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Sample records for gas numerical results

  1. Micronozzles: 3D numerical structural and gas dynamics modeling, fabrication, and preliminary experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, Alexei I.; Pyatishev, Evgenij N.; Lurie, Mihail S.; Korshunov, Andrey V.; Akulshin, Y. D.; Dolganov, A. G.; Sabadash, V. O.

    2001-02-01

    The tiny engines, founded on the principle of reactive thrust, are one of most perspective actuators developed by modern micromechanics. These engines can be applied for such apparent problems, as orientation and stabilization of small space objects, but also as local or distributed reactive thrust of new phylum of aerospace objects, for control of boundary layer of flying objects and in series of converting power devices of different purposes. Distinctive features of jet tiny engines are profitability (very large thrust-to-weight ratio) and high (milliseconds) response, which makes them to irreplaceable elements in control systems and, specially, in distributed power generations. These features are provided the minimum sizes, high pressure in working chambers and hypersonic velocity of propulsive jet. Topologically micronozzles are designed as the flat batch devices (3 layers as minimum). The lower and upper layers make flat walls of the nozzle and mainly influence on strength properties of the device. The mean layer reshapes geometry and determines gas dynamic characteristic of the nozzle. A special problem is the opening-up of the combustion-mixture, which is not esteemed in this work. It is necessary to allow for effect of considerable local stresses arising at the expense of static and dynamic loading at design of the jet tiny engines. Thermal gas dynamic processes in the chamber and nozzle determine the values and nature of these stresses, which are hardly studied for the microdevices. The priority is mathematical and experimental simulation of these processes. The most suitable object for initial phase of experimental simulation is the 'cold' engine. The demanded chamber static pressure is formed by external compressed air. In Laboratory of Microtechnology and MicroElectroMechanical Systems a number of such tiny engines with different shapes of the chamber's and the nozzles' surfaces were designed, made and tested. The engines were produced from photosensing

  2. Micronozzles: 3D numerical structural and gas dynamics modeling, fabrication, and preliminary experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, Alexei I.; Pyatishev, Evgenij N.; Lurie, Mihail S.; Korshunov, Andrey V.; Akulshin, Y. D.; Dolganov, A. G.; Sabadash, V. O.

    2000-02-01

    The tiny engines, founded on the principle of reactive thrust, are one of most perspective actuators developed by modern micromechanics. These engines can be applied for such apparent problems, as orientation and stabilization of small space objects, but also as local or distributed reactive thrust of new phylum of aerospace objects, for control of boundary layer of flying objects and in series of converting power devices of different purposes. Distinctive features of jet tiny engines are profitability (very large thrust-to-weight ratio) and high (milliseconds) response, which makes them to irreplaceable elements in control systems and, specially, in distributed power generations. These features are provided the minimum sizes, high pressure in working chambers and hypersonic velocity of propulsive jet. Topologically micronozzles are designed as the flat batch devices (3 layers as minimum). The lower and upper layers make flat walls of the nozzle and mainly influence on strength properties of the device. The mean layer reshapes geometry and determines gas dynamic characteristic of the nozzle. A special problem is the opening-up of the combustion-mixture, which is not esteemed in this work. It is necessary to allow for effect of considerable local stresses arising at the expense of static and dynamic loading at design of the jet tiny engines. Thermal gas dynamic processes in the chamber and nozzle determine the values and nature of these stresses, which are hardly studied for the microdevices. The priority is mathematical and experimental simulation of these processes. The most suitable object for initial phase of experimental simulation is the 'cold' engine. The demanded chamber static pressure is formed by external compressed air. In Laboratory of Microtechnology and MicroElectroMechanical Systems a number of such tiny engines with different shapes of the chamber's and the nozzles' surfaces were designed, made and tested. The engines were produced from photosensing

  3. Effects of turbulent viscosity on a rotating gas ring around a black hole: Results of numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, K.; Chang, H.-K.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the time evolution of a rotationally axisymmetric gas ring around a non rotating black hole using two dimensional grid-based hydrodynamics simulations. We show the way in which angular momentum transport is included in simulations of non-selfgravitating accretion of matter towards a black hole. We use the Shakura-Sunyaev α viscosity prescription to estimate the turbulent viscosity for all major viscous stress tensors. We investigate how a gas ring which is initially assumed to rotate with Keplerian angular velocity is accreted onto a black hole and hence forms an accretion disc in the presence of turbulent viscosity. We show that a centrifugally pressure supported sub-Keplerian flow with shocks forms when the ring starts to disperse with inclusion of relatively small amount of viscosity. But, if the viscosity is above the critical value, the shock disappears altogether and the whole disc becomes Keplerian which is subsonic everywhere except in a region close to the horizon, where it supersonically enters to the black hole. We discovered a multiple valued Mach number solution and the corresponding density distributions that connect matter (a) from the initial Keplerian gas ring to a sub-Keplerian disc with shocks in presence of small amount of viscosity and (b) from the sub-Keplerian flow to a Keplerian disc in presence of huge amount of viscosity. We calculate the temporal variations of the magnitude of various time scales which ensure us about the stability of the flow.

  4. Very high temperature laminar flow of a gas through the entrance region of a cooled tube - Numerical calculations and experimental results.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    The laminar flow equations in differential form are solved numerically on a digital computer for flow of a very high temperature gas through the entrance region of an externally cooled tube. The solution method is described and calculations are carried out in conjunction with experimental measurements. The agreement with experiment is good, with the result indicating relatively large energy and momentum losses in the highly cooled flows considered where the pressure is nearly uniform along the flow and the core flow becomes non-adiabatic a few diameters downstream of the inlet. The effects of a large range of Reynolds number and Mach number (viscous dissipation) are also investigated.

  5. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  6. Numerical evaluation of gas core length in free surface vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofano, L.; Nobili, M.; Caruso, G.

    2014-11-01

    The formation and evolution of free surface vortices represent an important topic in many hydraulic intakes, since strong whirlpools introduce swirl flow at the intake, and could cause entrainment of floating matters and gas. In particular, gas entrainment phenomena are an important safety issue for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors, because the introduction of gas bubbles within the core causes dangerous reactivity fluctuation. In this paper, a numerical evaluation of the gas core length in free surface vortices is presented, according to two different approaches. In the first one, a prediction method, developed by the Japanese researcher Sakai and his team, has been applied. This method is based on the Burgers vortex model, and it is able to estimate the gas core length of a free surface vortex starting from two parameters calculated with single-phase CFD simulations. The two parameters are the circulation and the downward velocity gradient. The other approach consists in performing a two-phase CFD simulation of a free surface vortex, in order to numerically reproduce the gas- liquid interface deformation. Mapped convergent mesh is used to reduce numerical error and a VOF (Volume Of Fluid) method was selected to track the gas-liquid interface. Two different turbulence models have been tested and analyzed. Experimental measurements of free surface vortices gas core length have been executed, using optical methods, and numerical results have been compared with experimental measurements. The computational domain and the boundary conditions of the CFD simulations were set consistently with the experimental test conditions.

  7. Numerical taxonomy on data: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Farach, M.

    1997-12-01

    The numerical taxonomy problems associated with most of the optimization criteria described above are NP - hard [3, 5, 1, 4]. In, the first positive result for numerical taxonomy was presented. They showed that if e is the distance to the closest tree metric under the L{sub {infinity}} norm. i.e., e = min{sub T} [L{sub {infinity}} (T-D)], then it is possible to construct a tree T such that L{sub {infinity}} (T-D) {le} 3e, that is, they gave a 3-approximation algorithm for this problem. We will refer to this algorithm as the Single Pivot (SP) heuristic.

  8. Numerical modeling of the gas lift process in gas lift wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirbekov, N. M.; Turarov, A. K.; Baigereyev, D. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, one-dimensional and two-dimensional axisymmetric motion of gas, liquid and a gas-liquid mixture in a gas-lift well is studied. Numerical simulation of the one-dimensional model of gas-lift process is considered where the movement in a gas-lift well is described by partial differential equations of hyperbolic type. Difference schemes for the gas-lift model of the process are developed on a nonuniform grid condensing in subdomains with big gradients of the solution. The results of the proposed algorithm are illustrated on the example of a real well.

  9. Numerical analysis of a microwave torch with axial gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kulumbaev, E. B.; Lelevkin, V. M.

    2013-07-15

    The characteristics of a microwave discharge in an argon jet injected axially into a coaxial channel with a shortened inner electrode are numerically analyzed using a self-consistent equilibrium gas-dynamic model. The specific features of the excitation and maintenance of the microwave discharge are determined, and the dependences of the discharge characteristics on the supplied electromagnetic power and gas flow rate are obtained. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

  10. Numerical simulation of synthesis gas incineration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, A. V.; Khaustov, S. A.; Tabakaev, R. B.; Belousova, Y. A.

    2016-04-01

    The authors have analysed the expediency of the suggested low-grade fuels application method. Thermal processing of solid raw materials in the gaseous fuel, called synthesis gas, is investigated. The technical challenges concerning the applicability of the existing gas equipment developed and extensively tested exclusively for natural gas were considered. For this purpose computer simulation of three-dimensional syngas-incinerating flame dynamics was performed by means of the ANSYS Multiphysics engineering software. The subjects of studying were: a three-dimensional aerodynamic flame structure, heat-release and temperature fields, a set of combustion properties: a flare range and the concentration distribution of burnout reagents. The obtained results were presented in the form of a time-averaged pathlines with color indexing. The obtained results can be used for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of complex multicomponent gas incineration singularities.

  11. Numerical simulations of catastrophic disruption: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.; Ryan, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to study high velocity two-body impacts. In this paper, a two-dimensional Largrangian finite difference hydro-code and a three-dimensional smooth particle hydro-code (SPH) are described and initial results reported. These codes can be, and have been, used to make specific predictions about particular objects in our solar system. But more significantly, they allow us to explore a broad range of collisional events. Certain parameters (size, time) can be studied only over a very restricted range within the laboratory; other parameters (initial spin, low gravity, exotic structure or composition) are difficult to study at all experimentally. The outcomes of numerical simulations lead to a more general and accurate understanding of impacts in their many forms.

  12. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL GAS-SWIRL BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2005-03-01

    A numerical simulation of a turbulent natural gas jet diffusion flame at a Reynolds number of 9000 in a swirling air stream is presented. The numerical computations were carried out using the commercially available software package CFDRC. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The thermal, composition, flow (velocity), as well as stream function fields for both the baseline and air-swirling flames were numerically simulated in the near-burner region, where most of the mixing and reactions occur. The results were useful to interpret the effects of swirl in enhancing the mixing rates in the combustion zone as well as in stabilizing the flame. The results showed the generation of two recirculating regimes induced by the swirling air stream, which account for such effects. The present investigation will be used as a benchmark study of swirl flow combustion analysis as a step in developing an enhanced swirl-cascade burner technology.

  13. Numerical simulation of turbulent gas flames in tubes.

    PubMed

    Salzano, E; Marra, F S; Russo, G; Lee, J H S

    2002-12-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is an emerging technique to predict possible consequences of gas explosion and it is often considered a powerful and accurate tool to obtain detailed results. However, systematic analyses of the reliability of this approach to real-scale industrial configurations are still needed. Furthermore, few experimental data are available for comparison and validation. In this work, a set of well documented experimental data related to the flame acceleration obtained within obstacle-filled tubes filled with flammable gas-air mixtures, has been simulated. In these experiments, terminal steady flame speeds corresponding to different propagation regimes were observed, thus, allowing a clear and prompt characterisation of the numerical results with respect to numerical parameters, as grid definition, geometrical parameters, as blockage ratio and to mixture parameters, as mixture reactivity. The CFD code AutoReagas was used for the simulations. Numerical predictions were compared with available experimental data and some insights into the code accuracy were determined. Computational results are satisfactory for the relatively slower turbulent deflagration regimes and became fair when choking regime is observed, whereas transition to quasi-detonation or Chapman-Jogouet (CJ) were never predicted. PMID:12423940

  14. Numerical stability in multifluid gas dynamics with implicit drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, J. D.; Chang, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    The numerical stability of a conventional explicit numerical scheme for solving the inviscid multifluid dynamical equations describing a multicomponent gas mixture is investigated both analytically and computationally. Although these equations do not explicitly contain diffusion terms, it is well known that they reduce to a single-fluid diffusional description when the drag coefficients in the species momentum equations are large. The question then arises as to whether their numerical solution is subject to a diffusional stability restriction on the time step in addition to the usual Courant sound-speed stability condition. An analytical stability analysis is performed for the special case of a quiescent binary gas mixture with equal sound speeds and temperatures. It is found that the Courant condition is always sufficient to ensure stability, so that no additional diffusional stability restriction arises for any value of the drag coefficient, however large. This result is confirmed by one-dimensional computational results for binary and ternary mixtures with unequal sound speeds, which remain stable even when the time step exceeds the usual diffusional limit by factors of order 100.

  15. Saturn's North Polar Hexagon Numerical Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Juberias, R.; Sayanagi, K. M.; Dowling, T. E.

    2008-12-01

    In 1980, Voyager images revealed the presence of a circumpolar wave at 78 degrees planetographic latitude in the northern hemisphere of Saturn. It was notable for having a dominant planetary wavenumber-six zonal mode, and for being stationary with respect to Saturn's Kilometric Radiation rotation rate measured by Voyager. The center of this hexagonal feature was coincident with the center of a sharp eastward jet with a peak speed of 100 ms-1 and it had a meridional width of about 4 degrees. This hexagonal feature was confirmed in 1991 through ground-based observations, and it was observed again in 2006 with the Cassini VIMS instrument. The latest observations highlight the longevity of the hexagon and suggest that it extends at least several bars deep into the atmosphere. We use the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Code (EPIC) to perform high-resolution numerical simulations of this unique feature. We show that a wavenumber six instability mode arises naturally from initially barotropic jets when seeded with weak random turbulence. We also discuss the properties of the wave activity on the background vertical stability, zonal wind, planetary rotation rate and adjacent vortices. Computational resources were provided by the New Mexico Computing Applications Center and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the Comparative Planetology Laboratory at the University of Louisville.

  16. Numerical simulations of compressively driven interstellar turbulence. I. Isothermal gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Federrath, C.; Hupp, M.; Kern, S.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Supersonic turbulence is ubiquitous in the interstellar medium and plays an important role in contemporary star formation. Aims: We performed high-resolution numerical simulations of supersonic isothermal turbulence driven by compressive large-scale forcing and analyse various statistical properties. Methods: The compressible Euler equations with an external stochastic force field dominated by rotation-free modes are solved with the piecewise parabolic method. Both a static grid and adaptive mesh refinement is used with an effective resolution N=7683. Results: After a transient phase dominated by shocks, turbulence evolves into a steady state with root mean square Mach number ≈2.5, in which cloud-like structures of over-dense gas are surrounded by highly rarefied gas. The index of the turbulence energy spectrum function is β≈ 2.0 in the shock-dominated phase. As the flow approaches statistical equilibrium, the spectrum flattens, with β≈ 1.9. For the scaling exponent of the root mean square velocity fluctuation, we obtain γ≈ 0.43 from the velocity structure functions of second order. These results are well within the range of observed scaling properties for the velocity dispersion in molecular clouds. Calculating structure functions of order p=1,ldots,5, we find significant deviations from the Kolmogorov-Burgers model proposed by Boldyrev for all scaling exponents. Our results are very well described by a general log-Poisson model with a higher degree of intermittency, which implies an influence by the forcing on the scaling properties. The spectral index of the quadratic logarithmic density fluctuation is βδ≈ 1.8. In contrast to previous numerical results for isothermal turbulence, we obtain a skewed probability density function of the mass density fluctuations that is not consistent with log-normal statistics and entails a substantially higher fraction of mass in the density peaks than implied by the Padoan-Nordlund relation between the

  17. A novel gas-droplet numerical method for spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Jiang, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a non-iterative numerical technique for computing time-dependent gas-droplet flows. The method is a fully-interacting combination of Eulerian fluid and Lagrangian particle calculation. The interaction calculations between the two phases are formulated on a pressure-velocity coupling procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. This procedure eliminates the global iterations required in the conventional particle-source-in-cell (PSIC) procedure. Turbulent dispersion calculations are treated by a stochastic procedure. Numerical calculations and comparisons with available experimental data, as well as efficiency assessments are given for some sprays typical of spray combustion applications.

  18. Gas hydrate dynamics in heterogeneous media - challenges for numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwicz, Ewa; Ruepke, Lars; Wallmann, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    Gas hydrates are ice-like crystalline cage structures containing various greenhouse gases, such as methane or CO2, which are locked within their spatial structure. Gas hydrate distribution in oceanic settings is mainly controlled by three factors: 1) low temperature regimes, 2) high pressure regimes, and 3) presence of biodegradable organic matter. Due to their composition, hydrates are vulnerable to temperature, pressure, and, to a smaller degree, salinity changes. The occurrence of gas hydrates in marine sediments was discovered mainly along continental margins (slope and rise) where water depths exceed 400 m and the bottom water temperatures are small enough to sustain their presence. The amount of gas hydrates present in marine sediments on a global scale is still under debate. Several numerical models of a different complexity have been developed to estimate the potential amount of clathrates locked world-wide within marine sediments. The range of estimates starts from 500 Gt up to 57,000 Gt of methane carbon which implies a variation of several orders of magnitude. It has been already established that current climate changes are triggering some of the methane releases around the world. Prominent gas hydrate occurrence zones, such as Blake Ridge, can provide important information of the scale of potential hazards and help to predict a future impact of such events. Blake Ridge is a well investigated gas hydrate province containing a large amount of a locked methane gas. With the new numerical multiphase model we have been investigating 1) the potential risk of gas hydrate destabilization caused by several environmental factors (e.g. bottom water temperature rise, sea-level variations), 2) the effect of changing sedimentation regimes to the total amount of gas hydrate, 3) dynamics of hydrate formation in heterogeneous sediment layers, and 4) the impact of dynamic compaction on fluid and gas flow regimes. The model contains four phases (solid porous matrix, pore

  19. Numerical results for the WFNDEC 2012 eddy current benchmark problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoulidis, T. P.; Martinos, J.; Poulakis, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present numerical results for the World Federation of NDE Centers (WFNDEC) 2012 eddy current benchmark problem obtained with a commercial FEM package (Comsol Multiphysics). The measurements of the benchmark problem consist of coil impedance values acquired when an inspection probe coil is moved inside an Inconel tube along an axial through-wall notch. The simulation runs smoothly with minimal user interference (default settings used for mesh and solver) and agreement between numerical and experimental results is excellent for all five inspection frequencies. Comments are made for the pros and cons of FEM and also some good practice rules are presented when using such numerical tools.

  20. Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2000-09-20

    This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

  1. Sheet Hydroforming Process Numerical Model Improvement Through Experimental Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Papadia; Antonio, Del Prete; Alfredo, Anglani

    2010-06-01

    The increasing application of numerical simulation in metal forming field has helped engineers to solve problems one after another to manufacture a qualified formed product reducing the required time [1]. Accurate simulation results are fundamental for the tooling and the product designs. The wide application of numerical simulation is encouraging the development of highly accurate simulation procedures to meet industrial requirements. Many factors can influence the final simulation results and many studies have been carried out about materials [2], yield criteria [3] and plastic deformation [4,5], process parameters [6] and their optimization. In order to develop a reliable hydromechanical deep drawing (HDD) numerical model the authors have been worked out specific activities based on the evaluation of the effective stiffness of the blankholder structure [7]. In this paper after an appropriate tuning phase of the blankholder force distribution, the experimental activity has been taken into account to improve the accuracy of the numerical model. In the first phase, the effective capability of the blankholder structure to transfer the applied load given by hydraulic actuators to the blank has been explored. This phase ended with the definition of an appropriate subdivision of the blankholder active surface in order to take into account the effective pressure map obtained for the given loads configuration. In the second phase the numerical results obtained with the developed subdivision have been compared with the experimental data of the studied model. The numerical model has been then improved, finding the best solution for the blankholder force distribution.

  2. An experimental and numerical study of shock interaction with a gas column seeded with droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M.; Vorobieff, P.; Truman, C. R.; Corbin, C.; Kuehner, G.; Wayne, P.; Conroy, J.; White, R.; Kumar, S.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents an experimental and numerical consideration of the flow developing after a planar shock wave accelerates a cylindrical column of heavy gas seeded with glycol droplets and surrounded by lighter unseeded gas. Special consideration is given to the formation of the gas column, and it is shown that careful modeling of the initial conditions and the tracer behavior is required to accurately match experimental results. Numerical analysis of the instability formation was performed using the Eulerian hydrodynamics code SHAMRC (second-order hydrodynamic automatic mesh refinement code), while the commercial CFD code FLUENT was used to model the formation of the initial conditions used in experiments. Experimental images and numerical results are presented for Mach numbers ranging from 1.2 to 2.1.

  3. Gas-kinetic numerical studies of three-dimensional complex flows on spacecraft re-entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Han-Xin

    2009-03-01

    The gas-kinetic numerical algorithm solving the Boltzmann model equation is extended and developed to study the three-dimensional hypersonic flows of spacecraft re-entry into the atmosphere in perfect gas. In this study, the simplified velocity distribution function equation for various flow regimes is presented on the basis of the kinetic Boltzmann-Shakhov model. The discrete velocity ordinate technique and numerical quadrature methods, such as the Gauss quadrature formulas with the weight function 2/ π1/2exp(- V2) and the Gauss-Legendre numerical quadrature rule, are studied to resolve the barrier in simulating complex flows from low Mach numbers to hypersonic problems. Specially, the gas-kinetic finite-difference scheme is constructed for the computation of three-dimensional flow problems, which directly captures the time evolution of the molecular velocity distribution function. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function. The HPF (high performance fortran) parallel implementation technique for the gas-kinetic numerical method is developed and applied to study the hypersonic flows around three-dimensional complex bodies. The main purpose of the current research is to provide a way to extend the gas-kinetic numerical algorithm to the flow computation of three-dimensional complex hypersonic problems with high Mach numbers. To verify the current method and simulate gas transport phenomena covering various flow regimes, the three-dimensional hypersonic flows around sphere and spacecraft shape with different Knudsen numbers and Mach numbers are studied by HPF parallel computing. Excellent results have been obtained for all examples computed.

  4. Numerical Study of Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustor Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song-Lin

    2002-01-01

    To further reduce pollutant emissions, such as CO, NO(x), UHCs, etc., in the next few decades, innovative concepts of gas turbine combustors must be developed. Several concepts, such as the LIPP (Lean- Premixed- Prevaporized), RQL (Rich-Burn Quick-Quench Lean-Burn), and LDI (Lean-Direct-Injection), have been under study for many years. To fully realize the potential of these concepts, several improvements, such as inlet geometry, air swirler, aerothermochemistry control, fuel preparation, fuel injection and injector design, etc., must be made, which can be studied through the experimental method and/or the numerical technique. The purpose of this proposal is to use the CFD technique to study, and hence, to guide the design process for low emission gas turbine combustors. A total of 13 technical papers have been (or will be) published.

  5. Preliminary numerical analysis of improved gas chromatograph model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for the gas chromatograph was developed which incorporates the heretofore neglected transport mechanisms of intraparticle diffusion and rates of adsorption. Because a closed-form analytical solution to the model does not appear realizable, techniques for the numerical solution of the model equations are being investigated. Criteria were developed for using a finite terminal boundary condition in place of an infinite boundary condition used in analytical solution techniques. The class of weighted residual methods known as orthogonal collocation is presently being investigated and appears promising.

  6. Spurious frequencies as a result of numerical boundary treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, Saul; Gottlieb, David

    1990-01-01

    The stability theory for finite difference Initial Boundary-Value approximations to systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations states that the exclusion of eigenvalues and generalized eigenvalues is a sufficient condition for stability. The theory, however, does not discuss the nature of numerical approximations in the presence of such eigenvalues. In fact, as was shown previously, for the problem of vortex shedding by a 2-D cylinder in subsonic flow, stating boundary conditions in terms of the primitive (non-characteristic) variables may lead to such eigenvalues, causing perturbations that decay slowly in space and remain periodic time. Characteristic formulation of the boundary conditions avoided this problem. A more systematic study of the behavior of the (linearized) one-dimensional gas dynamic equations under various sets of oscillation-inducing legal boundary conditions is reported.

  7. A numerical model for gas-droplet flow application to liquid spray and cooling towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinacht, P.; Buchlin, J. M.

    1982-07-01

    A two dimensional model consisting of coupled sets of equations governing the gas and liquid phases is presented. Modeling the gas phase as a continuum allows use of the Navier-Stokes equations with momentum source terms included. The particle-gas momentum exchange and the influence of the gas flow on the droplet trajectories results in a coupling of both of these sets of equations. Numerical solution of these equations is made in an iterative fashion by solving first the liquid phase equations and then the gas phase equations until a steady state solution is reached. Solution of the liquid phase equations by a fourth order Runge-Kutta method allows subsequent determination of the droplet-gas momentum exchange field. The degrading effect of wind on a spray curtain is demonstrated, though calculations show that curtain performance can be improved by tilting the nozzle into the wind.

  8. Numerical Investigation of Hot Gas Ingestion by STOVL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanka, S. P.

    1998-01-01

    This report compiles the various research activities conducted under the auspices of the NASA Grant NAG3-1026, "Numerical Investigation of Hot Gas Ingestion by STOVL Aircraft" during the period of April 1989 to April 1994. The effort involved the development of multigrid based algorithms and computer programs for the calculation of the flow and temperature fields generated by Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft, while hovering in ground proximity. Of particular importance has been the interaction of the exhaust jets with the head wind which gives rise to the hot gas ingestion process. The objective of new STOVL designs to reduce the temperature of the gases ingested into the engine. The present work describes a solution algorithm for the multi-dimensional elliptic partial-differential equations governing fluid flow and heat transfer in general curvilinear coordinates. The solution algorithm is based on the multigrid technique which obtains rapid convergence of the iterative numerical procedure for the discrete equations. Initial efforts were concerned with the solution of the Cartesian form of the equations. This algorithm was applied to a simulated STOVL configuration in rectangular coordinates. In the next phase of the work, a computer code for general curvilinear coordinates was constructed. This was applied to model STOVL geometries on curvilinear grids. The code was also validated in model problems. In all these efforts, the standard k-Epsilon model was used.

  9. Numerical Study of Gas-Phase Flow in a Cyclone Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ya-Ping; Qu, Biao; Huang, Shan; Niu, Xiao-Dong

    2016-06-01

    To investigate separation efficiency of a cyclone separator at different operating parameters, in this paper we use Fluent software to numerically study the three dimensional gas-solid two-phase flows in the cyclone separator. The present work mainly consists four parts. Firstly we investigates the accuracy of different turbulent models including the standard k-ɛ model, RNG k-ɛ model, Realizable k-ɛ model and Reynolds stress equation model (RSM), and finds that the RSM turbulence model gives a good comparison between the numerical results and the experimental results. Secondly, the gas phase flow rate, pressure, and turbulent distribution in the cyclone separator are explored numerically in detail with the RSM model. Thirdly, on the base of the gas flow results, gas-solid two phase flows in the cyclone separator are studied by coupling the random trajectory model in the Lagrangian coordinates so that the particle trajectories in separator are displayed. Finally, effects of particle size and velocity at the cyclone separator inlet on the separation efficiency are analyzed. Numerical results show that when the particle velocity is higher and particle size is larger at the inlet, the separation efficiency is better. However, when the particle velocity and size approach their threshold values, the separation efficiency will not change.

  10. Numerical study of the unitary Fermi gas across the superfluid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulko, Olga; Wingate, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    We present results from Monte Carlo calculations investigating the properties of the homogeneous, spin-balanced unitary Fermi gas in three dimensions. The temperature is varied across the superfluid transition allowing us to determine the temperature dependence of the chemical potential, the energy per particle, and the contact density. Numerical artifacts due to finite volume and discretization are systematically studied, estimated, and reduced.

  11. Study on Applicability of Numerical Simulation to Evaluation of Gas Entrainment From Free Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kei Ito; Takaaki Sakai; Hiroyuki Ohshima

    2006-07-01

    An onset condition of gas entrainment (GE) due to free surface vortex has been studied to establish a design of fast breeder reactor with higher coolant velocity than conventional designs, because the GE might cause the reactor operation instability and therefore should be avoided. The onset condition of the GE has been investigated experimentally and theoretically, however, dependency of the vortex type GE on local geometry configuration of each experimental system and local velocity distribution has prevented researchers from formulating the universal onset condition of the vortex type GE. A real scale test is considered as an accurate method to evaluate the occurrence of the vortex type GE, but the real scale test is generally expensive and not useful in the design study of large and complicated FBR systems, because frequent displacement of inner equipments accompanied by the design change is difficult in the real scale test. Numerical simulation seems to be promising method as an alternative to the real scale test. In this research, to evaluate the applicability of the numerical simulation to the design work, numerical simulations were conducted on the basic experimental system of the vortex type GE. This basic experiment consisted of rectangular flow channel and two important equipments for vortex type GE in the channel, i.e. vortex generation and suction equipments. Generated vortex grew rapidly interacting with the suction flow and the grown vortex formed a free surface dent (gas core). When the tip of the gas core or the bubbles detached from the tip of the gas core reached the suction mouth, the gas was entrained to the suction tube. The results of numerical simulation under the experimental conditions were compared to the experiment in terms of velocity distributions and free surface shape. As a result, the numerical simulation showed qualitatively good agreement with experimental data. The numerical simulation results were similar to the experimental

  12. Numerical evidence of gas hydrate detection by means of electroseismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyserman, Fabio I.; Gauzellino, Patricia M.; Santos, Juan E.

    2012-11-01

    This work presents numerical evidence that methane hydrate-bearing sediments located below permafrost can be detected using electroseismics as a prospecting tool. The numerically solved equations are the ones developed by Pride; we modified them by using an extended Biot formulation to appropriately deal with a composite (rock-ice/rock-methane hydrate) solid matrix. We modeled the subsurface as a two dimensional medium, and we used electromagnetic sources to give rise to the so called SHTE and PSVTM modes. The obtained results show that the seismic response is sensitive to the methane hydrate concentration.

  13. Some theoretical and numerical results for delayed neural field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Grégory; Faugeras, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we study neural field models with delays which define a useful framework for modeling macroscopic parts of the cortex involving several populations of neurons. Nonlinear delayed integro-differential equations describe the spatio-temporal behavior of these fields. Using methods from the theory of delay differential equations, we show the existence and uniqueness of a solution of these equations. A Lyapunov analysis gives us sufficient conditions for the solutions to be asymptotically stable. We also present a fairly detailed study of the numerical computation of these solutions. This is, to our knowledge, the first time that a serious analysis of the problem of the existence and uniqueness of a solution of these equations has been performed. Another original contribution of ours is the definition of a Lyapunov functional and the result of stability it implies. We illustrate our numerical schemes on a variety of examples that are relevant to modeling in neuroscience.

  14. Integrating Numerical Groundwater Modeling Results With Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, M. S.; Robinson, B. A.; Linger, S. P.

    2001-12-01

    Many different types of data are used to create numerical models of flow and transport of groundwater in the vadose zone. Results from water balance studies, infiltration models, hydrologic properties, and digital elevation models (DEMs) are examples of such data. Because input data comes in a variety of formats, for consistency the data need to be assembled in a coherent fashion on a single platform. Through the use of a geographic information system (GIS), all data sources can effectively be integrated on one platform to store, retrieve, query, and display data. In our vadoze zone modeling studies in support of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environmental Restoration Project, we employ a GIS comprised of a Raid storage device, an Oracle database, ESRI's spatial database engine (SDE), ArcView GIS, and custom GIS tools for three-dimensional (3D) analysis. We store traditional GIS data, such as, contours, historical building footprints, and study area locations, as points, lines, and polygons with attributes. Numerical flow and transport model results from the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM) are stored as points with attributes, such as fluid saturation, or pressure, or contaminant concentration at a given location. We overlay traditional types of GIS data with numerical model results, thereby allowing us to better build conceptual models and perform spatial analyses. We have also developed specialized analysis tools to assist in the data and model analysis process. This approach provides an integrated framework for performing tasks such as comparing the model to data and understanding the relationship of model predictions to existing contaminant source locations and water supply wells. Our process of integrating GIS and numerical modeling results allows us to answer a wide variety of questions about our conceptual model design: - Which set of locations should be identified as contaminant sources based on known historical building operations

  15. Secondary Vortex Formation in Bifurcated Submerged Entry Nozzles: Numerical Simulation of Gas Bubble Entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirker, Stefan; Kahrimanovic, Damir; Schneiderbauer, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The submerged entry nozzle (SEN) flow behavior is crucial for continuous casting of slab steel since it controls the mold flow pattern. In this study, we focus on the bottom zone of a bifurcated SEN where the flow deflection determines the port outflow. By applying a hybrid finite volume and lattice Boltzmann-based turbulence model, the dynamic behavior of horizontally orientated secondary vortices is investigated. In addition to the pure liquid metal flow, gas bubbles are traced in both discrete and continuous way. Simulation results indicate the existence of highly turbulent secondary vortices in the deflection zone of a bifurcated SEN, which attract gas bubbles in form of bubble threads or continuous gas volumes at their rotational axes. In addition, cyclically detaching gas volumes are formed at the upper port region at higher gas flow rates. Numerical predictions agree well with observations from physical water-air models.

  16. Numerical Study of Transmission Loss Through a Slow Gas Layer Adjacent to a Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Beck, Benjamin S.; Slagle, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic numerical investigation of the sound transmission loss through a multilayer system consisting of a bagged gas and lightweight panel. The goal of the study is to better understand the effect of the gas on transmission loss and determine whether a gas with a slow speed of sound is beneficial for noise control applications. As part of the study, the density and speed of sound of the gas are varied independently to assess the impact of each on transmission loss. Results show that near grazing incidence the plane wave transmission loss through the multilayer system is more sensitive to the speed of sound than the density of the gas. In addition, it was found that a slow wave speed in the bagged gas provides more low-frequency transmission loss benefit than a fast wave speed. At low angles of incidence, close to the plate normal, the benefit is due to the reduction of the characteristic impedance of the gas. At high angles of incidence, the benefit is attributed to the fact that the incident waves at the air/gas interface are bent towards the surface normal. Since transmission loss is angle dependent, refraction in the slow gas layer results in a significant improvement in the transmission loss at high angles of incidence.

  17. Numerical modeling of gas-liquid flows in mini- and microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzei, D. V.; Minakov, A. V.; Pryazhnikov, M. I.; Dekterev, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of testing a methodology for calculating two-phase flows in mini- and microchannels. The numerical methodology is based on the known fluid-in-cell method (VOF method) and the CSF procedure to account for surface tension forces. Solutions of several test problems of two-phase flow in microchannels, including the water-oil emulsion flow and gas-liquid flow in microchannels of the T-type and the stationary slug flow in a circular minichannel, were considered with the aid of this technique. Comparisons of numerical results with experimental data were carried out. A good agreement between the results was obtained.

  18. PolyPole-1: An accurate numerical algorithm for intra-granular fission gas release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocri, D.; Rabiti, C.; Luzzi, L.; Barani, T.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pastore, G.

    2016-09-01

    The transport of fission gas from within the fuel grains to the grain boundaries (intra-granular fission gas release) is a fundamental controlling mechanism of fission gas release and gaseous swelling in nuclear fuel. Hence, accurate numerical solution of the corresponding mathematical problem needs to be included in fission gas behaviour models used in fuel performance codes. Under the assumption of equilibrium between trapping and resolution, the process can be described mathematically by a single diffusion equation for the gas atom concentration in a grain. In this paper, we propose a new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the fission gas diffusion equation in time-varying conditions. The PolyPole-1 algorithm is based on the analytic modal solution of the diffusion equation for constant conditions, combined with polynomial corrective terms that embody the information on the deviation from constant conditions. The new algorithm is verified by comparing the results to a finite difference solution over a large number of randomly generated operation histories. Furthermore, comparison to state-of-the-art algorithms used in fuel performance codes demonstrates that the accuracy of PolyPole-1 is superior to other algorithms, with similar computational effort. Finally, the concept of PolyPole-1 may be extended to the solution of the general problem of intra-granular fission gas diffusion during non-equilibrium trapping and resolution, which will be the subject of future work.

  19. Numerical studies of gas composition differentiation during gas hydrate formation: An application to the IODP site 1327

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuncheng, C.; Chen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Structure I methane hydrate is the most common type found in nature. Structure I gas hydrate has two types of cages that gas molecules may be hosted. Because the larger cavities filled with ethane would be more stable than those filled by methane (Sloan and Koh, 2008), the larger cavities preferentially enclose ethane during the formation of gas hydrate, which results gas composition differentiation during gas hydrate formation. Based on the principle of gas composition differentiation, we establish a numerical model for the gas composition differentiation between methane and ethane during gas hydrate accumulation and applied the model to IODP site 1327. The simulation shows that the gas composition differentiation only occurs at the interval where gas hydrate presents. The lowest methane/ethane (C1/C2) point indicates the bottom of hydrate zone, and the composition differentiation produces the upward increase of C1/C2 within the gas hydrate zone. The C1/C2 reaches the largest value at the top occurrence of gas hydrate and keeps relative stable above the top occurrence of gas hydrate. The top and bottom occurrence of gas hydrate indicated by the inflection points of the C1/C2 profile are similar to those indicated by the negative anomalies of measured chloride concentrations (Riedel et al., 2006). By comparing with the measured C1/C2, the differentiation coefficient (kh=Xe,h/Xe,w, Xe,h is C1/C2 of the formed gas hydrate, Xe,w [mol/kg] is the concentration of ethane in water ) is calculated to 70 kg/mol. The top occurrence of gas hydrate indicated by the C1/C2 profile also confines the water flux to be 0.4kg/m2-year, similar to that confined by the chloride profile. To best fit the measured C1/C2 profile, the methane flux is calculated to 0.04mol/m2-year. Therefore, the C1/C2 profile could be used to obtain the gas hydrate accumulation information. Acknowledgments:This study was supported by Chinese National Science Foundation (grant 41303044, 91228206 ) References

  20. Impact of numerical integration on gas curtain simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.; Kamm, J.

    2000-11-01

    In recent years, we have presented a less than glowing experimental comparison of hydrodynamic codes with the gas curtain experiment (e.g., Kamm et al. 1999a). Here, we discuss the manner in which the details of the hydrodynamic integration techniques may conspire to produce poor results. This also includes some progress in improving the results and agreement with experimental results. Because our comparison was conducted on the details of the experimental images (i.e., their detailed structural information), our results do not conflict with previously published results of good agreement with Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities based on the integral scale of mixing. New experimental and analysis techniques are also discussed.

  1. Path Integrals and Exotic Options:. Methods and Numerical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormetti, G.; Montagna, G.; Moreni, N.; Nicrosini, O.

    2005-09-01

    In the framework of Black-Scholes-Merton model of financial derivatives, a path integral approach to option pricing is presented. A general formula to price path dependent options on multidimensional and correlated underlying assets is obtained and implemented by means of various flexible and efficient algorithms. As an example, we detail the case of Asian call options. The numerical results are compared with those obtained with other procedures used in quantitative finance and found to be in good agreement. In particular, when pricing at the money (ATM) and out of the money (OTM) options, path integral exhibits competitive performances.

  2. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  3. Slump Flows inside Pipes: Numerical Results and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekmohammadi, S.; Naccache, M. F.; Frigaard, I. A.; Martinez, D. M.

    2008-07-01

    In this work an analysis of the buoyancy-driven slumping flow inside a pipe is presented. This flow usually occurs when an oil well is sealed by a plug cementing process, where a cement plug is placed inside the pipe filled with a lower density fluid, displacing it towards the upper cylinder wall. Both the cement and the surrounding fluids have a non Newtonian behavior. The cement is viscoplastic and the surrounding fluid presents a shear thinning behavior. A numerical analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of some governing parameters on the slump length development. The conservation equations of mass and momentum were solved via a finite volume technique, using Fluent software (Ansys Inc.). The Volume of Fluid surface-tracking method was used to obtain the interface between the fluids and the slump length as a function of time. The results were obtained for different values of fluids densities differences, fluids rheology and pipe inclinations. The effects of these parameters on the interface shape and on the slump length versus time curve were analyzed. Moreover, the numerical results were compared to experimental ones, but some differences are observed, possibly due to chemical effects at the interface.

  4. Synthetic jet parameter identification and numerical results validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, Danilo; Rimasauskiene, Ruta; Matejka, Milan; Kurowski, Marcin; Wandowski, Tomasz; Malinowski, Paweł; Doerffer, Piotr

    2012-06-01

    The design of a synthetic jet requires a careful identification of the components' parameters, in order to be able to perform accurate numerical simulations, this identification must be done by mean of a series of measurements that, due to the small dimensions of the components, are required to be non-contact techniques. The activities described in this paper have been performed in the frame of the STA-DY-WI-CO project, whose purpose is the design of a synthetic jet and demonstrate its effectiveness and efficiency for a real application. To measure the energy saving, due to the synthetic jet effects on the separation, the increased performances of the profile must be compared to the energy absorbed by the actuator and the weight of the system. In design phase a series of actuators has being considered as well as a series of cavity layout, in order to obtain the most effective, efficient and durable package. The modal characteristics of piezoelectric component was assessed by means of tests performed with a 3D scanning laser vibrometer, measuring the frequency response to voltage excitation. Analyzed the effects of the parameters, and chosen components and layout, the system can be dimensioned by means of numeric simulations. The outcome of the simulation is the effect of the synthetic jet, in an assumed flow, for the selected profile. The numerical results on the field of the separated flow with recirculating area were validated by means of tests performed in an Eiffel type wind tunnel. The last test performed on the synthetic jet aims to understand the acoustic impact, noise measurements were performed to have full analysis and synthesis.

