opted for palm oil as the organic phase as it is plentiful in Malaysia. Experiments were carried out to study the effect of viscosity, gas holdup, and kLa on the xanthan solution with different palm oil fractions by varying the agitation rate and aeration rate in a 5?L bench-top bioreactor fitted with twin Rushton turbines. Results showed that 10% (v/v) of palm oil raised the kLa of xanthan solution by 1.5 to 3 folds with the highest kLa value of 84.44?h?1. It was also found that palm oil increased the gas holdup and viscosity of the xanthan solution. The kLa values obtained as a function of power input, superficial gas velocity, and palm oil fraction were validated by two different empirical equations. Similarly, the gas holdup obtained as a function of power input and superficial gas velocity was validated by another empirical equation. All correlations were found to fit well with higher determination coefficients. PMID:24350269

  3. Enhancement of oxygen mass transfer and gas holdup using palm oil in stirred tank bioreactors with xanthan solutions as simulated viscous fermentation broths.

    PubMed

    Mohd Sauid, Suhaila; Krishnan, Jagannathan; Huey Ling, Tan; Veluri, Murthy V P S

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) is an important parameter in bioreactors handling viscous fermentations such as xanthan gum production, as it affects the reactor performance and productivity. Published literatures showed that adding an organic phase such as hydrocarbons or vegetable oil could increase the kLa. The present study opted for palm oil as the organic phase as it is plentiful in Malaysia. Experiments were carried out to study the effect of viscosity, gas holdup, and kLa on the xanthan solution with different palm oil fractions by varying the agitation rate and aeration rate in a 5 L bench-top bioreactor fitted with twin Rushton turbines. Results showed that 10% (v/v) of palm oil raised the kLa of xanthan solution by 1.5 to 3 folds with the highest kLa value of 84.44 h(-1). It was also found that palm oil increased the gas holdup and viscosity of the xanthan solution. The kLa values obtained as a function of power input, superficial gas velocity, and palm oil fraction were validated by two different empirical equations. Similarly, the gas holdup obtained as a function of power input and superficial gas velocity was validated by another empirical equation. All correlations were found to fit well with higher determination coefficients. PMID:24350269

  4. A bubble-based microfluidic gas sensor for gas chromatographs.

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Ashrafuzzaman; Kim, Hanseup

    2015-01-01

    We report a new proof-of-concept bubble-based gas sensor for a gas chromatography system, which utilizes the unique relationship between the diameters of the produced bubbles with the gas types and mixture ratios as a sensing element. The bubble-based gas sensor consists of gas and liquid channels as well as a nozzle to produce gas bubbles through a micro-structure. It utilizes custom-developed software and an optical camera to statistically analyze the diameters of the produced bubbles in flow. The fabricated gas sensor showed that five types of gases (CO2, He, H2, N2, and CH4) produced (1) unique volumes of 0.44, 0.74, 1.03, 1.28, and 1.42 nL (0%, 68%, 134%, 191%, and 223% higher than that of CO2) and (2) characteristic linear expansion coefficients (slope) of 1.38, 2.93, 3.45, 5.06, and 5.44 nL/(kPa (?L s(-1))(-1)). The gas sensor also demonstrated that (3) different gas mixture ratios of CO2?:?N2 (100?:?0, 80?:?20, 50?:?50, 20?:?80 and 0?:?100) generated characteristic bubble diameters of 48.95, 77.99, 71.00, 78.53 and 99.50 ?m, resulting in a linear coefficient of 10.26 ?m (?L s(-1))(-1). It (4) successfully identified an injection (0.01 ?L) of pentane (C5) into a continuous carrier gas stream of helium (He) by monitoring bubble diameters and creating a chromatogram and demonstrated (5) the output stability within only 5.60% variation in 67 tests over a month. PMID:25350655

  5. Suppression of cavitation inception by gas bubble injection: a numerical study focusing on bubble-bubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2007-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of cavitation and gas bubbles under negative pressure has been studied numerically to evaluate the effect of gas bubble injection into a liquid on the suppression of cavitation inception. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated by direct observation that cavitation occurs in liquid mercury when mechanical impacts are imposed, and this will cause cavitation damage in spallation neutron sources, in which liquid mercury is bombarded by a high-power proton beam. In the present paper, we describe numerical investigations of the dynamics of cavitation bubbles in liquid mercury using a multibubble model that takes into account the interaction of a cavitation bubble with preexisting gas bubbles through bubble-radiated pressure waves. The numerical results suggest that, if the mercury includes gas bubbles whose equilibrium radius is much larger than that of the cavitation bubble, the explosive expansion of the cavitation bubble (i.e., cavitation inception) is suppressed by the positive-pressure wave radiated by the injected bubbles, which decreases the magnitude of the negative pressure in the mercury. PMID:17995108

  6. Resistance due to gas bubbles in aluminum reduction cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooksey, Mark A.; Taylor, Mark P.; Chen, John J. J.

    2008-02-01

    The contribution of gas bubbles to electrical resistance in aluminum reduction cells is becoming increasingly important as smelters attempt to reduce energy consumption. A prime example is the widespread introduction of slotted anodes to encourage faster gas bubble release from under the anodes. However, quantification of the bubble resistance is difficult, which makes evaluation of process changes problematic. Studies of the effect of bubbles on electrical resistance in industrial cells, laboratory-scale electrolysis experiments, and physical models are reviewed in this paper.

  7. Hydrodynamic design of multiphase bubble-column reactors: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkilineni, S.

    1988-01-01

    An understanding of three phase flow hydrodynamics and flow pattern are necessary for the design and scaleup of bubble column reactors. Gas phase residence time is an important parameter that depends on superficial gas velocity and gas holdup in the bubble column. This work emphasized the study of three phase flow hydrodynamics including flow patterns and holdup of three phases and gas phase residence time. The effects of solid particle size, solid concentration, density of solids, viscosity of slurry, gas distributor and column diameter and height on hydrodynamics were studied. A key finding is that gas holdup increases with increasing solids concentration up to approximately three weight percent. As solid concentration increases further gas holdup steadily decreases. The residence time distribution using solids showed the same shape as in two phase flow for solid concentrations up to ten weight percent. Beyond ten weight percent, the shape of the residence time curve using a porous plate gas distributor is similar to that of sieve plate due to rapid coalescence of gas bubbles right at the gas distributor. Both linear and non linear regression analysis were performed on gas holdup and residence time as a function of superficial gas velocity and other variables in all three flow patterns. The outcome of this research will yield a better understanding of residence time, interfacial area, and the transition from one flow pattern to another in the operating region of interest to direct coal liquefaction reactors.

  8. EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS WITH LARGE GAS BUBBLES IN MERCURY TOWARDS ESTABLISHING A GAS LAYER TO MITIGATE CAVITATION DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Felde, David K; Ruggles, Arthur; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2006-01-01

    One of several options that shows promise for protecting solid surfaces from cavitation damage in liquid metal spallation targets, involves introducing an interstitial gas layer between the liquid metal and the containment vessel wall. Several approaches toward establishing such a protective gas layer are being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory including large bubble injection, and methods that involve stabilization of the layer by surface modifications to enhance gas hold-up on the wall or by inserting a porous media. It has previously been reported that using a gas layer configuration in a test target showed an order-of-magnitude decrease in damage for an in-beam experiment. Video images that were taken of the successful gas/mercury flow configuration have been analyzed and correlated. The results show that the success was obtained under conditions where only 60% of the solid wall was covered with gas. Such a result implies that this mitigation scheme may have much more potential. Additional experiments with gas injection into water are underway. Multi-component flow simulations are also being used to provide direction for these new experiments. These simulations have been used to size the gas layer and position multiple inlet nozzles.

  9. Standards for holdup measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Holdup measurement, needed for material balance, depend intensively on standards and on interpretation of the calibration procedure. More than other measurements, the calibration procedure using the standard becomes part of the standard. Standards practical for field use and calibration techniques have been developed. While accuracy in holdup measurements is comparatively poor, avoidance of bias is a necessary goal.

  10. Gas Bubble Formation in Stagnant and Flowing Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Abdou, Ashraf A; Riemer, Bernie; Felde, David K

    2007-01-01

    Investigations in the area of two-phase flow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility are progressing. It is expected that the target vessel lifetime could be extended by introducing gas into the liquid mercury target. As part of an effort to validate the two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, simulations and experiments of gas injection in stagnant and flowing mercury have been completed. The volume of fluid (VOF) method as implemented in ANSYS-CFX, was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection into stagnant mercury. Bubbles produced at the upwards-oriented vertical gas injector were measured with proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The comparison of the CFD results to the radiographic images shows good agreement for bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth, detachment, and gravitational rise. Although several gas flows were measured, this paper focuses on the case with a gas flow rate of 8 cc/min through the 100-micron-diameter injector needle. The acoustic waves emitted due to the detachment of the bubble and during subsequent bubble oscillations were recorded with a microphone, providing a precise measurement of the bubble sizes. As the mercury flow rate increases, the drag force causes earlier bubble detachment and therefore smaller bubbles.

  11. Gas separation and bubble behavior at a woven screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrath, Michael; Dreyer, Michael E.

    Gas-liquid two phase flows are widespread and in many applications the separation of both phases is necessary. Chemical reactors, water treatment devices or gas-free delivery of liquids like propellant are only some of them. We study the performance of a woven metal screen in respect to its phase separation behavior under static and dynamic conditions. Beside hydraulic screen resistance and static bubble point, our study also comprises the bubble detachment from the screen upon gas breakthrough. Since a woven screen is essentially an array of identical pores, analogies to bubble detachment from a needle can be established. While the bubble point poses an upper limit for pressurized gas at a wetted screen to preclude gas breakthrough, the necessary pressure for growing bubbles to detach from the screen pores a lower limit when breakthrough is already in progress. Based on that inside, the dynamic bubble point effects were constituted that relate to a trapped bubble at such a screen in liquid flow. A trapped is caused to break through the screen by the flow-induced pressure drop across it. Our model includes axially symmetric bubble shapes, degree of coverage of the screen and bubble pressurization due to hydraulic losses in the rest of the circuit. We have built an experiment that consists of a Dutch Twilled woven screen made of stainless steel in a vertical acrylic glass tube. The liquid is silicon oil SF0.65. The screen is suspended perpendicular to the liquid flow which is forced through it at variable flow rate. Controlled injection of air from a needle allows us to examine the ability of the screen to separate gas and liquid along the former mentioned effects. We present experimental data on static bubble point and detachment pressure for breakthrough at different gas supply rates that suggest a useful criterion for reliable static bubble point measurements. Results for the dynamic bubble point are presented that include i) screen pressure drop for different trapped bubble volumes, liquid flow rates and flow-induced compression, ii) typical breakthrough of a trapped bubble at rising liquid flow rate and iii) steady gas supply in steady liquid flow. It shows that our model can explain the experimental observations. One of the interesting findings for the dynamic bubble point is that hydraulic losses in the rest of the circuit will shift the breakthrough of gas to higher liquid flow rates.

  12. Bubble formation at a gas-evolving microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Fernndez, Damaris; Maurer, Paco; Martine, Milena; Coey, J M D; Mbius, Matthias E

    2014-11-01

    The electrolytic production of gas bubbles involves three steps--nucleation, growth, and detachment. Here the growth of hydrogen bubbles and their detachment from a platinum microelectrode of diameter 125 ?m are studied using high-speed photography and overpotential frequency spectrum (noise) analysis. The periodic release of large <800 ?m bubbles--gas oscillator behavior--was often observed, with a corresponding periodic oscillation of the overpotential which is reflected as a main peak and a series of harmonics in the power spectral density. The release frequency is inversely correlated with the bubble size and hydrogen production rate. When the coalescence of bubbles at the electrode surface is inhibited, either chemically with a surfactant or ethylene glycol or hydrodynamically by magnetically induced convection, swarms of small ?50 ?m bubbles are released in an aperiodic stream. The abrupt transition from periodic to aperiodic release occurs when the surface tension falls below 70 mN m(-1). Hydrogen bubble growth is also studied on a transparent platinum thin-film electrode, where the bubble coalescence can be observed directly. It leaves sessile droplets of electrolyte within the footprint of the growing bubble, showing that the growth involves scavenging smaller bubbles from solution due to hydrogen generated directly at the electrode. A possible role of nanobubbles in the lift-off process is discussed. PMID:24694174

  13. Shape Oscillations of Gas Bubbles With Newtonian Interfacial Rheological Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadim, Ali

    1996-01-01

    The oscillation frequency and damping rate for small-amplitude axisymmetric shape modes of a gas bubble in an ideal liquid are obtained, in the limit when the bubble interface possesses Newtonian interfacial rheology with constant surface shear and dilatational viscosities. Such results permit the latter surface properties to be measured by analyzing experimental data on frequency shift and damping rate of specific shape modes of suspended bubbles in the presence of surfactants.

  14. Determination and evaluation of gas holdup time with the quadratic equation model and comparison with nonlinear equation models for isothermal gas chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liejun; Chen, Maoxue; Chen, Yongli; Li, Qing X.

    2013-01-01

    Gas holdup time (tM) is a basic parameter in isothermal gas chromatography (GC). Determination and evaluation of tM and retention behaviors of n-alkanes under isothermal GC conditions have been extensively studied since the 1950s, but still remains unresolved. The difference equation (DE) model [J. Chromatogr. A 1260:215223] reveals retention behaviors of n-alkanes excluding tM, while the quadratic equation (QE) model [J. Chromatogr. A 1260:224231] including tM is suitable for applications. In the present study, tM values were calculated with the QE model, which is referred to as tMT, evaluated and compared with other three typical nonlinear models. The QE model gives an accurate estimation of tM in isothermal GC. The tMT values are highly accurate, stable, and easy to calculate and use. There is only one tMT value at each GC condition. The proper classification of tM values can clarify their disagreement and facilitate GC retention data standardization for which tMT values are promising reference tM values. PMID:23726077

  15. Measurement Of Gas Bubbles In Mercury Using Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Bingham, Philip R; Mariam, Fesseha G; Merrill, Frank E

    2007-01-01

    An experiment using proton radiography on a small mercury loop for testing gas bubble injection was conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in December 2006. Small gas bubble injection is one of the approaches under development to reduce cavitation damage in the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source mercury target vessel. Several hundred radiograph images were obtained as the test loop was operated over range of conditions that included two jet type bubble generators, two needle type bubble generators, various mercury flow speeds and gas injection rates, and use of helium, argon and xenon. This paper will describe the analysis of the radiograph images and present the obtained bubble measurement data.

  16. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Shah, R.R.; Davis, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer.

  17. Endothelial lesions associated with gas bubble disease in fish.

    PubMed

    Speare, D J

    1991-04-01

    Two groups of healthy chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were experimentally exposed to gas supersaturated groundwater. Gross lesions consistent with gas bubble disease (GBD) developed. Vascular lesions associated with intravascular gas bubbles were examined with light and scanning electron microscopy. Dermal blood vessels containing gas bubbles were severely dilated. Additionally, the gas bubbles were spatially associated with endothelial lesions ranging from cellular degeneration to exfoliation. The resulting regions of exposed subendothelial connective tissue were sparsely covered by small unidentified adherent cells and strands of fibrin. In the light of these findings, the similarities in vascular pathology between GBD in fish and decompression disease in man are discussed, particularly with respect to the initiation of haemostatic disorders in both conditions. PMID:2061432

  18. How Bubbly Mixtures Foam and Foam Control Using a Fluidized Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitian, Jose; Joseph, D. D.; Mata, Clara

    1997-11-01

    In hydrocracking and other foaming reactors, the foam rises to the top because it has a higher gas fraction than the bubbly mixture from which it comes. The high gas hold-up in foams is undesirable in chemical reactors. To study foams we built a cold slit bubble reactor which when used with aqueous anionic surfactants gives rise to foam. We discovered a critical condition for foaming; when the gas velocity exceeds a critical value which depends on the liquid velocity, a foam interface appears at the top of the reactor, with foam above and bubbly mixture below. The interface is very sharp and it moves down the reactor as the gas velocity is increased at a constant liquid velocity. The foam may be destroyed by increasing the liquid velocity. The reactor partitions into two phase, two phase flow with bubbly mixture below and foam above. The bubbly mixture is dispersed gas in water plus surfactant; the phase above is a foam through which large gas bubbles rise. Constant state theories and semiempirical correlations are presented. Foaming may be strongly suppressed by fluidizing hydrophilic particles in the bubbly mixture below the foam. The suppression is achieved by increasing the liquid hold-up by bed expansion; by increasing the wetted area of solid surface (walls and particles) and by decreasing the gas hold-up by increasing the effective density of the liquid-solid mixture. Even greater suppression of foaming can be achieved by fluidizing hydrophobic particles.

  19. Dust and Gas Emission from MIR Bubble N56

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, Kathryn E.; Watson, Christer; Candelaria, Tierra; Rodriguez, Paula; Low, Cassiemarie; Pickett, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) bubbles, identified in galactic surveys, have been extensively studied with the aim of understanding both their structure and influence on the surrounding interstellar medium. Studies of MIR bubbles aim to explore the relationship between bubble expansion and subsequent star formation. We present observations toward bubble N56 using the Herschel Space Telescope and Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The Herschel continuum observations indicate that N56 may be forming within a high mass-scale environment. The GBT NH3(1,1) and NH3(2,2) spectral line observations indicate evidence of line broadening and velocity changes coincident with the MIR-identified bubble rim. The temperature, density, and kinematics of the gas along the bubble rim are presented. We also discuss the relationship between the kinematics, physical properties, and star formation in N56.

  20. Dysbaric gas bubble disease in dogs. IV. Acclimatization to diving

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkle, T.D.; Morita, A.; Beckman, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    Acclimatization to diving was documented to occur in dogs. An increase in the number of repetitive dives which could be tolerated, as well as a decrease in the total number of pulmonary artery venous gas emboli resulting from individual dives were observed. The results from the experimental subject ''Jason'' indicate that acclimatization involves a reduction in the number of bubbles, and not an increase in the ability of the body to tolerate bubbles. Acclimatization is principally a physical rather than a physiological event. Bubbles forming in vivo must grow from nuclei of some sort. If these nuclei are stable, discrete structure that are destroyed when they grow into gross bubbles, then repetitive diving might markedly reduce by attrition the number of such bubble micronuclei. This would result in fewer bubbles being formed during subsequent dives, thus leading to the observed acclimatization effect. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Bubble coalescence dynamics and supersaturation in electrolytic gas evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, R.L. |

    1996-08-01

    The apparatus and procedures developed in this research permit the observation of electrolytic bubble coalescence, which heretofore has not been possible. The influence of bubble size, electrolyte viscosity, surface tension, gas type, and pH on bubble coalescence was examined. The Navier-Stokes equations with free surface boundary conditions were solved numerically for the full range of experimental variables that were examined. Based on this study, the following mechanism for bubble coalescence emerges: when two gas bubbles coalesce, the surface energy decreases as the curvature and surface area of the resultant bubble decrease, and the energy is imparted into the surrounding liquid. The initial motion is driven by the surface tension and slowed by the inertia and viscosity of the surrounding fluid. The initial velocity of the interface is approximately proportional to the square root of the surface tension and inversely proportional to the square root of the bubble radius. Fluid inertia sustains the oblate/prolate oscillations of the resultant bubble. The period of the oscillations varies with the bubble radius raised to the 3/2 power and inversely with the square root of the surface tension. Viscous resistance dampens the oscillations at a rate proportional to the viscosity and inversely proportional to the square of the bubble radius. The numerical simulations were consistent with most of the experimental results. The differences between the computed and measured saddle point decelerations and periods suggest that the surface tension in the experiments may have changed during each run. By adjusting the surface tension in the simulation, a good fit was obtained for the 150-{micro}m diameter bubbles. The simulations fit the experiments on larger bubbles with very little adjustment of surface tension. A more focused analysis should be done to elucidate the phenomena that occur in the receding liquid film immediately following rupture.

  2. Model of gas bubble breakup in a turbulent liquid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sosinovich, V.A.; Tsyganov, V.A.; Kolovandin, B.A.; Puris, B.I.

    1995-10-01

    A system of equations for evolution of the size spectrum of gas bubbles as a result of their breakup in an isotropic turbulent damped flow of an incompressible liquid is derived and solved numerically.

  3. Venous gas embolism - Time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Luehr, S.; Katz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles after embolization with known amounts of venous air, using an N2O challenge technique. Attention was also given to the length of time that the venous gas emboli remained as discrete bubbles in the lungs with 100 percent oxygen ventilation. The data indicate that venous gas emboli can remain in the pulmonary vasculature as discrete bubbles for periods lasting up to 43 + or - 10.8 min in dogs ventilated with oxygen and nitrogen. With 100 percent oxygen ventilation, these values are reduced significantly to 19 + or - 2.5 min.

  4. Interaction of a shock with elliptical gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgievskiy, P. Yu.; Levin, V. A.; Sutyrin, O. G.

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of a shock with spherical and elliptical bubbles of light or heavy gas is numerically studied using the axisymmetric Euler equations. A model with a single heat capacity ratio is implemented, where bubbles are modeled by areas of the same gas with lower or higher density. Details of the general shock refraction patterns—diverging and converging—are described. The formation and development of secondary, focusing shocks are discussed. A computational parameter study for different Atwood numbers , shock strengths , where is the Mach number, and bubble geometries is performed. A basic classification for the shock focusing (cumulation) regimes is suggested, with the division of the internal, external and transitional focusing regimes determined by the position of the shock focusing point relative to the bubble. It is shown that the focusing pattern is governed not only by the Atwood number but also heavily by the Mach number and bubble shape. The qualitative dependence of cumulative intensity on bubble geometry is determined. The theoretical possibility of realizing an extremely intense shock collapse with a relatively small variation in bubble shape is demonstrated for the heavy-bubble scenario.

  5. Production of Gas Bubbles in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguz, Hasan N.; Takagi, Shu; Misawa, Masaki

    1996-01-01

    In a wide variety of applications such as waste water treatment, biological reactors, gas-liquid reactors, blood oxygenation, purification of liquids, etc., it is necessary to produce small bubbles in liquids. Since gravity plays an essential role in currently available techniques, the adaptation of these applications to space requires the development of new tools. Under normal gravity, bubbles are typically generated by forcing gas through an orifice in a liquid. When a growing bubble becomes large enough, the buoyancy dominates the surface tension force causing it to detach from the orifice. In space, the process is quite different and the bubble may remain attached to the orifice indefinitely. The most practical approach to simulating gravity seems to be imposing an ambient flow to force bubbles out of the orifice. In this paper, we are interested in the effect of an imposed flow in 0 and 1 g. Specifically, we investigate the process of bubble formation subject to a parallel and a cross flow. In the case of parallel flow, we have a hypodermic needle in a tube from which bubbles can be produced. On the other hand, the cross flow condition is established by forcing bubbles through an orifice on a wall in a shear flow. The first series of experiments have been performed under normal gravity conditions and the working fluid was water. A high quality microgravity facility has been used for the second type and silicone oil is used as the host liquid.

  6. The role of gas in ultrasonically driven vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Stricker, Laura; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we study both experimentally and theoretically the dynamics of an ultrasound-driven vapor bubble of perfluoropentane (PFP) inside a droplet of the same liquid, immersed in a water medium superheated with respect to the PFP boiling point. We determine the temporal evolution of the bubble radius with ultra-high speed imaging at 20 million frames per second. In addition, we model the vapor-gas bubble dynamics, based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-type equation, including thermal and gas diffusion inside the liquid. We compare the numerical results with the experimental data and find good agreement. We underline the fundamental role of gas diffusion in order to prevent total recondensation of the bubble at collapse.

  7. Bernoulli excitation and detection of gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Telling, R H; Walton, A J

    2001-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for detecting and sizing bubbles in pipeline fluid flow. This is based on changing the pressure of the fluid, which in turn excites volume oscillations in the bubble. If the change in pressure is of sufficient brevity and magnitude, the transient distortion results in excitation of the bubble into radiative oscillation at its natural frequency. In a moving fluid, the Bernoulli equation predicts that such a pressure change can be achieved through a suitable gradient in the flow velocity. In the experiments described here, this is achieved by altering the cross-sectional area of the pipe in which the fluid is flowing. We demonstrate the efficacy of this excitation method and, by detecting the radiated sound using a nearby hydrophone, determine the size of individual bubbles from their characteristic oscillation frequency. PMID:11775661

  8. Decompression-induced bubble formation in salmonids: comparison to gas bubble disease.

    PubMed

    Beyer, D L; D'Aoust, B G; Smith, L S

    1976-12-01

    The relationship of gas bubble disease (GBD) in fish to decompression-induced bubble formation was investigated with salmonids. Acute bioassays were used to determine equilibration times for critical effects in fish decompressed from depths to 200 fsw. It was found that equilibration of critical tissues was complete in 60-90 min. Salmonids and air-breathers are sensitive to decompressions at similar levels of supersaturation if elimination of excess gas following decompression is unrestricted. However, if elimination is restricted, bubble formation and growth increase accordingly. Tests with mixtures of He-O2, Ar-O2, N2-O2 (80% inert gas: 20% O2) and pure oxygen demonstrated that gas solubility as well as supersaturation (delta P), pressure ratio (initial pressure: final pressure), and absolute pressure must be considered in setting tolerance limits for any decompression. Gases with higher solubility are more likely to produce bubbles upon decompression. Oxygen, however, does not follow this relationship until higher pressures are reached, probably owing to its function in metabolism and in binding with hemoglobin. Tissue responses observed in both GBD and decompressed fish involved similar pathological effects at acute exposures. The circulatory system was consistently affected by bubbles that occluded vessels and blocked flow through the heart. PMID:10897859

  9. Proton Radiography Experiment to Visualize Gas Bubbles in Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Felde, David K; Wendel, Mark W; Mariam, Fesseha G; Merrill, Frank E

    2007-01-01

    An experiment to visualize small gas bubbles injected into mercury flowing in a test loop using proton radiography was conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in December 2006. Radiograph images of bubbles were obtained through two mercury thicknesses: 22 mm and 6 mm. Two jet bubblers and two needle bubblers were operated individually over a range of mercury flow speeds (0 - 1 m/s) and gas injection rates (0.1 - 500 sccm). Helium was most commonly used but Argon and Xenon were injected for limited test conditions. The smallest discernable bubbles were about 0.24 mm in diameter. Resolution was limited by image contrast which was notably improved with 6 mm of mercury thickness. Analysis of the radiograph images from jet bubbler conditions provided data on bubble size distribution and total bubble void fraction. In a few cases radiographs captured a large fraction of the injected gas, but generally 20 to 90% of injected gas was not captured in the images. In all more than 400 radiographs were made during the experiment in addition to several movies. Sound recordings of needle bubbler operation were also made and used to quantify bubble formation rate and size; these results are compared to theoretical predictions. This paper describes the experiment goals, scope and equipment; key results are presented and discussed.

  10. Plasma formation inside deformed gas bubbles submerged in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, Bradley; Foster, John

    2012-10-01

    Plasma formation in liquids produces highly reactive products that may be desirable for a variety of applications, including water purification and waste processing. The direct ignition of plasma in these environments, however, is limited by the large breakdown strength of liquids, which imposes severe voltage and energy requirements on the design of practical devices. One way to address this issue is by first igniting plasma in gas bubbles injected into the water. These bubbles provide an environment with higher reduced electric field (E/N) that is more suitable for plasma formation. If the same bubbles can be excited into strong distortions of their shape and volume, then it is possible to further alter E/N, both by field enhancement at the bubble's highly distorted dielectric interface (via E) and by fluctuations in its internal gas pressure (via N). This principle is investigated by trapping a single bubble at the node of a 26.4 kHz underwater acoustic field and driving it into violent oscillations using an A.C electric field. A third high voltage needle is placed nearby and used to ignite plasma in the bubble at various points during its oscillation. The bubble response is captured using a high speed camera capable of up to 30,000 frames per second.

  11. Hydrodynamics of the three-phase slurry Fischer-Tropsch bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Daly, J.G.; Patel, S.A.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes results of a study on hydrodynamics of three-phase bubble columns for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Experiments were conducted in two stainless bubble columns of 0.05 m and 0.21 m in diameter and 3 m tall, at 265{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure using nitrogen gas and two types of liquid medium (hydrotreated reactor wax designated FT-300, and raw reactor wax from fixed bed rectors at SASOL). The effects of solids types (iron oxide and silica), concentration (0--30 wt %), size (0--5 {mu}m and 20--44 {mu}m), slurry (liquid) velocity (up to 0.02 m/s) on the gas holdup and axial solids concentration profiles, were investigated. Phase volume fractions were determined using conventional (differential pressure measurements together with determination of slurry concentration along the column) and novel (dual energy nuclear density gauge) experimental techniques. Bubble size distribution and the Sauter mean bubble diameter were obtained using the dynamic gas disengagement (DGD) method. Flow regime transitions in both columns were determined using statistical analysis of both pressure and density fluctuations. Correlations for prediction of gas holdups and axial solids dispersion coefficient have been developed from experimental data obtained in this study. Data needed for calculation of the gas-liquid interfacial area (average gas holdup and Sauter mean bubble diameter) have been presented and can be used to estimate the mass transfer rate in slurry bubble column reactors. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

  12. Gas bubble formation in the cytoplasm of a fermenting yeast

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Chantel W; Dithebe, Khumisho; Pohl, Carolina H; Swart, Hendrik C; Coetsee, Elizabeth; van Wyk, Pieter WJ; Swarts, Jannie C; Lodolo, Elizabeth J; Kock, Johan LF

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Current paradigms assume that gas bubbles cannot be formed within yeasts although these workhorses of the baking and brewing industries vigorously produce and release CO2 gas. We show that yeasts produce gas bubbles that fill a significant part of the cell. The missing link between intracellular CO2 production by glycolysis and eventual CO2 release from cells has therefore been resolved. Yeasts may serve as model to study CO2 behavior under pressurized conditions that may impact on fermentation biotechnology. PMID:23020660

  13. Experimental characterization of slurry bubble-column reactor hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shollenberger, K.A.; Torczynski, J.R.; Jackson, N.B.; O`Hern, T.J.

    1997-09-01

    Sandia`s program to develop, implement, and apply diagnostics for hydrodynamic characterization of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) at industrially relevant conditions is discussed. Gas liquid flow experiments are performed on an industrial scale. Gamma densitometry tomography (GDT) is applied to measure radial variations in gas holdup at one axial location. Differential pressure (DP) measurements are used to calculate volume averaged gas holdups along the axis of the vessel. The holdups obtained from DP show negligible axial variation for water but significant variations for oil, suggesting that the air water flow is fully developed (minimal flow variations in the axial direction) but that the air oil flow is still developing at the GDT measurement location. The GDT and DP gas holdup results are in good agreement for the air water flow but not for the air oil flow. Strong flow variations in the axial direction may be impacting the accuracy of one or both of these techniques. DP measurements are also acquired at high sampling frequencies (250 Hz) and are interpreted using statistical analyses to determine the physical mechanism producing each frequency component in the flow. This approach did not yield the information needed to determine the flow regime in these experiments. As a first step toward three phase material distribution measurements, electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and GDT are applied to a liquid solid flow to measure solids holdup. Good agreement is observed between both techniques and known values.

  14. Studies on pressure response of gas bubbles contributions of condensed droplets in bubbles generated by a uniform nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a tiny gas bubble under reduced pressure is investigated in its relation to cavitation. Equations of motion are formulated for gas mixtures inside the bubble and numerical calculations performed for several examples. The conclusions are as follows: (1) at the onset of bubble growth, the gas mixture inside it adiabatically expands and the temperature decreases. Condensed droplets appear inside the gas mixture due to a uniform nucleation and the temperature recovers, thus the motion of the bubble is apparently isothermal; (2) the evaporation and condensation coefficient largely affects bubble motions (maximum radius, period and rate of attenuation of the bubble oscillation) including the uniform contraction; (3) the oscillation period of the bubble is longer as the equilibrium bubble radius is larger when the surrounding pressure decreases stepwise. In this circumstance the temperature inside the bubble is kept constant due to condensation evaporation phenomena and is nearly isothermal; and (4) when the surrounding pressure decreases in a stepwise fashion, the critical pressure bubble radius relation becomes closer to that for the isothermal process if the bubble radius is larger than 8 microns.

  15. Transient Flow Dynamics in Optical Micro Well Involving Gas Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.; Chen, C. P.; Jenkins, A.; Spearing, S.; Monaco, L. A.; Steele, A.; Flores, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development (LOCAD) team at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center is utilizing Lab-On-a-Chip to support technology development specifically for Space Exploration. In this paper, we investigate the transient two-phase flow patterns in an optic well configuration with an entrapped bubble through numerical simulation. Specifically, the filling processes of a liquid inside an expanded chamber that has bubbles entrapped. Due to the back flow created by channel expansion, the entrapped bubbles tend to stay stationary at the immediate downstream of the expansion. Due to the huge difference between the gas and liquid densities, mass conservation issues associated with numerical diffusion need to be specially addressed. The results are presented in terms of the movement of the bubble through the optic well. Bubble removal strategies are developed that involve only pressure gradients across the optic well. Results show that for the bubble to be moved through the well, pressure pulsations must be utilized in order to create pressure gradients across the bubble itself.

  16. Effect of dense heat exchanging internals on the hydrodynamics of bubble column reactors using non-invasive measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mesfer, Mohammed Khloofh

    Given their efficiency and capital cost reduction, bubble/slurry bubble column reactors are the reactors of choice for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, offering clean alternative fuels and chemicals. FT synthesis is an exothermic process that requires many heat exchanging tubes in order to remove heat efficiently and maintain the desired temperature and isothermal operating condition. The impact of the heat exchanging tubes (internals) on the hydrodynamics is not fully understood. Reliably designing and scaling up bubble column reactors requires proper understanding of hydrodynamics, as well as heat and mass transfer parameters. The main objective of this work is to advance the understanding of the effect of internals (25% covered cross-sectional area to meet FT needs) on hydrodynamics (gas holdup distribution, 3D liquid velocity, Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, eddy diffusivity, etc.) in bubble columns. Single-source gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT) were used for the first time to study the effect of dense internals and gas velocity on the phase holdup distribution and radial profiles, liquid velocity field and turbulent parameter profiles. The main findings obtained for the first time in this study can be summarized as follows: The presence of internals at a given superficial gas velocity causes: An increase in gas holdup and the axial centerline liquid velocity. A sharp decrease in turbulence parmeters. The increase in superficial gas velocity in the presence of internals causes: An increase in gas holdup, axial centerline liquid velocity and turbulent parameters.

  17. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into an actual SNS target.

  18. Sandia support for PETC Fischer-Tropsch research: Experimental characterization of slurry-phase bubble-column reactor hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, N.B.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shollenberger, K.A.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.

    1996-06-01

    Sandia`s program to develop, implement, and apply diagnostics for hydrodynamic characterization of slurry bubble-column reactors (SBCRs) at industrially relevant conditions is discussed. Gas-liquid flow experiments are performed in an industrial-scale 48 cm ID stainless steel vessel. Gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) is applied to make spatially resolved gas holdup measurements. Both water and Drakeol 10 with air sparging are examined at ambient and elevated pressures. Gas holdup increases with gas superficial velocity and pressure, and the GDT values are in good agreement with values from differential pressure measurements. Other diagnostic techniques are also discussed.

  19. Gas bubble dynamics model for shallow volcanic tremor at Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Gordeev, Evgenii

    1999-05-01

    Volcanic tremor at Stromboli (Aeolian islands, Italy) is correlated to small infrasonic transients [Ripepe et al., 1996] which repeat almost rhythmically in time in a range between 0.8 and 1.2 s. We demonstrate that infrasonic transients are associated to small gas bubble (0.5 m) burstings which produces no transients in the seismic signal. Tremor ground displacement attenuates with the inverse of the distance from the craters indicating that the source is shallow. Short-term energy release shows that infrasonic and seismic signals are linked to the same dynamical process, while at the long-term scale it is evident that the two signals are controlled by two distinctive mechanisms. We suggest that the possible physical model acts in two steps: first, gas coalescence and, then, gas bursting. In our model, the seismic signal is related to the coalescence of a gas bubble from a layer of small bubbles, while the infrasonic signal is linked to the bursting of the bubble when it reaches the magma surface. Gas bubbles could form by free coalescence in magma or could be forced to coalesce by a structural barrier. We calculate that forced coalescence induces in magma a pressure change (104 Pa) 2 orders of magnitude higher than free coalescence, and it explains best the tremor ground displacement (10-5 m) recorded at Stromboli. Moreover, forced coalescence evidences the role of a structural barrier, such as a dike, in volcanic tremor source dynamics. In this gas dynamic process, the delay time of 1-2 s between infrasonic pulses could reflect the gas nucleation interval of basaltic magma [Thomas et al., 1993; Manga, 1996]. We propose that the source function for the shallow volcanic tremor at Stromboli could be the viscoelastic reaction of the magma to the pressure decrease induced by gas bubble growth rate under constant depressurization. The spectrum of our source function is controlled by the time duration of the pressure pulse, which represents the viscoelastic relaxation time of the magma and gas bubble growth rate. The predicted asymptotic decay of the frequency contents fits the spectral behavior of the volcanic tremor ground displacement recorded at Stromboli. We show that the same spectral behavior can be found in ground displacement spectra of volcanic tremor recorded on different volcanoes.

  20. Gas Bubble Pinch-off in Viscous and Inviscid Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborek, P.

    2005-11-01

    We have used high-speed video to analyze pinch-off of nitrogen gas bubbles in fluids with a wide range of viscosity. If the external fluid is highly viscous (?ext>100 cP), the radius is proportional to the time before break, ?, and decreases smoothly to zero. If the external fluid has low viscosity (?ext<10 cP), the neck radius scales as &1/2circ; until an instability develops in the gas bubble which causes the neck to rupture and tear apart. Finally, if the viscosity of the external fluid is in an intermediate range, an elongated thread is formed which breaks apart into micron-sized bubbles. 100,000 frame-per-second videos will be presented which illustrate each of these flow regimes.

  1. Blind Deconvolution on Underwater Images for Gas Bubble Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenka, C.; Koch, R.

    2015-04-01

    Marine gas seeps, such as in the Panarea area near Sicily (McGinnis et al., 2011), emit large amounts of methane and carbon-dioxide, greenhouse gases. Better understanding their impact on the climate and the marine environment requires precise measurements of the gas flux. Camera based bubble measurement systems suffer from defocus blur caused by a combination of small depth of field, insufficient lighting and from motion blur due to rapid bubble movement. These adverse conditions are typical for open sea underwater bubble images. As a consequence so called 'bubble boxes' have been built, which use elaborate setups, specialized cameras and high power illumination. A typical value of light power used is 1000W (Leifer et al., 2003). In this paper we propose the compensation of defocus and motion blur in underwater images by using blind deconvolution techniques. The quality of the images can be greatly improved, which will relax requirements on bubble boxes, reduce their energy consumption and widen their usability.

  2. Shock wave in a bubble flow with high gas content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, I.; Son, E.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we experimentally measure the shock wave width in a gas-fluid dispersive medium using the hot-film CTA, a speed video camera, PIV and a shadowgraph. We develop a method for determining the velocity of an optically nontransparent flow on various parts of the laboratory installation. The bubble breadown in a shock wave is confirmed experimentally.

  3. Kinetics of gas bubble ensemble in supersaturated solid solution of point defects and gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E.; Volkov, Alexander E.

    2000-11-01

    The nodal line formalism is proposed to investigate the kinetics of a gas-pressurized bubble ensemble in a material supersaturated with vacancies, self-interstitials and gas atoms. The critical nuclei parameters were obtained using the general form of the growth rates and `hard sphere' equation of state for description of gas in bubbles. The detailed investigation of the relative arrangement of critical points of the nodal lines and the possible kinetic modes of evolution of gas-pressurized bubbles into voids that are primarily an agglomeration of vacancies is carried out. Comparison of the presented results with that obtained with the Mansur-Coghlan formalism is carried out.

  4. Anterior chamber gas bubbles in open globe injury.

    PubMed

    Barnard, E B G; Baxter, D; Blanch, R

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old soldier who was in close proximity to the detonation of an improvised explosive device (IED). Bubbles of gas were visible within the anterior chamber of his left eye. The authors propose that intraocular gas, present acutely after trauma, is diagnostic of open globe injury and is of particular importance in remote military environments. PMID:24079202

  5. Difference equation model for isothermal gas chromatography expresses retention behavior of homologues of n-alkanes excluding the influence of holdup time

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liejun; Chen, Yongli; Caccamise, Sarah A.L.; Li, Qing X.

    2012-01-01

    A difference equation (DE) model is developed using the methylene retention increment (?tz) of n-alkanes to avoid the influence of gas holdup time (tM). The effects of the equation orders (1st5th) on the accuracy of a curve fitting show that a linear equation (LE) is less satisfactory and it is not necessary to use a complicated cubic or higher order equation. The relationship between the logarithm of ?tz and the carbon number (z) of the n-alkanes under isothermal conditions closely follows the quadratic equation for C3C30 n-alkanes at column temperatures of 24260 C. The first and second order forward differences of the expression (?log ?tz and ?2log ?tz, respectively) are linear and constant, respectively, which validates the DE model. This DE model lays a necessary foundation for further developing a retention model to accurately describe the relationship between the adjusted retention time and z of n-alkanes. PMID:22939376

  6. Easy and Accurate Calculation of Programmed Temperature Gas Chromatographic Retention Times by Back-Calculation of Temperature and Hold-up Time Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Paul G.; Carr, Peter W.; Cohen, Jerry D.; Hegeman, Adrian D.

    2012-01-01

    Linear retention indices are commonly used to identify compounds in programmed-temperature gas chromatography (GC), but they are unreliable unless the original experimental conditions used to measure them are stringently reproduced. However, differences in many experimental conditions may be properly taken into account by calculating programmed-temperature retention times of compounds from their measured isothermal retention vs. temperature relationships. We call this approach retention projection. Until now, retention projection has been impractical because it required very precise, meticulous measurement of the temperature vs. time and hold-up time vs. temperature profiles actually produced by a specific GC instrument to be accurate. Here we present a new, easy-to-use methodology to precisely measure those profiles: We spike a sample with 25 n-alkanes and use their measured, programmed-temperature retention times to precisely back-calculate what the instrument profiles must have been. Then, when we use those back-calculated profiles to project retention times of 63 chemically diverse compounds, we found that the projections are extremely accurate (e.g. to 0.9 s in a 40 min ramp). They remained accurate with different temperature programs, GC instruments, inlet pressures, flow rates, and with columns taken from different batches of stationary phase while the accuracy of retention indices became worse the more the experimental conditions were changed from the original ones used to measure them. We also developed new, open-source software (http://www.retentionprediction.org/gc) to demonstrate the system. PMID:23040964

  7. Comparison of Holdup Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lousteau, Angela L; Stooksbury, John C; Cleveland, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of uranium holdup, the residual material left in process equipment such as pipes or ducts, is an integral element of material control and accountability. Not only are the measurements important for accountability, they are also important for criticality safety. The goal in measuring holdup is to quantify the amount of material in the pipes to verify that all material is accounted for (inventory in [inventory out + holdup] = 0) and to ensure that the amount of material heldup is not a criticality risk. There are a number of ways to measure holdup in process equipment; however, this paper will evaluate only two methods (i.e., Holdup Measurement System 4 (HMS-4) and In Situ Object Counting Software (ISOCS)) for specific measurement scenarios. The comparison will use measurements of well-known reference materials in various configurations and will examine the results, uncertainties, repeatability, time required, portability, and cost of each system.

  8. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G. A.; Schwarz, C. E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments were performed with nonreactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies were performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model.

  9. Breakdown Voltage Scaling in Gas Bubbles Immersed in Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah; Sommers, Bradley; Foster, John

    2013-09-01

    Radicals produced by the interaction of plasma with liquid water have the capacity to rapidly oxidize organic contaminants. This interaction is currently being investigated as a means to purify water. Direct plasma creation in water typically requires very high voltages to achieve breakdown. Igniting plasma in individual gas bubbles in liquid water on the other hand requires much less voltage. Furthermore, the use of an electrode-less plasma initiation in such bubbles is attractive in that it eliminates electrode erosion thereby circumventing the contamination issue. The breakdown physics of isolated bubbles in liquid water is still poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the relationship between applied voltage for breakdown and the associated pd. This is achieved by locating the breakdown voltage over a range of bubble sizes. This approach allows for the generation of a Paschen-type breakdown curve for isolated bubbles. Such a relationship yields insight into breakdown mechanics and even streamer propagation through water. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (CBET 1033141) and the National Science Foundation Graduate Student Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 0718128.

  10. Gas bubbles in marine mud-How small are they?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Allen H.; Briggs, Kevin B.

    2003-10-01

    Free gas in marine mud poses a challenging problem in the realm of ocean acoustics as it readily attenuates (i.e., scatters or absorbs) energy, such that objects lying below the gassy sediment are acoustically masked. Gas-laden sediments were located in 10- to 120-m water depth adjacent to the South Pass of the Mississippi River in East Bay using a 12-kHz transducer and the Acoustic Sediment Classification System. Several cores were collected in this region for physical property measurements. Some of the cores were x-rayed on medical and industrial computed tomography (CT) scanners. Volumetric CT images were used to locate gas bubbles, determine shapes and sizes to within the limits of the CT resolution. Free gas in the East Bay sediments was relegated to worm tubes as well as isolated pockets as was the case in Eckernfrde Bay sediments [Abegg and Anderson, Mar. Geol. 137, 137-147 (1997)]. The primary significance of the present work is that gas bubbles have been determined to exist in the tens of ?m size range, which is significantly smaller than the smallest bubbles that were previously resolved with medical CT (~440 ?m) with NRL's HD-500 micro-CT System. [Work supported by ONR and NRL.

  11. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  12. Evolution of bubble length distributions in three-phase fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.L.P.; Soria, A.; de Lasa, H.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Three-phase fluidization is an operation that has been applied to many chemical processes. The performance of a three-phase fluidized bed reactor is highly influenced by the bubble behavior. For example, gas bubbles affect bed expansion, bed mixing, gas holdup, particle entrainment, and mass transfer among the three phases. Therefore, the knowledge of the gas holdup, bubble velocity, bubble size, and its distribution, is very important in order to understand the behavior of this type of reactor. The aim of this present paper is the description of the steady-state evolution process of the average value and the distribution of bubble lengths in a column with solid particles whose diameter is smaller than the so-called critical particle size, which is around 3 mm for the air-water-glass beads system. Bubble length distributions are obtained from in situ fiber optic probe measurements throughout the fluidized bed. The evolution of bubble length distributions is studied under various operating conditions. The bubble flow regimes are identified objectively by studying, under steady-state operation, the bubble length mappings (functions of both axial and radial positions) in the fluidized bed.

  13. Phase-field simulation of irradiated metals Part II : Gas bubble kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, P. C.; El-Azab, A.; Wolf, D.

    2011-01-01

    The phase-field model developed in Part I of this work is expanded to include fission gas generation, diffusion, and segregation within bubbles nucleated both homogeneously and heterogeneously along grain boundaries. Illustrative results are presented that characterize bubble growth and shrinkage, as well as the bubble density, size and nucleation rate as a function of the irradiation conditions. Finally, intergranular bubble characteristics such as shape, pinning energy and bubble density are investigated.

  14. HUBBLE PICTURES SHOW HOT GAS BUBBLE EJECTED BY YOUNG STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 reveal the evolution of bubbles of glowing gas being blown out from the young binary star system XZ Tauri. Gas from an unseen disk around one or both of the stars is channeled through magnetic fields surrounding the binary system and then is forced out into space at nearly 300,000 miles per hour (540,000 kilometers per hour). This outflow, which is only about 30 years old, extends nearly 60 billion miles (96 billion kilometers). Hubble first discovered this unique bubble in 1995, and additional observations were made between 1998 and 2000. These images show that there was a dramatic change in its appearance between 1995 and 1998. In 1995, the bubble's edge was the same brightness as its interior. However, when Hubble took another look at XZ Tauri in 1998, the edge was suddenly brighter. This brightening is probably caused by the hot gas cooling off, which allows electrons in the gas to recombine with atoms, a process that gives off light. This is the first time that astronomers have seen such a cooling zone 'turn on.' These images provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the development of a very recent outflow from young (about 1 million years old) stars. Credits: NASA, John Krist (Space Telescope Science Institute), Karl Stapelfeldt (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Jeff Hester (Arizona State University), Chris Burrows (European Space Agency/Space Telescope Science Institute)

  15. Progression and severity of gas bubble trauma in juvenile salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, M.G.; Weiland, L.K.; Maule, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments to assess the progression and to quantify the severity of signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT) in juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to different levels of total dissolved gas (TDG), and we attempted to relate these signs to the likelihood of mortality. When fish were exposed to 110% TDG for up to 22 d, no fish died, and there were few signs of GBT in the lateral line or gills. Bubbles in the fins, however, were relatively common, and they progressively worsened over the experimental period. When fish were exposed to 120% TDG for up to 140 h, chinook salmon had an LT20 (time necessary to kill 20% of the fish) ranging from 40 to 120 h, whereas steelhead had LT20s ranging from 20 to 35 h. In steelhead, bubbles in the lateral line, fins, and gills displayed poor trends of worsening over time, showed substantial interindividual variability, and were poorly related to mortality. In chinook salmon, only bubbles in the lateral line showed a distinct worsening over time, and the severity of bubbles in the lateral line was highly correlated with mortality. When fish were exposed to 130% TDG for up to 11 h, LT20s for chinook salmon ranged from 3 to 6 h, whereas those for steelhead ranged from 5 to 7 h. In chinook salmon, bubbles in the lateral line and fins, but not those in the gills, showed distinct trends of worsening over time. In steelhead, bubbles in the lateral line displayed the most significant trend of progressive severity. In both species at 130% TDG, the severity of all GBT signs was highly correlated with mortality. The progressive nature of GBT and the methods we developed to examine fish for GBT may be useful for monitoring programs that aim to assess the severity of dissolved gas supersaturation exposures experienced by fish in the wild. However, the efficacy of such programs seems substantially hindered by problems associated with (1) the variable persistence of GBT signs; (2) the inconsistent relation of GBT signs to mortality; (3) the insufficient knowledge of the relation between exposure history and GBT sign development for fish in the wild; and (4) an extreme amount of interindividual variation in terms of susceptibility to GBT.

  16. Bubble expansion, gas percolation and preservation of pyroclasts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, A.; Cashman, K. V.; Wright, H. M.

    2009-12-01

    Prior to eruption, almost all magmas contained enough dissolved water and carbon dioxide to vesiculate at atmospheric pressure into foams with gas volume fractions greater than 95%. However, such high-vesicularity volcanic foams, called reticulite, are rare and form primarily in high lava fountains of crystal-poor basalt. Most eruptions produce pyroclasts of 65-85% vesicularity as well as ash formed by complete fragmentation of magma, often at the scale of individual bubbles. For this reason, the amount of ash produced is commonly taken as a measure of fragmentation efficiency. Here we re-examine this concept by considering the roles of both permeability and isolated bubbles in magma expansion and fragmentation. Syn-eruptive magma expansion requires that gas in the component bubbles expands due to decompression and volatile exsolution faster than it escapes by permeable flow through pathways of interconnected bubbles. Much like a hole in a balloon can make it impossible to inflate, an increase in permeability will halt or drastically slow down magma expansion despite continued decompression and degassing. Evidence for permeability increases ? 2 orders of magnitude across a threshold vesicularity (e.g., Eichelberger et al., 1986) would further suggest that pyroclasts should preserve vesicularities that are close to this threshold. Observed pumice vesicularities of 65-85% are consistent with laboratory studies indicating gas percolation thresholds of ? 60%; however, numerous permeability measurements from other suites of volcanic samples suggest percolation thresholds much lower than 60%. We review these findings in the context of percolation theory, consider reasons for apparent discrepancies in the data, and discuss implications for conditions of vesiculation during volcanic eruptions. We then re-evaluate the conditions required for bubble expansion and reticulite development. In particular, a comparisons of basaltic scoria and reticulite suggests that these two clast types have different vesiculation histories, with proto-reticulite having less-well-connected bubbles than scoria of the same vesicularity. We assess the implications for fragmentation and eruption dynamics, and potential biases in inferring magma properties from studies of relatively large pyroclasts. Central to our argument is that preserved scoria and pumice clasts were too permeable to expand further, and, as suggested by Witham and Sparks (1986) and Klug and Cashman (1996), bubble connectivity is key to the preservation of pumice. In particular, we conclude that reticulite cannot form in explosive rhyolite eruptions because closed-system degassing at the relevant decompression rates leads to stresses sufficient to fragment the magma into ash. This interpretation is consistent with the observed correlation between the intensity of (sub)Plinian eruptions and the proportion of ash relative to pumice erupted (Walker 1973, 1980).

  17. Mathematical model of diffusion-limited gas bubble dynamics in unstirred tissue with finite volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Models of gas bubble dynamics for studying decompression sickness have been developed by considering the bubble to be immersed in an extravascular tissue with diffusion-limited gas exchange between the bubble and the surrounding unstirred tissue. In previous versions of this two-region model, the tissue volume must be theoretically infinite, which renders the model inapplicable to analysis of bubble growth in a finite-sized tissue. We herein present a new two-region model that is applicable to problems involving finite tissue volumes. By introducing radial deviations to gas tension in the diffusion region surrounding the bubble, the concentration gradient can be zero at a finite distance from the bubble, thus limiting the tissue volume that participates in bubble-tissue gas exchange. It is shown that these deviations account for the effects of heterogeneous perfusion on gas bubble dynamics, and are required for the tissue volume to be finite. The bubble growth results from a difference between the bubble gas pressure and an average gas tension in the surrounding diffusion region that explicitly depends on gas uptake and release by the bubble. For any given decompression, the diffusion region volume must stay above a certain minimum in order to sustain bubble growth.

  18. Use of optical probes to characterize bubble behavior in gas-solid fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Mainland, M.E.; Welty, J.R. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1995-02-01

    Optical probes are used to study gas-solid fluidized-bed hydrodynamics. The probes each consisting of a light source and photodetector separated by a gap are suitable for use at combustion-level temperatures. The methodology to process the signal for calculation of bubble properties such as bubble frequency, local bubble residence time, bubble velocity, pierced length, bubble size, and visible bubble flow is presented. The signal processing technique is independent of bed operating conditions. The probe signal processing methodology is validated by comparing calculated bubble properties based on the probe signal with properties observed on videotapes of a 2-D bed.

  19. Modeling biogenic gas bubbles formation and migration in coarse sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.