  5. Numerical Simulations of Inclusion Behavior in Gas-Stirred Ladles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2013-06-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-population balance model (CFD-PBM) coupled model has been proposed to investigate the bubbly plume flow and inclusion behavior including growth, size distribution, and removal in gas-stirred ladles, and some new and important phenomena and mechanisms were presented. For the bubbly plume flow, a modified k- ɛ model with extra source terms to account for the bubble-induced turbulence was adopted to model the turbulence, and the bubble turbulent dispersion force was taken into account to predict gas volume fraction distribution in the turbulent gas-stirred system. For inclusion behavior, the phenomena of inclusions turbulent random motion, bubbles wake, and slag eye forming on the molten steel surface were considered. In addition, the multiple mechanisms both that promote inclusion growth due to inclusion-inclusion collision caused by turbulent random motion, shear rate in turbulent eddy, and difference inclusion Stokes velocities, and the mechanisms that promote inclusion removal due to bubble-inclusion turbulence random collision, bubble-inclusion turbulent shear collision, bubble-inclusion buoyancy collision, inclusion own floatation near slag-metal interface, bubble wake capture, and wall adhesion were investigated. The importance of different mechanisms and total inclusion removal ratio under different conditions, and the distribution of inclusion number densities in ladle, were discussed and clarified. The results show that at a low gas flow rate, the inclusion growth is mainly attributed to both turbulent shear collision and Stokes collision, which is notably affected by the Stokes collision efficiency, and the inclusion removal is mainly attributed to the bubble-inclusion buoyancy collision and inclusion own floatation near slag-metal interface. At a higher gas flow rate, the inclusions appear as turbulence random motion in bubbly plume zone, and both the inclusion-inclusion and inclusion-bubble turbulent random collisions become

  6. Preliminary Results of Solid Gas Generator Micropropulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wilhelmus A.; Reed, Brian D.; Brenizer, Marshall

    1999-01-01

    A decomposing solid thruster concept, which creates a more benign thermal and chemical environment than solid propellant combustion, while maintaining, performance similar to solid combustion, is described. A Micro-Electro-Mechanical (MEMS) thruster concept with diode laser and fiber-optic initiation is proposed, and thruster components fabricated with MEMS technology are presented. A high nitrogen content solid gas generator compound is evaluated and tested in a conventional axisymmetric thrust chamber with nozzle throat area ratio of 100. Results show incomplete decomposition of this compound in both low pressure (1 kPa) and high pressure (1 MPa) environments, with decomposition of up to 80% of the original mass. Chamber pressures of 1.1 MPa were obtained, with maximum calculated thrust of approximately 2.7 N. Resistively heated wires and resistively heated walls were used to initiate decomposition. Initiation tests using available lasers were unsuccessful, but infrared spectra of the compound show that the laser initiation tests used inappropriate wavelengths for optimal propellant absorption. Optimal wavelengths for laser ignition were identified. Data presented are from tests currently in progress. Alternative solid gas generator compounds are being evaluated for future tests.

  7. Numerical Investigation of PLIF Gas Seeding for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johanson, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of gas-seeding strategies required for planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in a Mach 10 air flow were performed. The work was performed to understand and quantify adverse effects associated with gas seeding and to compare different flow rates and different types of seed gas. The gas was injected through a slot near the leading edge of a flat plate wedge model used in NASA Langley Research Center's 31- Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Nitric oxide, krypton, and iodine gases were simulated at various injection rates. Simulation results showing the deflection of the velocity field for each of the cases are presented. Streamwise distributions of velocity and concentration boundary layer thicknesses as well as vertical distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass distributions are presented for each of the cases. Relative merits of the different seeding strategies are discussed.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Debris Cloud Propagation inside Gas-Filled Pressure Vessels under Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, F. F.; Pang, B. J.; Guan, G. S.

    2009-03-01

    In the paper SPH methods in AUTODYN-2D is used to investigate the characteristics of debris clouds propagation inside the gas-filled pressure vessels for hypervelocity impact on the pressure vessels. The effect of equation of state on debris cloud has been investigated. The numerical simulation performed to analyze the effect of the gas pressure and the impact condition on the propagation of the debris clouds. The result shows that the increase of gas pressure can reduce the damage of the debris clouds' impact on the back wall of vessels when the pressure value is in a certain range. The smaller projectile lead the axial velocity of the debris cloud to stronger deceleration and the debris cloud deceleration is increasing with increased impact velocity. The time of venting begins to occur is related to the "vacuum column" at the direction of impact-axial. The paper studied the effect of impact velocities on gas shock wave.

  9. Development of Numerical Simulation Method for Compressible Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation method of compressible gas-liquid two-phase flow is developed for analyses of a cavitation bubble. Thermodynamic state of both phases is described with stiffened gas equation of state. Interface of two phases is captured by Level-Set method. As internal energy jump between two phases is critical for the stability of computation, total energy equation is modified so that inviscid flux of energy is smoothly connected across the interface. Detail of governing equations as well as their discretization is described followed by the result of one-dimensional simple example computation.

  10. Heat transfer from a liquid bath due to an impinging gas jet: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, F.; Farouk, B.; Mutharasan, R.

    1995-12-31

    An impinging gasjet on a liquid surface is found in many industrial processes such as electric arc furnace steel-making and welding. Fundamental understanding of the interaction of a gas or plasmajet impinging on a liquid pool can provide important insights into process behavior resulting in improved efficiency. A numerical model is developed for solving both the impinging gas jet and the liquid pool temperature and flow fields along with the deformed interface shape for the above processing operation. Using curvilinear coordinates, the Navier-Stokes equations of each phase are solved separately and then coupled via continuity of static pressure, shear stress, temperature and heat flux at the interface.

  11. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  12. Method of Verification of the Numerical Codes for Modeling of Flows in Gas Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Kislov, V. A.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    A simple semi-analytical solution is proposed for the verification of numerical codes for modeling of unsteady gas flows in strong centrifugal fields. The gas flow is driven by a source/sink of energy and by an external force (deceleration/acceleration of the gas rotation) acting on the gas at a given frequency. In the semi-analytical solution, the rotor is infinite, while the given forces vary harmonically with a given wave-length along the axial coordinate. As a result, the unsteady flow problem is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, which can be quickly solved to any prescribed accuracy. A similar unsteady problem is solved numerically with the rotor length equal to the wavelength of the external force along the axis of rotation. The periodicity of the solution is prescribed at the end faces of the rotor. As an example, the semi-analytical solution is compared with the numerical ones obtained with different boundary conditions and mesh resolution in radial direction. The comparison confirms that the problem formulations are equivalent in both cases. The semi-analytical solution allows us to determine optimal mesh resolution and accuracy of the calculations.

  13. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Results of LIPS-200 Lifetime Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Tianping; Geng, Hai; Jia, Yanhui; Meng, Wei; Wu, Xianming; Sun, Anbang

    2016-06-01

    Accelerator grid structural and electron backstreaming failures are the most important factors affecting the ion thruster's lifetime. During the thruster's operation, Charge Exchange Xenon (CEX) ions are generated from collisions between plasma and neutral atoms. Those CEX ions grid's barrel and wall frequently, which cause the failures of the grid system. In order to validate whether the 20 cm Lanzhou Ion Propulsion System (LIPS-200) satisfies China's communication satellite platform's application requirement for North-South Station Keeping (NSSK), this study analyzed the measured depth of the pit/groove on the accelerator grid's wall and aperture diameter's variation and estimated the operating lifetime of the ion thruster. Different from the previous method, in this paper, the experimental results after the 5500 h of accumulated operation of the LIPS-200 ion thruster are presented firstly. Then, based on these results, theoretical analysis and numerical calculations were firstly performed to predict the on-orbit lifetime of LIPS-200. The results obtained were more accurate to calculate the reliability and analyze the failure modes of the ion thruster. The results indicated that the predicted lifetime of LIPS-200's was about 13218.1 h which could satisfy the required lifetime requirement of 11000 h very well.

  14. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Strongly Rotating Rarefied Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev; Kumaran, Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Centrifugal gas separation processes effect separation by utilizing the difference in the mole fraction in a high speed rotating cylinder caused by the difference in molecular mass, and consequently the centrifugal force density. These have been widely used in isotope separation because chemical separation methods cannot be used to separate isotopes of the same chemical species. More recently, centrifugal separation has also been explored for the separation of gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. The efficiency of separation is critically dependent on the secondary flow generated due to temperature gradients at the cylinder wall or due to inserts, and it is important to formulate accurate models for this secondary flow. The widely used Onsager model for secondary flow is restricted to very long cylinders where the length is large compared to the diameter, the limit of high stratification parameter, where the gas is restricted to a thin layer near the wall of the cylinder, and it assumes that there is no mass difference in the two species while calculating the secondary flow. There are two objectives of the present analysis of the rarefied gas flow in a rotating cylinder. The first is to remove the restriction of high stratification parameter, and to generalize the solutions to low rotation speeds where the stratification parameter may be O(1), and to apply for dissimilar gases considering the difference in molecular mass of the two species. Secondly, we would like to compare the predictions with molecular simulations based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for rarefied gas flows, in order to quantify the errors resulting from the approximations at different aspect ratios, Reynolds number and stratification parameter.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Cast Distortion in Gas Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Dubrovskaya, A. S.; Dongauser, K. A.; Trufanov, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper the process of multiple airfoilvanes manufacturing through investment casting is considered. The mathematical model of the full contact problem is built to determine stress strain state in a cast during the process of solidification. Studies are carried out in viscoelastoplastic statement. Numerical simulation of the explored process is implemented with ProCASTsoftware package. The results of simulation are compared with the real production process. By means of computer analysis the optimization of technical process parameters is done in order to eliminate the defect of cast walls thickness variation.

  16. Numerical simulations of combustion instabilities in gas turbine combustors, with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Grant Douglas

    Recent advances in technology have opened up a potential market for small gas turbine power systems in the 50--100 MW range. In an effort to improve their systems, the gas-turbine industry is interested in understanding and controlling combustion instabilities as well as reducing pollutant production. To understand the dynamics inherent in a combustion system, information about the flow field behavior is required. Because of a scarcity of available experimental or numerical results for full-scale gas-turbine combustors, we decided to use numerical simulations to provide the required information about the flow field dynamics. The ability of the numerical simulations to reproduce unstable behavior in combustion environments will be presented. The investigation of the flow field dynamics has been conducted for three test cases; a planar heat source in a tube, premixed flow in a dump combustor, and premixed and diffusion flames in a full-scale gas turbine combustor. The numerically determined unsteady acoustic modes will be shown to compare well with theory and experiments. An investigation of the local heat release response to an unsteady flow field is conducted for incorporation into an approximate analysis method. The results of including a Helmholtz resonator in a dump combustor as a passive control mechanism will be presented. The production of NOx and CO will be compared between stable and unstable flow configurations. The pollutant results indicate that for the planar flame in a tube and the dump combustor, the NOx levels at the exit plane are reduced when the system is unstable.

  17. Numerical study of contributions of shock wave and gas penetration toward induced rock damage during blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, M.; Fakhimi, A.

    2015-06-01

    The authors present an improved version of continuum analysis 2D, a hybrid two-dimensional finite element-discrete element-smoothed particle program for modeling rock blasting. A modified formula governing the interaction of smoothed particles with discrete elements is presented, along with the results of numerical simulations involving detonations within jointed rock. PETN was modeled as the explosive, and Barre granite as the rock specimen. The borehole was simulated both with and without a thin copper lining. The purpose of the copper lining is to prevent gas from penetrating into the induced cracks within the rock, so that the shock wave's contribution toward rock damage can be separated from that of the gas penetration. The results suggest that majority of the cracks are formed due to the shock wave propagating within the rock, whereas the gas penetration mostly separates the already-formed rock fragments and pushes them apart.

  18. Numerical simulation of the passive gas mixture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyncl, Martin; Pelant, Jaroslav

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is the numerical solution of the equations describing the non-stationary compressible turbulent multicomponent flow in gravitational field. The mixture of perfect inert gases is assumed. We work with the RANS equations equipped with the k-omega and the EARSM turbulence models. For the simulation of the wall roughness we use the modification of the specific turbulent dissipation. The finite volume method is used, with thermodynamic constants being functions in time and space. In order to compute the fluxes through the boundary faces we use the modification of the Riemann solver, which is the original result. We present the computational results, computed with the own-developed code (C, FORTRAN, multiprocessor, unstructured meshes in general).

  19. Numerical analysis of supersonic gas-dynamic characteristic in laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shaogang; Jun, Hu; Lei, Luo; Yao, Zhenqiang

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the processing parameters on the dynamic characteristic of supersonic impinging jet in laser cutting is studied numerically. The numerical modeling of a supersonic jet impinging on a plate with a hole is presented to analyze the gas jet-workpiece interaction. The model is able to make quantitative predictions of the effect of the standoff distance and exit Mach number on the mass flow rate and the axial thrust. The numerical results show that the suitable cutting range is slightly different for different exit Mach number, but the optimal cutting parameter for certain exit total pressure is nearly changeless. So the better cut quality and capacity can be obtained mainly by setting the suitable standoff distance for a certain nozzle pressure.

  20. Interaction between subducting plates: results from numerical and analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Capitanio, Fabio A.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    The tectonic setting of the Alpine-Mediterranean area is achieved during the late Cenozoic subduction, collision and suturing of several oceanic fragments and continental blocks. In this stage, processes such as interactions among subducting slabs, slab migrations and related mantle flow played a relevant role on the resulting tectonics. Here, we use numerical models to first address the mantle flow characteristic in 3D. During the subduction of a single plate the strength of the return flow strongly depends on the slab pull force, that is on the plate's buoyancy, however the physical properties of the slab, such as density, viscosity or width, do not affect largely the morphology of the toroidal cell. Instead, dramatic effects on the geometry and the dynamics of the toroidal cell result in models where the thickness of the mantle is varied. The vertical component of the vorticity vector is used to define the characteristic size of the toroidal cell, which is ~1.2-1.3 times the mantle depth. This latter defines the range of viscous stress propagation through the mantle and consequent interactions with other slabs. We thus further investigate on this setup where two separate lithospheric plates subduct in opposite sense, developing opposite polarities and convergent slab retreat, and model different initial sideways distance between the plates. The stress profiles in time illustrate that the plates interacts when slabs are at the characteristic distance and the two slabs toroidal cells merge. Increased stress and delayed slab migrations are the results. Analogue models of double-sided subduction show similar maximum distance and allow testing the additional role of stress propagated through the plates. We use a silicon plate subducting on its two opposite margins, which is either homogeneous or comprises oceanic and continental lithospheres, differing in buoyancy. The modeling results show that the double-sided subduction is strongly affected by changes in plate

  1. Numerical simulation of the passive gas mixture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyncl, Martin; Pelant, Jaroslav

    2015-05-01

    We work with the system of equations describing non-stationary compressible turbulent multicomponent flow in the gravitational field, and we focus on the numerical solution of these equations. In these computations we assume the mixture of perfect inert gases. The thermodynamic constants are functions in time and space. The finite volume method is used. In order to solve the local boundary problem at each mesh face, we use the original analysis of the exact solution of the Riemann problem. The roughness of the surface is simulated via the specific dissipation at the wall. We show the computational results obtained with the own-developed code (C,FORTRAN) for the solution of the 3D compressible turbulent mixture flow. The originality of this work lies with the special handling of the boundary conditions, which shows superior behavior, and own computational code.

  2. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  3. A numerical study of two-phase flow in gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpadi, A. K.

    1992-07-01

    A method is presented for computing steady two-phase turbulent combusting flow in a gas turbine combustor. The gas phase equations are solved in an Eulerian frame of reference. The two-phase calculations are performed by using a liquid droplet spray combustion model and treating the motion of the evaporating fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. The numerical algorithm employs nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, a multigrid iterative solution procedure, the standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and a combustion model made up of an assumed shape probability density function and the conserved scalar formulation. The trajectory computation of the fuel provides the source terms for all the gas phase equations. Results of the application of the two-phase model to a modern GE/SNECMA single annular CFM56 turbofan engine combustor are reported.

  4. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well. PMID:25144442

  5. Numerical Results of 3-D Modeling of Moon Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod; Antipin, Alexandr

    2014-05-01

    For the last time for the model of the Moon usually had been used the model of mega impact in which the forming of the Earth and its sputnik had been the consequence of the Earth's collision with the body of Mercurial mass. But all dynamical models of the Earth's accumulation and the estimations after the Pb-Pb system, lead to the conclusion that the duration of the planet accumulation was about 1 milliard years. But isotopic results after the W-Hf system testify about a very early (5-10) million years, dividing of the geochemical reservoirs of the core and mantle. In [1,2] it is shown, that the account of energy dissipating by the decay of short living radioactive elements and first of all Al26,it is sufficient for heating even small bodies with dimensions about (50-100) km up to the iron melting temperature and can be realized a principal new differentiation mechanism. The inner parts of the melted preplanets can join and they are mainly of iron content, but the cold silicate fragments return to the supply zone and additionally change the content of Moon forming to silicates. Only after the increasing of the gravitational radius of the Earth, the growing area of the future Earth's core can save also the silicate envelope fragments [3]. For understanding the further system Earth-Moon evolution it is significant to trace the origin and evolution of heterogeneities, which occur on its accumulation stage.In that paper we are modeling the changing of temperature,pressure,velocity of matter flowing in a block of 3d spherical body with a growing radius. The boundary problem is solved by the finite-difference method for the system of equations, which include equations which describe the process of accumulation, the Safronov equation, the equation of impulse balance, equation Navier-Stocks, equation for above litho static pressure and heat conductivity in velocity-pressure variables using the Businesque approach.The numerical algorithm of the problem solution in velocity

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces: capillary waves on gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; García-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces under liquid flow can produce significant slip, and thus drag reduction, when they entrap gas bubbles within their roughness elements. Our work aims to explore the onset mechanism to the failure of drag reduction by superhydrophobic surfaces when they are exposed to turbulent boundary layers. We focus on the effect of finite surface tension to the dynamic response of deformable interfaces between overlying water flow and the gas pockets. To this end, we conduct direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces allowing deformable gas-liquid interface. DNS results show that spanwise-coherent, upstream-traveling waves develop on the gas-liquid interface as a result of its interactions with turbulence. We study the nature and scaling of the upstream-traveling waves through semi-analytical modeling. We will show that the traveling waves are well described by a Weber number based on the slip velocity at the interface. In higher Weber number, the stability of gas pocket decreases as the amplitude of interface deformation and the magnitude of pressure fluctuations are augmented. Supported by Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  7. Analytical expression for gas-particle equilibration time scale and its numerical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila, Tatu; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Dal Maso, Miikka

    2016-05-01

    We have derived a time scale τeq that describes the characteristic time for a single compound i with a saturation vapour concentration Ceff,i to reach thermodynamic equilibrium between the gas and particle phases. The equilibration process was assumed to take place via gas-phase diffusion and absorption into a liquid-like phase present in the particles. It was further shown that τeq combines two previously derived and often applied time scales τa and τs that account for the changes in the gas and particle phase concentrations of i resulting from the equilibration, respectively. The validity of τeq was tested by comparing its predictions against results from a numerical model that explicitly simulates the transfer of i between the gas and particle phases. By conducting a large number of simulations where the values of the key input parameters were varied randomly, it was found out that τeq yields highly accurate results when i is a semi-volatile compound in the sense that the ratio of total (gas and particle phases) concentration of i to the saturation vapour concentration of i, μ, is below unity. On the other hand, the comparison of analytical and numerical time scales revealed that using τa or τs alone to calculate the equilibration time scale may lead to considerable errors. It was further shown that τeq tends to overpredict the equilibration time when i behaves as a non-volatile compound in a sense that μ > 1. Despite its simplicity, the time scale derived here has useful applications. First, it can be used to assess if semi-volatile compounds reach thermodynamic equilibrium during dynamic experiments that involve changes in the compound volatility. Second, the time scale can be used in modeling of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to check whether SOA forming compounds equilibrate over a certain time interval.

  8. Busted Butte: Achieving the Objectives and Numerical Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Soll; M. Kearney; P. Stauffer; P. Tseng; H.J. Turin; Z. Lu

    2002-10-07

    The Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) at Busted Butte is a mesoscale field/laboratory/modeling investigation designed to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport in the UZ site-process models for Yucca Mountain. The UZTT test facility is located approximately 8 km southeast of the potential Yucca Mountain repository area. The UZTT was designed in two phases, to address five specific objectives in the UZ: the effect of heterogeneities, flow and transport (F&T) behavior at permeability contrast boundaries, migration of colloids , transport models of sorbing tracers, and scaling issues in moving from laboratory scale to field scale. Phase 1A was designed to assess the influence of permeability contrast boundaries in the hydrologic Calico Hills. Visualization of fluorescein movement , mineback rock analyses, and comparison with numerical models demonstrated that F&T are capillary dominated with permeability contrast boundaries distorting the capillary flow. Phase 1B was designed to assess the influence of fractures on F&T and colloid movement. The injector in Phase 1B was located at a fracture, while the collector, 30 cm below, was placed at what was assumed to be the same fracture. Numerical simulations of nonreactive (Br) and reactive (Li) tracers show the experimental data are best explained by a combination of molecular diffusion and advective flux. For Phase 2, a numerical model with homogeneous unit descriptions was able to qualitatively capture the general characteristics of the system. Numerical simulations and field observations revealed a capillary dominated flow field. Although the tracers showed heterogeneity in the test block, simulation using heterogeneous fields did not significantly improve the data fit over homogeneous field simulations. In terms of scaling, simulations of field tracer data indicate a hydraulic conductivity two orders of magnitude higher than measured in the laboratory. Simulations of Li, a weakly sorbing tracer

  9. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  10. Numerical Results of Earth's Core Accumulation 3-D Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod

    2013-04-01

    For a long time as a most convenient had been the model of mega impact in which the early forming of the Earth's core and mantle had been the consequence of formed protoplanet collision with the body of Mercurial mass. But all dynamical models of the Earth's accumulation and the estimations after the Pb-Pb system, lead to the conclusion that the duration of the planet accumulation was about 1 milliard years. But isotopic results after the W-Hf system testify about a very early (5-10) million years, dividing of the geochemical reservoirs of the core and mantle. In [1,3] it is shown, that the account of energy dissipating by the decay of short living radioactive elements and first of all Al,it is sufficient for heating even small bodies with dimensions about (50-100) km up to the iron melting temperature and can be realized a principal new differentiation mechanism. The inner parts of the melted preplanets can join and they are mainly of iron content, but the cold silicate fragments return to the supply zone. Only after the increasing of the gravitational radius, the growing area of the future core can save also the silicate envelope fragments. All existing dynamical accumulation models are constructed by using a spherical-symmetrical model. Hence for understanding the further planet evolution it is significant to trace the origin and evolution of heterogeneities, which occur on the planet accumulation stage. In that paper we are modeling distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity of matter flowing in a block of 3D- spherical body with a growing radius. The boundary problem is solved by the finite-difference method for the system of equations, which include equations which describe the process of accumulation, the Safronov equation, the equation of impulse balance, equation Navier-Stocks, equation for above litho static pressure and heat conductivity in velocity-pressure variables using the Businesque approach. The numerical algorithm of the problem solution in

  11. Numerical study on horizontal convection of a rarefied gas over a non-isothermal plane wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Katto, Yudai; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2015-06-01

    A rarefied gas over an infinite plane wall with non-uniform periodic temperature distribution is considered under the effect of gravity. The Knudsen number and the Froude number are defined as the mean free path of gas molecules and the scale height at a reference state divided by the length of the period, respectively. Based on the kinetic theory of gases, the steady two-dimensional gas flow is investigated numerically for a wide range of parameters. The cases of a free molecular gas are analyzed by a deterministically accurate method, which enables the computation for large Froude numbers, i.e., vanishingly small gravity. The flow pattern is shown to be slightly effected by the Froude number when the Froude number is large, whereas the flow magnitude is proportional to the inverse of the Froude number. As a result, the flow vanishes in the limit of zero gravity. This is not a trivial consequence because the case of an infinite Froude number is different from the same setting without gravity. The cases of finite Knudsen numbers are investigated by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method for a hard sphere gas, and the flow characteristics are shown to be dominated by the presence of gravity for cases in which the Knudsen number is larger than the Froude number.

  12. A numerical study on the use of sulfur hexafluoride as a test gas for wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle

    1990-01-01

    A numerical study is presented which investigates effects of using sulfur hexafluoride, S F6, as a substitute for air. Inviscid results for airfoils indicate that for transonic cases the shock location calculated for S F6 is vastly different from that in air and moves progressively forward on the airfoil as the freestream pressure is increased and real gas effects become more pronounced. Application of a simple Mach number scaling procedure results in good correlation between S F6 abnd air even for pressures at which nonideal gas effects are significant. Computations for subsonic turbulent flows over a NACA 0012 airfoil show that the maximum angle of attack at which steady lift can be obtained is different between air and S F6. In addition, for S F6, this angle of attack depends greatly on the freestream conditions. Close agreement with air can be achieved by altering the freestream Mach number according to the inviscid scaling procedure.

  13. Numerical calculations of high-altitude differential charging: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laframboise, J. G.; Godard, R.; Prokopenko, S. M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A two dimensional simulation program was constructed in order to obtain theoretical predictions of floating potential distributions on geostationary spacecraft. The geometry was infinite-cylindrical with angle dependence. Effects of finite spacecraft length on sheath potential profiles can be included in an approximate way. The program can treat either steady-state conditions or slowly time-varying situations, involving external time scales much larger than particle transit times. Approximate, locally dependent expressions were used to provide space charge, density profiles, but numerical orbit-following is used to calculate surface currents. Ambient velocity distributions were assumed to be isotropic, beam-like, or some superposition of these.

  14. Some numerical simulation results of swirling flow in d.c. plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipini, C. L.; Pimenta, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    We present and discuss some results of numerical simulation of swirling flow in d.c. plasma torch, obtained with a two-dimensional mathematical model (MHD model) which was developed to simulate the phenomena related to the interaction between the swirling flow and the electric arc in a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The model was implemented in a computer code based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM) to enable the numerical solution of the governing equations. For the study, cases were simulated with different operating conditions (gas flow rate; swirl number). Some obtained results were compared to the literature and have proved themselves to be in good agreement in most part of computational domain regions. The numerical simulations performed with the computer code enabled the study of the behaviour of the flow in the plasma torch and also study the effects of different swirl numbers on temperature and axial velocity of the plasma flow. The results demonstrated that the developed model is suitable to obtain a better understanding of the involved phenomena and also for the development and optimization of plasma torches.

  15. Statistical properties and numerical implementation of a model for droplet dispersion in a turbulent gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Peter J.

    1989-08-01

    The stochastic technique developed by Dukowicz (1980) for calculating the dispersion of liquid-spray droplets by a moving turbulent gas is investigated analytically, with a focus on statistical aspects. Consideration is given to the distribution of droplet turbulent-velocity and position changes, the effect of neglecting turbulent-velocity changes in computations, and the numerical implementation of the method in the computer program KIVA (Amsden et al., 1985). Typical KIVA results are presented in graphs, and good agreement with theoretical predictions is demonstrated.

  16. A high-resolution numerical technique for inviscid gas-dynamic problems with weak solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1982-01-01

    The shock resolution of Harten's (1982) second-order explicit method for one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation laws is investigated for a two-dimensional gas-dynamic problem. The possible extension to a high resolution implicit method for both one- and two-dimensional problems is also investigated. Applications of Harten's method to the quasi-one-dimensional nozzle problem with two nozzle shapes (divergent and convergent-divergent) and the two-dimensional shock-reflection problem resulted in high shock resolution steady-state numerical solutions.

  17. Numerical analysis of real gas MHD flow on two-dimensional self-field MPD thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xisto, Carlos M.; Páscoa, José C.; Oliveira, Paulo J.

    2015-07-01

    A self-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster is a low-thrust electric propulsion space-system that enables the usage of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles for accelerating a plasma flow towards high speed exhaust velocities. It can produce an high specific impulse, making it suitable for long duration interplanetary space missions. In this paper numerical results obtained with a new code, which is being developed at C-MAST (Centre for Mechanical and Aerospace Technologies), for a two-dimensional self-field MPD thruster are presented. The numerical model is based on the macroscopic MHD equations for compressible and electrically resistive flow and is able to predict the two most important thrust mechanisms that are associated with this kind of propulsion system, namely the thermal thrust and the electromagnetic thrust. Moreover, due to the range of very high temperatures that could occur during the operation of the MPD, it also includes a real gas model for argon.

  18. Numerical studies of heat transfer and gas migration processes in relation to in situ vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.L.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.

    1990-09-01

    This document presents numerical studies conducted in support of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) treatability study. These results will be used for support of hardware design and performance assessments of ISV processes. Four models are presented and analyzed using finite element techniques: (1) heat transport and melting during the ISV process, (2) heat transfer calculations on the Intermediate Field Test (IFT) off-gas confinement hood, (3) gas migration in permeable soil surrounding the vitrified zone, and (4) melt rate calculations. Heat transport in the ISV process describes the temperature field and melt growth in the soil. Thermal radiation heat transfer calculations for the IFT hood demonstrate the sensitivity of the hood temperatures to melt temperature, melt radius, and exterior hood emissivity. The study of gas migration in permeable soil resulting from a buried source predicts that gas may migrate to the soil surface. The one-dimensional melt rate calculations conservatively predict a melt rate of 6 cm/hr. 11 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces: gas-liquid interface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; García-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces can induce large slip velocities for liquid flows, reducing the skin friction on walls, by entrapping gas pockets within the surface roughness. This work explores the onset mechanism leading to gas depletion through interface breakage under turbulent conditions. We conduct direct numerical simulations of flows over superhydrophobic walls. The superhydrophobic texture is conventionally modeled as a pattern of slip/no-slip boundary conditions for the wall-parallel velocities but, to take into account the dynamic deformation of the gas-liquid interface, we also introduce non-zero boundary conditions for the wall-normal velocity. These conditions are derived from the deformation of the interface in response to the overlying turbulent pressure fluctuations, following the Young-Laplace equation. Surface protrusions in the form of posts and streamwise-aligned ridges are studied, and results are presented as a function of the ``deformability'' of the gas-liquid interfaces, expressed as a Weber number. We will also discuss results for misaligned ridges. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  20. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Gas-Solid Interfaces with Large Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, O.Y.; Lomov, I.N.

    2000-02-01

    A method of treatment of multimaterial interfaces on Eulerian grids is developed which works well for mixtures of materials with diverse compressibilities and shear moduli. This makes it possible to use this method not only for problems of gas dynamics and solid mechanics but also to model fluid-structure interaction problems.

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE EFFECTS OF CHANGING FUEL FOR TURBINES FIRED BY NATURAL GAS AND SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wright, Ian G

    2007-01-01

    Gas turbines in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants burn a fuel gas (syngas) in which the proportions of hydrocarbons, H2, CO, water vapor, and minor impurity levels may vary significantly from those in natural gas, depending on the input feed to the gasifier and the gasification process. A data structure and computational methodology is presented for the numerical simulation of a turbine thermodynamic cycle for various fuel types, air/fuel ratios, and coolant flow rates. The approach used allowed efficient handling of turbine components and different variable constraints due to fuel changes. Examples are presented for a turbine with four stages and cooled blades. The blades were considered to be cooled in an open circuit, with air provided from appropriate compressor stages. Results are presented for the temperatures of the hot gas, alloy surface (coating-superalloy interface), and coolant, as well as for cooling flow rates. Based on the results of the numerical simulations, values were calculated for the fuel flow rates, airflow ratios, and coolant flow rates required to maintain the superalloy in the first stage blade at the desired temperature when the fuel was changed from natural gas (NG) to syngas (SG). One NG case was conducted to assess the effect of coolant pressure matching between the compressor extraction points and corresponding turbine injection points. It was found that pressure matching is a feature that must be considered for high combustion temperatures. The first series of SG simulations was conducted using the same inlet mass flow and pressure ratios as those for the NG case. The results showed that higher coolant flow rates and a larger number of cooled turbine rows were needed for the SG case. Thus, for this first case, the turbine size would be different for SG than for NG. In order to maintain the original turbine configuration (i.e., geometry, diameters, blade heights, angles, and cooling circuit characteristics) for

  3. Test 6, Test 7, and Gas Standard Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Horacio, III

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows results of analyses on odor, toxic off gassing and gas standards. The topics include: 1) Statistical Analysis Definitions; 2) Odor Analysis Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 6; 3) Toxic Off gassing Analysis Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 7; and 4) Gas Standard Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 7;

  4. Network model to study physiological processes of hypobaric decompression sickness: New numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueco, Joaquín; López-González, Luis María

    2016-04-01

    We have studied decompression processes when pressure changes that take place, in blood and tissues using a technical numerical based in electrical analogy of the parameters that involved in the problem. The particular problem analyzed is the behavior dynamics of the extravascular bubbles formed in the intercellular cavities of a hypothetical tissue undergoing decompression. Numerical solutions are given for a system of equations to simulate gas exchanges of bubbles after decompression, with particular attention paid to the effect of bubble size, nitrogen tension, nitrogen diffusivity in the intercellular fluid and in the tissue cell layer in a radial direction, nitrogen solubility, ambient pressure and specific blood flow through the tissue over the different molar diffusion fluxes of nitrogen per time unit (through the bubble surface, between the intercellular fluid layer and blood and between the intercellular fluid layer and the tissue cell layer). The system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Network Simulation Method, where the electric analogy is applied to convert these equations into a network-electrical model, and a computer code (electric circuit simulator, Pspice). In this paper, numerical results new (together to a network model improved with interdisciplinary electrical analogies) are provided.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Modelling of CO2 Atmospheric Dispersion in Hazardous Gas Emission Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, A.; sainz Gracia, A. S.; Grandia, F.; Bruno, J.

    2015-12-01

    Under stable atmospheric conditions and/or in presence of topographic depressions, CO2 concentrations can reach high values resulting in lethal effect to living organisms. The distribution of denser than air gases released from the underground is governed by gravity, turbulence and dispersion. Once emitted, the gas distribution is initially driven by buoyancy and a gas cloud accumulates on the ground (gravitational phase); with time the density gradient becomes less important due to dispersion or mixing and gas distribution is mainly governed by wind and atmospheric turbulence (passive dispersion phase). Natural analogues provide evidences of the impact of CO2 leakage. Dangerous CO2 concentration in atmosphere related to underground emission have been occasionally reported although the conditions favouring the persistence of such a concentration are barely studied.In this work, the dynamics of CO2 in the atmosphere after ground emission is assessed to quantify their potential risk. Two approaches have been followed: (1) direct measurement of air concentration in a natural emission site, where formation of a "CO2 lake" is common and (2) numerical atmospheric modelling. Two sites with different morphology were studied: (a) the Cañada Real site, a flat terrain in the Volcanic Field of Campo de Calatrava (Spain); (b) the Solforata di Pomezia site, a rough terrain in the Alban Hills Volcanic Region (Italy). The comparison between field data and model calculations reveal that numerical dispersion models are capable of predicting the formation of CO2 accumulation over the ground as a consequence of underground gas emission. Therefore, atmospheric modelling could be included as a valuable methodology in the risk assessment of leakage in natural degassing systems and in CCS projects. Conclusions from this work provide clues on whether leakage may be a real risk for humans and under which conditions this risk needs to be included in the risk assessment.

  6. Numerical investigation of coal seam gas detection using airborne electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, Mohamed

    The use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) techniques has been mostly utilized in the mining industry. The various AEM systems enable fast data acquisition to detect zones of interest in exploration and in some cases are used to delineate targets on a production scale. For coal seam gas (CSG) reservoirs, reservoir thickness and the resistivity contrast present a new challenge to the present AEM systems in terms of detectability. Our research question began with the idea of using AEM methods in the detection of thin reservoirs. CSG reservoirs resemble thin reservoirs that have been and are currently being produced. In this thesis we present the results of a feasibility analysis of AEM study on coal seam reservoirs using synthetic models. The aim of the study is to contribute and bridge the gap of the scientific literature on AEM systems in settings such as CSG exploration. In the models we have chosen to simulate both in 1-D and 3-D, the CSG target resistivity was varied from a resistive to a conductive target (4 ohm.m, 150 ohm.m, and 667 ohm.m) to compare the different responses while the target thickness was fixed to resemble a stack of coal seams at that interval. Due to the differences in 1-D and 3-D modelling, we also examine the differences resulting from each modelling set up. The results of the 1-D forward modeling served as a first order understanding of the detection depths by AEM for CSG reservoirs. Three CSG reservoir horizontally layered earth model scenarios were examined, half-space, conductive/resistive and resistive/conductive. The response behavior for each of the three scenarios differs with the differing target resistivities. The 1-D modeling in both the halfspace and conductive/resistive models shows detection at depths beyond 300 m for three cases of target resistivity outlined above. After the 300-m depth, the response falls below the assumed noise floor level of 5% response difference. However, when a resistive layer overlies a conductive host

  7. Numerical simulation of the LEC-growth of GaAs crystals with account of high-pressure gas convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainberg, J.; Leister, H.-J.; Müller, G.

    1997-10-01

    The influence of the inert gas pressure on the growth of 4 GaAs crystals by the liquid encapsulated Czochralski method (LEC) process is studied for a range of the Ar gas pressure up to 10 bar by using our finite-volume computer code STHAMAS. Up to the pressure of 0.6 bar we are considering laminar convection. For the pressure range from 5 to 10 bar we are using the buoyancy extended standard k-ε turbulence model with wall functions to simulate the gas flow. The numerical results show that the Argon gas pressure has a strong influence on the consumption of heater power in qualitative agreement with our experimental results. The convex curvature of the growth interface and the maximum thermal stress (von Mises criterion) are found to increase with increasing gas pressure both in the laminar and turbulent evaluations.

  8. Numeric Design and Performance Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell -- Gas Turbine Hybrids on Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovakimyan, Gevorg

    The aircraft industry benefits greatly from small improvements in aircraft component design. One possible area of improvement is in the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Modern aircraft APUs are gas turbines located in the tail section of the aircraft that generate additional power when needed. Unfortunately the efficiency of modern aircraft APUs is low. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrids are one possible alternative for replacing modern gas turbine APUs. This thesis investigates the feasibility of replacing conventional gas turbine APUs with SOFC/GT APUs on aircraft. An SOFC/GT design algorithm was created in order to determine the specifications of an SOFC/GT APU. The design algorithm is comprised of several integrated modules which together model the characteristics of each component of the SOFC/GT system. Given certain overall inputs, through numerical analysis, the algorithm produces an SOFC/GT APU, optimized for specific power and efficiency, capable of performing to the required specifications. The SOFC/GT design is then input into a previously developed quasi-dynamic SOFC/GT model to determine its load following capabilities over an aircraft flight cycle. Finally an aircraft range study is conducted to determine the feasibility of the SOFC/GT APU as a replacement for the conventional gas turbine APU. The design results show that SOFC/GT APUs have lower specific power than GT systems, but have much higher efficiencies. Moreover, the dynamic simulation results show that SOFC/GT APUs are capable of following modern flight loads. Finally, the range study determined that SOFC/GT APUs are more attractive over conventional APUs for longer range aircraft.

  9. Numerical investigation of gas-particle interaction in polydisperse volcanic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcano, Susanna; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Bonaventura, Luca; Neri, Augusto

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the problem of underexpanded jet decompression when the injected fluid is a mixture of a gaseous phase and different classes of solid particles. The underexpanded multiphase jet problem is representative of phenomena that can be observed in the first stages of explosive volcanic eruptions. Whereas the case of homogeneous jets has been studied deeply in the literature, both experimentally, theoretically and numerically, the case of multiphase gas--particle jets still presents some open issues. It has been proven theoretically and experimentally that vents with supersonic or sonic velocity and gas pressure greater than the atmospheric one result in a rapid expansion and acceleration of the fluid to high Mach number. A series of expansion waves form and are reflected as compression waves at the flow boundary. The compression waves coealesce to form a standing normal shock wave (Mach disk), across which the fluid is rapidly compressed and decelerated to subsonic speeds. When solid particles are added to the gas flow, new phenomena associated to kinetic and thermal non-equilibrium between gas and particulate phases arise. Such effects are controlled by drag and heat exchange terms in the momentum and energy equations. In the present work we carry out two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations with the multiphase flow model PDAC (Neri et al., J. Geophys. Res, 2003; Carcano et al., Geosci. Mod. Dev., 2013), to identify and quantify non-equilibrium effects related to the interaction between the jet decompression structure and solid particles. We quantify, on a theoretical basis, the expected non-equilibrium effects between the gas and the solid phase in terms of the particle Stokes numer (St), i.e. the ratio between the particle relaxation time and a characteristic time scale of the jet (taken as the formation time of the Mach disk shock), for two sample grain-size distributions of natural events (Mount St. Helens, 1980; Vesuvius, aD 79). The Stokes

  10. Experimental and Numerical Research of a Novel Combustion Chamber for Small Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, J.; Kubata, J.; Betak, V.; Hybl, R.