    2011-12-01

    Shujun Ye Department of Hydrosciences, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China; sjye@nju.edu.cn Brent E. Sleep Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A4 CANADA; sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca Methane gas generation in porous media was investigated in an anaerobic two-dimensional sand-filled cell. Inoculation of the lower portion of the cell with a methanogenic culture and addition of methanol to the bottom of the cell led to biomass growth and formation of a gas phase. The formation, migration, distribution and saturation of gases in the cell were visualized by the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Gas generated at the bottom of the cell in the biologically active zone moved upwards in discrete fingers, so that gas phase saturations (gas-filled fraction of void space) in the biologically active zone at the bottom of the cell did not exceed 40-50%, while gas accumulation at the top of the cell produced gas phase saturations as high as 80%. Macroscopic invasion percolation (MIP) at near pore scale[Glass, et al., 2001; Kueper and McWhorter, 1992]was used to model gas bubbles growth in porous media. The nonwetting phase migration pathway can be yielded directly by MIP. MIP was adopted to simulate the expansion, fragmentation, and mobilization of gas clusters in the cell. The production of gas, and gas phash saturations were simulated by a continuum model - compositional simulator (COMPSIM) [Sleep and Sykes, 1993]. So a combination of a continuum model and a MIP model was used to simulate the formation, fragmentation and migration of biogenic gas bubbles. Key words: biogenic gas; two dimensional; porous media; MIP; COMPSIM

  20. PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE KINETICS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C Millett; Anter El-Azab

    2011-01-01

    We present a phase-field model for inert gas bubble formation and evolution in irradiated metals. The model evolves vacancy, self-interstitial, and fission gas atoms through a coupled set of Cahn-Hilliard and Allen-Cahn equations, capturing the processes of defect generation, recombination, annihilation at GB sinks, as well as intragranular and intergranular bubble nucleation and growth in polycrystalline microstructures. Illustrative results are presented that characterize bubble growth and shrinkage, as well as the bubble density, size and nucleation rate as a function of varying irradiation conditions. Finally, intergranular bubble characteristics such as shape, pinning energy on GB motion, and bubble density are investigated.

  1. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  2. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia

    A phenomenological picture of pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water is produced by combining electrical, spectroscopic, and imaging methods. The discharge is generated by applying one microsecond long 5 to 20 kilovolt pulses between the needle and disk electrodes submerged in water. A gas bubble is generated at the tip of the needle electrode. The study includes detailed experimental investigation of the discharge in argon bubbles and a brief look at the discharge in oxygen bubbles. Imaging, electrical characteristics, and time-resolved optical emission data point to a fast streamer propagation mechanism and formation of a plasma channel in the bubble. Spectroscopic methods based on line intensity ratios and Boltzmann plots of line intensities of argon, atomic hydrogen, and argon ions and the examination of molecular emission bands from molecular nitrogen and hydroxyl radicals provide evidence of both fast beam-like electrons and slow thermalized ones with temperatures of 0.6 -- 0.8 electron-volts. The collisional nature of plasma at atmospheric pressure affects the decay rates of optical emission. Spectroscopic study of rotational-vibrational bands of hydroxyl radical and molecular nitrogen gives vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures of the discharge of about 0.9 and 0.1 electron-volt, respectively. Imaging and electrical evidence show that discharge charge is deposited on the bubble wall and water serves as a dielectric barrier for the field strength and time scales of this experiment. Comparing the electrical and imaging information for consecutive pulses applied at a frequency of 1 Hz indicates that each discharge proceeds as an entirely new process with no memory of the previous discharge aside from long-lived chemical species, such as ozone and oxygen. Intermediate values for the discharge gap and pulse duration, low repetition rate, and unidirectional character of the applied voltage pulses make the discharge process here unique compared to the traditional corona or dielectric barrier discharges. These conditions make the experimental evidence presented in this work valuable for the advancement of modeling and the theoretical understanding of the discharge in bubbles in water.

  3. Hydrodynamics of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in slurry bubble column reactors: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Daly, J.G.; Patel, S.A.; Raphael, M.L.; Tatterson, G.B.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes studies on hydrodynamics of bubble columns for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These studies were carried out in columns of 0.051 m and 0.229 m in diameter and 3 m tall to determine effects of operating conditions (temperature and gas flow rate), distributor type (sintered metal plate and single and multi-hole perforated plates) and liquid media (paraffin and reactor waxes) on gas hold-up and bubble size distribution. In experiments with the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) derived paraffin wax (FT-300) for temperatures between 230 and 280/sup 0/C there is a range of gas velocities (transition region) where two values of gas hold-up (i.e., two flow regimes) are possible. Higher hold-ups were accompanied by the presence of foam (''foamy'' regime) whereas lower values were obtained in the absence of foam (''slug flow'' in the 0.051 m column, or ''churn-turbulent'' flow regime in the 0.229 m column). This type of behavior has been observed for the first time in a system with molten paraffin wax as the liquid medium. Several factors which have significant effect on foaming characteristics of this system were identified. Reactor waxes have much smaller tendency to foam and produce lower hold-ups due to the presence of larger bubbles. Finally, new correlations for prediction of the gas hold-up and the specific gas-liquid interfacial area were developed on the basis of results obtained in the present study. 49 refs., 99 figs., 19 tabs.

  4. A computational model of gas bubble evolution in liquid filled straight tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himm, Jeff; Halpern, David

    1996-11-01

    Deep sea divers suffer from decompression sickness (DCS) when their rate of ascent to the surface is too quick. When the ambient pressure drops, inert gas bubbles are usually formed in blood vessels and tissues of divers. It is believed that the existence of gas bubbles is the cause of DCS that manifests itself as itching, joint pain, and neurological abnormalities. While models of gas bubbles in tissues are relatively well developed, the mechanism of bubble growth in the circulation is far less well understood. The existence of gas bubbles may affect gas exchange in small blood vessels by blocking the flow of blood. Gas bubble evolution in the circulation is investigated using an analytical method for small bubbles and the boundary element method for bubbles whose effective radius is close to the tube radius. The concentration field for the dissolved gas surrounding the bubble is solved numerically using finite differences. The bubble volume is adjusted over time according to the mass flux at the surface. It is shown that the effect of increasing the flow rate is to enhance bubble evolution, up to a factor of two compared with the evolution in tissue where there is no flow. This work was supported by the Naval Medical Research and Development Command work unit 62233N.MM33P30.0041509.

  5. In-water gas combustion in linear and annular gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teslenko, V. S.; Drozhzhin, A. P.; Medvedev, R. N.; Batraev, I. S.

    2014-08-01

    A new pulsed-cyclic method of in-water gas combustion was developed with separate feed of fuel gas and oxygen with the focus on development of new technologies for heat generators and submerged propellers. The results of calorimetric and hydrodynamic measurements are presented. In-water combustion of acetylene, hydrogen, and propane was tested with the operation frequency of 2-2.5 Hz and with a linear injector. The combustion dynamics of combustion of stoichiometric mixture with propane (C3H8+5O2) was studied for a bubble near a solid wall; the produced gas bubble continues expansion and oscillations (for the case of linear and annular bubbles). It was demonstrated that gas combustion in annular bubbles produces two same-magnitude pulses of force acting on the wall. The first pulse is produced due to expansion of combustion products, and the second pulse is produced due to axial cumulative processes after bubble collapse. This process shapes an annular vortex which facilitates high-speed convective processes between combustion products and liquid; and this convection produces small-size bubbles.

  6. Optical measurements of gas bubbles in oil behind a cavitating micro-orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, Uwe; Wolf, Fabian; Freudigmann, Hans-Arndt; Fröhlich, Jochen; Heller, Winfried

    2015-06-01

    In hydraulic systems, it is common for air release to occur behind valves or throttles in the form of bubbles. These air bubbles can affect the behavior and the performance of these systems to a substantial extent. In the paper, gas release in a liquid flow behind an orifice is analyzed by optical methods for various operation points. The bubbles are observed with a digital camera, and a detection algorithm based on the Hough transformation is used to determine their number and size. The appearance of gas bubbles is very sensitive to the inlet and outlet pressure of the orifice. Gas bubbles are only observed if choking cavitation occurs. An empirical relationship between an adjusted cavitation number and the appearance of gas release is presented. It is assumed that the observed bubbles contain mostly air. With the applied pressure differences, up to 30 % of the dissolved air was degassed in the form of bubbles.

  7. Phase-field simulations of gas density within bubbles under irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Anter El-Azab; Michael Tonks

    2011-05-01

    Phase-field simulations are used to study the evolution of gas density within irradiation-induced bubbles. In our simulations, the dpa rate, gas production rate, and defect diffusivities are systematically varied to understand their effect on bubble nucleation rates, bubble densities, and the distribution of gas concentration within bubbles and in the solid regions. We find that gas densities within bubbles fluctuate drastically in the early nucleation stages, when growth rates are highest, but converge to steady-state values during the later coarsening stages. The steady-state gas densities within bubbles correspond with the ratio of total accumulated vacancy content divided by the total accumulated gas content, in agreement with a thermodynamic analysis concerning free-energy minimization.

  8. Mathematical model of diffusion-limited evolution of multiple gas bubbles in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Models of gas bubble dynamics employed in probabilistic analyses of decompression sickness incidence in man must be theoretically consistent and simple, if they are to yield useful results without requiring excessive computations. They are generally formulated in terms of ordinary differential equations that describe diffusion-limited gas exchange between a gas bubble and the extravascular tissue surrounding it. In our previous model (Ann. Biomed. Eng. 30: 232-246, 2002), we showed that with appropriate representation of sink pressures to account for gas loss or gain due to heterogeneous blood perfusion in the unstirred diffusion region around the bubble, diffusion-limited bubble growth in a tissue of finite volume can be simulated without postulating a boundary layer across which gas flux is discontinuous. However, interactions between two or more bubbles caused by competition for available gas cannot be considered in this model, because the diffusion region has a fixed volume with zero gas flux at its outer boundary. The present work extends the previous model to accommodate interactions among multiple bubbles by allowing the diffusion region volume of each bubble to vary during bubble evolution. For given decompression and tissue volume, bubble growth is sustained only if the bubble number density is below a certain maximum.

  9. Accuracy of gas flowmeters determined by the bubble meter method.

    PubMed

    Waaben, J; Stokke, D B; Brinklv, M M

    1978-12-01

    THe accuracy of 15 oxygen and nitrous oxide flowmeter units in daily use was investigated using the bubble meter method. At preset oxygen flow rates of less than 1 litre min-1 unacceptable errors were found. At flow settings greater than 1 litre min-1 the deviations varied within closer limits, but the actural flows were inaccurate irrespective of the presettings and of the gas delivered, and independent of the indicator being adjusted to be opposite or between the graduation marks on the flowmeter. PMID:154917

  10. Transmission of detonation from a medium with bubbles to an explosive-gas volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    For the first time, the possibility of transmission of detonation from a gas-liquid medium with bubbles of a chemically active gas mixture to an explosive-gas volume occurring above the interface is established. The experiments are fulfilled in a formulation in which bubble detonation was initiated by the explosion of a conductor located inside the bubble medium. The distance between the wire and the bubblemedium boundary was varied by decreasing it to 1 cm, when the gas volume was more frequently initiated by hot products of the conductor explosion and the discharge plasma. The dynamics of the gas-liquid interface after the arrival of the bubble-detonation wave to it is investigated. The probabilities of transmission of detonation from the bubble medium to the gas-mixture volume in dependence on the wire-immersion depth are determined, and the mechanism of ignition of the explosive-gas volume is described.

  11. Ultrasonic methods for locating hold-up

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Olinger, C.T.

    1995-09-01

    Hold-up remains one of the major contributing factors to unaccounted for materials and can be a costly problem in decontamination and decommissioning activities. Ultrasonic techniques are being developed to noninvasively monitor hold-up in process equipment where the inner surface of such equipment may be in contact with the hold-up material. These techniques may be useful in improving hold-up measurements as well as optimizing decontamination techniques.

  12. Development of Liposomal Bubbles with Perfluoropropane Gas as Gene Delivery Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Kazuo; Suzuki, Ryo; Sawamura, Kaori; Takizawa, Tomoko; Utoguchi, Naoki; Negishi, Yoichi

    2007-05-01

    Liposomes have some advantages as drug, antigen and gene delivery carriers. Their size can be easily controlled and they can be modified to add a targeting function. Based on liposome technology, we developed novel liposomal bubbles (Bubble liposomes) containing the ultrasound imaging gas, perfluoropropane. We assessed the feasibility of Bubble liposomes as carriers for gene delivery after cavitation induced by ultrasound. At first, we investigated their ability to deliver genes with Bubble liposomes and ultrasound to various types of cells such as mouse sarcoma cells, mouse melanoma cells, human T cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results showed that the Bubble liposomes could deliver plasmid DNA to many cell types without cytotoxicity. In addition, we found that Bubble liposomes could effectively deliver plasmid DNA into mouse femoral artery in vivo. The gene transduction with Bubble liposomes was more effectively than conventional lipofection. We conclude that Bubble liposomes are unique and efficient gene delivery carriers in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Hydrodynamics of an endothermic gas with application to bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsko, James F.

    2006-10-01

    The hydrodynamics for a gas of hard spheres which sometimes experience inelastic collisions resulting in the loss of a fixed, velocity-independent, amount of energy ? is investigated with the goal of understanding the coupling between hydrodynamics and endothermic chemistry. The homogeneous cooling state of a uniform system and the modified Navier-Stokes equations are discussed and explicit expressions given for the pressure, cooling rates, and all transport coefficients for D dimensions. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically for the case of a two-dimensional gas subject to a circular piston so as to illustrate the effects of the enegy loss on the structure of shocks found in cavitating bubbles. It is found that the maximal temperature achieved is a sensitive function of ? with a minimum occurring near the physically important value of ? 12000K1eV.

  14. Observations on gas-bubble disease of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1953-01-01

    SOME DIFFICULTY has been experienced in raising fry and young fingerlings at the Puyallup hatchery of the Washington State Department of Game, a hatchery now in its fourth year of operation. There has been evidence of gas in the yolk-sac fry, and the mortality was always excessive among the fingerlings while reared in the hatchery troughs. The mortality rate decreased and evidence of gas-bubble disease disappeared when the fish mere moved to outside ponds. Also, fish seemed less susceptible to parasitic diseases when held in the ponds rather than 1m hatchery troughs. Strains of fish raised at the station were cutthroat trout (Salmo clarkii clarkii and Salmo clarkii lewisi) rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii gairdnerii), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdnerii iriatus)

  15. Hydrodynamics of an endothermic gas with application to bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Lutsko, James F

    2006-10-28

    The hydrodynamics for a gas of hard spheres which sometimes experience inelastic collisions resulting in the loss of a fixed, velocity-independent, amount of energy Delta is investigated with the goal of understanding the coupling between hydrodynamics and endothermic chemistry. The homogeneous cooling state of a uniform system and the modified Navier-Stokes equations are discussed and explicit expressions given for the pressure, cooling rates, and all transport coefficients for D dimensions. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically for the case of a two-dimensional gas subject to a circular piston so as to illustrate the effects of the energy loss on the structure of shocks found in cavitating bubbles. It is found that the maximal temperature achieved is a sensitive function of Delta with a minimum occurring near the physically important value of Delta approximately 12,000 K approximately 1 eV. PMID:17092085

  16. Rise characteristics of gas bubbles in a 2D rectangular column: VOF simulations vs experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, R.; Baten, J.M. van

    1999-10-01

    About five centuries ago, Leonardo da Vinci described the sinuous motion of gas bubbles rising in water. The authors have attempted to simulate the rise trajectories of bubbles of 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, and 20 mm in diameter rising in a 2D rectangular column filled with water. The simulations were carried out using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique developed by Hirt and Nichols (J. Computational Physics, 39, 201--225 (1981)). To solve the Navier-Stokes equations of motion the authors used a commercial solver, CFX 4.1c of AEA Technology, UK. They developed their own bubble-tracking algorithm to capture sinuous bubble motions. The 4 and 5 mm bubbles show large lateral motions observed by Da Vinci. The 7, 8 and 9 mm bubble behave like jellyfish. The 12 mm bubble flaps its wings like a bird. The extent of lateral motion of the bubbles decreases with increasing bubble size. Bubbles larger than 20 mm in size assume a spherical cap form and simulations of the rise characteristics match experiments exactly. VOF simulations are powerful tools for a priori determination of the morphology and rise characteristics of bubbles rising in a liquid. Bubble-bubble interactions are also properly modeled by the VOF technique.

  17. Micropumping of liquid by directional growth and selective venting of gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dennis Desheng; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2008-06-01

    We introduce a new mechanism to pump liquid in microchannels based on the directional growth and displacement of gas bubbles in conjunction with the non-directional and selective removal of the bubbles. A majority of the existing bubble-driven micropumps employs boiling despite the unfavorable scaling of energy consumption for miniaturization because the vapor bubbles can be easily removed by condensation. Other gas generation methods are rarely suitable for micropumping applications because it is difficult to remove the gas bubbles promptly from a pump loop. In order to eradicate this limitation, the rapid removal of insoluble gas bubbles without liquid leakage is achieved with hydrophobic nanopores, allowing the use of virtually any kind of bubbles. In this paper, electrolysis and gas injection are demonstrated as two distinctively different gas sources. The proposed mechanism is first proved by circulating water in a looped microchannel. Using H(2) and O(2) gas bubbles continuously generated by electrolysis, a prototype device with a looped channel shows a volumetric flow rate of 4.5-13.5 nL s(-1) with a direct current (DC) power input of 2-85 mW. A similar device with an open-ended microchannel gives a maximum flow rate of approximately 65 nL s(-1) and a maximum pressure head of approximately 195 Pa with 14 mW input. The electrolytic-bubble-driven micropump operates with a 10-100 times higher power efficiency than its thermal-bubble-driven counterparts and exhibits better controllability. The pumping mechanism is then implemented by injecting nitrogen gas bubbles to demonstrate the flexibility of bubble sources, which would allow one to choose them for specific needs (e.g., energy efficiency, thermal sensitivity, biocompatibility, and adjustable flow rate), making the proposed mechanism attractive for many applications including micro total analysis systems (microTAS) and micro fuel cells. PMID:18497918

  18. Phase-field Modeling of Gas Bubbles and Thermal Conductivity Evolution in Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Stan, Marius; Baskes, Michael I.; Valone, Steven

    2009-07-15

    The major factors that influence the thermal conductivity of the ceramics and metals are temperature, stoichiometry, microstructure, porosity, and point defects. Nuclear fuels and structure materials are subject to a severe radiation environment and their properties, including thermal conductivity change significantly with time and irradiation level. In particular, the accumulation of fission products and the formation of He bubbles can decrease the heat transfer, leading to overheating of the fuel element. In this work, we use the phase-field method to study the effect of microstructural changes on thermal conductivity. We developed a phase-field model to simulate the He bubble formation and growth in a single/polycrystalline material with defects. The model takes into account the generation of gas atoms and defects, gas atom diffusivity inhomogeneity, gas atom segregation, and gas bubble nucleation. With the model, we simulated the gas bubble and temperature evolution, and calculated the effect of gas bubble volume fraction on effective thermal conductivity.

  19. Gas bubble disease in farmed fish in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Saeed, M O; al-Thobaiti, S A

    1997-06-28

    Four outbreaks of gas bubble disease were encountered among farmed fish in Saudi Arabia. Two of them occurred among subadult (52.5 g) saltwater tilapia (Oreochromis spilurus), the first affecting about 50 per cent of the stock and resulting in about 30 per cent mortality, and the second affecting about 25 per cent of the population with about 5 per cent mortality. Another outbreak occurred among adult (270 g) brackish water (0.5 per cent salinity) tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), affecting about 40 per cent of the population with about 25 per cent mortality. The fourth outbreak occurred among three-month-old (15 g) grouper (Epinephelus fuscogutiatus) and resulted in 10 per cent mortality. In all cases the total water gas pressure ranged between 111.2 and 113.4 per cent saturation and nitrogen was supersaturated while oxygen was undersaturated. The outbreaks were alleviated by reducing the gas pressure by splashing the source water or by switching to a source of water with lower gas pressure. However, in O niloticus the conditions of gas supersaturation resulted in a heavy infection by monogenetic trematodes which was treated with formalin at 40 mg/litre for seven hours on five successive days. PMID:9234554

  20. Detecting the gas bubbles in a liquid metal coolant by means of magnetic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilner, A. I.; Morozov, S. A.; Zakharov, S. O.; Uralets, A. Yu.

    Solution of some problems of control and diagnosis of circuits with a liquid-metal coolant (LMC) often requires the detection of gas bubbles penetrating the circulation loop. The sources of gas intake can be presented by failed fuel elements in reactor core, failed heat-exchange surfaces in sodium-water steam generators in the secondary circuits, gas capture by circulating coolant from gas circuits. Sometimes the gas is especially injected into circulating coolant to study the dynamics of accumulation and extraction of gas bubbles and to solve research problems related to simulations of emergency situations. The most commonly used methods for gas bubble detection include methods based on measuring coolant electric conductivity. A method for detecting gas bubbles in LMC, based on revealing the change of its electric conductivity is considered. Magnetic flowmeter is used as a detecting element of these changes. Approximate theory for describing spectral and energy noises in signals of a magnetic flowmeter, controlling the flow rate of LMC with gas bubbles is suggested. A new method for signal reading is suggested. Experimental results illustrating the possibility of using the method for measuring the rate of bubble movement and studying the dependence of gas bubble volume on the flow rate of injected gas are presented.

  1. The dynamics and heat-mass transfer of vapor and gas bubbles with a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Khabeev, N. S.

    1980-02-01

    Some important results obtained by various investigators on the dynamics of gas and vapor bubbles are reviewed. The application of these results to the analysis of wave processes in liquid/vapor mixtures is examined. Thermal effects in the free oscillation of gas bubbles are analyzed.

  2. Axial solid distribution in slurry bubble columns

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.; Fan, L.-S. )

    1989-11-01

    The axial sold concentration distribution in a slurry bubbly column was studied in both batch and continuous operation. Air and water were used as the gas and liquid phases, respectively. The gas velocity ranged from 0.016 to 0.173 m/s, and the slurry velocity ranged from 0.0 to 0.031 m/s. Glass beads of diameters 163,97, and 49 {mu}m were used as the solid phase. The holdup distribution of each solid in binary mixtures was also studied. The effects of gas velocity, slurry velocity, and particle size on the axial solid concentration distribution were examined. A mechanistic model is developed to describe the solid distribution in the slurry bubble columns. The model accounts for the solid distribution for both batch and continuous operation involving monodispersed and binary mixtures of solid particles.

  3. Frequency dependence in seismoacoustic imaging of shallow free gas due to gas bubble resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tth, Zsuzsanna; Spiess, Volkhard; Keil, Hanno

    2015-12-01

    Shallow free gas is investigated in seismoacoustic data in 10 frequency bands covering a frequency range between 0.2 and 43 kHz. At the edge of a gassy patch in the Bornholm Basin (Baltic Sea), compressional wave attenuation caused by free gas is estimated from reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy sediment layer. Imaging of shallow free gas is considerably influenced by gas bubble resonance, because in the resonance frequency range attenuation is significantly increased. At the resonance frequency of the largest bubbles between 3 and 5 kHz, high scattering causes complete acoustic blanking beneath the top of the gassy sediment layer. In the wider resonance frequency range between 3 and 15 kHz, the effect of smaller bubbles becomes dominant and the attenuation slightly decreases. This allows acoustic waves to be transmitted and reflections can be observed beneath the gassy sediment layer for higher frequencies. Above resonance beginning at 19 kHz, attenuation is low and the presence of free gas can be inferred from the decreased reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy layer. Below the resonance frequency range (<1 kHz), attenuation is generally very low and not dependent on frequency. Using the geoacoustic model of Anderson and Hampton, the observed frequency boundaries suggest gas bubble sizes between 1 and 4-6 mm, and gas volume fractions up to 0.02% in a 2 m thick sediment layer, whose upper boundary is the gas front. With the multifrequency acoustic approach and the Anderson and Hampton model, quantification of free gas in shallow marine environments is possible if the measurement frequency range allows the identification of the resonance frequency peak. The method presented is limited to places with only moderate attenuation, where the amplitudes of a reflection can be analyzed beneath the gassy sediment layer.

  4. Swimming movements initiate bubble formation in fish decompressed from elevated gas pressures.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P M; Hemmingsen, E A

    1985-01-01

    Young specimens of trout, catfish, sculpin and salamanders were equilibrated with elevated gas pressures, then rapidly decompressed to ambient pressure. The newly hatched forms tolerated extremely high gas supersaturations; equilibration pressures of 80-120 atm argon or 150-250 atm helium were required for in vivo bubble formation. During subsequent larval development, the equilibration pressures required decreased to just 5-10 atm and bubbles originated in the fins. Anesthetising older fish before decompression prevented bubble formation in the fins; this suggests that swimming movements mechanically initiate bubbles, possibly by a tribonucleation mechanism. PMID:2859954

  5. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO2, suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  6. Modeling gas bubbles and dissolved gases in a turbulent ocean boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; McWilliams, J. C.; Sullivan, P. P.; Baschek, B.

    2010-12-01

    Gas bubbles are ubiquitous in the surface ocean boundary layer (OBL). After their injection by breaking surface gravity waves, gas bubbles are mixed by turbulent water flows, rise by buoyancy, change size, and exchange gases with the ambient water. They modify the acoustical and optical properties of the upper ocean, enhance upper ocean stratification, and provide an important pathway for gas exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. We have developed a coupled OBL-Bubble-Dissolved-Gas model that resolves the bubble behavior and bubble impacts on upper ocean dynamics and dissolved gases (Liang et al. 2010). The model is configured to simulate bubbles and dissolved gases in the turbulent OBL with Langmuir circulations and breaking waves. As a result of bubble injection and evolution, Langmuir circulations are weakened, the gas exchange rate is increased, and the equilibrium gas saturation level is enhanced. REFERENCE: Liang, J.-H., J. C. McWilliams, P. P. Sullivan, and B. Baschek (2010) Modeling bubbles and dissolved gases in the ocean, submitted.

  7. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-01

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh-Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh-Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials.

  8. Hydroacoustic detection and quantification of free gas -methane bubbles- in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greinert, J.; Artemov, Y.; Gimpel, P.

    2003-04-01

    Extensive methane release as a free gas phase from cold vents is well known from deep (>2000m) and shallow (10s of meters) water depths. Supposedly, much more methane is transported into the water column by free gas than by dissolved gas, which is oxidized by anaerobic and aerobic processes and partly precipitated as carbonate. Rising gas bubbles are not affected by this 'filter' mechanisms. Because of the strength of the backscattered signal from gas bubbles in the water column, bubbles can be detected by single-beam or multi-beam echosounder systems. Thus, hydroacoustic systems with different frequencies can be used to 1) detect free gas in the water column, 2) map the distribution of active vent sites which release free gas, 3) monitor a possible periodicity in the release of bubbles induced by e.g. tides or currents, 4) quantify the gas volume and gas flux that is released in a local area or larger region. In the German research project LOTUS we use ship- mounted single-beam echosounders to map gas plumes (flares) and investigate their periodicity (Flare Imaging). Using specialized single-beam echosounder systems makes it possible to measure the bubble sizes and their distribution. In combination with the volume of the backscattering strength these measurements can be used to estimate the gas volume in a defined part of the water body. Though gas bubbles rise in the water column, they are - particularly methane - rapidly dissolved and thus become smaller. Their rising speed as well as their diminishing size can be determined, which helps to understand the dissolution behaviour of methane bubbles; they form a hydrate skin at distinct pressure and temperature conditions. For a detailed, long-term observation of active bubble-expulsing areas we developed a lander based 180 kHz multi beam system that 'looks' horizontally (GasQuant). The system records backscatter data from a 75° swath that covers an area of about 5300m2. Via calibration we can quantify the methane flux of every single bubble-vent and calculate the methane flux of a bubble vent area. Both hydroacoustic techniques were used during several cruises in 2002 to investigate bubble vents at Hydrate Ridge (HR), offshore Oregon. Several bubble-vent areas were detected at the northern summit of HR. They are related to carbonate chemoherms and morphological heights but were also found in areas which do not show any of these features. The GasQuant system was successfully deployed at the northern and southern summit. The data processing is currently in progress.

  9. Three stages of bubble formation on submerged orifice under constant gas flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xianxian; Wang, Yiwei; Huang, Chenguang; Du, Tezhuan

    2015-12-01

    Bubble formation is involved in many engineering applications. It is important to understand the dynamics of bubble formation. This work reports experimental and numerical results of bubble formation on submerged orifice under constant gas flow rate. Compressible large eddy simulation combined volume of fluid (VOF) was adopted in simulation and results was validated by experiment. Bubble formation is divided into three stages in this paper, expansion stage, elongation stage and pinch-off stage. In expansion stage, The bubble grows radially due to the incoming gas flux, but the bubble base remains attached to the orifice. But as gas injected, the spherical bubble will go into the elongation stage when the downward resultant force is lager than upward resultant force. And when bubble neck's length is bigger than ?2Ro the bubble will go into pinch-off stage. Cylindrical Rayleigh-Plesset equation can be used to describe the pinch-off stage. Uncertain parameter r in it is given reference value in this paper.

  10. Heat transfer and bubble dynamics in slurry bubble columns for Fischer-Tropsch clean alternative energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengtian

    With the increasing demand for alternative energy resources, the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process that converts synthesis gas into clean liquid fuels has attracted more interest from the industry. Slurry bubble columns are the most promising reactors for FT synthesis due to their advantages over other reactors. Successful operation, design, and scale-up of such reactors require detailed knowledge of hydrodynamics, bubble dynamics, and transport characteristics. However, most previous studies have been conducted at ambient pressure or covered only low superficial gas velocities. The objectives of this study were to experimentally investigate the heat transfer coefficient and bubble dynamics in slurry bubble columns at conditions that can mimic FT conditions. The air-C9C 11-FT catalysts/glass beads systems were selected to mimic the physical properties of the gas, liquid, and solid phases at commercial FT operating conditions. A heat transfer coefficient measurement technique was developed, and for the first time, this technique was applied in a pilot scale (6-inch diameter) high pressure slurry bubble column. The effects of superficial gas velocity, pressure, solids loading, and liquid properties on the heat transfer coefficients were investigated. Since the heat transfer coefficient can be affected by the bubble properties (Kumar et al., 1992), in this work bubble dynamics (local gas holdup, bubble chord length, apparent bubble frequency, specific interfacial area, and bubble velocity) were studied using the improved four-point optical probe technique (Xue et al., 2003; Xue, 2004). Because the four-point optical technique had only been successfully applied in a churn turbulent flow bubble column (Xue, 2004), this technique was first assessed in a small scale slurry bubble column in this study. Then the bubble dynamics were studied at the same conditions as the heat transfer coefficient investigation in the same pilot scale column. The results from four-point probe bubble dynamics study advanced the understanding of heat transfer in the slurry bubble column. This study also provides important benchmark information for the slurry bubble column design and the evaluation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

  11. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  12. Physical data measurements and mathematical modelling of simple gas bubble experiments in glass melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1986-01-01

    In this work consideration is given to the problem of the extraction of physical data information from gas bubble dissolution and growth measurements. The discussion is limited to the analysis of the simplest experimental systems consisting of a single, one component gas bubble in a glassmelt. It is observed that if the glassmelt is highly under- (super-) saturated, then surface tension effects may be ignored, simplifying the task of extracting gas diffusivity values from the measurements. If, in addition, the bubble rise velocity is very small (or very large) the ease of obtaining physical property data is enhanced. Illustrations are given for typical cases.

  13. Studies of the Hot Gas in the Galactic halo and Local Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robin L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a report on the progress made on Studies of the Hot Gas in the Galactic halo and Local Bubble at Johns Hopkins University. The broad goals of this project are to determine the physical conditions and history of the hot phase of the Galaxy's interstellar medium. Such gas resides in the Galactic halo, the Local Bubble surrounding the solar neighborhood, other bubbles, and supernova remnants. A better understanding of the hot gas and the processes occurring within it requires several types of work, including ultraviolet and X-ray data analyses and computer modeling.

  14. The dissolution or growth of a gas bubble inside a drop in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondos, Pericles A.; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The radius-time history of a gas bubble located concentrically within a spherical liquid drop in a space laboratory is analyzed within the framework of the quasi-stationary approximation. Illustrative results are calculated from the theory which demonstrate interesting qualitative features. For instance, when a pure gas bubble dissolves within a liquid drop in an environment containing the same gas and some inert species, the dissolution can be more or less rapid than that in an unbounded liquid depending on the initial relative size of the drop. Further, given a similar growth situation, indefinite growth is not possible, and the bubble will initially grow, but always dissolve in the end.

  15. Nonlinear Oscillations of Gas Bubbles and Their Impact on Plasma Breakdown in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, Bradley; Foster, John

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the effects of a time varying electric field on air bubbles submerged in water. For a sufficiently strong field, a large electrical stress acting on the liquid-gas boundary can deform the volume and shape of the bubble. This deformation may drastically alter the internal pressure and polarization of the bubble, thus easing the conditions for streamer formation within the gas volume. This type of enhancement could have a broad impact on the viability of liquid plasma technologies, which tend to suffer from high voltage requirements. Bubbles with 0.5-3 mm diameter are trapped in the node of a 26.5 kHz underwater acoustic field while either alternating or pulsed voltage signals of 5-20 kV are applied across their diameter. Bubble response is captured using a high speed camera (10,000 fps), along with a high sensitivity hydrophone. The response is documented over a wide range of factors, including bubble size, field frequency, and field strength. The observed deformations of the bubble shape are then used to predict changes to the reduced field (E/N) within the bubble volume. We investigate the effects of a time varying electric field on air bubbles submerged in water. For a sufficiently strong field, a large electrical stress acting on the liquid-gas boundary can deform the volume and shape of the bubble. This deformation may drastically alter the internal pressure and polarization of the bubble, thus easing the conditions for streamer formation within the gas volume. This type of enhancement could have a broad impact on the viability of liquid plasma technologies, which tend to suffer from high voltage requirements. Bubbles with 0.5-3 mm diameter are trapped in the node of a 26.5 kHz underwater acoustic field while either alternating or pulsed voltage signals of 5-20 kV are applied across their diameter. Bubble response is captured using a high speed camera (10,000 fps), along with a high sensitivity hydrophone. The response is documented over a wide range of factors, including bubble size, field frequency, and field strength. The observed deformations of the bubble shape are then used to predict changes to the reduced field (E/N) within the bubble volume. Research supported by the NSF (CBET #1033141).

  16. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-02-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields.

  17. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields. PMID:26867515

  18. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields. PMID:26867515

  19. Hydrodynamic characterization of slurry bubble-column reactors for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, N.B.; Torczynski, J.R.; Shollenberger, K.A.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.

    1996-08-01

    In the Fischer-Tropsch approach to indirect liquefaction, slurry bubble-column reactors (SBCRs) are used to convert coal syngas into the desired product. Sandia`s program to develop, implement, and apply diagnostics for hydrodynamic characterization of SBCRs at industrially relevant conditions is discussed.Gas-liquid flow experiments are performed in an industrial-scale stainless steel vessel. Gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) is applied to make spatially resolved gas holdup measurements. Both water and Drakeol 10 with air sparging are examined at ambient and elevated pressures. Gas holdup increases with gas superficial velocity and pressure, and the GDT values are in good agreement with values from differential pressure (DP) measurements.

  20. Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

    1981-07-13

    The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

  1. Heat transfer investigations in a slurry bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, S.C.; Rao, N.S.; Vadivel, R.; Shrivastav, S.; Saxena, A.C.; Patel, B.B.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Kagzi, M.Y.; Khan, I.A.; Verma, A.K.

    1991-02-01

    Slurry bubble columns, for use in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, have been investigated. Two bubble columns (0.108 and 0.305 m internal diameter) were set up and experiments were conducted to determine gas holdup and heat transfer coefficients. These columns were equipped with either single heat transfer probes of different diameters, or bundles of five-, seven-, or thirty-seven tubes. the experiments were conducted for two- and three phase systems; employing for gas phase: air and nitrogen, liquid phase: water and Therminol-66, and solid phase: red iron oxide (1.02, 1.70 and 2.38 {mu}m), glass beads (50.0, 90.0, 119.0 and 143.3 {mu}m), silica sand (65 {mu}m), and magnetite (28.0, 35.7, 46.0, 58.0, 69.0, 90.5, 115.5 and 137.5 {mu}m). The column temperature was varied between 298--523 K, gas velocity between 0--40 cm/s, and solids concentration between 0--50 weight percent. The holdup and heat transfer data as a function of operating and system parameters were employed to assess the available correlations and semitheoretical models, and to develop new correlations. Information concerning the design and scale-up of larger units is presented. Specific research work that need to be undertaken to understand the phenomena of heat transfer and gas holdup is outlined so that efficient gas conversion and catalyst usage may be accomplished in slurry bubble columns. 28 refs., 102 figs., 42 tabs.

  2. Radial oscillation of a gas bubble in a fluid as a problem in canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, James

    2006-11-01

    The oscillation of a gas bubble is in a fluid is of interest in many areas of physics and technology. Lord Rayleigh treated the pressure developed in the collapse of cavitation bubbles and developed an expression for the collapse period. Minnaert developed a harmonic oscillator approximation to bubble oscillation in his study of the sound produced by running water. Besides recent interest in bubble oscillation in connection to sonoluminescence, an understanding of oscillating bubbles is of important to oceanographers studying the sound spectrum produced by water waves, geophysicists employing air guns as acoustic probes, mechanical engineers concerned with erosion of turbine blades, and military engineers concerned with the acoustic signatures developed by the propeller screws of ships and submarines. For the oceanographer, Minnaert's approximation is useful, for the latter two examples, Lord Rayleigh's analysis is appropriate. For the case of the airgun, a period of twice Rayleigh's period for the ``total collapse'' of the cavitation bubble is often cited as a good approximation for the period of an air bubble ejected from an air gun port, typically at 2000 psi), however for the geophysical example, numerical integration is employed from the outset to determine the dynamics of the bubble and the emitted acoustic energy. On the one hand, a bubble can be treated as a harmonic oscillator in the small amplitude regime, whereas even in the relatively moderate pressure regime characteristic of air guns the oscillation is strongly nonlinear and amplitude dependent. Is it possible to develop an analytic approximation that affords insight into the behavior of a bubble beyond the harmonic approximation of Minnaert? In this spirit, the free radial oscillation of a gas bubble in a fluid is treated as a problem in canonical perturbation theory. Several orders of the expansion are determined in order to explore the dependence of the oscillation frequency with bubble amplitude. The expansion to second order is inverted to express the time dependence of the oscillation.

  3. Dispersed bubble reactor for enhanced gas-liquid-solids contact and mass transfer

    DOEpatents

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, WanWang; Bonsu, Alexander

    2016-01-26

    An apparatus to promote gas-liquid contact and facilitate enhanced mass transfer. The dispersed bubble reactor (DBR) operates in the dispersed bubble flow regime to selectively absorb gas phase constituents into the liquid phase. The dispersion is achieved by shearing the large inlet gas bubbles into fine bubbles with circulating liquid and additional pumped liquid solvent when necessary. The DBR is capable of handling precipitates that may form during absorption or fine catalysts that may be necessary to promote liquid phase reactions. The DBR can be configured with multistage counter current flow sections by inserting concentric cylindrical sections into the riser to facilitate annular flow. While the DBR can absorb CO.sub.2 in liquid solvents that may lead to precipitates at high loadings, it is equally capable of handling many different types of chemical processes involving solids (precipitates/catalysts) along with gas and liquid phases.

  4. Bubble Size Control to Improve Oxygen-Based Bleaching: Characterization of Flow Regimes in Pulp-Water-Gas Three-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Ghiaasiaan and Seppo Karrila

    2006-03-20

    Flow characteristics of fibrous paper pulp-water-air slurries were investigated in a vertical circular column 1.8 m long, with 5.08 cm diameter. Flow structures, gas holdup (void fraction), and the geometric and population characteristics of gas bubbles were experimentally investigated, using visual observation, Gamma-ray densitometry, and flash X-ray photography. Five distinct flow regimes could be visually identified: dispersed bubbly, layered bubbly, plug, churn-turbulent, and slug. Flow regime maps were constructed, and the regime transition lines were found to be sensitive to consistency. The feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the identification of the flow regimes, using the statistical characteristics of pressure fluctuations measured by a single pressure sensor, was demonstrated. Local pressure fluctuations at a station were recorded with a minimally-intrusive transducer. Three-layer, feed-forward ANNs were designed that could identify the four major flow patterns (bubbly, plug, churn, and slug) well. The feasibility of a transportable artificial neural network (ANN) - based technique for the classification of flow regimes was also examined. Local pressures were recorded at three different locations using three independent but similar transducers. An ANN was designed, trained and successfully tested for the classification of the flow regimes using one of the normalized pressure signals (from Sensor 1). The ANN trained and tested for Sensor 1 predicted the flow regimes reasonably well when applied directly to the other two sensors, indicating a good deal of transportability. An ANN-based method was also developed, whereby the power spectrum density characteristics of other sensors were adjusted before they were used as input to the ANN that was based on Sensor 1 alone. The method improved the predictions. The gas-liquid interfacial surface area concentration was also measured in the study. The gas absorption technique was applied, using CO2 as the transferred species and sodium hydroxide as the alkaline agent in water. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the parametric dependencies. The experimental data were empirically correlated.

  5. Phase-field simulations of intragranular fission gas bubble evolution in UO2 under post-irradiation thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2013-05-15

    Fission gas bubble is one of evolving microstructures, which affect thermal mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking, in operating nuclear fuels. Therefore, fundamental understanding of gas bubble evolution kinetics is essential to predict the thermodynamic property and performance changes of fuels. In this work, a generic phasefield model was developed to describe the evolution kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in UO2 fuels under post-irradiation thermal annealing conditions. Free energy functional and model parameters are evaluated from atomistic simulations and experiments. Critical nuclei size of the gas bubble and gas bubble evolution were simulated. A linear relationship between logarithmic bubble number density and logarithmic mean bubble diameter is predicted which is in a good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Effect of biogenic gas bubbles on water flow through poorly decomposed blanket peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Clive W.; Baird, Andrew J.

    2001-03-01

    A laboratory investigation was used to determine whether biogenic gas bubbles accumulate and block water-conducting pores below the water table in poorly decomposed Sphagnum peat. We found that biogenic gas bubbles did accumulate under realistic incubation temperatures. At the end of incubations at 10.5C, volumetric water contents in two peat samples decreased to between 0.8 and 0.85 (porosity of the samples ranged from 0.96 to 0.97), indicating that the peat was considerably undersaturated with respect to water. Methane was found to be an important constituent of the gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles appeared to have a major effect on hydraulic conductivity (K). In control incubations, prior to which the peat had been irradiated and dosed with a biocide, biogenic gas bubbles did not accumulate, and K was 5-8 times higher than at the end of the microbially active incubations. Our results suggest that biogenic gas bubbles have a potentially significant effect on seepage in peat soils.

  7. Hydrodynamic and mass transfer parameters in a large-scale slurry bubble column reactor with high solid loading

    SciTech Connect

    Behkish, A.; Men, Z.; Inga, J.R.; Morsi, B.I.

    1999-07-01

    The effects of pressure (P), superficial gas velocity (UG) and solid concentration (CV) on the equilibrium Solubility (C*), gas holdup (eG), volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa) and bubble size distribution for methane (CH{sub 4}) in a liquid mixture of decanes were statistically studied in a large-scale (1-ft diameter, 10-ft high) slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). Glass beads with volumetric concentrations of 0, 7.6%, 18%, 28.4% and 36% were used. The experiments were selected following the central composite statistical design approach. The kLa values were determined using the transient physical absorption technique; the gas holdup was measured using the manometric method and the bubble size distributions were measured using the Dynamic Gas Disengagement technique (DGD). The equilibrium solubility values appeared to follow Henry's Law in the 1--15 bar range. The eG values were found to increase with superficial gas velocity and pressure due to the increase of the volume fraction of the small and large gas bubbles. The eG values, however, decreased with solid concentration due to the increase of slurry viscosity. The kLa values appeared to have the same trend as eG values indicting that the mass transfer behavior in the SBCR was mainly controlled by the gas-liquid interfacial area. Also, statistical correlations relating kLa and eG to the main process variables were proposed.

  8. An experimental investigation of gas-bubble breakup in constricted square capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; St. Laurent, C.M.; Radke, C.J.

    1987-09-01

    Recent advances in EOR involve generating foam within underground porous media to displace the oil. The authors investigate the important snap-off mechanism of gas-bubble generation in constricted square capillaries experimentally. The snap-off of smaller bubbles from a larger bubble as it moves through the constriction is recorded on 16-mm movies. The time required for bubbles to snap off once they move past the constriction and the length of the generated bubbles are obtained from viewing the movie frames. The bubble capillary number, ..mu..upsilon/sub T//sigma, is varied from 10/sup -5/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ by adjusting the wetting-fluid viscosity, ..mu.., and the surface tension, sigma, by adding aqueous surfactants to mixtures of glycerol and water, and by altering the bubble velocity, upsilon/sub T/. Results show that a dimensionless time to snap-off depends weakly on the capillary number and that the generated bubble size increases almost linearly with increasing capillary number. Surfactants create dynamically immobile interfaces for surfactant solutions of 1 wt% sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and Chevron Chaser SD1000. Compared with the surfactant-free solutions, the time to breakup with surfactants increases by a factor of about 3; generated bubble length increases by a factor of at most 3.

  9. A novel ultrasound based technique for classifying gas bubble sizes in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Walid; Salman Khan, Muhammad; Zamorano, Juan; Espic, Felipe; Becerra Yoma, Nestor

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing gas bubbles in liquids is crucial to many biomedical, environmental and industrial applications. In this paper a novel method is proposed for the classification of bubble sizes using ultrasound analysis, which is widely acknowledged for being non-invasive, non-contact and inexpensive. This classification is based on 2D templates, i.e. the average spectrum of events representing the trace of bubbles when they cross an ultrasound field. The 2D patterns are obtained by capturing ultrasound signals reflected by bubbles. Frequency-domain based features are analyzed that provide discrimination between bubble sizes. These features are then fed to an artificial neural network, which is designed and trained to classify bubble sizes. The benefits of the proposed method are that it facilitates the processing of multiple bubbles simultaneously, the issues concerning masking interference among bubbles are potentially reduced and using a single sinusoidal component makes the transmitter-receiver electronics relatively simpler. Results from three bubble sizes indicate that the proposed scheme can achieve an accuracy in their classification that is as high as 99%.

  10. Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-30

    Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at grain boundaries for given grain boundary properties. More validation of the model capability in polycrystalline is underway.

  11. Measurement and Analysis of Gas Bubbles Near a Reference Electrode in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Supathorn Phongikaroon; Steve Herrmann; Shelly Li; Michael Simpson

    2005-10-01

    Bubble size distributions (BSDs) near a reference electrode (RE) in aqueous glycerol solutions of an electrolyte NaCl have been investigated under various gas superficial velocities (U{sub S}). BSD and voltage reading of the solution were measured by using a high-speed digital camera and a pH/voltage meter, respectively. The results show that bubble size (b) increases with liquid viscosity ({mu}{sub c}) and U{sub S}. Self-similarity is seen and can be described by the log-normal form of the continuous number frequency distribution. The result shows that b controls the voltage reading in each solution. As b increases, the voltage increases because of gas bubbles interrupting their electrolyte paths in the solutions. An analysis of bubble rising velocity reveals that Stokes Law should be used cautiously to describe the system. The fundamental equation for bubble formation was developed via Newton's second law of motion and shown to be the function of three dimensionless groups--Weber number, Bond number, and Capillary number. After linking an electrochemical principle in the practical application, the result indicates that the critical bubble size is {approx}177 {micro}m. Further analysis suggests that there may be 3000 to 70,000 bubbles generated on the anode surface depending on the size of initial bubbles and provides the potential cause of the efficiency drop observed in the practical application.

  12. Radial oscillation of a gas bubble in a fluid as a problem in canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, James

    2005-11-01

    The oscillation of a gas bubble is in a fluid is of interest in many areas of physics and technology. Lord Rayleigh treated the pressure developed in the collapse of cavitation bubbles and developed an expression for the collapse period. Minnaert developed a harmonic oscillator approximation to bubble oscillation in his study of the sound produced by running water. Oscillating bubbles are important to oceanographers studying the sound spectrum produced by water waves, geophysicists employing air guns as acoustic probes, mechanical engineers concerned with erosion of turbine blades, and military engineers concerned with the acoustic signatures developed by the propeller screws of ships and submarines. For the oceanographer, Minnaert's approximation is useful, for the latter two examples, Lord Rayleigh's analysis is appropriate. On the one hand, a bubble can be treated as a harmonic oscillator in the small amplitude regime, whereas even in the relatively moderate pressure regime characteristic of air guns the oscillation is strongly nonlinear and amplitude dependent. Is it possible to develop an analytic approximation that affords insight into the behavior of a bubble beyond the harmonic approximation of Minnaert? In this spirit, the free radial oscillation of a gas bubble in a fluid is treated as a problem in canonical perturbation theory. Several orders of the expansion are determined in order to explore the dependence of the oscillation frequency with bubble amplitude. The expansion to second order is inverted to express the time dependence of the oscillation.

  13. A study of gas bubbles in liquid mercury in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaasen, B.; Verhaeghe, F.; Blanpain, B.; Fransaer, J.

    2014-01-01

    High-quality observations of mesoscopic gas bubbles in liquid metal are vital for a further development of pyrometallurgical gas injection reactors. However, the opacity of metals enforces the use of indirect imaging techniques with limited temporal or spatial resolution. In addition, accurate interface tracking requires tomography which further complicates the design of a high-temperature experimental setup. In this paper, an alternative approach is suggested that circumvents these two main restrictions. By injecting gas in a thin layer of liquid metal entrapped between two flat and closely spaced plates, bubbles in a Hele-Shaw flow regime are generated. The resulting quasi-2D multiphase flow phenomena can be fully captured from a single point of view and, when using a non-wetted transparent plate material, the bubbles can be observed directly. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by observations on buoyancy-driven nitrogen bubbles in liquid mercury in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. By using a moving high-speed camera to make continuous close up recordings of individual bubbles, the position and geometry of these bubbles are quantified with a high resolution along their entire path. After a thorough evaluation of the experimental accuracy, this information is used for a detailed analysis of the bubble expansion along the path. While the observed bubble growth is mainly caused by the hydrostatic pressure gradient, a careful assessment of the volume variations for smaller bubbles shows that an accurate bubble description should account for significant dynamic pressure variations that seem to be largely regime dependent.

  14. Severe gas bubble disease in a warmwater fishery in the midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Crunkilton, R.L.; Czarnezki, J.M.; Trial, L.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease below Harry S. Truman Dam, sited on the upper Osage River and spilling into Lake of the Ozarks, caused the largest fish kill on record in Missouri. This is the first recorded evidence of serious supersaturation in the Midwest. Total gas saturation levels up to 139% killed nearly a half million fish in the upper 85 km of the Osage Arm, Lake of the Ozarks, during April to June, 1978 and 1979. Gas supersaturation occurred throughout the 150 km of this main-stem reservoir. Nitrogen was the primary gas responsible for gas bubble disease mortalities. Pelagic and near-shore species suffered the earliest and heaviest mortalities, but fish characteristic of deeper waters were increasingly killed as supersaturation persisted. Instream cage bioassays defined the zone of lethal supersaturation. Significant mortality occurred in bottom-dwelling fish of several species, due to long-term intermittent exposure. Susceptibility to gas bubble disease was related to fish size.

  15. Evolution of fission-gas-bubble-size distribution in recrystallized U-10Mo nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, J.

    2010-12-01

    An analytical model for the nucleation and growth of intra and intergranular fission-gas bubbles, used to characterize fission-gas bubble development in U-Mo alloy fuel with burnup limited to less than 10 at.% U in order to capture the fuel swelling stage prior to irradiation-induced recrystallization, is extended to recrystallized fuel at a burnup of 16 at.% U. During recrystallization the grain size is transformed from micron to sub-micron sizes. The intergranular bubble-size distribution post-recrystallization is found to evolve with similar kinetics and morphology to that pre-recrystallization with any differences primarily due to gas content and initial and/or boundary conditions (e.g., fuel microstructure). The predictions of the theory are compared with measured bubble-size distributions in pre and post recrystallized U-10Mo alloy fuel.

  16. Development of New Geothermal Wellbore Holdup Correlations Using Flowing Well Data

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Alexander, J.H.

    2004-03-01

    An ability to predict both the quantity of fluid that can be produced and its thermodynamic state (pressure, temperature, enthalpy, gas content, salinity, etc.) is essential for estimating the total usable energy of a geothermal resource. Numerical reservoir simulators can be utilized to calculate the thermodynamic state of the fluid at the underground feed-zone(s) at which the fluid enters the wellbore. The computation of the well-head fluid properties from a given underground state (or vice-versa) requires the use of a wellbore simulator. The fluid flow in the wellbore is not amenable to strict analytical treatment. Depending upon the relative amounts of gas and liquid, a variety of flow patterns can occur in the pipe. At small gas loadings, bubble flow takes place. An increase in gas flow rate can result in slug, churn or annular flow. Existing methods for treating two-phase flow in a wellbore require use of empirical correlations for action factor and for liquid hold-up.

  17. Effect of wettability on bubble formation at gas nozzle under stagnant condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Shobu, Takahisa; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Bucheeri, Ahmed; Haga, Katsuhiro; Naoe, Takashi

    2008-06-01

    Injection of gas microbubbles into mercury might be effective to mitigate pressure waves generating and propagating in liquid mercury target for MW-class spallation neutron sources. The effect of mitigation is very dependent on the bubble conditions; size, population, etc. It is important to make clear bubble formation behavior from a nozzle for development of making suitable gas microbubbles into mercury. Visualization of microbubbles in mercury was carried out by refraction-enhanced imaging with high-energy synchrotron radiation X-rays at SPring-8 to observe the bubble formation behavior at micro-gas nozzle of 100 ?m in inner diameter and 200 ?m in outer diameter. The bubble formation behavior in mercury was quite different from that in water. A constant taking account of the wettability and interfacial tension force between liquid and solid metals in an equation of force balance around bubble was identified by visualized bubble size. The bubble size under mercury flowing condition was estimated from the force balance equitation.

  18. Rate of disappearance of gas bubble trauma signs in juvenile salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hans, K.M.; Mesa, M.G.; Maule, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the rate of disappearance of gas bubble trauma (GBT) signs in juvenile salmonids, we exposed spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss to water containing high levels of dissolved gas supersaturation (DGS) for a time period sufficient to induce signs of GBT, reduced the DGS to minimal levels, and then sampled fish through time to document changes in severity of GBT. Because of the tendency of GBT signs to dissipate at different rates, we conducted trials focusing on emboli (bubbles) in the gill filaments and lateral line and separate trials that focused on bubbles in the external surfaces (fins, eyes, and opercula). Bubbles in gill filaments dissipated almost completely within 2 h after transfer of fish to water of nearly normal DGS (104%), whereas bubbles in the lateral line dissipated to negligible levels within 5 h. Bubbles on external surfaces were more persistent through time than they were in gill filaments and the lateral line. Although typically dissipating to low levels within 48 h, external bubbles sometimes remained for 4 d. Assuming a direct relation exists between easily observable signs and direct mortality, our results suggest that fish can recover quickly from the potentially lethal effects of DGS once they move from water with high DGS to water of almost normal gas saturation. These results should be of fundamental importance to fishery managers interpreting the results of monitoring for the severity and prevalence of GBT in juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River system and perhaps elsewhere.

  19. Effect of Orifice Diameter on Bubble Generation Process in Melt Gas Injection to Prepare Aluminum Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianyu; Li, Yanxiang; Wang, Ningzhen; Cheng, Ying; Chen, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    The bubble generation process in conditioned A356 alloy melt through submerged spiry orifices with a wide diameter range (from 0.07 to 1.0 mm) is investigated in order to prepare aluminum foams with fine pores. The gas flow rate and chamber pressure relationship for each orifice is first determined when blowing gas in atmospheric environment. The effects of chamber pressure (P c) and orifice diameter (D o) on bubble size are then analyzed separately when blowing gas in melt. A three-dimensional fitting curve is obtained illustrating both the influences of orifice diameter and chamber pressure on bubble size based on the experimental data. It is found that the bubble size has a V-shaped relationship with orifice diameter and chamber pressure neighboring the optimized parameter (D o = 0.25 mm, P c = 0.4 MPa). The bubble generation mechanism is proposed based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. It is found that the bubbles will not be generated until a threshold pressure difference is reached. The threshold pressure difference is dependent on the orifice diameter, which determines the time span of pre-formation stage and bubble growth stage.

  20. Secondary Vortex Formation in Bifurcated Submerged Entry Nozzles: Numerical Simulation of Gas Bubble Entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirker, Stefan; Kahrimanovic, Damir; Schneiderbauer, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The submerged entry nozzle (SEN) flow behavior is crucial for continuous casting of slab steel since it controls the mold flow pattern. In this study, we focus on the bottom zone of a bifurcated SEN where the flow deflection determines the port outflow. By applying a hybrid finite volume and lattice Boltzmann-based turbulence model, the dynamic behavior of horizontally orientated secondary vortices is investigated. In addition to the pure liquid metal flow, gas bubbles are traced in both discrete and continuous way. Simulation results indicate the existence of highly turbulent secondary vortices in the deflection zone of a bifurcated SEN, which attract gas bubbles in form of bubble threads or continuous gas volumes at their rotational axes. In addition, cyclically detaching gas volumes are formed at the upper port region at higher gas flow rates. Numerical predictions agree well with observations from physical water-air models.

  1. The effect of gas-injector location on bubble formation in liquid cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, Sina; Rahimi, Payam; Nobes, David S.

    2010-04-01

    Liquid flows incorporating small-size bubbles play a vital role in many industrial applications. In this work, an experimental investigation is conducted on bubble formation during gas injection from a microtube into the channel of a downward liquid cross flow. The tip of the air injector has been located at the wall (wall orifice) and also at several locations from the wall to channel centerline (nozzle injection). The size, shape, and velocity of the bubbles along with liquid velocity field are measured using a shadow-particle image velocimetry/particle tracking velocimetry system. The process of bubble formation for the wall orifice and the nozzle injection configurations is physically explained. The effect of variation in water and air flow rates on the observed phenomena is also investigated by considering water average velocities of 0.46, 0.65, and 0.83 m/s and also air average velocities of 1.32, 1.97, 2.63, and 3.29 m/s. It was observed that shifting the air injector tip toward the center of the channel resulted in the coalescence of some of the preliminary bubbles and the formation of larger bubbles termed secondary and multiple bubbles. Increase in air flow rate and reduction in water flow rate also intensify the rate of bubble coalescence. A correlation-based model is also suggested to overcome the shortcoming of the available models in the literature which are developed to only estimate the size of the preliminary bubbles. The model predicts the percent of the preliminary, secondary, and multiple bubbles along with the average size of secondary and multiple bubbles as a function of nozzle position within a cross flow.

  2. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  3. Gas-bubble growth mechanisms in the analysis of metal fuel swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    During steady-state irradiation, swelling rates associated with growth of fission-gas bubbles in metallic fast reactor fuels may be expected to remain small. As a consequence, bubble-growth mechanisms are not a major consideration in modeling the steady-state fuel behavior, and it is usually adequate to consider the gas pressure to be in equilibrium with the external pressure and surface tension restraint. On transient time scales, however, various bubble-growth mechanisms become important components of the swelling rate. These mechanisms include growth by diffusion, for bubbles within grains and on grain boundaries; dislocation nucleation at the bubble surface, or ''punchout''; and bubble growth by creep. Analyses of these mechanisms are presented and applied to provide information on the conditions and the relative time scales for which the various processes should dominate fuel swelling. The results are compared to a series of experiments in which the swelling of irradiated metal fuel was determined after annealing at various temperatures and pressures. The diffusive growth of bubbles on grain boundaries is concluded to be dominant in these experiments.

  4. Histopathology and ultrastructure of ocular lesions associated with gas bubble disease in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Speare, D J

    1990-11-01

    Ocular lesions associated with natural and experimental outbreaks of gas bubble disease (GBD) in commercial salmonids were assessed histologically and by scanning electron microscopy. Small gas emboli were first detected in the choroid gland of the posterior uvea. In subacute and chronic cases, bubble size increased markedly and localization in retrobulbar and periocular sites was favoured. During the acute phase of GBD, ocular lesions were limited to anatomical displacement of tissue and local degeneration of compressed tissues around the perimeter of bubbles. Subacute sequelae included the formation of anterior synechia, lens cataract, and suppurative panophthalmitis. During chronic stages, when large retrobulbar bubbles had caused severe exophthalmia, there was stretching of the optic nerve and of retinal blood vessels and severe distortion of the posterior aspects of the globe. The sequential development, pathogenesis and persistence of ocular lesions associated with GBD in fish are discussed. PMID:2079557

  5. Gas bubble formation in fused silica generated by ultra-short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Cvecek, Kristian; Miyamoto, Isamu; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-06-30

    During processing of glass using ultra-fast lasers the formation of bubble-like structures can be observed in several glass types such as fused silica. Their formation can be exploited to generate periodic gratings in glasses but for other glass processing techniques such as waveguide-writing or glass welding by ultra-fast lasers the bubble formation proves often detrimental. In this work we present experiments and their results in order to gain understanding of the origins and on the underlying formation and transportation mechanisms of the gas bubbles. PMID:24977843

  6. Analysis of an oscillatory oil squeeze film containing a central gas bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, S.; Etsion, I.

    1985-01-01

    A squeeze-film damper, consisting of two circular plates, having only normal oscillatory relative motion is considered. The liquid lubricant between the plates is assumed to contain a single central gas bubble. The effect of the bubble on the damper performance is analyzed. Comparison is made with the performance of a pure liquid damper. Substantial deviations in peak dynamic pressures are predicted which explain discrepancies between experimental and theoretical results reported in the literature.

  7. MESO-SCALE MODELING OF THE INFLUENCE OF INTERGRANULAR GAS BUBBLES ON EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks

    2011-06-01

    Using a mesoscale modeling approach, we have investigated how intergranular fission gas bubbles, as observed in high-burnup nuclear fuel, modify the effective thermal conductivity in a polycrystalline material. The calculations reveal that intergranular porosity has a significantly higher resistance to heat transfer compared to randomly-distributed porosity. A model is developed to describe this conductivity reduction that considers an effective grain boundary Kapitza resistance as a function of the fractional coverage of grain boundaries by bubbles.

  8. Gas bubble disease in smallmouth bass and northern squawfish from the Snake and Columbia Rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J.C.; Becker, C.D.

    1980-11-01

    In 1975 and 1976, 179 smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and 85 northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) were collected by angling from the lower Snake and mid-Columbia rivers, southeastern Washington. All fish were examined externally for gas bubble syndrome. Emboli were found beneath membranes of the opercula, body, and fins of 72% of the smallmouth bass and 84% of the northern squawfish. Hemorrhage was also noted on the caudal, anal, and pectoral fins of several smallmouth bass. Presence of gas bubble syndrome corresponded to the spring runoff when total dissolved gas supersaturations in river water exceeded 115%.

  9. A Philippinite with an Unusually Large Bubble: Gas Pressure and Noble Gas Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, J.; Maruoka, T.; Pinti, D. L.; Koeberl, C.

    1995-09-01

    Bubbles are common in tektites, but usually their sizes range up to only a few mm. They are most abundant in Muong Nong-type tektites. The gases contained in these bubbles are of terrestrial atmospheric composition, with pressures below 1 atm (e.g., [1]). The abundances of light noble gases (He, Ne) are controlled by diffusion from the atmosphere [2], and noble gases dissolved in tektite glass indicate that the glass solidified at atmospheric pressures equivalent to about 40 km altitude [3]. Large bubbles in splash-form tektites are rather rare. Thus, the finding that a philippinite (size: 6.0 x 4.5 cm; weight: 199.6 g) contains an unusually large bubble justified a detailed study. The volume of the bubble, which was confirmed by X-ray photography, was estimated at 5.4 cm^3, by comparing the density of this tektite (2.288 g/cm^3) to that of normal philippinites (2.438 g/cm^3). A device was specifically constructed for crushing the present sample under vacuum. The 10x10 cm cylindrical device has a piston that allows to gently crush the sample by turning a handle. Various disk spacers can be used to adjust the inner height to that of the sample. The device is made of stainless steel, yielding a low noble gas blank. The crushing device is connected to a purification line and a noble gas sector-type mass spectrometer (VG 5400) [4]. Before crushing, the complete tektite was wrapped in aluminum foil. A first crushing attempt, using stainless steel disk spacers, failed and resulted in damage to the steel spacers, indicating a high strength of the tektite. Using iron disk spacers resulted in an ambient pressure increase (probably due to hydrogen from the Fe) in the sample chamber. However, the noble gas blanks were negligible. The background pressure, at 2 x 10-4 Torr, increased to 3 x 10-4 Torr when the sample was crushed. From the volume of the crushing device and that of the bubble in the tektite, the total gas pressure in the bubble was estimated at about 1 x 10-4 atm. Part of the extracted gas was kept for total gas analysis, while the remainder has been purified for the noble gas measurements. Total amounts and isotopic ratios of all noble gases were measured. The amounts of Ar, Kr, and Xe close to the blank level, while those of He and Ne were about 3 to 4 orders of magnitude larger than the blank. The ^20Ne/^36Ar ratio in the bubble gas is more than 4 orders of magnitude higher than the atmospheric value, which is similar to the pattern previously observed in tektites [2,3,5]. The isotopic ratios of Ar, Kr and Xe were, within uncertainties, similar to those of the terrestrial atmosphere. However, the Ne isotopic ratios were significantly different from atmospheric values, and differ from the results reported in previous studies [2,5]. The Ne isotope data seem to lie on the mass fractionation line from the atmosphere in a ^20Ne/^22Ne vs. ^21Ne/^22Ne three isotope plot, suggesting that the Ne in the bubble has diffused in from the atmosphere. However, it is generally believed that the isotopic fractionation during a steady state is very small, and the observed Ne values are higher than those calculated from simple mass fractionation [6]. The high isotopic fractionation is likely to be associated with the non-equilibrium conditions prevailing during tektite formation. Acknowledgments: We are grateful to D. Heinlein for bringing the precious sample to our attention and for allowing its analysis. References: [1] Jessberger E. K. and Gentner W. (1972) EPSL, 14, 221-225. [2] Matsubara K. and Matsuda J. (1991) Meteoritics, 26, 217-220. [3] Matsuda J. et al. (1993) Meteoritics, 28, 586-599. [4] Maruoka T. and Matsuda J. (1995) J. Mass Spectrom. Soc. Jpn., 43, 1-8. [5] Hennecke et al. (1975) JGR, 80, 2931-2934. [6] Kaneoka I., EPSL, 48, 284-292.

  10. Nonlinear oscillations of gas bubbles submerged in water: implications for plasma breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, B. S.; Foster, J. E.

    2012-10-01

    Gas bubbles submerged in a dielectric liquid and driven by an electric field can undergo dramatic changes in both shape and volume. In certain cases, this deformation can enhance the distribution of the applied field inside the bubble as well as decrease the internal gas pressure. Both effects will tend to facilitate plasma formation in the gas volume. A practical realization of these two effects could have a broad impact on the viability of liquid plasma technologies, which tend to suffer from high voltage requirements. In this experiment, bubbles of diameter 0.4-0.7 mm are suspended in the node of a 26.4 kHz underwater acoustic standing wave and excited into nonlinear shape oscillations using ac electric fields with amplitudes of 5-15 kV cm-1. Oscillations of the deformed bubble are photographed with a high-speed camera operating at 5130 frames s-1 and the resulting images are decomposed into their axisymmetric spherical harmonic modes, Y_l^0 , using an edge detection algorithm. Overall, the bubble motion is dominated by the first three even modes l = 0, 2 and 4. Electrostatic simulations of the deformed bubble's internal electric field indicate that the applied field is enhanced by as much as a factor of 2.3 above the nominal applied field. Further simulation of both the pure l = 2 and l = 4 modes predicts that with additional deformation, the field enhancement factors could reach as much as 10-50.

  11. Bubble dispersion and coalescence in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jianjun

    2002-04-01

    An experiment for investigating bubble coalescence rate in turbulent pipe flow was designed based on measuring evolution of the specific interfacial area at two locations along the pipeline. A broad range of operating conditions (i.e. 0.008 < phiG < 0.5, 4 < epsilonp < 26 w/kg, 25 mum < d32 < 8,700 mum, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration range of 0--50 ppm) were investigated. Three bubble coalescence rates were developed based on the temporal rate of variation of Sauter mean diameter, specific interfacial area, and bubble population density and the resulting findings were discussed in terms of hydrodynamic factors (including gas hold-up, energy dissipation rate and bubble size) and interfacial properties. The bubble coalescence rate was found to increase as the gas hold-up and the energy dissipation rate increase, and decrease as the bubble size and SAA concentration increase. Compared to tap water, the normalized coalescence rates were found to decrease radically by the presence of minute dosage of SAA due to the decisive role interfacial characteristics play. The exponential format of interfacial parameters can be used to characterize their effect on bubble coalescence processes, which implies that the interfacial characteristics affect the bubble coalescence through influencing coalescence efficiency which leads to decreasing bubble coalescence rate in gas/liquid turbulent flow. A theoretical collision model was adapted to the case of bubble coalescence rate in turbulent two-phase flow in pipes, and the resulting expression was found to apply not only to pure water system but also to contaminated streams displaying surface activity. The use of different interfacial parameters (such as the static surface tension, surface pressure, Gibbs surface excess and surface excess based on long-term approximation) to explain how SAA retards bubble coalescence rate was evaluated and it was found although the dimensionless forms of these interfacial parameters are correlated with bubble coalescence rate for SDS aqueous solutions to the similar degrees, the surface excess based on the long-term approximation could prevail due to its revealing the underlying mechanism of coalescence hindrance. Factors affecting bubble dispersion and sparger performance were systematically investigated though the use of a 25.4 mm pipe loop in which liquid velocities of up to 3.2 m/s, and gas holdup varying between 0.008 and 0.5 were tested. Trace dosage of either MIBC or SDS was added to simulate the industrial streams. The use of novel dynamic spargers results in the formation of large interfacial area of contact (up to 5,400 m2/m3) and small bubbles (d32 down to 25 mum). The efficiency by which dynamic spargers utilize energy for the formation of interfacial area was found to be one order of magnitude higher than that obtained in mechanically-agitated tanks and traditional pipe nozzles, and more efficient than some of the commonly used static mixers operating at the same power input per unit mass of the stream processed. The interfacial area and the Sauter mean bubble size can be predicted by using correlation equations for MIBC and SDS aqueous solutions. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  12. Gas Bubble Disease Monitoring and Research of Juvenile Salmonids : Annual Report 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Maule, Alec G.; Beeman, John W.; Hans, Karen M.; Mesa, M.G.; Haner, P.; Warren, J.J.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes the project activities 1996--1997 contract year. This report is composed of three chapters which contain data and analyses of the three main elements of the project: field research to determine the vertical distribution of migrating juvenile salmonids, monitoring of juvenile migrants at dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers, and laboratory experiments to describe the progression of gas bubble disease signs leading to mortality. The major findings described in this report are: A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter was found to be accurate and precise and, after compensation for water temperature, can be used to determine the depth of tagged-fish to within 0.32 m of the true depth (Chapter 1). Preliminary data from very few fish suggest that depth protects migrating juvenile steelhead from total dissolved gas supersaturation (Chapter 1). As in 1995, few fish had any signs of gas bubble disease, but it appeared that prevalence and severity increased as fish migrated downstream and in response to changing gas supersaturation (Chapter 2). It appeared to gas bubble disease was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids when total dissolved gas supersaturation was < 120% (Chapter 2). Laboratory studies suggest that external examinations are appropriate for determining the severity of gas bubble disease in juvenile salmonids (Chapter 3). The authors developed a new method for examining gill arches for intravascular bubbles by clamping the ventral aorta to reduce bleeding when arches were removed (Chapter 3). Despite an outbreak of bacterial kidney disease in the experimental fish, the data indicate that gas bubble disease is a progressive trauma that can be monitored (Chapter 3).

  13. Flow regime transitions in a bubble column with a paraffin wax as the liquid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Petrovic, D.; Daly, J.G.

    1987-06-01

    Gas hold-up measurements were made in a 0.051-m-diameter by 3.05-m-long glass bubble column with a molten paraffin wax as the liquid medium. For temperatures between 230 and 280/sup 0/C, there is a range of gas velocities where two modes of operation are possible, and they are referred to as the foamy and the turbulent bubbling flow regimes. The start-up velocity determines which flow regime are obtained. Transitions between these two flow regimes occur and are influenced by the temperature (i.e., the liquid viscosity) and the gas distributor design. Lower temperatures and/or perforated plate distributors with larger holes favor the existence of the turbulent bubbling flow regime.

  14. Experiment and Numerical Simulation of Bubble Behaviors in Argon Gas Injection Into Lead-Bismuth Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Yumi Yamada; Toyou Akashi; Minoru Takahashi

    2006-07-01

    In a lead-bismuth alloy (45%Pb-55%Bi) cooled direct contact boiling water fast reactor (PBWFR), steam can be produced by direct contact of feed water with primary Pb-Bi coolant in the upper core plenum, and Pb-Bi coolant can be circulated by buoyancy forces of steam bubbles. As a basic study to investigate the two-phase flow characteristics in the chimneys of PBWFR, a two-dimensional two-phase flow was simulated by injecting argon gas into Pb-Bi pool in a rectangular vessel (400 mm in length, 1500 mm in height, 50 mm in width), and bubble behaviors were investigated experimentally. Bubble sizes, bubble rising velocities and void fractions were measured using void probes. Argon gas was injected through five nozzles of 4 mm in diameter into Pb-Bi at two locations. The experimental conditions are the pressure of atmospheric pressure, Pb-Bi temperatures of 443 K, and the flow rate of injection Ar gas is 10, 20, and 30 NL/min. The measured bubble rising velocities were distributed in the range from 1 to 3 m/s. The average velocity was about 0.6 m/s. The measured bubble chord lengths were distributed from 1 mm up to 30 mm. The average chord length was about 7 mm. An analysis was performed by two-dimensional and two-fluid model. The experimental results were compared with the analytical results to evaluate the validity of the analytical model. Although large diameter bubbles were observed in the experiment, the drag force model for spherical bubbles performed better for simulation of the experimental result because of high surface tension force of Pb-Bi. (authors)

  15. Computational modelling of the interaction of shock waves with multiple gas-filled bubbles in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betney, M. R.; Tully, B.; Hawker, N. A.; Ventikos, Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a computational investigation of the interactions of a single shock wave with multiple gas-filled bubbles in a liquid medium. This work illustrates how multiple bubbles may be used in shock-bubble interactions to intensify the process on a local level. A high resolution front-tracking approach is used, which enables explicit tracking of the gas-liquid interface. The collapse of two identical bubbles, one placed behind the other is investigated in detail, demonstrating that peak pressures in a two bubble arrangement can exceed those seen in single bubble collapse. Additionally, a parametric investigation into the effect of bubble separation is presented. It is found that the separation distance has a significant effect on both the shape and velocity of the main transverse jet of the second bubble. Extending this analysis to effects of relative bubble size, we show that if the first bubble is sufficiently small relative to the second, it may become entirely entrained in the second bubble main transverse jet. In contrast, if the first bubble is substantially larger than the second, it may offer it significant protection from the incident shock. This protection is utilised in the study of a triangular array of three bubbles, with the central bubble being significantly smaller than the outer bubbles. It is demonstrated that, through shielding of bubbles until later in the collapse process, pressures over five times higher than the maximum pressure observed in the single bubble case may be achieved. This corresponds to a peak pressure that is approximately 40 times more intense than the incident shock wave. This work has applications in a number of different fields, including cavitation erosion, explosives, targeted drug delivery/intensification, and shock wave lithotripsy.

  16. Circulation of bubbly magma and gas segregation within tunnels of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menand, Thierry; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    2008-07-01

    Following an intersection of rising magma with drifts of the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, a pathway is likely to be established to the surface with magma flowing for days to weeks and affecting the performance of engineered structures located along or near the flow path. In particular, convective circulation could occur within magma-filled drifts due to the exsolution and segregation of magmatic gas. We investigate gas segregation in a magma-filled drift intersected by a vertical dyke by means of analogue experiments, focusing on the conditions of sustained magma flow. Degassing is simulated by electrolysis, producing micrometric bubbles in viscous mixtures of water and golden syrup, or by aerating golden syrup, producing polydisperse bubbly mixtures with 40% of gas by volume. The presence of exsolved bubbles induces a buoyancy-driven exchange flow between the dyke and the drift that leads to gas segregation. Bubbles segregate from the magma by rising and accumulating as a foam at the top of the drift, coupled with the accumulation of denser degassed magma at the base of the drift. Steady-state influx of bubbly magma from the dyke into the drift is balanced by outward flux of lighter foam and denser degassed magma. The length and time scales of this gas segregation are controlled by the rise of bubbles in the horizontal drift. Steady-state gas segregation would be accomplished within hours to hundreds of years depending on the viscosity of the degassed magma and the average size of exsolved gas bubbles, and the resulting foam would only be a few cm thick. The exchange flux of bubbly magma between the dyke and the drift that is induced by gas segregation ranges from 1 m3 s-1, for the less viscous magmas, to 10-8 m3 s-1, for the most viscous degassed magmas, with associated velocities ranging from 10-1 to 10-9 m s-1 for the same viscosity range. This model of gas segregation also predicts that the relative proportion of erupted degassed magma, that could potentially carry and entrain nuclear waste material towards the surface, would depend on the value of the dyke magma supply rate relative to the value of the gas segregation flux, with violent eruption of gassy as well as degassed magmas at relatively high magma supply rates, and eruption of mainly degassed magma by milder episodic Strombolian explosions at relatively lower supply rates.

  17. N131: A dust bubble born from the disruption of a gas filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Li, Guang-Xing; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Wang, Jun-Jie; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Xu, Jin-Long; Gong, Yan; Yeh, Cosmos C.; Menten, Karl M.

    2016-01-01

    Context. OB-type stars have strong ionizing radiation and drive energetic winds. The ultraviolet radiation from ionizing stars may heat dust and ionize gas to sweep up an expanding bubble shell. This shell may be the result of feedback leading to a new generation of stars. Aims: N131 is an infrared dust bubble residing in a molecular filament. We study the formation and fragmentation of this bubble with multiwavelength dust and gas observations. Methods: Towards the bubble N131, we analysed archival multiwavelength observations including 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, 160, 250, 350, 500 ?m, 1.1 mm, and 21 cm. In addition, we performed new observations of CO (2-1), CO (1-0), and 13CO (1-0) with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: Multiwavelength dust and gas observations reveal a ring-like shell with compact fragments, two filamentary structures, and the secondary bubble N131-A. Bubble N131 is a rare object with a large hole at 24 ?m and 21 cm in the direction of its centre. The dust and gas clumps are compact and might have been compressed at the inner edge of the ring-like shell, while they are extended and might be pre-existing at the outer edge. The column density, excitation temperature, and velocity show a potentially hierarchical distribution from the inner to outer edge of the ring-like shell. We also detected the front and back sides of the secondary bubble N131-A in the direction of its centre. The derived Lyman-continuum ionizing photon flux within N131-A is equivalent to an O9.5 star. Based on the above, we suggest that the bubble N131 might be triggered by the strong stellar winds from a group of massive stars inside the bubble. Conclusions: We propose a scenario in which the bubble N131 forms from the disruption of a gas filament by the expansion of the H II region, strong stellar winds, and fragments under self-gravity. The reduced datacubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A117

  18. Influences of gas bubble and ice density on ice thickness measurement by GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Jun; Jia, Qing; Zhang, Bao-Sen; Leppranta, Matti; Lu, Peng; Huang, Wen-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Lake ice thickness changes with regional hydrometeorology and is closely associated with global climate change. We tested the detection of ice thickness using ground penetrating radar (GPR) in the Hongqipao reservoir. Ice crystals, gas bubbles, ice density and ice thickness were also determined by concurrently drilling for validation. During the tests the gas bubble content was high in the upper and low in the bottom, ice density varied with the bubble content, and the ice thickness was not homogeneous. By comparisons between radar detected and in-situ measured ice thicknesses with theoretical analyses of the influence of gas bubble content on the dielectric constant, a three-layer model with snow, granular ice, and columnar ice was established and the transmission speed of radar wave within the ice was determined. Experience reveals that the equivalent dielectric constant can be used to evaluate the wave speed and the values at 1/3 ice cover depth can be used as equivalent values. Besides, the difference between the theoretical transmission time and the real detection time induced by large gas bubbles increases nonlinearly with the theoretical transmission time or ice thickness.

  19. Modeling the influence of bubble pressure on grain boundary separation and fission gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; Michael R. Tonks; Giovanni Pastore

    2014-09-01

    Grain boundary (GB) separation as a mechanism for fission gas release (FGR), complementary to gas bubble interlinkage, has been experimentally observed in irradiated light water reactor fuel. However there has been limited effort to develop physics-based models incorporating this mechanism for the analysis of FGR. In this work, a computational study is carried out to investigate GB separation in UO2 fuel under the effect of gas bubble pressure and hydrostatic stress. A non-dimensional stress intensity factor formula is obtained through 2D axisymmetric analyses considering lenticular bubbles and Mode-I crack growth. The obtained functional form can be used in higher length-scale models to estimate the contribution of GB separation to FGR.

  20. Equations of spatial hydrodynamic interaction of weakly nonspherical gas bubbles in liquid in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davletshin, A. I.; Khalitova, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model of spatial hydrodynamic interaction of gas bubbles in liquid in an acoustic field taking into account small deformations of their surfaces is proposed. It is a system of ordinary differential equations of the second order in radii of the bubbles, the position vectors of their centers and the amplitudes of deviation of their shape from the spherical one in the form of spherical harmonics. The equations derived are of the first order of accuracy in A / R and of the fourth order in R / D, where R is the characteristic radius of the bubbles, A is the amplitude of characteristic deviation of their surface from the spherical one in the form of spherical harmonics, D is the characteristic distance between bubbles. The derivation of the equations is carried out by the method of spherical functions with the use of the Bernoulli integral, the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions on the surface of the bubbles. The effects of viscosity and compressibility of the liquid are considered approximately, the gas in the bubbles is assumed homobaric.

  1. Experiment and Numerical Simulation of Bubble Behavior in Argon Gas Injection into Lead-Bismuth Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yumi; Akashi, Toyou; Takahashi, Minoru

    In a lead-bismuth alloy (45%Pb-55%Bi) cooled direct contact boiling water fast reactor (PBWFR), steam can be produced by direct contact of feed water with primary Pb-Bi coolant in the upper core plenum, and Pb-Bi coolant can be circulated by buoyancy forces of steam bubbles. As a basic study to investigate the two-phase flow characteristics in the chimneys of PBWFR, a two-dimensional two-phase flow was simulated by injecting argon gas into Pb-Bi pool in a rectangular vessel (400mm in length, 1500mm in height), and bubble behavior were investigated experimentally. Bubble sizes, bubble rising velocities and void fractions were measured using void probes. The experimental conditions are the atmospheric pressure and the flow rate of injection Ar gas is 10, 20, and 30 NL/min. The average of measured bubble rising velocity was about 0.6 m/s. The average chord length was about 7mm. An analysis was performed by two-dimensional and two-fluid model. The experimental results were compared with the analytical results to evaluate the validity of the analytical model. Although large diameter bubbles were observed in the experiment, the drag force model of lower value performed better for simulation of the experimental result.

  2. Evolution of a gas bubble in porous matrix filled by methane hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill; Lyubimov, Dmitry; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Zikanov, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    Behavior of a small isolated hydrate-free inclusion (a bubble) within hydrate-bearing porous matrix is studied analytically and numerically. An infinite porous matrix of uniform properties with pores filled by methane hydrates and either water (excessive water situation) or methane gas (excessive gas situation) is considered. A small spherical hydrate-free bubble of radius R0 exists at initial moment within the matrix due to overheating relative to the surrounding medium. There is no continuing heat supply within the bubble, so new hydrate forms on its boundary, and its radius decreases with time. The process is analysed in the framework of the model that takes into account the phase transition and accompanying heat and mass transport processes and assumes spherical symmetry. It is shown that in the case of small (~ 10-2-10-1 m) bubbles, convective fluxes are negligible and the process is fully described by heat conduction and phase change equations. A spherically symmetric Stefan problem for purely conduction-controlled evolution is solved analytically for the case of equilibrium initial temperature and pressure within the bubble. The self-similar solution is verified, with good results, in numerical simulations based on the full filtration and heat transfer model and using the isotherm migration method. Numerical simulations are also conducted for a wide range of cases not amenable to analytical solution. It is found that, except for initial development of an overheated bubble, its radius evolves with time following the self-similar formula: R(t) ( t)1-2 R0-= 1 - tm- , (1) where tm is the life-time of bubble (time of its complete freezing). The analytical solution shows that tm follows 2 tm ~ (R0-?) , (2) where ? is a constant determined by the temperature difference ?T between the bubble's interior and far field. We consider implications for natural hydrate deposits. As an example, for a bubble with R0 = 4 cm and ?T = 0.001 K, we find tm ~ 5.7 ? 106 s (2 months) in a water excess system, and ~ 2.9 ? 107 s (11 months) in a gas excess system. Motion of the bubble is not considered in our study, but it can be estimated that at the typical velocity of buoyancy-driven transport, a small bubble does not move a significant distance over its life-time and, thus, cannot survive filtration through the hydrate stability zone. Work was financially supported by the Civilian Research and Development Foundation (Grant RUP1-2945-PE-09) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant 09-01-92505).

  3. Measurement and Analysis of Gas Bubbles near a Reference Electrode in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Steven D. Herrmann; Shelly X. Li; Michael F. Simpson; Supathorn Phongikaroon

    2006-10-01

    Bubble size distributions (BSD) near a reference electrode (RE) in aqueous glycerol solutions of an electrolyte NaCl have been investigated under various gas superficial velocities (Us). BSD and RE voltage were measured by using a high-speed digital camera and a pH/voltage meter, respectively. Self-similarity is seen in the normalized cumulative number distribution through BSD. The percent relative difference (PRD) based on the baseline voltage shows that bubble size (b) has a strong impact on PRD at low liquid viscosity and both PRD and b increase at diverging rates as Us increases. An analysis on bubble rising velocity reveals that the system is in an intermediate region. A fundamental equation for spherical bubble formation is developed via Newtons second law of motion and is linked to an electrochemical principle in the practical application.

  4. Creating Small Gas Bubbles in Flowing Mercury Using Turbulence at an Orifice

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Abdou, Ashraf A; Paquit, Vincent C; Felde, David K; Riemer, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to create cavitation damage to the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, creating such a population in mercury is difficult due to the high surface tension and particularly the non-wetting behavior of mercury on gas-injection hardware. If the larger injected gas bubbles can be broken down into small bubbles after they are introduced to the flow, then the material interface problem is avoided. Research at the Oak Ridge National Labarotory is underway to develop a technique that has shown potential to provide an adequate population of small-enough bubbles to a flowing spallation target. This technique involves gas injection at an orifice of a geometry that is optimized to the turbulence intensity and pressure distribution of the flow, while avoiding coalescence of gas at injection sites. The most successful geometry thus far can be described as a square-toothed orifice having a 2.5 bar pressure drop in the nominal flow of 12 L/s for one of the target inlet legs. High-speed video and high-resolution photography have been used to quantify the bubble population on the surface of the mercury downstream of the gas injection sight. Also, computational fluid dynamics has been used to optimize the dimensions of the toothed orifice based on a RANS computed mean flow including turbulent energies such that the turbulent dissipation and pressure field are best suited for turbulent break-up of the gas bubbles.

  5. Effects of heterogeneous structure and diffusion permeability of body tissues on decompression gas bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, V P

    2000-07-01

    To gain insight into the special nature of gas bubbles that may form in astronauts, aviators and divers, we developed a mathematical model which describes the following: 1) the dynamics of extravascular bubbles formed in intercellular cavities of a hypothetical tissue undergoing decompression; and 2) the dynamics of nitrogen tension in a thin layer of intercellular fluid and in a thick layer of cells surrounding the bubbles. This model is based on the assumption that, due to limited cellular membrane permeability for gas, a value of effective nitrogen diffusivity in the massive layer of cells in the radial direction is essentially lower compared to conventionally accepted values of nitrogen diffusivity in water and body tissues. Due to rather high nitrogen diffusivity in intercellular fluid, a bubble formed just at completion of fast one-stage reduction of ambient pressure almost instantly grows to the size determined by the initial volume of the intercellular cavity, surface tension of the fluid, the initial nitrogen tension in the tissue, and the level of final pressure. The rate of further bubble growth and maximum bubble size depend on comparatively low effective nitrogen diffusivity in the cell layer, the tissue perfusion rate, the initial nitrogen tension in the tissue, and the final ambient pressure. The tissue deformation pressure performs its conservative action on bubble dynamics only in a limited volume of tissue (at a high density of formed bubbles). Our model is completely consistent with the available data concerning the random latency times to the onset of decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms associated with hypobaric decompressions simulating extravehicular activity. We believe that this model could be used as a theoretical basis for development of more adequate methods for the DCS risk prediction. PMID:10902936

  6. The effects of bubbles on the structure of upward gas-liquid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidulin, D. A.; Snigerev, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of study of the local structure of turbulent gas-liquid flow in vertical pipe. A mathematical model based on the use of Eulerian description for both phases taking into account the action of different forces of interfacial interaction. Special attention is paid to the development of approaches for the simulation of polydispersed bubbly flows taking into account processes of coagulation and fragmentation. Comparison of simulation results with experimental data showed that the developed approach allows to obtain detailed information about the structures of turbulent gas-liquid flows, the distribution of bubbles by size.

  7. The supersonic shock wave interaction with low-density gas bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakin, B.; Goryachev, V.

    2014-02-01

    Results of computer modeling of the process of shock wave interaction with low-density gas bubble are presented in the current work. Deformation and instability formation are being modeled by a high-order-accurate scheme of TVD type. Calculated area is presented by parallelepiped, the number of calculated area cells along axes X, Y and Z is equal to 409610241024. The calculated area is filled by air, one bubble has radius equal to 128 cells of the calculated area and is filled with low-density gas.

  8. ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS (SBCR)

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Al-Dahhan; M.P. Dudukovic; L.S. Fan

    2001-07-25

    This report summarizes the accomplishment made during the second year of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Air Products and Chemicals. The technical difficulties that were encountered in implementing Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) in high pressure SBCR have been successfully resolved. New strategies for data acquisition and calibration procedure have been implemented. These have been performed as a part of other projects supported by Industrial Consortium and DOE via contract DE-2295PC95051 which are executed in parallel with this grant. CARPT and Computed Tomography (CT) experiments have been performed using air-water-glass beads in 6 inch high pressure stainless steel slurry bubble column reactor at selected conditions. Data processing of this work is in progress. The overall gas holdup and the hydrodynamic parameters are measured by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) in 2 inch slurry bubble column using Norpar 15 that mimic at room temperature the Fischer Tropsch wax at FT reaction conditions of high pressure and temperature. To improve the design and scale-up of bubble column, new correlations have been developed to predict the radial gas holdup and the time averaged axial liquid recirculation velocity profiles in bubble columns.

  9. Bioinspired gas bubble spontaneous and directional transportation effects in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Wang, Jingming; Yang, Zhongjia; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    A series of well-ordered, 3D gradient porous interconnected network surfaces composed of micro-nano hierarchical geometries is constructed on a copper wire. A continuous gas film can be trapped around its interface in an aqueous medium acting as an effective channel for gas transportation. Driving by the difference of the Laplace pressure, gas bubbles can be transported spontaneously and directionally. PMID:25688855

  10. Characterization of intergranular fission gas bubbles in U-Mo fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Rest, J.; Shevlyakov, G. V.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SSCR RIAR

    2008-04-14

    This report can be divided into two parts: the first part, which is composed of sections 1, 2, and 3, is devoted to report the analyses of fission gas bubbles; the second part, which is in section 4, is allocated to describe the mechanistic model development. Swelling data of irradiated U-Mo alloy typically show that the kinetics of fission gas bubbles is composed of two different rates: lower initially and higher later. The transition corresponds to a burnup of {approx}0 at% U-235 (LEU) or a fission density of {approx}3 x 10{sup 21} fissions/cm{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that gas bubbles appear only on the grain boundaries in the pretransition regime. At intermediate burnup where the transition begins, gas bubbles are observed to spread into the intragranular regions. At high burnup, they are uniformly distributed throughout fuel. In highly irradiated U-Mo alloy fuel large-scale gas bubbles form on some fuel particle peripheries. In some cases, these bubbles appear to be interconnected and occupy the interface region between fuel and the aluminum matrix for dispersion fuel, and fuel and cladding for monolithic fuel, respectively. This is a potential performance limit for U-Mo alloy fuel. Microscopic characterization of the evolution of fission gas bubbles is necessary to understand the underlying phenomena of the macroscopic behavior of fission gas swelling that can lead to a counter measure to potential performance limit. The microscopic characterization data, particularly in the pre-transition regime, can also be used in developing a mechanistic model that predicts fission gas bubble behavior as a function of burnup and helps identify critical physical properties for the future tests. Analyses of grain and grain boundary morphology were performed. Optical micrographs and scanning electron micrographs of irradiated fuel from RERTR-1, 2, 3 and 5 tests were used. Micrographic comparisons between as-fabricated and as-irradiated fuel revealed that the site of first bubble appearance is the grain boundary. Analysis using a simple diffusion model showed that, although the difference in the Mo-content between the grain boundary and grain interior region decreased with burnup, a complete convergence in the Mo-content was not reached at the end of the test for all RERTR tests. A total of 13 plates from RERTR-1, 2, 3 and 5 tests with different as-fabrication conditions and irradiation conditions were included for gas bubble analyses. Among them, two plates contained powders {gamma}-annealed at {approx}800 C for {approx}100 hours. Most of the plates were fabricated with as-atomized powders except for two as-machined powder plates. The Mo contents were 6, 7 and 10wt%. The irradiation temperature was in the range 70-190 C and the fission rate was in the range 2.4 x 10{sup 14} - 7 x 10{sup 14} f/cm{sup 3}-s. Bubble size for both of the {gamma}-annealed powder plates is smaller than the as-atomized powder plates. The bubble size for the as-atomized powder plates increases as a function of burnup and the bubble growth rate shows signs of slowing at burnups higher than {approx}40 at% U-235 (LEU). The bubble-size distribution for all plates is a quasi-normal, with the average bubble size ranging 0.14-0.18 {micro}m. Although there are considerable errors, after an initial incubation period the average bubble size increases with fission density and shows saturation at high fission density. Bubble population (density) per unit grain boundary length was measured. The {gamma}-annealed powder plates have a higher bubble density per unit grain boundary length than the as-atomized powder plates. The measured bubble number densities per unit grain boundary length for as-atomized powder plates are approximately constant with respect to burnup. Bubble density per unit cross section area was calculated using the density per unit grain boundary length data. The grains were modeled as tetrakaidecahedrons. Direct measurements for some plates were also performed and compared with the calculated quantities. Bubble density per unit

  11. Experimental determination of gas-bubble breakup in a constricted cylindrical capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; St Laurent, C.M.; Radke, C.J.

    1988-07-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of gas-foam generation in porous media, this work quantifies how smaller bubbles snap off from a single, larger bubble as it moves through a smooth, cylindrical constriction. Time to snap off, generated bubble size, and bubble velocity are obtained from viewing 16-mm movies taken of snap-off events. The bubble capillary number, Ca/sub GAMMA, is varied from 10/sup -5/ to 5 x 10/sup -2/. The authors study two narrowly constricted capillaries of different tube radii (neck radius/tube radius of 0.17 and 0.20) and one widely constricted capillary (neck radius/tube radius = 0.40). In the widely constricted capillary, time to breakup is proportional to Ca/sub GAMMA/sup -2/, and the generated bubble length is proportional to Ca/sub GAMMA/sup -1/. In the narrow constrictions, the same results apply above Ca/sub GAMMA = 5 x 10/sup -4/; below this critical Ca/sub GAMMA, time to breakup is independent of Ca/sub GAMMA but depends on the Ohnesorge number. Snap-off behavior with surfactant solutions is found to be similar to that in surfactant-free solutions.

  12. Effects of gas bubble production on heat transfer from a volumetrically heated liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Geoffrey R.

    Aqueous solutions of uranium salts may provide a new supply chain to fill potential shortfalls in the availability of the most common radiopharmaceuticals currently in use worldwide, including Tc99m which is a decay product of Mo99. The fissioning of the uranium in these solutions creates Mo99 but also generates large amounts of hydrogen and oxygen from the radiolysis of the water. When the dissolved gases reach a critical concentration, bubbles will form in the solution. Bubbles in the solution affect both the fission power and the heat transfer out of the solution. As a result, for safety and production calculations, the effects of the bubbles on heat transfer must be understood. A high aspect ratio tank was constructed to simulate a section of an annulus with heat exchangers on the inner and outer steel walls to provide cooling. Temperature measurements via thermocouples inside the tank and along the outside of the steel walls allowed the calculation of overall and local heat transfer coefficients. Different air injection manifolds allowed the exploration of various bubble characteristics and patterns on heat transfer from the pool. The manifold type did not appear to have significant impact on the bubble size distributions in water. However, air injected into solutions of magnesium sulfate resulted in smaller bubble sizes and larger void fractions than those in water at the same injection rates. One dimensional calculations provide heat transfer coefficient values as functions of the superficial gas velocity in the pool.

  13. Field nano-localization of gas bubble production from water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammadi, Z.; Morin, R.; Olives, J.

    2013-11-01

    Using a tip shaped electrode and ac voltages, we show that the production of micro bubbles of gas from water electrolysis is localized at the tip apex inside a domain in the voltage frequency phase space. A model taking into account the electrode shape and dimensions explains these results which suggest a field effect control of the electrolysis reaction rate at a nanometer scale.

  14. Severe gas bubble disease in a warmwater fishery in the midwestern united states

    SciTech Connect

    Crunkilton, R.L.; Czarnezki, J.M.; Trial, L.

    1980-11-01

    Supersaturation of the water of the Osage River below the Harry S. Truman Dam resulted in an epidemic of gas bubble disease that caused the largest fish kill in the history of Missouri. This is the first recorded evidence of serious supersaturation in the midwestern U.S. Total gas saturation levels up to 139% killed nearly 500,000 fish in the Osage River and the Lake of the Ozarks during April-May 1978. Nitrogen was the primary gas responsible for gas bubble disease mortalities. Instream cage bioassays defined the zone of lethal supersaturation. Significant mortality occurred in pelagic and near-shore species, deepwater species, and bottom-dwelling species. Susceptibility to disease was related to fish size.

  15. Numerical simulation of bubble collapse and the transfer of vapor and noncondensable gas through the bubble interface using the ghost fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinbo, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Watanabe, M.; Takahira, H.

    2015-12-01

    The ghost fluid method is improved to include heat and mass transfer across the gas- liquid interface during the bubble collapse in a compressible liquid. This transfer is due to both nonequilibrium phase transition at the interface and diffusion of the noncondensable gas across the interface. In the present method, the ghost fluids are defined with the intention of conserving the total mass, momentum, and energy, as well as the mass of each component while considering the heat and mass fluxes across the interface. The gas phase inside the bubble is a mixture of vapor and noncondensable gas, where binary diffusion between the mixture components is taken into account. The gas diffusion in the surrounding liquid is also considered. This method is applied to a simulation of a single spherical bubble collapse with heat and mass transfer across the interface in a compressible liquid. When noncondensable gas is present, it accumulates near the interface due to vapor condensation, thereby preventing further condensation. This results in a weaker bubble collapse than the case without noncondensable gas.

  16. The effect of exercise and rest duration on the generation of venous gas bubbles at altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervay, Joseph P.; Powell, Michael R.; Butler, Bruce; Fife, Caroline E.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decompression, as occurs with aviators and astronauts undergoing high altitude operations or with deep-sea divers returning to surface, can cause gas bubbles to form within the organism. Pressure changes to evoke bubble formation in vivo during depressurization are several orders of magnitude less than those required for gas phase formation in vitro in quiescent liquids. Preformed micronuclei acting as "seeds" have been proposed, dating back to the 1940's. These tissue gas micronuclei have been attributed to a minute gas phase located in hydrophobic cavities, surfactant-stabilized microbubbles, or arising from musculoskeletal activity. The lifetimes of these micronuclei have been presumed to be from a few minutes to several weeks. HYPOTHESIS: The greatest incidence of venous gas emboli (VGE) will be detected by precordial Doppler ultrasound with depressurization immediately following lower extremity exercise, with progressively reduced levels of VGE observed as the interval from exercise to depressurization lengthens. METHODS: In a blinded cross-over design, 20 individuals (15 men, 5 women) at sea level exercised by performing knee-bend squats (150 knee flexes over 10 min, 235-kcal x h(-1)) either at the beginning, middle, or end of a 2-h chair-rest period without an oxygen prebreathe. Seated subjects were then depressurized to 6.2 psia (6,706 m or 22,000 ft altitude equivalent) for 120 min with no exercise performed at altitude. RESULTS: Of the 20 subjects with VGE in the pulmonary artery, 10 demonstrated a greater incidence of bubbles with exercise performed just prior to depressurization, compared with decreasing bubble grades and incidence as the interval of rest increased prior to depressurization. No decompression illness was reported. CONCLUSIONS: There is a significant increase in decompression-induced bubble formation at 6.2 psia when lower extremity exercise is performed just prior to depressurization as compared with longer rest intervals. Analysis indicated that micronuclei half-life is on the order of an hour under these hypobaric conditions.

  17. About the equilibrium speed of sound in a liquid with gas-vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Gubaidullina, D. D.; Fedorov, Yu V.

    2016-01-01

    The general expression of an equilibrium velocity of a sound in vapor-gas-liquid mixtures is presented and influence of concentration of vapor and a volume content of bubbles on the received expression is analyzed. In special cases, for gas-liquid and vapor-liquid mixtures expressions of an equilibrium velocity are presented and the satisfactory consent of the received expressions with known experimental data is discovered.

  18. The Experimental Study of Dynamics of Scaled Gas-Filled Bubble Collapse in Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, Alexander

    2011-06-01

    The article provides results of analyzing special features of the single-bubble sonoluminescence, developing the special apparatus to investigate this phenomenon on a larger-scale basis. Certain very important effects of high energy density physics, i.e. liquid compressibility, shock-wave formation under the collapse of the gas cavity in liquid, shock-wave focusing in the gas-filled cavity, occurrence of hot dense plasma in the focusing area, and high-temperature radiation yield are observed in this phenomenon. Specificity of the process is conditioned by the ``ideal'' preparation and sphericity of the gas-and-liquid contact boundary what makes the collapse process efficient due to the reduced influence of hydrodynamic instabilities. Results of experimental investigations; results of developing the facilities, description of methods used to register parameters of facilities and the system under consideration; analytical estimates how gas-filled bubbles evolve in liquid with the regard for scale effects; results of preliminary 1-D gas dynamic calculations of the gas bubble evolution are presented. The work supported by ISTC Project #2116.

  19. Removal of dichloromethane from waste gas streams using a hybrid bubble column/biofilter bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a hybrid bubble column/biofilter (HBCB) bioreactor for the removal of dichloromethane (DCM) from waste gas streams was studied in continuous mode for several months. The HBCB bioreactor consisted of two compartments: bubble column bioreactor removing DCM from liquid phase and biofilter removing DCM from gas phase. Effect of inlet DCM concentration on the elimination capacity was examined in the DCM concentration range of 34–359 ppm with loading rates ranged from 2.2 to 22.8 g/m3.h and constant total empty bed retention time (EBRT) of 200 s. In the equal loading rates, the elimination capacity and removal efficiency of the biofilter were higher than the corresponding values of the bubble column bioreactor. The maximum elimination capacity of the HBCB bioreactor was determined to be 15.7 g/m3.h occurred in the highest loading rate of 22.8 g/m3.h with removal efficiency of 69%. The overall mineralization portion of the HBCB bioreactor was in the range of 72-79%. The mixed liquor acidic pH especially below 5.5 inhibited microbial activity and decreased the elimination capacity. Inhibitory effect of high ionic strength was initiated in the mixed liquor electrical conductivity of 12.2 mS/cm. This study indicated that the HBCB bioreactor could benefit from advantages of both bubble column and biofilter reactors and could remove DCM from waste gas streams in a better manner. PMID:24406056

  20. Thermocapillary migration of a gas bubble in an arbitrary direction with respect to a plane surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Shankar Subramanian, R.

    1987-01-01

    The thermocapillary migration of a gas bubble in an unbounded fluid in the presence of a neighboring rigid plane surface is considered in the limit of negligible Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. Results are given for a scalar interaction parameter defined as the ratio of the speed of the bubble in the presence of the plane surface to the speed in its absence. It is suggested that the weaker interaction effects noted for the case of thermocapillary migration relative to the case of motion due to a body force such as that caused by a gravitational field is attributable to the more rapid decay, away from the bubble, of the disturbance velocity and temperature gradient fields. The surface is found to exert the greatest influence in the case of motion normal to it, and the weakest influence in the case of parallel motion.

  1. Catalytic microtubular jet engines self-propelled by accumulated gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Solovev, Alexander A; Mei, Yongfeng; Bermdez Urea, Esteban; Huang, Gaoshan; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2009-07-01

    Strain-engineered microtubes with an inner catalytic surface serve as self-propelled microjet engines with speeds of up to approximately 2 mm s(-1) (approximately 50 body lengths per second). The motion of the microjets is caused by gas bubbles ejecting from one opening of the tube, and the velocity can be well approximated by the product of the bubble radius and the bubble ejection frequency. Trajectories of various different geometries are well visualized by long microbubble tails. If a magnetic layer is integrated into the wall of the microjet engine, we can control and localize the trajectories by applying external rotating magnetic fields. Fluid (i.e., fuel) pumping through the microtubes is revealed and directly clarifies the working principle of the catalytic microjet engines. PMID:19373828

  2. The Holdup Measurement System II (HMSII)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.E.; Gibson, J.S.; Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Russo, P.A.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.

    1993-07-12

    A project is in progress that addresses two of the problems with existing holdup measurement technology: the need for compact instrumentation and a more efficient means of reducing the massive amounts of data to quantities of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). The approach taken by the project utilizes the Miniature Modular MultiChannel Analyzer (M{sup 3}CA), a complete and truly portable gamma-ray spectroscopy system, under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The hardware is then integrated and automated by the Holdup Measurement System II (HMSII) software being developed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Together they provide the hardware components, measurement control in the field, automated data acquisition, data storage and manipulation which simplify holdup measurements.

  3. Direct numerical simulation of single gas bubbles in pure and contaminated liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Peter; Ehrhard, Peter

    2008-11-01

    Disperse gas bubbles play an important role in many industrial applications. Knowing the rising velocity, the interfacial area, or the critical size for break-up or coalescence in different systems can be crucial for the process design. Hence, knowing the fundamental behaviour of a single bubble appears mandatory for the examination of bubble swarms and for the Euler-Lagrange or Euler--Euler modelling of disperse systems. In the present work a level--set--based volume--tracking method is implemented into the CFD--code OpenFOAM to follow the free interface of a single bubble. The volume-tracking method is coupled with a transport model for surfactants on the interface, including adsorption and desorption processes. The dependency of surface tension on the local surfactant concentration on the interface is modelled by a non-linear (Langmuir) equation of state. Marangoni forces, resulting from surface tension gradients, are included. The rise of a single air bubble (i) in pure water and (ii) in the presence of surfactants of different strengths is simulated. The results show good agreement with available (experimental and theoretical) correlations from literature.

  4. Two-stage process for conversion of synthesis gas to high quality transportation fuels. Quarterly report, 8 June-30 September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, J.C.W.

    1983-11-01

    The design of two large hot-flow models, to be used for slurry bubble-column hydrodynamic studies, is described. Scoping experiments were performed in smaller models to study the effects of feed-gas distributor type, column diameter, and liquid medium on gas holdup and bubble sizes. In addition, a literature review of bubble-column hydrodynamics is presented. Modifications to improve the operation and flexibility of the existing two stage pilot plant have been designed and construction initiated. Also, a sample of reactor-wax was fractionated under vacuum in a laboratory still. 8 figures, 4 tables.

  5. The speed of sound in a gas-vapour bubbly liquid.

    PubMed

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    In addition to the vapour of the liquid, bubbles in cavitating flows usually contain also a certain amount of permanent gas that diffuses out of the liquid as they grow. This paper presents a simplified linear model for the propagation of monochromatic pressure waves in a bubbly liquid with these characteristics. Phase change effects are included in detail, while the gas is assumed to follow a polytropic law. It is shown that even a small amount of permanent gas can have a major effect on the behaviour of the system. Particular attention is paid to the low-frequency range, which is of special concern in flow cavitation. Numerical results for water and liquid oxygen illustrate the implications of the model. PMID:26442146

  6. A Mathematical Model of Diffusion-Limited Gas Bubble Dynamics in Tissue with Varying Diffusion Region Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A three-region mathematical model of gas bubble dynamics has been shown suitable for describing diffusion-limited dynamics of more than one bubble in a given volume of extravascular tissue. The model is based on the dynamics of gas exchange between a bubble and a well-stirred tissue region through an intervening unperfused diffusion region previously assumed to have constant thickness and uniform gas diffusivity. As a result, the gas content of the diffusion region remains constant as the volume of the region increases with bubble growth, causing dissolved gas in the region to violate Henry's law. Earlier work also neglected the relationship between the varying diffusion region volume and the fixed total tissue volume, because only cases in which the diffusion region volume is a small fraction of the overall tissue volume were considered. We herein extend the three-region model to correct these theoretical inconsistencies by allowing both the thickness and gas content of the diffusion region to vary during bubble evolution. A postulated difference in gas diffusivity between an infinitesimally thin layer at the bubble surface and the remainder of the diffusion region leads to variation in diffusion region gas content and thickness during bubble growth and resolution. This variable thickness, differential diffusivity (VTDD) model can yield bubble lifetimes considerably longer than those yielded by earlier three-region models for given model and decompression parameters, and meets a need for theoretically consistent but relatively simple bubble dynamics models for use in studies of decompression sickness (DCS) in human subjects, Keywords: decompression sickness, gas diffusion in tissue, diffusivity

  7. Holdup Measurement System 4 (HMS4)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-01-15

    Nuclear material holdup in equipment is a consequence of the normal processing of nuclear material. The environmental, safety, and health (S&H) concerns, as well as those of nuclear materials accountability and safeguards, create the increasing demand for measurements of the holdup. To meet this demand, facility operators will have to have higher quality results in a timelier manner. To achieve this many thousands of items will have to be measured in a facility on amore » routine basis. These measurements will probably be made by personnel without an expertise in nuclear measurements.« less

  8. Analysis of diffusion of noncondensable gas in liquid around gaseous bubble nucleus in pressure reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mukasa, Shinobu; Mizukami, Koichi; Wada, Kazuhiro

    1999-07-01

    To know the boiling inception condition is one of the fundamental problems in boiling heat transfer research and is often concerned with evaluation of safety and reliability of apparatuses cooled by means of boiling. The boiling liquid is not necessarily free from noncondensable gas. For example, liquid sodium in a fast nuclear reactor contains inert gas. The purpose of this study is to develop a well established method for evaluating the effect of noncondensable gas on the condition of boiling inception induced by pressure reduction. In their previous study, the authors adopted one-directional diffusion equation to describe the diffusion of noncondensable gas in the liquid around a bubble nucleus growing due to pressure reduction. However the equation is an approximation obtained by ignoring the advection due to the movement of the liquid accompanied by the growth of the bubble nucleus. In the present study is derived a pseudo-spherical diffusion equation which includes the advection effect. The equation is applied for the investigation of the growth of gaseous bubble nucleus and the boiling inception caused by pressure reduction. Calculations are made for such combinations of liquid and noncondensable gas as liquid sodium and argon, water and oxygen, and water and nitrogen. The growing process of gaseous bubble nucleus and the boiling inception condition are analyzed and compared with those with the previous method. The modified curvatures at boiling does not differ greatly between two analyses, whereas the growth processes are quite different from those with the previous method. The effect of temperature, pressure reduction rate, cavity size and solubility of noncondensable gas are examined.