    2013-04-01

    New combustion chamber concept (based on burner JETIS-JET Induced Swirl) for small gas turbine engine (up to 200kW) is presented in this article. The combustion chamber concept is based on the flame stabilization by the generated swirl swirl generated by two opposite tangentially arranged jet tubes in the intermediate zone, this arrangement replaces air swirler, which is very complicated and expensive part in the scope of small gas turbines with annular combustion chamber. The mixing primary jets are oriented partially opposite to the main exhaust gasses flow, this enhances hot product recirculation and fuel-air mixing necessary for low NOx production and flame stability. To evaluate the designed concept a JETIS burner demonstrator (methane fuel) was manufactured and atmospheric experimental measurements of CO, NOx for various fuel nozzles and jet tubes the configuration were done. Results of these experiments and comparison with CFD simulation are presented here. Practical application of the new chamber concept in small gas turbine liquid fuel combustor was evaluated (verified) on 3 nozzles planar combustor sector test rig at atmospheric conditions results of the experiment and numerical simulation are also presented.

  11. Numerical simulation of gas flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical analysis is used to identify the physical phenomena associated with barometrically driven gas (air and water vapor) flow through unsaturated fractured rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Results from simple finite difference simulations indicate that for a fractured rock scenario, the maximum velocity of air out of an uncased 10 cm borehole is 0.002 m s{sub {minus}1}. An equivalent porous medium (EPM) model was incorporated into a multiphase, multicomponent simulator to test more complex conceptual models. Results indicate that for a typical June day, a diurnal pressure wave propagates about 160 m into the surrounding Tiva Canyon hydrogeologic unit. Dry air that enters the formation evaporates water around the borehole which reduces capillary pressure. Multiphase countercurrent flow develops in the vicinity of the hole; the gas phase flows into the formation while the liquid phase flows toward the borehole. The effect occurs within 0.5 m of the borehole. The amount of water vapor leaving the formation during 1 day is 900 cm{sup 3}. This is less than 0.1% of the total recharge into the formation, suggesting that the barometric effect may be insignificant in drying the unsaturated zone. However, gas phase velocities out of the borehole (3 m s{sup {minus}1}), indicating that observed flow rates from wells along the east flank of Yucca Mountain were able to be simulated with a barometric model.

  12. Sediment Pathways Across Trench Slopes: Results From Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. H.; Seeber, L.; McHugh, C. M.; Fujiwara, T.; Kanamatsu, T.; King, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Until the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake, the role of earthquakes as agents of sediment dispersal and deposition at erosional trenches was largely under-appreciated. A series of cruises carried out after the 2011 event has revealed a variety of unsuspected sediment transport mechanisms, such as tsunami-triggered sheet turbidites, suggesting that great earthquakes may in fact be important agents for dispersing sediments across trench slopes. To complement these observational data, we have modeled the pathways of sediments across the trench slope based on bathymetric grids. Our approach assumes that transport direction is controlled by slope azimuth only, and ignores obstacles smaller than 0.6-1 km; these constraints are meant to approximate the behavior of turbidites. Results indicate that (1) most pathways issued from the upper slope terminate near the top of the small frontal wedge, and thus do not reach the trench axis; (2) in turn, sediments transported to the trench axis are likely derived from the small frontal wedge or from the subducting Pacific plate. These results are consistent with the stratigraphy imaged in seismic profiles, which reveals that the slope apron does not extend as far as the frontal wedge, and that the thickness of sediments at the trench axis is similar to that of the incoming Pacific plate. We further applied this modeling technique to the Cascadia, Nankai, Middle-America, and Sumatra trenches. Where well-defined canyons carve the trench slopes, sediments from the upper slope may routinely reach the trench axis (e.g., off Costa Rica and Cascadia). In turn, slope basins that are isolated from the canyons drainage systems must mainly accumulate locally-derived sediments. Therefore, their turbiditic infill may be diagnostic of seismic activity only - and not from storm or flood activity. If correct, this would make isolated slope basins ideal targets for paleoseismological investigation.

  13. Acoustic Velocity Log Numerical Simulation and Saturation Estimation of Gas Hydrate Reservoir in Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method. PMID:23935407

  14. Numerical simulation of rarefied gas flow through a slit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Jeng, Duen-Ren; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Chung, Chan-Hong

    1990-01-01

    Two different approaches, the finite-difference method coupled with the discrete-ordinate method (FDDO), and the direct-simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, are used in the analysis of the flow of a rarefied gas from one reservoir to another through a two-dimensional slit. The cases considered are for hard vacuum downstream pressure, finite pressure ratios, and isobaric pressure with thermal diffusion, which are not well established in spite of the simplicity of the flow field. In the FDDO analysis, by employing the discrete-ordinate method, the Boltzmann equation simplified by a model collision integral is transformed to a set of partial differential equations which are continuous in physical space but are point functions in molecular velocity space. The set of partial differential equations are solved by means of a finite-difference approximation. In the DSMC analysis, three kinds of collision sampling techniques, the time counter (TC) method, the null collision (NC) method, and the no time counter (NTC) method, are used.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigation of the roll motion behavior of a floating liquefied natural gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, WenHua; Yang, JianMin; Hu, ZhiQiang; Xiao, LongFei; Peng, Tao

    2013-03-01

    The present paper does an experimental and numerical investigation of the hydrodynamic interaction and the response of a single point turret-moored Floating Liquefied Natural Gas (FLNG) system, which is a new type of floating LNG (Liquid Natural Gas) platform that consists of a ship-type FPSO hull equipped with LNG storage tanks and liquefaction plants. In particular, this study focuses on the investigation of the roll response of FLNG hull in free-decay motions, white noise waves and also in irregular waves. Model tests of the FLNG system in 60%H filling condition excited by both white noise waves and irregular waves combined with steady wind and current have been carried out. Response Amplitude Operators (RAOs) and time histories of the responses are obtained for sway, roll and yaw motions. Obvious Low Frequency (LF) components of the roll motions are observed, which may be out of expectation. To facilitate the physical understanding of this phenomenon, we filter the roll motions at the period of 30 s into two parts: the Wave Frequency (WF) motions and the Low Frequency (LF) motions respectively. The results indicate that the LF motions are closely related to the sway and yaw motions. Possible reasons for the presence of the LF motions of roll have been discussed in detail, through the comparison with the sway and yaw motions. As for the numerical part, the simulation of the modeled case is conducted with the help of the software SESAM®. A good agreement between experiments and calculations is reported within the scope of trends. However, the numerical simulations should be further improved for the prediction of the FLNG system in the heading sea.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Numerical modelling of atmospheric pressure gas discharges leading to plasma production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georghiou, G. E.; Papadakis, A. P.; Morrow, R.; Metaxas, A. C.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we give a detailed review of recent work carried out on the numerical characterization of non-thermal gas discharge plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure. First, we briefly describe the theory of discharge development for dielectric barrier discharges, which is central to the production of non-equilibrium plasma, and we present a hydrodynamic model to approximate the evolution of charge densities. The model consists of the continuity equations for electrons, positive and negative ions coupled to Poisson's equation for the electric field. We then describe features of the finite element flux corrected transport algorithm, which has been developed to specifically aim for accuracy (no spurious diffusion or oscillations), efficiency (through the use of unstructured grids) and ease of extension to complex 3D geometries in the framework of the hydrodynamic model in gas discharges. We summarize the numerical work done by other authors who have applied different methods to various models and then we present highlights of our own work, which includes code validation, comparisons with existing results and modelling of radio frequency systems, dc discharges, secondary effects such as photoionization and plasma production in the presence of dielectrics. The extension of the code to 3D for more realistic simulations is demonstrated together with the adaptive meshing technique, which serves to achieve higher efficiency. Finally, we illustrate the versatility of our scheme by using it to simulate the transition from non-thermal to thermal discharges. We conclude that numerical modelling and, in particular, the extension to 3D can be used to shed new light on the processes involved with the production and control of atmospheric plasma, which plays an important role in a host of emerging technologies.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  18. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

  19. Verification of Numerical Weather Prediction Model Results for Energy Applications in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sīle, Tija; Cepite-Frisfelde, Daiga; Sennikovs, Juris; Bethers, Uldis

    2014-05-01

    A resolution to increase the production and consumption of renewable energy has been made by EU governments. Most of the renewable energy in Latvia is produced by Hydroelectric Power Plants (HPP), followed by bio-gas, wind power and bio-mass energy production. Wind and HPP power production is sensitive to meteorological conditions. Currently the basis of weather forecasting is Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. There are numerous methodologies concerning the evaluation of quality of NWP results (Wilks 2011) and their application can be conditional on the forecast end user. The goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of Weather Research and Forecast model (Skamarock 2008) implementation over the territory of Latvia, focusing on forecasting of wind speed and quantitative precipitation forecasts. The target spatial resolution is 3 km. Observational data from Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre are used. A number of standard verification metrics are calculated. The sensitivity to the model output interpretation (output spatial interpolation versus nearest gridpoint) is investigated. For the precipitation verification the dichotomous verification metrics are used. Sensitivity to different precipitation accumulation intervals is examined. Skamarock, William C. and Klemp, Joseph B. A time-split nonhydrostatic atmospheric model for weather research and forecasting applications. Journal of Computational Physics. 227, 2008, pp. 3465-3485. Wilks, Daniel S. Statistical Methods in the Atmospheric Sciences. Third Edition. Academic Press, 2011.

  20. Reservoir Characterization using geostatistical and numerical modeling in GIS with noble gas geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, D. A.; Swift, J. N.; Tan, S.; Darrah, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The integration of precise geochemical analyses with quantitative engineering modeling into an interactive GIS system allows for a sophisticated and efficient method of reservoir engineering and characterization. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is utilized as an advanced technique for oil field reservoir analysis by combining field engineering and geological/geochemical spatial datasets with the available systematic modeling and mapping methods to integrate the information into a spatially correlated first-hand approach in defining surface and subsurface characteristics. Three key methods of analysis include: 1) Geostatistical modeling to create a static and volumetric 3-dimensional representation of the geological body, 2) Numerical modeling to develop a dynamic and interactive 2-dimensional model of fluid flow across the reservoir and 3) Noble gas geochemistry to further define the physical conditions, components and history of the geologic system. Results thus far include using engineering algorithms for interpolating electrical well log properties across the field (spontaneous potential, resistivity) yielding a highly accurate and high-resolution 3D model of rock properties. Results so far also include using numerical finite difference methods (crank-nicholson) to solve for equations describing the distribution of pressure across field yielding a 2D simulation model of fluid flow across reservoir. Ongoing noble gas geochemistry results will also include determination of the source, thermal maturity and the extent/style of fluid migration (connectivity, continuity and directionality). Future work will include developing an inverse engineering algorithm to model for permeability, porosity and water saturation.This combination of new and efficient technological and analytical capabilities is geared to provide a better understanding of the field geology and hydrocarbon dynamics system with applications to determine the presence of hydrocarbon pay zones (or

  1. Numerical simulation of gas concentration and dioxin formation for MSW combustion in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model was employed to simulate the combustion process in a fixed porous bed of municipal solid waste (MSW). Mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations of the waste bed were set up to describe the incineration process. The rate of moisture evaporation, volatile matter devolatilization, char combustion, NOx production, and reduction and dioxin formation were calculated and established according to the local thermal conditions and waste property characteristics. Changes in the bed volume during incineration were calculated according to the reaction rate of the process. The simulation results were compared with experimental data, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed was reasonably simulated. The simulation results of weight loss and solid temperature in the bed agree with the experimental data, which shows that the waste combustion rate is nearly constant in the middle of the incineration process, and that moisture evaporation takes up most of the time for the overall incineration experiment. The emission of gas species from the bed surface is also agreeably simulated, with O2, CO2, and CO concentrations in flue gas agreeing with the experimental data. The simulation results benefit the understanding of the combustion process in the waste bed as well as the design of incinerator grates. PMID:25897505

  2. Numerical analysis of gas-dynamic instabilities during the laser drilling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. H.; O'Neill, W.; Tunna, L.; Sutcliffe, C. J.

    2006-08-01

    The use of high-pressure gas jets in the laser-drilling process has significant influence on the melt ejection mechanism. These jets are highly unstable and this directly relates to the gas pressure and the geometry of the hole being drilled. The evolution of gas-dynamic instabilities during the laser-drilling process was investigated numerically. A minimum length nozzle (MLN) with a 300 μm throat diameter was modelled at various gas pressures, with the gas jet impinging on a range of simulated holes with different aspect ratios. The simulations predict the formation of surface pressure fluctuations that have a broad spectrum due to both the turbulent nature of the jet and the blunt shock oscillation on the surface. The surface pressure variations and the blunt shock oscillation govern the gas dynamic conditions inside the hole, which strongly influence the melt ejection phenomena during the laser-drilling process.

  3. Numerical study of the generation of runaway electrons in a gas diode with a hot channel

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenkov, V. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2015-11-15

    A new method for increasing the efficiency of runaway electron beam generation in atmospheric pressure gas media has been suggested and theoretically proved. The method consists of creating a hot region (e.g., a spark channel or a laser plume) with a decreased numerical density of gas molecules (N) near the cathode. In this method, the ratio E/N (E—electric field strength) is increased by decreasing N instead of increasing E, as has been done in the past. The numerical model that is used allows the simultaneous calculation of the formation of a subnanosecond gas discharge and the generation of runaway electrons in gas media. The calculations have demonstrated the possibility of obtaining current pulses of runaway electrons with amplitudes of hundred of amperes and durations of more than 100 ps. The influence of the hot channel geometry on the parameters of the generated beam has been investigated.

  4. Experimental and numerical study of heavy gas dispersion in a ventilated room.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Laurent; Prévost, Corinne; Bouilloux, Laurent; Sestier-Carlin, Roger

    2008-04-01

    In order to better evaluate the consequences of an accidental release of heavy gas, such as uranium hexafluoride (UF(6)), in some installations in the nuclear fuel cycle, an experimental and numerical study was conducted by IRSN on heavy gas dispersion in a ventilated room. This study was based on about 20 injection configurations of a large quantity of a heavy tracer gas, sulphur hexafluoride (SF(6)), inside two ventilated rooms of different sizes. Stratification of the tracer gas was detected in all the configurations studied, even at low concentrations. Numerical simulations performed with the multidimensional CFX code enabled the stratification and the concentration levels reached in the rooms to be predicted overall, and the higher the air flow rate, the more satisfactory the comparison between simulation and experiment. PMID:17804157

  5. Preliminary results of numerical investigations at SECARB Cranfield, MS field test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Nicot, J.; Meckel, T. A.; Chang, K.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration partnership sponsored by DOE has chosen the Cranfield, MS field as a test site for its Phase II experiment. It will provide information on CO2 storage in oil and gas fields, in particular on storage permanence, storage capacity, and pressure buildup as well as on sweep efficiency. The 10,300 ft-deep reservoir produced 38 MMbbl of oil and 677 MMSCF of gas from the 1940's to the 1960's and is being retrofitted by Denbury Resources for tertiary recovery. CO2 injection started in July 2008 with a scheduled ramp up during the next few months. The Cranfield modeling team selected the northern section of the field for development of a numerical model using the multiphase-flow, compositional CMG-GEM software. Model structure was determined through interpretation of logs from old and recently-drilled wells and geophysical data. PETREL was used to upscale and export permeability and porosity data to the GEM model. Preliminary sensitivity analyses determined that relative permeability parameters and oil composition had the largest impact on CO2 behavior. The first modeling step consisted in history-matching the total oil, gas, and water production out of the reservoir starting from its natural state to determine the approximate current conditions of the reservoir. The fact that pressure recovered in the 40 year interval since end of initial production helps in constraining boundary conditions. In a second step, the modeling focused on understanding pressure evolution and CO2 transport in the reservoir. The presentation will introduce preliminary results of the simulations and confirm/explain discrepancies with field measurements.

  6. PEGAS: Hydrodynamical code for numerical simulation of the gas components of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, Igor

    A new hydrodynamical code for numerical simulation of the gravitational gas dynamics is described in the paper. The code is based on the Fluid-in-Cell method with a Godunov-type scheme at the Eulerian stage. The numerical method was adapted for GPU-based supercomputers. The performance of the code is shown by the simulation of the collision of the gas components of two similar disc galaxies in the course of the central collision of the galaxies in the polar direction.

  7. Numerical modeling of non-isothermal gas flow and NAPL vapor transport in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pártl, Ondřej; Beneš, Michal; Frolkovič, Peter; Illangasekare, Tissa; Smits, Kathleen

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a mathematical model for the description of non-isothermal compressible flow of gas mixtures in heterogeneous porous media and we derive an efficient semi-implicit time-stepping numerical scheme for the solution of the governing equations. We experimentally estimate the order of convergence of the scheme in spatial variables and we present several computational studies that demonstrate the ability of the numerical scheme.

  8. Numerical analysis of the relaxation of particle and gas phases in dusty supersonic viscous flow

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, R.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the full dusty gas viscous flow equations is presented. In this method the terms representing drag force, work done by the particles passing through the gas, and heat transfer are evaluated using the trapezoidal rule. The differencing procedure for the remaining terms is similar to the MacCormack explicit predictor-corrector method (MacCormack and Baldwin, 1975). 18 references.

  9. Numerical Simulations of Buoyancy Effects in low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satti, R. P.; Pasumarthi, K. S.; Agrawal, A. K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the computational analysis of buoyancy effects in the near field of an isothermal helium jet injected into quiescent ambient air environment. The transport equations of helium mass fraction coupled with the conservation equations of mixture mass and momentum were solved using a staggered grid finite volume method. Laminar, axisymmetric, unsteady flow conditions were considered for the analysis. An orthogonal system with non-uniform grids was used to capture the instability phenomena. Computations were performed for Earth gravity and during transition from Earth to different gravitational levels. The flow physics was described by simultaneous visualizations of velocity and concentration fields at Earth and microgravity conditions. Computed results were validated by comparing with experimental data substantiating that buoyancy induced global flow oscillations present in Earth gravity are absent in microgravity. The dependence of oscillation frequency and amplitude on gravitational forcing was presented to further quantify the buoyancy effects.

  10. Numerical analysis of flow in the hot gas manifold of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Singhal, A. K.; Przekwas, A. J.; Glynn, D. R.; Costes, N. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model and results of analyses carried out to characterize the flow through the two duct configuration of the Hot Gas Manifold of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Three dimensional computations have been performed for a half-scale air test model using a nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate system. The calculation domain is extended from the inlet of the turnaround duct to the exit of the transfer duct. Three test cases, one for laminar flow and two for turbulent flow, have been considered. For turbulent flows, constant eddy viscosity and the k-epsilon model of turbulence were employed. As expected, laminar flow calculation predicts much larger pressure drop than turbulent flow cases. The turbulent flow results are in good agreement with the available flow-visualization data. This study and experimental data indicate that the two-transfer duct design will significantly improve the flow distribution in the Hot Gas Manifold and thereby enhance the overall performance of the SSME.

  11. Numerical simulations of high Knudsen number gas flows and microchannel electrokinetic liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fang

    Low pressure and microchannel gas flows are characterized by high Knudsen numbers. Liquid flows in microchannels are characterized by non-conventional driving potentials like electrokinetic forces. The main thrust of the dissertation is to investigate these two different kinds of flows in gases and liquids respectively. High Knudsen number (Kn) gas flows were characterized by 'rarified' or 'microscale' behavior. Because of significant non-continuum effect, traditional CFD techniques are often inaccurate for analyzing high Kn number gas flows. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method offers an alternative to traditional CFD which retains its validity in slip and transition flow regimes. To validate the DSMC code, comparisons of simulation results with theoretical analysis and experimental data are made. The DSMC method was first applied to compute low pressure, high Kn flow fields in partially heated two dimensional channels. The effects of varying pressure, inlet flow and gas transport properties (Kn, Reynolds number, Re and the Prandtl number, Pr respectively) on the wall heat transfer (Nusselt number, Nu) were examined. The DSMC method was employed to explore mixing gas flows in two dimensional microchannels. Mixing of two gas streams (H2 and O2) was considered within a microchannel. The effect of the inlet-outlet pressure difference, the pressure ratio of the incoming streams and the accommodation coefficient of the solid wall on mixing length were all examined. Parallelization of a three-dimensional DSMC code was implemented using OpenMP procedure on a shared memory multi-processor computer. The parallel code was used to simulate 3D high Kn number Couette flow and the flow characteristics are found to be very different from their continuum counterparts. A mathematical model describing electrokinetically driven mass transport phenomena in microfabricated chip devices will also be presented. The model accounts for the principal physical phenomena affecting

  12. Gas-transfer analysis. Section H - real gas results via the van der Waals equation of state and virial expansion extension of its limiting Abel-Noble form

    SciTech Connect

    Chenoweth, D R

    1983-06-01

    An ideal-gas, quasi-steady, duct-flow model previously formulated for small scale gas-transfer problems is extended to real gases via the van der Waals equation of state as well as general virial expansions. The model is applicable for an arbitrary series of ducting components where each is described empirically by total pressure and total temperature change correlations. The adequacy of the van der Waals model for gas-transfer calculations is verified by comparisons with: (1) real gas PVT data; (2) the magnitudes of the controlling effects; and (3) approximate limiting case solutions with numerical results using more accurate real-gas modeling. 25 figures.

  13. LaRC results on nuclear pumped noble gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The recent experiment and theoretical results obtained for noble gas nuclear laser systems are presented. It is shown that the noble gas lasers are among the easiest systems to pump by nuclear excitation and as a result, all of the noble gases except He have lased under nuclear excitation. The noble gas systems are not ideal for high-power applications but they do give valuable insight into the operation and pumping mechanisms associated with nuclear lasers. At present, the Ar-Xe system is the best noble gas candidate for (U-235)F6 pumping. It appears that the quenching of Ar-Xe lasing is a result of the fluorine and not the uranium or fission fragments themselves. Thus, to achieve lasing with UF6, a fluorine compatible system must be found.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Dependence of Separative Power of the Gas Centrifuge on the Length of Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Borman, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    Numerical modelling and optimization of the gas flow and isotope separation in the Iguasu gas centrifuge (GC) for uranium enrichment have been performed for different lengths of the rotor. The calculations show that the specific separative power of the GC reduces with the length of the rotor. We show that the reduction of the specific separative power is connected with the growth of the pressure in the optimal regime and corresponding growth of temperature to prevent the working gas sublimation. The specific separative power remains constant with the growth of the rotor length provided that the temperature of the rotor is taken to be constant.

  15. Numerical calculations of a high power CW CO2 gas-dynamic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif; Al-Mutaib, Kheir

    2008-03-01

    Numerical solution of gas-dynamic laser equations in a gas mixture CO2:N2:H2O was carried out, using five-temperature-model (one translational and four vibrational temperatures) by a computational program written in FORTRAN. The spatial distributions of population inversion, gain and temperatures of the gas flow, in addition to the laser intensity and power extraction were studied inside the cavity, for certain initial conditions like pressure (p0=20 atm), temperature (T0= 1500 K), ratio of gases in the laser mixture (CO2:N2:H2O ≡ 10:85:5).

  16. Combined thermal and gas dynamics numerical model for laser ablation of carbon.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Kedar; Mullenix, Nathan; Povitsky, Alex

    2006-05-01

    One of the major methods of production of carbon nanotubes is the laser ablation process. In this process, a powerful nanosecond-scale laser beam illuminates a target. The resulting explosion produces a plume of rapidly expanding gaseous carbon with embedded metallic catalysts, on whose surfaces the nanotubes are formed. The time-scale of a single laser pulse is of the order of nanoseconds whereas the plume development and growth of nanotubes take up to several milliseconds. The synthesis process largely depends on the plume properties, i.e., on the temperature, pressure, and density of the expanding plume. In turn, the plume propagation depends on the ablation speed, pressure, and density. In the current study, a combined thermal and gas dynamics model is proposed, implemented and tested. The proposed model is based on combined conduction heat transfer within the solid target, carbon sublimation process described by equilibrium thermodynamics, and process of plume development described by continuous gas dynamics. The carbon sublimation model is based on Clausius-Clapeyron equation and conservation of energy for differential control volume. The parameters of the injected plume are defined by this thermal model. The validity of viscous and inviscid models of plume dynamics is discussed. The ability of finite-volume discretizations to capture the plume dynamics and its roll-up is compared for various numerical schemes. To evaluate the accuracy of numerical modeling of plume dynamics, we compare finite-volume discretization based on Relaxing TVD scheme with that based on the upwind scheme with Roe averaging at the cell interface and non-linear ENO scheme for second-order flux formulas. PMID:16792353

  17. Numerical Studies of the Application of Shock Tube Technology for Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, R.; Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Parkot, D.; Varava, W.; Olivier, H.; Luo, X.

    2007-12-01

    A new method for a combustion-free spraying is studied fundamentally by modeling and simulation in comparison with first experiments. The article focuses on the numerical simulation of the gas-particle nozzle flow, which is generated by the shock reflection at the end wall section of a shock tube. To study the physical fundamentals of this process, at present only a single shot operation is considered. The particles are injected downstream of the nozzle throat into a supersonic nozzle flow. The measurements of the particle velocity made by a laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) set up show that the maximum velocity amounts to 1220 m/s for stainless steel particles of 15 μm diameter. The CFD-Code (Fluent) is first verified by a comparison with available numerical and experimental data for gas and gas-particle flow fields in a long Laval-nozzle. The good agreement implied the great potential of the new dynamic process concept for cold-gas coating applications. Then the flow fields in the short Laval nozzle designed and realized by the Shock Wave Laboratory (SWL) are investigated. The gas flow for experimentally obtained stagnation conditions is simulated. The gas-particle flow without and with the influence of the particles on the gas flow is calculated by the Surface Engineering Institute (IOT) and compared with experiments. The influence of the injection parameters on the particle velocities is investigated, as well.

  18. Numerical models of steady-state and pulsating flows of self-ionizing gas in plasma accelerator channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Kozlov, A. N.; Konovalov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper continues the series of numerical investigations of self-ionizing gas flows in plasma accelerator channels with an azimuthal magnetic field. The mathematical model is based on the equations of dynamics of a three-component continuous medium consisting of atoms, ions, and electrons; the model is supplemented with the equation of ionization and recombination kinetics within the diffusion approximation with account for photoionization and photorecombination. It also takes into account heat exchange, which in this case is caused by radiative heat conductance. Upon a short history of the issue, the proposed model, numerical methods, and results for steady-state and pulsating flows are described.

  19. Numerical Analysis of a Multi-Physics Model for Trace Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Brian

    Trace gas sensors are currently used in many applications from leak detection to national security and may some day help with disease diagnosis. These sensors are modelled by a coupled system of complex elliptic partial differential equations for pressure and temperature. Solutions are approximated using the finite element method which we will show admits a continuous and coercive variational problem with optimal H1 and L2 error estimates. Numerically, the finite element discretization yields a skew-Hermitian dominant matrix for which classical algebraic preconditioners quickly degrade. We develop a block preconditioner that requires scalar Helmholtz solutions to apply but gives a very low outer iteration count. To handle this, we explore three preconditoners for the resulting linear system. First we analyze the classical block Jacobi and block Gauss-Seidel preconditions before presenting a custom, physics based preconditioner. We also present analysis showing eigenvalues of the custom preconditioned system are mesh-dependent but with a small coefficient. Numerical experiments confirm our theoretical discussion.

  20. A numerical study for transport phenomena of nanoscale gas flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Tomoya; Yonemura, Shigeru; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Gas flow in porous media occurs in various engineering devices such as catalytic converters and fuel cells. In order to improve the performance of such devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena in porous media. In porous media with pores as small as a molecular mean free path, molecular motions need to be directly considered instead of treating gas flow as a continuum, and effects of complicated channels need to be taken into account. Therefore, such gas flow was analyzed by using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which is the stochastic solution of the Boltzmann equation. Numerical simulations of gas flow driven by pressure gradient without surface reaction were performed to clarify transport phenomena in porous media imitated by arranging nanoscale solid particles randomly. The effects of pressure gradient, diameter of particles and porosity on gas flow rates and permeability of porous media were investigated.

  1. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori; Yonemura, Shigeru; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Miki, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-09

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment.

  2. Analysis and numerical optimization of gas turbine space power systems with nuclear fission reactor heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2005-07-01

    A new three objective optimization technique is developed and applied to find the operating conditions for fission reactor heated Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) space power systems at which maximum efficiency, minimum radiator area, and minimum total system mass is achieved. Such CCGT space power systems incorporate a nuclear reactor heat source with its radiation shield; the rotating turbo-alternator, consisting of the compressor, turbine and the electric generator (three phase AC alternator); and the heat rejection subsystem, principally the space radiator, which enables the hot gas working fluid, emanating from either the turbine or a regenerative heat exchanger, to be cooled to compressor inlet conditions. Numerical mass models for all major subsystems and components developed during the course of this work are included in this report. The power systems modeled are applicable to future interplanetary missions within the Solar System and planetary surface power plants at mission destinations, such as our Moon, Mars, the Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto), or Saturn's moon Titan. The detailed governing equations for the thermodynamic processes of the Brayton cycle have been derived and successfully programmed along with the heat transfer processes associated with cycle heat exchangers and the space radiator. System performance and mass results have been validated against a commercially available non-linear optimization code and also against data from existing ground based power plants.

  3. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Yonemura, Shigeru; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori; Miki, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-01

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment.

  4. Equilibrium gas flow computations. II - An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel; Liu, Yen

    1988-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, equilibrium gas laws. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for three-dimensional, time-varying grids. The approximations inherent in previous generalizations are discussed.

  5. Numerical study of droplet dynamics in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell gas channel using an embedded Eulerian-Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarauta, Alex; Ryzhakov, Pavel; Secanell, Marc; Waghmare, Prashant R.; Pons-Prats, Jordi

    2016-08-01

    An embedded Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for the simulation of droplet dynamics within a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) channel is presented. Air is modeled using an Eulerian formulation, whereas water is described with a Lagrangian framework. Using this framework, the gas-liquid interface can be accurately identified. The surface tension force is computed using the curvature defined by the boundary of the Lagrangian mesh. The method naturally accounts for material property changes across the interface and accurately represents the pressure discontinuity. A sessile drop in a horizontal surface, a sessile drop in an inclined plane and droplets in a PEFC channel are solved for as numerical examples and compared to experimental data. Numerical results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Numerical results are also compared to results obtained with the semi-analytical model previously developed by the authors in order to discuss the limitations of the semi-analytical approach.

  6. Numerical prediction of freezing fronts in cryosurgery: comparison with experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fortin, André; Belhamadia, Youssef

    2005-08-01

    Recent developments in scientific computing now allow to consider realistic applications of numerical modelling to medicine. In this work, a numerical method is presented for the simulation of phase change occurring in cryosurgery applications. The ultimate goal of these simulations is to accurately predict the freezing front position and the thermal history inside the ice ball which is essential to determine if cancerous cells have been completely destroyed. A semi-phase field formulation including blood flow considerations is employed for the simulations. Numerical results are enhanced by the introduction of an anisotropic remeshing strategy. The numerical procedure is validated by comparing the predictions of the model with experimental results. PMID:16298846

  7. Numerical Simulation Research of Gas Migration Laws on Real Underground Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S. Y.; Chen, X. X.; Dong, L. H.; Li, Z.

    In order to show gas migration process visually and research gas migration laws at different status when gas gushed from driving working face and then migrated along the roadway, we used FLUENT to research the characters of gas migration when wind velocities were 6m / s, 8m / s, 10m / s, and gas emission speeds were 10m / s, 30m / s and 50m / s on real atmospheric pressure, moisture content, viscosity coefficient of the mixed gas and other real roadway conditions. We derived the following results: Gas group gather together at the bottom of the roadway when it gush from driving working face by wind action, and then rise to the top gradually. Its volume increased while gas concentration came down in the process of migration. Attenuation degree of gas group diminished slower as the volume of gas group nun larger when the wind velocity is constant. Gas attenuation degree diminished slower as wind speed came down while gas emission volume is constant. Contrarily, wind speed is constant, the volume of gas emission became larger the maximum values of gas group became much more approximated to power function.

  8. Immiscible liquid-liquid pressure-driven flow in capillary tubes: Experimental results and numerical comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Edson J.; Thompson, Roney L.; Niero, Debora C.

    2015-08-01

    The immiscible displacement of one viscous liquid by another in a capillary tube is experimentally and numerically analyzed in the low inertia regime with negligible buoyancy effects. The dimensionless numbers that govern the problem are the capillary number Ca and the viscosity ratio of the displaced to the displacing fluids Nμ. In general, there are two output quantities of interest. One is associated to the relation between the front velocity, Ub, and the mean velocity of the displaced fluid, U ¯ 2 . The other is the layer thickness of the displaced fluid that remains attached to the wall. We compute these quantities as mass fractions in order to make them able to be compared. In this connection, the efficiency mass fraction, me, is defined as the complement of the mass fraction of the displaced fluid that leaves the tube while the displacing fluid crosses its length. The geometric mass fraction, mg, is defined as the fraction of the volume of the layer that remains attached to the wall. Because in gas-liquid displacement, these two quantities coincide, it is not uncommon in the literature to use mg as a measure of the displacement efficiency for liquid-liquid displacements. However, as is shown in the present paper, these two quantities have opposite tendencies when we increase the viscosity of the displacing fluid, making this distinction a crucial aspect of the problem. Results from a Galerkin finite element approach are also presented in order to make a comparison. Experimental and numerical results show that while the displacement efficiency decreases, the geometrical fraction increases when the viscosity ratio decreases. This fact leads to different decisions depending on the quantity to be optimized. The quantitative agreement between the numerical and experimental results was not completely achieved, especially for intermediate values of Ca. The reasons for that are still under investigation. The experiments conducted were able to achieve a wide range

  9. Numerical investigations of arc behaviour in gas metal arc welding using ANSYS CFX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnick, M.; Fuessel, U.; Hertel, M.; Spille-Kohoff, A.; Murphy, A. B.

    2011-06-01

    Current numerical models of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are trying to combine magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models of the arc and volume of fluid (VoF) models of metal transfer. They neglect vaporization and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as it is common practice for models of gas tungsten arc welding. These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to tungsten inert gas (TIG) arcs. However, current spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to TIG arcs they found a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. The paper presents a GMAW arc model that considers metal vapour and which is in a very good agreement with experimentally observed temperatures. Furthermore, the model is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial temperature and the radial electric current density distributions for the first time. The axially symmetric model of the welding torch, the work piece, the wire and the arc (fluid domain) implements MHD as well as turbulent mixing and thermal demixing of metal vapour in argon. The mass fraction of iron vapour obtained from the simulation shows an accumulation in the arc core and another accumulation on the fringes of the arc at 2000 to 5000 K. The demixing effects lead to very low concentrations of iron between these two regions. Sensitive analyses demonstrate the influence of the transport and radiation properties of metal vapour, and the evaporation rate relative to the wire feed. Finally the model predictions are compared with the measuring results of Zielińska et al.

  10. Numerical models for the diffuse ionized gas in galaxies. I. Synthetic spectra of thermally excited gas with turbulent magnetic reconnection as energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lieb, S.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Lesch, H.; Hultzsch, P. J. N.; Birk, G. T.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to verify whether turbulent magnetic reconnection can provide the additional energy input required to explain the up to now only poorly understood ionization mechanism of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in galaxies and its observed emission line spectra. Methods: We use a detailed non-LTE radiative transfer code that does not make use of the usual restrictive gaseous nebula approximations to compute synthetic spectra for gas at low densities. Excitation of the gas is via an additional heating term in the energy balance as well as by photoionization. Numerical values for this heating term are derived from three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic two-fluid plasma-neutral-gas simulations to compute energy dissipation rates for the DIG under typical conditions. Results: Our simulations show that magnetic reconnection can liberate enough energy to by itself fully or partially ionize the gas. However, synthetic spectra from purely thermally excited gas are incompatible with the observed spectra; a photoionization source must additionally be present to establish the correct (observed) ionization balance in the gas.

  11. A numerical procedure to determine blade temperature of cooled stator blades in gas turbines: A numerical and experimental comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Carcasci, C.; Facchini, B.; Corradini, U.

    1994-12-31

    The continuing need to improve both efficiency and specific power of gas turbines requires progressively increasing turbine inlet temperatures and blade cooling efficiency. This paper presents a blade cooling simulation code for gas turbine stator blades analysis. A comparison between the predictions of simulation and the experimental data of the external nozzle temperatures of a small heavy duty gas turbine is presented. The simulation code allows for several cooling techniques on the basis of different solutions combined (as they often are) on the same blade. The cooling model considered is simplified: the limitation in the accuracy of the results is far overcome by the simplicity and versatility of the approach. A two-dimensional Navier Stokes simulation of film cooling is also compared with a correlation approach.

  12. Classical hydrodynamics on the sphere: Gas giant phenomenology and novel numerical methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhne, Gordan Robert

    1999-12-01

    A new body of numerical methodology for the solution of hydrodynamical problems on the sphere is developed and applied to the integration of the two-dimensional shallow-water and nondivergent barotropic vorticity equations. Various discretizations of these nonlinear dynamical systems are derived and compared on the basis of these novel techniques, which utilize Cartesian representations of the governing equations defined on local patches of a refined icosahedral. grid structure. This mesh is almost uniform on the sphere and is particularly well-suited to the incorporation of multigrid methods whose implementation I also describe. In their totality, the new numerical techniques deliver (in addition to a other potential advantages) a greater theoretical efficiency at high resolution than the spectral transform methodology which is currently prevalent in hydrodynamical applications in spherical geometry. Models derived on the basis of these techniques are shown to perform well in comparisons with previously published results in the field of atmospheric dynamics, both for simple, standard test cases, and for more challenging nonlinear analyses of polar vortex erosion. The new models have also been exercised in novel simulations of physical processes relating to the action of the nonlinear inverse energy cascade that controls the evolution of two-dimensional flows and which is fundamental to the understanding of the observed atmospheric states of the Gas Giant Planets. I also present and interpret a novel nondimensionalization of global barotropic and shallow water flows on the sphere and relate it to the potential vorticity (PV) mixing principle whereby zonal flows in the presence of background rotation tend to self-organize into stable ``PV staircase'' configurations with latitudinal regions of homogeneous PV separated by strong gradients. Analytical representations of the corresponding mean zonal velocity profiles are developed and shown to furnish good fits to

  13. Wavy liquid films in interaction with a strongly confined laminar gas flow: Modeling and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Georg F.; Ruyer-Quil, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Different technological settings concern the flow of a wavy liquid film in contact with a strongly confined gas flow. Micro-gaps for instance, which are employed for the cooling of electronic equipment, involve a pressure-driven evaporating liquid film flowing co-currently to its own vapor. In packed columns used for distillation, falling liquid films sheared by a counter-current gas flow occur within narrow channels. Surface waves on the liquid-gas interface of these flows play an important role as they intensify scalar transfer and may cause flooding of the channel. However, their accurate prediction by full numerical simulation is associated with a substantial computational cost. We evaluate an alternative approach based on a low-dimensional integral boundary layer formulation applied to both fluid layers. The resulting model captures the long-wave (Yih and Kapitza) instabilities of the flow accurately and allows calculations on long domains at low computational cost. These evince a number of intricate wave-induced flow structures within the film and gas as well as a possible route to the flooding of narrow channels under counter-current gas flow conditions. Comparisons with direct numerical simulations using the VOF-CSF approach as well as experiments are convincing. GFD acknowledges support from DAAD (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst).

  14. Numerical models, geochemistry and the zero-paradox noble-gas mantle.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, Chris J; Van Keken, Peter E; Porcelli, Don; Hauri, Erik H

    2002-11-15

    Numerical models of whole-mantle convection demonstrate that degassing of the mantle is an inefficient process, resulting in ca. 50% of the (40)Ar being degassed from the mantle system. In this sense the numerical simulations are consistent with the (40)Ar mass balance between the atmosphere and mantle reservoir. These models, however, are unable to preserve the large-scale heterogeneity predicted by models invoking geochemical layering of the mantle system. We show that the three most important noble-gas constraints on the geochemically layered mantle are entirely dependent on the (3)He concentration of the convecting mantle derived from the (3)He flux into the oceans and the average ocean-crust generation rate. A factor of 3.5 increase in the convecting-mantle noble-gas concentration removes all requirements for: a (3)He flux into the upper mantle from a deeper high (3)He source; a boundary in the mantle capable of separating heat from helium; and a substantial deep-mantle reservoir to contain a hidden (40)Ar rich reservoir. We call this model concentration for the convecting mantle the 'zero-paradox' concentration. The time-integrated flux of (3)He into the oceans is a robust observation, but only representative of the ocean-floor activity over the last 1000 years. In contrast, ocean-floor generation occurs over tens of millions of years. We argue that combining these two observations to obtain the (3)He concentration of the mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is unsound. Other indicators of mantle (3)He concentration suggest that the real value may be at least a factor of two higher. As the zero-paradox concentration is approached, the noble-gas requirement for mantle layering is removed. We further consider the role that recycled material plays in ocean-island-basalt generation and show that a source with high (3)He and (3)He/(4)He must exist within the mantle. Nevertheless, only a small amount of this material is required to generate both the observed ocean

  15. Numerical simulation of particle fluxes formation generated as a result of space objects breakups in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, A. G.; Galushina, T. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes the software package developed for the numerical simulation of the breakups of natural and artificial objects and algorithms on which it is based. A new software "Numerical model of breakups" includes models of collapse of the spacecraft (SC) as a result of the explosion and collision as well as two models of the explosion of an asteroid.