  9. Compositional Discrimination of Decompression and Decomposition Gas Bubbles in Bycaught Seals and Dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Bernaldo de Quirs, Yara; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Greer, Bill; Niemeyer, Misty; Bogomolni, Andrea L.; Moore, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Gas bubbles in marine mammals entangled and drowned in gillnets have been previously described by computed tomography, gross examination and histopathology. The absence of bacteria or autolytic changes in the tissues of those animals suggested that the gas was produced peri- or post-mortem by a fast decompression, probably by quickly hauling animals entangled in the net at depth to the surface. Gas composition analysis and gas scoring are two new diagnostic tools available to distinguish gas embolisms from putrefaction gases. With this goal, these methods have been successfully applied to pathological studies of marine mammals. In this study, we characterized the flux and composition of the gas bubbles from bycaught marine mammals in anchored sink gillnets and bottom otter trawls. We compared these data with marine mammals stranded on Cape Cod, MA, USA. Fresh animals or with moderate decomposition (decomposition scores of 2 and 3) were prioritized. Results showed that bycaught animals presented with significantly higher gas scores than stranded animals. Gas composition analyses indicate that gas was formed by decompression, confirming the decompression hypothesis. PMID:24367623

  10. Two-phase mixture in a reactor with a TPJ gas distributor: The statistical model of bubble population

    SciTech Connect

    Pindur, K.; Pawelczyk, R.

    1996-12-31

    Statistical description is presented of the population of bubbles produced in a two-phase mixture in a reactor using a novel TPJ (Two Perpendicular Jets) gas distributor. The analysis performed supports the idea that it is the lognormal distribution which should be assumed as a statistical model of the population of bubble diameters.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U-7wt% Mo dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Miller; J. Gan; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.-F. Jue; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev

    2015-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy characterization of irradiated U-7wt% Mo dispersion fuel was performed on various samples to understand the effect of irradiation parameters (fission density, fission rate, and temperature) on the self-organized fission-gas-bubble superlattice that forms in the irradiated U-Mo fuel. The bubble superlattice was seen to form a face-centered cubic structure coherent with the host U-7wt% Mo body centered cubic structure. At a fission density between 3.0 and 4.5 x 1021 fiss/cm3, the superlattice bubbles appear to have reached a saturation size with additional fission gas associated with increasing burnup predominately accumulating along grain boundaries. At a fission density of ~4.5x1021 fiss/cm3, the U-7wt% Mo microstructure undergoes grain subdivision and can no longer support the ordered bubble superlattice. The fuel grains are primarily less than 500 nm in diameter with micron-size fission-gas bubbles present on the grain boundaries. Solid fission products decorate the inside surface of the micron-sized fission-gas bubbles. Residual superlattice bubbles are seen in areas where fuel grains remain micron sized. Potential mechanisms of the formation and collapse of the bubble superlattice are discussed.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U-7 wt%Mo dispersion fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. D.; Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Robinson, A. B.; Jue, J. F.; Madden, J. W.; Medvedev, P. G.

    2015-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy characterization of irradiated U-7 wt%Mo dispersion fuel were performed on various U-Mo fuel samples to understand the effect of irradiation parameters (fission density, fission rate, and temperature) on the self-organized fission-gas-bubble superlattice that forms in the irradiated U-Mo fuel. The bubble superlattice was seen to form a face centered cubic structure coherent with the host U-7 wt%Mo body-centered cubic structure. At a fission density between 3.0 and 4.5 1021 fiss/cm3, the superlattice bubbles appear to have reached a saturation size with additional fission gas associated with increasing burnup predominately accumulating along grain boundaries. At a fission density of ?4.5 1021 fiss/cm3, the U-7 wt%Mo microstructure starts to undergo grain subdivision and can no longer support the ordered bubble superlattice. The sub-divided fuel grains are less than 500 nm in diameter with what appears to be micron-size fission-gas bubbles present on the grain boundaries. Solid fission products typically decorate the inside surface of the micron-sized fission-gas bubbles. Residual superlattice bubbles are seen in areas where fuel grains remain micron sized. Potential mechanisms of the formation and collapse of the bubble superlattice are discussed.

  13. Prospecting for zones of contaminated ground-water discharge to streams using bottom-sediment gas bubbles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    1991-01-01

    Decomposition of organic-rich bottom sediment in a tidal creek in Maryland results in production of gas bubbles in the bottom sediment during summer and fall. In areas where volatile organic contaminants discharge from ground water, through the bottom sediment, and into the creek, part of the volatile contamination diffuses into the gas bubbles and is released to the atmosphere by ebullition. Collection and analysis of gas bubbles for their volatile organic contaminant content indicate that relative concentrations of the volatile organic contaminants in the gas bubbles are substantially higher in areas where the same contaminants occur in the ground water that discharges to the streams. Analyses of the bubbles located an area of previously unknown ground-water contamination. The method developed for this study consisted of disturbing the bottom sediment to release gas bubbles, and then capturing the bubbles in a polyethylene bag at the water-column surface. The captured gas was transferred either into sealable polyethylene bags for immediate analysis with a photoionization detector or by syringe to glass tubes containing wires coated with an activated-carbon adsorbent. Relative concentrations were determined by mass spectral analysis for chloroform and trichloroethylene.

  14. Generating singlet oxygen bubbles: a new mechanism for gas-liquid oxidations in water.

    PubMed

    Bartusik, Dorota; Aebisher, David; Ghafari, BiBi; Lyons, Alan M; Greer, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Laser-coupled microphotoreactors were developed to bubble singlet oxygen [(1)O(2) ((1)Δ(g))] into an aqueous solution containing an oxidizable compound. The reactors consisted of custom-modified SMA fiberoptic receptacles loaded with 150 μm silicon phthalocyanine glass sensitizer particles, where the particles were isolated from direct contact with water by a membrane adhesively bonded to the bottom of each device. A tube fed O(2) gas to the reactor chambers. In the presence of O(2), singlet oxygen was generated by illuminating the sensitizer particles with 669 nm light from an optical fiber coupled to the top of the reactor. The generated (1)O(2) was transported through the membrane by the O(2) stream and formed bubbles in solution. In solution, singlet oxygen reacted with probe compounds (9,10-anthracene dipropionate dianion, trans-2-methyl-2-pentanoate anion, N-benzoyl-D,L-methionine, or N-acetyl-D,L-methionine) to give oxidized products in two stages. The early stage was rapid and showed that (1)O(2) transfer occurred via bubbles mainly in the bulk water solution. The later stage was slow; it arose only from (1)O(2)-probe molecule contact at the gas/liquid interface. A mechanism is proposed that involves (1)O(2) mass transfer and solvation, where smaller bubbles provide better penetration of (1)O(2) into the flowing stream due to higher surface-to-volume contact between the probe molecules and (1)O(2). PMID:22260325

  15. Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring and Research of Juvenile Salmonids, 1994-1995 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hans, Karen M.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes laboratory and field monitoring studies of gas bubble trauma (GBT) in migrating juvenile salmonids in the Snake and Columbia rivers. The first chapter describes laboratory studies of the progression of GBT signs leading to mortality and the use of the signs for GBT assessment. The progression and severity of GBT signs in juvenile salmonids exposed to different levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) and temperatures was assessed and quantified. Next, the prevalence, severity, and individual variation of GBT signs was evaluated to attempt to relate them to mortality. Finally, methods for gill examination in fish exposed to high TDG were developed and evaluated. Primary findings were: (1) no single sign of GBT was clearly correlated with mortality, but many GBT signs progressively worsened; (2) both prevalence and severity of GBT signs in several tissues is necessary; (3) bubbles in the lateral line were the earliest sign of GBT, showed progressive worsening, and had low individual variation but may develop poorly during chronic exposures; (4) fin bubbles had high prevalence, progressively worsened, and may be a persistent sign of GBT; and (5) gill bubbles appear to be the proximate cause of death but may only be relevant at high TDG levels and are difficult to examine. Chapter Two describes monitoring results of juvenile salmonids for signs of GBT. Emigrating fish were collected and examined for bubbles in fins and lateral lines. Preliminary findings were: (1) few fish had signs of GBT, but prevalence and severity appeared to increase as fish migrated downstream; (2) there was no apparent correlation between GBT signs in the fins, lateral line, or gills; (3) prevalence and severity of GBT was suggestive of long-term, non-lethal exposure to relatively low level gas supersaturated water; and (4) it appeared that GBT was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids. 24 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Gas bubble retention and its effect on waste properties: Retention mechanisms, viscosity, and tensile and shear strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Powell, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    Several of the underground nuclear storage tanks at Hanford have been placed on a flammable gas watch list, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. Because retention and episodic release of flammable gases from these tanks containing radioactive waste slurries are critical safety concerns, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the episodic gas release from these storage tanks. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNL Flammable Gas project. Previous investigations have concluded that gas bubbles are retained by the slurry or sludge that has settled at the bottom of the tanks; however, the mechanisms responsible for the retention of these bubbles are not well understood. Understanding the rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles and the dynamics of how these bubbles are released from the waste. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, specifically its viscosity and tensile and shear strengths, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. The objectives of this study were to conduct experiments and develop theories to understand better how bubbles are retained by slurries and sludges, to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of simulated slurries, and to measure the effect of gas bubbles on the tensile and shear strengths of simulated slurries and sludges. In addition to accomplishing these objectives, this study developed correlations, based on the new experimental data, that can be used in large-scale computations of waste tank physical phenomena.

  17. Finite-sized gas bubble motion in a blood vessel: Non-Newtonian effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundakrishnan, Karthik; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Eckmann, David M.

    2008-09-01

    We have numerically investigated the axisymmetric motion of a finite-sized nearly occluding air bubble through a shear-thinning Casson fluid flowing in blood vessels of circular cross section. The numerical solution entails solving a two-layer fluid modela cell-free layer and a non-Newtonian core together with the gas bubble. This problem is of interest to the field of rheology and for gas embolism studies in health sciences. The numerical method is based on a modified front-tracking method. The viscosity expression in the Casson model for blood (bulk fluid) includes the hematocrit [the volume fraction of red blood cells (RBCs)] as an explicit parameter. Three different flow Reynolds numbers, Reapp=?lUmaxd/?app , in the neighborhood of 0.2, 2, and 200 are investigated. Here, ?l is the density of blood, Umax is the centerline velocity of the inlet Casson profile, d is the diameter of the vessel, and ?app is the apparent viscosity of whole blood. Three different hematocrits have also been considered: 0.45, 0.4, and 0.335. The vessel sizes considered correspond to small arteries, and small and large arterioles in normal humans. The degree of bubble occlusion is characterized by the ratio of bubble to vessel radius (aspect ratio), ? , in the range 0.9???1.05 . For arteriolar flow, where relevant, the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effects are taken into account. Both horizontal and vertical vessel geometries have been investigated. Many significant insights are revealed by our study: (i) bubble motion causes large temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the endothelial cell (EC) surface lining the blood vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it, and passes it by; (ii) rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress (+ ? - ? +) imparted to the cell surface during bubble motion; (iii) large shear stress gradients together with sign reversals are ascribable to the development of a recirculation vortex at the rear of the bubble; (iv) computed magnitudes of shear stress gradients coupled with their sign reversals may correspond to levels that cause injury to the cell by membrane disruption through impulsive compression and stretching; and (v) for the vessel sizes and flow rates investigated, gravitational effects are negligible.

  18. The Bubble Box: Towards an Automated Visual Sensor for 3D Analysis and Characterization of Marine Gas Release Sites

    PubMed Central

    Jordt, Anne; Zelenka, Claudius; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Koch, Reinhard; Köser, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Several acoustic and optical techniques have been used for characterizing natural and anthropogenic gas leaks (carbon dioxide, methane) from the ocean floor. Here, single-camera based methods for bubble stream observation have become an important tool, as they help estimating flux and bubble sizes under certain assumptions. However, they record only a projection of a bubble into the camera and therefore cannot capture the full 3D shape, which is particularly important for larger, non-spherical bubbles. The unknown distance of the bubble to the camera (making it appear larger or smaller than expected) as well as refraction at the camera interface introduce extra uncertainties. In this article, we introduce our wide baseline stereo-camera deep-sea sensor bubble box that overcomes these limitations, as it observes bubbles from two orthogonal directions using calibrated cameras. Besides the setup and the hardware of the system, we discuss appropriate calibration and the different automated processing steps deblurring, detection, tracking, and 3D fitting that are crucial to arrive at a 3D ellipsoidal shape and rise speed of each bubble. The obtained values for single bubbles can be aggregated into statistical bubble size distributions or fluxes for extrapolation based on diffusion and dissolution models and large scale acoustic surveys. We demonstrate and evaluate the wide baseline stereo measurement model using a controlled test setup with ground truth information. PMID:26690168

  19. The Bubble Box: Towards an Automated Visual Sensor for 3D Analysis and Characterization of Marine Gas Release Sites.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Anne; Zelenka, Claudius; von Deimling, Jens Schneider; Koch, Reinhard; Köser, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Several acoustic and optical techniques have been used for characterizing natural and anthropogenic gas leaks (carbon dioxide, methane) from the ocean floor. Here, single-camera based methods for bubble stream observation have become an important tool, as they help estimating flux and bubble sizes under certain assumptions. However, they record only a projection of a bubble into the camera and therefore cannot capture the full 3D shape, which is particularly important for larger, non-spherical bubbles. The unknown distance of the bubble to the camera (making it appear larger or smaller than expected) as well as refraction at the camera interface introduce extra uncertainties. In this article, we introduce our wide baseline stereo-camera deep-sea sensor bubble box that overcomes these limitations, as it observes bubbles from two orthogonal directions using calibrated cameras. Besides the setup and the hardware of the system, we discuss appropriate calibration and the different automated processing steps deblurring, detection, tracking, and 3D fitting that are crucial to arrive at a 3D ellipsoidal shape and rise speed of each bubble. The obtained values for single bubbles can be aggregated into statistical bubble size distributions or fluxes for extrapolation based on diffusion and dissolution models and large scale acoustic surveys. We demonstrate and evaluate the wide baseline stereo measurement model using a controlled test setup with ground truth information. PMID:26690168

  20. Gas bubbles in seals, dolphins, and porpoises entangled and drowned at depth in gillnets.

    PubMed

    Moore, M J; Bogomolni, A L; Dennison, S E; Early, G; Garner, M M; Hayward, B A; Lentell, B J; Rotstein, D S

    2009-05-01

    Gas bubbles were found in 15 of 23 gillnet-drowned bycaught harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus), harbor (Phoca vitulina) and gray (Halichoerus grypus) seals, common (Delphinus delphis) and white-sided (Lagenorhyncus acutus) dolphins, and harbor porpoises (Phocaena phocaena) but in only 1 of 41 stranded marine mammals. Cases with minimal scavenging and bloating were chilled as practical and necropsied within 24 to 72 hours of collection. Bubbles were commonly visible grossly and histologically in bycaught cases. Affected tissues included lung, liver, heart, brain, skeletal muscle, gonad, lymph nodes, blood, intestine, pancreas, spleen, and eye. Computed tomography performed on 4 animals also identified gas bubbles in various tissues. Mean +/- SD net lead line depths (m) were 92 +/- 44 and ascent rates (ms(-1)) 0.3 +/- 0.2 for affected animals and 76 +/- 33 and 0.2 +/- 0.1, respectively, for unaffected animals. The relatively good carcass condition of these cases, comparable to 2 stranded cases that showed no gas formation on computed tomography (even after 3 days of refrigeration in one case), along with the histologic absence of bacteria and autolytic changes, indicate that peri- or postmortem phase change of supersaturated blood and tissues is most likely. Studies have suggested that under some circumstances, diving mammals are routinely supersaturated and that these mammals presumably manage gas exchange and decompression anatomically and behaviorally. This study provides a unique illustration of such supersaturated tissues. We suggest that greater attention be paid to the radiology and pathology of bycatch mortality as a possible model to better understand gas bubble disease in marine mammals. PMID:19176498

  1. IR dust bubbles: gas, dust and star formation in the S21-S24 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, E. C.; Romero, A. G.; Vasquez, J.; Firpo, V.; Dorunea, N.; Rubio, M.; Kobilnicky, C.

    2013-06-01

    Churchwell et al. (2006) identified many IR dust bubbles in the GLIMPSE images at 8 μm. Among these bubbles, S21, S22, S23, and S24 conform a poorly studied complex plenty of small scale bubbles, with IRDCs and signposts of recent star formation, located at about 4.5 kpc. Based on 12CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), and 13CO(3-2) line observations obtained with the APEX telescope (angular resolution of 20"-30"), LABOCA continuum observations at 870 μm (angular resolution of 18.5") also from APEX, Spitzer-IRAC and -MIPS images in the near and mid IR (3.6 to 24 μm, and Herschel-PACS and -SPIRE images in the far infrared (70-500 μm), we performed an analysis of the characteristics of the gas and dust in this high density complex. This study allowed molecular shells linked to these bubbles to be revealed, and to estimate new distances, excitation conditions, masses, and ambient densities. Cold dust counterparts were revealed by Herschel and LABOCA images, showing the material available for new generations of stars. In addition to the presence of EGOs and methanol masers, a search for young stellar objets in the complex using the available data at several wavelengths in the infrared revealed many active areas of star formation coincident with the densest regions. We compare our results with those for other IR dust bubbles and investigate the possibility that the expansion of the bubbles has triggered the star formation activity.

  2. Gas bubbles in fossil amber as possible indicators of the major gas composition of ancient air

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berner, R.A.; Landis, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    Gases trapped in Miocene to Upper Cretaceous amber were released by gently crushing the amber under vacuum and were analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. After discounting the possibility that the major gases N2, O2, and CO2 underwent appreciable diffusion and diagenetic exchange with their surroundings or reaction with the amber, it has been concluded that in primary bubbles (gas released during initial breakage) these gases represent mainly original ancient air modified by the aerobic respiration of microorganisms. Values of N2/(CO2+O2) for each time period give consistent results despite varying O2/CO2 ratios that presumably were due to varying degrees of respiration. This allows calculation of original oxygen concentrations, which, on the basis of these preliminary results, appear to have changed from greater than 30 percent O2 during one part ofthe Late Cretaceous (between 75 and 95 million years ago) to 21 percent during the Eocene-Oligocene and for present-day samples, with possibly lower values during the Oligocene-Early Miocene. Variable O2 levels over time in general confirm theoretical isotope-mass balance calculations and suggest that the atmosphere has evolved over Phanerozoic time.

  3. A comprehensive fission gas release model considering multiple bubble sizes on the grain boundary under steady-state conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, W.; Suk, H.C. ); Jae, W.M. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on a comprehensive fission gas release model developed by considering the behavior of multiple bubble sizes on the fuel grain boundary in terms of relevant physical parameters. This model takes into account bubble migration and coalescence; critical bubble size, which depends on the thermal gradient on the grain boundary; and the lenticular shape of the bubbles. Booth's classical diffusion theory is directly adopted in the modeling of intragranular fission gas behavior. To consider the bubble drift due to the thermal gradient, those bubbles that exceed the critical bubble size are assumed to be left on the grain boundary and to migrate along the thermal gradient until they encounter free voidages. Use of this model in the KAFEPA code, which predicts the absolute magnitude and the trend of the gas release depending on power history, gives better agreement with the experimental data than the predictions of the model in the ELESIM code, which considers only a single bubble size at the grain boundary.

  4. Thermal stability of fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U-10Mo fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Robinson, A. B.; Wachs, D. M.; Meyer, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice, a key microstructural feature in both irradiated U-7Mo dispersion and U-10Mo monolithic fuel plates, a focused ion beam-transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM) sample of irradiated U-10Mo fuel with a local fission density of 3.5 1021 fissions/cm3 was used for an in-situ heating TEM experiment. The temperature of the heating holder was raised at a ramp rate of approximately 10 C/min up to ?700 C, kept at that temperature for about 34 min and further increased to 850 C with a reduced rate of 5 C/min. The result shows a high thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice. The implication of this observation on the fuel microstructural evolution and performance under irradiation is discussed.

  5. Molecular gas and star formation toward the IR dust bubble S 24 and its environs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. E.; Duronea, N.; Firpo, V.; Vasquez, J.; Lpez-Caraballo, C. H.; Rubio, M.; Vazzano, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We present a multiwavelength analysis of the infrared dust bubble S 24 and the extended IR sources G341.220-0.213 and G341.217-0.237 located in its environs. We aim to investigate the characteristics of the molecular gas and the interstellar dust linked to them and analyze the evolutionary state of the young stellar objects identified there and the relation of the bubble to S 24 and the IR sources. Methods: Using the APEX telescope, we mapped the molecular emission in the CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), C18O(2-1), and 13CO(3-2) lines in a region of about 5' 5' in size around the bubble. The cold dust distribution was analyzed using submillimeter continuum images from ATLASGAL and Herschel. Complementary IR and radio data at different wavelengths were used to complete the study of the interstellar medium in the region. Results: The molecular gas distribution shows that gas linked to the S 24 bubble and to G341.220-0.213 and G341.217-0.237 has velocities of between -48.0 km s-1 and -40.0 km s-1, compatible with the kinematical distance of 3.7 kpc that is generally adopted for the region. The gas distribution reveals a shell-like molecular structure of ~0.8 pc in radius bordering the S 24 bubble. A cold dust counterpart of the shell is detected in the LABOCA and Herschel-SPIRE images. The weak extended emission at 24 ?m from warm dust and radio continuum emission projected inside the bubble indicates exciting sources and that the bubble is a compact HII region. Part of the molecular gas bordering the S 24 HII region coincides with the extended infrared dust cloud SDC341.194-0.221. A molecular and cold dust clump is present at the interface between the S 24 HII region and G341.217-0.237, shaping the eastern border of the IR bubble. The arc-like molecular structure encircling the northern and eastern sections of the IR source G341.220-0.213 indicates that the source is interacting with the molecular gas. The analysis of the available IR point source catalogs reveals some young stellar object candidates linked to the IR-extended sources, thus confirming their nature as active star-forming regions. Gas and dust masses were estimated for the different features. The total gas mass in the region and the H2 ambient density amount to 10 300 M? and 5900 cm-3, indicating that G341.220-0.213, G341.217-0.237, and the S 24 HII region are evolving in a high-density medium. A triggering star formation scenario for the HII region is investigated. Final reduced APEX data cube in FITS format is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A30

  6. Thermal stability of fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U10Mo fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Robinson, A. B.; Wachs, D. M.; Meyer, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice, a key microstructural feature in both irradiated U-7Mo dispersion and U-10Mo monolithic fuel plates, a FIB-TEM sample of the irradiated U-10Mo fuel with a local fission density of 3.51021 fissions/cm3 was used for an in-situ heating TEM experiment. The temperature of the heating holder was raised at a ramp rate of approximately 10 C/min up to ~700 C, kept at that temperature for about 34 min, continued to 850 C with a reduced rate of 5 C/min. The result shows a high thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice. The implication of this observation on the fuel microstructural evolution and performance under irradiation is discussed.

  7. Changes in Gas Bubble Disease Signs for Migrating Juvenile Salmonids Experimentally Exposed to Supersaturated Gasses, 1996-1997 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Absolon, Randall F.

    1999-03-01

    This study was designed to answer the question of whether gas bubble disease (GBD) signs change as a result of the hydrostatic conditions juvenile salmonids encounter when they enter the turbine intake of hydroelectric projects during their downstream migration.

  8. Experimental study on a plane shock wave accelerating a gas bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layes, Guillaume; Jourdan, Georges; Houas, Lazhar

    2009-07-01

    A detailed experimental study of the interaction between a planar shock wave and an isolated spherical gas inhomogeneity is presented here. Different configurations have been considered: a shock wave moving from one gas into another, of similar density, lower density and one of higher density. Sequences of shadowgraph pictures obtained during the same run provided useful insights into several mechanisms such as shock wave reflection, refraction and focusing, distortion of the bubble interface, and vortex formation. Based on these sequences, the changes with time in the characteristic bubble sizes were plotted and the results showed that the influence of the shock wave Mach number is significantly greater in the case of light gas bubbles. The displacement of the inhomogeneity relative to the surrounding gas was determined and compared to Rudinger and Somers' model. In all the cases studied, although the measurements were found to agree well with the theoretical predictions, in the initial acceleration phase, the final translational motions of the vortex ring were not accurately predicted by the model. The database obtained was used to estimate the resulting pattern of circulation, which was compared to other existing models. The circulation was found to increase with both the Mach number and the density ratio across the interface and was always overestimated by the models. These differences are probably caused by the presence of pulverized soap film trapped in the vortices, which reduces the motion and the strength of the resulting flow. A large number of tests are performed over a significant range of shock wave Mach numbers and density differences, with the use of high-speed imaging methods to track the vortex evolution during a single test shot. The database obtained should provide a useful tool for checking the validity of many codes and models describing the dynamics of shock/bubble interactions.

  9. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Bubble Point Pressure for Cryogenic LADs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen and nitrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device (LAD). Three fine mesh screen samples (325x2300, 450x2750, 510x3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen using cold and warm non-condensable (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen or nitrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0K 90K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over non-condensable pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  10. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Static Bubble Point Pressure for Cryogenic LADs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John; Chato, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen and nitrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device (LAD). Three fine mesh screen samples (325x2300, 450x2750, 510x3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen using cold and warm non-condensable (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen or nitrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0K - 90K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over non-condensable pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  11. Shock-induced collapse of a gas bubble in shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Eric; Colonius, Tim

    2008-10-01

    The shock-induced collapse of a pre-existing nucleus near a solid surface in the focal region of a lithotripter is investigated. The entire flow field of the collapse of a single gas bubble subjected to a lithotripter pulse is simulated using a high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing scheme, and the wall pressure is considered as an indication of potential damage. Results from the computations show the same qualitative behavior as that observed in experiments: a re-entrant jet forms in the direction of propagation of the pulse and penetrates the bubble during collapse, ultimately hitting the distal side and generating a water-hammer shock. As a result of the propagation of this wave, wall pressures on the order of 1 GPa may be achieved for bubbles collapsing close to the wall. The wall pressure decreases with initial stand-off distance and pulse width and increases with pulse amplitude. For the stand-off distances considered in the present work, the wall pressure due to bubble collapse is larger than that due to the incoming shockwave; the region over which this holds may extend to ten initial radii. The present results indicate that shock-induced collapse is a mechanism with high potential for damage in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:19062841

  12. Shock-induced collapse of a gas bubble in shockwave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Eric; Colonius, Tim

    2008-01-01

    The shock-induced collapse of a pre-existing nucleus near a solid surface in the focal region of a lithotripter is investigated. The entire flow field of the collapse of a single gas bubble subjected to a lithotripter pulse is simulated using a high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing scheme, and the wall pressure is considered as an indication of potential damage. Results from the computations show the same qualitative behavior as that observed in experiments: a re-entrant jet forms in the direction of propagation of the pulse and penetrates the bubble during collapse, ultimately hitting the distal side and generating a water-hammer shock. As a result of the propagation of this wave, wall pressures on the order of 1 GPa may be achieved for bubbles collapsing close to the wall. The wall pressure decreases with initial stand-off distance and pulse width and increases with pulse amplitude. For the stand-off distances considered in the present work, the wall pressure due to bubble collapse is larger than that due to the incoming shockwave; the region over which this holds may extend to ten initial radii. The present results indicate that shock-induced collapse is a mechanism with high potential for damage in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:19062841

  13. Handling of liquid holdup in Duyong two-phase flow pipeline system

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, M.R.; Singh, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This paper deals with the handling of liquids in the multi-phase flow pipeline system within Carigali's Duyong Offshore Gas Complex and the Onshore Gas Terminal, in Kerteh, Terongganu. The data and operations experience gathered necessitate changes to the operating procedures originally identified during the design phase. This is to ensure more efficient handling of liquid hold-up in the pipeline during low gas flowrates.

  14. A MODEL TO ESTIMATE VOLUME CHANGE DUE TO RADIOLYTIC GAS BUBBLES AND THERMAL EXPANSION IN SOLUTION REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    F. SOUTO; A HEGER

    2001-02-01

    Aqueous homogeneous solution reactors have been proposed for the production of medical isotopes. However, the reactivity effects of fuel solution volume change, due to formation of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, have to be mitigated to allow steady-state operation of solution reactors. The results of the free run experiments analyzed indicate that the proposed model to estimate the void volume due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors can accurately describe the observed behavior during the experiments. This void volume due to radiolytic gas bubbles and fuel solution thermal expansion can then be used in the investigation of reactivity effects in fissile solutions. In addition, these experiments confirm that the radiolytic gas bubbles are formed at a higher temperature than the fuel solution temperature. These experiments also indicate that the mole-weighted average for the radiolytic gas bubbles in uranyl fluoride solutions is about 1 {micro}m. Finally, it should be noted that another model, currently under development, would simulate the power behavior during the transient given the initial fuel solution level and density. The model is based on Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP computer code [Briesmeister, 1997] to obtain the reactor reactivity as a function of the fuel solution density, which, in turn, changes due to thermal expansion and radiolytic gas bubble formation.

  15. Measurement of bubble velocity components in a swirling gas liquid pipe flow using a local four-sensor conductance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, G. P.; Mishra, R.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a novel technique for measuring the local axial, radial and azimuthal velocity components of the gas in bubbly gas-liquid flows using a local four-sensor conductance probe. A mathematical model is presented showing how the velocity vector of a gas bubble can be calculated from seven time intervals taken from the output signals from each of the four conductance sensors located within the probe. The paper goes on to describe the construction of a local four-sensor probe and the associated electronic measurement circuitry. Results are presented showing the distributions of the mean local axial, radial and azimuthal gas velocity components in vertical, bubbly gas-liquid flows, both with and without swirl. These results were obtained using the four-sensor probe in a vertical 80 mm diameter pipe into which a swirl generator could be installed. Additional results are presented showing the local gas volume fraction distribution, also obtained from the probe, in bubbly gas-liquid flows with and without swirl. It was found, as expected, that the presence of swirl caused a significant increase in the magnitude of the measured azimuthal velocity of the gas, particularly at the pipe walls. It was also found that, at a comparatively high water flow rate, the presence of swirl caused the gas bubbles to preferentially accumulate at the centre of the pipe.

  16. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, H. Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-31

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  17. Dynamic morphology of gas hydrate on a methane bubble in water: Observations and new insights for hydrate film models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald; Haljasmaa, Igor; Leifer, Ira; Shaffer, Frank; Anderson, Brian J.; Levine, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-01

    Predicting the fate of subsea hydrocarbon gases escaping into seawater is complicated by potential formation of hydrate on rising bubbles that can enhance their survival in the water column, allowing gas to reach shallower depths and the atmosphere. The precise nature and influence of hydrate coatings on bubble hydrodynamics and dissolution is largely unknown. Here we present high-definition, experimental observations of complex surficial mechanisms governing methane bubble hydrate formation and dissociation during transit of a simulated oceanic water column that reveal a temporal progression of deep-sea controlling mechanisms. Synergistic feedbacks between bubble hydrodynamics, hydrate morphology, and coverage characteristics were discovered. Morphological changes on the bubble surface appear analogous to macroscale, sea ice processes, presenting new mechanistic insights. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate coverage and bubble dissolution rate is indicated. Understanding and incorporating these phenomena into bubble and bubble plume models will be necessary to accurately predict global greenhouse gas budgets for warming ocean scenarios and hydrocarbon transport from anthropogenic or natural deep-sea eruptions.

  18. Gas-liquid mass transfer characteristics in a bubble column with suspended sparingly soluble fine particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sada, E.; Fujiwara, N.; Kumazawa, M.; Lee, C.

    1985-04-01

    (To investigate the influence of suspended particles on mass transfer characteristics in a slurry bubble column, physical and chemical absorptions were performed into aqueous slurries of fine calcium hydroxide particles ca. 7 ..mu..m in average size. Such mass transfer parameters as volumetric liquid-side mass transfer coefficient, specific gas-liquid interfacial area, and hence liquid-side mass transfer coefficient were determined under various electrolyte concentrations, solid concentrations, and gas flow rates.) and K /SUB L/ /SUP o/ a could be correlated by the gas flow rate. (The volumetric gas-side mass transfer coefficient was determined and correlated by the gas flow rate. The enhancement factors during absorption of dilute carbon dioxide into aqueous calcium hydroxide slurries were compared with the theoretical predictions based on the film theoryincorporating a finite slurry concept.)

  19. Surface and internal energy of hydrocarbon gas bubbles as a factor of formation of gas deposits and related heat anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    It is shown that, during coalescence of bubbles, the mechanical energy of the surface tension transits to the heat energy sufficient to increase the temperature of the bed-reservoir by several tens of degrees. The positive heat anomalies and anomalously high formation pressure in the petroleum regions may be caused by energy released during the amalgamation of a small-disperse gas phase into economic deposits.

  20. Gas bubble disease in smallmouth bass and northern squawfish from the Snake and Columbia Rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J.C.; Becker, C.D.

    1980-11-01

    Supersaturation of the Columbia and Snake River systems was caused by entrainment of air into water spilling over hydroelectric dams. Total gas saturations of 100% or more have occurred during the spring in each river system. External signs of gas bubble diseases were noted in adult Smallmouth bass and northern squawfish collected from the lower Snake and mid-Columbia rivers during 1975-76. Emboli occurred beneath membranes of the opercula body, and fins of 72% of the smallmouth bass and 84% of the northern squawfish. Hemorrhage was also noted on the caudal, anal, and pectoral fins of several fish.

  1. Lateral line pore diameters correlate with the development of gas bubble trauma signs in several Columbia River fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, R.G.; Beeman, J.W.; VanderKooi, S.P.; Maule, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Gas bubble trauma (GBT) caused by gas supersaturation of river water continues to be a problem in the Columbia River Basin. A common indicator of GBT is the percent of the lateral line occluded with gas bubbles; however, this effect has never been examined in relation to lateral line morphology. The effects of 115, 125 and 130% total dissolved gas levels were evaluated on five fish species common to the upper Columbia River. Trunk lateral line pore diameters differed significantly (Plargescale sucker>northern pikeminnow???chinook salmon???redside shiner). At all supersaturation levels evaluated, percent of lateral line occlusion exhibited an inverse correlation to pore size but was not generally related to total dissolved gas level or time of exposure. This study suggests that the differences in lateral line pore diameters between species should be considered when using lateral line occlusion as an indicator of gas bubble trauma. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lateral line pore diameters correlate with the development of gas bubble trauma signs in several Columbia River fishes.

    PubMed

    Morris, R Gregg; Beeman, John W; VanderKooi, Scott P; Maule, Alec G

    2003-06-01

    Gas bubble trauma (GBT) caused by gas supersaturation of river water continues to be a problem in the Columbia River Basin. A common indicator of GBT is the percent of the lateral line occluded with gas bubbles; however, this effect has never been examined in relation to lateral line morphology. The effects of 115, 125 and 130% total dissolved gas levels were evaluated on five fish species common to the upper Columbia River. Trunk lateral line pore diameters differed significantly (P<0.0001) among species (longnose sucker>largescale sucker>northern pikeminnow>/=chinook salmon>/=redside shiner). At all supersaturation levels evaluated, percent of lateral line occlusion exhibited an inverse correlation to pore size but was not generally related to total dissolved gas level or time of exposure. This study suggests that the differences in lateral line pore diameters between species should be considered when using lateral line occlusion as an indicator of gas bubble trauma. PMID:12781831

  3. Preliminary study of the effects of a reversible chemical reaction on gas bubble dissolution. [for space glass refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary investigation is carried out of the effects of a reversible chemical reaction on the dissolution of an isolated, stationary gas bubble in a glass melt. The exact governing equations for the model system are formulated and analyzed. The approximate quasi-steady-state version of these equations is solved analytically, and a calculation is made of bubble dissolution rates. The results are then compared with numerical solutions obtained from the finite difference form of the exact governing equations. It is pointed out that in the microgravity condition of space, the buoyant rise of a gas bubble in a glass melt will be negligible on the time scale of most experiments. For this reason, a determination of the behavior of a stationary gas bubble in a melt is relevant for an understanding of glass refining in space.

  4. Aerobic exercise before diving reduces venous gas bubble formation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Duji?, eljko; Duplan?ic, Darko; Marinovic-Terzi?, Ivana; Bakovi?, Darija; Ivan?ev, Vladimir; Valic, Zoran; Eterovi?, Davor; Petri, Nadan M; Wislff, Ulrik; Brubakk, Alf O

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown in a rat model that a single bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise 20h before a simulated dive reduces bubble formation and after the dive protects from lethal decompression sickness. The present study investigated the importance of these findings in man. Twelve healthy male divers were compressed in a hyperbaric chamber to 280kPa at a rate of 100kPamin?1 breathing air and remaining at pressure for 80min. The ascent rate was 9mmin?1 with a 7min stop at 130kPa. Each diver underwent two randomly assigned simulated dives, with or without preceding exercise. A single interval exercise performed 24h before the dive consisted of treadmill running at 90% of maximum heart rate for 3min, followed by exercise at 50% of maximum heart rate for 2min; this was repeated eight times for a total exercise period of 40min. Venous gas bubbles were monitored with an ultrasonic scanner every 20min for 80min after reaching surface pressure. The study demonstrated that a single bout of strenuous exercise 24h before a dive to 18 m of seawater significantly reduced the average number of bubbles in the pulmonary artery from 0.98 to 0.22 bubbles cm?2(P= 0.006) compared to dives without preceding exercise. The maximum bubble grade was decreased from 3 to 1.5 (P= 0.002) by pre-dive exercise, thereby increasing safety. This is the first report to indicate that pre-dive exercise may form the basis for a new way of preventing serious decompression sickness. PMID:14755001

  5. An acoustic study of soils that model seabed sediments containing gas bubbles

    PubMed

    Gardner

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic response of gassy seabed sediment is unique. It is a dispersive and extraordinarily attenuative natural material at frequencies which cause gas bubble resonance. It conceals the structure of the seabed from seismic profiling and it dampens acoustic signals that, for example, trigger acoustic mines. In the past, theoretical studies have formulated the probable cause of this response and crude experimental work has partially corroborated theory. This study measures compressional wave velocity and attenuation in a laboratory soil simulating natural gassy soil, and it investigates the structural properties that cause the unique acoustic response. It was confirmed that below the frequencies which cause resonance the soil behaves as a compressible material (containing gas), and above as a relatively incompressible material (containing no gas). Over the frequency range producing bubble resonance it is suggested that the soil should be modeled as a biphasic material of gas and a relatively incompressible saturated soil matrix (particles and fluid). Velocities for gassy soil were found to be as low as 220 m/s at frequencies below resonance and 1500 m/s above resonance; attenuations were found to be as high as 60 dB/cm for moderately gassy soil and as low as 1 dB/cm for soil with almost no gas. PMID:10641629

  6. The Effect of Viscosity on the Spherical Stability of Oscillating Gas Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Prosperetti, A.

    1999-01-01

    Gas bubbles driven in radial oscillations are subject to an instability of the spherical shape that is opposed by surface tension and viscosity. An exact linear formulation for the study of the phenomenon has been available for many years, but its complexity has discouraged a detailed investigation. With the recent theory of sonoluminescence of Lohse and co-workers, there has been a renewed interest in the problem and new data have become available. This paper presents a numerical method for the solution of the pertinent equations and compares the theory with these new data. The coupling of the strong nonlinearity of the bubble radial oscillations with the parametric mechanism of the surface instability results in a very complex structure for the stability boundary. Nevertheless, a good agreement between theory and data is found. A comparison with earlier approximate models is also made.

  7. Gas embolotherapy: Bubble evolution in acoustic droplet vaporization and design of a benchtop microvascular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Zheng Zheng

    This work was motivated by an ongoing development of a potential embolotherapy technique to occlude blood flow to tumors using gas bubbles selectively formed by in vivo acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets. Mechanisms behind the ADV, transport and lodging of emboli need to be understood before gas embolotherapy can translate to the clinic. Evolution of a bubble from acoustic droplet vaporization in a rigid tube, under physiological and room temperature conditions, was observed via ultra-high speed imaging. Effective radii and radial expansion ratios were obtained by processing the images using Image] software. At physiological temperature, a radial expansion ratio of 5.05 was attained, consistent with theoretical prediction. The initial radial growth rate was linear, after which the growth rate increased proportionally with square root of time. Nondimensionalization revealed that the subsequent growth rate also varied inversely with square root of initial radius. Eventually growth became asymptotic. No collapse was observed. A theoretical model derived from a modified Bernoulli equation, and a computational model by Ye & Bull (2004), were compared respectively with experimental results. Initial growth rates were predicted correctly by both models. Experimental results showed heavy damping of growth rate as the bubble grew towards the wall, whereas both models predicted an overshoot in growth followed by multiple oscillations. The theoretical model broke down near the wall; the computational model gave a reasonable bubble shape near the wall but would require correct initial pressure values to be accurate. At room temperature, the expansion ratio shot to 1.43 initially and oscillated down to 1.11, far below the theoretical prediction. Failure of the bubble to expand fully could be due to unconsumed or condensed liquid perfluorocarbon. A new fabrication method via non-lithographic means was devised to make a circular-lumen microchannel out of PDMS, with a diameter as small as 80 microns to mimic the size of a medium arteriole. The microchannel was endothelialized successfully, with a fairly homogeneous distribution along the length. Cell viability assays confirmed the viability of cells maintained in the microchannel. Bubble motion experiments performed with the benchtop microvascular model demonstrated its feasibility.

  8. ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS(SBCR)

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Al-Dahhan; L.S. Fan; M.P. Dudukovic

    2002-07-25

    This report summarizes the accomplishment made during the third year of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Air Products and Chemicals. Data processing of the performed Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) experiments in 6 inch column using air-water-glass beads (150 {micro}m) system has been completed. Experimental investigation of time averaged three phases distribution in air-Therminol LT-glass beads (150 {micro}m) system in 6 inch column has been executed. Data processing and analysis of all the performed Computed Tomography (CT) experiments have been completed, using the newly proposed CT/Overall gas holdup methodology. The hydrodynamics of air-Norpar 15-glass beads (150 {micro}m) have been investigated in 2 inch slurry bubble column using Dynamic Gas Disengagement (DGD), Pressure Drop fluctuations, and Fiber Optic Probe. To improve the design and scale-up of bubble column reactors, a correlation for overall gas holdup has been proposed based on Artificial Neural Network and Dimensional Analysis.

  9. Generating Singlet Oxygen Bubbles: A New Mechanism for Gas-Liquid Oxidations in Water

    PubMed Central

    Bartusik, Dorota; Aebisher, David; Ghafari, BiBi

    2012-01-01

    Laser-coupled microphotoreactors were developed to bubble singlet oxygen [1O2 (1Δg)] into an aqueous solution containing an oxidizable compound. The reactors consisted of custom-modified SMA fiber-optic receptacles loaded with 150-μm silicon phthalocyanine glass sensitizer particles, where the particles were isolated from direct contact with water by a membrane adhesively bonded to the bottom of each device. A tube fed O2 gas to the reactor chambers. In the presence of O2, singlet oxygen was generated by illuminating the sensitizer particles with 669-nm light from an optical fiber coupled to the top of the reactor. The generated 1O2 was transported through the membrane by the O2 stream and formed bubbles in solution. In solution, singlet oxygen reacted with probe compounds (either 9,10-anthracene dipropionate dianion, trans-2-methyl-2-pentanoate anion, N-benzoyl-D,L-methionine, and N-acetyl-D,L-methionine) to give oxidized products in two stages. The early stage was rapid and showed that 1O2 transfer occurred via bubbles mainly in the bulk water solution. The later stage was slow, it arose only from 1O2-probe molecule contact at the gas/liquid interface. A mechanism is proposed that involves 1O2 mass transfer and solvation, where smaller bubbles provide better penetration of 1O2 into the flowing stream due to higher surface-to-volume contact between the probe molecules and 1O2. PMID:22260325

  10. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Seventh technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phase. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. A hydrodynamic model for multiphase flows, based on the principles of mass, momentum and energy conservation for each phase, was developed and applied to model gas-liquid, gas-liquid-solid fluidization and gas-solid-solid separation. To simulate the industrial slurry bubble column reactors, a computer program based on the hydrodynamic model was written with modules for chemical reactions (e.g. the synthesis of methanol), phase changes and heat exchangers. In the simulations of gas-liquid two phases flow system, the gas hold-ups, computed with a variety of operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas and liquid velocities, agree well with the measurements obtained at Air Products` pilot plant. The hydrodynamic model has more flexible features than the previous empirical correlations in predicting the gas hold-up of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems. In the simulations of gas-liquid-solid bubble column reactors with and without slurry circulation, the code computes volume fractions, temperatures and velocity distributions for the gas, the liquid and the solid phases, as well as concentration distributions for the species (CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}0H, ... ), after startup from a certain initial state. A kinetic theory approach is used to compute a solid viscosity due to particle collisions. Solid motion and gas-liquid-solid mixing are observed on a color PCSHOW movie made from computed time series data. The steady state and time average catalyst concentration profiles, the slurry height and the rates of methanol production agree well with the measurements obtained at an Air Products` pilot plant.

  11. Free gas bubbles in the hydrate stability zone: evidence from CT investigation under in situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegg, F.; Freitag, J.; Bohrmann, G.; Brueckmann, W.; Eisenhauer, A.; Amann, H.; Hohnberg, H.-J.

    2003-04-01

    Determination of the internal structures and the fabric of natural marine gas hydrate as well as its distribution in shallow subseafloor depth was restricted because of dissociation during recovery. Investigation under in situ conditions becomes possible with a pressure coring device. The newly developed MultiAutoclaveCorer (MAC) can take up to four cores which are housed in a pressure vessel called LabTransferChamber (LTC), which is compatible with CT imaging technology. During a video-guided deployment on Hydrate Ridge, a well known near-surface gas hydrate-rich environment, two LTCs were filled and recovered under pressure. CT imaging was performed four days after retrieval in a medical clinic in Palo Alto/Ca., a second round was run 2 months later in Kiel/Germany, still under pressure. The same type of scanner was used for both rounds of imaging. The function and the pressure preserving capability of the MAC was confirmed. Although only 0.8 m apart, both cores showed different gas hydrate contents, varying between a maximum of 5 vol-% in LTC 3 and 48 vol-% in LTC 4, documenting the high variability of gas hydrate occurrences in near-surface sediments. The uppermost layer of gas hydrate was observed 0.1 m below the seafloor. The high gas hydrate content in LTC 4 is concentrated in a horizon between 0.28 and 0.32 m subseafloor depth. Within this hoizon a significant quantity of bubbles was detected with a free gas content of up to 2.4 vol-%. Bubble sizes reach a maximum of 1.8 x 10-2 m in either x, y or z direction. Integrating across the mentioned core interval, the gas hydrate content is 19 vol-% and the free gas content is 0.8 vol-%. Assuming several simplifications, the normalised calculated methane volume of the gas hydrate is 9.15 x 10-3 m^3 and the amount of methane in the bubbles is 1.49 x 10-4 m^3.

  12. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma is created either through flowing gas around the high voltage electrode in the discharge tube or self-generated by the plasma as in the steam discharge. This second method allows for large scale processing of contaminated water and for bulk chemical and optical analysis. Breakdown mechanisms of attached and unattached gas bubbles in liquid water were investigated using the first device. The breakdown scaling relation between breakdown voltage, pressure and dimensions of the discharge was studied. A Paschen-like voltage dependence for air bubbles in liquid water was discovered. The results of high-speed photography suggest the physical charging of the bubble due to a high voltage pulse; this charging can be significant enough to produce rapid kinetic motion of the bubble about the electrode region as the applied electric field changes over a voltage pulse. Physical deformation of the bubble is observed. This charging can also prevent breakdown from occurring, necessitating higher applied voltages to overcome the phenomenon. This dissertation also examines the resulting chemistry from plasma interacting with the bubble-liquid system. Through the use of optical emission spectroscopy, plasma parameters such as electron density, gas temperature, and molecular species production and intensity are found to have a time-dependence over the ac voltage cycle. This dependence is also source gas type dependent. These dependencies afford effective control over plasma-driven decomposition. The effect of plasma-produced radicals on various wastewater simulants is studied. Various organic dyes, halogenated compounds, and algae water are decomposed and assessed. Toxicology studies with melanoma cells exposed to plasma-treated dye solutions are completed, demonstrating the non-cytotoxic quality of the decomposition process. Thirdly, this dissertation examines the steam plasma system, developed through this research to circumvent the acidification associated with gas-feed discharges. This steam plasma creates its own gas pocket via field emission. This steam plasma is shown to have strong decontamination properties, with residual effects lasting beyond two weeks that continue to decompose contaminants. Finally, a "two-dimensional bubble" was developed and demonstrated as a novel diagnostic device to study the gas-water interface, the reaction zone. This device is shown to provide convenient access to the reaction zone and decomposition of various wastewater simulants is investigated.

  13. ALMA observations of cold molecular gas filaments trailing rising radio bubbles in PKS 0745-191

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; McNamara, B. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Edge, A. C.; Combes, F.; Murray, N. W.; Parrish, I. J.; Salomé, P.; Sanders, J. S.; Baum, S. A.; Donahue, M.; Main, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; O'Dea, C. P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Tremblay, G.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Voit, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present ALMA observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) line emission tracing filaments of cold molecular gas in the central galaxy of the cluster PKS 0745-191. The total molecular gas mass of 4.6 ± 0.3 × 109 M⊙, assuming a Galactic XCO factor, is divided roughly equally between three filaments each extending radially 3-5 kpc from the galaxy centre. The emission peak is located in the SE filament ˜ 1 arcsec (2 kpc) from the nucleus. The velocities of the molecular clouds in the filaments are low, lying within ± 100 km s-1 of the galaxy's systemic velocity. Their FWHMs are less than 150 km s-1, which is significantly below the stellar velocity dispersion. Although the molecular mass of each filament is comparable to a rich spiral galaxy, such low velocities show that the filaments are transient and the clouds would disperse on <107 yr timescales unless supported, likely by the indirect effect of magnetic fields. The velocity structure is inconsistent with a merger origin or gravitational free-fall of cooling gas in this massive central galaxy. If the molecular clouds originated in gas cooling even a few kpc from their current locations their velocities would exceed those observed. Instead, the projection of the N and SE filaments underneath X-ray cavities suggests they formed in the updraft behind bubbles buoyantly rising through the cluster atmosphere. Direct uplift of the dense gas by the radio bubbles appears to require an implausibly high coupling efficiency. The filaments are coincident with low temperature X-ray gas, bright optical line emission and dust lanes indicating that the molecular gas could have formed from lifted warmer gas that cooled in situ.

  14. Experimental investigation of remote seismic triggering by gas bubble growth in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, J. B.; Cooper, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is the process by which an earthquake at one location initiates others after a time delay ranging from seconds to days, over distances up to thousands of kilometers. Candidate mechanisms have been proposed, but none specifically address the role of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble growth in groundwater as a driver of remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, where shallow crustal CO2 gas is abundant. In the present study, we hypothesize that a seismic wave from a distant source can initiate rapid gas bubble growth in CO2-rich groundwater, resulting in a persistent increase in pore fluid pressure and a reduction of effective stress, which can trigger failure on a critically loaded geologic fault. Under conditions representative of a confined aquifer, a Berea sandstone core flooded with an aqueous CO2 solution was subjected to a six-period burst of 0.05-0.3 Hz, 0.1-0.4 MPa confining stress oscillations. After the oscillations were terminated, the pore fluid pressure exceeded its initial value by 13-60 cm equivalent freshwater head, scaling with the amplitude and frequency - a surplus that is consistent with borehole water level changes [Roeloffs et al. (1995) USGS Open File Report, 95-42] observed in response to the June 28 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California earthquake Rayleigh wave in Parkfield and Long Valley caldera, California, where remotely triggered earthquakes occurred [Hill et al. (1993) Science, 260(5114); Hill et al. (1995) Journal of Geophysical Research, 100(B7)]. Our experimental results indicate that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater is a physically plausible mechanism for remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, suggesting that the aqueous CO2 saturation state in a confined aquifer may be used to assess susceptibility to remote seismic triggering.

  15. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM, a computational model developed at Glenn, that simulates the cavitational collapse of a single bubble in a liquid (water) and the subsequent combustion of the gaseous contents inside the bubble. The model solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in one-dimension with finite-rate chemical kinetics using the CHEMKIN package. Specifically, parameters such as frequency, pressure, bubble radius, and the equivalence ratio were varied while examining their effect on the maximum temperature, radius, and chemical species. These studies indicate that the radius of the bubble is perhaps the most critical parameter governing bubble combustion dynamics and its efficiency. Based on the results of the parametric studies, we plan on conducting experiments to study the effect of ultrasonic perturbations on the bubble generation process with respect to the bubble radius and size distribution.

  16. Static liquid holdup in packed beds of spherical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, A.E.; Yepez, M.M.; Cabrera, C.; Soria, E.M. )

    1991-11-01

    In this paper, the authors use dimensional analysis to establish the independent parameters that affect the static liquid holdup. The authors also present experimental data to explore the dependence of the static holdup on the E[umlt o]tv[umlt o]s number; through comparison with previous theoretical works, the authors analyze the mechanisms responsible for the effect of E[umlt o]tv[umlt o]s number on the static liquid holdup.