  16. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Numerical simulation of a moving rigid body in a rarefied gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Samir; Tiwari, Sudarshan; Klar, Axel; Hardt, Steffen

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a numerical scheme to simulate a moving rigid body with arbitrary shape suspended in a rarefied gas. The rarefied gas is simulated by solving the Boltzmann equation using a DSMC particle method. The motion of the rigid body is governed by the Newton-Euler equations, where the force and the torque on the rigid body are computed from the momentum transfer of the gas molecules colliding with the body. On the other hand, the motion of the rigid body influences the gas flow in its surroundings. We validate the numerical scheme by considering a moving piston problem in 1D and the Einstein relation for Brownian motion of the suspended particle in 3D. In the piston problem it is shown that the equilibrium position of the moving piston converges to the analytical solution for a wide range of Knudsen numbers. In the case of Brownian motion the translational as well as the rotational degrees of freedom are taken into account. In this case it is shown that the numerically computed translational and rotational diffusion coefficients converge to the theoretical values. Finally, the motion of an object of complex shape under the influence of a thermophoretic force is investigated.

  18. Numerical simulation of high pressure release and dispersion of hydrogen into air with real gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksarfard, R.; Kameshki, M. R.; Paraschivoiu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen is a renewable and clean source of energy, and it is a good replacement for the current fossil fuels. Nevertheless, hydrogen should be stored in high-pressure reservoirs to have sufficient energy. An in-house code is developed to numerically simulate the release of hydrogen from a high-pressure tank into ambient air with more accuracy. Real gas models are used to simulate the flow since high-pressure hydrogen deviates from ideal gas law. Beattie-Bridgeman and Abel Noble equations are applied as real gas equation of state. A transport equation is added to the code to calculate the concentration of the hydrogen-air mixture after release. The uniqueness of the code is to simulate hydrogen in air release with the real gas model. Initial tank pressures of up to 70 MPa are simulated.

  19. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, Tim; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation consists of viewgraph which review the test program and the results of the tests for the Gas Generator (GG) component for the Fastrac Engine. Included are pictures of the Fastrac (MC-1) Engine and the GG, diagrams of the flight configuration, and schematics of the LOX, and the RP-1 systems and the injector assembly. The normal operating parameters are reviewed, as are the test instrumentation. Also shown are graphs of the hot gas temperature, and the test temperature profiles. The results are summarized.

  20. Numerical analysis of gas separator with thermal transpiration in micro channels II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaye, Shoeji; Sugimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    A membrane gas separator which operates with only a small temperature difference across a membrane is designed, and its capability is numerically proved. The separator system consists of three Knudsen pumps - a motionless pump that utilizes the thermal transpiration of the rarefied gas. Each pump is composed of a porous membrane and one channel along each of the two surfaces of the membrane. Two of the pumps induce a variation of mole fraction using a combination of the thermal transpiration and pressure driven flow through the membrane, and the other one provides the former two pumps with a required pressure difference. This paper reports the first numerical calculations that demonstrate a neon-argon binary gas mixture can be separated into pure neon gas and argon gas with the proposed design. The temperature difference is no more than 90 K, and the total length of the membrane is ˜ 15 cm at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The production rate of the separator is proportional to the width of the membrane. For example, when the width is 10 cm, the flow rates of the product gases are 0.8 sccm for argon and 1.9 sccm for neon.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Energy Balance in Argon-Helium Mixed Gas Tungsten Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Fusaki; Suzuki, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Kei

    High temperature arc plasma produced by employing Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) is highly controllable, since it is stabilized with a shielding gas. Additionally, GTA requires low cost for equipment investment. Therefore, it is widely utilized as a heat source for material processing such as melting, cutting and welding, or decomposition and detoxification of toxic waste. Energy source properties of GTA strongly depend on the physical properties of the shielding gas. For instance, helium (He) gas or admixture of He gas with argon gas is employed as the shielding gas for conditions requiring high productivity in GTA welding process. Since He has low electrical conductivity especially in low temperature range due to high ionization potential, the current channel in He arc plasma is constricted near the arc axis. Consequently, the enhanced heat input intensity into a base material by the constriction increases weld depth and, thus, leads to the high productivity. However, the effect of the admixture on the heat input characteristics to the base metal is still not clear. In this paper, energy source properties of Ar-He GTA are predicted. The properties of arc plasma and the heat input intensity into a water-cooled copper anode are numerically analyzed.

  2. Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai

    2012-07-15

    Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

  3. Non-equilibrium Numerical Analysis of Microwave-supported Detonation Threshold Propagating through Diatomic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Microwave-supported Detonation (MSD), one type of Microwave-supported Plasma (MSP), is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for beam-powered space propulsion systems. In this study, I numerically simulate MSD waves propagating through a diatomic gas. In order to evaluate the threshold of beam intensity, I use the physical-fluid dynamics scheme, which has been developed for simulating unsteady and non-equilibrium LSD waves propagating through a hydrogen gas.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of the thermal performance of gas-cooled divertor modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosatti, Lorenzo

    Divertors are in-vessel, plasma-facing, components in magnetic-confinement fusion reactors. Their main function is to remove the fusion reaction ash (alpha-particles), unburned fuel, and eroded particles from the reactor, which adversely affect the quality of the plasma. A significant fraction (˜15 %) of the total fusion thermal power is removed by the divertor coolant and must, therefore, be recovered at elevated temperature in order to enhance the overall thermal efficiency. Helium is the leading coolant because of its high thermal conductivity, material compatibility, and suitability as a working fluid for power conversion systems using a closed high temperature Brayton cycle. Peak surface heat fluxes on the order of 10 MW/m2 are anticipated with surface temperatures in the region of 1,200 °C to 1,500 °C. Recently, several helium-cooled divertor designs have been proposed, including a modular T-tube design and a modular "finger" configuration with jet impingement cooling from perforated end caps. Design calculations performed using the FLUENTRTM CFD software package have shown that these designs can accommodate a peak heat load of 10 MW/m2. Extremely high heat transfer coefficients (˜50,000 W/(m2•K)) were predicted by these calculations. Since these values of heat transfer coefficient are considered to be "outside of the experience base" for gas-cooled systems, an experimental investigation has been undertaken to validate the results of the numerical simulations. Attention has been focused on the thermal performance of the T-tube and the "finger" divertor designs. Experimental and numerical investigations have been performed to support both divertor geometries. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the experimental data and model predictions, thereby confirming the predicted performance of the leading helium-cooled divertor designs for near- and long-term magnetic fusion reactor designs. The results of this investigation provide confidence in the

  5. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  6. Understanding Bead Hump Formation in Gas Metal Arc Welding Using a Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Min Hyun; Farson, Dave F.

    2007-04-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to study temperature distributions and fluid flows during formation of humped beads in high speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Based on simulation and experimental results, the physical mechanisms associated with humping phenomenon were investigated and two conditions responsible for hump formation were identified: the formation of thin liquid channel induced by surface tension pinching force and premature solidification of the melt in the thin channel that divides the weld pool into a front and rear portion. A strong backward fluid flow that produced an accumulation of melt at the rear of the weld pool increased the size of humps. Although surface tension was shown to be important in hump formation, Marangoni flow induced by negative surface tension gradients was not significant for hump formation. The simulation results clarified the fluid flow associated with two different hump shapes. Experimental welds without bead humping were made at a lower travel speed and were also simulated to illustrate the differences in heat and fluid flow from humped beads.

  7. Three-dimensional convection in horizontal cylinders - Numerical solutions and comparison with experimental and analytical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smutek, C.; Bontoux, P.; Roux, B.; Schiroky, G. H.; Hurford, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of Boussinesq free convection in a horizontal differentially heated cylinder are presented. The computation was based on a Samarskii-Andreyev scheme (described by Leong, 1981) and a false-transient advancement in time, with vorticity, velocity, and temperature as dependent variables. Solutions for velocity and temperature distributions were obtained for Rayleigh numbers (based on the radius) Ra = 74-18,700, thus covering the core- and boundary-layer-driven regimes. Numerical solutions are compared with asymptotic analytical solutions and experimental data. The numerical results well represent the complex three-dimensional flows found experimentally.

  8. Numerical results using the conforming VEM for the convection-diffusion-reaction equation with variable coefficients.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Cangiani, Andrea; Sutton, Oliver

    2014-10-02

    This document presents the results of a set of preliminary numerical experiments using several possible conforming virtual element approximations of the convection-reaction-diffusion equation with variable coefficients.

  9. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  10. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.W.

    1992-11-30

    This report documents studies on the effects of gas sorption on coal, with the intent of eventually evaluating how sorption and strain affect permeability. These studies were, carried out at the University of Alabama during the period from 1989 through 1992. Two major experimental methods were developed and used. In the strain experiments, electronic strain gauges were attached to polished blocks of coal in order to measure linear and volumetric swelling due to gas sorption. The effects of bedding plane orientation, of gas type, and of coal type were investigated. In the gravimetric experiment the weight of small samples of coal was measured during exposure to high pressure gases. Sample measurements were corrected for buoyancy effects and for sample swelling, and the results were plotted in the form of Langmuir isotherms. Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of grain size, coal type, moisture, and of sorbant gas. The advantage of this method is that it can be applied to very small samples, and it enabled comparison liptinite versus vitrinite concentrates, and kerogen rich versus kerogen depleted oil shales. Also included is a detailed discussion of the makeup of coal and its effect on gas sorption behavior.

  11. Numerical calculations of turbulent reacting flow in a gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1987-01-01

    A numerical study for confined, axisymmetrical, turbulent diffusion flames is presented. Local mean gas properties are predicted by solving the appropriate conservation equations in the finite difference form with the corresponding boundary conditions. The k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model is employed to describe the turbulent nature of the flow. A two-step kinetic model is assumed to govern the reaction mechanism. The finite reaction rate is the smaller of an Arrhenius type of reaction rate and a modified version of eddy-breakup model. Reasonable agreement is observed between calculations and measurements, but to obtain better agreement, more work is needed on improvements of the above mathematical models. However, the present numerical study offers an improvement in the analysis and design of the gas turbine combustors.

  12. Numerical approximation of boundary conditions with applications to inviscid equations of gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the state of the art of well-posedness and stability analysis of difference approximations for initial boundary value problems of the hyperbolic type is presented. The applicability of recent theoretical development to practical calculations for nonlinear gas dynamics is examined. The one dimensional inviscid gas dynamics equations in conservation law form are selected for numerical experiments. The class of implicit schemes developed from linear multistep methods in ordinary differential equations is chosen and the use of linear extrapolation as an explicit or implicit boundary scheme is emphasized. Specification of boundary data in the primitive variables and computation in terms of the conservative variables in the interior is discussed. Some numerical examples for the quasi-one-dimensional nozzle are given.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Response Characteristics of Audio-magnetotelluric for Gas Hydrate in the Qilian Mountain Permafrost, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Yu, Changqing; Pi, Jinyun

    2015-10-01

    Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) method is a kind of frequencydomain sounding technique, which can be applied to gas hydrate prospecting and assessments in the permafrost region due to its high frequency band. Based on the geological conditions of gas hydrate reservoir in the Qilian Mountain permafrost, by establishing high-resistance abnormal model for gas hydrate and carrying out numerical simulation using finite element method (FEM) and nonlinear conjugate gradient (NLCG) method, this paper analyzed the application range of AMT method and the best acquisition parameters setting scheme. When porosity of gas hydrate reservoir is less than 5%, gas hydrate saturation is greater than 70%, occurrence scale is less than 50 m, or bury depth is greater than 500 m, AMT technique cannot identify and delineate the favorable gas hydrate reservoir. Survey line should be more than twice the length of probable occurrence scale, while tripling the length will make the best result. The number of stations should be no less than 6, and 11 stations are optimal. At the high frequency section (10~1000 Hz), there should be no less than 3 frequency points, 4 being the best number.

  14. Accumulation of errors in numerical simulations of chemically reacting gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Stamov, L. I.; Altoukhov, D. I.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate problems of numerical simulations precision and stochastic errors accumulation in solving problems of detonation or deflagration combustion of gas mixtures in rocket engines. Computational models for parallel computing on supercomputers incorporating CPU and GPU units were tested and verified. Investigation of the influence of computational grid size on simulation precision and computational speed was performed. Investigation of accumulation of errors for simulations implying different strategies of computation were performed.

  15. A Hydrodynamic Theory for Spatially Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Lasers. 2; Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jianzhong; Ning, C. Z.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present numerical results of the diffusion coefficients (DCs) in the coupled diffusion model derived in the preceding paper for a semiconductor quantum well. These include self and mutual DCs in the general two-component case, as well as density- and temperature-related DCs under the single-component approximation. The results are analyzed from the viewpoint of free Fermi gas theory with many-body effects incorporated. We discuss in detail the dependence of these DCs on densities and temperatures in order to identify different roles played by the free carrier contributions including carrier statistics and carrier-LO phonon scattering, and many-body corrections including bandgap renormalization and electron-hole (e-h) scattering. In the general two-component case, it is found that the self- and mutual- diffusion coefficients are determined mainly by the free carrier contributions, but with significant many-body corrections near the critical density. Carrier-LO phonon scattering is dominant at low density, but e-h scattering becomes important in determining their density dependence above the critical electron density. In the single-component case, it is found that many-body effects suppress the density coefficients but enhance the temperature coefficients. The modification is of the order of 10% and reaches a maximum of over 20% for the density coefficients. Overall, temperature elevation enhances the diffusive capability or DCs of carriers linearly, and such an enhancement grows with density. Finally, the complete dataset of various DCs as functions of carrier densities and temperatures provides necessary ingredients for future applications of the model to various spatially inhomogeneous optoelectronic devices.

  16. CO2 migration in the vadose zone: experimental and numerical modelling of controlled gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gasparini, andrea; credoz, anthony; grandia, fidel; garcia, david angel; bruno, jordi

    2014-05-01

    The mobility of CO2 in the vadose zone and its subsequent transfer to the atmosphere is a matter of concern in the risk assessment of the geological storage of CO2. In this study the experimental and modelling results of controlled CO2 injection are reported to better understanding of the physical processes affecting CO2 and transport in the vadose zone. CO2 was injected through 16 micro-injectors during 49 days of experiments in a 35 m3 experimental unit filled with sandy material, in the PISCO2 facilities at the ES.CO2 centre in Ponferrada (North Spain). Surface CO2 flux were monitored and mapped periodically to assess the evolution of CO2 migration through the soil and to the atmosphere. Numerical simulations were run to reproduce the experimental results, using TOUGH2 code with EOS7CA research module considering two phases (gas and liquid) and three components (H2O, CO2, air). Five numerical models were developed following step by step the injection procedure done at PISCO2. The reference case (Model A) simulates the injection into a homogeneous soil(homogeneous distribution of permeability and porosity in the near-surface area, 0.8 to 0.3 m deep from the atmosphere). In another model (Model B), four additional soil layers with four specific permeabilities and porosities were included to predict the effect of differential compaction on soil. To account for the effect of higher soil temperature, an isothermal simulation called Model C was also performed. Finally, the assessment of the rainfall effects (soil water saturation) on CO2 emission on surface was performed in models called Model D and E. The combined experimental and modelling approach shows that CO2 leakage in the vadose zone quickly comes out through preferential migration pathways and spots with the ranges of fluxes in the ground/surface interface from 2.5 to 600 g·m-2·day-1. This gas channelling is mainly related to soil compaction and climatic perturbation. This has significant implications to

  17. Gas Flowing out of the Large Magellanic Cloud Galaxy due to Numerous Supernovae Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Madeline; Barger, Kathleen; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J. Christopher; Haffner, L. Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) galaxy is currently losing gas due to the numerous supernovae explosions that are spread across its disk. We detected Hα emission from this wide-spread galactic wind using the Wisconsin Hα Mapper (WHAM) telescope and present mapped observations of the LMC and its intermediate and high velocity clouds between +125 ≤ vLSR ≤ +400 km/s. Previous absorption studies found that these clouds contain a few 107 solar masses of gas (Lehner et al. 2009 and Barger et al. 2015). However, these studies were only sensitive to the region in front of the LMC. From this study, we conclude that the gas cloud extends much further off the LMC and that it is much more massive than previous studies predict.

  18. A Numerical Study on Gas Phase Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jae-Sang; Park, Sun-Kyu; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2008-08-01

    The high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray is used for a particulate deposition process in which micro-sized particles are propelled and heated in a supersonic combusting gas stream. It is characterized by high gas velocity and high density and is being used in an increasing variety of coating applications, such as ceramic and composite coatings, to improve wear and abrasion resistance. The particle temperature and velocity are two of the most important parameters in HVOF thermal spraying, which affect the quality of the coatings. To understand the particle dynamics, it is necessary to study, first, the thermal flow characteristics in the HVOF system. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed to predict the gas dynamic behaviors, and the effect of the geometrical parameter is studied to optimize the nozzle design.

  19. Numerical simulation of gas-solid two-phase flow in U-beam separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. Y.; Zhang, H. Z.; Chen, X. P.; Ruan, J. M.; Dou, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation is carried out for gas-solid two-phase flow in a U-beam separator. In this study, the U-beam is altered with the inlet fins in order to improve the performance of the separator. The inlet fin angle of the separator are 30°, 35°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55 ° and 60°. The governing equations are the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with the standard k-epsilon model and the discrete phase model (DPM) describing the discrete two - phase flow as well as stochastic tracking model. Results show that the pressure drop deviation with fins is within 3% from those without fins. It is found that there is a maximum separation efficiency at the fin angle of 35°. Fin induces generation of a stagnation region which could collect particles and lead to change of vortical structures. The fin induced flow also causes the turbulent intensity inside the baffle to decrease to facilitate separation.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Investigations on Flue Gas Purification during Hot Gas Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Thulfaut, C.; Renz, U.

    2002-09-19

    The aim of the actual investigations is to integrate the catalytic reduction of carbon monoxide and particularly nitric oxides into the hot gas filtration process with ceramic filter elements of fluidized bed combustors which mainly represent an important N2O-source. According to Klein (Klein 1994) worldwide approx. 260 coal-fired power plants with fluidized bed combustors in the power range > 50 MWel existed in 1994, to which approx. 1% of the global coal dissipation corresponds. These emitted dinitrogen oxide with 70 kt/a, however, 20% of the entire N2O amounts from stationary firing plants. After Kleins calculations an increase of coal-fired fluidized bed combustors only by 10% triples the N2O emission.

  1. Comparison of results of experimental research with numerical calculations of a model one-sided seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimiak, Damian; Krzyślak, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents the results of experimental and numerical research of a model segment of a labyrinth seal for a different wear level. The analysis covers the extent of leakage and distribution of static pressure in the seal chambers and the planes upstream and downstream of the segment. The measurement data have been compared with the results of numerical calculations obtained using commercial software. Based on the flow conditions occurring in the area subjected to calculations, the size of the mesh defined by parameter y+ has been analyzed and the selection of the turbulence model has been described. The numerical calculations were based on the measurable thermodynamic parameters in the seal segments of steam turbines. The work contains a comparison of the mass flow and distribution of static pressure in the seal chambers obtained during the measurement and calculated numerically in a model segment of the seal of different level of wear.

  2. Height of burst explosions: a comparative study of numerical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omang, M.; Christensen, S. O.; Børve, S.; Trulsen, J.

    2009-06-01

    In the current work, we use the Constant Volume model and the numerical method, Regularized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (RSPH) to study propagation and reflection of blast waves from detonations of the high explosives C-4 and TNT. The results from simulations of free-field TNT explosions are compared to previously published data, and good agreement is found. Measurements from height of burst tests performed by the Norwegian Defence Estates Agency are used to compare against numerical simulations. The results for shock time of arrival and the pressure levels are well represented by the numerical results. The results are also found to be in good agreement with results from a commercially available code. The effect of allowing different ratios of specific heat capacities in the explosive products are studied. We also evaluate the effect of changing the charge shape and height of burst on the triple point trajectory.

  3. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  4. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  5. Numerical study of the effect of water addition on gas explosion.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuntao; Zeng, Wen

    2010-02-15

    Through amending the SENKIN code of CHEMKIN III chemical kinetics package, a computational model of gas explosion in a constant volume bomb was built, and the detailed reaction mechanism (GRI-Mech 3.0) was adopted. The mole fraction profiles of reactants, some selected free radicals and catastrophic gases in the process of gas explosion were analyzed by this model. Furthermore, through the sensitivity analysis of the reaction mechanism of gas explosion, the dominant reactions that affect gas explosion and the formation of catastrophic gases were found out. At the same time, the inhibition mechanisms of water on gas explosion and the formation of catastrophic gases were analyzed. The results show that the induced explosion time is prolonged, and the mole fractions of reactant species such as CH(4), O(2) and catastrophic gases such as CO, CO(2) and NO are decreased as water is added to the mixed gas. With the water fraction in the mixed gas increasing, the sensitivities of the dominant reactions contributing to CH(4), CO(2) are decreased and the sensitivity coefficients of CH(4), CO and NO mole fractions are also decreased. The inhibition of gas explosion with water addition can be ascribed to the significant decrease of H, O and OH in the process of gas explosion due to the water presence. PMID:19811873

  6. A Study of the Influence of Numerical Diffusion on Gas-Solid Flow Predictions in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandriz, Ronak; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an investigation is made of the influence of numerical diffusion on the accuracy of gas-solid flow predictions in fluidized beds. This is an important issue particularly in bubbling fluidized beds since numerical error greatly affects the dynamics of bubbles and their associated mixing process. A bed of coal (classified as Geldart A) is considered which becomes fluidized as the velocity of nitrogen stream into the reactor is gradually increased. The fluidization process is simulated using various numerical schemes as well as grid resolutions. Simulations involve Eulerian-Eulerian two-phase flow modeling approach and results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that higher order schemes equipped with flux limiter give favorable prediction of bubble and particle dynamics and hence, the mixing process within the reactor. The excessive numerical diffusion associated with lower order schemes results in unrealistic prediction of bubble shapes and bed height. Comparison is also made of computational efficiency of various schemes. It is shown that the Monotonized Central scheme with down wind factor results in the shortest simulation time because of its efficient parallelization on distributed memory platforms.

  7. A robust numerical method for the R13 equations of rarefied gas dynamics: Application to lid driven cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Anirudh; Torrilhon, Manuel; Struchtrup, Henning

    2013-03-01

    In this work we present a finite difference scheme to compute steady state solutions of the regularized 13 moment (R13) equations of rarefied gas dynamics. The scheme allows fast solutions for 2D and 3D boundary value problems (BVPs) with velocity slip and temperature jump boundary conditions. The scheme is applied to the lid driven cavity problem for Knudsen numbers up to 0.7. The results compare well with those obtained from more costly solvers for rarefied gas dynamics, such as the Integro Moment Method (IMM) and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The R13 equations yield better results than the classical Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations for this boundary value problem, since they give an approximate description of Knudsen boundary layers at moderate Knudsen numbers. The R13 based numerical solutions are computationally economical and may be considered as a reliable alternative mathematical model for complex industrial problems at moderate Knudsen numbers.

  8. Numerical simulation and experimental results of ultrasonic waves scattering on a model of the artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, J.; Powalowski, T.; Trawinski, Z.

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the results of the mathematical modeling and experimental results of the ultrasonic waves scattering in the inhomogeneous dissipative medium. The research was carried out for an artery model (a pipe made of a latex), with internal diameter of 5 mm and wall thickness of 1.25 mm. The numerical solver was created for calculation of the fields of ultrasonic beams and scattered fields under different boundary conditions, different angles and transversal displacement of ultrasonic beams with respect to the position of the arterial wall. The investigations employed the VED ultrasonic apparatus. The good agreement between the numerical calculation and experimental results was obtained.

  9. Aircraft Engine Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: Public Benchmarking Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Borguet, Sebastien; Leonard, Olivier; Zhang, Xiaodong (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem has been created and made publicly available. This software tool, referred to as the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDiMES), has been constructed based on feedback provided by the aircraft EHM community. It provides a standard benchmark problem enabling users to develop, evaluate and compare diagnostic methods. This paper will present an overview of ProDiMES along with a description of four gas path diagnostic methods developed and applied to the problem. These methods, which include analytical and empirical diagnostic techniques, will be described and associated blind-test-case metric results will be presented and compared. Lessons learned along with recommendations for improving the public benchmarking processes will also be presented and discussed.

  10. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yuann, R Y; Schrock, V E; Chen, Xiang

    1995-09-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena.

  11. Numerical simulations of turbulent ionized gas flows in the circumsolar protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marov, M. Ya.; Kuksa, M. M.

    2015-09-01

    An axisymmetric protoplanetary disk model that takes into account the interaction of turbulent gas flows with the magnetic field is considered. A closed system of equations of homogeneous compressible magnetohydrodynamics in the regime of developed turbulence in the gravitational and magnetic fields of a star has been constructed. Apart from the traditional probability-theoretical averaging of the MHD equations, the weighted Favre averaging is used. The approach by A.V. Kolesnichenko and M.Ya. Marov to modeling the turbulent transport coefficients in a weakly ionized disk has been implemented. It allows the inverse effects of the generated magnetic field on a turbulent gas flow and the dissipation of turbulence through kinematic and magnetic viscosities to be taken into account. A parallel code for numerically solving the system of averaged MHD equations has been developed. The averaged gas density and velocity distributions as well as the configuration of the disk's intrinsic magnetic field at a distance of 1 AU from the star have been obtained through numerical simulations. The assumption that the vertical (parallel to the disk's rotation axis) magnetic induction component changes much more profoundly in height than in radius and, hence, gives grounds to take into account its gradient in the model of the turbulent kinematic viscosity coefficient has been confirmed.

  12. Validation and Analysis of Numerical Results for a Two-Pass Trapezoidal Channel With Different Cooling Configurations of Trailing Edge.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Waseem; El-Gabry, Lamyaa; Shevchuk, Igor V; Fransson, Torsten H

    2013-01-01

    High inlet temperatures in a gas turbine lead to an increase in the thermal efficiency of the gas turbine. This results in the requirement of cooling of gas turbine blades/vanes. Internal cooling of the gas turbine blade/vanes with the help of two-pass channels is one of the effective methods to reduce the metal temperatures. In particular, the trailing edge of a turbine vane is a critical area, where effective cooling is required. The trailing edge can be modeled as a trapezoidal channel. This paper describes the numerical validation of the heat transfer and pressure drop in a trapezoidal channel with and without orthogonal ribs at the bottom surface. A new concept of ribbed trailing edge has been introduced in this paper which presents a numerical study of several trailing edge cooling configurations based on the placement of ribs at different walls. The baseline geometries are two-pass trapezoidal channels with and without orthogonal ribs at the bottom surface of the channel. Ribs induce secondary flow which results in enhancement of heat transfer; therefore, for enhancement of heat transfer at the trailing edge, ribs are placed at the trailing edge surface in three different configurations: first without ribs at the bottom surface, then ribs at the trailing edge surface in-line with the ribs at the bottom surface, and finally staggered ribs. Heat transfer and pressure drop is calculated at Reynolds number equal to 9400 for all configurations. Different turbulent models are used for the validation of the numerical results. For the smooth channel low-Re k-ɛ model, realizable k-ɛ model, the RNG k-ω model, low-Re k-ω model, and SST k-ω models are compared, whereas for ribbed channel, low-Re k-ɛ model and SST k-ω models are compared. The results show that the low-Re k-ɛ model, which predicts the heat transfer in outlet pass of the smooth channels with difference of +7%, underpredicts the heat transfer by -17% in case of ribbed channel compared to

  13. Numerical simulation of gas and particle flow field characteristics in HVOF guns

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Eidelman, S.; Lottati, I.

    1995-12-31

    The particle flow field characteristics in an HVOF gun are examined using numerical simulation techniques. The authors consider the particle injection, acceleration, convection heat transfer, and particle barrel interaction processes in a TAFA JP-5000 HVOF gun. Details of particle trajectories and temperature history as a function of particle size and other parameters are simulated and analyzed. A parameter study is conducted for different particle size, particle injection direction, and particle velocity. The number of distinct particle injection regimes was predicted and analyzed. Particle velocity and temperature at the exit of the barrel are listed. Using numerical simulation, the injection condition can be designed as a function of the set of flow parameters as well as particle properties, including particle size and material properties, to optimize the thermal spray process. A companion paper by the same authors in this proceedings presents a comprehensive analysis of the gas flow conditions for the HVOF gun.

  14. Numerical Analysis of Combustion in a Compressed Natural Gas Direct Injection Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yoshihiro; Inagaki, Hideto; Tsukasaki, Yukihiro

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) direct injection engine has many advantages for the reduction of CO2 emission. For further improvement of those engines, a numerical simulation technique has been developed for the analysis of combustion process. Prior to an in-cylinder calculation, the wall function was modified to improve the accuracy of the wall heat loss. Then the nozzle-to-cylinder entire calculation was performed. Good agreements were obtained in comparison with the experiment for the behavior of impinging jets. This method was applied to the analysis of the difference of combustion processes between CNG and conventional gasoline direct-injection engines. It is accordingly found that the velocity and the turbulence of in-cylinder gas are increased by the fuel injection into CNG engine and thus the combustion speed is enhanced significantly.

  15. Element variations in rhyolitic magma resulting from gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlo, K.; Tuffen, H.; Smith, V. C.; Castro, J. M.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.; Geraki, K.

    2013-11-01

    Tuffisite veins are glass-filled fractures formed when magma fragments during degassing within the conduit. These veins form transient channels through which exsolved gases can escape from magma. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which chemical heterogeneity within the melt results from gas transport, and assess how this can be used to study magma degassing. Two tuffisite veins from contrasting rhyolitic eruptions at Torfajökull (Iceland) and Chaitén (Chile) were studied in detail. The tuffisite vein from Torfajökull is from a shallow dissected conduit (∼70 ka) that fed a degassed lava flow, while the sample from Chaitén was a bomb ejected during the waning phases of Plinian activity in May 2008. The results of detailed in situ chemical analyses (synchrotron XRF, FTIR, LA-ICP-MS) show that in both veins larger vesiculated fragments are enriched in volatile elements (Torfajökull: H, Li, Cl; Chaitén: Li, Cl, Cu, Zn, As, Sn, Sb) compared to the host, while the surrounding smaller particles are depleted in the Torfajökull vein (Li, Cl, Zn, Br, Rb, Pb), but enriched in the Chaitén vein (K, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Sb, Pb). The lifespans of both veins and the fluxes of gas and particles through them can be estimated using diffusion profiles and enrichment factors. The Torfajökull vein had a longer lifespan (∼a day) and low particle velocities (∼cm/s), while the Chaitén vein was shorter lived (<1 h) with a high gas velocity (∼m/s). These differences are consistent with the contrasting eruption mechanisms (effusive vs. explosive). The amount of magma that degassed through the Chaitén vein is more than ten times the volume of the vein itself, requiring the vein to tap into pre-exsolved gas pockets. This study highlights that tuffisite veins are highly efficient gas pathways and thereby impart chemical diversity in volatile elements on the melt.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Quantum Transport Equation for Bose Gas in One Dimensional Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yukiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiya

    The quantum transport equation and the correction of the quasiparticle energy are derived by imposing the renormalization conditions on the improved time-dependent on-shell self-energy in nonequilibrium Thermo Field Dynamics. They are numerically analyzed for the one dimensional system of cold neutral atomic Bose gas confined by a combined harmonic and optical lattice potentials. The analysis indicates that the correction of the quaisparticle energy plays a crucial role in the thermal relaxation processes described by the quantum transport equation.

  17. Numerical investigations of cold gas dynamic spray with a novel convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Quan; Tan, Zhihai

    2013-10-01

    Due to the disadvantages of conventional De-Laval nozzle for cold gas dynamic spray process, a novel structure of De-Laval nozzle was proposed in this paper. The numerical simulations of supersonic fluid flow within this nozzle have been conducted by commercial CFD software Fluent. The performance of particle acceleration within the nozzle have been comprehensively studied and compared with those of the conventional De-Laval nozzle. Furthermore, the relationships between the performance of particle acceleration and the locations of released particles are thoroughly studied for this new De-Laval nozzle and some useful conclusions have been drawn for the real application of CGDS with this kind of nozzle.

  18. Numerical analysis of MHD instability suppression in a double gas puff

    SciTech Connect

    Glazyrin, Igor V.; Diyankov, Oleg V.; Karlykhanov, Nikolai G.; Koshelev, Sergei V.

    1997-05-05

    The process of double gas-puff implosion is numerically analyzed. Various liner configurations are considered: 1) the outer cascade is ten times lighter then the inner one, 2) the masses of cascades are equal, 3) the outer cascade is ten times heavier then the inner one. The mechanism of liner implosions stabilization is discussed. The comparison of two-cascade and single-cascade schemes is performed. The role of magnetic field penetration at the initial time into liner's body is also discussed.

  19. Numerical Research of Steam and Gas Plant Efficiency of Triple Cycle for Extreme North Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashov, Nikolay; Tsibulskii, Svjatoslav; Matveev, Aleksandr; Masjuk, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The present work shows that temperature decrease of heat rejection in a cycle is necessary for energy efficiency of steam turbine plants. Minimum temperature of heat rejection at steam turbine plant work on water steam is 15°C. Steam turbine plant of triple cycle where lower cycle of steam turbine plant is organic Rankine cycle on low-boiling substance with heat rejection in air condenser, which safely allows rejecting heat at condensation temperatures below 0°C, has been offered. Mathematical model of steam and gas plant of triple cycle, which allows conducting complex researches with change of working body appearance and parameters defining thermodynamic efficiency of cycles, has been developed. On the basis of the model a program of parameters and index cycles design of steam and gas plants has been developed in a package of electron tables Excel. Numerical studies of models showed that energy efficiency of steam turbine plants of triple cycle strongly depend on low-boiling substance type in a lower cycle. Energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net 60% higher can be received for steam and gas plants on the basis of gas turbine plant NK-36ST on pentane and its condensation temperature below 0°C. It was stated that energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net linearly depends on condensation temperature of low-boiling substance type and temperature of gases leaving reco very boiler. Energy efficiency increases by 1% at 10% decrease of condensation temperature of pentane, and it increases by 0.88% at 15°C temperature decrease of gases leaving recovery boiler.

  20. Particle-Resolved Direct Numerical Simulation for Gas-Solid Flow Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenneti, Sudheer; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Gas-solid flows in nature and industrial applications are characterized by multiscale and nonlinear interactions that manifest as rich flow physics and pose unique modeling challenges. In this article, we review particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) of the microscale governing equations for understanding gas-solid flow physics and obtaining quantitative information for model development. A clear connection between a microscale realization and meso/macroscale representation is necessary for PR-DNS to be used effectively for model development at the meso- and macroscale. Furthermore, the design of PR-DNS must address the computational challenges of parameterizing models in a high-dimensional parameter space and obtaining accurate statistics of flow properties from a finite number of realizations at acceptable grid resolution. This review also summarizes selected recent insights into the physics of momentum, kinetic energy, and heat transfer in gas-solid flows obtained from PR-DNS. Promising future applications of PR-DNS include the study of the effect of number fluctuations on hydrodynamics, instabilities in gas-solid flow, and wall-bounded flows.

  1. Numerical simulations of CO2 -assisted gas production from hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhara, P.; Anderson, B. J.; Myshakin, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experimental studies over the last decade have reviewed the feasibility of using CO2 or CO2+N2 gas mixtures to recover CH4 gas from hydrates deposits. That technique would serve the dual purpose of CO2 sequestration and production of CH4 while maintaining the geo-mechanical stability of the reservoir. In order to analyze CH4 production process by means of CO2 or CO2+N2 injection into gas hydrate reservoirs, a new simulation tool, Mix3HydrateResSim (Mix3HRS)[1], was previously developed to account for the complex thermodynamics of multi-component hydrate phase and to predict the process of CH4 substitution by CO2 (and N2) in the hydrate lattice. In this work, Mix3HRS is used to simulate the CO2 injection into a Class 2 hydrate accumulation characterized by a mobile aqueous phase underneath a hydrate bearing sediment. That type of hydrate reservoir is broadly confirmed in permafrost and along seashore. The production technique implies a two-stage approach using a two-well design, one for an injector and one for a producer. First, the CO2 is injected into the mobile aqueous phase to convert it into immobile CO2 hydrate and to initiate CH4 release from gas hydrate across the hydrate-water boundary (generally designating the onset of a hydrate stability zone). Second, CH4 hydrate decomposition is induced by the depressurization method at a producer to estimate gas production potential over 30 years. The conversion of the free water phase into the CO2 hydrate significantly reduces competitive water production in the second stage, thereby improving the methane gas production. A base case using only the depressurization stage is conducted to compare with enhanced gas production predicted by the CO2-assisted technique. The approach also offers a possibility to permanently store carbon dioxide in the underground formation to greater extent comparing to a direct injection of CO2 into gas hydrate sediment. Numerical models are based on the hydrate formations at the

  2. Study of Parameters Effect on Hydrodynamics of a Gas-Solid Chamber Experimentally and Numerically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzehei, Mahdi; Rahimzadeh, Hassan

    2012-04-01

    In this research, gas velocity, initial static bed height and particle size effect on hydrodynamics of a non-reactive gas-solid fluidized bed chamber were studied experimentally and computationally. A multi fluid Eulerian model incorporating the kinetic theory for solid particles was applied to simulate the unsteady state behavior of this chamber and momentum exchange coefficients were calculated by using the Syamlal- O'Brien drag functions. Simulation results were compared with the experimental data in order to validate the CFD model. Pressure drops predicted by the simulations at different particle sizes and initial static bed height were in good agreement with experimental measurements at superficial gas velocity higher than the minimum fluidization velocity. Simulation results also indicated that small bubbles were produced at the bottom of the bed. These bubbles collided with each other as they moved upwards forming larger bubbles. Furthermore, this comparison showed that the model can predict hydrodynamic behavior of gas solid fluidized bed chambers reasonably well.

  3. Numerical modeling of on-orbit propellant motion resulting from an impulsive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.; Hochstein, John I.

    1987-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undesirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle orbiter cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity was suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  4. Results of the Purdue University GAS-1 payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R.

    1984-01-01

    The Purdue University GAS-1 payload was flown on STS-7. Results of the three experiments included in the payload are summarized. The experiments conducted were: (1) the detection of nuclear particles in near-Earth space environment, (2) an investigation of the effect of microgravity on the germination of sunflower seeds, and (3) an examination of the motion of mercury under low gravity conditions. Results of the payload experiments are discussed from an engineering design standpoint. Data were obtained from one of the experiments, but electrical and mechanical malfunctions prevented the operation of the other two. The thermal control design maintained the desired temperatures and the structure successfully supported all components. The microprocessor collected and stored temperature readings and other data during the flight. A series of recommendations based on these results are included herein.

  5. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

  6. Numerical solutions of ideal quantum gas dynamical flows governed by semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Yan, Chih-Yuan; Diaz, Manuel; Huang, Juan-Chen; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-01-01

    The ideal quantum gas dynamics as manifested by the semiclassical ellipsoidal-statistical (ES) equilibrium distribution derived in Wu et al. (Wu et al. 2012 Proc. R. Soc. A 468, 1799–1823 (doi:10.1098/rspa.2011.0673)) is numerically studied for particles of three statistics. This anisotropic ES equilibrium distribution was derived using the maximum entropy principle and conserves the mass, momentum and energy, but differs from the standard Fermi–Dirac or Bose–Einstein distribution. The present numerical method combines the discrete velocity (or momentum) ordinate method in momentum space and the high-resolution shock-capturing method in physical space. A decoding procedure to obtain the necessary parameters for determining the ES distribution is also devised. Computations of two-dimensional Riemann problems are presented, and various contours of the quantities unique to this ES model are illustrated. The main flow features, such as shock waves, expansion waves and slip lines and their complex nonlinear interactions, are depicted and found to be consistent with existing calculations for a classical gas. PMID:24399919

  7. Numerical Studies of Magnetohydrodynamic Activity Resulting from Inductive Transients Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sovinec, Carl R.

    2005-08-29

    This report describes results from numerical studies of transients in magnetically confined plasmas. The work has been performed by University of Wisconsin graduate students James Reynolds and Giovanni Cone and by the Principal Investigator through support from contract DE-FG02-02ER54687, a Junior Faculty in Plasma Science award from the DOE Office of Science. Results from the computations have added significantly to our knowledge of magnetized plasma relaxation in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and spheromak. In particular, they have distinguished relaxation activity expected in sustained configurations from transient effects that can persist over a significant fraction of the plasma discharge. We have also developed the numerical capability for studying electrostatic current injection in the spherical torus (ST). These configurations are being investigated as plasma confinement schemes in the international effort to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for environmentally benign energy production. Our numerical computations have been performed with the NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) using local computing resources and massively parallel computing hardware at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. Direct comparisons of simulation results for the spheromak with laboratory measurements verify the effectiveness of our numerical approach. The comparisons have been published in refereed journal articles by this group and by collaborators at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (see Section 4). In addition to the technical products, this grant has supported the graduate education of the two participating students for three years.

  8. Finite difference model for aquifer simulation in two dimensions with results of numerical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trescott, Peter C.; Pinder, George Francis; Larson, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The model will simulate ground-water flow in an artesian aquifer, a water-table aquifer, or a combined artesian and water-table aquifer. The aquifer may be heterogeneous and anisotropic and have irregular boundaries. The source term in the flow equation may include well discharge, constant recharge, leakage from confining beds in which the effects of storage are considered, and evapotranspiration as a linear function of depth to water. The theoretical development includes presentation of the appropriate flow equations and derivation of the finite-difference approximations (written for a variable grid). The documentation emphasizes the numerical techniques that can be used for solving the simultaneous equations and describes the results of numerical experiments using these techniques. Of the three numerical techniques available in the model, the strongly implicit procedure, in general, requires less computer time and has fewer numerical difficulties than do the iterative alternating direction implicit procedure and line successive overrelaxation (which includes a two-dimensional correction procedure to accelerate convergence). The documentation includes a flow chart, program listing, an example simulation, and sections on designing an aquifer model and requirements for data input. It illustrates how model results can be presented on the line printer and pen plotters with a program that utilizes the graphical display software available from the Geological Survey Computer Center Division. In addition the model includes options for reading input data from a disk and writing intermediate results on a disk.

  9. Numerical computation and validation of two-phase flow downstream of a gas turbine combustor dome swirl cup

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpadi, A.K.; Burrus, D.L.; Lawson, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    The two-phase axisymmetric flow field downstream of the swirl cup of an advanced gas turbine combustor is studied numerically and validated against experimental Phase-Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) data. The swirl cup analyzed is that of a single annular GE/SNECMA CFM56 turbofan engine that is comprised of a pair of coaxial counterswirling air streams together with a fuel atomizer. The atomized fuel mixes with the swirling air stream, resulting in the establishment of a complex two-phase flow field within the swirl chamber. The analysis procedure involves the solution of the gas phase equations in an Eulerian frame of reference using the code CONCERT. CONCERT has been developed and used extensively in the past and represents a fully elliptic body-fitted computational fluid dynamics code to predict flow fields in practical full-scale combustors. The flow in this study is assumed to be nonreacting and isothermal. The liquid phase is simulated by using a droplet spray model and by treating the motion of the fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Extensive PDPA data for the CFM56 engine swirl cup have been obtained at atmospheric pressure by using water as the fuel (Wang et al., 1992a). The PDPA system makes pointwise measurements that are fundamentally Eulerian. Measurements have been made of the continuous gas phase velocity together with discrete phase attributes such as droplet size, droplet number count, and droplet velocity distribution at various axial stations downstream of the injector. Numerical calculations were performed under the exact inlet and boundary conditions as the experimental measurements. The computed gas phase velocity field showed good agreement with the test data.

  10. Numerical modeling of carrier gas flow in atomic layer deposition vacuum reactor: A comparative study of lattice Boltzmann models

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Chien Jen, Tien; Li, Tao; Yuan, Chris

    2014-01-15

    This paper characterizes the carrier gas flow in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) vacuum reactor by introducing Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to the ALD simulation through a comparative study of two LBM models. Numerical models of gas flow are constructed and implemented in two-dimensional geometry based on lattice Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (LBGK)-D2Q9 model and two-relaxation-time (TRT) model. Both incompressible and compressible scenarios are simulated and the two models are compared in the aspects of flow features, stability, and efficiency. Our simulation outcome reveals that, for our specific ALD vacuum reactor, TRT model generates better steady laminar flow features all over the domain with better stability and reliability than LBGK-D2Q9 model especially when considering the compressible effects of the gas flow. The LBM-TRT is verified indirectly by comparing the numerical result with conventional continuum-based computational fluid dynamics solvers, and it shows very good agreement with these conventional methods. The velocity field of carrier gas flow through ALD vacuum reactor was characterized by LBM-TRT model finally. The flow in ALD is in a laminar steady state with velocity concentrated at the corners and around the wafer. The effects of flow fields on precursor distributions, surface absorptions, and surface reactions are discussed in detail. Steady and evenly distributed velocity field contribute to higher precursor concentration near the wafer and relatively lower particle velocities help to achieve better surface adsorption and deposition. The ALD reactor geometry needs to be considered carefully if a steady and laminar flow field around the wafer and better surface deposition are desired.

  11. Supersonic flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical solution for chemically reacting supersonic gas-particle flows in rocket nozzles and exhaust plumes was described. The gas-particle flow solution is fully coupled in that the effects of particle drag and heat transfer between the gas and particle phases are treated. Gas and particles exchange momentum via the drag exerted on the gas by the particles. Energy is exchanged between the phases via heat transfer (convection and/or radiation). Thermochemistry calculations (chemical equilibrium, frozen or chemical kinetics) were shown to be uncoupled from the flow solution and, as such, can be solved separately. The solution to the set of governing equations is obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form are shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The particle distribution is represented in the numerical solution by a finite distribution of particle sizes.

  12. [Particle trajectory model desulfurization spray tower used in numerical simulation of flue gas].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhe; Tian, He-zhong; Hao, Ji-ming; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Han-qiang

    2005-11-01

    The commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT is used to predict the two-phase flow in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) spray tower. The Euler-Lagrange method is used, in which the gas flow is described with standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and the motion of the liquid droplets is described with the particle trajectory model. The procedure of model definition, including force analysis of liquid particle, gas turbulent dispersion and the gas-liquid coupling method, is presented. The results show that the uniformity of axial gas velocity in the spray tower is satisfactory, and the hollow spray nozzle used in the tower can efficiently prevent short-circuiting of the flue gas. The concentration of liquid droplets in the central region is higher than near the wall, and this problem can be solved by optimizing the arrangement of the spray nozzles near the wall. Model predictions for particle trajectory are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results, and the particle trajectory model can predict the two-phase flow in the spray tower successfully. PMID:16447425

  13. A numerical reduced model for thin liquid films sheared by a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, G.; Vila, J.-P.; Blanchard, G.; Laurent, C.; Charru, F.

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear dynamics of thin liquid films sheared by a laminar gas flow in a channel is investigated. Such a two-layer flow is driven by pressure gradient and possibly by the gravity force. We describe the liquid phase with a long-wave integral model, with the aim to save computational cost with respect to the full Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive this long-wave model by the integration of the Navier-Stokes equations over the film thickness, and by an asymptotic expansion up to the first order in terms of a long-wave parameter. These depth-integrated (or shallow water) equations are discretized by means of an augmented system, which holds an evolution equation for the surface tension in order to avoid numerical instabilities of classical upwind and centered schemes. On the other side, we study the gas phase with compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and we discretize them by means of a low-Mach scheme, accounting also for moving meshes (ALE). In order to analyze liquid-gas interactions, we introduce then a coupling methodology between depth-integrated equations and Navier-Stokes equations. This approach represents a compromise between the two existing methods: the full DNS, and the full long-wave model applied to both phases. In order to validate this approach, we present comparisons with DNS, showing a good agreement of spatio-temporal evolutions of the film thickness and the stress field. Furthermore, interfacial shear stress and pressure gradient evolutions are shown to be in accordance with those provided by two-layer second-order low-dimensional models.

  14. Mode analysis for a microwave driven plasma discharge: A comparison between analytical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Zimmermanns, Marc; Rolfes, Ilona; Eremin, Denis; Ruhr-University Bochum, Theoretical Electrical Engineering Team; Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute of Microwave Systems Team

    2015-09-01

    The market shows in recent years a growing demand for bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Therefore, fast and efficient sterilization processes as well as barrier coatings to decrease gas permeation are required. A specialized microwave plasma source - referred to as the plasmaline - has been developed to allow for depositing thin films of e.g. silicon oxid on the inner surface of such PET bottles. The plasmaline is a coaxial waveguide combined with a gas-inlet which is inserted into the empty bottle and initiates a reactive plasma. To optimize and control the different surface processes, it is essential to fully understand the microwave power coupling to the plasma and the related heating of electrons inside the bottle and thus the electromagnetic wave propagation along the plasmaline. In this contribution, we present a detailed dispersion analysis based on a numerical approach. We study how modes of guided waves are propagating under different conditions, if at all. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the framework of the collaborative research centre TRR87.

  15. Improving the trust in results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Cappello, Franck; Constantinescu, Emil; Hovland, Paul; Peterka, Tom; Phillips, Carolyn; Snir, Marc; Wild, Stefan

    2015-04-30

    This white paper investigates several key aspects of the trust that a user can give to the results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics. In this document, the notion of trust is related to the integrity of numerical simulations and data analytics applications. This white paper complements the DOE ASCR report on Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity by (1) exploring the sources of trust loss; (2) reviewing the definitions of trust in several areas; (3) providing numerous cases of result alteration, some of them leading to catastrophic failures; (4) examining the current notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics; (5) providing a gap analysis; and (6) suggesting two important research directions and their respective research topics. To simplify the presentation without loss of generality, we consider that trust in results can be lost (or the results’ integrity impaired) because of any form of corruption happening during the execution of the numerical simulation or the data analytics application. In general, the sources of such corruption are threefold: errors, bugs, and attacks. Current applications are already using techniques to deal with different types of corruption. However, not all potential corruptions are covered by these techniques. We firmly believe that the current level of trust that a user has in the results is at least partially founded on ignorance of this issue or the hope that no undetected corruptions will occur during the execution. This white paper explores the notion of trust and suggests recommendations for developing a more scientifically grounded notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics. We first formulate the problem and show that it goes beyond previous questions regarding the quality of results such as V&V, uncertainly quantification, and data assimilation. We then explore the complexity of this difficult problem, and we sketch complementary general

  16. Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

    2012-06-01

    In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (5–40 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using

  17. Optimization of gas path aerodynamics for PK-39 boiler of power generating unit No. 4 of Troitskaya SDPP using numerical simulation of gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, V. B.; Grigorev, I. V.; Fomenko, M. V.; Kaverin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Power generating unit no. 4 of Troitskaya State District Power Plant (SDPP) is incapable of operating with a nominal load of 278 MW because of high aerodynamic drag of the gas path. At present, the maximum load of the two-boiler single-turbine unit is 210 MW practically without a possibility of adjustment. The results of numerical simulation of the gas flow for the existing gas path from the electrostatic precipitator (EP) to the smoke exhausts (SEs) and two flue designs proposed for renovation of this section are presented. The results of simulation show that the existing flue section has high aerodynamic drag, which is explained by poor, as regards aerodynamics, design. The local loss coefficient, in terms of the dynamic pressure in the sucker pocket of the smoke exhaust is equal to 4.57. The local aerodynamic loss coefficient after renovation at the considered section according to the first version would make 1.48, and according to the second version 1.325, which would reduce losses at this section by more than a factor of three, and ensure the power unit operation with the rated load.

  18. A numerical study of liquid film distribution in wet natural gas pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. Q.; Zhao, Y. L.; Xu, W. W.; Guan, X. R.; Wang, J. J.; Jin, Y. H.

    2016-05-01

    The software of FLUENT was used to simulate the gas-liquid turbulent flow in wet natural gas pipeline of the Puguang gas field. The RNG k- ɛ model was used to simulate the turbulent flow, the Mixture model was used to simulate gas-liquid mixed phase, and the Eulerian wall film model was used to simulate the formation and development of liquid film. The gas phase flow field characteristics, the distribution of the axial and circumferential film thickness, and the droplet distribution in the pipeline were studied when the gas Reynolds number is 7.72 × 106(10.8m/s). The results can be concluded as followed: Liquid film distributes unevenly along the circumferential direction and mostly distributes under the pipeline wall because of gravity. The impact of the dean vortex and centrifugal force in the straight section can also influence the liquid film distribution. The wall shear stress distributions in horizontal straight pipeline is concerned with liquid membrane volatility, and consistent with the film volatility period, the wall shear stress reached the maximum value in a certain position of wave front. The influence of the wall shear stress on the film fluctuation in inclined pipeline is weakened by gravity and other factors.

  19. Numerical simulation and field test study of desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment through flue gas.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jia-Jia; Pan, Liang-Ming; Chen, De-Qi; Dong, Yu-Quan; Wang, Cheng-Mu; Liu, Hang; Kang, Mei-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at cost saving and pollution reduction, a novel desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment system (DWETS) for handling wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) wastewater of a coal-fired power plant was studied. The system's advantages include simple process, and less investment and space. The feasibility of this system has been proven and the appropriate position and number of nozzles, the spray droplet size and flue gas temperature limitation have been obtained by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The simulation results show that a longer duct, smaller diameter and higher flue gas temperature could help to increase the evaporation rate. The optimal DWETS design of Shangdu plant is 100 μm droplet sprayed by two nozzles located at the long duct when the flue gas temperature is 130 °C. Field tests were carried out based on the simulation results. The effects of running DWETS on the downstream devices have been studied. The results show that DWETS has a positive impact on ash removal efficiency and does not have any negative impact on the electrostatic precipitator (ESP), flue gas heat exchanger and WFGD. The pH values of the slurry of WFGD slightly increase when the DWETS is running. The simulation and field test of the DWETS show that it is a feasible future technology for desulfurization wastewater treatment. PMID:25325555

  20. Impulse propagation over a complex site: a comparison of experimental results and numerical predictions.

    PubMed

    Dragna, Didier; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poisson, Franck

    2014-03-01

    Results from outdoor acoustic measurements performed in a railway site near Reims in France in May 2010 are compared to those obtained from a finite-difference time-domain solver of the linearized Euler equations. During the experiments, the ground profile and the different ground surface impedances were determined. Meteorological measurements were also performed to deduce mean vertical profiles of wind and temperature. An alarm pistol was used as a source of impulse signals and three microphones were located along a propagation path. The various measured parameters are introduced as input data into the numerical solver. In the frequency domain, the numerical results are in good accordance with the measurements up to a frequency of 2 kHz. In the time domain, except a time shift, the predicted waveforms match the measured waveforms with a close agreement. PMID:24606253

  1. Results of numerical modeling of the convective burning of particulate explosive systems in the presence of increasing pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolaev, B.S.; Novozhilov, B.V.; Posvyanskii, V.S.; Sulimov, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors analyze the results of a numerical simulation of the convective burning of explosive powders in the presence of increasing pressure. The formulation of the problem reproduces a typical experimental technique: a strong closed vessel with a channel uniformly filled with the explosive investigated is fitted with devices for initiating and recording the process of explosion. It is shown that the relation between the propagation velocities of the flame and the compression waves in the powder and the rate of pressure increase in the combustion zone is such that a narrow compaction zone is formed ahead of the ignition front. Another important result is obtained by analyzing the difference between the flame velocity and the gas flow velocity in the ignition front. A model of the process is given. The results of the investigation throw light on such aspects of the convective combustion mechanism and the transition from combustion to detonation as the role of compaction of the explosive in the process of flame propogation and the role of the rate of pressure increase and dissipative heating of the gas phase in the pores ahead of the ignition front.

  2. Forecasting Energy Market Contracts by Ambit Processes: Empirical Study and Numerical Results

    PubMed Central

    Di Persio, Luca; Marchesan, Michele

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we exploit the theory of ambit processes to develop a model which is able to effectively forecast prices of forward contracts written on the Italian energy market. Both short-term and medium-term scenarios are considered and proper calibration procedures as well as related numerical results are provided showing a high grade of accuracy in the obtained approximations when compared with empirical time series of interest. PMID:27437500

  3. Parametric Evaluation of Absorption Losses and Comparison of Numerical Results to Boeing 707 Aircraft Experimental HIRF Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaygorsky, J.; Amburgey, C.; Elliott, J. R.; Fisher, R.; Perala, R. A.

    A broadband (100 MHz-1.2 GHz) plane wave electric field source was used to evaluate electric field penetration inside a simplified Boeing 707 aircraft model with a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method using EMA3D. The role of absorption losses inside the simplified aircraft was investigated. It was found that, in this frequency range, none of the cavities inside the Boeing 707 model are truly reverberant when frequency stirring is applied, and a purely statistical electromagnetics approach cannot be used to predict or analyze the field penetration or shielding effectiveness (SE). Thus it was our goal to attempt to understand the nature of losses in such a quasi-statistical environment by adding various numbers of absorbing objects inside the simplified aircraft and evaluating the SE, decay-time constant τ, and quality factor Q. We then compare our numerical results with experimental results obtained by D. Mark Johnson et al. on a decommissioned Boeing 707 aircraft.

  4. A method for data handling numerical results in parallel OpenFOAM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, Alin; Muntean, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations produce vast amount of numerical result data. This paper introduces a method for reducing the size of the data by replaying the interprocessor traffic. The results are recovered only in certain regions of interest configured by the user. A known test case is used for several mesh partitioning scenarios using the OpenFOAM toolkit®[1]. The space savings obtained with classic algorithms remain constant for more than 60 Gb of floating point data. Our method is most efficient on large simulation meshes and is much better suited for compressing large scale simulation results than the regular algorithms.

  5. A method for data handling numerical results in parallel OpenFOAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, Alin; Muntean, Sebastian

    2015-12-31

    Parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations produce vast amount of numerical result data. This paper introduces a method for reducing the size of the data by replaying the interprocessor traffic. The results are recovered only in certain regions of interest configured by the user. A known test case is used for several mesh partitioning scenarios using the OpenFOAM toolkit{sup ®}[1]. The space savings obtained with classic algorithms remain constant for more than 60 Gb of floating point data. Our method is most efficient on large simulation meshes and is much better suited for compressing large scale simulation results than the regular algorithms.

  6. Analytic and numeric Green's functions for a two-dimensional electron gas in an orthogonal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Cresti, Alessandro . E-mail: cresti@df.unipi.it; Grosso, Giuseppe . E-mail: grosso@df.unipi.it; Parravicini, Giuseppe Pastori . E-mail: pastori@fisicavolta.unipv.it

    2006-05-15

    We have derived closed analytic expressions for the Green's function of an electron in a two-dimensional electron gas threaded by a uniform perpendicular magnetic field, also in the presence of a uniform electric field and of a parabolic spatial confinement. A workable and powerful numerical procedure for the calculation of the Green's functions for a large infinitely extended quantum wire is considered exploiting a lattice model for the wire, the tight-binding representation for the corresponding matrix Green's function, and the Peierls phase factor in the Hamiltonian hopping matrix element to account for the magnetic field. The numerical evaluation of the Green's function has been performed by means of the decimation-renormalization method, and quite satisfactorily compared with the analytic results worked out in this paper. As an example of the versatility of the numerical and analytic tools here presented, the peculiar semilocal character of the magnetic Green's function is studied in detail because of its basic importance in determining magneto-transport properties in mesoscopic systems.

  7. 3-D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problems with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronov, I.D.; Voronin, B.L.; Butnev, O.I.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of the work performed is to develop a 3D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problem with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS), satisfying the condition of numerical result independence from the number of processors involved. Two basically different approaches to the structure of massive parallel computations have been developed. The first approach uses the 3D data matrix decomposition reconstructed at temporal cycle and is a development of parallelization algorithms for multiprocessor CS with shareable memory. The second approach is based on using a 3D data matrix decomposition not reconstructed during a temporal cycle. The program was developed on 8-processor CS MP-3 made in VNIIEF and was adapted to a massive parallel CS Meiko-2 in LLNL by joint efforts of VNIIEF and LLNL staffs. A large number of numerical experiments has been carried out with different number of processors up to 256 and the efficiency of parallelization has been evaluated in dependence on processor number and their parameters.

  8. Numerical Analysis on Effect of Areal Gas Distribution Pipe on Characteristics Inside COREX Shaft Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengli; Du, Kaiping; Xu, Jian; Shen, Wei; Kou, Mingyin; Zhang, Zhekai

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, two parallel pipes of areal gas distribution (AGD) were installed into the COREX shaft furnace to improve the furnace efficiency. A three-dimensional mathematical model at steady state, which takes a modified three-interface unreacted core model into consideration, is developed in the current work to describe the effect of the AGD pipe on the inner characteristics of shaft furnace. The accuracy of the model is evaluated using the plant operational data. The AGD pipe effectively improves the uniformity of reducing gas distribution, which leads to an increase in gas temperature and concentration of CO or H2 around the AGD pipe, and hence it further contributes to the iron oxide reduction. As a result, the top gas utilization rate and the solid metallization rate (MR) at the bottom outlet are increased by 0.015 and 0.11, respectively. In addition, the optimizations of the flow volume ratio (FVR) of the reducing gas fed through the AGD inlet and the AGD pipe arrangement are further discussed based on the gas flow distribution and the solid MR. Despite the relative suitability of the current FVR (60%), it is still meaningful to enable a manual adjustment of FVR, instead of having it driven by pressure difference, to solve certain production problems. On the other hand, considering the flatter distribution of gas flow, the higher solid MR, and easy installation and replacement, the cross distribution arrangement of AGD pipe with a length of 3 m is recommended to replace the current AGD pipe arrangement.

  9. Numerical modeling of liquid-liquid bi-propellant droplet/gas reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yupai L.; Schuman, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid-liquid bipropellant capability for numerically simulating droplets and gas two-phase flows for impinging type rocket injectors was developed through modification of the KIVA-II computer program. This added feature of liquid-liquid bipropellant sprays makes it possible to analyze the impinging type injectors through prescribed drop size and velocity distributions near the point of impingement. Two sample cases for LOX/liquid propane were run at mixture ratios of 3.06 and 2.72 respectively for a 3.4-inch diameter rocket engine with a contraction ratio of four and an expansion ratio of two. The predicted performance as well as the chamber heat transfer were found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Numerical calculation of the radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yipeng; Zhu, Dingqiang

    2014-11-01

    The heat flux density of radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas is one of the most important factors to decide temperature of nozzle's wall. It also provides an invaluable references advice for choosing the material of wall and type of cooling. The numerical calculation based on finite volume method is introduced in the paper. After analysis of the formula of FVM without the influence of scattering, a formula that is used to let spectral radiant intensity that is the calculation of FVM be converted into heat flux density of radiation heat transfer is deduced. It is compiled that the program based on FVM is used to calculate the heat flux density. At the end, the heat flux density of radiation heat transfer of 3D model of double-arc nozzle's wall is calculated under different condition, then simply analysis cooling system is performed.

  11. Three-dimensional numerical modelling of gas discharges at atmospheric pressure incorporating photoionization phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, L.; Metaxas, A. C.; Georghiou, G. E.

    2011-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model for the characterization of gas discharges in air at atmospheric pressure incorporating photoionization through the solution of the Helmholtz equation is presented. Initially, comparisons with a two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric model are performed in order to assess the validity of the model. Subsequently several discharge instabilities (plasma spots and low pressure inhomogeneities) are considered in order to study their effect on streamer branching and off-axis propagation. Depending on the magnitude and position of the plasma spot, deformations and off-axis propagation of the main discharge channel were obtained. No tendency for branching in small (of the order of 0.1 cm) overvolted discharge gaps was observed.

  12. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Werner, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  13. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Wernet, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  14. Wave interpretation of numerical results for the vibration in thin conical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2014-05-01

    The dynamic behaviour of thin conical shells can be analysed using a number of numerical methods. Although the overall vibration response of shells has been thoroughly studied using such methods, their physical insight is limited. The purpose of this paper is to interpret some of these numerical results in terms of waves, using the wave finite element, WFE, method. The forced response of a thin conical shell at different frequencies is first calculated using the dynamic stiffness matrix method. Then, a wave finite element analysis is used to calculate the wave properties of the shell, in terms of wave type and wavenumber, as a function of position along it. By decomposing the overall results from the dynamic stiffness matrix analysis, the responses of the shell can then be interpreted in terms of wave propagation. A simplified theoretical analysis of the waves in the thin conical shell is also presented in terms of the spatially-varying ring frequency, which provides a straightforward interpretation of the wave approach. The WFE method provides a way to study the types of wave that travel in thin conical shell structures and to decompose the response of the numerical models into the components due to each of these waves. In this way the insight provided by the wave approach allows us to analyse the significance of different waves in the overall response and study how they interact, in particular illustrating the conversion of one wave type into another along the length of the conical shell.

  15. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued on the study of coal permeability and gas desorption. This quarter, most of the effort involved identifying problems with the microbalance and then getting it repaired. Measurement of the amount of gas adsorbed with the microbalance involved corrections for the buoyancy change with pressure and several experiments with helium were made to determine this correction.

  16. Recent Analytical and Numerical Results for The Navier-Stokes-Voigt Model and Related Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios, Adam; Titi, Edriss; Petersen, Mark; Wingate, Beth

    2010-11-01

    The equations which govern the motions of fluids are notoriously difficult to handle both mathematically and computationally. Recently, a new approach to these equations, known as the Voigt-regularization, has been investigated as both a numerical and analytical regularization for the 3D Navier-Stokes equations, the Euler equations, and related fluid models. This inviscid regularization is related to the alpha-models of turbulent flow; however, it overcomes many of the problems present in those models. I will discuss recent work on the Voigt-regularization, as well as a new criterion for the finite-time blow-up of the Euler equations based on their Voigt-regularization. Time permitting, I will discuss some numerical results, as well as applications of this technique to the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and various equations of ocean dynamics.

  17. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics based on the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht Yonkofski, C. M.; Horner, J.; White, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after a thorough quality check. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This study uses numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the CH4/CO2/N2 guest molecule exchange process that occurred at Ignik Sikumi #1. Simulations were further informed by experimental observations. The goal of the scoping experiments was to understand kinetic exchange rates and develop parameters for use in Iġnik Sikumi history match simulations. The experimental procedure involves two main stages: 1) the formation of CH4 hydrate in a consolidated sand column at 750 psi and 2°C and 2) flow-through of a 77.5/22.5 N2/CO2 molar ratio gas mixture across the column. Experiments were run both above and below the hydrate stability zone in order to observe exchange behavior across varying conditions. The numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was then used to match experimental results, specifically fitting kinetic behavior. Once this behavior is understood, it can be applied to field scale models based on Ignik Sikumi #1.

  18. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wojcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-09

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm{sup 2}, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between

  19. Numerical investigations on mapping permeability heterogeneity in coal seam gas reservoirs using seismo-electric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, L.; Shaw, S.

    2016-04-01

    Mapping the horizontal distribution of permeability is a key problem for the coal seam gas industry. Poststack seismic data with anisotropy attributes provide estimates for fracture density and orientation which are then interpreted in terms of permeability. This approach delivers an indirect measure of permeability and can fail if other sources of anisotropy (for instance stress) come into play. Seismo-electric methods, based on recording the electric signal from pore fluid movements stimulated through a seismic wave, measure permeability directly. In this paper we use numerical simulations to demonstrate that the seismo-electric method is potentially suitable to map the horizontal distribution of permeability changes across coal seams. We propose the use of an amplitude to offset (AVO) analysis of the electrical signal in combination with poststack seismic data collected during the exploration phase. Recording of electrical signals from a simple seismic source can be closer to production planning and operations. The numerical model is based on a sonic wave propagation model under the low frequency, saturated media assumption and uses a coupled high order spectral element and low order finite element solver. We investigate the impact of seam thickness, coal seam layering, layering in the overburden and horizontal heterogeneity of permeability.

  20. Numerical simulation of sealing effect of gas hydrate for CO2 leakage in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Yu, T.; Oyama, H.; Yoshida, T.; Nakashima, T.; Kamada, K.

    2015-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide capture and storage in subsea geological structure is regarded as one of the promising mitigation technologies against the global warming, there is a risk of CO2 leakage and it is required to develop numerical models to predict how the CO2 migrate in the marine sediments. It is said that there are CO2-trap mechanisms in the geological formations, such as capillary trap, dissolution trap, and mineral trap. In this study, we focus on another trap mechanism: namely, hydrate trap. If the water is deep in the ocean, say more than 250 m, CO2 hydrate forms near the sea floor, at which temperature and pressure conditions can stabilise CO2 hydrate. To predict the gas productivity, it is important to know permeability damage in hydrate bearing sediments. Although hydrate saturation is the same, the permeability is different depending on its spatial distribution within the pore of sand sediment. Here, to know where hydrate is formed in the pore of porous media, we propose a numerical model for estimating the microscopic distribution of CO2 hydrate in sand sediment using a classical nucleation theory and the phase-field model.

  1. Numerical studies of the behavior of ionized residual gas in an energy recovering linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöplau, Gisela; van Rienen, Ursula; Meseck, Atoosa

    2015-04-01

    Next generation light sources such as energy recovering linacs (ERLs) are highly sensitive to instabilities due to ionized residual gas, which must be mitigated for successful operation. Vacuum pumps are insufficient for removal of the ions, as the ions are trapped by the beam's electrical potential. Two effective measures are (i) introducing clearing gaps in the bunch train, and (ii) installing clearing electrodes which pull out the trapped ions from the electrical potential of the beam. In this paper, we present numerical studies on the behavior of ion clouds that interact with bunch trains in an ERL taking into account the effects of the clearing gaps and clearing electrodes. We present simulations with different compositions of the residual gas. Simulations are done using the MOEVE PIC Tracking software package developed at Rostock University, which has been upgraded to include the behavior of ion clouds in the environment of additional electromagnetic fields, such as generated by clearing electrodes. The simulations use the parameters of the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (bERLinPro) to allow for the deduction of appropriate measures for bERLinPro 's design and operation.

  2. Some analytical and numerical approaches to understanding trap counts resulting from pest insect immigration.

    PubMed

    Bearup, Daniel; Petrovskaya, Natalia; Petrovskii, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring of pest insects is an important part of the integrated pest management. It aims to provide information about pest insect abundance at a given location. This includes data collection, usually using traps, and their subsequent analysis and/or interpretation. However, interpretation of trap count (number of insects caught over a fixed time) remains a challenging problem. First, an increase in either the population density or insects activity can result in a similar increase in the number of insects trapped (the so called "activity-density" problem). Second, a genuine increase of the local population density can be attributed to qualitatively different ecological mechanisms such as multiplication or immigration. Identification of the true factor causing an increase in trap count is important as different mechanisms require different control strategies. In this paper, we consider a mean-field mathematical model of insect trapping based on the diffusion equation. Although the diffusion equation is a well-studied model, its analytical solution in closed form is actually available only for a few special cases, whilst in a more general case the problem has to be solved numerically. We choose finite differences as the baseline numerical method and show that numerical solution of the problem, especially in the realistic 2D case, is not at all straightforward as it requires a sufficiently accurate approximation of the diffusion fluxes. Once the numerical method is justified and tested, we apply it to the corresponding boundary problem where different types of boundary forcing describe different scenarios of pest insect immigration and reveal the corresponding patterns in the trap count growth. PMID:25744607

  3. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  4. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large

  5. Equations of state of freely jointed hard-sphere chain fluids: Numerical results

    SciTech Connect

    Stell, G.; Lin, C.; Kalyuzhnyi, Y.V.

    1999-03-01

    We continue our series of studies in which the equations of state (EOS) are derived based on the product-reactant Ornstein{endash}Zernike approach (PROZA) and first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1). These include two compressibility EOS, two virial EOS, and one TPT1 EOS (TPT1-D) that uses the structural information of the dimer fluid as input. In this study, we carry out the numerical implementation for these five EOS and compare their numerical results as well as those obtained from Attard{close_quote}s EOS and GF-D (generalized Flory-dimer) EOS with computer simulation results for the corresponding chain models over a wide range of densities and chain length. The comparison shows that our compressibility EOS, GF-D, and TPT1-D are in quantitative agreement with simulation results, and TPT1-D is the best among various EOS according to its average absolute deviation (AAD). On the basis of a comparison of limited data, our virial EOS appears to be superior to the predictions of Attard{close_quote}s approximate virial EOS and the approximate virial EOS derived by Schweizer and Curro in the context of the PRISM approach; all of them are only qualitatively accurate. The degree of accuracy predicted by our compressibility EOS is comparable to that of GF-D EOS, and both of them overestimate the compressibility factor at low densities and underestimate it at high densities. The compressibility factor of a polydisperse homonuclear chain system is also investigated in this work via our compressibility EOS; the numerical results are identical to those of a monodisperse system with the same chain length. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Numerical computation of the effective-one-body potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2016-03-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two nonspinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: a (v ) , d ¯ (v ) , q (v ) . By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (nonspinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [A. Le Tiec, Phys. Rev. D 92, 084021 (2015).] recently obtained new expressions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential q (v ) by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine q (v ) for inverse binary separations in the range 1 /1200 ≤v ≲1 /6 . Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for q (v ) . We also obtain d ¯ (v ) in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of ≳10-8 . We find that our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for d ¯(v ) in the strong field.

  7. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Tsay, F.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of sorption capacity of coals by microbalance in a high pressure environment requires that corrections be made for the buoyancy of the gas that is displaced by the solid coal. As the pressure increases, the gas density increases, requiring that a correction factor be applied to the weight of the sample as measured by microbalance. A brief report summarizing this correction is attached as Appendix A.

  8. Experimental results and numerical modeling of a high-performance large-scale cryopump. I. Test particle Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Xueli; Day, Christian; Haas, Horst; Varoutis, Stylianos

    2011-07-15

    For the torus of the nuclear fusion project ITER (originally the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, but also Latin: the way), eight high-performance large-scale customized cryopumps must be designed and manufactured to accommodate the very high pumping speeds and throughputs of the fusion exhaust gas needed to maintain the plasma under stable vacuum conditions and comply with other criteria which cannot be met by standard commercial vacuum pumps. Under an earlier research and development program, a model pump of reduced scale based on active cryosorption on charcoal-coated panels at 4.5 K was manufactured and tested systematically. The present article focuses on the simulation of the true three-dimensional complex geometry of the model pump by the newly developed ProVac3D Monte Carlo code. It is shown for gas throughputs of up to 1000 sccm ({approx}1.69 Pa m{sup 3}/s at T = 0 deg. C) in the free molecular regime that the numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the pumping speeds measured. Meanwhile, the capture coefficient associated with the virtual region around the cryogenic panels and shields which holds for higher throughputs is calculated using this generic approach. This means that the test particle Monte Carlo simulations in free molecular flow can be used not only for the optimization of the pumping system but also for the supply of the input parameters necessary for the future direct simulation Monte Carlo in the full flow regime.

  9. Numeral description of grain size effects of tin oxide gas-sensitive elements and evaluation of depletion layer width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianqiao; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Monica, Faheema Fairuj; Liu, Xuesong

    2015-05-01

    The grain size effects on tin oxide gas-sensitive elements are numerically described by the model of gradient-distributed oxygen vacancies, which extends the receptor function of semiconductors to the condition of inhomogeneous donor density in grains. The sensor resistance and the response to the reducing gas are formulated as functions of the grain size and the depletion layer width. The simulations show good agreement with the experimental results. The depletion layer width is estimated as 4 nm for the undoped SnO2 element, whereas the values are 2 and 7 nm for Sb-doped and Al-doped samples, respectively. The results are experimentally verified by the donor-doped SnO2 thin films, the depletion layer widths of which are evaluated on the basis of the correlation between the electrical resistance and the Sb-doping amount. The location of the Fermi level is found to be a crucial factor that dominates the evaluation results.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Numerical simulation of the helium gas spin-up channel performance of the relativity gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.; Edgell, Josephine; Zhang, Burt X.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of the spin-up system efficiency on each geometrical parameter of the spin-up channel and the exhaust passage of the Gravity Probe-B (GPB) is individually investigated. The spin-up model is coded into a computer program which simulates the spin-up process. Numerical results reveal optimal combinations of the geometrical parameters for the ultimate spin-up performance. Comparisons are also made between the numerical results and experimental data. The experimental leakage rate can only be reached when the gap between the channel lip and the rotor surface increases beyond physical limit. The computed rotating frequency is roughly twice as high as the measured ones although the spin-up torques fairly match.

  11. Fluid Instabilities in the Crab Nebula Jet: Results from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, A.; Striani, E.; Bodo, G.; Anjiri, M.

    2014-09-01

    We present an overview of high-resolution relativistic MHD numerical simulations of the Crab Nebula South-East jet. The models are based on hot and relativistic hollow outflows initially carrying a purely toroidal magnetic field. Our results indicate that weakly relativistic (γ˜ 2) and strongly magnetized jets are prone to kink instabilities leading to a noticeable deflection of the jet. These conclusions are in good agreement with the recent X-ray (Chandra) data of Crab Nebula South-East jet indicating a change in the direction of propagation on a time scale of the order of few years.

  12. Gas transport by thermal transpiration in micro-channels -- A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Hudson, M.L.; Potter, D.L.; Bartel, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    A reliable micro gas pump is an essential element to the development of many micro-systems for chemical gas analyses. At Sandia, the authors are exploring a different pumping mechanism, gas transport by thermal transpiration. Thermal transpiration refers to the rarefied gas dynamics developed in a micro-channel with a longitudinal temperature gradient. To investigate the potential of thermal transpiration for gas pumping in micro-systems, the authors have performed simulations and model analysis to design micro-devices and to assess their design performance before the fabrication process. The effort is to apply ICARUS (a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code developed at Sandia) to characterize the fluid transport and evaluate the design performance. The design being considered has two plenums at different temperatures (hot and cold) separated by a micro-channel of 0.1 micron wide and 1 micron long. The temperature difference between the two plenums is 30 kelvin. ICARUS results, a quasi-steady analysis, predicts a net flow through the micro-channel with a velocity magnitude of about 0.4 m/s due to temperature gradient at the wall (thermal creep flow) at the early time. Later as the pressure builds up in the hot plenum, flow is reversed. Eventually when the system reaches steady state equilibrium, the net flow becomes zero. The thermal creep effect is compensated by the thermo-molecular pressure effect. This result demonstrates that it is important to include the thermo-molecular pressure effect when designing a pumping mechanism based on thermal transpiration. The DSMC technique can model this complex thermal transpiration problem.

  13. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  14. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-09

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  15. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110m wide and 50m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere. PMID:26583741

  16. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110 m wide and 50 m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  17. Numerical Prediction of Non-Reacting and Reacting Flow in a Model Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoudzadeh, Farhad; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, reacting and non-reacting flow characteristics of a model gas turbine combustor operating on air/methane are simulated via an unstructured and massively parallel Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code. This serves to demonstrate the capabilities of the code for design and analysis of real combustor engines. The effects of some design features of combustors are examined. In addition, the computed results are validated against experimental data.

  18. U.S. gas conditioning and processing plant survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Tannehill, C.; Echterhoff, L.; Trimble, K.

    1995-11-01

    A database of information on 1,427 natural gas conditioning and processing plants in the lower 48 states has been compiled with the assistance of over 50 operating companies and several engineering and construction firms. The database was updated in 1994 with NGL recovery plants now numbering 724. Acid gas (CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) is removed by 617 plants. Sulfur is recovered at over 100 plants. Nitrogen is rejected at 12 plants, and helium is recovered at eight plants. The plants are categorized into 12 regions with the number of plants and combined inlet capacity for each region categorized as follows: Built before 1970; Built in each year between 1970 and 1994; Removing H{sub 2}S and/or CO{sub 2}; Using direct conversion H{sub 2}S removal processes (iron sponge, ARI LO-CAT{reg_sign}, SulFerox); Using chemical solvents for acid gas removal (MEA, DEA, MDEA, DGA, Benfield, Other); Using physical solvents for acid gas removal (Sulfinol, Selexol, other); Recovering sulfur (Claus, Selectox, other); Tail gas clean-up (SCOT, CBA, MCRC, other); NGL recovery (refrigeration, cryogenic expander, refrigerated lean oil, adsorption, other); Nitrogen rejection; Helium recovery; and Shutdown plants.

  19. Noninvasive assessment of mitral inertness: clinical results with numerical model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial forces (Mdv/dt) are a significant component of transmitral flow, but cannot be measured with Doppler echo. We validated a method of estimating Mdv/dt. Ten patients had a dual sensor transmitral (TM) catheter placed during cardiac surgery. Doppler and 2D echo was performed while acquiring LA and LV pressures. Mdv/dt was determined from the Bernoulli equation using Doppler velocities and TM gradients. Results were compared with numerical modeling. TM gradients (range: 1.04-14.24 mmHg) consisted of 74.0 +/- 11.0% inertial forcers (range: 0.6-12.9 mmHg). Multivariate analysis predicted Mdv/dt = -4.171(S/D (RATIO)) + 0.063(LAvolume-max) + 5. Using this equation, a strong relationship was obtained for the clinical dataset (y=0.98x - 0.045, r=0.90) and the results of numerical modeling (y=0.96x - 0.16, r=0.84). TM gradients are mainly inertial and, as validated by modeling, can be estimated with echocardiography.

  20. Instability of surface lenticular vortices: results from laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, Noé; Paci, Alexandre; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2016-04-01

    We examine the instability of lenticular vortices -- or lenses -- in a stratified rotating fluid. The simplest configuration is one in which the lenses overlay a deep layer and have a free surface, and this can be studied using a two-layer rotating shallow water model. We report results from laboratory experiments and high-resolution direct numerical simulations of the destabilization of vortices with constant potential vorticity, and compare these to a linear stability analysis. The stability properties of the system are governed by two parameters: the typical upper-layer potential vorticity and the size (depth) of the vortex. Good agreement is found between analytical, numerical and experimental results for the growth rate and wavenumber of the instability. The nonlinear saturation of the instability is associated with conversion from potential to kinetic energy and weak emission of gravity waves, giving rise to the formation of coherent vortex multipoles with trapped waves. The impact of flow in the lower layer is examined. In particular, it is shown that the growth rate can be strongly affected and the instability can be suppressed for certain types of weak co-rotating flow.