  17. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Schwarz, C.E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments have been performed with non-reactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies have been performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non-entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model. However heat transfer data for fluid pairs which are found to entrain (water-oil), believed to be characteristic of molten reactor core-concrete conditions, were measured to be up to two orders of magnitude greater than surface renewal predictions and are calculated by a simple entrainment heat transfer model.

  18. A Study of Vertical Gas Jets in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccio, Steven; Curtis, Jennifer

    2011-04-15

    A detailed experimental study of a vertical gas jet impinging a fluidized bed of particles has been conducted with the help of Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements. Mean and fluctuating velocity profiles of the two phases have been presented and analyzed for different fluidization states of the emulsion. The results of this work would be greatly helpful in understanding the complex two-phase mixing phenomenon that occurs in bubbling beds, such as in coal and biomass gasification, and also in building more fundamental gas-solid Eulerian/Lagrangian models which can be incorporated into existing CFD codes. Relevant simulations to supplement the experimental findings have also been conducted using the Department of Energy's open source code MFIX. The goal of these simulations was two-fold. One was to check the two-dimensional nature of the experimental results. The other was an attempt to improve the existing dense phase Eulerian framework through validation with the experimental results. In particular the sensitivity of existing frictional models in predicting the flow was investigated. The simulation results provide insight on wall-bounded turbulent jets and the effect frictional models have on gas-solid bubbling flows. Additionally, some empirical minimum fluidization correlations were validated for non-spherical particles with the idea of extending the present study to non-spherical particles which are more common in industries.

  19. From ordered bubbles to random stripes: Pattern formation in a hydrodynamic lattice gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. )

    1993-05-01

    A two-component momentum-conserving lattice gas with competing interactions is introduced in two dimensions. One interaction acts at short range and produces interfaces with surface tension. The second interaction, the negative of the first, acts at range a and produces modulated structures with approximate wavelength 2a. Depending on particle density, species concentration, and relative interaction strength, the equilibrium patterns formed by the model range from isotropic mixed and unmixed phases to hexagonally-ordered bubbles to randomly-oriented stripes. A Ginzburg-Landau equation is proposed that qualitatively captures the basic features of the phase transitions. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Method for gas bubble and void control and removal from metals

    DOEpatents

    Van Siclen, Clinton D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    A method for enhancing the diffusion of gas bubbles or voids attached to impurity precipitates, and biasing their direction of migration out of the host metal (or metal alloy) by applying a temperature gradient across the host metal (or metal alloy). In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the impurity metal is insoluble in the host metal and has a melting point lower than the melting point of the host material. Also, preferably the impurity metal is lead or indium and the host metal is aluminum or a metal alloy.

  1. Method for gas bubble and void control and removal from metals

    DOEpatents

    Siclen, C.D. Van; Wright, R.N.

    1996-02-06

    A method is described for enhancing the diffusion of gas bubbles or voids attached to impurity precipitates, and biasing their direction of migration out of the host metal (or metal alloy) by applying a temperature gradient across the host metal (or metal alloy). In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the impurity metal is insoluble in the host metal and has a melting point lower than the melting point of the host material. Also, preferably the impurity metal is lead or indium and the host metal is aluminum or a metal alloy. 2 figs.

  2. Gas Bubble Disease in the Brain of a Living California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

    PubMed Central

    Van Bonn, William; Dennison, Sophie; Cook, Peter; Fahlman, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A yearling California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) was admitted into rehabilitation with signs of cerebellar pathology. Diagnostic imaging that included radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated space-occupying lesions predominantly in the cerebellum that were filled partially by CSF-like fluid and partially by gas, and cerebral lesions that were fluid filled. Over a maximum period of 4?months, the brain lesions reduced in size and the gas resorbed and was replaced by CSF-like fluid. In humans, the cerebellum is known to be essential for automating practiced movement patterns (e.g., learning to touch-type), also known as procedural learning or the consolidation of motor memory. To test the animal in this study for motor memory deficits, an alternation task in a two-choice maze was utilized. The sea lion performed poorly similar to another case of pneumocerebellum previously reported, and contrary to data acquired from a group of sea lions with specific hippocampal injury. The learning deficits were attributed to the cerebellar injury. These data provide important insight both to the clinical presentation and behavioral observations of cerebellar injury in sea lions, as well as providing an initial model for long-term outcome following cerebellar injury. The specific etiology of the gas could not be determined. The live status of the patient with recovery suggests that the most likely etiologies for the gas are either de novo formation or air emboli secondary to trauma. A small air gun pellet was present within and was removed from soft tissues adjacent to the tympanic bulla. While no evidence to support the pellet striking bone was found, altered dive pattern associated with this human interaction may have provided the opportunity for gas bubble formation to occur. The similarity in distribution of the gas bubble related lesions in this case compared with another previously published case of pneumocerebellum suggests that preferential perfusion of the brain, and more specifically the cerebellum, may occur during diving events. PMID:23372553

  3. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Sloan W.; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  4. Incidence and Outcomes of Anterior Chamber Gas Bubble during Femtosecond Flap Creation for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Rush, Sloan W; Cofoid, Philip; Rush, Ryan B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report the incidence and outcomes of anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Methods. The charts of 2,886 consecutive eyes that underwent femtosecond LASIK from May 2011 through August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed in subjects developing anterior chamber gas bubble formation during the procedure. Results. A total of 4 cases (0.14%) developed anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation. In all four cases, the excimer laser was unable to successfully track the pupil immediately following the anterior chamber bubble formation, temporarily postponing the completion of the procedure. There was an ethnicity predilection of anterior chamber gas formation toward Asians (p = 0.0055). An uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 was ultimately achieved in all four cases without further complications. Conclusions. Anterior chamber gas bubble formation during femtosecond laser flap creation for LASIK is an uncommon event that typically results in a delay in treatment completion; nevertheless, it does influence final positive visual outcome. PMID:25954511

  5. An impedance probe for the measurements of liquid hold-up and mixing time in two/three-phase stirred tank reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglianti, A.; Pintus, S.

    A new probe based on the measurement of the electrical impedance has been developed to measure liquid hold-up in gas/liquid, solid/liquid and gas/solid/liquid stirred tank reactors. It allows measurements of liquid hold-up and mixing time to be made in stirred tanks. The main advantage of the new probe is that it is absolutely non-intrusive, because it uses the shaft and the baffles' support as electrodes, and that it can be used both for laboratory scale reactors as well as for industrial stirred tank reactors. The relation between impedance and liquid hold-up under loading conditions closely follows the predictions made by means of the Bruggeman model. Therefore, the new probe does not need any calibration, in that the liquid hold-up can be theoretically computed by the measurement of impedance.

  6. Enhancing the efficiency of direct carbon fuel cells by bubbling Ar gas in carbon/carbonate slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirotatsu; Furuyama, Tomoaki; Okazaki, Ken

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to enhance the direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) efficiency by bubbling Ar gas in a carbon/carbonate slurry. The current discharge curve and CO and CO2 production rates were measured during discharge at 20 mA cm-2. When carbon content in carbonates (WC/carbonate) was 1.0 wt%, Ar bubbling decreased the CO/CO2 production ratio from 0.16 to 0.051, and increased the CO2 production rate, which approached the theoretical value for complete electrochemical oxidation of carbon. Moreover, bubbling increased the cell voltage by about 0.1 V at steady state. At WC/carbonate = 3.0 wt%, the CO/CO2 production ratio without bubbling increased significantly to 8.5, indicating that partial electrochemical oxidation became dominant. The C/O2- ratio is key for explaining the electrochemical oxidation of the carbon. When the C/O2- ratio was low, such as at WC/carbonate = 1.0 wt%, complete electrochemical oxidation became dominant, and bubbling enhanced the complete electrochemical oxidation. When the C/O2- ratio was high, such as at WC/carbonate = 3.0 wt%, partial electrochemical oxidation became dominant, and bubbling did not inhibit it. For WC/carbonate = 1.0 wt%, bubbling increased both coulombic and voltage efficiencies, resulting in an increase in total efficiency from 52% to 64%.

  7. Clostridium perfringens septicemia in a long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis: an etiology of gas bubble accumulation in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Danil, Kerri; St Leger, Judy A; Dennison, Sophie; Bernaldo de Quirs, Yara; Scadeng, Miriam; Nilson, Erika; Beaulieu, Nicole

    2014-10-16

    An adult female long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis live-stranded in La Jolla, California, USA, on July 30, 2012 and subsequently died on the beach. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed gas bubble accumulation in the vasculature, organ parenchyma, mandibular fat pads, and subdermal sheath as well as a gas-filled cavity within the liver, mild caudal abdominal effusion, and fluid in the uterus. Gross examination confirmed these findings and also identified mild ulcerations on the palate, ventral skin, and flukes, uterine necrosis, and multifocal parenchymal cavitations in the brain. Histological review demonstrated necrosis and round clear spaces interpreted as gas bubbles with associated bacterial rods within the brain, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Anaerobic cultures of the lung, spleen, liver, bone marrow, and abdominal fluid yielded Clostridium perfringens, which was further identified as type A via a multiplex PCR assay. The gas composition of sampled bubbles was typical of putrefaction gases, which is consistent with the by-products of C. perfringens, a gas-producing bacterium. Gas bubble formation in marine mammals due to barotrauma, and peri- or postmortem off-gassing of supersaturated tissues and blood has been previously described. This case study concluded that a systemic infection of C. perfringens likely resulted in production of gas and toxins, causing tissue necrosis. PMID:25320031

  8. Review of Monitoring Plans for Gas Bubble Disease Signs and Gas Supersaturation Levels on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Fidler, Larry; Elston, Ralph; Colt, John

    1994-07-01

    Montgomery Watson was retained by the Bonneville Power Administration to evaluate the monitoring program for gas bubble disease signs and dissolved gas supersaturation levels on the Columbia and Snake rivers. The results of this evaluation will provide the basis for improving protocols and procedures for future monitoring efforts. Key study team members were Dr. John Colt, Dr. Larry Fidler, and Dr. Ralph Elston. On the week of June 6 through 10, 1994 the study team visited eight monitoring sites (smolt, adult, and resident fish) on the Columbia and Snake rivers. Additional protocol evaluations were conducted at the Willard Field Station (National Biological Survey) and Pacific Northwest Laboratories at Richland (Battelle). On June 13 and 14, 1994, the study team visited the North Pacific Division office of the U.S. Corps of Engineers and the Fish Passage Center to collect additional information and data on the monitoring programs. Considering the speed at which the Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring Program was implemented this year, the Fish Passage Center and cooperating Federal, State, and Tribal Agencies have been doing an incredible job. Thirty-one specific recommendations are presented in this report and are summarized in Section 14.

  9. Venous gas bubble production following cold stress during a no-decompression dive.

    PubMed

    Dunford, R; Hayward, J

    1981-03-01

    The effect of cold stress on venous gas bubble production was studied using Doppler ultrasonic monitoring. Ten subjects participated in four exposure regimes carried out at 78 fsw on an underwater platform for 38 min of light exercise in 10 degrees C water. Two cold exposures (1/8-in. wet suit) and two warm exposures (insulated dry suit) were each followed by rewarming in a heated bath or by endogenous heat production while insulated in a sleeping bag. Results showed that for the cold dives compared to warm dives, air consumption increased 29%, rectal temperature dropped 0.8 degrees C by the end of the dive, mean skin temperature dropped 11 degrees C, and cooling rate correlated with mean skin fold and endomorphy (P less than 0.001). A threefold increase in bubble scores (P less than 0.025) was observed following the warm dives compared to the cold dives. The results suggest that inert gas uptake is reduced as a result of peripheral vasoconstriction when the cold stress is induced at the onset of the dive and maintained throughout. PMID:7222286

  10. Dual gas-bubble-assisted solvothermal synthesis of magnetite with tunable size and structure.

    PubMed

    He, Quanguo; Wu, Zhaohui; Huang, Chunyan

    2011-10-01

    We present a facile solvothermal approach by employing ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) and ammonium acetate (NH4Ac) as dual gas-bubble-generating structure-directing agent to produce of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles with tunable size ranging from 90 nm to 400 nm and controllable structures including porous and hollow construction. The size, morphology and structure of the final products are achieved by simple adjustment of the molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac, ammonium ion concentration and the reaction time. The results reveal that the molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac strongly influenced the morphology and size of magnetite particles, even could decide the kind of architecture including solid, hollow and porous to form. Particularly, ammonium ion molar concentration plays a significant role in controlling size and magnetic property for magnetite particles. Simultaneously, prolonging the reaction time is beneficial to the magnetite particles growth and inner space escalation with altered reaction time at a certain concentration of ammonium and molar ratio of NH4HCO3 and NH4Ac. Such a design conception of dual gas-bubble-assistance used here is promisingly positive and significant for hollow magnetic particles fabrication and may be extended to other nano-scale hollow construction. PMID:22400226

  11. Measurement of Entrapped Biogenic Gas Bubbles in Northern Peat Soils: Application of Resistivity and X-ray Computed Tomography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettridge, N.; Binley, A.; Baird, A.

    2008-05-01

    Peatlands are the largest natural source per annum of CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. CH4 is lost from peatlands via diffusion or active transport through vascular plants, and as bubbles moving to the peatland surface - ebullition. The build up and ebullition of biogenic gas bubbles within northern peatlands is spatially variable and depends on the rate of CH4 production, the transport of dissolved CH4 to bubbles through pore water, and the physical properties of the peat. Recent measurements suggest a threshold bubble volume must be reached to trigger episodic or cyclic ebullition, which is assumed to be dependent on peat type. However, this threshold theory lacks a secure physical basis and therefore cannot be applied to simulate methane ebullition from northern peatlands with any confidence. We develop an approach to examine the structural attributes of the peat that cause and promote the trapping and release of bubbles by combining resistivity and X-ray computed tomography (CT). The spatial and temporal variation in the biogenic gas content of peat cores are identified from resistivity measurements. Areas of high and low entrapped gas content are subsequently correlated with the pore structure of the peat samples, characterised using CT. The CT images of the peat structure are vectorised to allow them to be analysed for metrics which relate to the ability of the peat to trap bubbles: e.g. stem length and width, number of branches, angle of branches. Difficulties applying these approaches within northern peatlands are examined. The low pore water conductivity of poorly decomposed near surface peat can hamper resistivity measurements at the laboratory scale, and electrolytic reactions induce the development of artificial gas bubbles. The similarity in linear attenuations between poorly decomposed Sphagnum and pore water also makes the peat structure indistinguishable from the pore water within standard CT scans. The peat samples must, therefore, first be doped with a solution of lead(II) nitrate which is adsorbed by the peat fibres, making them visible.

  12. The effects of total dissolved gas on chum salmon fry survival, growth, gas bubble disease, and seawater tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Linley, Timothy J.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2013-02-01

    Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta alevin developing in gravel habitats downstream of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are exposed to elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) when water is spilled at the dam to move migrating salmon smolts downstream to the Pacific Ocean. Current water quality criteria for the management of dissolved gas in dam tailwaters were developed primarily to protect salmonid smolts and are assumed to be protective of alevin if adequate depth compensation is provided. We studied whether chum salmon alevin exposed to six levels of dissolved gas ranging from 100% to 130% TDG at three development periods between hatch and emergence (hereafter early, middle, and late stage) suffered differential mortality, growth, gas bubble disease, or seawater tolerance. Each life stage was exposed for 50 d (early stage), 29 d (middle stage), or 16 d (late stage) beginning at 13, 34, and 37 d post-hatch, respectively, through 50% emergence. The mortality for all stages from exposure to emergence was estimated to be 8% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 4% to 12%) when dissolved gas levels were between 100% and 117% TDG. Mortality significantly increased as dissolved gas levels rose above 117% TDG,; with the lethal concentration that produced 50% mortality (LC50 ) was estimated to be 128.7% TDG (95% CI of 127.2% to 130.2% TDG) in the early and middle stages. By contrast, there was no evidence that dissolved gas level significantly affected growth in any life stage except that the mean wet weight at emergence of early stage fish exposed to 130% TDG was significantly less than the modeled growth of unexposed fish. The proportion of fish afflicted with gas bubble disease increased with increasing gas concentrations and occurred most commonly in the nares and gastrointestinal tract. Early stage fish exhibited higher ratios of filament to lamellar gill chloride cells than late stage fish, and these ratios increased and decreased for early and late stage fish, respectively, as gas levels increased; however, there were no significant differences in mortality between life stages after 96 h in seawater. The study results suggest that current water quality guidelines for the management of dissolved gas appear to offer a conservative level of protection to chum salmon alevin incubating in gravel habitat downstream of Bonneville Dam.

  13. Does nitrogen gas bubbled through a low density polymer gel dosimeter solution affect the polymerization process?

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Gholami, Mehrdad; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi; Keshtkar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: On account of the lower electron density in the lung tissue, the dose distribution in the lung cannot be verified with the existing polymer gel dosimeters. Thus, the aims of this study are to make a low density polymer gel dosimeter and investigate the effect of nitrogen gas bubbles on the R2 responses and its homogeneity. Materials and Methods: Two different types of low density polymer gel dosimeters were prepared according to a composition proposed by De Deene, with some modifications. In the first type, no nitrogen gas was perfused through the gel solution and water. In the second type, to expel the dissolved oxygen, nitrogen gas was perfused through the water and gel solution. The post-irradiation times in the gels were 24 and 5 hours, respectively, with and without perfusion of nitrogen gas through the water and gel solution. Results: In the first type of gel, there was a linear correlation between the doses and R2 responses from 0 to 12 Gy. The fabricated gel had a higher dynamic range than the other low density polymer gel dosimeter; but its background R2 response was higher. In the second type, no difference in R2 response was seen in the dose ranges from 0 to 18 Gy. Both gels had a mass density between 0.35 and 0.45 g.cm-3 and CT values of about -650 to -750 Hounsfield units. Conclusion: It appeared that reactions between gelatin-free radicals and monomers, due to an increase in the gel temperature during rotation in the household mixer, led to a higher R2-background response. In the second type of gel, it seemed that the collapse of the nitrogen bubbles was the main factor that affected the R2-responses. PMID:26015914

  14. Bubble characteristics in the radial direction of three-phase fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.H.; Kim, S.D. )

    1988-12-01

    Bubble characteristics such as bubble size and rising velocity in three-phase fluidized beds provide the basic information for analyzing phase holdup, axial and radial mixing and heat and mass transfer characteristics. The relationship between the bubble size and its rising velocity and the bubble size distribution in three-phase fluidized beds have been investigated. On the other hand, bubble size reduction has been observed by addition of floating bubble breakers. This paper presents a study on the bubble holdup mean velocity, and mean bubble chord length in a three-phase fluidized bed of 0.254 m-ID with four different particle sizes (0.4--6.0 mm).

  15. How man-made interference might cause gas bubble emboli in deep diving whales.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Andreas; Tyack, Peter L; Miller, Patrick J O; Kvadsheim, Petter H

    2014-01-01

    Recent cetacean mass strandings in close temporal and spatial association with sonar activity has raised the concern that anthropogenic sound may harm breath-hold diving marine mammals. Necropsy results of the stranded whales have shown evidence of bubbles in the tissues, similar to those in human divers suffering from decompression sickness (DCS). It has been proposed that changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving could increase tissue and blood N2 levels, thereby increasing DCS risk. Dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville's beaked and Cuvier's beaked whales before and during exposure to low- (1-2 kHz) and mid- (2-7 kHz) frequency active sonar were used to estimate the changes in blood and tissue N2 tension (PN2 ). Our objectives were to determine if differences in (1) dive behavior or (2) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors for bubble formation. The theoretical estimates indicate that all species may experience high N2 levels. However, unexpectedly, deep diving generally result in higher end-dive PN2 as compared with shallow diving. In this focused review we focus on three possible explanations: (1) We revisit an old hypothesis that CO2, because of its much higher diffusivity, forms bubble precursors that continue to grow in N2 supersaturated tissues. Such a mechanism would be less dependent on the alveolar collapse depth but affected by elevated levels of CO2 following a burst of activity during sonar exposure. (2) During deep dives, a greater duration of time might be spent at depths where gas exchange continues as compared with shallow dives. The resulting elevated levels of N2 in deep diving whales might also make them more susceptible to anthropogenic disturbances. (3) Extended duration of dives even at depths beyond where the alveoli collapse could result in slow continuous accumulation of N2 in the adipose tissues that eventually becomes a liability. PMID:24478724

  16. How man-made interference might cause gas bubble emboli in deep diving whales

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Andreas; Tyack, Peter L.; Miller, Patrick J. O.; Kvadsheim, Petter H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent cetacean mass strandings in close temporal and spatial association with sonar activity has raised the concern that anthropogenic sound may harm breath-hold diving marine mammals. Necropsy results of the stranded whales have shown evidence of bubbles in the tissues, similar to those in human divers suffering from decompression sickness (DCS). It has been proposed that changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving could increase tissue and blood N2 levels, thereby increasing DCS risk. Dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville's beaked and Cuvier's beaked whales before and during exposure to low- (1–2 kHz) and mid- (2–7 kHz) frequency active sonar were used to estimate the changes in blood and tissue N2 tension (PN2). Our objectives were to determine if differences in (1) dive behavior or (2) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors for bubble formation. The theoretical estimates indicate that all species may experience high N2 levels. However, unexpectedly, deep diving generally result in higher end-dive PN2 as compared with shallow diving. In this focused review we focus on three possible explanations: (1) We revisit an old hypothesis that CO2, because of its much higher diffusivity, forms bubble precursors that continue to grow in N2 supersaturated tissues. Such a mechanism would be less dependent on the alveolar collapse depth but affected by elevated levels of CO2 following a burst of activity during sonar exposure. (2) During deep dives, a greater duration of time might be spent at depths where gas exchange continues as compared with shallow dives. The resulting elevated levels of N2 in deep diving whales might also make them more susceptible to anthropogenic disturbances. (3) Extended duration of dives even at depths beyond where the alveoli collapse could result in slow continuous accumulation of N2 in the adipose tissues that eventually becomes a liability. PMID:24478724

  17. Macro- and microscopic in-situ observation of gas bubbles and sludge particles in a biogas tower reactor.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Torsten; Mehrwald, Ralf; Grajetzki, Ralf; Sens, Jan; Pakendorf, Tim; Ulrich, Reinhard; Kumpart, Jrn; Matz, Gerhard; Mrkl, Herbert

    2002-06-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic in-situ observation of particles and gas bubbles are used to get precise impressions of the hydrodynamical characteristics of a biologically active suspension. Moreover, values of in-situ velocities and particle densities can be gained by using these methods. The suspended anaerobic sludge revealed an extensive fibrous structure ('fur') on its surface. The observed microfibers have a profound influence on the settling/flotation behavior of the particles because they increase the effective particle volume, they may trap gas bubbles and they favor agglomeration. The biomass particles do not appear as single spherical objects but due to its fibrous structure on the outside as strongly interacting mass. The compressibility of the bubbles which are entrapped in the sludge agglomerates results in a pressure-dependent density of the sludge particles. PMID:12146872

  18. The two-phase flow at gas-evolving electrodes: Bubble-driven and Lorentz-force-driven convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, T.; Landgraf, S.

    2013-03-01

    We observe electrolysis with gas evolution, a phenomenon occurring in a number of industrial scale electrochemical processes. Here, water electrolysis takes place in a small undivided electrolysis cell consisting of vertical electrodes embedded in a larger glass vessel which contains a dilute NaOH solution. Fluid flow velocities are measured by particle image velocimetry with fluorescent tracers, while size distribution and velocities of the bubbles are determined from bubble shadow images obtained with a high speed camera. Coalescence phenomena are observed in the flow and explain the relatively wide distribution of bubble sizes. Depending on the gap width and the current density, bubbles ascending near the electrodes form two discernible bubble curtains (low average void fraction, wide gaps) or a flow profile more akin to a channel flow (high average void fraction, small gaps). If the flow consists of separate bubble curtains, instabilities develop not unlike to those of a single phase wall jet. Finally, the influence of different wall parallel Lorentz force configurations on the velocity distribution in the cell is investigated. These Lorentz forces are generated by permanent magnets mounted behind the electrodes. Depending on gap width, current density, and magnet configuration, liquid phase velocities can be increased by several times compared to the baseline case.

  19. A computational model for large eddy simulation of dilute bubbly turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajit, Mohammad; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    A mathematical formulation of filtered equations for two phase bubbly flows based on two-fluid method is presented. To remove high frequencies (noise), we extracted the filtered form of the equations in curvilinear coordinates, converting the microscopic governing equations to macroscopic equations via spatial averaging of solution variables. The set of equations describing the hydrodynamics in a gas-liquid system can be solved effectively if the solution procedure is decoupled so that an efficient iterative scheme can be employed. We propose a formulation for dilute bubbly flows in which the equations are converted to a loosely-coupled form. The resulting mathematical model is based on five distinct sets of equations, namely mixture momentum balance, pressure Poisson equation, Boyle's law and momentum and mass balances of gas phase. This mathematical formulation provides an efficient numerical procedure for two-way coupling of bubbly flows at low gas holdups. The subgrid-scale modeling is based on dynamic procedure of Germano for both phases. The formulation is validated for a fully turbulent bubble column test by comparing to available experimental results. This work is supported by the US department of energy (DE-EE0005416) and the Minnesota supercomputing institute.

  20. Passive acoustic derived bubble flux and applications to natural gas seepage in the Mackenzie Delta, NWT, Canada and Coal Oil Point, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culling, D.; Leifer, I.; Dallimore, S.; Alcala, K.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is a prominent greenhouse gas that escapes naturally from thermogenic reservoirs as seepage from marine and lacustrine biogenic sources as bubble ebullition. Geologic methane emissions are critically important contributors to the global methane budget however, few quantitative flux measurements are available for shallow waters. This gap in knowledge is critical as in these settings gas can easily transit as bubbles through the water column and directly influence global atmospheric budgets. Video and active acoustic (sonar) measurements of bubble flux have spatial limitations requiring predictable bubble emission location. Passive acoustics are less affected by these limitations, in addition, they can provide data in water too shallow for effective sonar bubble observations. Lab tests were undertaken to quantify the acoustic signature of bubbles formed in non-cohesive sediments. specifically focusing on mechanisms that complicate interpretation of acoustic data. Lab tests then were compared to field data to provide measurement calibration/validation. The principles behind the acoustic analysis method are based on the Minnaert equation, which relates a bubble radius and acoustic frequency. Bubble size and the resultant acoustic frequency from known flows and capillary tube diameters are well documented; however changing sediment pathways adds to the complexity of bubble formation and the resultant bubble acoustic signal. These complex signals were investigated in a lab tank with a thick, cohesive fine-grained sediment bed, through which bubbles produced by a syringe pump migrated to the sediment-water interface. Then, the resultant bubbles were diverted into clear water and measured from high speed, high definition video, while the acoustic signature of bubble formation was recorded concurrently by a hydrophone. Bubble formation is influenced by currents, which shifts the acoustical signal towards a higher frequency with a more complex pattern than the Minnaert equation predicts. Furthermore, bubbles from a cohesive media escaped in pulses of multiple bubbles, which caused significant inter-bubble acoustic coupling and mud-bubble interaction. The acoustic signature of subsurface bubble migration and concurrent sediment movements, including bubble pinch off, presented additional complexities. Use of passive acoustic derived flux was applied to natural gas seepage in the Mackenzie Delta in the North West Territories, Canada as well as offshore Coal Oil Point (COP), CA. Video data were used to calibrate the COP acoustic observations and showed a strong current impact for non-cohesive sediments. Seepage flux in the delta (cohesive sediments) was calibrated using a custom turbine tent that directly measured flux. Further applications of passive acoustic-derived seep fluxes include monitoring of marine pipelines for leaks, and studying biogenic wetlands ebullition as well as thermogenic and hydrate seepage.

  1. Near-wall measurements of the bubble- and Lorentz-force-driven convection at gas-evolving electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczyzmalski, Dominik; Weier, Tom; Kähler, Christian J.; Cierpka, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Chemical energy storage systems, e.g., in the form of hydrogen or methanol, have a great potential for the establishment of volatile renewable energy sources due to the large energy density. The efficiency of hydrogen production through water electrolysis is, however, limited by gas bubbles evolving at the electrode's surface and can be enhanced by an accelerated bubble detachment. In order to characterize the complex multi-phase flow near the electrode, simultaneous measurements of the fluid velocities and the size and trajectories of hydrogen bubbles were performed in a water electrolyzer. The liquid phase velocity was measured by PIV/PTV, while shadowgraphy was used to determine the bubble trajectories. Special measurement and evaluation techniques had to be applied as the measurement uncertainty is strongly affected by the high void fraction close to the wall. In particular, the application of an advanced PTV scheme allowed for more precise fluid velocity measurements closer to electrode. Based on these data, stability characteristics of the near-wall flow were evaluated and compared to that of a wall jet. PTV was used as well to investigate the effect of Lorentz forces on the near-wall fluid velocities. The results show a significantly increased wall parallel liquid phase velocity with increasing Lorentz forces. It is presumed that this enhances the detachment of hydrogen bubbles from the electrode surface and, consequently, decreases the fractional bubble coverage and improves the efficiency. In addition, the effect of large rising bubbles with path oscillations on the near-wall flow was investigated. These bubbles can have a strong impact on the mass transfer near the electrode and thus affect the performance of the process.

  2. Ion-induced density bubble in a strongly correlated one-dimensional gas

    SciTech Connect

    Goold, J.; Doerk, H.; Idziaszek, Z.; Calarco, T.; Busch, Th.

    2010-04-15

    We consider a harmonically trapped Tonks-Girardeau gas of impenetrable bosons in the presence of a single embedded ion, which is assumed to be tightly confined in an RF trap. In an ultracold ion-atom collision the ion's charge induces an electric dipole moment in the atoms which leads to an attractive r{sup -4} potential asymptotically. We treat the ion as a static deformation of the harmonic trap potential and model its short range interaction with the gas in the framework of quantum defect theory. The molecular bound states of the ionic potential are not populated due to the lack of any possible relaxation process in the Tonks-Girardeau regime. Armed with this knowledge we calculate the density profile of the gas in the presence of a central ionic impurity and show that a density bubble of the order of 1{mu}m occurs around the ion for typical experimental parameters. From these exact results we show that an ionic impurity in a Tonks gas can be described using a pseudopotential approximation, allowing for significantly easier treatment.

  3. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  4. Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochnauer, Tim

    1998-12-01

    Select portions of the Clearwater and North Fork of the Clearwater rivers were electroshocked to estimate the incidence of gas bubble trauma (GBT) occurring in resident fish populations for the spring and summer months of 1998. The study area was divided into four sections and sampled weekly during periods of spill and non-spill from Dworshak Dam. Five thousand five hundred and forty one fish, representing 22 different species, were captured and examined for GBT. Two fish were detected with signs of GBT; exhibiting the lowest incidence of GBT in the last four years (0.04%). Reduced discharge and lower levels of total dissolved gases may have resulted in lower incidence of GBT in the 1998 monitoring period.

  5. Recrystallization and fission-gas-bubble swelling of U-Mo fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G. L.; Cheon, J. S.

    2013-05-01

    At high burnup, U-Mo fuel exhibits some form of recrystallization, by which fuel grains are subdivided. The effect of grain subdivision is to effectively enhance fission gas bubble (FGB) swelling due to increased grain boundaries. Inter-granular FGB swelling, i.e., FGB formation and growth at the grain boundaries, is much larger than the intra-granular FGB swelling. Recrystallized fuel volume fractions of U-Mo fuels irradiated to fission densities reaching 5.7 1021 f/cm3 were measured. Analytical expressions of recrystallization kinetics of U-Mo fuel during irradiation have been developed through the usage of the Avrami equation, a phenomenological equation which is also used to describe similar typical transformation reactions, such as new phase formation. In this work, we present a novel FGB swelling model of U-Mo fuel that is expressed in terms of Mo content, extent of cold work (fuel powder fabrication method), and fission density.

  6. Homogeneous bubble nucleation in binary systems of liquid solvent and dissolved gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    A formulation of the classical nucleation theory (CNT) is developed for bubble nucleation in a binary system composed of a liquid solvent and a dissolved gas. The theoretical predictions are compared to the experimental nucleation data of four binary mixtures, i.e. diethylether - nitrogen, propane - carbon dioxide, isobutane - carbon dioxide, and R22 (chlorodifluoromethane) - carbon dioxide. The presented CNT formulation is found to improve the precision of the simpler theoretical method of Ward et al. [J. Basic Eng. 92 (10), 71-80, 1970] based on the weak-solution approximation. By analyzing the available experimental nucleation data, an inconsistency in the data reported by Mori et al. [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 19 (10), 1153-1159, 1976] for propane - carbon dioxide and R22 - carbon dioxide is identified.

  7. Research on acting mechanism and behavior of a gas bubble in the air dense medium fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, X.; Chen, Q.; Yang, Y.; Chen, Z.

    1996-12-31

    Coal dry beneficiation with air-dense medium fluidized bed has now been established as a high efficiency dry separation technology, it is the application of fluidization technology to the coal preparation field. The tiny particle media forms an uniform and stable fluidized bed with a density acted by airflow, which is used to separate 80{micro}m to {approximately}6mm size coal. This technology has achieved satisfied industrialization results, and attracted the expert`s attention in the field. In fluidized bed, the interaction between gas and solid was mainly decided by the existence state of heavy media particles mass (position and distance) relative velocity of gas-solid two phase, as well turbulent action. A change of vertical gas-solid fluidizing state essentially is the one of a energy transforming process. For a coal separating process with air-dense medium fluidized bed, the gas bubble, producing a turbulent and stirring action in the bed, leads to two effects. It can promote a uniform distribution of heavy media particles, and a uniform and stability of a bed density. Otherwise it will decrease effective contacts between gas-solids two phases, producing a bigger gas bubble. Therefore controlling a gas bubble size in bed should be optimized. This paper analyzes mutual movement between gas-solid, and studies the gas bubble behavior in the bed. A mechanic mode and a separating process of coal in the bed is discussed. It aims to research the coal separating mechanism with air-dense fluidized bed.

  8. Relationship of the time course of venous gas bubbles to altitude decompression illness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, J.; Foster, P. P.; Powell, M. R.; Waligora, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The correlation is low between the occurrence of gas bubbles in the pulmonary artery, called venous gas emboli (VGE), and subsequent decompression illness (DCI). The correlation improves when a "grade" of VGE is considered; a zero to four categorical classification based on the intensity and duration of the VGE signal from a Doppler bubble detector. Additional insight about DCI might come from an analysis of the time course of the occurrence of VGE. Using the NASA Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Databank, we compared the time course of the VGE outcome between 322 subjects who exercised and 133 Doppler technicians who did not exercise to evaluate the role of physical activity on the VGE outcome and incidence of DCI. We also compared 61 subjects with VGE and DCI with 110 subjects with VGE but without DCI to identify unique characteristics about the time course of the VGE outcome to try to discriminate between DCI and no-DCI cases. The VGE outcome as a function of time showed a characteristic short lag, rapid response, and gradual recovery phase that was related to physical activity at altitude and the presence or absence of DCI. The average time for DCI symptoms in a limb occurred just before the time of the highest fraction of VGE in the pulmonary artery. It is likely, but not certain, that an individual will report a DCI symptom if VGE are detected early in the altitude exposure, the intensity or grade of VGE rapidly increases from a limb region, and the intensity or grade of VGE remains high.

  9. Vortex motion in the near-wake region behind a single gas bubble in a liquid-solid fluidized bed - The pendulum model for wake size prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Fan, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    A mechanistic model, denoted as the pendulum model, which interrelates the frequency of vortex shedding and the size of the bubble wake is developed based on secondary motion of a single gas bubble rising in liquids and/or liquid-solid suspensions. In the model, the bubble and its primary wake are regarded as a single semi-rigid body steadily rocking at the vortex shedding frequency. Inherent model parameters, including bubble geometric parameters, the bubble rise velocity and the vortex shedding frequency, are expressed in terms of the bubble size to permit a priori prediction of the wake size. The predicted wake sizes are compared satisfactorily with the experimental data reported in the literature over a wide range of the bubble Reynolds number.

  10. SNM holdup assessment of Los Alamos exhaust ducts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    Fissile material holdup in glovebox and fume hood exhaust ducting has been quantified for all Los Alamos duct systems. Gamma-based, nondestructive measurements were used to quantify holdup. The measurements were performed during three measurement campaigns. The first campaign, Phase I, provided foot-by-foot, semiquantitative measurement data on all ducting. These data were used to identify ducting that required more accurate (quantitative) measurement. Of the 280 duct systems receiving Phase I measurements, 262 indicated less than 50 g of fissile holdup and 19 indicated fissile holdup of 50 or more grams. Seven duct systems were measured in a second campaign, called Series 1, Phase II. Holdup estimates on these ducts ranged from 421 g of {sup 235}U in a duct servicing a shut-down uranium-machining facility to 39 g of {sup 239}Pu in a duct servicing an active plutonium-processing facility. Measurements performed in the second campaign proved excessively laborious, so a third campaign was initiated that used more efficient instrumentation at some sacrifice in measurement quality. Holdup estimates for the 12 duct systems measured during this third campaign ranged from 70 g of {sup 235}U in a duct servicing analytical laboratories to 1 g of {sup 235}U and 1 g of {sup 239}Pu in a duct carrying exhaust air to a remote filter building. These quantitative holdup estimates support the conclusion made at the completion of the Phase I measurements that only ducts servicing shut-down uranium operations contain about 400 g of fissile holdup. No ventilation ducts at Los Alamos contain sufficient fissile material holdup to present a criticality safety concern.

  11. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Mammini, Beth M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  12. Sparger Effects on Gas Volume Fraction Distributions in Vertical Bubble-Column Flows as Measured by Gamma-Densitometry Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-01-18

    Gamma-densitometry tomography is applied to study the effect of sparger hole geometry, gas flow rate, column pressure, and phase properties on gas volume fraction profiles in bubble columns. Tests are conducted in a column 0.48 m in diameter, using air and mineral oil, superficial gas velocities ranging from 5 to 30 cm s{sup -1}, and absolute column pressures from 103 to 517 kPa. Reconstructed gas volume fraction profiles from two sparger geometries are presented. The development length of the gas volume fraction profile is found to increase with gas flow rate and column pressure. Increases in gas flow rate increase the local gas volume fraction preferentially on the column axis, whereas increases in column pressure produce a uniform rise in gas volume fraction across the column. A comparison of results from the two spargers indicates a significant change in development length with the number and size of sparger holes.

  13. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  14. Inertial-Fusion-Related Hydrodynamic Instabilities in a Spherical Gas Bubble Accelerated by a Planar Shock Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhaus, John; Ranjan, Devesh; Anderson, Mark; Oakley, Jason; Bonazza, Riccardo; Greenough, Jeff

    2005-05-15

    Experiments studying the compression and unstable growth of a dense spherical bubble in a gaseous medium subjected to a strong planar shock wave (2.8 < M < 3.4) are performed in a vertical shock tube. The test gas is initially contained in a free-falling spherical soap-film bubble, and the shocked bubble is imaged using planar laser diagnostics. Concurrently, simulations are carried out using a compressible hydrodynamics code in r-z axisymmetric geometry.Experiments and computations indicate the formation of characteristic vortical structures in the post-shock flow, due to Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and smaller-scale vortices due to secondary effects. Inconsistencies between experimental and computational results are examined, and the usefulness of the current axisymmetric approach is evaluated.

  15. Plumes of bubbles release methane gas from the seabed along the West Spitsbergen continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, G. K.

    2009-04-01

    Over 250 plumes of gas bubbles have been discovered emanating from the seabed of the West Spitsbergen continental margin, at and above the upper limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), at depths of 150-400 m. Some plumes extend upward to within 50 m of the sea surface. The gas is predominantly methane, and seismic reflection data indicate free gas beneath the plume field. A 1C warming of the northward-flowing West Spitsbergen current over the last thirty years is likely to have increased the release of methane from the seabed by reducing the extent of the GHSZ, causing the liberation of methane from decomposing hydrate. If this process is widespread along Arctic continental margins, the methane released could be a large proportion of global methane flux. Methane released from gas hydrate in submarine sediments has been invoked as an agent of past climate change, yet comparatively little is known about methane fluxes in the present-day marine environment. Global atmospheric methane concentration continues to rise, following a period of stability between 1998 and 2006. A multidisciplinary marine geological, geophysical, and geochemical expedition was undertaken with the Royal Research Ship James Clark Ross between 23 August and 24 September 2008, as part of the International Polar Year, to investigate the role of the GHSZ in the release and retention of methane from geological sources along the West Spitsbergen continental margin, between 78 and 80 N. The techniques employed in the expedition included: detailed (10-m resolution) mapping of sea-floor morphology; detailed acoustic imaging of sea-floor stratigraphy and of features extending into the water column; seismic portrayal of geological features to depths of several hundreds of metres beneath the seabed, such as depositional and tectonic structures and the bottom-simulating reflector (BSR, the boundary between free-gas-containing sediment and hydrate-containing sediment); sediment coring to obtain sequences for geochemical and palaeoceanographic investigations; water-column sampling for chemical analyses of the water and dissolved gases; and atmospheric sampling for gas concentration (notably methane). In the Arctic, the GHSZ is especially sensitive to climate-induced changes in temperature, because the degree of temperature change is greater than at lower latitudes. The GHSZ for a specific gas or gases and salinity of water is defined by conditions of temperature and pressure (dependent on water depth plus depth beneath seabed), both of which have varied greatly in this area over the past 15 kyr. At present, the GHSZ (for pure methane gas and water with 3.5 wt % NaCl) is expected to taper out at its landward limit where water temperature is 3C at a depth of about 396 m. It is in water just shallower than this depth that most of the bubble plumes occur.

  16. Tribonucleation of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other while immersed in a gas-supersaturated liquid. For given supersaturation and surface material, bubble nucleation is only observed beyond a certain threshold for the rubbing force and velocity. Above this threshold, a regularly spaced row of growing bubbles is left behind on the surface. Direct observation through the bottom of a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the row results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles. From a detailed study of the wear tracks it seems that these gas nuclei originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities in the contact area.

  17. Measurement of bubble size distribution in a gas-liquid foam using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul; Sederman, Andrew J; Mantle, Mick D; Li, Xueliang; Gladden, Lynn F

    2010-12-01

    Pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance, previously used for measuring droplet size distributions in emulsions, has been used to measure bubble size distributions in a non-overflowing pneumatic gas-liquid foam that has been created by sparging propane into an aqueous solution of 1.5g/l (5.20mM) SDS. The bubble size distributions measured were reproducible and approximated a Weibull distribution. However, the bubble size distributions did not materially change with position at which they were measured within the froth. An analysis of foam coarsening due to Ostwald ripening in a non-overflowing foam indicates that, for the experimental conditions employed, one would not expect this to be a significant effect. It is therefore apparent that the eventual collapse of the foam is due to bubble bursting (or surface coalescence) rather than Ostwald ripening. This surface coalescence occurs because of evaporation from the free surface of the foam. An analytical solution for the liquid fraction profile for a certain class of non-overflowing pneumatic foam is given, and a mean bubble size that is appropriate for drainage calculations is suggested. PMID:20832808

  18. Fission gas bubble nucleated cavitational swelling of the alpha-uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.

    1992-04-01

    Cavitational swelling has been identified as a potential swelling mechanism for the alpha uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels for the Integral Fast Reactor being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The trends of U-Pu-Zr swelling data prior to fuel cladding contact can be interpreted in terms of unrestrained cavitational driven swelling. It is theorized that the swelling mechanisms at work in the alpha uranium phase can be modeled by single vacancy and single interstitial kinetics with intergranular gas bubbles providing the void nuclei, avoiding the use of complicated defect interaction terms required for the calculation of void nucleation. The focus of the kinetics of fission gas evolution as it relates to cavitational swelling is prior to the formation of a significant amount of interconnected porosity and is on the development of small intergranular gas bubbles which can act as void nuclei. Calculations for the evolution of intergranular fission gas bubbles show that they provide critical cavity sizes (i.e., the size above which the cavity will grow by bias-driven vacancy flux) consistent with the observed incubation dose for the onset of rapid swelling and gas release.

  19. Gas bubble dimensions in Archean lava flows indicate low air pressure at 2.7 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S. M.; Buick, R.; Hagadorn, J.; Blake, T.; Perreault, J.; Harnmeijer, J.; Catling, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Air pressure constrains atmospheric composition, which, in turn, is linked to the Earth system through biogeochemical cycles and fluxes of volatiles from and to the Earth's interior. Previous studies have only placed maximum levels on surface air pressure for the early Earth [1]. Here, we calculate an absolute value for Archean barometric pressure using gas bubble size (vesicle) distributions in uninflated basaltic lava flows that solidified at sea level 2.7 billion years ago in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. These vesicles have been filled in by secondary minerals deposited during metasomatism and so are now amydules, but thin sections show that infilling did not change vesicle dimensions. Amygdule dimensions are measured using high-resolution X-ray tomography from core samples obtained from the top and bottom of the lava flows. The modal size expressed at the top and at the bottom of an uninflated flow can be linked to atmospheric pressure using the ideal gas law. Such a technique has been verified as a paleoaltimeter using Hawaiian Quaternary lava flows [2]. We use statistical methods to estimate the mean and standard deviation of the volumetric size of the amygdules by applying 'bootstrap'resampling and the Central Limit Theorem. Our data indicate a surprisingly low atmospheric pressure. Greater nitrogen burial under anaerobic conditions likely explains lower pressure. Refs: [1] Som et al. (2012) Nature 484, 359-262. D. L. Sahagian et al. (2002) J. Geol., 110, 671-685.

  20. Segregating gas from melt: an experimental study of the Ostwald ripening of vapor bubbles in magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lautze, Nicole C.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusive coarsening (Ostwald ripening) of H2O and H2O-CO2 bubbles in rhyolite and basaltic andesite melts was studied with elevated temperaturepressure experiments to investigate the rates and time spans over which vapor bubbles may enlarge and attain sufficient buoyancy to segregate in magmatic systems. Bubble growth and segregation are also considered in terms of classical steady-state and transient (non-steady-state) ripening theory. Experimental results are consistent with diffusive coarsening as the dominant mechanism of bubble growth. Ripening is faster in experiments saturated with pure H2O than in those with a CO2-rich mixed vapor probably due to faster diffusion of H2O than CO2 through the melt. None of the experimental series followed the time1/3 increase in mean bubble radius and time-1 decrease in bubble number density predicted by classical steady-state ripening theory. Instead, products are interpreted as resulting from transient regime ripening. Application of transient regime theory suggests that bubbly magmas may require from days to 100 years to reach steady-state ripening conditions. Experimental results, as well as theory for steady-state ripening of bubbles that are immobile or undergoing buoyant ascent, indicate that diffusive coarsening efficiently eliminates micron-sized bubbles and would produce mm-sized bubbles in 102104 years in crustal magma bodies. Once bubbles attain mm-sizes, their calculated ascent rates are sufficient that they could transit multiple kilometers over hundreds to thousands of years through mafic and silicic melt, respectively. These results show that diffusive coarsening can facilitate transfer of volatiles through, and from, magmatic systems by creating bubbles sufficiently large for rapid ascent.

  1. Hold-up power supply for flash memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, William E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A hold-up power supply for flash memory systems is provided. The hold-up power supply provides the flash memory with the power needed to temporarily operate when a power loss exists. This allows the flash memory system to complete any erasures and writes, and thus allows it to shut down gracefully. The hold-up power supply detects when a power loss on a power supply bus is occurring and supplies the power needed for the flash memory system to temporally operate. The hold-up power supply stores power in at least one capacitor. During normal operation, power from a high voltage supply bus is used to charge the storage capacitors. When a power supply loss is detected, the power supply bus is disconnected from the flash memory system. A hold-up controller controls the power flow from the storage capacitors to the flash memory system. The hold-up controller uses feedback to assure that the proper voltage is provided from the storage capacitors to the flash memory system. This power supplied by the storage capacitors allows the flash memory system to complete any erasures and writes, and thus allows the flash memory system to shut down gracefully.

  2. On the theory of fission gas bubble evolution in irradiated UO 2 fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veshchunov, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    The standard approaches for modelling of the intra- and intergranular bubbles evolution in the UO 2 fuel are critically analysed on the basis of available experimental data. It is demonstrated that the main disadvantage of the simplified treatment of the problem by the standard models can be associated with underestimation of the radiation effects at low temperatures (below 1500C) and thermal effects at high temperatures (above 1500C). The presented analysis allows a quantitative description of the bubble nucleation mechanism, adequate modelling of the bubble diffusion growth, and evaluation of the intragranular bubble number density and stable size attained under steady irradiation conditions.

  3. Bubble size distribution in a gas sparged vessel agitated by a Rushton turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, R.; Ahmed, N. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The effect of agitation, due to a Rushton turbine, on the bubble size and bubble size distribution has been studied in an aerated vessel. By using a noncoalescing system, it has been possible to study the bubble breakup process in isolation. Bubbles of two different sizes, with d[sub 32] of 300 [mu]m and 2.5 mm, are generated using porous spargers. With no agitation, the bubble populations are found to exhibit a log-normal distribution. The 300-[mu]m bubbles are too small to undergo further breakage for the range of impeller speeds studied, and the size distribution is preserved. The larger bubbles are broken by agitation and the d[sub 32] decreases. Also with increasing agitation, the size distribution changes from unimodal to bimodal, and again to unimodal, as the bubble population moves progressively down the size scale. A model proposed, based on the energy dissipated in the impeller zone, predicts the continually changing pattern of the bubble size distributions satisfactorily.

  4. A Phase-Field Approach to Modeling Hydrate Formation on Methane Gas Bubbles in a Water Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Waite, W. F.; Ruppel, C. D.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Methane hydrates are water-based crystalline solids, where gas molecules are trapped inside the lattice structure formed by water. Most commonly found in deep ocean floors where low temperature and high pressure are primal conditions for hydrate to form, gas hydrates contain most of the world's mobile carbon and yet it remains an important and open question how methane leakage from gas hydrate impacts ocean and the atmosphere. While current work focus on the breakdown of gas hydrate in marine environment and the the release of methane from seafloor, few studies explore the fate of a single or a plume of methane bubbles when entering the water column after the release. We propose to study the fate of an individual and a series of methane bubbles through mathematical modeling, specifically using a phase-field approach. Phase-field modeling is a mathematical framework that describes systems that are out of thermodynamic equilibrium. First introduced in the context of solidification process and phase transitions, it has since been adopted in the field of multiphase flow. In this work, we present a new phase-field formulation for multiphase/multicomponent flows that allows us to model the fate of methane bubbles in the water system as a nonequilibrium process.

  5. Bubble column reactors for wastewater treatment. 2: The effect of sparger design on sublation column hydrodynamics in the homogeneous flow regime

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.S.; Burns, L.F.; Valsaraj, K.T.; Thibodeaux, L.J.

    1996-05-01

    A simple analysis of bubble column hydrodynamics indicates that the upper limit of the homogeneous flow regime is the optimum operating condition for solvent sublation. This is in contrast to the traditional belief that solvent sublation is limited to the string bubbling flow regime. The implication is that the limited number of low-pressure adsorptive processes that operate in the bubbly flow regime, such as solvent sublation, may soon become viable options for industry. Results of gas holdup, bubble size, and dispersion experiments are reported as functions of gas velocity for three different types of gas-bubble spargers, namely, a fine porous glass frit, a flexible rubber membrane, and an annular shear sparger. The data show that the shear sparger affects the column dynamic properties such that the transition to the heterogeneous regime is delayed. Therefore, for applications requiring homogeneous flow, column capacity can be improved by approximately 25%. Moreover, the interfacial area produced by the shear sparger operating in the homogeneous regime rivals that produced by perforated and sintered plates operating in the heterogeneous regime.

  6. Experiments on the motion of gas bubbles in turbulence generated by an active grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorte, R. E. G.; Biesheuvel, A.

    2002-06-01

    The random motion of nearly spherical bubbles in the turbulent flow behind a grid is studied experimentally. In quiescent water these bubbles rise at high Reynolds number. The turbulence is generated by an active grid of the design of Makita (1991), and can have turbulence Reynolds number R[lambda] of up to 200. Minor changes in the geometry of the grid and in its mode of operation improves the isotropy of the turbulence, compared with that reported by Makita (1991) and Mydlarski & Warhaft (1996). The trajectory of each bubble is measured with high spatial and temporal resolution with a specially developed technique that makes use of a position-sensitive detector. Bubble statistics such as the mean rise velocity and the root-mean-square velocity fluctuations are obtained by ensemble averaging over many identical bubbles. The resulting bubble mean rise velocity is significantly reduced (up to 35%) compared with the quiescent conditions. The vertical bubble velocity fluctuations are found to be non-Gaussian, whereas the horizontal displacements are Gaussian for all times. The diffusivity of bubbles is considerably less than that of fluid particles. These findings are qualitatively consistent with results obtained through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations by Spelt & Biesheuvel (1997).

  7. The effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of gas bubbles near free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, S. J.; Phillips, T. N.

    2013-02-01

    The dynamics of bubbles immersed in a viscoelastic fluid directly beneath an initially plane free surface is modelled using the boundary integral method. The model predicts a range of dynamics that is dependent on the Deborah number, the Reynolds number and the proximity of the bubble to the free surface. The motion of the free surface jet caused by the collapse of a bubble in a viscoelastic fluid can be significantly retarded compared with the Newtonian case. The axial jet predicted in many instances in the Newtonian case is not observed when the inertial forces are sufficiently small. In this case an annular jet forms that can penetrate the bubble. At high Deborah numbers, there is a return to Newtonian-like dynamics since the effects of viscosity are abated by elasticity to such an extent that inertia is the prevailing influence on bubble dynamics.

  8. A generalized bubble diameter correlation for gas-solid fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, M.; Nonaka, A.

    1987-11-01

    A new bubble diameter correlation is derived to predict bubbling characteristics of fluidized beds of varieties of powders. The present model is founded on the postulate that the steady bubble size, which is often called the maximum stable diameter, observed in a bed of Geldart group A powder is formed as a result of an equilibrium of successive coalescence and splitting. For the cases of group B powders the present correlation automatically converges to the conventional correlation. For group A powders the present correlation is validated by comparison with experimental data in the literature. Based on this correlation a theoretical explanation is presented for the fact that the maximum bubble diameters observed were up to 50 to 100 times as large as those from the stable bubble theory.

  9. Hydrodynamic instabilities in gas-liquid monolithic reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Grolman, E.; Edvinsson, R.K.; Stankiewicz, A.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Liquid holdup and pressure drop were measured during the co-current down flow of air and water through a monolith in the Taylor flow regime. The model presented accounts for the significant, up to three fold, increase in frictional pressure drop that is caused by the presence of gas bubbles. It is accurate to within 20%. In addition, the model presented is used to predict hydrodynamic stability, which is defined as the situation where all channels transport gas and liquid in the direction of mass flow. Essential for stability is a sufficiently good initial liquid distribution, which was achieved with a shower-type distributor. Furthermore, distribution was significantly enhanced by the natural occurrence of a well-mixed foam (aerated liquid) layer on top of the monolith at liquid holdup values above 0.5. The quality of the liquid distribution across the monolith follows directly from on-line, integral liquid holdup measurements. Monoliths have been developed and used extensively for catalytic automobile exhaust conversion, from which they have inherited mechanical and thermal robustness. Today, monoliths provide an interesting alternative to trickle-bed and slurry-column technologies, for solid-catalyzed gas-liquid reactions.

  10. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  11. Proteomics of juvenile senegal sole (Solea senegalensis) affected by gas bubble disease in hyperoxygenated ponds.

    PubMed

    Salas-Leiton, E; Cnovas-Conesa, B; Zerolo, R; Lpez-Barea, J; Caavate, J P; Alhama, J

    2009-01-01

    Solea senegalensis is a commercial flat fish traditionally farmed in earth ponds in coastal wetlands that might also become important to more intensive aquaculture. Gas bubble disease (GBD) is a potential risk for outdoor fish farming, particularly in certain periods of the year, related to improper management leading to macroalgae blooms. Physical-chemical conditions inducing hyperoxia, including radiation, temperature, and high levels of dissolved oxygen, have been monitored in fish affected by GBD together with observed symptoms. Exophthalmia, subcutaneous emphysemas, obstruction of gill lamellae, hemorrhages, and anomalous swimming were the main effects of oxygen supersaturation. A proteomic study was carried out for the first time under aquaculture conditions and protein expression changes are described for fish that were subject to hyperoxic conditions. Proteins identified in gill of GBD-affected fish are related to oxidative alteration of cytoskeleton structure/function (beta-tubulin, beta-actin), motility (light myosin chain, alpha-tropomyosin), or regulatory pathways (calmodulin, Raf kinase inhibitor protein), reflecting the central role of gill in oxygen exchange. Hepatic proteins identified are related to protein oxidative damages (beta-globin, FABPs), protection from oxidative stress (DCXR, GNMT), and inflammatory response (C3), in agreement with the predominant metabolic role of liver. Comparison of protein expression patterns and protein identification are suggested as potentially specific hyperoxia biomarkers that would facilitate prevention of GBD outbreaks. PMID:19101763

  12. The effect of pH and gas composition on the bubble fractionation of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    DeSouza, A.H.G.; Tanner, R.D.; Effler, W.T. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Studies were conducted to establish the effect of the variation of environmental factors on the separation occurring in protein systems, resulting from bubble fractionation in a bioreactor. The measure of separation was selected to be the separation ratio. This is defined to be the ratio of either the top or the middle position concentration in the vessel to the bottom concentration of the vessel. Invertase and Ce-amylase were the two {open_quotes}model{close_quotes} enzymes considered. It was observed that, under certain conditions, i.e., a combination of the nature of the sparging gas and the medium pH, varying degrees of protein separation were achieved. The pH of the system dramatically influenced the separation. It was found that the best separation occurred at a certain pH, assumed to be at or close to the pI of the protein in question. Furthermore, it was observed that systems sparged with CO{sub 2} exhibited greater separation than systems sparged with air. In fact, in the case of invertase, almost threefold separation was observed at the top port when the solution was sparged with CO{sub 2}.

  13. Carbonic anhydrase activities from the rainbow trout lens correspond to the development of acute gas bubble disease.

    PubMed

    Gltepe, Nejdet; Ate?, Orhan; Hisar, Olcay; Beydemir, Skr

    2011-09-01

    Dissolved gas supersaturation is hazardous to fish and can result in gas bubble disease (GBD). Signs of GBD typically include bubbles in the eyes, fins, skin, lateral line, and gill filaments. Ocular abnormalities in diseased salmonids typically occur after aberrant gas production in the eyes. In this study, freshwater rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were exposed experimentally to percent total gas pressure (TGP%) levels of 104% (control) and 115%. No mortalities occurred during the 7-d experimental period. Effects of GBD were observed externally as a darkened skin, exophthalmia, localized hemorrhage in the eye, and gas bubbles on the operculum. Additional signs included increased swimming activity and, more frequently, panic episodes. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme activities from the lens and retina were determined at days 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 of the study. Venous blood gases were also measured on day 7. Retinal pH did not differ between normal and affected fish, but blood characteristics such as the partial pressure of O2, partial pressure of CO2, carboxyhemoglobin level, and bicarbonate ion concentration were significantly elevated in affected fish relative to normal fish. Venous blood pH and oxyhemoglobin levels were not significantly different between affected and normal fish. Patterns of response to total dissolved gas levels differed between the lens and the retina. Mean CA activities in the lenses of fish exposed to a TGP% level of 115% were significantly below those of control fish. However, retinal CA activities did not significantly differ between the two groups over the course of the experiment. These findings show that dissolved gas supersaturation reduces CA activity in the rainbow trout lens. PMID:22216712

  14. Evaluation of the Integrated Holdup Measurement System with the M3(superscript 3)CA for Assay of Uranium and Plutonium Holdup

    SciTech Connect

    P. A. Russo; J. K. Sprinkle, Jr.; C. W. Bjork; T. O. McKown; G. A. Sheppard; S. E. Smith; J. F. Harris

    1999-08-01

    Uranium and plutonium holdup that has been simulated by insertion of a variety of sealed, reference samples into pipes, ducts, and other hardware has been measured over a period of six years with an integrated holdup measurement system. The result is a systematic evaluation of the generalized-geometry holdup (GGH) formalism applied to portable gamma-ray holdup measurements with low-resolution detectors. The extended exercise was carried out both with and without automation of the measurements, data reduction/analysis, and holdup evaluation. Automation was accomplished by the software Version 2 for the Holdup Measurement System (HMS2). The purpose of the exercise was to establish reliable benchmarks for GGH measurements and to document the advantages of the automation with actual measurement results. The results presented below demonstrate a factor of 2 improvement in the quantitative reliability of the holdup assay automated by HMS2. The automated results are otherwise identical to the manual measurements. These and similar exercises also show that automation can decrease by a factor of 20 or more the time required to execute a holdup measurement campaign and obtain the holdup quantities for the facility using an integrated holdup measurement system, and that only one person, rather than two, is required to perform the measurements. Enhanced implementation of the integrated holdup measurement system with new software, corrections for systematic effects, and improved room-temperature gamma-ray detectors is planned.

  15. Testing a simple model of gas bubble dynamics in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Baird, Andy J.; Coulthard, Tom J.; Waddington, J. Michael

    2015-02-01

    Bubble dynamics in porous media are of great importance in industrial and natural systems. Of particular significance is the impact that bubble-related emissions (ebullition) of greenhouse gases from porous media could have on global climate (e.g., wetland methane emissions). Thus, predictions of future changes in bubble storage, movement, and ebullition from porous media are needed. Methods exist to predict ebullition using numerical models, but all existing models are limited in scale (spatial and temporal) by high computational demands or represent porous media simplistically. A suitable model is needed to simulate ebullition at scales beyond individual pores or relatively small collections (<10-4 m3) of connected pores. Here we present a cellular automaton model of bubbles in porous media that addresses this need. The model is computationally efficient, and could be applied over large spatial and temporal extent without sacrificing fine-scale detail. We test this cellular automaton model against a physical model and find a good correspondence in bubble storage, bubble size, and ebullition between both models. It was found that porous media heterogeneity alone can have a strong effect on ebullition. Furthermore, results from both models suggest that the frequency distributions of number of ebullition events per time and the magnitude of bubble loss are strongly right skewed, which partly explains the difficulty in interpreting ebullition events from natural systems.

  16. Engineering Development of Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR) Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Puneet Gupta

    2002-07-31

    This report summarizes the procedures used and results obtained in determining radial gas holdup profiles, via gamma ray scanning, and in assessing liquid and gas mixing parameters, via radioactive liquid and gas tracers, during Fischer Tropsch synthesis. The objectives of the study were (i) to develop a procedure for detection of gas holdup radial profiles in operating reactors and (ii) to test the ability of the developed, previously described, engineering models to predict the observed liquid and gas mixing patterns. It was shown that the current scanning procedures were not precise enough to obtain an accurate estimate of the gas radial holdup profile and an improved protocol for future use was developed. The previously developed physically based model for liquid mixing was adapted to account for liquid withdrawal from the mid section of the column. The ability of our engineering mixing models for liquid and gas phase to predict both liquid and gas phase tracer response was established and illustrated.

  17. Mass transfer processes across the Capillary Fringe: Quantification of gas-water interface and bubble mediated mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Mohammadian, Sadjad; Schlter, Steffen; Karimzadeh, Lotfollah; Vogel, Hans-Jrg

    2013-04-01

    The Capillary Fringe (CF) is a highly dynamic zone at the interface between the water-saturated aquifer and the vadose zone, where steep biogeochemical gradients and thus high bioactivities are expected. Mass transfer processes between the unsaturated zone and the atmosphere, like Greenhouse gas emissions and evaporation, are controlled by the highly temporal and spatial variable gas-water interface across the capillary fringe. Due to water table fluctuations, gas phase may be entrapped or released at/from the CF, which extremely affects the hydraulic properties of the porous medium as well as the mass transfer processes in the partially saturated zone. Most of these processes (gas entrapment and bubble mediated mass transfer (BMT)) are governed by the interactions between the interfaces of gas, water and soil phases. Quantification of these parameters requires a pore-scale approach, which can determine the phase volumes and interfaces with high accuracy. For the understanding and prediction of the involved processes, experiments and modeling at the pore scale are the necessary prerequisites for upscaled, effective modeling approaches. To achieve this aim, we conducted a set of column experiments using X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT). Using this technique, we are able to quantitatively analyze the desired variables in 3D inside the actual bulk volume of the porous media. Water table (WT) elevation was raised at different velocities in the column filled with 1mm-glass beads. After each rise, the column was scanned with CT. We used an intelligent multi-phase segmentation method, considering grey value frequency and voxel neighboring, to separate gas, water, and solid phases in the CT images. The saturation of the gas phase, distribution of the trapped gas bubbles and clusters, and their size, shape, and area are quantified and analyzed at pore-scale. We developed a new segmentation algorithm to distinguish the gas/water interface from the gas/solid interface. Only the first plays the key role in BMT. Parallel to the CT-column experiments we measured in the same experimental setup (column, sediment, WT-rise velocity) the dissolution of trapped Oxygen gas bubbles using optode spots along the capillary fringe inside the column. For the first time we quantify BMT based on pore-scale process characteristics of gas phase distribution using two different models: (i) an effective 1D-diffusion model and (ii) a Multisphere diffusion model.

  18. Gas-solid fluidized bed reactors: Scale-up, flow regimes identification and hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Faraj Muftah

    This research studied the scale-up, flow regimes identification and hydrodynamics of fluidized beds using 6-inch and 18- inch diameter columns and different particles. One of the objectives was to advance the scale-up of gas-solid fluidized bed reactors by developing a new mechanistic methodology for hydrodynamic similarity based on matching the radial or diameter profile of gas phase holdup, since gas dynamics dictate the hydrodynamics of these reactors. This has been successfully achieved. However, the literature reported scale-up methodology based on matching selected dimensionless groups was examined and it was found that it was not easy to match the dimensionless groups and hence, there was some deviation in the hydrodynamics of the studied two different fluidized beds. A new technique based on gamma ray densitometry (GRD) was successfully developed and utilized to on-line monitor the implementation of scale-up, to identify the flow regime, and to measure the radial or diameter profiles of gas and solids holdups. CFD has been demonstrated as a valuable tool to enable the implementation of the newly developed scale-up methodology based on finding the conditions that provide similar or closer radial profile or cross sectional distribution of the gas holdup. As gas velocity increases, solids holdup in the center region of the column decreases in the fully developed region of both 6 inch and 18 inch diameter columns. Solids holdup increased with the increase in the particles size and density. Upflowing particles velocity increased with the gas velocity and became steeper at high superficial gas velocity at all axial heights where the center line velocity became higher than that in the wall region. Smaller particles size and lower density gave larger upflowing particles velocity. Minimum fluidization velocity and transition velocity from bubbly to churn turbulent flow regimes were found to be lower in 18 inch diameter column compared to those obtained in 6 inch diameter column. Also the absolute fluctuation of upflowing particles velocity multiplied by solids holdups v? 3? as one of the terms for solids mass flux estimation was found to be larger in 18-inch diameter column than that in 6-inch diameter column using same particles size and density.

  19. Enhanced electron injection in laser-driven bubble acceleration by ultra-intense laser irradiating foil-gas targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Bo; Ma, Yan-Yun; Xu, Han; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Chen, Min; Yu, Tong-Pu; Zou, De-Bin; Liu, Jian-Xun; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Gan, Long-Fei; Tian, Li-Chao; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Kawata, S.

    2015-08-01

    A scheme for enhancing the electron injection charge in a laser-driven bubble acceleration is proposed. In this scheme, a thin foil target is placed in front of a gas target. Upon interaction with an ultra-intense laser pulse, the foil emits electrons with large longitudinal momenta, allowing them to be trapped into the transmitted shaped laser-excited bubble in the gaseous plasma target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to demonstrate this scheme, and an electron beam with a total electron number of 4.21 10 8 ? m - 1 can be produced, which is twice the number of electrons produced without the foil. Such scheme may be widely used for applications that require high electron yields such as positron and gamma ray generation from relativistic electron beams interacting with solid targets.

  20. The condition of the resonant break-up of a gas bubble subjected to an acoustic wave in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanovskiy, V. V.; Petrov, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of a gas bubble break-up in liquid is considered in the conditions of the frequencies resonance of the radial and nth axially symmetric deformational mode 2:1. The nonlinear energy transfer between the modes is described using an efficient Krylov-Bogolyubov averaging technique. It is shown that the deformational mode magnitude can be some orders larger than the radial mode magnitude which is damped by the thermal, viscous and acoustic dissipation. The estimative criterion of bubble break-up is obtained in the cases of slow and fast acoustic wave start. The obtained pressure magnitudes in the wave for break-up are very small and the mechanism can have strong medical and technical applications.

  1. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  2. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  3. Mechanism of gas bubble shoot-off and motion during spark discharge in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavtushenko, I. O.; Orlov, A. M.; Zharkov, S. V.

    2012-07-01

    The conditions of the excitation of a pulsed plasma discharge on the surface of a processed metal (copper) sample immersed in a conducting aqueous solution have been studied. Cathode polarization of the metal was provided by a high-voltage capacitor bank (4?F) charged to U = 200-1100 V after each discharge. It is established that electric breakdown with a duration not exceeding 0.1 ?s is always preceded by the formation of small hydrogen bubbles (with radii r ? 37-40 ?m) on the polarized metal surface, which takes about 139-159 ?s. A mechanism of passivation of the processed metal surface by these hydrogen bubbles, which are synchronously shot off from the electrode surface under the action of the spark discharge, is proposed. Consistent matching of the experimental data and model calculations is used to estimate the main parameters determining the kinetics of bubble detachment from the electrode surface at various voltages U on the capacitor bank.

  4. Structure and properties of detonation in a liquid-gas bubble system

    SciTech Connect

    Pinaev, A.V.; Sychev, A.I.

    1986-11-01

    The authors study the detonation of two liquid hydrocarbon fuels, two oils, glycerine and two oxidizers--oxygen and air--in systems with bubbles where the detonation is initiated by the pressure exerted by a detonation wave propagating through the system. They use photography, oscillography, and mathematical simulation to assess the effects of viscosity, pressure, and hydrodynamics on the wave propagation and ignition process in the shock tube, and conclude that an increase in the initial bubble volume and initial pressure and a decrease in bubble diameter all tend to increase the detonation wave amplitude, whereas an increase in viscosity and a reduction in the ignition induction period work to reduce the amplitude. Detonation wave velocity was also found to be influenced by these parameters. The results held true for all systems studied and are therefore assumed to be general phenomena.

  5. The North Sea Blowout: A gas bubble megaplume with spiral vortex motion and why it might, or might not, contribute much to the atmospheric methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Leifer, Ira; Schmidt, Mark; Rehder, Gregor; Linke, Peter

    2014-05-01

    In the Central North Sea, during drilling operations, a gas blowout accident happened in 1990. Thereafter, natural gas has leaked prodigiously from a 60 m diameter and 20 m deep crater located at 95 m depth into the water column and to the sea surface. A series of field studies was carried out at this site since 2005 evidencing ongoing intense seepage activity. Three gas bubble megaplumes and dozens of minor to major bubble seeps were observed in the crater during a manned submersible dive, ROV mapped hundreds. Analysis of gas bubbles captured at 118 m water depth revealed concentrations between 88-90%Vol CH4 with ? 13C-CH4 values around -74 VPDB, consistent with a biogenic origin. Blowout site flux estimates derived from ROV video show the site's emissions are the strongest and most intense marine methane seepage quantified to date with seabed emissions of ~32.6 kt/y. Based on previous research suggesting greater flux correlates with greater transport efficiency, the direct bubble-mediated atmospheric flux to the atmosphere was estimated at a surprisingly low 0.7kt/y. This is orders of magnitude smaller compared to the seabed flux, thus the bulk methane dissolves before reaching the atmosphere, suggesting enhanced bubble dissolution rates for megaplumes. Analysis of more than 120 water samples from near the blowout plume showed dissolved methane concentration distributions consistent with enhanced bubble dissolution at depth. CH4 concentrations ranged from 0.2 mol/L at 20 m depth to a peak in the crater of an extraordinary 400 mol/L. To evaluate further the controlling factors on the rising bubble plume, multibeam water column data were analyzed. The bubble plume spatial distribution revealed a horizontal intrusion of gas bubbles just below the thermocline. This pronounced pattern was traced 200 m horizontally with a downflow plume orientation suggesting trapping of methane-enriched fluids at depth. A numerical bubble propagation model was used to simulate the extraordinarily intense Blowout site plume. Simulations that used normal bubble dissolution rates were unable to explain the observed trapping of almost all methane at depth, even when neglecting the observed very strong upwelling flows at the site. Incorporating a hypothesized enhanced bubble gas exchange rate allowed reproduction of observations. Video and multibeam water column analyses revealed significant turbulence in and around the bubble plume on decimeter and meter scale. Moreover 3D water column assessments by multibeam reveal that the gas ebullitions merge into a 20 m wide spiral vortex extending throughout the water column. Spiral vortex formation never has been reported for gas seepage and may be an important process enhancing plume methane dissolution. Numerical simulations incorporating vortical bubble trapping (slow rise) and enhanced bubble gas exchange were able to reproduce observations. Thus, megaplume processes could explain the surprising low surface methane observations, with important implications for understanding the fate of methane from intense seepage and for blowout response.

  6. The Interstellar Gas toward LSE 234. A High D/H Ratio beyond the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecavalier Des Etangs, A., Hbrard, G., Williger, G. M.

    2006-06-01

    LSE 234 is a sub-dwarf located at about 400 parsecs. We obtained FUSE spectra with very good signal-to-noise ratio, allowing accurate abundance measurements. We find high values for D/H, D/N and D/O in this sight line probing material well beyond the Local Bubble. This is in contrast with published measurements at such distances (Hbrard & Moos 2003, Wood et al. 2004). This favors the hypothesis of D/H inhomogeneities outside the Local Bubble.

  7. A Refined Approach to Bubble Nucleation and Polymer Foaming Process: Dissolved Gas and Cluster Size Effects

    PubMed

    Lee; Flumerfelt

    1996-12-25

    A refined approach to bubble nucleation is presented and applied to polymer foaming process. The integral overall energy balance and the integral Clausius-Duhem inequality are used to analyze a bubble nucleation experiment. The computation of long-range intermolecular potential results in expressions for surface tension, work, and critical work for cluster formation, as functions of the Hamaker constant, molecular and/or repeat unit interaction distance, molar fractions of each component, and cluster radius. The variation of surface tension with cluster size, temperature, and pressure is determined in terms of well-known macroscopic properties and compared with available experimental data. PMID:8978536

  8. Implementation and verification of numerical model for gas bubble dynamics in electroconductive fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucs, A.; Spitans, S.; Jakovics, A.; Baake, E.

    2013-10-01

    Apart from common steam reforming process the thermal decomposition of methane is regarded as an alternate route to producing hydrogen and elemental carbon with out of CO2 emissions. Chemical reaction of decarburation can be ensured by means of methane bubbly flow through a molten metal bath and additionally controlled by external electromagnetic field. This is the initial stage of research and preliminary calculation results for the single bubble rise dynamics in 2D axisymmetric consideration at different flow conditions and 2D planar consideration in the presence of external DC EM field are obtained and compared to experimental and simulation data from literature.

  9. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  10. Upper ocean bubble measurements from the NE Pacific and estimates of their role in air-sea gas transfer of the weakly soluble gases nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagle, Svein; McNeil, Craig; Steiner, Nadja

    2010-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of upper-ocean bubble clouds, and dissolved gaseous nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) from three winter storms are presented and analyzed. The data were collected on the Canadian Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (C-SOLAS) mooring located near Ocean Station Papa (OSP) at 50N, 145W in the NE Pacific during winter of 2003/2004. The bubble field was measured using an upward looking 200 kHz echosounder. Direct estimates of bubble mediated gas fluxes were made using assumed bubble size spectra and the upward looking echosounder data. A one-dimensional biogeochemical model was used to help compare data and various existing models of bubble mediated air-sea gas exchange. The direct bubble flux calculations show an approximate quadratic/cubic dependence on mean bubble penetration depth. After scaling from N2/O2 to carbon dioxide, near surface, nonsupersaturating, air-sea transfer rates, KT, for U10 > 12 m s-1 fall between quadratic and cubic relationships. Estimates of the subsurface bubble induced air injection flux, VT, show an approximate quadratic/cubic dependence on mean bubble penetration depth. Both KT and VT are much higher than those measured during Hurricane Frances over the wind speed range 12 < U10 < 23 m s-1. This result implies that over the open ocean and this wind speed range, older and more developed seas which occur during winter storms are more effective in exchanging gases between the atmosphere and ocean than younger less developed seas which occur during the rapid passage of a hurricane.

  11. Lander based hydroacoustic monitoring of marine single bubble releases in Eckernfrde Bay utilizing the multibeam based GasQuant II system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Peter; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Greinert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel is currently developing a Imagenex Delta T based lander system for monitoring and quantifying marine gas release (bubbles). The GasQuant II is built as the successor of the GasQuant I system (Greinert, 2008), that has been successfully used for monitoring tempo-spatial variability of gas release in the past (Schneider von Deimling et al., 2010). The new system is lightweight (40 kg), energy efficient, flexible to use and built for ROV deployment with autonomous operation of up to three days. A prototype has been successfully deployed in Eckernfrde Bay during the R/V ALKOR cruise AL447 in October/November 2014 to monitor the tempo-spatial variability of gas bubble seepage and to detect a possible correlation with tidal variations. Two deployments, one in forward- and one in upward looking mode, reveal extensive but scattered single bubble releases rather than distinct and more continuous sources. While these releases are difficult to detect in forward looking mode, they can unambiguously be detected in the upward looking mode even for minor gas releases, bubble rising speeds can be determined. Greinert, J., 2008. Monitoring temporal variability of bubble release at seeps: The hydroacoustic swath system GasQuant. J. Geophys. Res. Oceans Vol. 113 Issue C7 CiteID C07048 113, 7048. doi:10.1029/2007JC004704 Schneider von Deimling, J., Greinert, J., Chapman, N.R., Rabbel, W., Linke, P., 2010. Acoustic imaging of natural gas seepage in the North Sea: Sensing bubbles controlled by variable currents. Limnol. Oceanogr. Methods 8, 155. doi:10.4319/lom.2010.8.155

  12. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation. PMID:17801113

  13. Determination of the Accommodation Coefficient Using Vapor/gas Bubble Dynamics in an Acoustic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumerov, Nail A.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Goumilevski, Alexei G.; Allen, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nonequilibrium liquid/vapor phase transformations can occur in superheated or subcooled liquids in fast processes such as in evaporation in a vacuum. The rate at which such a phase transformation occurs depends on the "condensation" or "accommodation" coefficient, Beta, which is a property of the interface. Existing measurement techniques for Beta are complex and expensive. The development of a relatively inexpensive and reliable technique for measurement of Beta for a wide range of substances and temperatures is of great practical importance. The dynamics of a bubble in an acoustic field strongly depends on the value of Beta. It is known that near the saturation temperature, small vapor bubbles grow under the action of an acoustic field due to "rectified heat transfer." This finding can be used as the basis for an effective measurement technique of Beta. We developed a theory of vapor bubble behavior in an isotropic acoustic wave and in a plane standing acoustic wave. A numerical code was developed which enables simulation of a variety of experimental situations and accurately takes into account slowly evolving temperature. A parametric study showed that the measurement of Beta can be made over a broad range of frequencies and bubble sizes. We found several interesting regimes and conditions which can be efficiently used for measurements of Beta. Measurements of Beta can be performed in both reduced and normal gravity environments.

  14. How many bubbles in your glass of bubbly?

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2014-03-20

    The issue about how many carbon dioxide bubbles are likely to nucleate in a glass of champagne (or bubbly) is of concern for sommeliers, wine journalists, experienced tasters, and any open minded physical chemist wondering about complex phenomena at play in a glass of bubbly. The whole number of bubbles likely to form in a single glass is the result of the fine interplay between dissolved CO2, tiny gas pockets trapped within particles acting as bubble nucleation sites, and ascending bubble dynamics. Based on theoretical models combining ascending bubble dynamics and mass transfer equations, the falsely naı̈ve question of how many bubbles are likely to form per glass is discussed in the present work. A theoretical relationship is derived, which provides the whole number of bubbles likely to form per glass, depending on various parameters of both the wine and the glass itself. PMID:24571670

  15. Bubble convection within magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouche, Emmanuella; Vergniolle, Sylvie; Gamblin, Yves; Vieira, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    Volcanoes are gas-rich hence small bubbles slowly rise in magma reservoirs. Under certain condition of gas flux, bubble size and reservoir height, the bubble rise is no more homogeneous: the collective buoyancy of the bubbles produces instabilities and the bubble motion becomes driven by convection. If such a convection occurs, the residence time of bubbles in the reservoir is reduced and thus eruptive activity is modified. By analogy with thermal convection, we define Rayleigh (Rab) and Prandtl (Prb) numbers for bubble convection. However, the critical Rab for bubble convection is hardly known from previous studies and its dependence to Prb is ignored. Laboratory experiments are performed with small bubbles rising in a cylindrical tank filled with viscous oils in order to quantify bubble convection and apply it to real volcanoes. Rab and Prb are acurately determined from measurement, via two hydrophones, of bubble size and gas volume fraction. Bubble velocity is obtained by PIV. Experiments show two main regimes: a steady cellular regime at low Rab and a bubble plume regime when Rab is higher. The critical Rab depends on the critical Prb for the two transitions.

  16. Cohesion of Bubbles in Foam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sydney

    1978-01-01

    The free-energy change, or binding energy, of an idealized bubble cluster is calculated on the basis of one mole of gas, and on the basis of a single bubble going from sphere to polyhedron. Some new relations of bubble geometry are developed in the course of the calculation. (BB)

  17. Hydrodynamics and axial mixing in a three-phase bubble column. effects of slurry properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, B.G.; Carr, N.L.; Shah, Y.T.

    1984-04-01

    The hydrodynamics and mixing properties were studied with three phases (gas, liquid, and solid) flowing cocurrently upward in a column. The effects of gas and slurry velocities, solid physical properties, particle size, solids concentration, interfacial tension, and slurry viscosity on phase holdups and axial dispersion coefficients were examined. The phase holdups as well as axial dispersion coefficients were not significantly affected by particle size, solids concentration, and slurry velocities. However, solids wettability was found to enhance the coalescence tendencies in the liquid phase, and hence it decreased the axial dispersion coefficient compared to the ones for water. Addition of surfactants increased the gas holdup and slightly decreased the axial dispersion coefficient. However, an increase in the liquid viscosity reduced both the gas holdup and dispersion coefficients. The results are compared with those reported in the literature and are explained by the drift flux approach and Zuber-Findley theory.

  18. Interstellar bubbles. II - Structure and evolution. [stellar wind interaction with interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R.; Mccray, R.; Castor, J.; Moore, R.; Shapiro, P.

    1977-01-01

    The detailed structure of the interaction of a strong stellar wind with the interstellar medium is presented. First, an adiabatic similarity solution is given which is applicable at early times. Second, a similarity solution is derived which includes the effects of thermal conduction between the hot (about 1 million K) interior and the cold shell of swept-up interstellar matter. This solution is then modified to include the effects of radiative energy losses. The evolution of an interstellar bubble is calculated, including the radiative losses. The quantitative results for the outer-shell radius and velocity and the column density of highly ionized species such as O VI are within a factor 2 of the approximate results of Castor, McCray, and Weaver (1975). The effect of stellar motion on the structure of a bubble, the hydrodynamic stability of the outer shell, and the observable properties of the hot region and the outer shell are discussed.

  19. The secondary Bjerknes force between two gas bubbles under dual-frequency acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuning; Zhang, Yuning; Li, Shengcai

    2016-03-01

    The secondary Bjerknes force is one of the essential mechanisms of mutual interactions between bubbles oscillating in a sound field. The dual-frequency acoustic excitation has been applied in several fields such as sonochemistry, biomedicine and material engineering. In this paper, the secondary Bjerknes force under dual-frequency excitation is investigated both analytically and numerically within a large parameter zone. The unique characteristics (i.e., the complicated patterns of the parameter zone for sign change and the combination resonances) of the secondary Bjerknes force under dual-frequency excitation are revealed. Moreover, the influence of several parameters (e.g., the pressure amplitude, the bubble distance and the phase difference between sound waves) on the secondary Bjerknes force is also investigated numerically. PMID:26584991

  20. Binary coalescence of gas bubbles in the presence of a non-ionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Duerr-Auster, N; Gunde, R; Mder, R; Windhab, Erich J

    2009-05-15

    The coalescence behavior of air bubbles in a dilute aqueous surfactant solution of a polyglycerol fatty acid ester (PGE), a commercial non-ionic surfactant, is investigated in a binary coalescence experiment. The focus is on the influence of the ionic strength of the solution on the rate of coalescence. Results are compared with the adsorption kinetics and surface shear/dilatational rheological properties of the surfactant. Experiments show that the coalescence frequency is significantly lower at low ionic strength, and that bubble stability increases with increasing aging time. Stabilization occurs via surfactant adsorption and a resulting electrostatic and/or steric repulsive force. The electrostatic force presumably originates from small amounts of anionic fatty acid soaps, which are residues from the industrial synthesis. The steric force can be related to the adsorption of visco-elastic layers of PGE at the air-water interface. PMID:19200557

  1. Velocity of a freely rising gas bubble in a soda-lime silicate glass melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornyak, E. J.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison is conducted between measured velocities for the buoyant rise of single bubbles of varying size and composition, in a soda-lime silicate glass melt, with the steady state velocities predicted by the Stokes and Hadamard-Rybczynski formulas. In all cases, the data are noted to fit the Hadamard-Rybczynski expression for steady state rise speed considerably better than the Stokes formula.

  2. Influence of a gas bubble on the dynamical parameters of the slug flow using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, M. I.; Heikal, M. R.; Munir, S.; Dass, S. C.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2014-10-01

    Inlet conditions strongly affect the dynamical parameters of a two-phase slug flow. A series of experiments were carried out, in a 6m long Plexiglas pipe having internal diameter 74 mm, to investigate the influence of gas bubble on the flow dynamics inside the slugy body of a unit slug. The pipe was kept inclined at an elevation of 1.160 to consider the terrain slugging mechanism. An optical diagnostic technique, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed at a point 3.5m from the inlet to measure the instantaneous velocity fields of the flow for each case. Single-phase liquid pipe flow and the slugy body of the two-phase slug flow are the targeted sections for study and comparison. Velocity components, turbulence intensity and average volume flux are measured and compared. The effect of gas bubble on the liquid Reynolds number is also considered. It is noticed that by increasing the gas flow rate velocity, average flux and average kinetic energy increases dramatically in a slugy body of a slug flow regime. The results are also compared with the single phase liquid flow having same liquid flow rate. Moreover it is noticed that the increase in average volume flux in a slugy body for lower liquid flow rates are more significant as compared to the higher liquid flow rates by increasing gas rate. This shows that slug can be helpful in oil transportation in terrain oil fields for lower liquid flow rates as it creates more fluctuations and vibrational forces for higher liquid flow.

  3. Cluster finds giant gas vortices at the edge of Earth's magnetic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    12 August 2004 ESA’s quartet of space-weather watchers, Cluster, has discovered vortices of ejected solar material high above the Earth. The superheated gases trapped in these structures are probably tunnelling their way into the Earth’s magnetic ‘bubble’, the magnetosphere. This discovery possibly solves a 17-year-mystery of how the magnetosphere is constantly topped up with electrified gases when it should be acting as a barrier. hi-res Size hi-res: 1446 Kb Credits: H. Hasegawa (Dartmouth College) Three-dimensional cut-away view of Earth's magnetosphere This figure shows a three-dimensional cut-away view of Earth' s magnetosphere. The curly features sketched on the boundary layer are the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices discovered by Cluster. They originate where two adjacent flows travel with different speed. In this case, one of the flows is the heated gas inside the boundary layer of the magnetosphere, the other the solar wind just outside it. The arrows show the direction of the magnetic field, in red that associated with the solar wind and in green the one inside Earth’s magnetosphere. The white dashed arrow shows the trajectory followed by Cluster. High resolution version (JPG format) 1446 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 15 365 Kb hi-res Size hi-res: 22 Kb Credits: H. Hasegawa (Dartmouth College) Electrified gas varies across the vortices along Cluster’s trajectory This computer simulation shows how the density of the electrified gas is expected to vary across the vortices along Cluster’s trajectory (white dashed line). The density is lower inside the boundary layer (blue region) and higher outside, in the region dominated by the solar wind (shown in red). The density variations measured by the instruments on board Cluster match those predicted by this model. Low resolution version (JPG format) 22 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 3438 Kb The Earth’s magnetic field is our planet’s first line of defence against the bombardment of the solar wind. The solar wind itself is launched from the Sun and carries the Sun’s magnetic field throughout the Solar System. Sometimes this magnetic field is aligned with Earth’s and sometimes it points in the opposite direction. When the two fields point in opposite directions, scientists understand how ‘doors’ in Earth’s field can open. This phenomenon, called ‘magnetic reconnection’, allows the solar wind to flow in and collect in the reservoir known as the boundary layer. On the contrary, when the fields are aligned they should present an impenetrable barrier to the flow. However, spacecraft measurements of the boundary layer, dating back to 1987, present a puzzle because they clearly show that the boundary layer is fuller when the fields are aligned than when they are not. So how is the solar wind getting in? Thanks to the data from the four formation-flying spacecraft of ESA’s Cluster mission, scientists have made a breakthrough. On 20 November 2001, the Cluster flotilla was heading around from behind Earth and had just arrived at the dusk side of the planet, where the solar wind slides past Earth’s magnetosphere. There it began to encounter gigantic vortices of gas at the magnetopause, the outer ‘edge’ of the magnetosphere. “These vortices were really huge structures, about six Earth radii across,” says Hiroshi Hasegawa, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire who has been analysing the data with help from an international team of colleagues. Their results place the size of the vortices at almost 40 000 kilometres each, and this is the first time such structures have been detected. These vortices are known as products of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI). They can occur when two adjacent flows are travelling with different speeds, so one is slipping past the other. Good examples of such instabilities are the waves whipped up by the wind slipping across the surface of the ocean. Although KHI-waves had been observed before, this is the first time that vortices are actually detected. When a KHI-wave rolls up into a vortex, it becomes known as a ‘Kelvin Cat’s eye’. The data collected by Cluster have shown density variations of the electrified gas, right at the magnetopause, precisely like those expected when travelling through a ‘Kelvin Cat’s eye’. Scientists had postulated that, if these structures were to form at the magnetopause, they might be able to pull large quantities of the solar wind inside the boundary layer as they collapse. Once the solar wind particles are carried into the inner part of the magnetosphere, they can be excited strongly, allowing them to smash into Earth’s atmosphere and give rise to the aurorae. Cluster’s discovery strengthens this scenario but does not show the precise mechanism by which the gas is transported into Earth’s magnetic bubble. Thus, scientists still do not know whether this is the only process to fill up the boundary layer when the magnetic fields are aligned. For those measurements, Hasegawa says, scientists will have to wait for a future generation of magnetospheric satellites. Notes for editors The results of this investigation have appeared in today’s issue of the scientific journal Nature, in a paper entitled ‘Transport of solar wind into Earth's magnetosphere through rolled-up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices’, by H. Hasegawa, M. Fujimoto, T.D. Phan, H. Reme, A. Balogh, M.W. Dunlop, C. Hashimoto and R. TanDokoro. More about magnetic reconnection Solar wind particles follow ‘magnetic field lines’, rather like beads on a wire. The ‘doors’ that open in Earth’s magnetosphere during oppositely aligned magnetic configurations are caused by a phenomenon called ‘magnetic reconnection‘. During this process, Earth’s field lines spontaneously break and join themselves to the Sun’s, allowing the solar wind to pass freely into Earth’s magnetosphere. Magnetic reconnections are not possible in the aligned case, however, hence the need for a different mechanism to inject the particles into Earth’s magnetosphere. More about Cluster Cluster is a mission of international co-operation between ESA and NASA. It involves four spacecraft, launched on two Russian rockets during the summer of 2000. They are now flying in formation around Earth, relaying the most detailed ever information about how the solar wind affects our planet in 3D. The solar wind is the perpetual stream of subatomic particles given out by the Sun and it can damage communications satellites and power stations on Earth. The Cluster mission is expected to continue until at least 2005. The ongoing archiving of the Cluster data (or Cluster Active Archive) is part of the International Living with a Star programme (ILWS), in which space agencies worldwide get together to investigate how variations in the Sun affect the environment of Earth and the other planets. In particular, ILWS concentrate on those aspects of the Sun-Earth system that may affect mankind and society. ILWS is a collaborative initiative between Europe, the United States, Russia, Japan and Canada.

  4. Nondestructive assay holdup measurements with the Ortec detective

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, Duc; Wenz, Tracy; Bracken, David

    2009-01-01

    Wing 4 of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to be downgraded from a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility to a Hazard Category 3 Radiological Facility. Survey and holdup measurements are used to ensure that the total contamination levels present in the facility do not contribute enough activity to go above the Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities. Additionally, the measurement information provides an understanding of the cleanup and the equipment removal needs for the next step of decontaminating and decommissioning of the site. The Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) facility has been housing the research and experimental activities for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy since the start of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is currently being replaced by the new Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement facilities. As a result, the CMR is gradually closing and/or downgrading to a nonnuclear facility. In 2008, the Safeguards Science and Technology group, N-1, was assigned the task of doing survey and holdup measurements of Wing 4 of the CMR. The goal of the measurements is to provide defensible measurement data for Wing 4 of the CMR Building to be downgraded from a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility to below a Hazard Category 3 Radiological Facility. In addition, the measurement information would provide an understanding of the cleanup and the equipment removal needs for the next step of decontaminating and decommissioning the site. The large areal olume of the site and the high intensity of the high-energy gamma rays of thorium, either from the background or the contaminated objects in the measured room or the adjacent rooms, present some challenges in the holdup measurements. Typical holdup techniques of point source, line, or area measurement do not work well. In order to speed up the measurement time and to accuralely account for all the isotopes present in the facility, we used a new technique that we tentatively named 'Room Holdup Measurement' to do holdup measurements of the site. This technique uses the portable, electric-cooled high-purity germanium detectors from Ortec (the Detectives) to measure the activities of the isotopes.

  5. Sonochemistry and bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mettin, Robert; Cairs, Carlos; Troia, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    The details of bubble behaviour in chemically active cavitation are still not sufficiently well understood. Here we report on experimental high-speed observations of acoustically driven single-bubble and few-bubble systems with the aim of clarification of the connection of their dynamics with chemical activity. Our experiment realises the sonochemical isomerization reaction of maleic acid to fumaric acid, mediated by bromine radicals, in a bubble trap set-up. The main result is that the reaction product can only be observed in a parameter regime where a small bubble cluster occurs, while a single trapped bubble stays passive. Evaluations of individual bubble dynamics for both cases are given in form of radius-time data and numerical fits to a bubble model. A conclusion is that a sufficiently strong collapse has to be accompanied by non-spherical bubble dynamics for the reaction to occur, and that the reason appears to be an efficient mixing of liquid and gas phase. This finding corroborates previous observations and literature reports on high liquid phase sonochemical activity under distinct parameter conditions than strong sonoluminescence emissions. PMID:25194210

  6. Influence of infection with Renibacterium salmoninarum on susceptibility of juvenile spring chinook salmon to gas bubble trauma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiland, L.K.; Mesa, M.G.; Maule, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    During experiments in our laboratory to assess the progression and severity of gas bubble trauma (GBT) in juvenile spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, we had the opportunity to assess the influence of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease, on the susceptibility of salmon to GBT. We exposed fish with an established infection of Rs to 120% total dissolved gas (TDG) for 96 h and monitored severity of GBT signs in the fins and gills, Rs infection level in kidneys by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and mortality. Mortality occurred rapidly after exposure to 120% TDG, with a LT20 (time necessary to kill 20% of the population) of about 37 h, which is at a minimum about 16% earlier than other bioassays we have conducted using fish that had no apparent signs of disease. Fish that died early (from 31 to 36 h and from 49 to 52 h) had significantly higher infection levels (mean ?? SE ELISA absorbance = 1.532 ?? 0.108) than fish that survived for 96h (mean ?? SE ELISA absorbance = 0.828 ?? 0.137). Fish that died early also had a significantly greater number of gill filaments occluded with bubbles than those that survived 96 h. Conversely, fish that survived for 96 h had a significantly higher median fin severity ranking than those that died early. Our results indicate that fish with moderate to high levels of Rs infection are more vulnerable to the effects of dissolved gas supersaturation (DGS) and die sooner than fish with lower levels of Rs infection. However, there is a substantial amount of individual variation in susceptibility to the apparent cumulative effects of DGS and Rs infection. Collectively, our findings have important implications to programs designed to monitor the prevalence and severity of GBT in juvenile salmonids in areas like the Columbia River basin and perhaps elsewhere.

  7. Investigation of the influence of an inner gas bubble on the response of a liquid scintillation detector to ?-rays and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xufei, Xie; Xing, Zhang; Xi, Yuan; Tieshuan, Fan; Jinxiang, Chen; Xiangqing, Li

    2013-09-01

    The influence of an inert gas bubble inside EJ301 cylindrical cell on the response of the liquid scintillation detector to ?-rays and neutrons has been investigated. It is found experimentally that the response of the detector to radiation varies with the detector placement styles. The explanation proposed in this article is that this variation arises from the change of the light transmission process induced by the motion of the inner gas bubble. This assertion has been supported by the simulations of both radiation energy deposition and light transmission process inside the detector with the GEANT4 code. For the recommended detector placement style when the detector is placed horizontally, the variation of the response is smaller than 1.56%, which will increase to about 22% when the detector is placed facing down and the bubble lies between the scintillator and photomultiplier tube.

  8. Holdup Measurement System 4 V1.0d

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-31

    HMS4 is a software package for performing and documenting holdup measurements. HMS4 includes two sets of programs; the main program that runs on a host personal computer (PC), and the other ones that run on a handheld mobile computer or portable PC. The main host computer program performs setup and calibration of multichannel analyzer/detector pairs, loads the controllers with operational parameters, receives measurement data from the controllers, maintains measurements and derived results in databases, and prints reports.

  9. Bubble-induced mixing of two horizontal liquid layers with non-uniform gas injection at the bottom. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Leinweber, G.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    During a postulated severe core meltdown accident in an LMFBR, a large amount of sodium coolant may spill into the reactor concrete cavity. A layer of liquid products may form as a result of the sodium-concrete reactions. The liquid product layer, which is highly viscous and much heavier than sodium, separates the concrete from the sodium pool. In general, the downward transport of sodium through the liquid product layer to the unreacted concrete surface, which controls the rate of chemical erosion of the concrete, depends strongly on the agitation induced by gas evolution from the heated concrete. In this study, experiments were conducted to explore the effect of non-uniform gas injection on mixing of two horizontal mutually soluble liquid layers. The liquid in the lower layer was chosen to be more viscous and heavier than the liquid in the upper layer. To simulate the reactor accident situation, gas was injected at the bottom of the liquid-liquid system through a circular hole that covered only the center portion of the bottom surface of the lower liquid layer. The bubble-induced mixing motions were observed and the rate of mixing was measured for different hole sizes and for various gas flow rates.

  10. Continuous Holdup Measurements with Silicon P-I-N Photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Oberer, R.B.; Williams, J.A.; Smith, D.E.; Paulus, M.J.

    2002-05-01

    We report on the behavior of silicon P-I-N photodiodes used to perform holdup measurements on plumbing. These detectors differ from traditional scintillation detectors in that no high-voltage is required, no scintillator is used (gamma and X rays are converted directly by the diode), and they are considerably more compact. Although the small size of the diodes means they are not nearly as efficient as scintillation detectors, the diodes' size does mean that a detector module, including one or more diodes, pulse shaping electronics, analog-to-digital converter, embedded microprocessor, and digital interface can be realized in a package (excluding shielding) the size of a pocket calculator. This small size, coupled with only low-voltage power requirement, completely solid-state realization, and internal control functions allows these detectors to be strategically deployed on a permanent basis, thereby reducing or eliminating the need for manual holdup measurements. In this paper, we report on the measurement of gamma and X rays from {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U contained in steel pipe. We describe the features of the spectra, the electronics of the device and show how a network of them may be used to improve estimates of inventory in holdup.

  11. Models for gamma-ray holdup measurements at duct contact

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, G.A.; Russo, P.A.; Wenz, T.R.; Miller, M.C.; Piquette, E.C. ); Haas, F.X.; Glick, J.B.; Garrett, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The use of gamma-ray measurements to nondestructively assay special nuclear material holdup in DOE processing facilities has increased recently. A measurement approach that is relatively insensitive to deposit geometry involves withdrawing the detector from the holdup-bearing equipment far enough to validate an assumed point-, line-, or area-source deposit geometry. Because of facility constraints, these generalized geometry procedures are not always followed, and some ducts are measured at contact. Quantitative interpretation of contact measurements requires knowledge of the width of the deposit transverse to the duct axis. Rocky Flats personnel have introduced a method to obtain data from which this width can be deduced. It involves taking measurements in pairs, with the detector viewing the holdup deposit at contact from above and below the duct. The interpretation of the top and bottom measurements to give the deposit width at each location requires a model for the detector's response to radial source position and a model for the deposit geometry. We have derived a relationship between the top-to-bottom count rate ratio and the deposit width that approximates the detector response and models the deposit geometry as a uniform strip. The model was validated in controlled experiments that used thin foils of high-enriched uranium metal to simulate duct deposits. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Tribonucleation of bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other in a liquid. The phenomenon is found to depend strongly on the material and roughness of the solid surfaces. For a given surface, temperature, and gas content, a trail of growing bubbles is observed if the rubbing force and velocity exceed a certain threshold. Direct observation through a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the trail results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, themselves detaching from microscopic gas pockets forming between the solids. From a detailed study of the wear tracks, with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging, we conclude that these microscopic gas pockets originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities, possibly enhanced by chemical reactions at the freshly created surfaces. Our findings will be useful either for preventing undesired bubble formation or, on the contrary, for “writing with bubbles,” i.e., creating controlled patterns of microscopic bubbles. PMID:24982169

  13. Passage of a shock wave through inhomogeneous media and its impact on gas-bubble deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, A. F.; Ballil, A.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2015-08-01

    The paper investigates shock-induced vortical flows within inhomogeneous media of nonuniform thermodynamic properties. Numerical simulations are performed using a Eulerian type mathematical model for compressible multicomponent flow problems. The model, which accounts for pressure nonequilibrium and applies different equations of state for individual flow components, shows excellent capabilities for the resolution of interfaces separating compressible fluids as well as for capturing the baroclinic source of vorticity generation. The developed finite volume Godunov type computational approach is equipped with an approximate Riemann solver for calculating fluxes and handles numerically diffused zones at flow component interfaces. The computations are performed for various initial conditions and are compared with available experimental data. The initial conditions promoting a shock-bubble interaction process include weak to high planar shock waves with a Mach number ranging from 1.2 to 3 and isolated cylindrical bubble inhomogeneities of helium, argon, nitrogen, krypton, and sulphur hexafluoride. The numerical results reveal the characteristic features of the evolving flow topology. The impulsively generated flow perturbations are dominated by the reflection and refraction of the shock, the compression, and acceleration as well as the vorticity generation within the medium. The study is further extended to investigate the influence of the ratio of the heat capacities on the interface deformation.

  14. Passage of a shock wave through inhomogeneous media and its impact on gas-bubble deformation.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, A F; Ballil, A; Nicolleau, F C G A

    2015-08-01

    The paper investigates shock-induced vortical flows within inhomogeneous media of nonuniform thermodynamic properties. Numerical simulations are performed using a Eulerian type mathematical model for compressible multicomponent flow problems. The model, which accounts for pressure nonequilibrium and applies different equations of state for individual flow components, shows excellent capabilities for the resolution of interfaces separating compressible fluids as well as for capturing the baroclinic source of vorticity generation. The developed finite volume Godunov type computational approach is equipped with an approximate Riemann solver for calculating fluxes and handles numerically diffused zones at flow component interfaces. The computations are performed for various initial conditions and are compared with available experimental data. The initial conditions promoting a shock-bubble interaction process include weak to high planar shock waves with a Mach number ranging from 1.2 to 3 and isolated cylindrical bubble inhomogeneities of helium, argon, nitrogen, krypton, and sulphur hexafluoride. The numerical results reveal the characteristic features of the evolving flow topology. The impulsively generated flow perturbations are dominated by the reflection and refraction of the shock, the compression, and acceleration as well as the vorticity generation within the medium. The study is further extended to investigate the influence of the ratio of the heat capacities on the interface deformation. PMID:26382524

  15. Experimental and theoretical studies of gas-liquid mass transfer of a single bubble in a liquid-solid fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Song, G.H.; Jean, R.H.; Fan, L.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    Experiments are conducted using ozone as a tracer to study the interfacial gas-liquid mass transfer behavior of a single bubble in liquid and liquid-solid fluidized media. A spectrophotometric system is developed, which consists of an ultraviolet (UV) light source, optical fibers, narrow band interference filters, UV-visible photomultipliers, and computerized fast data acquisition. Bubble size, particle properties, and bed voidage are varied to examine the axial variation of the mass transfer rate. A theoretical model is developed for the prediction of the overall gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient of a single circular-cap in a two dimensional or spherical-cap bubble in a three dimensional liquid-solid fluidized bed. The penetration concept is used to account for the mass transfer rate across the bubble roof. Two cases are considered in the evaluation of the mass transfer rate across the bubble base. The prediction of the overall mass transfer coefficient based on the model is shown to agree reasonably well with the experimental results obtained in this study.

  16. Physics of bubble oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Bubbles in liquids, soft and squeezy objects made of gas and vapour, yet so strong as to destroy any material and so mysterious as at times turning into tiny light bulbs, are the topic of the present report. Bubbles respond to pressure forces and reveal their full potential when periodically driven by sound waves. The basic equations for nonlinear bubble oscillation in sound fields are given, together with a survey of typical solutions. A bubble in a liquid can be considered as a representative example from nonlinear dynamical systems theory with its resonances, multiple attractors with their basins, bifurcations to chaos and not yet fully describable behaviour due to infinite complexity. Three stability conditions are treated for stable trapping of bubbles in standing sound fields: positional, spherical and diffusional stability. Chemical reactions may become important in that respect, when reacting gases fill the bubble, but the chemistry of bubbles is just touched upon and is beyond the scope of the present report. Bubble collapse, the runaway shrinking of a bubble, is presented in its current state of knowledge. Pressures and temperatures that are reached at this occasion are discussed, as well as the light emission in the form of short flashes. Aspherical bubble collapse, as for instance enforced by boundaries nearby, mitigates most of the phenomena encountered in spherical collapse, but introduces a new effect: jet formation, the self-piercing of a bubble with a high velocity liquid jet. Examples of this phenomenon are given from light induced bubbles. Two oscillating bubbles attract or repel each other, depending on their oscillations and their distance. Upon approaching, attraction may change to repulsion and vice versa. When being close, they also shoot self-piercing jets at each other. Systems of bubbles are treated as they appear after shock wave passage through a liquid and with their branched filaments that they attain in standing sound fields. The N-bubble problem is formulated in the spirit of the n-body problem of astrophysics, but with more complicated interaction forces. Simulations are compared with three-dimensional bubble dynamics obtained by stereoscopic high speed digital videography.

  17. Energy effects in bubble nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Bubble size and number produced by desorption are important considerations for certain industrial processes such as flotation, gas stripping, and some types of chemical reactions and mass transfer. The size and number of bubbles produced by the desorption of supersaturated gases from water are shown to be a primary function of the energy available for bubble formation in a flowing system; this energy is that not dissipated in turbulence and friction. The number of nucleation sites is greatly increased when certain impurities are present, particularly surface-active agents. Low saturation pressures can produce very large numbers of very small bubbles when added energy is provided for discharge. High gas concentrations produce excess large bubbles which pass up rapidly through the much slower rising bubble mass. A combination of low saturation pressure followed by higher pressure for flow, such as by liquid pumping, results in bubble characteristics which can be controlled for applications.

  18. A Next-Generation Automated Holdup Measurement System (HMS-5)

    SciTech Connect

    Gariazzo, Claudio Andres; Smith, Steven E; Solodov, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    Holdup Measurement System 4 software (HMS4) has been in use at facilities to systematically measure and verify the amounts of uranium holdup in process facilities under safeguards since its release in 2004. It is a system for measuring uranium and plutonium and archiving holdup data (via barcoded locations with information) which is essential for any internationally safeguarded facility to monitor all amounts of residual special nuclear material (SNM). Additionally, HMS4 has been tested by sites in Russia, the United States, South Africa, and China for more effective application. Comments and lessons learned have been received over time and an updated version of the software would enable the international partners to use a wider variety of commercial equipment existing at these facilities. In June 2005, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory conducted a holdup measurement training course on HMS4 for subject matter experts from the Ulba Metallurgical Facility at Ust-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan, which included an additional external software package for improved measurements of low-enriched uranium by using higher energy gamma-rays more readily found. Due to not being currently integrated into HMS4, it would be greatly beneficial to include this application in the next generation HMS software package (HMS-5). This software system upgrade would assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in having a more comprehensive software package and having it tested at several safeguarded locations. When released, HMS4 only supported AMETEK/ORTEC equipment despite many facilities currently utilizing Canberra Industries technology (detectors, multi-channel analyzers, other hardware, and software packages). For HMS-5 to support all available hardware systems and to benefit the majority of international partners and the IAEA, Canberra technology must be integrated because of such widespread use of its hardware. Furthermore, newly developed hardware such as lanthanum halide detectors and digital processing multichannel analyzers will be incorporated into the new HMS-5 system to accommodate the evolving realm of SNM detection and quantification. HMS-5 is the natural progression from the previous incantations of automated special nuclear material holdup measurement systems for process facilities. ORNL is leading this next-generation system with assistance from its foreign partners and past experiences of its Safeguards Laboratory staff.