  1. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  2. Forebody and base region real gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. II - Equilibrium reactive gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1981-01-01

    The factored-implicit, gas-dynamic algorithm has been adapted to the numerical simulation of equilibrium reactive flows. Changes required in the perfect gas version of the algorithm are developed, and the method of coupling gas-dynamic and chemistry variables is discussed. A flow-field solution that approximates a Jovian entry case was obtained by this method and compared with the same solution obtained by HYVIS, a computer program much used for the study of planetary entry. Comparison of surface pressure distribution and stagnation line shock-layer profiles indicates that the two solutions agree well.

  3. Re-Computation of Numerical Results Contained in NACA Report No. 496

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III

    2015-01-01

    An extensive examination of NACA Report No. 496 (NACA 496), "General Theory of Aerodynamic Instability and the Mechanism of Flutter," by Theodore Theodorsen, is described. The examination included checking equations and solution methods and re-computing interim quantities and all numerical examples in NACA 496. The checks revealed that NACA 496 contains computational shortcuts (time- and effort-saving devices for engineers of the time) and clever artifices (employed in its solution methods), but, unfortunately, also contains numerous tripping points (aspects of NACA 496 that have the potential to cause confusion) and some errors. The re-computations were performed employing the methods and procedures described in NACA 496, but using modern computational tools. With some exceptions, the magnitudes and trends of the original results were in fair-to-very-good agreement with the re-computed results. The exceptions included what are speculated to be computational errors in the original in some instances and transcription errors in the original in others. Independent flutter calculations were performed and, in all cases, including those where the original and re-computed results differed significantly, were in excellent agreement with the re-computed results. Appendix A contains NACA 496; Appendix B contains a Matlab(Reistered) program that performs the re-computation of results; Appendix C presents three alternate solution methods, with examples, for the two-degree-of-freedom solution method of NACA 496; Appendix D contains the three-degree-of-freedom solution method (outlined in NACA 496 but never implemented), with examples.

  4. Long-Term Creep Behavior of the Intervertebral Disk: Comparison between Bioreactor Data and Numerical Results

    PubMed Central

    Castro, A. P. G.; Paul, C. P. L.; Detiger, S. E. L.; Smit, T. H.; van Royen, B. J.; Pimenta Claro, J. C.; Mullender, M. G.; Alves, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    The loaded disk culture system is an intervertebral disk (IVD)-oriented bioreactor developed by the VU Medical Center (VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands), which has the capacity of maintaining up to 12 IVDs in culture, for approximately 3 weeks after extraction. Using this system, eight goat IVDs were provided with the essential nutrients and submitted to compression tests without losing their biomechanical and physiological properties, for 22 days. Based on previous reports (Paul et al., 2012, 2013; Detiger et al., 2013), four of these IVDs were kept in physiological condition (control) and the other four were previously injected with chondroitinase ABC (CABC), in order to promote degenerative disk disease (DDD). The loading profile intercalated 16 h of activity loading with 8 h of loading recovery to express the standard circadian variations. The displacement behavior of these eight IVDs along the first 2 days of the experiment was numerically reproduced, using an IVD osmo-poro-hyper-viscoelastic and fiber-reinforced finite element (FE) model. The simulations were run on a custom FE solver (Castro et al., 2014). The analysis of the experimental results allowed concluding that the effect of the CABC injection was only significant in two of the four IVDs. The four control IVDs showed no signs of degeneration, as expected. In what concerns to the numerical simulations, the IVD FE model was able to reproduce the generic behavior of the two groups of goat IVDs (control and injected). However, some discrepancies were still noticed on the comparison between the injected IVDs and the numerical simulations, namely on the recovery periods. This may be justified by the complexity of the pathways for DDD, associated with the multiplicity of physiological responses to each direct or indirect stimulus. Nevertheless, one could conclude that ligaments, muscles, and IVD covering membranes could be added to the FE model, in order to improve its accuracy and properly

  5. Long-Term Creep Behavior of the Intervertebral Disk: Comparison between Bioreactor Data and Numerical Results.

    PubMed

    Castro, A P G; Paul, C P L; Detiger, S E L; Smit, T H; van Royen, B J; Pimenta Claro, J C; Mullender, M G; Alves, J L

    2014-01-01

    The loaded disk culture system is an intervertebral disk (IVD)-oriented bioreactor developed by the VU Medical Center (VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands), which has the capacity of maintaining up to 12 IVDs in culture, for approximately 3 weeks after extraction. Using this system, eight goat IVDs were provided with the essential nutrients and submitted to compression tests without losing their biomechanical and physiological properties, for 22 days. Based on previous reports (Paul et al., 2012, 2013; Detiger et al., 2013), four of these IVDs were kept in physiological condition (control) and the other four were previously injected with chondroitinase ABC (CABC), in order to promote degenerative disk disease (DDD). The loading profile intercalated 16 h of activity loading with 8 h of loading recovery to express the standard circadian variations. The displacement behavior of these eight IVDs along the first 2 days of the experiment was numerically reproduced, using an IVD osmo-poro-hyper-viscoelastic and fiber-reinforced finite element (FE) model. The simulations were run on a custom FE solver (Castro et al., 2014). The analysis of the experimental results allowed concluding that the effect of the CABC injection was only significant in two of the four IVDs. The four control IVDs showed no signs of degeneration, as expected. In what concerns to the numerical simulations, the IVD FE model was able to reproduce the generic behavior of the two groups of goat IVDs (control and injected). However, some discrepancies were still noticed on the comparison between the injected IVDs and the numerical simulations, namely on the recovery periods. This may be justified by the complexity of the pathways for DDD, associated with the multiplicity of physiological responses to each direct or indirect stimulus. Nevertheless, one could conclude that ligaments, muscles, and IVD covering membranes could be added to the FE model, in order to improve its accuracy and properly

  6. Moomba Lower Daralingie Beds (LDB) gas storage project: Reservoir management using a novel numerical simulation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jamal, F.G.

    1994-12-31

    Engineers managing underground gas storage projects are often faced with challenges involving gas migration, inventory variance, gas quality and inventory-pressures. This paper discusses a unique underground gas storage project where sales gas and ethane are stored in two different but communicating regions of the same reservoir. A commercially available reservoir simulator was used to model the fluid flow behavior in this reservoir, hence, providing a tool for better management and use of the existing gas storage facilities.

  7. Numerical Prediction of the Performance of Integrated Planar Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells, with Comparisons of Results from Several Codes

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; B. A. Haberman; A. J. Marquis; C. M. Baca; D. Tripepi; P. Costamagna

    2008-06-01

    A numerical study of the thermal and electrochemical performance of a single-tube Integrated Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IP-SOFC) has been performed. Results obtained from two finite-volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes FLUENT and SOHAB and from a two-dimensional inhouse developed finite-volume GENOA model are presented and compared. Each tool uses physical and geometric models of differing complexity and comparisons are made to assess their relative merits. Several single-tube simulations were run using each code over a range of operating conditions. The results include polarization curves, distributions of local current density, composition and temperature. Comparisons of these results are discussed, along with their relationship to the respective imbedded phenomenological models for activation losses, fluid flow and mass transport in porous media. In general, agreement between the codes was within 15% for overall parameters such as operating voltage and maximum temperature. The CFD results clearly show the effects of internal structure on the distributions of gas flows and related quantities within the electrochemical cells.

  8. Interpretation of high-dimensional numerical results for the Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, I. M.

    2014-12-15

    The existence of the upper critical dimension d{sub c2} = 4 for the Anderson transition is a rigorous consequence of the Bogoliubov theorem on renormalizability of φ{sup 4} theory. For d ≥ 4 dimensions, one-parameter scaling does not hold and all existent numerical data should be reinterpreted. These data are exhausted by the results for d = 4, 5 from scaling in quasi-one-dimensional systems and the results for d = 4, 5, 6 from level statistics. All these data are compatible with the theoretical scaling dependences obtained from Vollhardt and Wolfle’s self-consistent theory of localization. The widespread viewpoint that d{sub c2} = ∞ is critically discussed.

  9. Numerical simulation of infrared radiation absorption for diagnostics of gas-aerosol medium by remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Egorov, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.; Shefer, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    Calculated absorption spectra of the mixture of gases (H2O, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, and SO2) and aerosol (soot and Al2O3), contained in the exhausts of aircraft and rocket engines are demonstrated. Based on the model of gas-aerosol medium, a numerical study of the spectral dependence of the absorptance for different ratios of gas and aerosol components was carried out. The influence of microphysical and optical properties of the components of the mixture on the spectral features of absorption of gas-aerosol medium was established.

  10. Effect of depletion layer width on electrical properties of semiconductive thin film gas sensor: a numerical study based on the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianqiao; Lu, Yiting; Cui, Xiao; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia

    2016-03-01

    The effects of depletion layer width on the semiconductor gas sensors were investigated based on the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model, which provided numerical descriptions for the sensor properties. The potential barrier height, sensor resistance, and response to target gases were simulated to reveal their dependences on the depletion layer width. According to the simulation, it was possible to improve the sensor response by enlarging the width of depletion layer without changing the resistance of the gas sensor under the special circumstance. The different performances between resistance and response could provide a bright expectation that the design and fabrication of gas sensing devices could be economized. The simulation results were validated by the experimental performances of SnO2 thin film gas sensors, which were prepared by the sol-gel technique. The dependences of sensor properties on depletion layer width were observed to be in agreement with the simulations.

  11. Fast methods to numerically integrate the Reynolds equation for gas fluid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1992-01-01

    The alternating direction implicit (ADI) method is adopted, modified, and applied to the Reynolds equation for thin, gas fluid films. An efficient code is developed to predict both the steady-state and dynamic performance of an aerodynamic journal bearing. An alternative approach is shown for hybrid journal gas bearings by using Liebmann's iterative solution (LIS) for elliptic partial differential equations. The results are compared with known design criteria from experimental data. The developed methods show good accuracy and very short computer running time in comparison with methods based on an inverting of a matrix. The computer codes need a small amount of memory and can be run on either personal computers or on mainframe systems.

  12. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  13. Numerical Modeling of Reactive Multiphase Flow for FCC and Hot Gas Desulfurization Circulating Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    This work was carried out to understand the behavior of the solid and gas phases in a CFB riser. Only the riser is modeled as a straight pipe. A model with linear algebraic approximation to solids viscosity of the form, {musubs} = 5.34{epsisubs}, ({espisubs} is the solids volume fraction) with an appropriate boundary condition at the wall obtained by approximate momentum balance solution at the wall to acount for the solids recirculation is tested against experimental results. The work done was to predict the flow patterns in the CFB risers from available experimental data, including data from a 7.5-cm-ID CFB riser at the Illinois Institute of Technology and data from a 20.0-cm-ID CFB riser at the Particulate Solid Research, Inc., facility. This research aims at modeling the removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas using zinc oxide as the sorbent in a circulating fluidized bed and in the process indentifying the parameters that affect the performance of the sulfidation reactor. Two different gas-solid reaction models, the unreacted shrinking core (USC) and the grain model were applied to take into account chemical reaction resistances. Also two different approaches were used to affect the hydrodynamics of the process streams. The first model takes into account the effect of micro-scale particle clustering by adjusting the gas-particle drag law and the second one assumes a turbulent core with pseudo-steady state boundary condition at the wall. A comparison is made with experimental results.

  14. Asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis: Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey; Cerfon, Antoine; Parra, Felix

    2012-10-01

    We have recently presented a new asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria that generalizes the classic Greene-Johnson expansion [1] to allow for 3D equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis [2]. Our expansion achieves the two goals of reducing the complexity of the three-dimensional MHD equilibrium equations and of describing equilibria in modern stellarator experiments. The end result of our analysis is a set of two coupled partial differential equations for the plasma pressure and the toroidal vector potential which fully determine the stellarator equilibrium. Both equations are advection equations in which the toroidal angle plays the role of time. We show that the method of characteristics, following magnetic field lines, is a convenient way of solving these equations, avoiding the difficulties associated with the periodicity of the solution in the toroidal angle. By combining the method of characteristics with Green's function integrals for the evaluation of the magnetic field due to the plasma current, we obtain an efficient numerical solver for our expansion. Numerical equilibria thus calculated will be given.[4pt] [1] J.M. Greene and J.L. Johnson, Phys. Fluids 4, 875 (1961)[0pt] [2] A.J. Cerfon, J.P. Freidberg, and F.I. Parra, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 16 GP9.00081 (2011)

  15. A theory of scintillation for two-component power law irregularity spectra: Overview and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Rino, Charles L.

    2016-06-01

    We extend the power law phase screen theory for ionospheric scintillation to account for the case where the refractive index irregularities follow a two-component inverse power law spectrum. The two-component model includes, as special cases, an unmodified power law and a modified power law with spectral break that may assume the role of an outer scale, intermediate break scale, or inner scale. As such, it provides a framework for investigating the effects of a spectral break on the scintillation statistics. Using this spectral model, we solve the fourth moment equation governing intensity variations following propagation through two-dimensional field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere. A specific normalization is invoked that exploits self-similar properties of the structure to achieve a universal scaling, such that different combinations of perturbation strength, propagation distance, and frequency produce the same results. The numerical algorithm is validated using new theoretical predictions for the behavior of the scintillation index and intensity correlation length under strong scatter conditions. A series of numerical experiments are conducted to investigate the morphologies of the intensity spectrum, scintillation index, and intensity correlation length as functions of the spectral indices and strength of scatter; retrieve phase screen parameters from intensity scintillation observations; explore the relative contributions to the scintillation due to large- and small-scale ionospheric structures; and quantify the conditions under which a general spectral break will influence the scintillation statistics.

  16. Chaoticity threshold in magnetized plasmas: Numerical results in the weak coupling regime

    SciTech Connect

    Carati, A. Benfenati, F.; Maiocchi, A.; Galgani, L.; Zuin, M.

    2014-03-15

    The present paper is a numerical counterpart to the theoretical work [Carati et al., Chaos 22, 033124 (2012)]. We are concerned with the transition from order to chaos in a one-component plasma (a system of point electrons with mutual Coulomb interactions, in a uniform neutralizing background), the plasma being immersed in a uniform stationary magnetic field. In the paper [Carati et al., Chaos 22, 033124 (2012)], it was predicted that a transition should take place when the electron density is increased or the field decreased in such a way that the ratio ω{sub p}/ω{sub c} between plasma and cyclotron frequencies becomes of order 1, irrespective of the value of the so-called Coulomb coupling parameter Γ. Here, we perform numerical computations for a first principles model of N point electrons in a periodic box, with mutual Coulomb interactions, using as a probe for chaoticity the time-autocorrelation function of magnetization. We consider two values of Γ (0.04 and 0.016) in the weak coupling regime Γ ≪ 1, with N up to 512. A transition is found to occur for ω{sub p}/ω{sub c} in the range between 0.25 and 2, in fairly good agreement with the theoretical prediction. These results might be of interest for the problem of the breakdown of plasma confinement in fusion machines.

  17. Study of quantification and distribution of explosive mixture in a confined space as a result of natural gas leak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulach, Aleš; Mynarz, Miroslav; Kozubková, Milada

    2014-03-01

    The contribution deals with quantification of natural gas leak from a domestic low pressure pipe to a confined space in relation to formation of explosive concentration. Within the experiments, amount of leak gas was determined considering the character of pipe damage. Leakage coefficients, natural gas expansion and time before reaching the lower explosive limit of a gas-air mixture were taken. Conducted experiments were then modelled using CFD software and the results were verified. In numerical model, several models of flow were used and afterwards following issues were analysed: leakage velocity, spatial distribution of the mixture in a confined space, formation of concentration at the lower explosive limit etc. This work should contribute to better understanding of propagation and distribution of gaseous fuel mixtures in confined spaces and thereby significantly reduce the risk of fires or explosions or prevent them.

  18. Comprehensive Numerical Modeling of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Water Resource Recovery Facilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Bowen, James D; Kinnear, David

    2015-11-01

    A numerical model was developed to comprehensively predict greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from water resource recovery facilities. An existing activated sludge model was extended to include a nitrifier-denitrification process and carbon dioxide (CO₂) as a state variable. The bioreactor model was coupled to a process-based digester model and an empirical model of indirect CO₂emissions. Direct emissions were approximately 90% of total GHG emissions for a plantwide simulation using the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger process. Biogenic CO₂, nitrous oxide (N₂O), and methane (CH₄) represented 10, 43, and 34% of total emissions. Simulating a dissolved oxygen controlled closed-loop system reduced both sensitivity and uncertainty of GHG emissions. Nitrous oxide emissions were much more sensitive under different design and operating conditions compared to CH₄and CO₂, indicating a significant mitigation potential. An uncertainty analysis found that the uncertainty in GHGs emissions estimates could be significant. Nitrous oxide emissions dominated in both magnitude and uncertainty. PMID:26564584

  19. Why different gas flux velocity parameterizations result in so similar flux results in the North Atlantic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Wróbel, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is a crucial region for both ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. Most of ocean deep waters are produced in the basin making it a large CO2 sink. The region, close to the major oceanographic centres has been well covered with cruises. This is why we have performed a study of net CO2 flux dependence upon the choice of gas transfer velocity k parameterization for this very region: the North Atlantic including European Arctic Seas. The study has been a part of a ESA funded OceanFlux GHG Evolution project and, at the same time, a PhD thesis (of I.W) funded by Centre of Polar Studies "POLAR-KNOW" (a project of the Polish Ministry of Science). Early results have been presented last year at EGU 2015 as a PICO presentation EGU2015-11206-1. We have used FluxEngine, a tool created within an earlier ESA funded project (OceanFlux Greenhouse Gases) to calculate the North Atlantic and global fluxes with different gas transfer velocity formulas. During the processing of the data, we have noticed that the North Atlantic results for different k formulas are more similar (in the sense of relative error) that global ones. This was true both for parameterizations using the same power of wind speed and when comparing wind squared and wind cubed parameterizations. This result was interesting because North Atlantic winds are stronger than the global average ones. Was the flux result similarity caused by the fact that the parameterizations were tuned to the North Atlantic area where many of the early cruises measuring CO2 fugacities were performed? A closer look at the parameterizations and their history showed that not all of them were based on North Atlantic data. Some of them were tuned to the South Ocean with even stronger winds while some were based on global budgets of 14C. However we have found two reasons, not reported before in the literature, for North Atlantic fluxes being more similar than global ones for different gas transfer velocity parametrizations

  20. Effective Compressibility of A Bubbly Slurry: II. Fitting Numerical Results to Field Data and Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, Seung I.; Gauglitz, Phillip A. ); Rossen, William R.

    2000-12-01

    The goal of this study is to fit model parameters to changes in waste level in response to barometric pressure changes in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This waste compressibility is a measure of the quantity of gas, typically hydrogen and other flammable gases that can pose a safety hazard, retained in the waste. A one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model for compressibility of a bubbly slurry is presented in a companion paper. Fitting these results to actual waste level changes in the tanks implies that bubbles are long in the slurry layer and the ratio of pore-body radius to pore-throat radius is close to one; unfortunately, capillary effects can not be quantified unambiguously from the data without additional information on pore geometry. Therefore determining the quantity of gas in the tanks requires more than just slurry volume data. Similar ambiguity also exists with two other simple models: a capillary-tube model with contact angle hysteresis and spherical-p ore model.

  1. Results of Laboratory and Industrial Tests of Periodic-Type Gas Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, I. N.; P‧yanykh, K. E.; Antoshchuk, T. A.; Lysenko, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Results of laboratory and industrial tests of periodic-type gas generators burning various solid biofuels have been presented. The tests were carried out with the aim of obtaining producer gas which could totally or partly replace natural gas in power equipment burning gaseous fuel. The energy and environmental characteristics of a boiler unit burning a mixture of producer gas and natural gas have been assessed.

  2. Introducing "É VIVO! Virtual Eruptions on a Supercomputer". A DVD aimed at sharing results from numerical simulations of explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Todesco, M.; Neri, A.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Tola, E.; Rocco, G.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new DVD of the INGV outreach series, aimed at illustrating our research work on pyroclastic flow modeling. Pyroclastic flows (or pyroclastic density currents) are hot, devastating clouds of gas and ashes, generated during explosive eruptions. Understanding their dynamics and impact is crucial for a proper hazard assessment. We employ a 3D numerical model which describes the main features of the multi-phase and multi-component process, from the generation of the flows to their propagation along complex terrains. Our numerical results can be translated into color animations, which describe the temporal evolution of flow variables such as temperature or ash concentration. The animations provide a detailed and effective description of the natural phenomenon which can be used to present this geological process to a general public and to improve the hazard perception in volcanic areas. In our DVD, the computer animations are introduced and commented by professionals and researchers who deals at various levels with the study of pyroclastic flows and their impact. Their comments are taken as short interviews, mounted in a short video (about 10 minutes), which describes the natural process, as well as the model and its applications to some explosive volcanoes like Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei, Mt. St. Helens and Soufriere Hills (Montserrat). The ensemble of different voices and faces provides a direct sense of the multi-disciplinary effort involved in the assessment of pyroclastic flow hazard. The video also introduces the people who address this complex problem, and the personal involvement beyond the scientific results. The full, uncommented animations of the pyroclastic flow propagation on the different volcanic settings are also provided in the DVD, that is meant to be a general, flexible outreach tool.

  3. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  4. Lateral and axial resolutions of an angle-deviation microscope for different numerical apertures: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ming-Hung; Lai, Chin-Fa; Tan, Chen-Tai; Lin, Yi-Zhi

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the lateral and axial resolutions of a transmission laser-scanning angle-deviation microscope (TADM) with different numerical aperture (NA) values. The TADM is based on geometric optics and surface plasmon resonance principles. The surface height is proportional to the phase difference between two marginal rays of the test beam, which is passed through the test medium. We used common-path heterodyne interferometry to measure the phase difference in real time, and used a personal computer to calculate and plot the surface profile. The experimental results showed that the best lateral and axial resolutions for NA = 0.41 were 0.5 μm and 3 nm, respectively, and the lateral resolution breaks through the diffraction limits.

  5. Dynamics of Tachyon Fields and Inflation - Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results with Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M.; Dimitrijević, D. D.; Djordjević, G. S.; Stojanović, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n), and tensor-scalar ratio (r) for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V(x)˜ x^{-4}, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X_0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X_0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered.

  6. Solar flare model: Comparison of the results of numerical simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Vashenyuk, E. V.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    The electrodynamic flare model is based on numerical 3D simulations with the real magnetic field of an active region. An energy of ˜1032 erg necessary for a solar flare is shown to accumulate in the magnetic field of a coronal current sheet. The thermal X-ray source in the corona results from plasma heating in the current sheet upon reconnection. The hard X-ray sources are located on the solar surface at the loop foot-points. They are produced by the precipitation of electron beams accelerated in field-aligned currents. Solar cosmic rays appear upon acceleration in the electric field along a singular magnetic X-type line. The generation mechanism of the delayed cosmic-ray component is also discussed.

  7. Conductivity and scattering in graphene bilayers: Numerically exact results versus Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hengyi; Heinzel, T.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2011-09-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the conductivity of bilayer graphene (BLG) using the Boltzmann approach within the the Born approximation for a model of Gaussian disorders describing both short- and long-range impurity scattering. The range of validity of the Born approximation is established by comparing the analytical results to exact tight-binding numerical calculations. A comparison of the obtained density dependencies of the conductivity with experimental data shows that the BLG samples investigated experimentally so far are in the quantum scattering regime where the Fermi wavelength exceeds the effective impurity range. In this regime both short- and long-range scattering lead to the same linear density dependence of the conductivity. Our calculations imply that bilayer and single-layer graphene have the same scattering mechanisms. We also provide an upper limit for the effective, density-dependent spatial extension of the scatterers present in the experiments.

  8. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices - How numerical implementation affects the results.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-02-01

    This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed. PMID:26679833

  9. Experimental and numerical results for CO2 concentration and temperature profiles in an occupied room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotel, Aline; Junghans, Lars; Wang, Xiaoxiang

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, a recognition of the scope of the negative environmental impact of existing buildings has spurred academic and industrial interest in transforming existing building design practices and disciplinary knowledge. For example, buildings alone consume 72% of the electricity produced annually in the United States; this share is expected to rise to 75% by 2025 (EPA, 2009). Significant reductions in overall building energy consumption can be achieved using green building methods such as natural ventilation. An office was instrumented on campus to acquire CO2 concentrations and temperature profiles at multiple locations while a single occupant was present. Using openFOAM, numerical calculations were performed to allow for comparisons of the CO2 concentration and temperature profiles for different ventilation strategies. Ultimately, these results will be the inputs into a real time feedback control system that can adjust actuators for indoor ventilation and utilize green design strategies. Funded by UM Office of Vice President for Research.

  10. Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1995-01-19

    Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document.

  11. Investigating the Fate of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid in Shale Gas Formations Through Two-Phase Numerical Modelling of Fluid Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R.; Doster, F.; Celia, M. A.; Bandilla, K.

    2015-12-01

    The process of hydraulic fracturing in shale gas formations typically involves the injection of large quantities of water-based fluid (2×107L typical) into the shale formations in order to fracture the rock. A large proportion of the fracturing fluids injected into shale gas wells during hydraulic fracturing does not return out of the well once production begins. The percentage of water returning varies within and between different shale plays, but is generally around 30%. The large proportion of the fluid that does not return raises the possibility that it could migrate out of the target shale formation and potentially toward aquifers and the surface through pathways such as the created hydraulic fractures, faults and adjacent wells. A leading hypothesis for the fate of the remaining fracturing fluid is that it is spontaneously imbibed from the hydraulic fractures into the shale rock matrix due to the low water saturation and very high capillary pressure in the shale. The imbibition hypothesis is assessed using numerical modeling of the two-phase flow of fracturing fluid and gas in the shale during injection. The model incorporates relevant two-phase physical phenomena such as capillarity and relative permeability, including hysteretic behavior in both. Modeling scenarios for fracturing fluid injection were assessed under varying conditions for shale reservoir parameters and spatial heterogeneities in permeability and wettability. The results showed that the unaccounted fracturing fluid may plausibly be imbibed into the shale matrix under certain conditions, and that significant small-scale spatial heterogeneity in the shale permeability likely plays an important role in imbibing the fracturing fluid.

  12. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  13. A numerical study of the heat transfer through a rarefied gas confined in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Anirudh S.; Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Struchtrup, Henning

    2015-05-01

    Flow and heat transfer in a bottom-heated square cavity in a moderately rarefied gas is investigated using the R13 equations and the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations. The results obtained are compared with those from the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with emphasis on understanding thermal flow characteristics from the slip flow to the early transition regime. The R13 theory gives satisfying results—including flow patterns in fair agreement with DSMC—in the transition regime, which the conventional Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations are not able to capture.

  14. Numerical simulation of transient inviscid gas flows in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. Y.; Lombard, C. K.; Nagaraj, N.; Bershader, D.

    1985-01-01

    Time-dependent upwind high resolution schemes for solving the Euler equations were developed and applied to simulate 1-D and 2-D transient inviscid gas flows in a shock tube. Using obstacles of different geometries, a series of calculations were carried out to investigate the transient complex shock-wave diffraction phenomena. Shock-wave and objects interactions with shock Mach-number Ms ranging from 2 to 20 were considered. Comparison with analytical and available experimental results indicate good agreement. Display of detailed flow structures including multiple Mach shocks, slip surfaces, and vortex are also given.

  15. Numerical studies of gas production from several CH4 hydrate zones at the Mallik site, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Dallimore, S.R.; Satoh, T.; Hancock, S.; Weatherill, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mallik site represents an onshore permafrost-associated gas hydrate accumulation in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. A gas hydrate research well was drilled at the site in 1998. The objective of this study is the analysis of various gas production scenarios from five methane hydrate-bearing zones at the Mallik site. In Zone #1, numerical simulations using the EOSHYDR2 model indicated that gas production from hydrates at the Mallik site was possible by depressurizing a thin free gas zone at the base of the hydrate stability field. Horizontal wells appeared to have a slight advantage over vertical wells, while multiwell systems involving a combination of depressurization and thermal stimulation offered superior performance, especially when a hot noncondensible gas was injected. Zone #2, which involved a gas hydrate layer with an underlying aquifer, could yield significant amounts of gas originating entirely from gas hydrates, the volumes of which increased with the production rate. However, large amounts of water were also produced. Zones #3, #4 and #5 were lithologically isolated gas hydrate-bearing deposits with no underlying zones of mobile gas or water. In these zones, thermal stimulation by circulating hot water in the well was used to induce dissociation. Sensitivity studies indicated that the methane release from the hydrate accumulations increased with the gas hydrate saturation, the initial formation temperature, the temperature of the circulating water in the well, and the formation thermal conductivity. Methane production appears to be less sensitive to the specific heat of the rock and of the hydrate, and to the permeability of the formation. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Experiment and Numerical Simulation of Bubble Behavior in Argon Gas Injection into Lead-Bismuth Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yumi; Akashi, Toyou; Takahashi, Minoru

    In a lead-bismuth alloy (45%Pb-55%Bi) cooled direct contact boiling water fast reactor (PBWFR), steam can be produced by direct contact of feed water with primary Pb-Bi coolant in the upper core plenum, and Pb-Bi coolant can be circulated by buoyancy forces of steam bubbles. As a basic study to investigate the two-phase flow characteristics in the chimneys of PBWFR, a two-dimensional two-phase flow was simulated by injecting argon gas into Pb-Bi pool in a rectangular vessel (400mm in length, 1500mm in height), and bubble behavior were investigated experimentally. Bubble sizes, bubble rising velocities and void fractions were measured using void probes. The experimental conditions are the atmospheric pressure and the flow rate of injection Ar gas is 10, 20, and 30 NL/min. The average of measured bubble rising velocity was about 0.6 m/s. The average chord length was about 7mm. An analysis was performed by two-dimensional and two-fluid model. The experimental results were compared with the analytical results to evaluate the validity of the analytical model. Although large diameter bubbles were observed in the experiment, the drag force model of lower value performed better for simulation of the experimental result.

  17. DUSTYBOX and DUSTYWAVE: two test problems for numerical simulations of two-fluid astrophysical dust-gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laibe, Guillaume; Price, Daniel J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present the analytic solutions for two test problems involving two-fluid mixtures of dust and gas in an astrophysical context. The solutions provide a means of benchmarking numerical codes designed to simulate the non-linear dynamics of dusty gas. The first problem, DUSTYBOX, consists of two interpenetrating homogeneous fluids moving with relative velocity difference. We provide exact solutions to the full non-linear problem for a range of drag formulations appropriate to astrophysical fluids (i.e. various prescriptions for Epstein and Stokes drag in different regimes). The second problem, DUSTYWAVE, consists of the propagation of linear acoustic waves in a two-fluid gas-dust mixture. We provide the analytic solution for the case when the two fluids are interacting via a linear drag term. Both test problems are simple to set up in any numerical code and can be run with periodic boundary conditions. The solutions we derive are completely general with respect to both the dust-to-gas ratio and the amplitude of the drag coefficient. A stability analysis of waves in a gas-dust system is also presented, showing that sound waves in an astrophysical dust-gas mixture are linearly stable.

  18. Recent nuclear pumped laser results. [gas mixtures and laser plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Wells, W. E.; Akerman, M. A.; Anderson, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Recent direct nuclear pumped laser research has concentrated on experiments with three gas mixtures (Ne-N2, He-Ne-O2, and He-Hg). One mixture has been made to lase and gain has been achieved with the other two. All three of these mixtures are discussed with particular attention paid to He-Hg. Of interest is the 6150-angstroms ion transition in Hg(+). The upper state of this transition is formed directly by charge transfer and by Penning ionization.

  19. Comparison Between Numerical and Experimental Results on Mechanical Stirrer and Bubbling in a Cylindrical Tank - 13047

    SciTech Connect

    Lima da Silva, M.; Sauvage, E.; Brun, P.; Gagnoud, A.; Fautrelle, Y.; Riva, R.

    2013-07-01

    The process of vitrification in a cold crucible heated by direct induction is used in the fusion of oxides. Its feature is the production of high-purity materials. The high-level of purity of the molten is achieved because this melting technique excludes the contamination of the charge by the crucible. The aim of the present paper is to analyze the hydrodynamic of the vitrification process by direct induction, with the focus in the effects associated with the interaction between the mechanical stirrer and bubbling. Considering the complexity of the analyzed system and the goal of the present work, we simplified the system by not taking into account the thermal and electromagnetic phenomena. Based in the concept of hydraulic similitude, we performed an experimental study and a numerical modeling of the simplified model. The results of these two studies were compared and showed a good agreement. The results presented in this paper in conjunction with the previous work contribute to a better understanding of the hydrodynamics effects resulting from the interaction between the mechanical stirrer and air bubbling in the cold crucible heated by direct induction. Further works will take into account thermal and electromagnetic phenomena in the presence of mechanical stirrer and air bubbling. (authors)

  20. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Gas Dynamics in the Keyhole During Laser Metal Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenner, Felix; Brock, Christian; Gürtler, Franz-Josef; Klämpfl, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    The keyhole is the crucial factor for an appropriate weld seam in laser metal welding. The stability of the keyhole is governed by multiple hydrodynamic effects such as melt flow, evaporation on the keyhole front, gas dynamics inside the evolving vapor plume and the resulting pressures from all these phenomena. Due to their elusive nature the measurement of pressures inside the keyhole is still an unresolved task. Here we show a quantification of the density of the metal vapor and the pressure inside the keyhole through measuring the keyhole opening geometry, the evaporation rate and the flow velocity inside the vapor plume. Furthermore, a comparison to a simulation model is shown. Our results are in accordance with theoretical approaches. In the future this results can support an increase of process understanding which eventually leads to a better control of the process in industry.

  1. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  2. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  3. Numerical modeling of the simulated gas hydrate production test at Mallik 2L-38 in the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS - Applying the "foamy oil" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Sven; Thaler, Jan; Klump, Jens; Schicks, Judith; Uddin, Mafiz

    2014-05-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam. These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. We performed an experiment similar to the field-test conditions of the production test in the Mallik gas hydrate field (Mallik 2L-38) in the Beaufort Mackenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic. The aim of this experiment was to study the transport behavior of fluids in gas hydrate reservoirs during depressurization (see also Heeschen et al. and Priegnitz et al., this volume). The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, to validate the models through history matching, and to feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the one observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. They suggest that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. Our results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models of gas flow in water. References Uddin M., Wright J.F. and Coombe D

  4. Experimental results for an experimental condensation heat exchanger with a spiral minichanel tube. Comparison to numerical imulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peukert, P.; Hrubý, J.

    2013-04-01

    The paper describes new results for an experimental heat exchanger equipped with a single corrugated capillary tube, basic information about the measurements and the experimental setup. Some of the results were compared with numerical simulations.

  5. Numerical-model developments for stimulation technologies in the Eastern Gas Shales Project

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, T.G.; Maxwell, D.E.; Young, C.

    1980-01-01

    These efforts were directed towards the development of a numerical tensile failure model that could be used to make a parameter sensitivity study of the EGSP wellbore stimulation methods for gas recovery in Devonain shales, calculations were performed using the NTS Multi-Frac Mineback Experiments as the geometry, boundary conditions and material properties of the models. Several major accomplishments were achieved during this task. These include: development of a Crack and Void Strain (CAVS) tensile failure model for one-dimensional fracture analysis using the one-dimensional geometries available in SAI's STEALTH 1-D finite-difference code; modification of the original CAVS tensile failure criteria to improve its representation of multiple fracture development by introducing a logic that adjusts the material's tensile strength (both for crack initiation and crack propagation) according to the degree of cracking that has occurred; adding a submodel to CAVS to allow for cracking propping when a crack is reclosed and to require energy to be expanded during this process; adding a submodel to CAVS to allow for crack pressurization when a crack void strain is in communication with the fluid pressure of the borehole; and performing a parameter sensitivity analysis to determine the effect that the material properties of the rock has on crack development, to include the effects of yielding and compaction. Using the CAVS model and its submodels, a series of STEALTH calculations were then performed to estimate the response of the NTS unaugmented Dynafrac experiment. Pressure, acceleration and stress time histories and snapshot data were obtained and should aid in the evaluation of these experiments. Crack patterns around the borehole were also calculated and should be valuable in a comparison with the fracture patterns observed during mineback.

  6. Computational modelling of cardiac electrophysiology: explanation of the variability of results from different numerical solvers.

    PubMed

    Pathmanathan, P; Bernabeu, M O; Niederer, S A; Gavaghan, D J; Kay, D

    2012-08-01

    A recent verification study compared 11 large-scale cardiac electrophysiology solvers on an unambiguously defined common problem. An unexpected amount of variation was observed between the codes, including significant error in conduction velocity in the majority of the codes at certain spatial resolutions. In particular, the results of the six finite element codes varied considerably despite each using the same order of interpolation. In this present study, we compare various algorithms for cardiac electrophysiological simulation, which allows us to fully explain the differences between the solvers. We identify the use of mass lumping as the fundamental cause of the largest variations, specifically the combination of the commonly used techniques of mass lumping and operator splitting, which results in a slightly different form of mass lumping to that supported by theory and leads to increased numerical error. Other variations are explained through the manner in which the ionic current is interpolated. We also investigate the effect of different forms of mass lumping in various types of simulation. PMID:25099569

  7. Numerical analysis of an impinging jet reactor for the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-06-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  8. Numerical Analysis of an Impinging Jet Reactor for the CVD and Gas-Phase Nucleation of Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  9. Experimental and numerical investigations of internal heat transfer in an innovative trailing edge blade cooling system: stationary and rotation effects, part 2: numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniaiche, Ahmed; Ghenaiet, Adel; Carcasci, Carlo; Facchini, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a numerical validation of the aero-thermal study of a 30:1 scaled model reproducing an innovative trailing edge with one row of enlarged pedestals under stationary and rotating conditions. A CFD analysis was performed by means of commercial ANSYS-Fluent modeling the isothermal air flow and using k-ω SST turbulence model and an isothermal air flow for both static and rotating conditions (Ro up to 0.23). The used numerical model is validated first by comparing the numerical velocity profiles distribution results to those obtained experimentally by means of PIV technique for Re = 20,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. The second validation is based on the comparison of the numerical results of the 2D HTC maps over the heated plate to those of TLC experimental data, for a smooth surface for a Reynolds number = 20,000 and 40,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. Two-tip conditions were considered: open tip and closed tip conditions. Results of the average Nusselt number inside the pedestal ducts region are presented too. The obtained results help to predict the flow field visualization and the evaluation of the aero-thermal performance of the studied blade cooling system during the design step.

  10. Numerical analysis of the flow fields in a RQL gas turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Michael C.; Micklow, Gerald J.; Yang, S. L.; Nguyen, H. L.

    1992-06-01

    The KIVA-2 code was modified to allow calculation of the flow field in a Richburn/Quick quench/Lean burn (RQL) staged gas turbine combustor including the airblast fuel nozzle. The results illustrate the complicated flow field present in RQL combustors. In particular the thermal protection requirements of the quick-quench mixer used in this study may be similar to those of the rich-burn combustor despite the presence of the cool dilution jet. Variation of the mass flow split between the fuel nozzle air passages has a significant effect on the flow as well as the level of the NO emissions. In addition, the slanted dilution slots form a counter-rotating flow field. From the results obtained to date, it appears that the modified KIVA-2 code can be used to study the effects of various RQL combustor design and operating conditions.

  11. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Eventually, the weight stabilized and the measurements commenced. Helium pressure was increased slowly and carefully, first to 15 psig then to 28 psig. The readout for the balance unit continued to exhibit unexplained fluctuation and output. Buoyancy of the empty pan was measured at pressures ranging up to 800 psig measured at approximately 100 psig increments. The balance weighing unit exhibited a progressive increase in weight with increasing pressure demonstrating that the displacement volume of the tare weight side of the balance was greater than the displacement volume of the weighing pan side of the balance. Therefore, the increased gas pressure produced a greater buoyancy of the tare side, producing a net increase in weight. The carefully collected data showed a linear change in weight with pressure (see accompanying diagram). A schematic diagram of the new configuration of the sorption apparatus is depicted in the accompanying figure.

  12. Compressible magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in stratified plasmas: Comparison of analytical and numerical results in the linear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Liberatore, S.; Jaouen, S.; Tabakhoff, E.; Canaud, B.

    2009-04-15

    Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability is addressed in compressible hydrostatic media. A full model is presented and compared to numerical results from a linear perturbation code. A perfect agreement between both approaches is obtained in a wide range of parameters. Compressibility effects are examined and substantial deviations from classical Chandrasekhar growth rates are obtained and confirmed by the model and the numerical calculations.

  13. Numerical modeling of protocore destabilization during planetary accretion: Methodology and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ja-Ren; Gerya, Taras V.; Tackley, Paul J.; Yuen, David A.; Golabek, Gregor J.