  19. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The ratio of the bubble velocity variance to the square of the mean is 0(0.1). For these conditions Spelt and Sangani predicted that the homogeneous suspension would be unstable and clustering into horizontal rafts will take place. Evidence for bubble clustering is obtained by analysis of video images. The liquid velocity variance is larger than would be expected for a homogeneous suspension and the liquid velocity frequency spectrum indicates the presence of velocity fluctuations that are slow compared with the time for the passage of an individual bubble. These observations provide further evidence for bubble clustering.

  20. Axial and Radial Solids Holdup Modeling of Circulating Fluidized Bed Risers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Q.; Zhu, J.; Barghl, S.; Wanfi, C.; Yin, X. L.; Wu, C. Z.

    Hydrodynamics plays a crucial role in defining the performance of gas-solid circulating fluidized beds (CFB). A two dimensional model was developed considering the hydrodynamic behavior of CFB gasifiers. In the modeling, the CFB riser was divided into two regions: a dense region at the bottom and a dilute region at the top of the riser. Radial distributions of bed voidage were taken into account in the upper zone by using (1991)'s correlation. For model validation purposes, a cold model CFB was employed, in which sawdust was transported with air as fluidizing agent. The column was 10m in height and 280 mm in diameter, and was equipped with pressure transducers to measure axial pressure profile and with a reflective optical fiber probe to measure local solids holdup. A satisfactory agreement between the model predictions and experimental data was found.

  1. The effect of high viscosity on the collapse-like chaotic and regular periodic oscillations of a harmonically excited gas bubble.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Ferenc; Klapcsik, Kálmán

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade many industrial applications have emerged based on the rapidly developing ultrasonic technology such as ultrasonic pasteurization, alteration of the viscosity of food systems, and mixing immiscible liquids. The fundamental physical basis of these applications is the prevailing extreme conditions (high temperature, pressure and even shock waves) during the collapse of acoustically excited bubbles. By applying the sophisticated numerical techniques of modern bifurcation theory, the present study intends to reveal the regions in the excitation pressure amplitude-ambient temperature parameter plane where collapse-like motion of an acoustically driven gas bubble in highly viscous glycerine exists. We report evidence that below a threshold temperature the bubble model, the Keller-Miksis equation, becomes an overdamped oscillator suppressing collapse-like behaviour. In addition, we have found periodic windows interspersed with chaotic regions indicating the presence of transient chaos, which is important from application point of view if predictability is required. PMID:26186832

  2. Observations of solute effects on bubble formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmeier, U.; Yaminsky, V.V.; Christenson, H.K.

    1995-09-01

    The authors have studied the effects of solute, in particular aqueous electrolyte, on bubble formation at capillary orifices and frits at varying gas flow rates. Using a stroboscope, video microscope, and rotating mirror, they have obtained pictures which show how bubble formation involves the interaction of bubbles at the orifice. These interactions depend on the value of the surface elasticity E due to positively (ethanol) or negatively (NaCl) adsorbed solute. At low flow rates consecutive bubbles do not interact. Each bubble detaches and leaves the orifice region before the next one starts forming. A intermediate flow rates the more closely spaced, consecutive bubbles begin to interact. In pure liquids there is no barrier to bubble coalescence and the detached bubble is fed by the subsequent bubble as this starts to grow. The process may be repeated several times before the original bubble has risen out of range. In solutions where E is large enough bubble coalescence is inhibited. Instead of feeding into the detached bubble the following bubble pushes it aside, and the bubbles appear to bounce off each other. Bouncing may give rise to a characteristic sequence of larger and smaller bubbles if the emerging bubbles break off prematurely from the orifice due to the inertia of the original bubble. The transition from feeding to bouncing depends critically on E of the solution and leads to a smaller average bubble size for large E values. At high flow rates detached bubbles are invariably fed by several subsequent ones. At very high flow rates the bubbling becomes chaotic, but the interaction of bubbles after leaving the orifice area produces smaller bubbles in solutions. Bouncing is more likely to occur with narrow and irregular capillaries. The dramatically different appearance of gas-sparged columns in salt water and freshwater has its origin in the difference between assemblies of pores showing mainly feeding (freshwater) or bouncing (salt water).

  3. Phospholipid-coated gas bubble engineering: key parameters for size and stability control, as determined by an acoustical method.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Simona; Waton, Gilles; Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2010-02-01

    We have recently reported the sampling of differently sized monomodal populations of microbubbles from a polydisperse lipid-coated bubble preparation. The microbubbles were coated with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and stabilized by perfluorohexane (PFH). Such microbubbles are useful as contrast agents and, potentially, for oxygen, drug, and gene delivery and as therapeutic devices. Monomodal populations of small bubbles (approximately 1.6 microm in radius) and large bubbles (approximately 5.4 microm) have been obtained, as assessed by acoustical measurement, static light scattering, and optical microscopy. In this paper, we have determined the influence of various preparation parameters on the initial size characteristics (mean radius and radii distribution) of the microbubbles and on their stability upon time. The bubble size was determined acoustically, with a homemade acoustic setup equipped with a low-power emitter, to avoid altering the bubble stability. We have focused on the effects of the bubble flotation time during the fractionation process and on the DMPC concentration. PFH was indispensable for obtaining stable bubbles. The nature of the buffer [Isoton II vs N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)] used as the continuous phase did not significantly impact the bubble characteristics and stability. In both buffers, the half-lives of small bubbles (approximately 1.6 microm in radius in Isoton II and approximately 2.1 microm in HEPES) were found to be longer than those of larger ones (approximately 5.4 and approximately 5.9 microm in Isoton II and HEPES, respectively). The bubble stability study revealed that in both buffers, the average radius of the population of large bubbles progressively increased with time. On the other hand, the average radius of the population of small bubbles decreased slightly in Isoton II and remained constant in HEPES. This suggests that the dissolution behavior of small and large bubbles is governed by different mechanisms. PMID:20099916

  4. BLOWING COSMIC BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image reveals an expanding shell of glowing gas surrounding a hot, massive star in our Milky Way Galaxy. This shell is being shaped by strong stellar winds of material and radiation produced by the bright star at the left, which is 10 to 20 times more massive than our Sun. These fierce winds are sculpting the surrounding material - composed of gas and dust - into the curve-shaped bubble. Astronomers have dubbed it the Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635). The nebula is 10 light-years across, more than twice the distance from Earth to the nearest star. Only part of the bubble is visible in this image. The glowing gas in the lower right-hand corner is a dense region of material that is getting blasted by radiation from the Bubble Nebula's massive star. The radiation is eating into the gas, creating finger-like features. This interaction also heats up the gas, causing it to glow. Scientists study the Bubble Nebula to understand how hot stars interact with the surrounding material. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA)

  5. Intense gas bubble emissions in the Kerch seep area - A newly discovered high-flux seep site in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, M.; Sahling, H.; Pape, T.; Bahr, A.; Feseker, T.; Wintersteller, P.; Bohrmann, G.

    2012-04-01

    More than 500 bubble-induced hydroacoustic anomalies (flares) were found in the water column above the seafloor in the study area comprising about 430 km2 at the Don-Kuban paleo-fan (Eastern Black Sea) by using ship mounted single beam and multibeam echosounders. Almost all flares originated from the seafloor above the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), which in that region is located below ~700 m water depth. This observation confirms the sealing mechanism of gas hydrate, which impedes migration of free gas through the GHSZ and subsequent bubble emission from the seafloor. However, an intense seep site, called the "Kerch seep area" was discovered as an exception at 890 m water depth well within the GHSZ. In situ temperature measurements in shallow sediments indicate locally elevated temperatures probably caused by enhanced upward fluid flow. The base of the GHSZ in this region is generally situated at about 150 m below the seafloor. However, the local thermal anomalies result in a thinning of the gas hydrate occurrence zone to only a few meters below the seafloor and allow free gas to reach the seafloor. At sites where gas migrated into near-surface deposits, shallow gas hydrate deposits evolved and up-doming of overlying sediments led to the formation of mounds rising several meters from the surrounding seafloor. Further gas bubbles ascending from greater depth are accumulated below the gas hydrate layer at the base of the mound structures and migrate horizontally to their rims. At the mound edges gas bubbles either might form fresh gas hydrates and increase the extent of the mound structures by pushing up overlying sediments or escape at several sites into the water column. Two mounds were mapped in ultra-high resolution during dives with the autonomous underwater vehicle 'AUV MARUM SEAL 5000'. Several individual flares were detected in the Kerch seep area using hydroacoustic systems. Repeated surveys in that area conducted during three cruises within four years suggested that gas discharge varied spatially and temporally while the total number of flares remained rather constant. During seafloor inspections with MARUḾs remotely operated vehicle 'ROV QUEST 4000 m' gas bubble emission sites were investigated in detail. Gas bubbles collected during the ROV dives mainly consisted of methane predominantly of microbial origin. By analyzing the high-definition video material the gas flux from several bubble emission sites was calculated. In combination with the hydroacoustic results (flare distributions) it is estimated that about 2.2 - 87 × 106 mol CH4/yr are emitted from the seafloor at the Kerch seep area. Despite this high mass of methane injected into the hydrosphere, the peak of the highest flares at ~350 m water depth as revealed by echosounder recording suggest that the ascending methane completely dissolves in the water column and does not pass the sea-atmosphere boundary.

  6. Recalcitrant bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, Martin E. R.; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in anomalous' mixtures. Unlike ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles). PMID:24740256

  7. Recalcitrant bubbles.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Martin E R; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in 'anomalous' mixtures. Unlike 'ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just 'downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in 'anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles). PMID:24740256

  8. Review of Current Literature and Research on Gas Supersaturation and Gas Bubble Trauma: Special Publication Number 1, 1986.

    SciTech Connect

    Colt, John; Bouck, Gerald R.; Fidler, Larry

    1986-12-01

    This report presents recently published information and on-going research on the various areas of gas supersaturation. Growing interest in the effects of chronic gas supersaturation on aquatic animals has been due primarily to heavy mortality of salmonid species under hatchery conditions. Extensive examination of affected animals has failed to consistently identify pathogenic organisms. Water quality sampling has shown that chronic levels of gas supersaturation are commonly present during a significant period of the year. Small marine fish larvae are significantly more sensitive to gas supersaturation than salmonids. Present water quality criteria for gas supersaturation are not adequate for the protection of either salmonids under chronic exposure or marine fish larvae, especially in aquaria or hatcheries. To increase communication between interested parties in the field of gas supersaturation research and control, addresses and telephone numbers of all people responding to the questionnaire are included. 102 refs.

  9. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF FINE BUBBLE AERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology assessment addresses design and evaluation of fine bubble aeration equipment. It discusses the associated gas transfer theory used as the basis for measuring water and wastewater oxygenation efficiency. Mixing requirements are also discussed. While bubble aeration...

  10. Holdup Measurement System 4 V1.0d

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-05-31

    HMS4 is a software package for performing and documenting holdup measurements. HMS4 includes two sets of programs; the main program that runs on a host personal computer (PC), and the other ones that run on a handheld mobile computer or portable PC. The main host computer program performs setup and calibration of multichannel analyzer/detector pairs, loads the controllers with operational parameters, receives measurement data from the controllers, maintains measurements and derived results in databases, andmore » prints reports.« less

  11. Holdup Measures on an SRNL Mossbauer Spectroscopy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Brown, T.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-05-05

    Gamma-ray holdup measurements of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument are described and modeled. In the qualitative acquisitions obtained in a low background area of Savannah River National Laboratory, only Am-241 and Np-237 activity were observed. The Am-241 was known to be the instrumental activation source, while the Np-237 is clearly observed as a source of contamination internal to the instrument. The two sources of activity are modeled separately in two acquisition configurations using two separate modeling tools. The results agree well, demonstrating a content of (1980 {+-} 150) {mu}Ci Am-241 and (110 {+-} 50) {mu}Ci of Np-237.

  12. A Simple Economic Teaching Experiment on the Hold-Up Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkenborg, Dieter; Kaplan, Todd; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The hold-up problem is central to the theory of incomplete contracts. This can occur if, after making a sunk investment in a relationship, one party can be taken advantage of by the other party, leading to inefficient underinvestment. The authors describe a simple teaching experiment that illustrates the hold-up problem, and address how to…

  13. Mass flow measurement of gas-liquid bubble flow with the combined use of a Venturi tube and a vortex flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiqiang

    2010-05-01

    Development of effective techniques for gas-liquid two-phase flow measurement is of interest to both academic research and industrial applications. This paper presents a novel approach to the measurement of the mass flow rate of homogeneous gas-liquid bubble flow with the combined use of a Venturi tube and a vortex flowmeter. The Venturi tube and the vortex flowmeter were mounted in the same pipeline with a spacing interval of ten times the pipe's inner diameter. A measurement correlation was established based on the differential pressure generated across the Venturi tube and the frequency extracted from the vortex flowmeter signal. Experiments were conducted on a vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow rig under the bubble flow pattern, with the air mass flow rate from 0.2 10-3 to 3.2 10-3 kg s-1, the water mass flow rate from 3.3 to 5.2 kg s-1 and the volumetric void fraction from 0.004 to 0.246. The results show that the relative errors of the correlation for the mixture mass flow rate measurement were within 5%, and the maximum standard deviation of the relative errors was 2.0%. This method provides a simple and practical solution to the mass flow measurement of homogeneous gas-liquid bubble flows.

  14. Heat transfer between stratified immiscible liquid layers driven by gas bubbling across the interface

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The modeling of molten core debris in the CORCON and VANESA computer codes as overlying, immiscible liquid layers is discussed as it relates to the transfer of heat and mass between the layers. This initial structure is identified and possible configurations are discussed. The stratified, gas-sparged configuration that is presently employed in CORCON and VANESA is examined and the existing literature for interlayer heat transfer is assessed. An experiment which was designed to measure interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is described. The results are presented and compared to previously existing models. A dimensionless correlation for stratified, interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is developed. This relationship is recommended for inclusion in CORCON-MOD2 for heat transfer between stratified, molten liquid layers. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. An energy-efficient process for decomposing perfluorooctanoic and perfluorooctane sulfonic acids using dc plasmas generated within gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, K.; Sasaki, K.; Hayashi, R.

    2011-06-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are environmentally harmful and persistent substances. Their decomposition was investigated using dc plasmas generated within small gas bubbles in a solution. The plasma characteristics including discharge voltage, voltage drop in the liquid, plasma shape and the emission spectrum were examined with different gases. The decomposition rate and energy efficiency were evaluated by measuring the concentration of fluoride and sulfate ions released from PFOA/PFOS molecules. The concentration of fluoride ions and energy efficiency in the treatment of a PFOS solution were 17.7 mg l-1 (54.8% of the initial amount of fluorine atoms) and 26 mg kWh-1, respectively, after 240 min of operation. The addition of scavengers of hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons showed little effect on the decomposition. The decomposition processes were analyzed with an assumption that positive species reacted with PFOA/PFOS molecules at the boundary of the plasma-solution surface. This type of plasma showed a much higher decomposition energy efficiency compared with energy efficiencies reported in other studies.

  16. Mesoporous hollow spheres from soap bubbling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xianglin; Liang, Fuxin; Liu, Jiguang; Lu, Yunfeng; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2012-02-01

    The smaller and more stable bubbles can be generated from the large parent bubbles by rupture. In the presence of a bubble blowing agent, hollow spheres can be prepared by bubbling a silica sol. Herein, the trapped gas inside the bubble acts as a template. When the porogen, i.e., other surfactant, is introduced, a mesostructured shell forms by the co-assembly with the silica sol during sol-gel process. Morphological evolution emphasizes the prerequisite of an intermediate interior gas flow rate and high exterior gas flow rate for hollow spheres. The method is valid for many compositions from inorganic, polymer to their composites. PMID:22078340

  17. The Dueling Bubble Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anshuman; Borrell, Marcos; Felts, John; Leal, Gary; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    When two drops or bubbles are brought into close proximity to each other, the thin film of the fluid between them drains as they are squeezed together. If the film becomes thin enough that intermolecular forces of attraction overwhelm capillary forces, the drops/bubbles coalesce and the time it takes for this to happen, starting from the point of apparent contact is referred to as the drainage time. One practical version of this scenario occurs during the formation of foams, when the thin film forms between gas bubbles that are growing in volume with time. We performed an experimental study that is intended to mimic this process in which the two drops (or bubbles) in the size range of 50-100 microns diameter are created by oozing a liquid/gas out of two capillaries of diameter less than 100 microns directly facing each other and immersed in a second fluid. We present measurements of drainage times for the cases of very low viscosity ratios PDMS drops in Castor oil (less than 0.05) and bubbles of air in PDMS, and highlight the differences that arise in part due to the different boundary conditions for thin film drainage for liquid-liquid versus gas-liquid systems, and in part due to the different Hamaker constants for the two systems.

  18. Plasma in sonoluminescing bubble.

    PubMed

    An, Yu

    2006-12-22

    With the new accommodation coefficient of water vapor evaluated by molecular dynamics model, the maximum temperature of a sonoluminescing bubble calculated with the full partial differential equations easily reaches few tens of thousands degrees. Though at this temperature the gas is weakly ionized (10% or less), the gas density inside a sonoluminescing bubble at the moment of the bubble's flashing is so high that there still forms a dense plasma. The light emission of the bubble is calculated by the plasma model which is compared with that by the bremsstrahlung (electron-ion, electron-neutral atom) and recombination model. The calculation by the two models shows that for the relatively low maximum temperature (< 30,000 K) of the bubble, the pulse width is independent of the wavelength and the spectrum deviates the black body radiation type; while for the relatively high maximum temperature (approximately 60,000 K), the pulse width is dependent of the wavelength and the spectrum is an almost perfect black body radiation spectrum. The maximum temperature calculated by the gas dynamics equations is much higher than the temperature fitted by the black body radiation formula. PMID:16797657

  19. Removal of elemental mercury from flue gas by thermally activated ammonium persulfate in a bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangxian; Wang, Qian

    2014-10-21

    In this article, a novel technique on removal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from flue gas by thermally activated ammonium persulfate ((NH4)(2)S(2)O(8)) has been developed for the first time. Some experiments were carried out in a bubble column reactor to evaluate the effects of process parameters on Hg(0) removal. The mechanism and kinetics of Hg(0) removal are also studied. The results show that the parameters, (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration, activation temperature and solution pH, have significant impacts on Hg(0) removal. The parameters, Hg(0), SO2 and NO concentration, only have small effects on Hg(0) removal. Hg(0) is removed by oxidations of (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8), sulfate and hydroxyl free radicals. When (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration is more than 0.1 mol/L and solution pH is lower than 9.71, Hg(0) removal by thermally activated (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) meets a pseudo-first-order fast reaction with respect to Hg(0). However, when (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration is less than 0.1 mol/L or solution pH is higher than 9.71, the removal process meets a moderate speed reaction with respect to Hg(0). The above results indicate that this technique is a feasible method for emission control of Hg(0) from flue gas. PMID:25251199

  20. Gas-bubble snap-off under pressure driven flow in constricted noncircular capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.R.; Radke, C.J.

    1996-04-01

    A model for snap-off of a gas thread in a constricted cornered pore is developed. The time for wetting liquid to accumulate at a pore throat into an unstable collar is examined, as for the resulting pore-spanning lens to be displaced from the pore so that snap-off is the time may repeat. A comer-flow hydrodynamic analysis for the accumulation rate of wetting liquid due to both gradients in interfacial curvature and in applied liquid-phase pressure reveals that wetting-phase pressure gradients significantly increase the frequency of liquid accumulation for snap-off as compared to liquid rearrangement driven only by differences in pore-wall curvature. For moderate and large pressure gradients, the frequency of accumulation increases linearly with pressure gradient because of the increased rate of wetting liquid flow along pore comers. Pore topology is important to the theory, for pores with relatively small throats connected to large bodies demonstrate excellent ability to snapoff gas threads even when the initial capillary pressure is high or equivalently when the liquid saturation is low. A macroscopic momentum balance across the lens resulting from snap-off reveals that lens displacement rates are not linear with the imposed pressure drop. Instead, the frequency of lens displacement scales with powers between 0.5 and 0.6 for pores with dimensionless constriction radii between 0.15 and 0.40. Statistical percolation arguments are employed to form a generation rate expression and connect pore-level foam generation events to macroscopic pressure gradients in porous media. The rate of foam generation by capillary snap-off increases linearly with the liquid-phase pressure gradient and according to a power-law relationship with respect to the imposed gas-phase pressure gradient.

  1. Heat transfer and hydrodynamic investigations of a baffled slurry bubble column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, S. C.; Chen, Z. D.

    1992-09-01

    Heat transfer and hydrodynamic investigations have been conducted in a 0.108 m internal diameter bubble column at ambient conditions. The column is equipped with seven 19mm diameter tubes arranged in an equilateral triangular pitch of 36.5 mm. A Monsanto synthetic heat transfer fluid, Therminol-66 having a viscosity of 39.8 cP at 303 K, is used as a liquid medium. Magnetite powders, average diameters 27.7 and 36.6 µm, in five concentrations up to 50 weight percent in the slurry, are used. As a gas phase, industrial grade nitrogen of purity 99.6 percent is employed. Gas holdup in different operating modes and regimes have been measured for the two- and three-phase systems over a superficial gas velocity range up to 0.20 m/s in the semi-batch mode. Heat transfer coefficients are measured at different tube locations in the bundle at different radial and vertical locations over a range of operating conditions. All these data are compared with the existing literature correlations and models. New correlations are proposed.

  2. Mid-Infrared Galactic Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corn, Tyler; Watson, C.

    2008-03-01

    Using 2MASS, GLIMPSE, MIPSGAL, and MAGPIES surveys, we analyzed three bubbles centered at G8.1238-0.47712, G9.83464-0.71713, and G353.35010-0.14083. Each bubble has a circular PAH emission surrounding hot dust. Two bubbles observed also have PAH emission surrounding ionized gas. Physical properties (stellar mass, accretion rate, disk mass, inclination, etc.) are given for each YSO using a model fitter based on radiative transfer numerical simulations and a chi-squared minimization technique. YSOs are suggestive of triggered star formation in two bubbles. Ionizing stars can also be determined.

  3. Writing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-11-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles under a solid sphere immersed in a supersaturated liquid that is gently rubbed against a surface. For a fixed liquid supersaturation, bubbles are observed only above a certain rubbing velocity threshold. Above this threshold and provided that bubbles adhere better to the surface than to the sphere, a regularly spaced row of growing bubbles is left behind on the surface. Direct observation through a transparent sphere shows that each bubble in the row actually results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, which nucleate between the sphere and the surface. Together with the influence of the degree of supersaturation and the normal force between sphere and surface, we study the influence of the liquid itself (water or ethanol), the sphere material (glass, metal or Teflon) and of the surface roughness (polished or unpolished). Regardless of its precise origin, this method of ``writing bubbles'' also provides a simple way to spatially and temporally control the nucleation of bubbles on a surface and to study their interactions.

  4. Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Tonks, Michael; Biner, Bullent; Millet, Paul; Tikare, Veena; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Andersson , David

    2012-04-11

    A study was conducted to evaluate the capabilities of different numerical methods used to represent microstructure behavior at the mesoscale for irradiated material using an idealized benchmark problem. The purpose of the mesoscale benchmark problem was to provide a common basis to assess several mesoscale methods with the objective of identifying the strengths and areas of improvement in the predictive modeling of microstructure evolution. In this work, mesoscale models (phase-field, Potts, and kinetic Monte Carlo) developed by PNNL, INL, SNL, and ORNL were used to calculate the evolution kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in UO2 fuel under post-irradiation thermal annealing conditions. The benchmark problem was constructed to include important microstructural evolution mechanisms on the kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubble behavior such as the atomic diffusion of Xe atoms, U vacancies, and O vacancies, the effect of vacancy capture and emission from defects, and the elastic interaction of non-equilibrium gas bubbles. An idealized set of assumptions was imposed on the benchmark problem to simplify the mechanisms considered. The capability and numerical efficiency of different models are compared against selected experimental and simulation results. These comparisons find that the phase-field methods, by the nature of the free energy formulation, are able to represent a larger subset of the mechanisms influencing the intra-granular bubble growth and coarsening mechanisms in the idealized benchmark problem as compared to the Potts and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. It is recognized that the mesoscale benchmark problem as formulated does not specifically highlight the strengths of the discrete particle modeling used in the Potts and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Future efforts are recommended to construct increasingly more complex mesoscale benchmark problems to further verify and validate the predictive capabilities of the mesoscale modeling methods used in this study.

  5. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  6. A Bubble Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars.

    The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top.

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  7. Growth and setting of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic matrix imaged by X-ray microtomography: the evolution of cellular structures in fermenting wheat flour dough.

    PubMed

    Turbin-Orger, A; Babin, P; Boller, E; Chaunier, L; Chiron, H; Della Valle, G; Dendievel, R; Rguerre, A L; Salvo, L

    2015-05-01

    X-ray tomography is a relevant technique for the dynamic follow-up of gas bubbles in an opaque viscoelastic matrix, especially using image analysis. It has been applied here to pieces of fermenting wheat flour dough of various compositions, at two different voxel sizes (15 and 5 ?m). The resulting evolution of the main cellular features shows that the creation of cellular structures follows two regimes that are defined by a characteristic time of connectivity, tc [30 and 80 min]: first (t ? tc), bubbles grow freely and then (t ? tc) they become connected since the percolation of the gas phase is limited by liquid films. During the first regime, bubbles can be tracked and the local strain rate can be measured. Its values (10(-4)-5 10(-4) s(-1)) are in agreement with those computed from dough viscosity and internal gas pressure, both of which depend on the composition. For higher porosity, P = 0.64 in our case, and thus occurring in the second regime, different cellular structures are obtained and XRT images show deformed gas cells that display complex shapes. The comparison of these images with confocal laser scanning microscopy images suggests the presence of liquid films that separate these cells. The dough can therefore be seen as a three-phase medium: viscoelastic matrix/gas cell/liquid phase. The contributions of the different levels of matter organization can be integrated by defining a capillary number (C = 0.1-1) that makes it possible to predict the macroscopic dough behavior. PMID:25816111

  8. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  9. Mechanisms for stable single bubble sonoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, M.P.; Lohse, D.; Oxtoby, D.; Dupont, T.F.

    1996-02-01

    A gas bubble trapped in water by an oscillating acoustic field is expected to either shrink or grow on a diffusive time scale, depending on the forcing strength and the bubble size. At high ambient gas concentration this has long been observed. However, recent sonoluminescence experiments show that when the ambient gas concentration is low the bubble can be stable for days. This paper discusses mechanisms leading to stability. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Enhancing gas-liquid mass transfer rates in non-newtonian fermentations by confining mycelial growth to microbeads in a bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    Gbewonyo, K.; Wang, D.I.C.

    1983-12-01

    The performance of a penicillin fermentation was assessed in a laboratory-scale bubble column fermentor, with mycelial growth confined to the pore matrix of celite beads. Final cell densities of 29 g/L and penicillin titres of 5.5 g/L were obtained in the confined cell cultures. In comparison, cultures of free mycelial cells grown in the absence of beads experienced dissolved oxygen limitations in the bubble column, giving only 17 g/L final cell concentrations with equally low penicillin titres of 2 g/L. The better performance of the confined cell cultures was attributed to enhanced gas liquid mass transfer rates, with mass transfer coefficients (k /SUB L/ a) two to three times higher than those determined in the free cell cultures. Furthermore, the confined cell cultures showed more efficient utilization of power input for mass transfer, providing up to 50% reduction in energy requirements for aeration.

  11. Weak waves in multifractional liquids with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Nikiforov, A. A.; Gafiyatov, R. N.

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of weak waves in multifractional mixtures of liquid with vapor-gas and gas bubbles of different sizes and different compositions with phase transitions is studied. The dispersed phase consists of N+M fractions having various gases in bubbles and different in the bubbles radii. Phase transitions accounted for N fractions. The total bubble volume concentration is small (less than 1%). The dispersion relation is derived and dispersion curves is built. Influence of the mass concentration is shown. It is shown that dispersion and dissipation of acoustic waves depends significantly on presence of different bubbles in fractions of the dispersed phase.

  12. STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, C. M.; Thomson, A. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Edge, A. C.; Hogan, M. T.; Swinbank, A. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Mullaney, J. R.

    2015-02-10

    We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) Very Large Array data, combined with VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral field unit data and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, of a z = 0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup –1} and L {sub AGN} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the ''Teacup'' active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the literature. We identify ''bubbles'' of radio emission that are extended ≈10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the ''Teacup'' AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ≈0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v = –740 km s{sup –1}. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on ≳ 10 kpc scales. Our study highlights that even when a quasar is formally ''radio-quiet'' the radio emission can be extremely effective for observing the effects of AGN feedback.

  13. Gravity driven flows of bubble suspensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto; Koch, Donald L.; Sangani, Ashok K.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments on vertical and inclined channels were performed to study the behavior of a mono-dispersed bubble suspension for which the dual limit of large Reynolds number and small Weber number is satisfied. A uniform stream of 1.5 mm diameter bubbles is produced by a bank of identical capillaries and coalescence is inhibited by addition of salt to the water. Measurements of the liquid velocity and bubble-probe collision rate are obtained with a hot wire anemometer. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, velocity variance and chord length are measured using a dual impedance probe. Image analysis is used to quantify the distributions of bubble size and aspect ratio. For vertical channels the bubble velocity is observed to decrease as the bubble concentration increases in accord with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani (1998). The bubble velocity variance arises largely due to bubble-wall and bubble-bubble collisions. For inclined channels, the strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  14. Driving bubbles out of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    Surface tension gradient in melt forces gas bubbles to surface, increasing glass strength and transparency. Conventional chemical and buoyant fining are extremely slow in viscous glasses, but tension gradient method moves 250 um bubbles as rapidly as 30 um/s. Heat required for high temperature part of melt is furnished by stationary electrical or natural-gas heater; induction and laser heating are also possible. Method has many applications in industry processes.

  15. Sonoluminescing Air Bubbles Rectify Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Lohse, D.; Hilgenfeldt, S.; Brenner, M.P.; Dupont, T.F.; Johnston, B.

    1997-02-01

    The dynamics of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) strongly depends on the percentage of inert gas within the bubble. We propose a theory for this dependence, based on a combination of principles from sonochemistry and hydrodynamic stability. The nitrogen and oxygen dissociation and subsequent reaction to water soluble gases implies that strongly forced air bubbles eventually consist of pure argon. Thus it is the partial argon (or any other inert gas) pressure which is relevant for stability. The theory provides quantitative explanations for many aspects of SBSL. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Bubble size in horizontal pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Hesketh, R.P.; Russell, T.W.F.; Etchells, A.W.

    1987-04-01

    Bubble sizes for dilute dispersion in horizontal pipelines under turbulent liquid flow conditions are shown to be predicted by a theory. This theory contains the dependence of dispersed-phase density on the bubble size, which is not included in theories presented by others. Theories are compared using experimental data from both gas-liquid and liquid-liquid dispersions to show that only one theory can predict both gas bubble and liquid drop sizes with a single constant. Additionally, a generalized equation is proposed that includes the effect of the dispersed-phase viscosity.

  17. Bubble cluster dynamics in an acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Nasibullaeva, E S; Akhatov, I S

    2013-06-01

    A mathematical model describing dynamics of the cluster of gas bubbles in an acoustic field is presented. According to this model a cluster is considered as a large drop with microbubbles inside. The proposed model is used as a basis (1) for an analytical study of small bubble oscillations in mono- and polydisperse clusters and (2) for numerical investigations of nonlinear bubble oscillations and of the diffusion stability of gas bubbles in the cluster. A synchronization of the collapse phases of bubbles with different radii and collapse intensification for bubbles of one size in the presence of bubbles of other size is found. These effects are explained by the interaction between the bubbles of different radii in the cluster. For the cluster with one radius bubbles the numerical values are obtained for the initial gas concentrations in the liquid at which the bubbles tend to one of two equilibrium states because of rectified diffusion. It is found that the cluster with the bubbles of two different radii tends to become a cluster with the bubbles of one radius due to rectified diffusion. PMID:23742328

  18. Decommissioning the Fuel Process Building, a Shift in Paradigm for Terminating Safeguards on Process Holdup

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan R. Thomas

    2010-07-01

    INMM Abstract 51st Annual Meeting Decommissioning the Fuel Process Building, a Shift in Paradigm for Terminating Safeguards on Process Holdup The Fuel Process Building at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is being decommissioned after nearly four decades of recovering high enriched uranium from various government owned spent nuclear fuels. The separations process began with fuel dissolution in one of multiple head-ends, followed by three cycles of uranium solvent extraction, and ending with denitration of uranyl nitrate product. The entire process was very complex, and the associated equipment formed an extensive maze of vessels, pumps, piping, and instrumentation within several layers of operating corridors and process cells. Despite formal flushing and cleanout procedures, an accurate accounting for the residual uranium held up in process equipment over extended years of operation, presented a daunting safeguards challenge. Upon cessation of domestic reprocessing, the holdup remained inaccessible and was exempt from measurement during ensuing physical inventories. In decommissioning the Fuel Process Building, the Idaho Cleanup Project, which operates the INTEC, deviated from the established requirements that all nuclear material holdup be measured and credited to the accountability books and that all nuclear materials, except attractiveness level E residual holdup, be transferred to another facility. Instead, the decommissioning involved grouting the process equipment in place, rather than measuring and removing the contained holdup for subsequent transfer. The grouting made the potentially attractiveness level C and D holdup even more inaccessible, thereby effectually converting the holdup to attractiveness level E and allowing for termination of safeguards controls. Prior to grouting the facility, the residual holdup was estimated by limited sampling and destructive analysis of solutions in process lines and by acceptable knowledge based upon the separations process, plant layout, and operating history. The use of engineering estimates, in lieu of approved measurement methods, was justified by the estimated small quantity of holdup remaining, the infeasibility of measuring the holdup in a highly radioactive background, and the perceived hazards to personnel. The alternate approach to quantifying and terminating safeguards on process holdup was approved by deviation.

  19. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics. PMID:26486337

  20. Exploring Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Geary, Melissa A.

    Bubbles provide an enjoyable and festive medium through which to teach many concepts within the science topics of light, color, chemistry, force, air pressure, electricity, buoyancy, floating, density, among many others. In order to determine the nature of children's engagement within a museum setting and the learning opportunities of playing with bubbles, I went to a children's interactive museum located in a metropolitan city in the Northeastern part of the United States.

  1. Study on the dynamic holdup distribution of the pulsed extraction column

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Chen, J.; Wu, Q.

    2013-07-01

    In the study, a CSTR cascade dynamic hydraulic model was developed to investigate the dynamic holdup distribution of the pulsed extraction column. It is assumed that the dynamic process of the dispersed phase holdup of pulsed extraction column has equal effects with the operational process of multiple cascade CSTRs. The process is consistent with the following assumptions: the holdups vary on different stages but maintain uniform on each stage; the changes of the hydraulic parameters have impact initially on the inlet of dispersed phase, and stability will be reached gradually through stage-by-stage blending. The model was tested and verified utilizing time domain response curves of the average holdup. Nearly 150 experiments were carried out with different capillary columns, various feed liquids, and diverse continuous phases and under different operation conditions. The regression curves developed by the model show a good consistency with the experimental results. After linking parameters of the model with operational conditions, the study further found that the parameters are only linearly correlated with pulse conditions and have nothing to do with flow rate for a specific pulsed extraction column. The accuracy of the model is measured by the average holdup, and the absolute error is 0.01. The model can provide supports for the boundary studies on hydraulics and mass transfer by making simple and reliable prediction of the dynamic holdup distribution, with relatively less accessible hydraulic experimental data. (authors)

  2. Filling in the Gaps in a Study of Gas that Molds the Fermi Bubbles: An Archival Supplement to a Cycle 20 GO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Edward

    2013-10-01

    Two sharply defined lobes of gamma-ray emission emerging from the center of our Galaxy, called the Fermi Bubbles, have been discovered in the Galactic halo. Their emissivity appears to be uniform and extends up to 8 kpc on either side of the plane. Accompanying the Fermi Bubbles are excess emissions seen in X-rays, microwaves and polarized, low frequency radio emissions. It is generally believed that cosmic ray particles emitted from the central portion of the Galactic disk {or perhaps the nucleus itself} are responsible for these emissions. These particles must have been advected into the halo by a wind or shock. Our COS observations of 5 extragalactic targets behind or near the southern lobe of the Fermi Bubbles will help us to understand the physical nature and kinematics of the gas responsible for this transport. Spectra in the MAST archive for other extragalactic targets in the same part of the sky, plus those of some foreground stars, should offer us further guidance in our interpretation of the primary data obtained from the Cycle 20 observations.

  3. Studies in Three Phase Gas-Liquid Fluidised Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awofisayo, Joyce Ololade

    1992-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The work is a logical continuation of research started at Aston some years ago when studies were conducted on fermentations in bubble columns. The present work highlights typical design and operating problems that could arise in such systems as waste water, chemical, biochemical and petroleum operations involving three-phase, gas-liquid -solid fluidisation; such systems are in increasing use. It is believed that this is one of few studies concerned with "true" three-phase, gas-liquid-solid fluidised systems, and that this work will contribute significantly to closing some of the gaps in knowledge in this area. The research work was experimentally based and involved studies of the hydrodynamic parameters, phase holdups (gas and solid), particle mixing and segregation, and phase flow dynamics (flow regime and circulation patterns). The studies have focused particularly on the solid behaviour and the influence of properties of solids present on the above parameters in three-phase, gas-liquid-solid fluidised systems containing single particle components and those containing binary and ternary mixtures of particles. All particles were near spherical in shape and two particle sizes and total concentration levels were used. Experiments were carried out in two- and three-dimensional bubble columns. Quantitative results are presented in graphical form and are supported by qualitative results from visual studies which are also shown as schematic diagrams and in photographic form. Gas and solid holdup results are compared for air-water containing single, binary and ternary component particle mixtures. It should be noted that the criteria for selection of the materials used are very important if true three-phase fluidisation is to be achieved: this is very evident when comparing the results with those in the literature. The fluid flow and circulation patterns observed were assessed for validation of the generally accepted patterns, and the author believes that the present work provides more accurate insight into the modelling of liquid circulation in bubble columns. The characteristic bubbly flow at low gas velocity in a two-phase system is suppressed in the three-phase system. The degree of mixing within the system is found to be dependent on flow regime, liquid circulation and the ratio of solid phase physical properties.

  4. Bubbles of Metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-11-01

    Metamorphosis presents a puzzling challenge where, triggered by a signal, an organism abruptly transforms its entire shape and form. Here I describe the role of physical fluid dynamic processes during pupal metamorphosis in flies. During early stages of pupation of third instar larvae into adult flies, a physical gas bubble nucleates at a precise temporal and spatial location, as part of the normal developmental program in Diptera. Although its existence has been known for the last 100 years, the origin and control of this ``cavitation'' event has remained completely mysterious. Where does the driving negative pressure for bubble nucleation come from? How is the location of the bubble nucleation site encoded in the pupae? How do molecular processes control such a physical event? What is the role of this bubble during development? Via developing in-vivo imaging techniques, direct bio-physical measurements in live insect pupal structures and physical modeling, here I elucidate the physical mechanism for appearance and disappearance of this bubble and predict the site of nucleation and its exact timing. This new physical insight into the process of metamorphosis also allows us to understand the inherent design of pupal shell architectures in various species of insects. Milton Award, Harvard Society of Fellows; Terman Fellowship, Stanford

  5. Bubble migration during hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Rusinov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    A model of the process of migration of methane bubbles in water under thermobaric conditions of hydrate formation is proposed. The peculiarities of the temperature field evolution, migration rate, and changes in the radius and volume fraction of gas hydrate bubbles are studied. It is shown that, with a constant mass flow of gas from the reservoir bottom, for all parameters of the surfacing gas hydrate disperse system, there is a quasistationary pattern in the form of a "step"-like wave. Depending on the relationship of the initial gas bubble density with the average gas density in the hydrate composition determined by the depth from which bubbles rise to the surface, the final radius of hydrate particles may be larger or smaller than the initial gas bubble radii. It is established that the speed at which gas hydrate inclusions rise to the surface decreases by several times due to an increase in their weight during hydrate formation. The influence of the depth of the water reservoir whose bottom is a gas flow source on the dynamics of hydrate formation is studied.

  6. Biomass gasification with air in an atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed. Effect of six operational variables on the quality of the produced raw gas

    SciTech Connect

    Narvaez, I.; Orio, A.; Corella, J.; Aznar, M.P.

    1996-07-01

    Biomass gasification with air in a bubbling fluidized bed is studied in a small pilot plant. Variables analyzed are equivalence ratio (from 0.20 to 0.45), temperatures of the gasifier bed (750--850 C) and of its freeboard (500--600 C), H/C ratio in the feed, use of secondary air (10% of the overall) in the freeboard, and addition (2--5 wt %) of a calcined dolomite mixed with the biomass used as the feedstock. Using advanced tar and gas sampling and analysis methods, the gas composition and tar content in the gas are determined and their variation with the operation parameters is given. A statistical analysis of the effects of the gasification variables is also here presented.

  7. Interaction of Cavitation Bubbles on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Manish

    2005-11-01

    Patterned structures on solid surfaces can be used as controlled nucleation sites for cavitation. Etched micro-pits on hydrophobic solid surfaces trap small amounts of gas during immersion in water, which--when lowering the pressure--serve as bubble nucleus. Using specifically patterned surfaces, the dynamics of a few bubbles with controlled distances is investigated. The temporal evolution of the cavitating bubbles is visualized stroboscopically and with high speed imaging. When the inter-bubble distance is sufficiently small, the bubbles merge through a series of fascinating intermediate 3d shapes. Morover, bubbles on the edge of the pattern `shield' the bubbles inside, thus delaying the collapse of the interior bubbles. The results are reproduced with the help of axis-symmetric boundary integral simulations.

  8. Frictional drag reduction by bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    The injection of gas bubbles into a turbulent boundary layer of a liquid phase has multiple different impacts on the original flow structure. Frictional drag reduction is a phenomenon resulting from their combined effects. This explains why a number of different void-drag reduction relationships have been reported to date, while early works pursued a simple universal mechanism. In the last 15 years, a series of precisely designed experimentations has led to the conclusion that the frictional drag reduction by bubble injection has multiple manifestations dependent on bubble size and flow speed. The phenomena are classified into several regimes of two-phase interaction mechanisms. Each regime has inherent physics of bubbly liquid, highlighted by keywords such as bubbly mixture rheology, the spectral response of bubbles in turbulence, buoyancy-dominated bubble behavior, and gas cavity breakup. Among the regimes, bubbles in some selected situations lose the drag reduction effect owing to extra momentum transfer promoted by their active motions. This separates engineers into two communities: those studying small bubbles for high-speed flow applications and those studying large bubbles for low-speed flow applications. This article reviews the roles of bubbles in drag reduction, which have been revealed from fundamental studies of simplified flow geometries and from development of measurement techniques that resolve the inner layer structure of bubble-mixed turbulent boundary layers.

  9. Sensitivity study of Bubble diameter for prediction of flow pattern in homogeneous bubble column regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtousi, M.; Ganesan, P.; Sahu, J. N.; Redzwan, Ghufran

    2015-09-01

    Determining the bubble diameter size in a bubble column rector plays an important role to accurately predict flow pattern in a bubble column reactor. This paper employs the Eulerian-Eulerian method to numerically investigate the sensitivity study of bubble diameter size in a cylindrical bubble column reactor. Existing experimental results in the literature are used to validate the implementation of the proposed numerical method. In our simulation various bubble diameter size (i.e., 35.5mm) are used to find an appropriate bubble size inside the bubble column when the regime is homogeneous (superficial gas velocity = 0.005m/s). The result shows that bubble diameter 4mm is a reasonable size for flow pattern prediction inside the column.

  10. Bubble fusion: Preliminary estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    The collapse of a gas-filled bubble in disequilibrium (i.e., internal pressure {much_lt} external pressure) can occur with a significant focusing of energy onto the entrapped gas in the form of pressure-volume work and/or acoustical shocks; the resulting heating can be sufficient to cause ionization and the emission of atomic radiations. The suggestion that extreme conditions necessary for thermonuclear fusion to occur may be possible has been examined parametrically in terms of the ratio of initial bubble pressure relative to that required for equilibrium. In this sense, the disequilibrium bubble is viewed as a three-dimensional ``sling shot`` that is ``loaded`` to an extent allowed by the maximum level of disequilibrium that can stably be achieved. Values of this disequilibrium ratio in the range 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}6} are predicted by an idealized bubble-dynamics model as necessary to achieve conditions where nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium might be observed. Harmonic and aharmonic pressurizations/decompressions are examined as means to achieve the required levels of disequilibrium required to create fusion conditions. A number of phenomena not included in the analysis reported herein could enhance or reduce the small levels of nuclear fusions predicted.

  11. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Mller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  12. Controlling the Mobility of the Fluid Interface of Moving Gas Bubbles or Liquid Drops by Using Micellar Solutions of Surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity processes must rely on mechanisms other than buoyancy to move bubbles or droplets from one region to another in a continuous liquid phase. One suggested method is thermocapillary migration in which a temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase. A significant and as yet unresolved impediment to the use of thermocapillary migration to direct bubble or drop motion is that these migrations can be significantly retarded by the adsorption onto the fluid particle surface of surface active impurities unavoidably present in the continuous or (if the particle is a liquid) droplet phases. The focus of our research was to develop a theory for remobilizing fluid particle interfaces retarded by a surfactant impurity in an effort to make more viable the use of thermocapillary migrations for the management of bubbles and drops in microgravity. We postulated that a surfactant at high bulk concentration which kinetically exchanges rapidly with the surface can restore interface mobility. The scaling arguments along with a discussion of the previous literature is reviewed in the context of the scaling framework. The specific objectives of the research were twofold. The first was to prove the remobilization theory by studying a model problem. As the mechanism for remobilization is independent of the force which drives the particle, the fluid particle shape and the presence of fluid inertia, we chose the simplest model consisting of a spherical bubble rising steadily by buoyancy in creeping flow. We solved the hydrodynamic and surfactant transport equations for rapid kinetic exchange to demonstrate that as the concentration increases, the Marangoni retardation at first increases (the low k behavior) and then decreases (the high k behavior). The second objective was to develop a method to determine the kinetic rate constants of a surfactant molecule, since this information is necessary to select surfactants which will exchange rapidly enough relative to the convective rate in the thermocapillary process of interest. To measure the kinetic rate, we measure the dynamic tension change accompanying adsorption onto an initially clean interface, or the re-equilibration in tension when an equilibrium interface is compressed. The dynamic tension measurements are made by a pendant bubble method, in which surfactant adsorbs onto a pendant bubble, and the tension is measured by analyzing the shape change in the bubble. We conclude this report by detailing the publications, presentations and doctoral thesis completed under the auspices of this grant.

  13. Low-enriched uranium holdup measurements in Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, M.A.; Ceo, R.N.; Smith, S.E.

    1998-12-31

    Quantification of the residual nuclear material remaining in process equipment has long been a challenge to those who work with nuclear material accounting systems. Fortunately, nuclear material has spontaneous radiation emissions that can be measured. If gamma-ray measurements can be made, it is easy to determine what isotope a deposit contains. Unfortunately, it can be quite difficult to relate this measured signal to an estimate of the mass of the nuclear deposit. Typically, the measurement expert must work with incomplete or inadequate information to determine a quantitative result. Simplified analysis models, the distribution of the nuclear material, any intervening attenuation, background(s), and the source-to-detector distance(s) can have significant impacts on the quantitative result. This presentation discusses the application of a generalized-geometry holdup model to the low-enriched uranium fuel pellet fabrication plant in Ust-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan. Preliminary results will be presented. Software tools have been developed to assist the facility operators in performing and documenting the measurements. Operator feedback has been used to improve the user interfaces.

  14. Bubbles, microparticles, and neutrophil activation: changes with exercise level and breathing gas during open-water SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena M; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Madden, Dennis; Lozo, Mislav; Dujic, Zeljko

    2013-05-15

    The study goal was to evaluate responses in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that exertion underwater and use of a breathing mixture containing more oxygen and less nitrogen (enriched air nitrox) would alter annexin V-positive microparticle (MP) production and size changes and neutrophil activation, as well as their relationships to intravascular bubble formation. Twenty-four divers followed a uniform dive profile to 18 m of sea water breathing air or 22.5 m breathing 32% oxygen/68% nitrogen for 47 min, either swimming with moderately heavy exertion underwater or remaining stationary at depth. Blood was obtained pre- and at 15 and 120 min postdive. Intravascular bubbles were quantified by transthoracic echocardiography postdive at 20-min intervals for 2 h. There were no significant differences in maximum bubble scores among the dives. MP number increased 2.7-fold, on average, within 15 min after each dive; only the air-exertion dive resulted in a significant further increase to 5-fold over baseline at 2 h postdive. Neutrophil activation occurred after all dives. For the enriched air nitrox stationary at depth dive, but not for other conditions, the numbers of postdive annexin V-positive particles above 1 μm in diameter were correlated with intravascular bubble scores (correlation coefficients ∼0.9, P < 0.05). We conclude that postdecompression relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation appear to exist, but more study is required to improve confidence in the associations. PMID:23493363

  15. Evaluation of an integrated holdup measurement system using the GGH formalism with the M{sup 3}CA

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, P.A.; Smith, H.A.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Bjork, C.W.; Sheppard, G.A.; Smith, S.E.

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear facilities need portable, automated tools based on gamma-ray spectroscopy to perform plantwide assays of special nuclear materials (SNM) deposited as holdup in processing equipment. These assays satisfy such nuclear material control functions as obtaining or verifying SNM inventory quantities, assuring safe operating conditions, and quantifying SNM for decontamination and decommissioning. A new, integrated holdup measurement system designed to meet these requirements has been evaluated quantitatively for holdup assays. The hardware for the integrated holdup measurement system consists of a compact gamma-ray detector with collimation and shielding, a self-contained portable gamma-ray spectroscopy instrument, and a palm-size programmable control and data-storage unit. The application software, called HMSII (Holdup Measurement System II) masks the sophistication of the hardware and data analysis with a simple user interface. The heart of the integrated holdup measurement system is the generalized-geometry holdup (GGH) calibration and analysis formalism. The GGH formalism is based on the simplifying assumptions that each of hundreds of holdup deposit geometries in the facility can be interpreted as one of three simple geometric models (point, line, or area) to reduce the calibration and analysis effort to manageable proportions. Results obtained over a 4-yr period will be presented. Because of the reproducibility of setup and data treatment under HMSII automation, it is straightforward to repeat the assays of static equipment over extended periods of time with multiple users. This new integrated measurement system improves the precision and reliability of holdup measurements.

  16. Two-phase pressure drop and holdup in flows through large diameter vertical tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Gueler-Quadir, N.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental facility was designed and constructed to study pressure gradients and liquid holdup in upward vertical two-phase flow in large diameter tubing. The facility is comprised of a research well, an instrument for monitoring downhole liquid holdup, and a surface facility for calibration of the holdup detector. Sample data were acquired for a feasibility test. The well, located at The University of Tulsa, North Campus, is 2,360 ft deep with 10 3/4 in. casing, 2 7/8 in. injection tubing, and 3 1/2 in. production tubing. Up to 5,600 BPD of water and 5 MMscf/D of air can flow. Downhole pressures and temperatures are measured by eight variable reluctance pressure and temperature transducers. Liquid holdup is measured 500 ft. below the surface by a gamma-ray densitometer. The investigation includes a design study for the gamma-ray densitometer and a surface facility to calibrate the densitometer. An equation is obtained to convert count rate readings from the densitometer into volumetric average liquid holdup. Also, a design study to determine the compressor capacity needed to achieve different flow regimes in the test facility is included. Acquired data range from 171 to 4,100 BPD water and from 118 to 3,273 Mscf/D air flow rates. These sixty-one data sets, along with the thirty-nine data sets obtained from the same facility after further instrumental development, were compared with eight correlations for pressure drop and seven correlations holdup prediction. Based on the statistical results, the Duns and Ros correlation was the best at predicting liquid holdup, and the Hagedorm and Brown correlation was the best at predicting pressure gradient and total pressure drop.

  17. Experimental evidence for seismically initiated gas bubble nucleation and growth in groundwater as a mechanism for coseismic borehole water level rise and remotely triggered seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-09-01

    Changes in borehole water levels and remotely triggered seismicity occur in response to near and distant earthquakes at locations around the globe, but the mechanisms for these phenomena are not well understood. Experiments were conducted to show that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater can trigger a sustained increase in pore fluid pressure consistent in magnitude with observed coseismic borehole water level rise, constituting a physically plausible mechanism for remote triggering of secondary earthquakes through the reduction of effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. A portion of the CO2 degassing from the Earth's crust dissolves in groundwater where seismic Rayleigh and P waves cause dilational strain, which can reduce pore fluid pressure to or below the bubble pressure, triggering CO2 gas bubble growth in the saturated zone, indicated by a spontaneous buildup of pore fluid pressure. Excess pore fluid pressure was measured in response to the application of 0.1-1.0 MPa, 0.01-0.30 Hz confining stress oscillations to a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially subsaturated aqueous CO2, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. Confining stress oscillations equivalent to the dynamic stress of the 28 June 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake Rayleigh wave as it traveled through the Long Valley caldera, and Parkfield, California, increased the pore fluid pressure in the Berea core by an average of 36 15 cm and 23 15 cm of equivalent freshwater head, respectively, in agreement with 41.8 cm and 34 cm rises recorded in wells at those locations.

  18. The oscillations of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Yin, Z.; Yang, B.

    2003-04-01

    Bob Apfel had so many interests that it is impossible-however fitting and desirable-to pay homage to his work as a whole. Some of his early studies were devoted to bubble nucleation at high superheats. In the first part of this paper a recent application of this phenomenon is described. Once a vapor bubble is generated, its subsequent oscillations (free and forced) present analogies and differences with those of a gas bubble: the second part of the paper focuses on this topic. [Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  19. The oscillation of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Yin, Zhizhong

    2001-05-01

    Bob Apfel had so many interests that it is impossible-however fitting and desirable-to pay homage to his work as a whole. Some of his early studies were devoted to bubble nucleation at high superheats. In the first part of this paper a recent application of this phenomenon is described. Once a vapor bubble is generated, its subsequent oscillations (free and forced) present analogies and differences with those of a gas bubble: the second part of the paper focuses on this topic. [Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  20. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. PMID:24974006

  1. Achieving Higher Accuracy in the Gamma-Ray Spectrocopic Assay of Holdup

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, P.A.; Wenz, T.R.; Smith, S.E.; Harris, J.F.

    2000-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an important technique for the measurement of quantities of nuclear material holdup in processing equipment. Because the equipment in large facilities dedicated to uranium isotopic enrichment, uranium/plutonium scrap recovery or various stages of fuel fabrication is extensive, the total holdup may be large by its distribution alone, even if deposit thicknesses are small. Good accountability practices require unbiased measurements with uncertainties that are as small as possible. This paper describes new procedures for use with traditional holdup analysis methods based on gamma-ray spectroscopy. The procedures address the two sources of bias inherent in traditional gamma-ray measurements of holdup. Holdup measurements are performed with collimated, shielded gamma-ray detectors. The measurement distance is chosen to simplify the deposit geometry to that of a point, line or area. The quantitative holdup result is based on the net count rate of a representative gamma ray. This rate is corrected for contributions from room background and for attenuation by the process equipment. Traditional holdup measurements assume that the width of the point or line deposit is very small compared to the measurement distance, and that the self-attenuation effects can be neglected. Because each point or line deposit has a finite width and because self-attenuation affects all measurements, bias is incurred in both assumptions. In both cases the bias is negative, explaining the systematically low results of gamma-ray holdup measurements. The new procedures correct for bias that arises from both the finite-source effects and the gamma-ray self-attenuation. The procedures used to correct for both of these effects apply to the generalized geometries. One common empirical parameter is used for both corrections. It self-consistently limits the total error incurred (from uncertain knowledge of this parameter) in the combined correction process, so that it is compelling to use these procedures. The algorithms and the procedures are simple, general, and easily automated for use plant-wide. This paper shows the derivation of the new, generalized correction algorithms for finite-source and self-attenuation effects. It also presents an analysis of the sensitivity of the holdup result to the uncertainty in the empirical parameter when one or both corrections are made. The paper uses specific examples of the magnitudes of finite-source and self-attenuation corrections to measurements that were made in the field. It discusses the automated implementation of the correction procedure.

  2. What Can Be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Both solar wind charge exchange emission and diffuse thermal emission from the Local Bubble are strongly dominated in the soft X-ray band by lines from highly ionized elements. While both processes share many of the same lines, the spectra should differ significantly due to the different production mechanisms, abundances, and ionization states. Despite their distinct spectral signatures, current and past observatories have lacked the spectral resolution to adequately distinguish between the two sources. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy instrumentation proposed for future missions has the potential to answer fundamental questions such as whether there is any hot plasma in the Local Hot Bubble, and if so, what are the abundances of the emitting plasma and whether the plasma is in equilibrium. Such instrumentation will provide dynamic information about the solar wind including data on ion species which are currently difficult to track. It will also make possible remote sensing of the solar wind.

  3. Modelling isothermal bubbly-cap flows using two-group averaged bubble number density approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, S. C. P.; Yeoh, G. H.; Tu, J. Y.

    2012-09-01

    Gas-liquid flows with wide range of bubble sizes are commonly encountered in many nuclear gas-liquid flow systems. In tracking the changes of gas volume fraction and bubble size distribution under complex flow conditions, numerical studies have been performed to predict the temporal and spatial evolution of two-phase geometrical structure caused by the effects of bubble interactions in gas-liquid flows. Within literatures, the development of most coalescence and break-up mechanisms were primarily focused on the interaction of spherical bubbles. Nevertheless, cap bubbles which are precursors to the formation of slug units in the slug flow regime with increasing volume fraction become ever more prevalent at high gas velocity conditions. It has been shown through many experiments that interaction behaviors between non-spherical bubbles in a liquid flow are remarkably different when compared to those of spherical bubbles. Based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) framework, a three-fluid model was solved, one set of conservation equations for the liquid phase while two sets of conservation equations for the gas phase with one being Group 1 spherical bubbles and the other depicting Group 2 cap bubbles. In this initial assessment, the bubble mechanistic models proposed by Hibiki and Ishii [1] have been adopted to describe the intra-group and inter-group interactions. The numerical predictions were evaluated against the experiment data of the TOPFLOW facility for vertical, upwards, airwater flows in a large pipe diameter [2].

  4. Holdup Measurement System II (HMSII): Version 2.1. User`s guide and software documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.E.

    1995-05-31

    The Holdup Measurement System II (HMSII) software is a database management package for doing Holdup Measurements. It is based on the generalized geometry holdup (GGH) methodology taught in the US Department of Energy Safeguards Technology Training Program, ``Nondestructive Assay of Special Nuclear Materials Holdup.`` This program was developed and taught by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The HMSII was developed as a joint effort between LANL and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, managed for the US Department of Energy by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. The system is designed specifically for use with three types of Multichannel Analyzer (MCA): a Davidson Portable MultiChannel Analyzer (MCA); a EG&G Ortec MicroNOMAD ({mu}NOMAD); or a new Miniature Modular MultiChannel Analyzer (M{sup 3}CA) under development at LANL. It is also designed assuming a 512 channel spectrum from a low resolution (e.g., NaI) detector measuring Uranium or Plutonium. Another important hardware component of the system is a portable bar code reader (also called a DataLogger or Trakker), by Intermec Corporation. The 944X series and the JANUS 2OXX series readers are compatible models with the HMSII. The JANUS series is a bar code reader which is also a 386 compatible palmtop PC with MS-DOS 5.0 built-in. Both series readers are programmable and control all the aspects of field holdup data collection from the MCAs.

  5. Seismically Initiated Carbon Dioxide Gas Bubble Growth in Groundwater: A Mechanism for Co-seismic Borehole Water Level Rise and Remotely Triggered Secondary Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.

    Visualization experiments, core-scale laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations were conducted to examine the transient effect of dilational seismic wave propagation on pore fluid pressure in aquifers hosting groundwater that is near saturation with respect to dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. Groundwater can become charged with dissolved CO2 through contact with gas-phase CO2 in the Earth's crust derived from magma degasing, metamorphism, and biogenic processes. The propagation of dilational seismic waves (e.g., Rayleigh and p-waves) causes oscillation of the mean normal confining stress and pore fluid pressure. When the amplitude of the pore fluid pressure oscillation is large enough to drive the pore fluid pressure below the bubble pressure, an aqueous-to-gas-phase transition can occur in the pore space, which causes a buildup of pore fluid pressure and reduces the inter-granular effective stress under confined conditions. In visualization experiments conducted in a Hele-Shaw cell representing a smooth-walled, vertically oriented fracture, millisecond-scale pressure perturbations triggered bubble nucleation and growth lasting tens of seconds, with resulting pore fluid overpressure proportional to the magnitude of the pressure perturbation. In a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially under-saturated aqueous CO2 under conditions representative of a confined aquifer, rapid reductions in confining stress triggered transient pore pressure rise up to 0.7 MPa (100 psi) overpressure on a timescale of ~10 hours. The rate of pore pressure buildup in the first 100 seconds was proportional to the saturation with respect to dissolved CO 2 at the pore pressure minimum. Sinusoidal confining stress oscillations on a Berea sandstone core produced excess pore fluid pressure after the oscillations were terminated. Confining stress oscillations in the 0.1-0.4 MPa (15-60 psi) amplitude range and 0.05-0.30 Hz frequency band increased the pore fluid pressure by 13-60 cm of freshwater. Co-seismic borehole water level increases of the same magnitude were observed in Parkfield, California, and Long Valley caldera, California, in response to the propagation of a Rayleigh wave in the same amplitude and frequency range produced by the June 28, 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake. Co-seismic borehole water level rise is well documented in the literature, but the mechanism is not well understood, and the results of core-scale experiments indicate that seismically initiated CO2 gas bubble nucleation and growth in groundwater is a reasonable mechanism. Remotely triggered secondary seismicity is also well documented, and the reduction of effective stress due to CO2 bubble nucleation and growth in critically loaded faults may potentially explain how, for example, the June 28, 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake triggered seismicity as far away as Yellowstone, Wyoming, 1250 km from the hypocenter. A numerical simulation was conducted using Euler's method and a first-order kinetic model to compute the pore fluid pressure response to confining stress excursions on a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially under-saturated aqueous CO2. The model was calibrated on the pore pressure response to a rapid drop and later recovery of the confining stress. The model predicted decreasing overpressure as the confining stress oscillation frequency increased from 0.05 Hz to 0.30 Hz, in contradiction with the experimental results and field observations, which exhibit larger excess pore fluid pressure in response to higher frequency oscillations. The limitations of the numerical model point to the important influence of non-ideal behavior arising from a discontinuous gas phase and complex dynamics at the gas-liquid interface.

  6. Characterization of oxygen transfer in miniature and lab-scale bubble column bioreactors and comparison of microbial growth performance based on constant k(L)a.

    PubMed

    Doig, Steven D; Ortiz-Ochoa, Kenny; Ward, John M; Baganz, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This work describes the engineering characterization of miniature (2 mL) and laboratory-scale (100 mL) bubble column bioreactors useful for the cultivation of microbial cells. These bioreactors were constructed of glass and used a range of sintered glass gas diffusers with differently sized pores to disperse humidified air within the liquid biomedium. The effect of the pressure of this supplied air on the breakthrough point for gas diffusers with different pore sizes was examined and could be predicted using the Laplace-Young equation. The influence of the superficial gas velocity (u(g)) on the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) was determined, and values of up to 0.09 s(-1) were observed in this work. Two modeling approaches were considered in order to predict and provide comparison criteria. The first related the volumetric power consumption (P/V) to the k(L)a and a good correlation was obtained for differently sized reactors with a given pore size, but this correlation was not satisfactory for bubble columns with different gas diffusers. Values for P/V ranged from about 10 to 400 W.m(-3). Second, a model was developed predicting bubble size (d(b)), bubble rising velocity (u(b)), gas hold-up (phi), liquid side mass transfer coefficient (k(L)), and thus the k(L)a using established theory and empirical correlations. Good agreement was found with our experimental data at different scales and pore sizes. Values for d(b) varied from 0.1 to 0.6 mm, and k(L) values between 1.7 and 9.8 x 10(-4) m.s(-1) were determined. Several E. coli cultivations were performed in the miniature bubble column at low and high k(L)a values, and the results were compared to those from a conventional stirred tank operated under identical k(L)a values. Results from the two systems were similar in terms of biomass growth rate and carbon source utilization. PMID:16080699

  7. Satellites in the inviscid breakup of bubbles.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, J M; Fontelos, M A

    2007-04-01

    In this Letter, we stress the essential role played by gas inertia in the breakup of gas bubbles. Our results reveal that, whenever the gas to liquid density ratio Lambda=rhog/rhol is different from zero, tiny satellite bubbles may be formed as a result of the large gas velocities that are reached close to pinch-off. Moreover, we provide a closed expression for the characteristic satellite diameter, which decreases when decreasing Lambda and which shows order of magnitude agreement with the micron-sized satellite bubbles observed experimentally. PMID:17501278

  8. 235U Holdup Measurements in Three 321-M Exhaust HEPA Banks

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R

    2005-02-24

    The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report covers holdup measurements of uranium residue in three HEPA filter exhaust banks of the 321-M facility. Each of the exhaust banks has dimensions near 7' x 14' x 4' and represents a complex holdup problem. A portable HPGe detector and EG&G Dart system that contains the high voltage power supply and signal processing electronics were used to determine highly enriched uranium (HEU) holdup. A personal computer with Gamma-Vision software was used to control the Dart MCA and to provide space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel {gamma}-ray spectra. Some acquisitions were performed with the portable detector configured to a Canberra Inspector using NDA2000 acquisition and analysis software. Our results for each component uses a mixture of redundant point source and area source acquisitions that yielded HEU contents in the range of 2-10 grams. This report discusses the methodology, non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements, assumptions, and results of the uranium holdup in these items. This report includes use of transmission-corrected assay as well as correction for contributions from secondary area sources.

  9. First measurements of gas output from bubbling pools in a mud volcano at the periphery of Mt Etna (Italy): methodologies and implications for monitoring purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Cinzia; Giudice, Gaetano; Liuzzo, Marco; Pedone, Maria; Cosenza, Paolo; Riccobono, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Gases and brines emitted in the southern sector of Mt Etna from mofettes, mud pools and mud volcanoes come from an hydrothermal reservoir hosted within the clayey formations of the sedimentary basement (Chiodini et al., 1996). The gas emitted consists mainly of CO2, with CH4, N2 and He as minor species. CO2 and He stable isotopes indicate a clear magmatic origin for these gases, and their compositional changes during either eruptive or rest periods closely parallel that of crater fumaroles (Paonita et al., 2012). Altough these manifestations are the most significant CO2 emitters outside the crater area, their mass output has never been measured. We present the first measurements of gas flux from several bubbling mud pools in a mud volcano located in the village of Patern (Lon 14.89 Lat 37.57), in the southern flank of the volcano. We performed gas measurements using a home-made apparatus, able to capture all the bubbles over an area of 0.4 m2. Over an area of about 7000 m2, we measured the flow rate of every single bubbling pool, providing that it had a minimum flux rate of 0.5 l/min. The maximum measured flow rate for a single pool was 15 l/min. A preliminary estimate of the total CO2 output over the whole mud volcano is in the order of few t/d. At the same time, we measured the chemical composition of emitted gases in various pools, characterised by different gas flow rates, to calculate the output of CO2 and verify the effect of eventual chemical fractionation processes upon gas chemistry. During the same campaign of direct measurements, we also used a commercial infrared laser unit (GasFinder 2.0 from Boreal Laser Ltd) for measurement of volcanic CO2 path-integrated concentrations along cross-sections of the atmospheric plumes in the area. The GasFinder was set as to measure CO2 concentrations at 1 Hz rate. During the field campaigns, the position of the GasFinder unit was sequentially moved so as to scan the plumes from different viewing directions and angles. The positions of both laser source and retro-reflectors were chosen so to have the target CO2 plume in between retro-reflectors and the GasFinder, and to realize the complete coverage of the degassing area. We therefore explored the possibility to combine the available path-integrated CO2 concentration data to derive a two-dimensional mapping of CO2 over the mud volcano. The periodic survey of total CO2 output in a subset of vigorously degassing pools, paralleled to the chemical and isotopic measurements routinely performed in selected pools, would offer a robust monitoring tool in a peripheral sector of the volcano. Chiodini G., D'Alessandro W. and Parello F. (1996) Geochemistry of gases and water discharged by the mud volcanoes at Patern, Mt. Etna (Italy). Bull. Volcanol. 58, 51-58. Paonita A., Caracausi A., Iacono-Marziano G., Martelli M., Rizzo A. (2012) Geochemical evidence for mixing between fluids exsolved at different depths in the magmatic system of Mt Etna (Italy). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 84 (2012) 380-394.

  10. Characteristics of an underwater direct current discharge in bubbles and the temperature distribution in the bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ranhua; Nikiforov, Anton Yu.; Vanraes, Patrick; Leys, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    An underwater direct current (DC) discharge in artificially produced air bubbles is investigated. Electrical and optical emission properties of the plasma and temperature distribution in bubbles evaluated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are presented. The behavior of plasma inside a bubble significantly depends on the bubble size. The discharge with water as a cathode is characterized by streamer nature, whereas the plasma with water as an anode appears diffuse and homogenous. The gas temperature is estimated from emission of the plasma, and it is much higher when water is a cathode. Bubble dynamics is investigated by CFD simulation, and results are in good agreement with experimental data. It shows the temperature distribution in bubbles strongly depends on the bubble dynamics, and gas-water interface has a sharp temperature gradient and acts as an efficient heat sink.

  11. Air bubble migration rates as a proxy for bubble pressure distribution in ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadic, Ruzica; Schneebeli, Martin; Bertler, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    Air bubble migration can be used as a proxy to measure the pressure of individual bubbles and can help constrain the gradual close-off of gas bubbles and the resulting age distribution of gases in ice cores. The close-off depth of single bubbles can vary by tens of meters, which leads to a distribution of pressures for bubbles at a given depth. The age distribution of gases (along with gas-age-ice-age differences) decreases the resolution of the gas level reconstructions from ice cores and limits our ability to determine the phase relationship between gas and ice, and thus, the impact of rapid changes of greenhouse gases on surface temperatures. For times of rapid climate change, including the last 150 years, and abrupt climate changes further back in the past, knowledge of the age distribution of the gases trapped in air bubbles will enable us to refine estimates of atmospheric changes. When a temperature gradient is applied to gas bubbles in an ice sample, the bubbles migrate toward warmer ice. This motion is caused by sublimation from the warm wall and subsequent frost deposition on the cold wall. The migration rate depends on ice temperature and bubble pressure and is proportional to the temperature gradient. The spread in migration rates for bubbles in the same samples at given temperatures should therefore reflect the variations in bubble pressures within a sample. Air bubbles with higher pressures would have been closed off higher in the firn column and thus have had time to equilibrate with the surrounding ice pressure, while air bubbles that have been closed off recently would have pressures that are similar to todays atmospheric pressure above the firn column. For ice under pressures up to ~13-16 bar, the pressure distribution of bubbles from a single depth provides a record of the trapping function of air bubbles in the firn column for a certain time in the past. We will present laboratory experiments on air bubble migration, using Antarctic ice core samples from a range of depths, to show that air bubble migration is a valid proxy for bubble pressure and can thus be used to determine the trapping function of air bubbles and gas age distribution for past conditions.

  12. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J.; Zenit, R.; Chellppannair, T.; Koch, D. L.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Sangani, A.

    1998-11-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1 and Re >> 1 , so that the bubbles are relatively undeformed and the flow is inviscid and approximately irrotational. Nitrogen is introduced through an array of capillaries at the base of a .2x.02x2 m channel filled with an aqueous electrolyte solution (0.06 molL-1 MgSO_4). The rising bubbles generate a unidirectional shear flow, where the denser suspension at the lower surface of the channel falls, while the less dense suspension at the upper surface rises. Hot-film anemometry is used to measure the resulting gas volume fraction and fluid velocity profiles. The bubble collision rate with the sensor is related to the gas volume fraction and the mean and variance of the bubble velocity using an experimentally measured collision surface area for the sensor. Bubble collisions with the sensor are identified by the characteristic slope of the hot-film anemometer signal when bubbles collide with the sensor. It is observed that the steady shear flow develops a bubble phase pressure gradient across the channel gap as the bubbles interchange momentum through direct collisions. The discrete phase presssure gradient balances the buoyancy force driving bubbles toward the upper surface resulting in a steady void fraction profile across the gap width. The strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and by the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion (Kang et al. 1997; Spelt and Sangani, 1998), for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  13. Bubble nucleation in stout beers.

    PubMed

    Lee, W T; McKechnie, J S; Devereux, M G

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide-such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers-is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets. PMID:21728549

  14. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  15. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical…

  16. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical

  17. FEASTING BLACK HOLE BLOWS BUBBLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A monstrous black hole's rude table manners include blowing huge bubbles of hot gas into space. At least, that's the gustatory practice followed by the supermassive black hole residing in the hub of the nearby galaxy NGC 4438. Known as a peculiar galaxy because of its unusual shape, NGC 4438 is in the Virgo Cluster, 50 million light-years from Earth. These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy's central region clearly show one of the bubbles rising from a dark band of dust. The other bubble, emanating from below the dust band, is barely visible, appearing as dim red blobs in the close-up picture of the galaxy's hub (the colorful picture at right). The background image represents a wider view of the galaxy, with the central region defined by the white box. These extremely hot bubbles are caused by the black hole's voracious eating habits. The eating machine is engorging itself with a banquet of material swirling around it in an accretion disk (the white region below the bright bubble). Some of this material is spewed from the disk in opposite directions. Acting like high-powered garden hoses, these twin jets of matter sweep out material in their paths. The jets eventually slam into a wall of dense, slow-moving gas, which is traveling at less than 223,000 mph (360,000 kph). The collision produces the glowing material. The bubbles will continue to expand and will eventually dissipate. Compared with the life of the galaxy, this bubble-blowing phase is a short-lived event. The bubble is much brighter on one side of the galaxy's center because the jet smashed into a denser amount of gas. The brighter bubble is 800 light-years tall and 800 light-years across. The observations are being presented June 5 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Rochester, N.Y. Both pictures were taken March 24, 1999 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. False colors were used to enhance the details of the bubbles. The red regions in the picture denote the hot gas. Credits: NASA and Jeffrey Kenney and Elizabeth Yale (Yale University)

  18. Simulations of Bubble Motion in an Oscillating Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraynik, A. M.; Romero, L. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    Finite-element simulations are used to investigate the motion of a gas bubble in a liquid undergoing vertical vibration. The effect of bubble compressibility is studied by comparing "compressible" bubbles that obey the ideal gas law with "incompressible" bubbles that are taken to have constant volume. Compressible bubbles exhibit a net downward motion away from the free surface that does not exist for incompressible bubbles. Net (rectified) velocities are extracted from the simulations and compared with theoretical predictions. The dependence of the rectified velocity on ambient gas pressure, bubble diameter, and bubble depth are in agreement with the theory. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Surface Bubble Nucleation Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, James R. T.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-02-01

    Recent research has revealed several different techniques for nanoscopic gas nucleation on submerged surfaces, with findings seemingly in contradiction with each other. In response to this, we have systematically investigated the occurrence of surface nanobubbles on a hydrophobized silicon substrate for various different liquid temperatures and gas concentrations, which we controlled independently. We found that nanobubbles occupy a distinct region of this parameter space, occurring for gas concentrations of approximately 100%-110%. Below the nanobubble region we did not detect any gaseous formations on the substrate, whereas micropancakes (micron wide, nanometer high gaseous domains) were found at higher temperatures and gas concentrations. We moreover find that supersaturation of dissolved gases is not a requirement for nucleation of bubbles.

  20. Physical modeling studies of electrolyte flow due to gas evolution and some aspects of bubble behavior in advanced Hall cells; Part 1: Flow in cells with a flat anode

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar, R. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering); Evans, J.W. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The need for energy reduction in the electrolytic production of aluminum led to the concept of advanced Hall cells that can be operated at lower interelectrode gaps compared to existing cells. However, gas bubbles generated by the anodic reaction increase the resistivity of electrolyte and cancel out part of the reduction in interelectrode resistance expected from bringing the electrodes closer together. Therefore, the primary objective of this work was to determine a cell design in which flow can be managed to promote the removal of anode gas bubbles from the interelectrode gap. In particular, this article focuses on advanced Hall cells equipped with flat'' anodes, similar to those used in existing cells. The principal experimental tool has been a water'' model consisting of a large tank in which simulated anodes can be suspended in either the horizontal or near-horizontal configurations. Gas was generated by forcing compressed air through porous graphite, and the fine bubbles characteristic of inert anodes used in advanced Hall cells were produced by adding butanol to water. Velocities were measured using a laser-Doppler velocimeter (LDV). This study indicates that the existing cell configuration might not be the optimum configuration for advanced Hall cells. The results also show that operation of an advanced Hall cell with a fully submerged anode should give rise to higher electrolyte velocities and thus rapid removal of bubbles. The bubble effect should be further lowered in a near-horizontal configuration; however, the flow pattern could have an adverse effect on current efficiency and alumina distribution in the cell. It has also been shown that the bubble size, and, therefore, the physical properties of the electrolyte, can have a significant effect on the electrolyte flow pattern in the interelectrode gap.

  1. Bubbling orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhi, Sunil; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2005-08-01

    We investigate a class of 1/2-BPS bubbling geometries associated to orientifolds of type-IIB string theory and thereby to excited states of the SO(N)/Sp(N) Script N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The geometries are in correspondence with free fermions moving in a harmonic oscillator potential on the half-line. Branes wrapped on torsion cycles of these geometries are identified in the fermi fluid description. Besides being of intrinsic interest, these solutions may also occur as local geometries in flux compactifications where orientifold planes are present to ensure global charge cancellation. We comment on the extension of this procedure to M-theory orientifolds.

  2. O VI gas - Circumstellar or interstellar. [abundance models due to ionization of circumstellar bubbles or supernova shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1978-01-01

    Observations in the UV spectra from the Copernicus satellite have revealed absorption lines from five-times ionized oxygen atoms. To explain this abundance, two explanations have been advanced to supplant the traditional model of steady loss from nearby stars. One, ionization from circumstellar bubbles, is said to result from rapidly rotating stars. The other, examined in more detail, suggests a mechanism whereby shock waves from explosive disturbances in nearby supernovae preferentially channel coronal-type O VI regions in the interstellar medium into areas of high temperature (above 100,000 K). An examination of column densities with increasing distribution is proposed to examine the hypotheses, although the results are as yet inconclusive.

  3. Water hammer phenomena in gas-water two-phase bubbly flow through a 90 bend tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuli; Sun, Qi; Zheng, Zhi; Li, Beibei; Cai, Pei

    2008-11-01

    Water hammer phenomena of two-phase bubbly flow caused by a rapid valve closure in a 90 bend pipe were investigated experimentally. The experiments were conducted in a horizontal tube of 25.4mm in inner diameter and 1.9~3.8 in ratio of the curvature radius to the inner diameter of the bend tube, in the ranges of superficial velocity from 0.23 to 1.64 m/s and of void fraction from 0. 0% to 1.12%. The air and water were used as the working fluid. The value of potential surge and its attenuation, and propagation velocity of the compression waves were obtained and discussed, comparing them with those in the single-phase water flow. The distribution of potential surge in a 90 bend pipe is a "ring", and it was respect with void fraction, superficial velocity, curvature radius.

  4. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 181, 251. (2) Liu Y, Zhang YX, Behrens H (2005) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 143, 219. (3) Murase T, McBirney A (1970) Science 167, 1491. (4) Proussevitch AA, Sahagian DL (1998) J. Geophys. Res. 103, 18223. (5) Saal AE, Hauri EH, Cascio ML, et al. (2008) Nature 454, 192. (6) Zhang YX, Stolper EM (1991) Nature 351, 306.

  5. Fissile material holdup measurement systems: an historical review of hardware and software

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Smith, Steven E; Rowe, Nathan C

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of fissile material holdup is accomplished by passively measuring the energy-dependent photon flux and/or passive neutron flux emitted from the fissile material deposited within an engineered process system. Both measurement modalities--photon and neutron--require the implementation of portable, battery-operated systems that are transported, by hand, from one measurement location to another. Because of this portability requirement, gamma-ray spectrometers are typically limited to inorganic scintillators, coupled to photomultiplier tubes, a small multi-channel analyzer, and a handheld computer for data logging. For neutron detection, polyethylene-moderated, cadmium-back-shielded He-3 thermal neutron detectors are used, coupled to nuclear electronics for supplying high voltage to the detector, and amplifying the signal chain to the scaler for counting. Holdup measurement methods, including the concept of Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH), are well presented by T. Douglas Reilly in LA-UR-07-5149 and P. Russo in LA-14206, yet both publications leave much of the evolutionary hardware and software to the imagination of the reader. This paper presents an historical review of systems that have been developed and implemented since the mid-1980s for the nondestructive assay of fissile material, in situ. Specifications for the next-generation holdup measurements systems are conjectured.

  6. Burst of Star Formation Drives Galactic Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) captures a lumpy bubble of hot gas rising from a cauldron of glowing matter in Galaxy NGC 3079, located 50 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. Astronomers suspect the bubble is being blown by 'winds' or high speed streams of particles, released during a burst of star formation. The bubble's lumpy surface has four columns of gaseous filaments towering above the galaxy's disc that whirl around in a vortex and are expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down on the disc and may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars.

  7. Bubble characteristics in gassy aqueous sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Orsi, T.H.; Anderson, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    Although gas bubbles are known to dramatically alter the biogeochemical, geotechnical, and geoacoustic characteristics of bottom sediments in numerous marine, estuarine, and lacustrine sediments worldwide, little is known about their size, shape, or spatial distribution within the sediments. In this study, we describe an approach for quantifying gas bubble characteristics in gassy aqueous sediments using x-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scanning). By calibrating the CT scanner using a specially machined Plexiglas disk with preformed spheres of different diameters, the proper thresholding technique can be identified for segmenting the CT images into matrix (sediment) and bubble (free gas). To illustrate the approach, we examine a naturally gassy sediment from a shallow water lake near College Station, Texas. Free gas within the sediments occurred as large bubbles with diameters >2 mm, resulting in volume fractions ranging from essentially zero to a high in excess of 0.08. The distinct vertical segregation of bubbles correlated well with sediment structure and water content, but had a nominal effect overall on sediment bulk density. Bubble size and shape were related as bubble shape progressed from spherical to elliptical to amorphous (blobs) in form with increasing size. These results suggest that the assumption of spherical bubbles distributed uniformly throughout a volume of aqueous sediments, as commonly invoked for modeling purposes, may be inaccurate.

  8. Determining the gas permeability coefficient of a porous medium by means of the bubble-counting flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoczylas, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    In this paper the conception of a low-cost device to determine the coefficient of permeability was presented. In the apparatus a non-typical source of gas and gas flow meter has been used. A used flow meter allows us to measure very low gas flow rates. The upper measurement range limit of the constructed device was about 20?cm3?min-1, whereas the lower measurement range limit was estimated to be approximately 0.01?cm3?min-1.

  9. Bioinspired bubble design for particle generation

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Oguzhan; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Stride, Eleanor; Tamerler, Candan; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we devise a method to generate homogeneous particles from a bubble suspension, with the capability to control loading and the structure of bubbles. Ideally, a process such as this would occur at the interface between daughter bubble formation (instant) and gaseous diffusion (gradual). Interestingly, the budding mechanism in micro-organisms is one that demonstrates features of the desired phenomena (although at a much slower rate), as viruses can eject and evolve structures from their membranes. With these natural concepts, a bubble's surface can also be made to serve as a platform for particle generation, which transfers significant elements from the initial bubble coating to the newly generated structures. Here, we illustrate this by preparing coated bubbles (approx. 150 m in diameter) using a hydrophobic polymer, which may be comparable to naturally occurring bubble coatings (e.g. organic matter forming part of bubble coatings in the sea), and dye (which can demonstrate entrapment of smaller quantities of a desired moiety) and then observe particle generation (approx. 500 nm). The process, which may be driven by a polymerosome-forming mechanism, also illustrates how additional uniform sub-micrometre-scale structures may form from a bubble's surface, which may have also previously been attributed to gas diffusion. In addition, such methods of particle formation from a bubble structure, the incorporation of chemical or biological media via an in situ process and subsequent release technologies have several areas of interest across the broad scientific community. PMID:22112651

  10. Bioinspired bubble design for particle generation.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Oguzhan; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Stride, Eleanor; Tamerler, Candan; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we devise a method to generate homogeneous particles from a bubble suspension, with the capability to control loading and the structure of bubbles. Ideally, a process such as this would occur at the interface between daughter bubble formation (instant) and gaseous diffusion (gradual). Interestingly, the budding mechanism in micro-organisms is one that demonstrates features of the desired phenomena (although at a much slower rate), as viruses can eject and evolve structures from their membranes. With these natural concepts, a bubble's surface can also be made to serve as a platform for particle generation, which transfers significant elements from the initial bubble coating to the newly generated structures. Here, we illustrate this by preparing coated bubbles (approx. 150 m in diameter) using a hydrophobic polymer, which may be comparable to naturally occurring bubble coatings (e.g. organic matter forming part of bubble coatings in the sea), and dye (which can demonstrate entrapment of smaller quantities of a desired moiety) and then observe particle generation (approx. 500 nm). The process, which may be driven by a polymerosome-forming mechanism, also illustrates how additional uniform sub-micrometre-scale structures may form from a bubble's surface, which may have also previously been attributed to gas diffusion. In addition, such methods of particle formation from a bubble structure, the incorporation of chemical or biological media via an in situ process and subsequent release technologies have several areas of interest across the broad scientific community. PMID:22112651

  11. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography and gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil and gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil and gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 and 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 and 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  12. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography & gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-01

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil & gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil & gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 & 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 & 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  13. Manipulating bubbles with secondary Bjerknes forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanoy, Maxime; Derec, Caroline; Tourin, Arnaud; Leroy, Valentin

    2015-11-01

    Gas bubbles in a sound field are submitted to a radiative force, known as the secondary Bjerknes force. We propose an original experimental setup that allows us to investigate in detail this force between two bubbles, as a function of the sonication frequency, as well as the bubbles radii and distance. We report the observation of both attractive and, more interestingly, repulsive Bjerknes force, when the two bubbles are driven in antiphase. Our experiments show the importance of taking multiple scatterings into account, which leads to a strong acoustic coupling of the bubbles when their radii are similar. Our setup demonstrates the accuracy of secondary Bjerknes forces for attracting or repealing a bubble, and could lead to new acoustic tools for noncontact manipulation in microfluidic devices.

  14. Mechanics of Bubbles in Sludges and Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A; Terrones, Guillermo; Rossen, William R

    2001-12-31

    The Hanford Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks that are known to retain and release bubbles composed of flammable gases. Characterizing and understanding the behavior of these bubbles is important for the safety issues associated with the flammable gases for both ongoing waste storage and future waste-retrieval operations. The retained bubbles are known to respond to small barometric pressure changes, though in a complex manner with unusual hysteresis occurring in some tanks in the relationship between bubble volume and pressure, or V-P hysteresis. With careful analysis, information on the volume of retained gas and the interactions of the waste and the bubbles can be determined. The overall objective of this study is to create a better understanding of the mechanics of bubbles retained in high-level waste sludges and slurries. Significant advancements have been made in all the major areas of basic theoretical and experimental method development.

  15. How are soap bubbles blown? Fluid dynamics of soap bubble blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Lambert, Lori; Sherman, Erica; Wei, Timothy; Ryu, Sangjin

    2013-11-01

    Soap bubbles are a common interfacial fluid dynamics phenomenon having a long history of delighting not only children and artists but also scientists. In contrast to the dynamics of liquid droplets in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, the dynamics of soap bubbles has not been well documented. This is possibly because studying soap bubbles is more challenging due to there existing two gas-liquid interfaces. Having the thin-film interface seems to alter the characteristics of the bubble/drop creation process since the interface has limiting factors such as thickness. Thus, the main objective of this study is to determine how the thin-film interface differentiates soap bubbles from gas bubbles and liquid drops. To investigate the creation process of soap bubbles, we constructed an experimental model consisting of air jet flow and a soap film, which consistently replicates the conditions that a human produces when blowing soap bubbles, and examined the interaction between the jet and the soap film using the high-speed videography and the particle image velocimetry.

  16. Bubble-Free Containers For Liquids In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornfeld, Dale M.; Antar, Basil L.

    1995-01-01

    Reports discuss entrainment of gas bubbles during handling of liquids in microgravity, and one report proposes containers filled with liquids in microgravity without entraining bubbles. Bubbles are troublesome in low-gravity experiments - particularly in biological experiments. Wire-mesh cage retains liquid contents without solid wall, because in microgravity, surface tension of liquid exerts sufficient confining force.

  17. Bubble rearrangements dynamics in foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Merrer, Marie; Costa, Severine; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Hoehler, Reinhard

    2011-11-01

    Liquid foams are jammed dispersions of gas bubbles in a surfactant solution. Their structure evolves with time because surface tension drives a diffusive gas exchange between neighboring bubbles. This coarsening leads to a build-up of stresses which are relaxed upon local intermittent bubble rearrangements. These events govern the slow viscoelastic foam response, and similar bubble rearrangements are the elementary processes of plastic flow. Thus, the rearrangement duration is a key parameter describing how the microstructure dynamics control the macroscopic rheological response. We probe the duration of coarsening-induced rearrangements in 3D foams using a multiple light scattering technique (time resolved Diffusing-Wave Spectroscopy) as a function of the surfactant chemistry and the liquid fraction. As the foam becomes wetter, the confinement pressure of the packing goes to zero and the contacts between bubbles vanish. For mobile interfaces, we find that the rearrangements slow down as the jamming point is approached. These findings are compared to scaling laws which reveal an analogy between rearrangements dynamics in foams and granular suspensions.

  18. Electrolysis Bubbles Make Waterflow Visible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Technique for visualization of three-dimensional flow uses tiny tracer bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen made by electrolysis of water. Strobe-light photography used to capture flow patterns, yielding permanent record that is measured to obtain velocities of particles. Used to measure simulated mixing turbulence in proposed gas-turbine combustor and also used in other water-table flow tests.

  19. Shock induced jetting of micron sized bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Ikink, Roy; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2002-11-01

    Gas bubbles having a radius between 10 mum and 100 mum and rising freely in water when being subjected to a shock front exhibit a liquid jetting phenomenon. The jet points in the direction of the propagating shock wave. A linear relationship between the jet length and the bubble radius is found and a lower bound of the averaged velocity of the liquid jet can be estimated to be between 50 m/s and 300 m/s increasing linearly for larger bubbles. In a later stage the jet breaks up and releases micron sized bubbles. In the course of shock wave mediated cell permeabilization this observation suggests a microinjection mechanism responsible for cell transfection when minute gas bubbles are present and exposed together with cells to shock waves.

  20. 235U and TRU Holdup Measurements on the 321-M Sawbenches

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R

    2004-07-02

    The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested by the Facilities Disposition Projects (FDP) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report covers holdup measurements on two sawbench components that were used for cutting U-Al fuel rods. The benches contained U-Al residue scattered on the bench tops and bagged up in plastic containers. It was very important to obtain an estimate of the HEU content of this residue in order to remove criticality concerns before vacuuming it into a much smaller volume. A portable high purity germanium (HPGe) detection system and a portable sodium iodide (NaI) detection system were used to determine highly enriched uranium (HEU) holdup and to determine holdup Np-237 and Am-241 that were observed in these components. The measured Np-237 and Am-241 contents were especially important in these components because their presence is unusual and unexpected in 321-M. It was important to obtain a measured value of these two components to disposition the saw benches and to determine whether a separate waste stream was necessary for release of these contaminated components to the E-Area Solid Waste Vault. The reported values for Np-237 are < 0.8 mg on each of the two bench tops and < 3 {micro}g in the bag of chips. The reported values for Am-241 are < 500 ng on the two bench tops and < 15 ng in the bag of chips. Our results demonstrate an upper limit of {sup 235}U content of 0.4 g on the two benchtops and of 0.1 mg in the bag of chips. These reported values completely eliminated the criticality concerns. This report discusses the methodology, non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements, and results of the holdup measured for each of the three actinide species in these saw benches.

  1. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. L.; Hill, R. J.; Chellppannair, T.; Zenit, R.; Zenit, R.; Spelt, P. D. M.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1a nd Re >> 1, for which comparisons are made with kinetic theory and numerical simulations. Here Re = gamma(a(exp 2)/nu is the Reynolds number and We = rho(gamma(exp 2))a(exp 3)/sigma is the Weber number; gamma is the shear rate, a is the bubble radius, nu is the kinematic viscosity of the liquid, rho is the density of the liquid, and sigma is the surface tension of the gas/liquid interface. Kang et al. calculated the bubble phase pressure and velocity variance of sheared bubble suspensions under conditions where the bubbles are spherical and the liquid phase velocity field can be approximated using potential flow theory, i.e. We= 0 and Re >> 1. Such conditions can be achieved in an experiment using gas bubbles, with a radius of O(0.5mm), in water. The theory requires that there be no average relative motion of the gas and liquid phases, hence the motivation for an experimental program in microgravity. The necessity of performing preliminary, Earth based experiments, however, requires performing experiments where the gas phase rises in the liquid, which significantly complicates the comparison of experiments with theory. Rather than comparing experimental results with theory for a uniform, homogeneous shear flow, experiments can be compared directly with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for bubble suspensions. This requires accounting for the significant lift force acting on the gas phase when the bubbles rise parallel to the average velocity of the sheared suspension. Shear flows can be produced in which the bubble phase pressure gradient, arising from shear induced collisions amongst the bubbles, balances a body force (centrifugal or gravitational) on the gas phase. A steady, non-uniform gas volume fraction can be measured, from which the bubble phase pressure gradient can be obtained and compared to theory and numerical simulations. The presence of bounding walls further complicates the experiments, since the detailed interactions of the bubbles with bounding walls is not well understood, especially in the presence of gravity, where the momentum and energy exchange depends on the inclination of the wall.

  2. Mechanisms of single bubble cleaning.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Fabian; Mettin, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of collapsing bubbles close to a flat solid is investigated with respect to its potential for removal of surface attached particles. Individual bubbles are created by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses focused into water close to glass plates contaminated with melamine resin micro-particles. The bubble dynamics is analysed by means of synchronous high-speed recordings. Due to the close solid boundary, the bubble collapses with the well-known liquid jet phenomenon. Subsequent microscopic inspection of the substrates reveals circular areas clean of particles after a single bubble generation and collapse event. The detailed bubble dynamics, as well as the cleaned area size, is characterised by the non-dimensional bubble stand-off γ=d/Rmax, with d: laser focus distance to the solid boundary, and Rmax: maximum bubble radius before collapse. We observe a maximum of clean area at γ≈0.7, a roughly linear decay of the cleaned circle radius for increasing γ, and no cleaning for γ>3.5. As the main mechanism for particle removal, rapid flows at the boundary are identified. Three different cleaning regimes are discussed in relation to γ: (I) For large stand-off, 1.8<γ<3.5, bubble collapse induced vortex flows touch down onto the substrate and remove particles without significant contact of the gas phase. (II) For small distances, γ<1.1, the bubble is in direct contact with the solid. Fast liquid flows at the substrate are driven by the jet impact with its subsequent radial spreading, and by the liquid following the motion of the collapsing and rebounding bubble wall. Both flows remove particles. Their relative timing, which depends sensitively on the exact γ, appears to determine the extension of the area with forces large enough to cause particle detachment. (III) At intermediate stand-off, 1.1<γ<1.8, only the second bubble collapse touches the substrate, but acts with cleaning mechanisms similar to an effective small γ collapse: particles are removed by the jet flow and the flow induced by the bubble wall oscillation. Furthermore, the observations reveal that the extent of direct bubble gas phase contact to the solid is partially smaller than the cleaned area, and it is concluded that three-phase contact line motion is not a major cause of particle removal. Finally, we find a relation of cleaning area vs. stand-off γ that deviates from literature data on surface erosion. This indicates that different effects are responsible for particle removal and for substrate damage. It is suggested that a trade-off of cleaning potential and damage risk for sensible surfaces might be achieved by optimising γ. PMID:26187759

  3. Molecular emission from single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B., III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-10-01

    Ultrasound can drive a single gas bubble in water into violent oscillation; as the bubble is compressed periodically, extremely short flashes of light (about 100ps) are generated with clock-like regularity. This process, known as single-bubble sonoluminescence, gives rise to featureless continuum emission in water (from 200 to 800nm, with increasing intensity into the ultraviolet). In contrast, the emission of light from clouds of cavitating bubbles at higher acoustic pressures (multi-bubble sonoluminescence) is dominated by atomic and molecular excited-state emission at much lower temperatures. These observations have spurred intense effort to uncover the origin of sonoluminescence and to generalize the conditions necessary for its creation. Here we report a series of polar aprotic liquids that generate very strong single-bubble sonoluminescence, during which emission from molecular excited states is observed. Previously, single-bubble sonoluminescence from liquids other than water has proved extremely elusive. Our results give direct proof of the existence of chemical reactions and the formation of molecular excited states during single-bubble cavitation, and provide a spectroscopic link between single- and multi-bubble sonoluminescence.

  4. Bubbles, Gating, and Anesthetics in Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk; Nonner, Wolfgang; Eisenberg, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that bubbles are the bistable hydrophobic gates responsible for the on-off transitions of single channel currents. In this view, many types of channels gate by the same physical mechanismdewetting by capillary evaporationbut different types of channels use different sensors to modulate hydrophobic properties of the channel wall and thereby trigger and control bubbles and gating. Spontaneous emptying of channels has been seen in many simulations. Because of the physics involved, such phase transitions are inherently sensitive, unstable threshold phenomena that are difficult to simulate reproducibly and thus convincingly. We present a thermodynamic analysis of a bubble gate using morphometric density functional theory of classical (not quantum) mechanics. Thermodynamic analysis of phase transitions is generally more reproducible and less sensitive to details than simulations. Anesthetic actions of inert gasesand their interactions with hydrostatic pressure (e.g., nitrogen narcosis)can be easily understood by actions on bubbles. A general theory of gas anesthesia may involve bubbles in channels. Only experiments can show whether, or when, or which channels actually use bubbles as hydrophobic gates: direct observation of bubbles in channels is needed. Existing experiments show thin gas layers on hydrophobic surfaces in water and suggest that bubbles nearly exist in bulk water. PMID:18234836

  5. Bubbles, gating, and anesthetics in ion channels.

    PubMed

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk; Nonner, Wolfgang; Eisenberg, Robert E

    2008-06-01

    We suggest that bubbles are the bistable hydrophobic gates responsible for the on-off transitions of single channel currents. In this view, many types of channels gate by the same physical mechanism-dewetting by capillary evaporation-but different types of channels use different sensors to modulate hydrophobic properties of the channel wall and thereby trigger and control bubbles and gating. Spontaneous emptying of channels has been seen in many simulations. Because of the physics involved, such phase transitions are inherently sensitive, unstable threshold phenomena that are difficult to simulate reproducibly and thus convincingly. We present a thermodynamic analysis of a bubble gate using morphometric density functional theory of classical (not quantum) mechanics. Thermodynamic analysis of phase transitions is generally more reproducible and less sensitive to details than simulations. Anesthetic actions of inert gases-and their interactions with hydrostatic pressure (e.g., nitrogen narcosis)-can be easily understood by actions on bubbles. A general theory of gas anesthesia may involve bubbles in channels. Only experiments can show whether, or when, or which channels actually use bubbles as hydrophobic gates: direct observation of bubbles in channels is needed. Existing experiments show thin gas layers on hydrophobic surfaces in water and suggest that bubbles nearly exist in bulk water. PMID:18234836

  6. Enhancing acoustic cavitation using artificial crevice bubbles.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Aaldert; Fernandez Rivas, David; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    We study the response of pre-defined cavitation nuclei driven continuously in the kHz regime (80, 100 and 200 kHz). The nuclei consist of stabilized gaspockets in cylindrical pits of 30 μm diameter etched in silicon or glass substrates. It is found that above an acoustic pressure threshold the dynamics of the liquid-gas meniscus switches from a stable drum-like vibration to expansion and deformation, frequently resulting in detachment of microbubbles. Just above this threshold small bubbles are continuously and intermittently ejected. At elevated input powers bubble detachment becomes more frequent and cavitation bubble clouds are formed and remain in the vicinity of the pit bubble. Surprisingly, the resulting loss of gas does not lead to deactivation of the pit which can be explained by a rectified gas diffusion process. PMID:25455191

  7. Motion of an intravascular axisymmetric bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.

    2003-11-01

    The motion of a gas bubble in an arteriolar blood vessel or microvessel is investigated numerically. An imposed pressure gradient drives blood flow. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically using a front tracking method. Comparative behaviors of bubbles of various ratios (effective diameter/vessel diameter) are ascertained. Effects of vessel size, magnitude of the applied pressure gradient, presence of a soluble surfactant, variations in the values of the density ratio (ρ_g/ρ_l) and viscosity ratio (μ_g/μ_l) on the motion and interfacial shape of the bubble are determined. The results obtained have significance in the study of activation of blood clotting, initiation of inflammation, cellular injury, and adhesion of gas bubbles to the vessel wall occurring in intravascular gas embolism. Supported by NIH R01 HL67986.

  8. Portable gamma-ray holdup and attributes measurements of high- and variable-burnup plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, T.R.; Russo, P.A.; Miller, M.C.; Menlove, H.O. ); Takahashi, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Aoki, I. )

    1991-01-01

    High burnup-plutonium holdup has been assayed quantitatively by low resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The assay was calibrated with four plutonium standards representing a range of fuel burnup and {sup 241}Am content. Selection of a calibration standard based on its qualitative spectral similarity to gamma-ray spectra of the process material is partially responsible for the success of these holdup measurements. The spectral analysis method is based on the determination of net counts in a single spectral region of interest (ROI). However, the low-resolution gamma-ray assay signal for the high-burnup plutonium includes unknown amounts of contamination from {sup 241}Am. For most needs, the range of calibration standards required for this selection procedure is not available. A new low-resolution gamma-ray spectral analysis procedure for assay of {sup 239}Pu has been developed. The procedure uses the calculated isotope activity ratios and the measured net counts in three spectral ROIs to evaluate and remove the {sup 241}Am contamination from the {sup 239}Pu assay signal on a spectrum-by-spectrum basis. The calibration for the new procedure requires only a single plutonium standard. The procedure also provides a measure of the burnup and age attributes of holdup deposits. The new procedure has been demonstrated using portable gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment for a wide range of plutonium standards and has also been applied to the assay of {sup 239}Pu holdup in a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Comparison of steam-generator liquid holdup and core uncovery in two facilities of differing scale

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, F.; Schultz, R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on Run SB-CL-05, a test similar to Semiscale Run S-UT-8. The test results show that the core was uncovered briefly during the accident and that the rods overheated at certain core locations. Liquid holdup on the upflow side of the steam-generator tubes was observed. After the loop seal cleared, the core refilled and the rods cooled. These behaviors were similar to those observed in the Semiscale run. The Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) Run SB-CL-06 is a counterpart test to Semiscale Run S-LH-01. The comparison of the results of both tests shows similar phenomena. The similarity of phenomena in these two facilities build confidence that these results can be expected to occur in a PWR. Similar holdup has now been observed in the 6 tubes of Semiscale and in the 141 tubes of LSTF. It is now more believable that holdup may occur in a full-scale steam generator with 3000 or more tubes. These results confirm the scaling of these phenomena from Semiscale (1/1705) to LSTF (1/48). The TRAC results for SB-CL-05 are in reasonable agreement with the test data. TRAC predicted the core uncovery and resulting rod heatup. The liquid holdup on the upflow side of the steam-generator tubes was also correctly predicted. The clearing of the loop seal allowed core recovery and cooled the overheated rods just as it had in the data. The TRAC analysis results of Run SB-CL-05 are similar to those from Semiscale Run S-UT-8. The ability of the TRAC code to calculate the phenomena equally well in the two experiments of different scales confirms the scalability of the many models in the code that are important in calculating this small break.

  10. Morphology control and mechanisms of CaCO3 crystallization on gas-liquid interfaces of CO2/NH3 bubbles in aqueons-glycine solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaomei; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Jian; Li, Shikuo; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Guo, Degui; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian

    2015-06-01

    As one of the new methods of materials preparing, interface-regulated mineralization, has been developed and used to fabricate the CaCO3 materials with mimetic construction of natural biogenic structures in the present work. Combined with the effect of glycine at different concentrations, novel gas-liquid interfaces of CO2/NH3 bubbles have been substituted for the traditional settled matrix and utilized as new reaction fields of CaCO3. CaCO3 crystals with delicate hierarchical structures and morphologies, such as scallop-shaped, ellipsoidal and spherical structure, have been obtained at the special glycine-mediated gasliquid interfaces. The effect of glycine concentration and the chemical reaction kinetics have been deeply studied. As a result, we have successfully captured in detail the crystallization behaviors of CaCO3 in different stages, which allow us to put forward a general kinetic model to reveal the formation mechanism of CaCO3 and implicate a straightforward mean to control the morphology and structure.

  11. Understanding Peat Bubbles: Biogeochemical-Hydrological Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, M.

    2009-05-01

    Decomposition of organic matter in peatland ecosystems produces gaseous end-products that can accumulate at depth and result in the build up of free-phase gas below the water table. This free-phase gas, or bubbles, reduces hydraulic conductivity, alters hydrologic and chemical gradients, and affects productivity surface vegetation through its role in peat buoyancy. In terms of greenhouse gas dynamics, these bubbles are likely the dominant subsurface stock of methane (CH4) and release of this CH4 to the atmosphere via ebullition may account for a significant portion of total efflux. Despite the importance of entrapped bubbles for peatland ecohydrological function there is still little known about how the quantity of bubbles varies between peatland types and at smaller scales within a peatland. Profiles of bubbles collected from several locations within four peatlands reveal that bubble volume varies significant among peatlands, between microforms and with depth. Previous studies also suggest that ebullition is spatially and temporally variable. This spatial variability may have important impacts on system ecohydrology and should be incorporated in models of peatland hydrology and development. This requires the difficult task of mapping bubble volume in three dimensions and over large areas. The potential for geophysical methods and the use of surface features to address this task will be discussed.

  12. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  13. Study Of Bubble-Count Measurement Of Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Gary M.; Berg, James I.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents study of bubble-count method of measurement of surface or interfacial tension of liquids. In method, gas or liquid pumped at known rate along capillary tube. One end of tube open and immersed in liquid that wets tube. Pumped gas or liquid forms bubbles, detaching themselves from immersed open end of tube, and one measures average period, Pi, for formation and detachment of bubbles.

  14. Daughter bubble cascades produced by folding of ruptured thin films.

    PubMed

    Bird, James C; de Ruiter, Rille; Courbin, Laurent; Stone, Howard A

    2010-06-10

    Thin liquid films, such as soap bubbles, have been studied extensively for over a century because they are easily formed and mediate a wide range of transport processes in physics, chemistry and engineering. When a bubble on a liquid-gas or solid-gas interface (referred to herein as an interfacial bubble) ruptures, the general expectation is that the bubble vanishes. More precisely, the ruptured thin film is expected to retract rapidly until it becomes part of the interface, an event that typically occurs within milliseconds. The assumption that ruptured bubbles vanish is central to theories on foam evolution and relevant to health and climate because bubble rupture is a source for aerosol droplets. Here we show that for a large range of fluid parameters, interfacial bubbles can create numerous small bubbles when they rupture, rather than vanishing. We demonstrate, both experimentally and numerically, that the curved film of the ruptured bubble can fold and entrap air as it retracts. The resulting toroidal geometry of the trapped air is unstable, leading to the creation of a ring of smaller bubbles. The higher pressure associated with the higher curvature of the smaller bubbles increases the absorption of gas into the liquid, and increases the efficiency of rupture-induced aerosol dispersal. PMID:20535206

  15. Analysis of bubble rise using the VOF method. 2: Bubble interactions, wall effects and evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Leonardi, E.; Reizes, J.A.; Garimella, S.V.

    1996-12-31

    The motion of single and multiple gas bubbles in an otherwise stationary liquid contained in a closed, right vertical cylinder is investigated using a modified Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method incorporating surface tension stresses. The theoretical background and the motion of an isolated bubble was considered in a separate paper (Chen et al., 1996) where the initial bubble radius was small compared to that of the cylinder and wall-effects were negligible. In this work, the focus is on the interference effects during the motion of two initially spherical bubbles in a gravitational field, as well as the influence of the container wall on the bubble motion: the initial bubble diameter in the present study is more than half the cylinder diameter. The bubble size is also much larger than that required to satisfy the condition in which the gas can be treated as incompressible. In addition, the effect on bubble motion of the inclusion of evaporation at the gas-liquid interface is considered.

  16. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  17. Phase-Doppler anemometer measurement of bubble concentrations in laboratory-simulated breaking waves

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, W.E.; Farley, P.J.

    1995-04-15

    Breaking waves and the bubble plumes they generate are thought to be an important air-sea gas transfer mechanism. In order to compare bubble populations generated by laboratory-simulated breaking waves and model bubble-mediated air-water gas transfer in a whitecap simulation tank (WST), it was necessary to measure bubble sizes and water velocities. The phase-Doppler anemometer (PDA) is well suited for this research because it provides simultaneous measurement of the size and velocity of a bubble. Bubble concentrations can be estimated from PDA data records with an accuracy of 15% ({+-}1{sigma}) for larger bubbles with radii in the range of 50 to 160 {mu}m and 40% ({+-}1 {sigma}) for larger bubbles. However, estimation of