    2009-12-01

    We developed and tested an efficient 2D numerical methodology for modeling gravitational redistribution processes in a quasi spherical planetary body based on a simple Cartesian grid. This methodology allows one to implement large viscosity contrasts and to handle properly a free surface and self-gravitation. With this novel method we investigated in a simplified way the evolution of gravitationally unstable global three-layer structures in the interiors of large metal-silicate planetary bodies like those suggested by previous models of cold accretion [Sasaki, S., Nakazawa, K., 1986. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 9231-9238; Karato, S., Murthy, V.R., 1997. Phys. Earth Planet Interios 100, 61-79; Senshu, H., Kuramoto, K., Matsui, T., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (E12), 5118. 10.1029/2001JE001819]: an innermost solid protocore (either undifferentiated or partly differentiated), an intermediate metal-rich layer (either continuous or disrupted), and an outermost silicate-rich layer. Long-wavelength (degree-one) instability of this three-layer structure may strongly contribute to core formation dynamics by triggering planetary-scale gravitational redistribution processes. We studied possible geometrical modes of the resulting planetary reshaping using scaled 2D numerical experiments for self-gravitating planetary bodies with Mercury-, Mars- and Earth-size. In our simplified model the viscosity of each material remains constant during the experiment and rheological effects of gravitational energy dissipation are not taken into account. However, in contrast to a previously conducted numerical study [Honda, R., Mizutani, H., Yamamoto, T., 1993. J. Geophys. Res. 98, 2075-2089] we explored a freely deformable planetary surface and a broad range of viscosity ratios between the metallic layer and the protocore (0.001-1000) as well as between the silicate layer and the protocore (0.001-1000). An important new prediction from our study is that realistic modes of planetary reshaping

  14. Reprint of: A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  15. A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  16. Tsunami Hazards along the Eastern Australian Coast from Potential Earthquakes: Results from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H. L.; Ding, R. W.; Yuen, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    Australia is surrounded by the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean and, thus, may suffer from tsunamis due to its proximity to the subduction earthquakes around the boundary of Australian Plate. Potential tsunami risks along the eastern coast, where more and more people currently live, are numerically investigated through a scenario-based method to provide an estimation of the tsunami hazard in this region. We have chosen and calculated the tsunami waves generated at the New Hebrides Trench and the Puysegur Trench, and we further investigated the relevant tsunami hazards along the eastern coast and their sensitivities to various sea floor frictions and earthquake parameters (i.e. the strike, the dip and the slip angles and the earthquake magnitude/rupture length). The results indicate that the Puysegur trench possesses a seismic threat causing wave amplitudes over 1.5 m along the coast of Tasmania, Victoria, and New South Wales, and even reaching over 2.6 m at the regions close to Sydney, Maria Island, and Gabo Island for a certain worse case, while the cities along the coast of Queensland are potentially less vulnerable than those on the southeastern Australian coast.

  17. Analysis and design of numerical schemes for gas dynamics. 2: Artificial diffusion and discrete shock structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1994-01-01

    The effect of artificial diffusion on discrete shock structures is examined for a family of schemes which includes scalar diffusion, convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) schemes, and upwind schemes with characteristics splitting. The analysis leads to conditions on the diffusive flux such that stationary discrete shocks can contain a single interior point. The simplest formulation which meets these conditions is a CUSP scheme in which the coefficients of the pressure differences is fully determined by the coefficient of convective diffusion. It is also shown how both the characteristic and CUSP schemes can be modified to preserve constant stagnation enthalpy in steady flow, leading to four variants, the E and H-characteristic schemes, and the E and H-CUSP schemes. Numerical results are presented which confirm the properties of these schemes.

  18. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Luong, V.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to develop computational methods to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer, and to use these methods in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the coolant channels, was developed. The mode was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods. Parametric studies were performed to find a strategy for optimized combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  19. Thermodiffusion in concentrated ferrofluids: Experimental and numerical results on magnetic thermodiffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, Lisa Lange, Adrian; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-02-15

    Ferrofluids consist of magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a carrier liquid. Their strong thermodiffusive behaviour, characterised by the Soret coefficient, coupled with the dependency of the fluid's parameters on magnetic fields is dealt with in this work. It is known from former experimental investigations on the one hand that the Soret coefficient itself is magnetic field dependent and on the other hand that the accuracy of the coefficient's experimental determination highly depends on the volume concentration of the fluid. The thermally driven separation of particles and carrier liquid is carried out with a concentrated ferrofluid (φ = 0.087) in a horizontal thermodiffusion cell and is compared to equally detected former measurement data. The temperature gradient (1 K/mm) is applied perpendicular to the separation layer. The magnetic field is either applied parallel or perpendicular to the temperature difference. For three different magnetic field strengths (40 kA/m, 100 kA/m, 320 kA/m) the diffusive separation is detected. It reveals a sign change of the Soret coefficient with rising field strength for both field directions which stands for a change in the direction of motion of the particles. This behaviour contradicts former experimental results with a dilute magnetic fluid, in which a change in the coefficient's sign could only be detected for the parallel setup. An anisotropic behaviour in the current data is measured referring to the intensity of the separation being more intense in the perpendicular position of the magnetic field: S{sub T‖} = −0.152 K{sup −1} and S{sub T⊥} = −0.257 K{sup −1} at H = 320 kA/m. The ferrofluiddynamics-theory (FFD-theory) describes the thermodiffusive processes thermodynamically and a numerical simulation of the fluid's separation depending on the two transport parameters ξ{sub ‖} and ξ{sub ⊥} used within the FFD-theory can be implemented. In the case of a parallel aligned magnetic field, the parameter can

  20. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this task is to accurately measure the elongation and shrinkage exhibited by coal as it sorbs and desorbs methane gas at elevated pressure. Our research group has discussed several possible methods to measure this strain, including: optical microscopy, laser interferometry, conventional strain gauges, and LVDT strain gauges. There are advantages and disadvantages of each method. We had planned to use optical microscopy but, on further investigation, this approach will be less satisfactory than the strain gauge method. Accordingly, we have switched our focws to the use of strain gauges. Conventional strain gauges also involve potential problems which must be overcome, including: (1) Contrast in strength between the coal and the strain gauge must be minimized, (2) The proper glue that is neither too strong or too weak must be used to affix the strain gauge to the coal or the strain in the coal will not be accurately transmitted to the gauge, and (3) We must be aware that the total strain in the coal may not be homogeneously distributed through the specimen (due either either to boundary effects or contrast in composition of the coal layers). A high pressure chamber for sorption-strain experiments is currently being tested an modified and tested. The chamber will accommodate several small blocks of coal simultaneously. This will optimize efficiency, owing to the long times required to reequilibrate the coal blocks to changes in methane pressure.

  1. Numerical computation of multishocked, three-dimensional supersonic flow fields with real gas effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Reinhardt, W. A.; Warming, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented which is capable of determining the supersonic flow field surrounding three-dimensional wing-body configurations such as a delta-wing space shuttle. The governing equations in conservation-law form are solved by a finite difference method using a second-order noncentered algorithm between the body and the outermost shock wave, which is treated as a sharp discontinuity. Secondary shocks which form between these boundaries are captured automatically, and the intersection of these shocks with the bow shock posed no difficulty. Resulting flow fields about typical blunt nose shuttle-like configurations at angle of attack are presented. The differences between perfect and real gas effects for high Mach number flows are shown.

  2. Atmospheric turbulence in complex terrain: Verifying numerical model results with observations by remote-sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, P. W.

    2009-03-01

    The Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) is situated in an area of complex terrain. Turbulent flow due to terrain disruption could occur in the vicinity of HKIA when winds from east to southwest climb over Lantau Island, a mountainous island to the south of the airport. Low-level turbulence is an aviation hazard to the aircraft flying into and out of HKIA. It is closely monitored using remote-sensing instruments including Doppler LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) systems and wind profilers in the airport area. Forecasting of low-level turbulence by numerical weather prediction models would be useful in the provision of timely turbulence warnings to the pilots. The feasibility of forecasting eddy dissipation rate (EDR), a measure of turbulence intensity adopted in the international civil aviation community, is studied in this paper using the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS). Super-high resolution simulation (within the regime of large eddy simulation) is performed with a horizontal grid size down to 50 m for some typical cases of turbulent airflow at HKIA, such as spring-time easterly winds in a stable boundary layer and gale-force southeasterly winds associated with a typhoon. Sensitivity of the simulation results with respect to the choice of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) parameterization scheme in RAMS is also examined. RAMS simulation with Deardorff (1980) TKE scheme is found to give the best result in comparison with actual EDR observations. It has the potential for real-time forecasting of low-level turbulence in short-term aviation applications (viz. for the next several hours).

  3. Plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane at low temperatures: numerical analysis of gas-phase chemical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goujard, Valentin; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Yuzawa, Shuhei; Ağiral, Anil; Okazaki, Ken

    2011-07-01

    Methane partial oxidation was investigated using a plasma microreactor. The experiments were performed at 5 and 300 °C. Microreactor configuration allows an efficient evacuation of the heat generated by methane partial oxidation and dielectric barrier discharges, allowing at the same time a better temperature control. At 5 °C, liquid condensation of low vapour pressure compounds, such as formaldehyde and methanol, occurs. 1H-NMR analysis allowed us to demonstrate significant CH3OOH formation during plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane. Conversion and product selectivity were discussed for both temperatures. In the second part of this work, a numerical simulation was performed and a gas-phase chemical mechanism was proposed and discussed. From the comparison between the experimental results and the simulation it was found that CH3OO· formation has a determinant role in oxygenated compound production, since its fast formation disfavoured radical recombination. At 5 °C the oxidation leads mainly towards oxygenated compound formation, and plasma dissociation was the major phenomenon responsible for CH4 conversion. At 300 °C, higher CH4 conversion resulted from oxidative reactions induced by ·OH radicals with a chemistry predominantly oxidative, producing CO, H2, CO2 and H2O.

  4. NMR Mechanisms and Fluid Typing Based on Numerical Simulation in Gas-Bearing Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, M.; Xu, J.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    In Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) survey of oil- or gas-bearing shales, the relaxation is so fast and the diffusion is so low, and oil or gas typing is difficult to distinguish from each other using the previous analysis method. To study the NMR responses in gas-bearing shale, we supposed an ideal shale model including incredible water, free and adsorbed gas, and kerogen. Firstly, we supposed a series of ideal shale models with incredible water, free and adsorbed gas, and kerogen. Then, some simulations are performed for two-dimensional T2-D plots, and NMR characteristics are summarized successfully. Then, a series of simulations of different models with different adsorbed gas fractions are made, and the NMR responses are analyzed, from which we can identify the adsorbed gas and free gas. In inversion, a hybrid method with LSQR and TSVD is proved suitable for D-T2 NMR of gas shale with slow and fast diffusion, and short and long relaxation. It is noticed that the activation sequence of NMR is also important for accurate fluid typing in gas-bearing shale. We design a series of activation sequences, and simulate the corresponding NMR echo decays, and invert the fluid properties to search for an optimal activation sequence for fluid typing purpose. Figure 1 SEM picture and petrophysical model of organic shale. (a) 2D SEM shows pore and kerogen within shale. Black deposits pore, and dark gray is kerogen, light grey is matrix including clay and silica; (b) Petrophysical model Figure 2 Comparison of 2D-NMR simulations with different adsorbed gas fractions, (a) ɛ =0.0, (b) ɛ =0.2, (c) ɛ=0.4, t (d) ɛ =0.6, (e) ɛ =0.8, and (f) ɛ=1.0. From D-T2 plots, the position and amplitude of signals in T2-D plots indicate the fluid typing and fraction of the gas or adsorbed gas.

  5. Numerical modeling of transition to turbulence in low-pressure axial gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flitan, Horia Constantin

    2002-09-01

    Experimental data from modern turbofan engines indicate that the low-pressure turbine stages experience a significant drop in efficiency as the aircraft reaches its cruise conditions at high altitude. Under these circumstances, the low Reynolds number flow allows the apparition of a boundary layer which is no longer turbulent but transitional in nature. A further decrease in velocity may lead to the separation of the highly unstable laminar portion accompanied by a dramatic growth in aerodynamic losses. The methods for numerically simulating the transitional flows occurring over turbine blades were reviewed. Two large categories were identified as suitable for numerical implementation into a fully-implicit, finite-difference, Navier-Stokes code. The first involved a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model corrected for attached flow transition with an intermittency factor distribution. The general expression of Solomon, Walker and Gostelow was added to the code, in parallel with the zero-pressure gradient form of Narasimha, used for reference. In both cases transition inception is detected with the Abu-Ghannam Shaw correlation. Whenever laminar separation takes place, Robert's correlation for short bubble transition is activated. The second category comprised the two-equation, low Reynolds number turbulence models of Chien and Launder-Sharma. They have a certain ability to predict bypass transition and seem to better comprehend the physics of wake-induced transition. For the approximate factorization solution algorithm, the implicit part of the Launder-Sharma system was expressed in an original form. Also, the Kato-Launder correction was added to be used as an option. Numerical investigations of attached flow bypass transition and separated flow short bubble transitions were performed on two cascade geometries. The Abu-Ghannam Shaw criterion proved to be inaccurate for curved surfaces. The Solomon, Walker Gostelow distribution did not perform better than Narasimha

  6. Numerical evaluation of subsoil diffusion of (15) N labelled denitrification products during employment of the (15) N gas flux method in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Ruoss, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Common methods for measuring soil denitrification in situ include monitoring the accumulation of 15N labelled N2 and N2O evolved from 15N labelled soil nitrate pool in soil surface chambers. Gas diffusion is considered to be the main accumulation process. Because accumulation of the gases decreases concentration gradients between soil and chamber over time, gas production rates are underestimated if calculated from chamber concentrations. Moreover, concentration gradients to the non-labelled subsoil exist, inevitably causing downward diffusion of 15N labelled denitrification products. A numerical model for simulating gas diffusion in soil was used in order to determine the significance of this source of error. Results show that subsoil diffusion of 15N labelled N2 and N2O - and thus potential underestimation of denitrification derived from chamber fluxes - increases with cover closure time as well as with increasing diffusivity. Simulations based on the range of typical gas diffusivities of unsaturated soils show that the fraction of subsoil diffusion after chamber closure for 1 hour is always significant with values up to >30 % of total production of 15N labelled N2 and N2O. Field experiments for measuring denitrification with the 15N gas flux method were conducted. The ability of the model to predict the time pattern of gas accumulation was evaluated by comparing measured 15N2 concentrations and simulated values.

  7. Application of the methods of numerical modeling to evaluation of the total-pressure loss in gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, K. N.

    2007-09-01

    The total-pressure loss in gas turbines is evaluated. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are used for numerical calculations. The Spalart-Allmaras model, the k-ɛ model, and the two-layer model and their different modifications allowing for the rotation of the flow and the curvature of streamlines are used to close these equations. The role of different corrections to the turbulence models for the accuracy of calculated estimates is elucidated.

  8. THE 2D HEISENBERG ANTIFERROMAGNET IN HIGH-Tc SUPERCONDUCTIVITY:. A Review of Numerical Techniques and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, T.

    In this article we review numerical studies of the quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice, which is a model of the magnetic properties of the undoped “precursor insulators” of the high temperature superconductors. We begin with a brief pedagogical introduction and then discuss zero and nonzero temperature properties and compare the numerical results to analytical calculations and to experiment where appropriate. We also review the various algorithms used to obtain these results, and discuss algorithm developments and improvements in computer technology which would be most useful for future numerical work in this area. Finally we list several outstanding problems which may merit further investigation.

  9. Numerical simulation of multiphase flow and collision humidification in the multifluid alkaline spray generator for a novel semidry flue gas desulfurization system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.G.; Cao, W.C.; Wang, L.; Zhang, M.C.

    2008-07-15

    A hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian model was developed to simulate gas-droplet-particle multiphase flow and the collision humidification between sorbent particles and spray droplets in the confined multifluid alkaline spray generator for a novel semidry flue gas desulfurization system. In this model, the motions of discrete phases were tracked simultaneously by using a stochastic trajectory approach, and a probability model of droplets catching particles was presented to judge whether sorbent particles were caught with direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Numerical humidification efficiency of sorbent particles is validated by the experimental one deduced from the measured desulfurization efficiency. The effects of flue gas flow rate, spray droplet diameter, sorbent particle diameter, and particle injection location on the humidification efficiency were optimized. Numerical results show that the collision humidification efficiency of sorbent particles increases significantly at the axial distance of 1.67 times the generator diameter from the nozzle tip and reaches 78.5% without recirculation flow in the alkaline spray generator when the ratio of flue gas mass flow rate to spray water mass flow rate is 6.7. Moreover, there is an optimal droplet diameter ranging from 125 to 150 {mu} m and an optimal particle injection location corresponding to the maximum humidification efficiency in this paper.

  10. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    This report covers three experiments on the adsorptive properties of coal. The adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide were investigated. The results of these experiments were excellent and proved the high capacity for adsorption of the coal studied. Strain gages were used to measure the expansion of the coals. The results also indicate a higher capacity for sorption of CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. Unfortunately these excellent results have been tarnished by various containment problems.

  11. Effects of heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and biomass on biodegradation rate calculations - Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations were used to examine the effects of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and intrinsic biodegradation rate on the accuracy of contaminant plume-scale biodegradation rates obtained from field data. The simulations were based on a steady-state BTEX contaminant plume-scale biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions, with the electron acceptor in excess. Biomass was either uniform or correlated with K to model spatially variable intrinsic biodegradation rates. A hydraulic conductivity data set from an alluvial aquifer was used to generate three sets of 10 realizations with different degrees of heterogeneity, and contaminant transport with biodegradation was simulated with BIOMOC. Biodegradation rates were calculated from the steady-state contaminant plumes using decreases in concentration with distance downgradient and a single flow velocity estimate, as is commonly done in site characterization to support the interpretation of natural attenuation. The observed rates were found to underestimate the actual rate specified in the heterogeneous model in all cases. The discrepancy between the observed rate and the 'true' rate depended on the ground water flow velocity estimate, and increased with increasing heterogeneity in the aquifer. For a lognormal K distribution with variance of 0.46, the estimate was no more than a factor of 1.4 slower than the true rate. For aquifer with 20% silt/clay lenses, the rate estimate was as much as nine times slower than the true rate. Homogeneous-permeability, uniform-degradation rate simulations were used to generate predictions of remediation time with the rates estimated from heterogeneous models. The homogeneous models were generally overestimated the extent of remediation or underestimated remediation time, due to delayed degradation of contaminants in the low-K areas. Results suggest that aquifer characterization for natural attenuation at contaminated sites should include assessment of the presence

  12. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  13. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Key Points: Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces PMID

  14. Numerical Simulation of Subsurface Transport and Groundwater Impacts from Hydraulic Fracturing of Tight/Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. T.; Moridis, G. J.; Keen, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown tremendously over the last decade, and concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways that could connect the stimulated reservoir to shallower groundwater aquifers. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a deeper tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying groundwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, assuming that the formation of a connecting pathway has already occurred. We focus on two general transport scenarios: 1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and 2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. The simulations explore a range of permeabilities and geometries over time scales, and evaluate the mechanisms and factors that could lead to the escape of gas or reservoir fluid and the contamination of groundwater resources. We also examine the effects of overpressured reservoirs, and explore long-term transport processes as part of a continuing study. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Gas production from the reservoir via a horizontal well is likely to mitigate release through the reduction of available free gas and the lowering of reservoir pressure. We also find that fractured tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of large volumes of migrating gas, and incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  15. Problems with the use of near-surface soil gas results for source identification

    SciTech Connect

    Siebenmann, K. )

    1993-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine if near-surface [3 to 6 feet below ground surface (BGS)] soil gas results accurately determine source areas and indicate soil gas concentrations at greater depth. A statistical analysis of more that 200 near-surface and associated downhole soil gas results for trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and total halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) from a Superfund site in Sacramento, California was performed. The analysis showed a poor correlation between near-surface and downhole concentrations. In addition, the analysis indicated that the use of near-surface soil gas concentrations could result in a high probability of NOT locating contaminated soil gas (false negatives) or placing needless borings thereby incurring useless drilling and analytical costs (false positives). For this site, impermeable layers between 3 and 8 feet BGS impeded the vertical migration of soil gas, resulting in the low correlation between near-surface and deeper soil gas concentrations. For sites with similar geologic characteristics, soil gas samples should be collected from below the impermeable layers. Near-surface soil gas investigations may not be applicable to identification of deeper soil gas contamination at some sites, where impermeable lithologic layers impede the vertical migration of soil gas.

  16. On the anomalies in gravity associated with lateral inhomogeneities in temperature: 2. Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliko, A. O.; Molodenskii, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    ) are not only capable of significantly changing the magnitude of the radial displacements of the geoid but also altering their sign. Moreover, even in the uniform Earth's model, the effects of sphericity of its external surface and self-gravitation can also provide a noticeable contribution, which determines the signs of the coefficients in the expansion of the geoid's shape in the lower-order spherical functions. In order to separate these effects, below we present the results of the numerical calculations of the total effects of thermoelastic deformations for the two simplest models of spherical Earth without and with self-gravitation with constant density and complex-valued shear moduli and for the real Earth PREM model (which describes the depth distributions of density and elastic moduli for the high-frequency oscillations disregarding the rheology of the medium) and the modern models of the mantle rheology. Based on the calculations, we suggest the simplest interpretation of the present-day data on the relationship between the coefficients of spherical expansion of temperature, velocities of seismic body waves, the topography of the Earth's surface and geoid, and the data on the correlation between the lower-order coefficients in the expansions of the geoid and the corresponding terms of the expansions of horizontal inhomogeneities in seismic velocities. The suggested interpretation includes the estimates of the sign and magnitude for the ratios between the first coefficients of spherical expansions of seismic velocities, topography, and geoid. The presence of this correlation and the relationship between the signs and absolute values of these coefficients suggests that both the long-period oscillations of the geoid and the long-period variations in the velocities of seismic body waves are largely caused by thermoelastic deformations.

  17. Numerical Solution of the Flow of a Perfect Gas Over A Circular Cylinder at Infinite Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Frank M.

    1959-01-01

    A solution for the two-dimensional flow of an inviscid perfect gas over a circular cylinder at infinite Mach number is obtained by numerical methods of analysis. Nonisentropic conditions of curved shock waves and vorticity are included in the solution. The analysis is divided into two distinct regions, the subsonic region which is analyzed by the relaxation method of Southwell and the supersonic region which was treated by the method of characteristics. Both these methods of analysis are inapplicable on the sonic line which is therefore considered separately. The shapes of the sonic line and the shock wave are obtained by iteration techniques. The striking result of the solution is the strong curvature of the sonic line and of the other lines of constant Mach number. Because of this the influence of the supersonic flow on the sonic line is negligible. On comparison with Newtonian flow methods, it is found that the approximate methods show a larger variation of surface pressure than is given by the present solution.

  18. Modeling the Fracturing of Rock by Fluid Injection - Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Fluid-rock interactions are mechanically fundamental to many earth processes, including fault zones and hydrothermal/volcanic systems, and to future green energy solutions such as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Modeling these processes is challenging because of the strong coupling between rock fracture evolution and the consequent large changes in the hydraulic properties of the system. In this talk, we present results of a numerical model that includes poro-elastic plastic rheology (with hardening, softening, and damage), and coupled to a non-linear diffusion model for fluid pressure propagation and two-phase fluid flow. Our plane strain model is based on the poro- elastic plastic behavior of porous rock and is advanced with hardening, softening and damage using the Mohr- Coulomb failure criteria. The effective stress model of Biot (1944) is used for coupling the pore pressure and the rock behavior. Frictional hardening and cohesion softening are introduced following Vermeer and de Borst (1984) with the angle of internal friction and the cohesion as functions of the principal strain rates. The scalar damage coefficient is assumed to be a linear function of the hardening parameter. Fluid injection is modeled as a two phase mixture of water and air using the Richards equation. The theoretical model is solved using finite differences on a staggered grid. The model is benchmarked with experiments on the laboratory scale in which fluid is injected from below in a critically-stressed, dry sandstone (Stanchits et al. 2011). We simulate three experiments, a) the failure a dry specimen due to biaxial compressive loading, b) the propagation a of low pressure fluid front induced from the bottom in a critically stressed specimen, and c) the failure of a critically stressed specimen due to a high pressure fluid intrusion. Comparison of model results with the fluid injection experiments shows that the model captures most of the experimental

  19. Chaotic scattering in an open vase-shaped cavity: Topological, numerical, and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novick, Jaison Allen

    We present a study of trajectories in a two-dimensional, open, vase-shaped cavity in the absence of forces The classical trajectories freely propagate between elastic collisions. Bound trajectories, regular scattering trajectories, and chaotic scattering trajectories are present in the vase. Most importantly, we find that classical trajectories passing through the vase's mouth escape without return. In our simulations, we propagate bursts of trajectories from point sources located along the vase walls. We record the time for escaping trajectories to pass through the vase's neck. Constructing a plot of escape time versus the initial launch angle for the chaotic trajectories reveals a vastly complicated recursive structure or a fractal. This fractal structure can be understood by a suitable coordinate transform. Reducing the dynamics to two dimensions reveals that the chaotic dynamics are organized by a homoclinic tangle, which is formed by the union of infinitely long, intersecting stable and unstable manifolds. This study is broken down into three major components. We first present a topological theory that extracts the essential topological information from a finite subset of the tangle and encodes this information in a set of symbolic dynamical equations. These equations can be used to predict a topologically forced minimal subset of the recursive structure seen in numerically computed escape time plots. We present three applications of the theory and compare these predictions to our simulations. The second component is a presentation of an experiment in which the vase was constructed from Teflon walls using an ultrasound transducer as a point source. We compare the escaping signal to a classical simulation and find agreement between the two. Finally, we present an approximate solution to the time independent Schrodinger Equation for escaping waves. We choose a set of points at which to evaluate the wave function and interpolate trajectories connecting the source

  20. Nonlinearities of waves propagating over a mild-slope beach: laboratory and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Mariana V. L.; Michallet, Hervé; Silva, Paulo A.; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2014-05-01

    As surface gravity waves propagate from deeper waters to the shore, their shape changes, primarily due to nonlinear wave interactions and further on due to breaking. The nonlinear effects amplify the higher harmonics and cause the oscillatory flow to transform from nearly sinusoidal in deep water, through velocity-skewed in the shoaling zone, to velocity asymmetric in the inner-surf and swash zones. In addition to short-wave nonlinearities, the presence of long waves and wave groups also results in a supplementary wave-induced velocity and influences the short-waves. Further, long waves can themselves contribute to velocity skewness and asymmetry at low frequencies, particularly for very dissipative mild-slope beach profiles, where long wave shoaling and breaking can also occur. The Hydralab-IV GLOBEX experiments were performed in a 110-m-long flume, with a 1/80 rigid-bottom slope and allowed the acquisition of high-resolution free-surface elevation and velocity data, obtained during 90-min long simulations of random and bichromatic wave conditions, and also of a monochromatic long wave (Ruessink et al., Proc. Coastal Dynamics, 2013). The measurements are compared to numerical results obtained with the SERR-1D Boussinesq-type model, which is designed to reproduce the complex dynamics of high-frequency wave propagation, including the energy transfer mechanisms that enhance infragravity-wave generation. The evolution of skewness and asymmetry along the beach profile until the swash zone is analyzed, relatively to that of the wave groupiness and long wave propagation. Some particularities of bichromatic wave groups are further investigated, such as partially-standing long-wave patterns and short-wave reformation after the first breakpoint, which is seen to influence particularly the skewness trends. Decreased spectral width (for random waves) and increased modulation (for bichromatic wave groups) are shown to enhance energy transfers between super- and sub

  1. Experimental and numerical investigations of the geometry influence on gas accumulation using a V-shaped forest model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudour, Bruno; Chetehouna, Khaled; Conan, Boris; Aubrun, Sandrine; Kaiss, Ahmed; Garo, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Accumulation of gas inside a valley exposed to crosswind is experimented in this paper to extrapolate it to a case of a forest fire approaching a thalweg. Experimentations were done inside a wind tunnel using a 1/400 forest model configured as a valley with two different internal angles. The forest was modelled by mesh cylinders so that a parallel is possible with a real forest thanks to similitude laws. Gas emission was ensured by 400 tubes introduced inside the cylinders and supplied with ethane which acted as a tracer. The 400 tubes were divided into four independent parts of 100 tubes, inside and outside the valley, to be able to study independently the influence of the different zones of the forest model on the gas accumulation. We focused on the measurements of velocity by Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and concentration with a Flame Ionization Detector (FID) to visualise the flow and quantify the accumulation of ethane. Analysing velocity, turbulence and concentration, a stagnation point was observed in the thalweg for the flattest valley and a recirculation zone for the deepest one where gas accumulation reached up to four times the concentration measured outside the valley due to airflow. The study of the influence of the different emission zones showed that gas accumulation mainly comes from the zones inside the valley. All these data permitted us to validate a numerical modelling which will enable us to study more cases, varying above all gas density but also choosing more valley angles and configurations. Another interest of the numerical model is the possibility of adding a thermal model.

  2. Numeric and symbolic knowledge representation of cerebral cortex anatomy: methods and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Dameron, O; Gibaud, B; Morandi, X

    2004-06-01

    The human cerebral cortex anatomy describes the brain organization at the scale of gyri and sulci. It is used as landmarks for neurosurgery as well as localization support for functional data analysis or inter-subject data comparison. Existing models of the cortex anatomy either rely on image labeling but fail to represent variability and structural properties or rely on a conceptual model but miss the inner 3D nature and relations of anatomical structures. This study was therefore conducted to propose a model of sulco-gyral anatomy for the healthy human brain. We hypothesized that both numeric knowledge (i.e., image-based) and symbolic knowledge (i.e., concept-based) have to be represented and coordinated. In addition, the representation of this knowledge should be application-independent in order to be usable in various contexts. Therefore, we devised a symbolic model describing specialization, composition and spatial organization of cortical anatomical structures. We also collected numeric knowledge such as 3D models of shape and shape variation about cortical anatomical structures. For each numeric piece of knowledge, a companion file describes the concept it refers to and the nature of the relationship. Demonstration software performs a mapping between the numeric and the symbolic aspects for browsing the knowledge base. PMID:15118839

  3. Protection of SF/sub 6/ gas insulated substations - Industry survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Akamine, J.K.; Baumgartner, E.A.; Emery, J.T.; Haas, R.W.; Murray, T.J.

    1987-10-01

    This paper summarizes the result of an industry survey of gas insulated equipment practices and develops recommendations where necessary. Tables are included to show the type of gas insulated equipment located at each substation (current transformers, voltage transformers, switches, bus bars, bushings, lightning arresters, and cable end terminations), the equipment configuration (single or three conductors), the type of gas monitoring equipment used (density or pressure), the use of gas monitoring equipment (alarm and/or trip), unique relaying protection applications, and unique operating procedures. Gas insulated circuit breakers are specifically excluded from this survey.

  4. A discontinuous Galerkin numerical model for the simulation of multiphase gas-particle flows in explosive volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcano, Susanna; Bonaventura, Luca

    2014-05-01

    During explosive volcanic eruptions a mixture of gases, magma fragments, crystals and eroded rocks is injected in the atmosphere at high velocity, pressure and temperature. In the proximity of the volcanic vent, the erupted underexpanded multiphase mixture can manifest the features of supersonic flows, while the subsequent column behaviour is controlled by the (subsonic) turbulent mixing and mass and thermal exchange between the gas-particle mixture and the atmosphere. One of the main difficulties of the numerical simulation of explosive volcanic eruptions is therefore the need of modeling a multiphase process where different fluid dynamic regimes coexist and develop on on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. From a computational point of view, this requires robust numerical techniques able to resolve supersonic regimes and to capture flow discontinuities (shock waves), as well as to reduce, where needed, the so-called numerical diffusion (while increasing the numerical accuracy) in order to simulate gas-particle non-equilibrium phenomena. Several examples of numerical approximation of multiphase gas-particle equations based on finite volume approach have been proposed in the literature, able to simulate the multiphase mixture up to second-order accuracy in space and time. However, achieving higher order of accuracy in the finite volume framework implies an increasing computational cost related to the extension of the computational stencil, in particular when a parallel implementation has to be employed. In this work, a mixture of gas and solid particles is described with a set of coupled partial differential equations for the mass, momentum and energy of each phase. Solid particles and the gas phase are considered as non-equilibrium interpenetrating continua, following an Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Each phase is compressible and inviscid. The gas and particles dynamics are coupled through the drag term in the momentum equations and the heat exchange term

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of Particle Behaviour in a Gas-Solid Three Dimensional Plane Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, N. A.; Tang, J. C. K.; Hawkes, E. R.; Yeoh, G. H.; Grout, Ray W.; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Talei, M.; Taylor, R. A.; Bolla, M.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a three-dimensional (3D), non-reacting, temporally evolving planar jet laden with mono-dispersed solid particles in the two-way coupling (TWC) regime are performed. Three different particles Stokes numbers (St = 0.1, 1, 10) have been considered. This has been achieved by varying the particle diameter while keeping the particle mass loading (fm = 1) and the jet Reynolds number (Rejet = 2000) unchanged. The objective is to study the effect of the particle Stokes number TWC regime on the temporal development of the planar jet. Two-way coupled momentum and heat transfer has been studied by investigating mean relative velocity and temperature. Results indicate that the relative parameters are more pronounced on the edges of the jet and decrease in time in general. At the center of the jet however, the mean value first increases and then decreases again. Additionally, lighter particles spread farther than heavier particles from the center of the jet. Furthermore, the heavier particles delay the development of the jet due to TWC effects.

  6. Numerical modeling of gas mixing and bio-chemical transformations during underground hydrogen storage within the project H2STORE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, B.; Feldmann, F.; Panfilov, M.; Ganzer, L.

    2015-12-01

    The change from fossil to renewable energy sources is demanding an increasing amount of storage capacities for electrical energy. A promising technological solution is the storage of hydrogen in the subsurface. Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis using excessive electrical energy and subsequently converted back into electricity by fuel cells or engine generators. The development of this technology starts with adding small amounts of hydrogen to the high pressure natural gas grid and continues with the creation of pure underground hydrogen storages. The feasibility of hydrogen storage in depleted gas reservoirs is investigated in the lighthouse project H2STORE financed by the German Ministry for Education and Research. The joint research project has project members from the University of Jena, the Clausthal University of Technology, the GFZ Potsdam and the French National Center for Scientic Research in Nancy. The six sub projects are based on laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and analytical work which cover the investigation of mineralogical, geochemical, physio-chemical, sedimentological, microbiological and gas mixing processes in reservoir and cap rocks. The focus in this presentation is on the numerical modeling of underground hydrogen storage. A mathematical model was developed which describes the involved coupled hydrodynamic and microbiological effects. Thereby, the bio-chemical reaction rates depend on the kinetics of microbial growth which is induced by the injection of hydrogen. The model has been numerically implemented on the basis of the open source code DuMuX. A field case study based on a real German gas reservoir was performed to investigate the mixing of hydrogen with residual gases and to discover the consequences of bio-chemical reactions.

  7. Numerical simulation of an ICF target explosion in a stratified gas atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.J.; Peterson, R.R.; Moses, G.A.

    1986-11-01

    Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations of a light ion fusion target generated microfireball in a stratified gas atmosphere have been performed. The target location in a two region cavity was varied with the intent to reduce the overpressure on the diodes at the walls of a target chamber with a single cavity gas. Helium and nitrogen at 15 torr were used as the cavity gases; target explosions of 200 and 800 MJ were investigated. It was found that placing the target in a helium region surrounded by nitrogen could reduce the overpressure by a factor of 2 when compared with a single gas cavity of nitrogen. The surface heat flux was also reduced from a pure helium gas cavity.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Large Telescopes in Terms of Induced Loads and Resulting Geometrical Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upnere, S.; Jekabsons, N.; Joffe, R.

    2013-03-01

    Comprehensive numerical studies, involving structural and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, have been carried out at the Engineering Research Institute "Ventspils International Radio Astron- omy Center" (VIRAC) of the Ventspils University College to investigate the gravitational and wind load effects on large, ground-based radio tele- scopes RT-32 performance. Gravitational distortions appear to be the main limiting factor for the reflector performance in everyday operation. Random loads caused by wind gusts (unavoidable at zenith) contribute to the fatigue accumulation.

  9. Chaotic structures of nonlinear magnetic fields. I - Theory. II - Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Nam C.; Parks, George K.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the evolutionary properties of nonlinear magnetic fields in flowing MHD plasmas is presented to illustrate that nonlinear magnetic fields may involve chaotic dynamics. It is shown how a suitable transformation of the coupled equations leads to Duffing's form, suggesting that the behavior of the general solution can also be chaotic. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear magnetic field equations that have been cast in the form of Duffing's equation are presented.

  10. Coupled transport processes in semipermeable media. Part 2: Numerical method and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Janet S.; Carnahan, Chalon L.

    1990-04-01

    A numerical simulator has been developed to investigate the effects of coupled processes on heat and mass transport in semipermeable media. The governing equations on which the simulator is based were derived using the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The equations are nonlinear and have been solved numerically using the n-dimensional Newton's method. As an example of an application, the numerical simulator has been used to investigate heat and solute transport in the vicinity of a heat source buried in a saturated clay-like medium, in part to study solute transport in bentonite packing material surrounding a nuclear waste canister. The coupled processes considered were thermal filtration, thermal osmosis, chemical osmosis and ultrafiltration. In the simulations, heat transport by coupled processes was negligible compared to heat conduction, but pressure and solute migration were affected. Solute migration was retarded relative to the uncoupled case when only chemical osmosis was considered. When both chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis were included, solute migration was enhanced.

  11. Evaluation of dense gas dispersion test results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheesley, D.

    1997-03-01

    A national Spill Test Facility (STF) program dedicated to public safety in the use and transport of fuels and other chemicals was established by Congress. The program is charged with developing technology for spill prediction, prevention, and mitigation. The Spill Test Facility, located northeast of Mercury, Nevada, is to be used for research leading to the development of tools for the protection of workers, the public, and the environment in response to accidental spills of hazardous materials. Public laws, including the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990, also require that the Secretary of Energy make the STF and STF test data available to industry, academia, and other government agencies. The objective of this subtask is to produce a data base allowing the chemical and fuel accident responder to access emergency management information quickly and efficiently. The work has involved (1) archiving spill test facility results from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (LGFSTF) at the Nevada National Test Site, (2) updating the data base on spill control technology documents and data, and (3) transferring this information to the public.

  12. Toward a detailed physical modelling of wildfires: physical considerations and numerical results (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morvan, D.

    2010-12-01

    behaviour of forest fires, based on a multiphase formulation. This approach consists in solving the balance equations (mass, momentum, energy, chemical species, radiation intensity …) governing the coupled system formed by the vegetation and the surrounding atmosphere. The vegetation was represented as a collection of solid fuel particles, regrouped in families, each one characterized by its own set of physical variables (mass fraction of water, of dry matter, of char, temperature, volume fraction, density, surface area to volume ratio …) necessary to describe the evolution of its state during the propagation of fire. Some numerical results were then presented and compared with available experimental data. A particular attention was taken to simulate surface fires propagating through grassland and Mediterranean shrubland for which a large experimental data base exists. We conclude our paper, in presenting some recent results obtained in a more operational context, to simulate the interaction between two fire fronts (head fire and backfire) in conditions similar to two those encountered during a suppression fire operation.

  13. Numerical model of the lowermost Mississippi River as an alluvial-bedrock reach: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Mohrig, D. C.; Parker, G.

    2012-12-01

    Recent field studies reveal that the river bed of the Lower Mississippi River is characterized by a transition from alluvium (upstream) to bedrock (downstream). In particular, in the downstream 250 km of the river, fields of actively migrating bedforms alternate with deep zones where a consolidated substratum is exposed. Here we present a first version of a one-dimensional numerical model able to capture the alluvial-bedrock transition in the lowermost Mississippi River, defined herein as the 500-km reach between the Old River Control Structure and the Gulf of Mexico. The flow is assumed to be steady, and the cross-section is divided in two regions, the river channel and the floodplain. The streamwise variation of channel and floodplain geometry is described with synthetic relations derived from field observations. Flow resistance in the river channel is computed with the formulation for low-slope, large sand bed rivers due to Wright and Parker, while a Chezy-type formulation is implemented on the floodplain. Sediment is modeled in terms of bed material and wash load. Suspended load is computed with the Wright-Parker formulation. This treatment allows either uniform sediment or a mixture of different grain sizes, and accounts for stratification effects. Bedload transport rates are estimated with the relation for sediment mixtures of Ashida and Michiue. Previous work documents reasonable agreement between these load relations and field measurements. Washload is routed through the system solving the equation of mass conservation of sediment in suspension in the water column. The gradual transition from the alluvial reach to the bedrock reach is modeled in terms of a "mushy" layer of specified thickness overlying the non-erodible substrate. In the case of a fully alluvial reach, the channel bed elevation is above this mushy layer, while in the case of partial alluvial cover of the substratum, the channel bed elevation is within the mushy layer. Variations in base

  14. Numerical analysis of gas and micro-particle interactions in a hand-held shock-tube device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kendall, M A F

    2006-12-01

    A unique hand-held gene gun is employed for ballistically delivering biomolecules to key cells in the skin and mucosa in the treatment of the major diseases. One of these types of devices, called the Contoured Shock Tube (CST), delivers powdered micro-particles to the skin with a narrow and highly controllable velocity distribution and a nominally uniform spatial distribution. In this paper, we apply a numerical approach to gain new insights in to the behavior of the CST prototype device. The drag correlations proposed by Henderson (1976), Igra and Takayama (1993) and Kurian and Das (1997) were applied to predict the micro-particle transport in a numerically simulated gas flow. Simulated pressure histories agree well with the corresponding static and Pitot pressure measurements, validating the CFD approach. The calculated velocity distributions show a good agreement, with the best prediction from Igra & Takayama correlation (maximum discrepancy of 5%). Key features of the gas dynamics and gas-particle interaction are discussed. Statistic analyses show a tight free-jet particle velocity distribution is achieved (570 +/- 14.7 m/s) for polystyrene particles (39 +/- 1 microm), representative of a drug payload. PMID:16917664

  15. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  16. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a Westinghouse Model 51 steam generator. Volume 2. Appendix A, numerical results. Interim report. [CALIPSOS code numerical data

    SciTech Connect

    Fanselau, R.W.; Thakkar, J.G.; Hiestand, J.W.; Cassell, D.

    1981-03-01

    The Comparative Thermal-Hydraulic Evaluation of Steam Generators program represents an analytical investigation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of four PWR steam generators. The analytical tool utilized in this investigation is the CALIPSOS code, a three-dimensional flow distribution code. This report presents the steady state thermal-hydraulic characteristics on the secondary side of a Westinghouse Model 51 steam generator. Details of the CALIPSOS model with accompanying assumptions, operating parameters, and transport correlations are identified. Comprehensive graphical and numerical results are presented to facilitate the desired comparison with other steam generators analyzed by the same flow distribution code.

  17. Numerical simulation of the electrical properties of shale gas reservoir rock based on digital core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xin; Zou, Changchun; Li, Zhenhua; Meng, Xiaohong; Qi, Xinghua

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the electrical properties of shale gas reservoir rock by applying the finite element method to digital cores which are built based on an advanced Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and a combination workflow. Study shows that the shale gas reservoir rock has strong anisotropic electrical conductivity because the conductivity is significantly different in both horizontal and vertical directions. The Archie formula is not suitable for application in shale reservoirs. The formation resistivity decreases in two cases; namely (a) with the increase of clay mineral content and the cation exchange capacity of clay, and (b) with the increase of pyrite content. The formation resistivity is not sensitive to the solid organic matter but to the clay and gas in the pores.

  18. A numerical investigation of the cooling effect of compressed natural gas throttling on engine delivery ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Yacoub, Y.; Marbun, L.; Bata, R.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical study was conducted to investigate the cooling effect of throttling compressed natural gas during the pressure regulation process. The concept of using this effect in cooling down the induction air was investigated. A thermodynamic model was developed for a typical fuel delivery system used on a vehicle fueled with compressed natural gas. The model was based on a set of integral conservation laws applied to each component of the fueling system. Several heat exchanging arrangements between the throttled gas and the inlet air were examined. The effect of the added heat exchanger on engine delivery ratio was examined for different engine sizes as well as for different operating conditions. An increase of 1 to 2.5% in engine delivery ratio was predicted due to the added heat exchanger.

  19. Elasticity of mechanical oscillators in nonequilibrium steady states: Experimental, numerical, and theoretical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Livia; De Gregorio, Paolo; Bonaldi, Michele; Borrielli, Antonio; Crivellari, Michele; Karapetyan, Gagik; Poli, Charles; Serra, Enrico; Thakur, Ram-Krishna; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2012-06-01

    We study experimentally, numerically, and theoretically the elastic response of mechanical resonators along which the temperature is not uniform, as a consequence of the onset of steady-state thermal gradients. Two experimental setups and designs are employed, both using low-loss materials. In both cases, we monitor the resonance frequencies of specific modes of vibration, as they vary along with variations of temperatures and of temperature differences. In one case, we consider the first longitudinal mode of vibration of an aluminum alloy resonator; in the other case, we consider the antisymmetric torsion modes of a silicon resonator. By defining the average temperature as the volume-weighted mean of the temperatures of the respective elastic sections, we find out that the elastic response of an object depends solely on it, regardless of whether a thermal gradient exists and, up to 10% imbalance, regardless of its magnitude. The numerical model employs a chain of anharmonic oscillators, with first- and second-neighbor interactions and temperature profiles satisfying Fourier's Law to a good degree. Its analysis confirms, for the most part, the experimental findings and it is explained theoretically from a statistical mechanics perspective with a loose notion of local equilibrium.

  20. Estimation of geopotential from satellite-to-satellite range rate data: Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thobe, Glenn E.; Bose, Sam C.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for high-resolution geopotential field estimation by recovering the harmonic coefficients from satellite-to-satellite range rate data is presented and tested against both a controlled analytical simulation of a one-day satellite mission (maximum degree and order 8) and then against a Cowell method simulation of a 32-day mission (maximum degree and order 180). Innovations include: (1) a new frequency-domain observation equation based on kinetic energy perturbations which avoids much of the complication of the usual Keplerian element perturbation approaches; (2) a new method for computing the normalized inclination functions which unlike previous methods is both efficient and numerically stable even for large harmonic degrees and orders; (3) the application of a mass storage FFT to the entire mission range rate history; (4) the exploitation of newly discovered symmetries in the block diagonal observation matrix which reduce each block to the product of (a) a real diagonal matrix factor, (b) a real trapezoidal factor with half the number of rows as before, and (c) a complex diagonal factor; (5) a block-by-block least-squares solution of the observation equation by means of a custom-designed Givens orthogonal rotation method which is both numerically stable and tailored to the trapezoidal matrix structure for fast execution.

  1. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on twomore » general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.« less

  2. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Van, Luong

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper are to develop a multidisciplinary computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates CFD for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40 k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine Main Combustion Chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the Advanced Main Combustion Chamber to find a strategy for a proposed combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  3. An Introduction to Thermodynamic Performance Analysis of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Cycles Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    This document is intended as an introduction to the analysis of gas turbine engine cycles using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code. It is assumed that the analyst has a firm understanding of fluid flow, gas dynamics, thermodynamics, and turbomachinery theory. The purpose of this paper is to provide for the novice the information necessary to begin cycle analysis using NPSS. This paper and the annotated example serve as a starting point and by no means cover the entire range of information and experience necessary for engine performance simulation. NPSS syntax is presented but for a more detailed explanation of the code the user is referred to the NPSS User Guide and Reference document (ref. 1).

  4. Interaction of a mantle plume and a segmented mid-ocean ridge: Results from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have proposed that changes in lithospheric thickness across a transform fault, due to the juxtaposition of seafloor of different ages, can impede lateral dispersion of an on-ridge mantle plume. The application of this “transform damming” mechanism has been considered for several plume-ridge systems, including the Reunion hotspot and the Central Indian Ridge, the Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot and the Southeast Indian Ridge, the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Iceland hotspot and the Kolbeinsey Ridge, the Afar plume and the ridges of the Gulf of Aden, and the Marion/Crozet hotspot and the Southwest Indian Ridge. This study explores the geodynamics of the transform damming mechanism using a three-dimensional finite element numerical model. The model solves the coupled steady-state equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, including thermal buoyancy and viscosity that is dependent on pressure and temperature. The plume is introduced as a circular thermal anomaly on the bottom boundary of the numerical domain. The center of the plume conduit is located directly beneath a spreading segment, at a distance of 200 km (measured in the along-axis direction) from a transform offset with length 100 km. Half-spreading rate is 0.5 cm/yr. In a series of numerical experiments, the buoyancy flux of the modeled plume is progressively increased to investigate the effects on the temperature and velocity structure of the upper mantle in the vicinity of the transform. Unlike earlier studies, which suggest that a transform always acts to decrease the along-axis extent of plume signature, these models imply that the effect of a transform on plume dispersion may be complex. Under certain ranges of plume flux modeled in this study, the region of the upper mantle undergoing along-axis flow directed away from the plume could be enhanced by the three-dimensional velocity and temperature structure associated with ridge

  5. The spectroscopic search for the trace aerosols in the planetary atmospheres - the results of numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecka, Maria I.

    2010-05-01

    The passive remote spectrometric methods are important in examinations the atmospheres of planets. The radiance spectra inform us about values of thermodynamical parameters and composition of the atmospheres and surfaces. The spectral technology can be useful in detection of the trace aerosols like biological substances (if present) in the environments of the planets. We discuss here some of the aspects related to the spectroscopic search for the aerosols and dust in planetary atmospheres. Possibility of detection and identifications of biological aerosols with a passive InfraRed spectrometer in an open-air environment is discussed. We present numerically simulated, based on radiative transfer theory, spectroscopic observations of the Earth atmosphere. Laboratory measurements of transmittance of various kinds of aerosols, pollens and bacterias were used in modeling.

  6. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Equatorial Spread F: Results and Observations in the Pacific Sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveiro, H. C.; Hysell, D. L.; Caton, R. G.; Groves, K. M.; Klenzing, J.; Pfaff, R. F.; Stoneback, R.; Heelis, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of plasma density irregularities in the postsunset equatorial F region ionosphere leading to equatorial spread F (ESF) is described. The simulation evolves under realistic background conditions including bottomside plasma shear flow and vertical current. It also incorporates C/NOFS satellite data which partially specify the forcing. A combination of generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability (GRT) and collisional shear instability (CSI) produces growing waveforms with key features that agree with C/NOFS satellite and ALTAIR radar observations in the Pacific sector, including features such as gross morphology and rates of development. The transient response of CSI is consistent with the observation of bottomside waves with wavelengths close to 30 km, whereas the steady state behavior of the combined instability can account for the 100+ km wavelength waves that predominate in the F region.

  7. Numerical results on the transcendence of constants involving pi, e, and Euler's constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The existence of simple polynomial equations (integer relations) for the constants e/pi, e + pi, log pi, gamma (Euler's constant), e exp gamma, gamma/e, gamma/pi, and log gamma is investigated by means of numerical computations. The recursive form of the Ferguson-Fourcade algorithm (Ferguson and Fourcade, 1979; Ferguson, 1986 and 1987) is implemented on the Cray-2 supercomputer at NASA Ames, applying multiprecision techniques similar to those described by Bailey (1988) except that FFTs are used instead of dual-prime-modulus transforms for multiplication. It is shown that none of the constants has an integer relation of degree eight or less with coefficients of Euclidean norm 10 to the 9th or less.

  8. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h(exp -1) Mpc having cell size 0.31 h(exp -1) Mpc is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 1.05, omega(sub b) = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10(exp -3) of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having L(sub x) is greater than 10(exp 43) ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h(exp -1) Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright

  9. First results of ground-based LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Yu, Chun-chao; Wang, Hai-yang; Fu, Yan-peng; Liao, Ning-fang; Su, Jun-hong

    2014-11-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented. The LWIR hyperspectral imaging by using the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy, and the results of outdoor ether gas detection, verify the features of LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote sensing and technical approach. It provides a new technical means for ground-based gas remote sensing.

  10. Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2011-01-01

    To minimize confusion in the expression of measurement results of stable isotope and gas-ratio measurements, recommendations based on publications of the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) are presented. Whenever feasible, entries are consistent with the Système International d'Unités, the SI (known in English as the International System of Units), and the third edition of the International Vocabulary of Basic and General Terms in Metrology (VIM, 3rd edition). The recommendations presented herein are approved by the Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights and are designed to clarify expression of quantities related to measurement of isotope and gas ratios to ensure that quantity equations instead of numerical value equations are used for quantity definitions. Examples of column headings consistent with quantity calculus (also called the algebra of quantities) and examples of various deprecated usages connected with the terms recommended are presented.

  11. Numerical Simulations of STOVL Hot Gas Ingestion in Ground Proximity Using a Multigrid Solution Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Gang

    2003-01-01

    A multi grid solution procedure for the numerical simulation of turbulent flows in complex geometries has been developed. A Full Multigrid-Full Approximation Scheme (FMG-FAS) is incorporated into the continuity and momentum equations, while the scalars are decoupled from the multi grid V-cycle. A standard kappa-Epsilon turbulence model with wall functions has been used to close the governing equations. The numerical solution is accomplished by solving for the Cartesian velocity components either with a traditional grid staggering arrangement or with a multiple velocity grid staggering arrangement. The two solution methodologies are evaluated for relative computational efficiency. The solution procedure with traditional staggering arrangement is subsequently applied to calculate the flow and temperature fields around a model Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft hovering in ground proximity.

  12. Numerical study of the spontaneous nucleation of self-rotational moist gas in a converging-diverging nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qing-Fen; Hu, Da-Peng; Jiang, Jing-Zhi; Qiu, Zhong-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous nucleation is the primary way of droplet formation in the supersonic gas separation technology, and the converging-diverging nozzle is the condensation and separation unit of supersonic gas separation devices. A three-dimensional geometrical model for the generation of self-rotational transonic gas flow is set up, based on which, the spontaneous nucleation of self-rotational transonic moist gas in the converging-diverging nozzle is carried out using an Eulerian multi-fluid model. The simulated results of the main flow and nucleation parameters indicate that the spontaneous nucleation can occur in the diverging part of the nozzle. However, different from the nucleation flow without self-rotation, the distributions of these parameters are unsymmetrical about the nozzle axis due to the irregular flow form caused by the self-rotation of gas flow. The nucleation region is located on the position where gas flows with intense rotation and the self-rotation impacts much on the nucleation process. Stronger rotation delays the onset of spontaneous nucleation and yields lower nucleation rate and narrow nucleation region. In addition, influences of other factors such as inlet total pressure p 0, inlet total temperature T 0, the nozzle-expanding ratio Ȧ and the inlet relative humidity ф 0 on the nucleation of self-rotational moist gas flow in the nozzle are also discussed.

  13. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum - Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Van Fossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation on leading edge heat transfer is presented. Experimental and numerical results are given for a circular leading edge and for a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. It is demonstrated that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  14. Numerical study of the wind energy potential in Bulgaria - Some preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanov, G.; Gadzhev, G.; Ganev, K.; Miloshev, N.; Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.

    2012-10-01

    The new energy efficiency politics of the EU requires till year 2020 16% of Bulgarian electricity to be produced from renewable sources. The wind is one of renewable energy sources. The ecological benefits of all the kinds of "green" energy are obvious. It is desirable, however, the utilization of renewable energy sources to be as much as possible economically effective. This means that installment of the respective devices (wind farms, solar farms, etc.) should be based on a detailed and reliable evaluation of the real potential of the country. Detailed study of the wind energy potential of the country - spatial distribution, temporal variation, mean and extreme values, fluctuations and statistical characteristics; evaluation from a point of view of industrial applicability can not be made only on the basis of the existing routine meteorological data - the measuring network is not dense enough to catch all the details of the local flow systems, hence of the real wind energy potential of the country spatial distribution. That is why the measurement data has to be supplemented by numerical modeling. The wind field simulations were performed applying the 5th generation PSU/NCAR Meso-Meteorological Model MM5 for years 2000-2007 with a spatial resolution of 3 km over Bulgaria. Some preliminary evaluations of the country wind energy potential, based on the simulation output are demonstrated in the paper.

  15. Displacement-Based Seismic Design Procedure for Framed Buildings with Dissipative Braces Part II: Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mazza, Fabio; Vulcano, Alfonso

    2008-07-08

    For a widespread application of dissipative braces to protect framed buildings against seismic loads, practical and reliable design procedures are needed. In this paper a design procedure based on the Direct Displacement-Based Design approach is adopted, assuming the elastic lateral storey-stiffness of the damped braces proportional to that of the unbraced frame. To check the effectiveness of the design procedure, presented in an associate paper, a six-storey reinforced concrete plane frame, representative of a medium-rise symmetric framed building, is considered as primary test structure; this structure, designed in a medium-risk region, is supposed to be retrofitted as in a high-risk region, by insertion of diagonal braces equipped with hysteretic dampers. A numerical investigation is carried out to study the nonlinear static and dynamic responses of the primary and the damped braced test structures, using step-by-step procedures described in the associate paper mentioned above; the behaviour of frame members and hysteretic dampers is idealized by bilinear models. Real and artificial accelerograms, matching EC8 response spectrum for a medium soil class, are considered for dynamic analyses.

  16. Accretion of rotating fluids by barytropes - Numerical results for white-dwarf models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical sequences of rotating axisymmetric nonmagnetic equilibrium models are constructed which represent the evolution of a barytropic star as it accretes material from a rotating medium. Two accretion geometries are considered - one approximating accretion from a rotating cloud and the other, accretion from a Keplerian disk. It is assumed that some process, such as Ekman spin-up or nonequilibrium oscillations, maintains nearly constant angular velocity along cylinders about the rotation axis. Transport of angular momentum in the cylindrically radial direction by viscosity is included. Fluid instabilities and other physical processes leading to enhancement of this transport are discussed. Particular application is made to zero-temperature white-dwarf models, using the degenerate electron equation of state. An initially nonrotating 0.566-solar-mass white dwarf is followed during the accretion of more than one solar mass of material. Applications to degenerate stellar cores, to mass-transfer binary systems containing white dwarfs, such as novae and dwarf novae, to Type I supernovae, and to galactic X-ray sources are considered.

  17. Preliminary Results from Numerical Experiments on the Summer 1980 Heat Wave and Drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, N.; Atlas, R.; Sud, Y. C.

    1985-01-01

    During the summer of 1980, a prolonged heat wave and drought affected the United States. A preliminary set of experiments has been conducted to study the effect of varying boundary conditions on the GLA model simulation of the heat wave. Five 10-day numerical integrations with three different specifications of boundary conditions were carried out: a control experiment which utilized climatological boundary conditions, an SST experiment which utilized summer 1980 sea-surface temperatures in the North Pacific, but climatological values elsewhere, and a Soil Moisture experiment which utilized the values of Mintz-Serafini for the summer, 1980. The starting dates for the five forecasts were 11 June, 7 July, 21 July, 22 August, and 6 September of 1980. These dates were specifically chosen as days when a heat wave was already established in order to investigate the effect of soil moistures or North Pacific sea-surface temperatures on the model's ability to maintain the heat wave pattern. The experiments were evaluated in terms of the heat wave index for the South Plains, North Plains, Great Plains and the entire U.S. In addition a subjective comparison of map patterns has been performed.

  18. Recent results from numerical models of the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico: Do they all agree?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinbaum, J.

    2013-05-01

    A great variety of numerical models of the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico have been developed over the years. They all reproduce the basic features of the circulation in the region but do not necessarily agree in the dynamics that explains them. We review recent results related to: 1) semiannual and interannual eddy variability in the Caribbean and their possible role in determining the extension of the western Atlantic warm pool. 2) Loop Current and its eddy shedding dynamics and 3) the deep circulation in the Gulf of Mexico. Recent observations of inertial wave trapping by eddies suggest new veins for numerical research and model comparisons.

  19. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  20. A simplified method for numerical simulation of gas grilling of non-intact beef steaks to elimate Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to develop a numerical simulation method to study gas grilling of non-intact beef steaks (NIBS) and evaluate the effectiveness of grilling on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7. A numerical analysis program was developed to determine the effective heat transfer ...

  1. Correlation of the experimental and numerical results for the holding power of dental, traumatic, and spinal screws.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Ching; Lin, Shang-Chih; Wu, Shu-Wei; Li, Yu-Ching; Fu, Ping-Yuen

    2012-10-01

    The holding power of the bone-screw interfaces is one of the key factors in the clinical performance of screw design. The value of the holding power can be experimentally measured by pullout tests. Historically, some researchers have used the finite-element method to simulate the holding power of the different screws. Among them, however, the assumed displacement of the screw withdrawal is unreasonably small (about 0.005-1.0 mm). In addition, the chosen numerical indices are quite different, including maximum stress, strain energy, and reaction force. This study systematically uses dental, traumatic, and spinal screws to experimentally measure and numerically simulate their bone-purchasing ability within the synthetic bone. The testing results (pullout displacement and holding power) and numerical indices (maximum stress, total strain energy, and reaction forces) are chosen to calculate their correlation coefficients. The pullout displacement is divided into five regions from initial to final withdrawal. The experimental results demonstrate that the pullout displacement consistently occurs at the final region (0.6-1.6 mm) and is significantly higher than the assumed value of the literature studies. For all screw groups, the measured holding power within the initial region is not highly or even negatively correlated with the experimental and numerical results within the final region. The observation from the simulative results shows the maximum stress only reflects the loads concentrated at some local site(s) and is the least correlated to the measured holding power. Comparatively, both energy and force are more global indices to correlate with the gross failure at the bone-screw interfaces. However, the energy index is not suitable for the screw groups with rather tiny threads compared with the other specifications. In conclusion, the underestimated displacement leads to erroneous results in the screw-pullout simulation. Among three numerical indices the reaction

  2. Hidden modes in open disordered media: analytical, numerical, and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliokh, Yury P.; Freilikher, Valentin; Shi, Z.; Genack, A. Z.; Nori, Franco

    2015-11-01

    We explore numerically, analytically, and experimentally the relationship between quasi-normal modes (QNMs) and transmission resonance (TR) peaks in the transmission spectrum of one-dimensional (1D) and quasi-1D open disordered systems. It is shown that for weak disorder there exist two types of the eigenstates: ordinary QNMs which are associated with a TR, and hidden QNMs which do not exhibit peaks in transmission or within the sample. The distinctive feature of the hidden modes is that unlike ordinary ones, their lifetimes remain constant in a wide range of the strength of disorder. In this range, the averaged ratio of the number of transmission peaks {N}{{res}} to the number of QNMs {N}{{mod}}, {N}{{res}}/{N}{{mod}}, is insensitive to the type and degree of disorder and is close to the value \\sqrt{2/5}, which we derive analytically in the weak-scattering approximation. The physical nature of the hidden modes is illustrated in simple examples with a few scatterers. The analogy between ordinary and hidden QNMs and the segregation of superradiant states and trapped modes is discussed. When the coupling to the environment is tuned by an external edge reflectors, the superradiance transition is reproduced. Hidden modes have been also found in microwave measurements in quasi-1D open disordered samples. The microwave measurements and modal analysis of transmission in the crossover to localization in quasi-1D systems give a ratio of {N}{{res}}/{N}{{mod}} close to \\sqrt{2/5}. In diffusive quasi-1D samples, however, {N}{{res}}/{N}{{mod}} falls as the effective number of transmission eigenchannels M increases. Once {N}{{mod}} is divided by M, however, the ratio {N}{{res}}/{N}{{mod}} is close to the ratio found in 1D.

  3. Numerical Analyses on Transient Thermal Process of Gas - Cooled Current Leads in BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Yao, Z. L.; Wang, L.; Jia, L. X.

    2004-06-01

    A pair of high current leads will be used for the superconducting detector solenoid magnet and six pairs of low current leads will be used for the superconducting interaction quadruple magnets in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPC II). This paper reports the numerical analyses on the thermal processes in the current leads, including the power charging process and overloaded current case as well as the transient characteristic of the leads once the helium cooling is interrupted. The design parameters of the current leads are studied for the stable and unstable conditions.

  4. Numerical Solutions for Supersonic Flow of an Ideal Gas Around Blunt Two-Dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Franklyn B.

    1961-01-01

    The method described is an inverse one; the shock shape is chosen and the solution proceeds downstream to a body. Bodies blunter than circular cylinders are readily accessible, and any adiabatic index can be chosen. The lower limit to the free-stream Mach number available in any case is determined by the extent of the subsonic field, which in turn depends upon the body shape. Some discussion of the stability of the numerical processes is given. A set of solutions for flows about circular cylinders at several Mach numbers and several values of the adiabatic index is included.

  5. Three-dimensional Numerical Simulation of Gas-particulate Flow around Breathing Human and Particulate Inhalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Okubo, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Toshiaki

    2006-05-01

    It is important to predict the environment around the breathing human because inhalation of virus (avian influenza, SARS) is recently severe worldwide problem, and air pollution caused by diesel emission particle (DEP) and asbestos attract a great deal of attention. In the present study, three-dimensional numerical simulation was carried out to predict unsteady flows around a breathing human and how suspended particulate matter (SPM, diameter˜1 μm) reaches the human nose in inhalation and exhalation. In the calculation, we find out smaller breathing angle and the closer distance between the human nose and pollutant region are effective in the inhalation of SPM.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Enhanced Nitrogen Dissolution During Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A

    2001-08-17

    Nitrogen concentrations far in excess of Sieverts' Law calculations and as high as 0.2 wt.% have been obtained in steel welds during arc welding. Such high concentrations of nitrogen in the weld metal can originate from a variety of sources, depending on the welding operation in question. One such mechanism involves the interaction between the surrounding atmosphere, which is about 80% nitrogen, and the plasma phase above the weld pool. Impingement of the surrounding atmosphere into the arc column, which is primarily composed of an inert shielding gas, can be due, in part, to insufficient shielding of the weld metal. In other cases, nitrogen can be purposefully added to the shielding gas to enhance the microstructural evolution of the weld metal. The mechanisms responsible for enhanced nitrogen concentrations are of significant interest. In both arc melting and welding operations, a plasma phase exists above the liquid metal. This plasma phase, which is composed of a number of different species not normally observed in gas-metal systems, significantly alters the nitrogen absorption reaction in liquid iron and steel. Monatomic nitrogen (N) is considered to be the species responsible for the observed enhancements in the nitrogen concentration. This role for monatomic nitrogen is based on its significantly higher solubility in iron with partial pressures many orders of magnitude less than that for diatomic nitrogen. It has also been proposed that the total amount of nitrogen present in the liquid metal is the balance of two independent processes. Monatomic nitrogen is absorbed through the interface between the arc and the liquid metal. Once a saturation level is reached at any location on the metal surface, nitrogen is then expelled from the surface of the liquid metal. This expulsion of nitrogen from the weld pool surface occurs via a desorption reaction, in which bubbles form at the surface and other heterogeneous nucleation sites in the liquid melt. These bubbles

  7. Experimental and numerical insights into seismo-acoustic signals generated during the expansion of rising and bursting large gas bubbles in low-viscosity magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Stephen; Corder, Steven; James, Michael

    2010-05-01

    wholesale meniscus disruption when overpressure becomes appreciable. The nature of the atmospheric pressure response changes with the burst process, but is predominantly driven by two slug-depressurisation processes, namely the rise of the liquid-atmosphere interface and burst of an overpressured slug. We compare simulated results to existing seismic and acoustic measurements from a number of volcanic centres and discuss the insights this gives in understanding flow dynamics during strombolian eruptions as well as identifying where laboratory, numerical and field approaches could be more closely related to provide more accurate descriptions of the eruption process.

  8. Numerical simulation of gas dynamics and heat exchange tasks in fuel assemblies of the nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuchenko, S. V.

    2014-11-12

    This report presents a PC-based program for solution gas dynamics and heat exchange mathematical tasks in fuel assemblies of the fast-neutron nuclear reactors. A fuel assembly consisting of bulk heat-generating elements, which are integrated together by the system of supply and pressure manifolds, is examined. Spherical heat-generating microelements, which contain nuclear fuel, are pulled into the heat-generating elements. Gaseous coolant proceed from supply manifolds to heat-generating elements, where it withdraws the nuclear reaction heat and assembles in pressure manifolds.

  9. Gas Evolution Dynamics in Godunov-Type Schemes and Analysis of Numerical Shock Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we are going to study the gas evolution dynamics of the exact and approximate Riemann solvers, e.g., the Flux Vector Splitting (FVS) and the Flux Difference Splitting (FDS) schemes. Since the FVS scheme and the Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS) scheme have the same physical mechanism and similar flux function, based on the analysis of the discretized KFVS scheme the weakness and advantage of the FVS scheme are closely observed. The subtle dissipative mechanism of the Godunov method in the 2D case is also analyzed, and the physical reason for shock instability, i.e., carbuncle phenomena and odd-even decoupling, is presented.

  10. Numerical modeling of two-phase behavior in the PEFC gas diffusion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha Pa223876; Kang, Qinjun; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L

    2009-01-01

    A critical performance limitation in the polymer electrolye fuel cell (PEFC) is attributed to the mass transport loss originating from suboptimal liquid water transport and flooding phenomena. Liquid water can block the porous pathways in the fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the catalyst layer (CL), thus hindering oxygen transport from the flow field to the electrochemically actives sites in the catalyst layer. In this paper, the study of the two phase behavior and the durability implications due to the wetting characteristics in the carbon paper GDL are presented using a pore-scale modeling framework.

  11. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted hydrologic and natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 16, and 17, 2009. Hydrologic sampling consists of collecting water samples from water wells and surface water locations. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. The water well samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides and tritium. Surface water samples were analyzed for tritium. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. Water samples were analyzed by ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, and natural gas samples were analyzed by Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois. Concentrations of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides in water samples collected in the vicinity of the Gasbuggy site continue to demonstrate that the sample locations have not been impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Results from the sampling of natural gas from producing wells demonstrate that the gas wells nearest the Gasbuggy site are not currently impacted by detonation-related contaminants. Annual sampling of the gas production wells nearest the Gasbuggy site for gas and produced water will continue for the foreseeable future. The sampling frequency of water wells and surface water sources in the surrounding area will be reduced to once every 5 years. The next hydrologic sampling event at water wells, springs, and ponds will be in 2014.

  12. Test Results From a Direct Drive Gas Reactor Simulator Coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervol, David S.; Briggs, Maxwell H.; Owen, Albert K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2009-01-01

    The Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) located at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH is a closed cycle system incorporating a turboaltemator, recuperator, and gas cooler connected by gas ducts to an external gas heater. For this series of tests, the BPCU was modified by replacing the gas heater with the Direct Drive Gas heater or DOG. The DOG uses electric resistance heaters to simulate a fast spectrum nuclear reactor similar to those proposed for space power applications. The combined system thermal transient behavior was the focus of these tests. The BPCU was operated at various steady state points. At each point it was subjected to transient changes involving shaft rotational speed or DOG electrical input. This paper outlines the changes made to the test unit and describes the testing that took place along with the test results.

  13. Numerical simulation of a low-emission gas turbine combustor using KIVA-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S. L.; Chen, R.; Cline, M. C.; Nguyen, H. L.; Micklow, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A modified version of the KIVA-II code was used to obtain a multidimensional numerical solution for the turbulent two-phase chemically reacting flows inside a staged turbine combustor (STC). The STC under consideration is equipped with an advanced airblast fuel nozzle and encompasses a fuel nozzle (FN), a rich-burn (RB) zone, a converging connecting pipe, a quick-quench (QQ) zone, a diverging connecting pipe, and a lean-combustion (LC) zone. The STC was divided into two subsystems, namely, FN/RB zone and QQ/LC zones, and the numerical solutions were obtained separately for each subsystem. Preliminary data characterize the major features of the flow and temperature fields inside the STC. Information on velocity, temperature, and some critical species in the FN/RB zone is presented. In the QQ/LC zones, formation of the co- and counter-rotating bulk flow and the sandwiched-ring-shaped temperature field can be clearly seen. The calculations of the mass-weighted standard deviation and the pattern factor of temperature indicated that the mixing performance of the STC is very promising.

  14. A review of numerical models for predicting the energy deposition and resultant thermal response of humans exposed to electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegal, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    For humans exposed to electromagnetic (EM) radiation, the resulting thermophysiologic response is not well understood. Because it is unlikely that this information will be determined from quantitative experimentation, it is necessary to develop theoretical models which predict the resultant thermal response after exposure to EM fields. These calculations are difficult and involved because the human thermoregulatory system is very complex. In this paper, the important numerical models are reviewed and possibilities for future development are discussed.

  15. 222Rn transport in a fractured crystalline rock aquifer: Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Folger, P.F.; Poeter, E.; Wanty, R.B.; Day, W.; Frishman, D.

    1997-01-01

    Dissolved 222Rn concentrations in ground water from a small wellfield underlain by fractured Middle Proterozoic Pikes Peak Granite southwest of Denver, Colorado range from 124 to 840 kBq m-3 (3360-22700 pCi L-1). Numerical simulations of flow and transport between two wells show that differences in equivalent hydraulic aperture of transmissive fractures, assuming a simplified two-fracture system and the parallel-plate model, can account for the different 222Rn concentrations in each well under steady-state conditions. Transient flow and transport simulations show that 222Rn concentrations along the fracture profile are influenced by 222Rn concentrations in the adjoining fracture and depend on boundary conditions, proximity of the pumping well to the fracture intersection, transmissivity of the conductive fractures, and pumping rate. Non-homogeneous distribution (point sources) of 222Rn parent radionuclides, uranium and 226Ra, can strongly perturb the dissolved 222Rn concentrations in a fracture system. Without detailed information on the geometry and hydraulic properties of the connected fracture system, it may be impossible to distinguish the influence of factors controlling 222Rn distribution or to determine location of 222Rn point sources in the field in areas where ground water exhibits moderate 222Rn concentrations. Flow and transport simulations of a hypothetical multifracture system consisting of ten connected fractures, each 10 m in length with fracture apertures ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm, show that 222Rn concentrations at the pumping well can vary significantly over time. Assuming parallel-plate flow, transmissivities of the hypothetical system vary over four orders of magnitude because transmissivity varies with the cube of fracture aperture. The extreme hydraulic heterogeneity of the simple hypothetical system leads to widely ranging 222Rn values, even assuming homogeneous distribution of uranium and 226Ra along fracture walls. Consequently, it is

  16. Numerical simulation of dense gas flows on unstructured grids with an implicit high resolution upwind Euler solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, P.; Rebay, S.

    2004-11-01

    The study of the dense gas flows which occur in many technological applications demands for fluid dynamic simulation tools incorporating complex thermodynamic models that are not usually available in commercial software. Moreover, the software mentioned can be used to study very interesting phenomena that usually go under the name of non-classical gasdynamics, which are theoretically predicted for high molecular weight fluids in the superheated region, close to saturation. This paper presents the numerical methods and models implemented in a computer code named zFlow which is capable of simulating inviscid dense gas flows in complex geometries. A detailed description of the space discretization method used to approximate the Euler equations on unstructured grids and for general equations of state, and a summary of the thermodynamic functions required by the mentioned formulation are also given. The performance of the code is demonstrated by presenting two applications, the calculation of the transonic flow around an airfoil computed with both the ideal gas and a complex equation of state and the simulation of the non-classical phenomena occurring in a supersonic flow between two staggered sinusoidal blades. Non-classical effects are simulated in a supersonic flow of a siloxane using a Peng-Robinson-type equation of state. Siloxanes are a class of substances used as working fluids in organic Rankine cycles turbines.

  17. Numerical investigation of methane and formation fluid leakage along the casing of a decommissioned shale gas well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowamooz, A.; Lemieux, J.-M.; Molson, J.; Therrien, R.

    2015-06-01

    Methane and brine leakage rates and associated time scales along the cemented casing of a hypothetical decommissioned shale gas well have been assessed with a multiphase flow and multicomponent numerical model. The conceptual model used for the simulations assumes that the target shale formation is 200 m thick, overlain by a 750 m thick caprock, which is in turn overlain by a 50 m thick surficial sand aquifer, the 1000 m geological sequence being intersected by a fully penetrating borehole. This succession of geological units is representative of the region targeted for shale gas exploration in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Québec, Canada). The simulations aimed at assessing the impact of well casing cementation quality on methane and brine leakage at the base of a surficial aquifer. The leakage of fluids can subsequently lead to the contamination of groundwater resources and/or, in the case of methane migration to ground surface, to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. The minimum reported surface casing vent flow (measured at ground level) for shale gas wells in Quebec (0.01 m3/d) is used as a reference to evaluate the impact of well casing cementation quality on methane and brine migration. The simulations suggest that an adequately cemented borehole (with a casing annulus permeability kc≤ 1 mD) can prevent methane and brine leakage over a time scale of up to 100 years. However, a poorly cemented borehole (kc≥ 10 mD) could yield methane leakage rates at the base of an aquifer ranging from 0.04 m3/d to more than 100 m3/d, depending on the permeability of the target shale gas formation after abandonment and on the quantity of mobile gas in the formation. These values are compatible with surface casing vent flows reported for shale gas wells in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada). The simulated travel time of methane from the target shale formation to the surficial aquifer is between a few months and 30 years, depending on cementation quality and

  18. Numerical study on the deformation of soil stratum and vertical wells with gas hydrate dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xudong; Zhang, Xuhui; Lu, Xiaobing; Wei, Wei; Shi, Yaohong

    2016-07-01

    Gas hydrate (GH) dissociates owing to thermal injection or pressure reduction from the well in gas/oil or GH exploitation. GH dissociation leads to, for example, decreases in soil strength, engineering failures such as wellbore instabilities, and marine landslides. The FLAC3D software was used to analyze the deformation of the soil stratum and vertical wells with GH dissociation. The effects of Young's modulus, internal friction angle, cohesion of the GH layer after dissociation, and the thickness of the GH layer on the deformation of soils were studied. It is shown that the maximum displacement in the whole soil stratum occurs at the interface between the GH layer and the overlayer. The deformation of the soil stratum and wells increases with decreases in the modulus, internal friction angle, and cohesion after GH dissociation. The increase in thickness of the GH layer enlarges the deformation of the soil stratum and wells with GH dissociation. The hydrostatic pressure increases the settlement of the soil stratum, while constraining horizontal displacement. The interaction between two wells becomes significant when the affected zone around each well exceeds half the length of the GH dissociation zone.

  19. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Cold Spray Gas Dynamic Effects for Polymer Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhulaifi, Abdulaziz S.; Buck, Gregory A.; Arbegast, William J.

    2012-09-01

    Low melting temperature materials such as polymers are known to be difficult to deposit using traditional cold spray techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were created for various nozzle geometries and flow conditions. A schlieren optical system was used to visualize the density gradients and flow characteristics in the free jet impingement region. Based on the CFD models, it was determined that a diffuser placed into the carrier gas flow near the nozzle exit not only leads to lower particle impact velocity required for polymer deposition, but also provides for appropriate application of compression heating of the particles to produce the conditions necessary at impact for successful coating adhesion of these materials. Experiments subsequently confirmed the successful deposition of polyethylene powder onto a 7075-T6 aluminum substrate. Using air as the carrier gas, polyethylene particles of 53-75 μm diameter and 0.94 g/cm3 density, were cold spray deposited onto the aluminum substrate, with a critical impact velocity of 191 m/s. No apparent melting of the polymer particles was observed. Refinements to these concepts are currently under investigation and a patent disclosure for the idea is pending.

  20. Image restoration by the method of convex projections: part 2 applications and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Sezan, M I; Stark, H

    1982-01-01

    The image restoration theory discussed in a previous paper by Youla and Webb [1] is applied to a simulated image and the results compared with the well-known method known as the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm. The results show that the method of image restoration by projection onto convex sets, by providing a convenient technique for utilizing a priori information, performs significantly better than the Gerchberg-Papoulis method. PMID:18238262

  1. Numerical simulation of humping phenomenon in high speed gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Wu, Chuan-Song

    2011-06-01

    It is of great significance to obtain a thorough understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for humping bead phenomenon in high speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) in order to raise welding efficiency. Experiments were conducted to observe the weld pool behaviors in high speed GMAW, and it was found that both the severely deformed weld pool surface and strong backward flowing play a dominant role in humping bead formation. In this study, a mathematical model is developed to quantitatively analyze the forming mechanism of humping beads for high speed GMAW through considering both the momentum and heat content distribution of the backward flowing molten metal inside the weld pool. The transient development of temperature profiles in the weld pool with severe deformation demonstrates the humping bead forming process under some welding conditions. The predicted and measured humping bead dimensions are in agreement.

  2. Numerical Methodology for Coupled Time-Accurate Simulations of Primary and Secondary Flowpaths in Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Athavale, M. M.; Hendricks, R. C.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    Detailed information of the flow-fields in the secondary flowpaths and their interaction with the primary flows in gas turbine engines is necessary for successful designs with optimized secondary flow streams. Present work is focused on the development of a simulation methodology for coupled time-accurate solutions of the two flowpaths. The secondary flowstream is treated using SCISEAL, an unstructured adaptive Cartesian grid code developed for secondary flows and seals, while the mainpath flow is solved using TURBO, a density based code with capability of resolving rotor-stator interaction in multi-stage machines. An interface is being tested that links the two codes at the rim seal to allow data exchange between the two codes for parallel, coupled execution. A description of the coupling methodology and the current status of the interface development is presented. Representative steady-state solutions of the secondary flow in the UTRC HP Rig disc cavity are also presented.

  3. The lambda-scheme. [for numerical integration of Euler equation of compressible gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1979-01-01

    A method for integrating the Euler equations of gas dynamics for compressible flows in any hyperbolic case is presented. This method is applied to the Mach number distribution over a stretch of an infinite duct having a variable cross section, and to the distribution in a channel opening into a vacuum with the Mach number equalling 1.04. An example of the ability of this method to handle two-dimensional unsteady flows is shown using the steady shock-and-isobars pattern reached asymptotically about an ablated blunt body with a free stream Mach number equalling 12. A final example is presented where the technique is applied to a three-dimensional steady supersonic flow, with a Mach number of 2 and an angle of attack of 5 deg.

  4. Multi-Country Experience in Delivering a Joint Course on Software Engineering--Numerical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budimac, Zoran; Putnik, Zoran; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Bothe, Klaus; Zdravkova, Katerina; Jakimovski, Boro

    2014-01-01

    A joint course, created as a result of a project under the auspices of the "Stability Pact of South-Eastern Europe" and DAAD, has been conducted in several Balkan countries: in Novi Sad, Serbia, for the last six years in several different forms, in Skopje, FYR of Macedonia, for two years, for several types of students, and in Tirana,…

  5. A numerically efficient finite element hydroelastic analysis. Volume 1: Theory and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppolino, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    Symmetric finite element matrix formulations for compressible and incompressible hydroelasticity are developed on the basis of Toupin's complementary formulation of classical mechanics. Results of implementation of the new technique in the NASTRAN structural analysis program are presented which demonstrate accuracy and efficiency.

  6. Three-dimensional Simulations of Thermonuclear Detonation with α-Network: Numerical Method and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlov, A.; Domínguez, I.; Bacon, C.; Clifford, B.; Baron, E.; Hoeflich, P.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Wang, L.

    2012-07-01

    We describe a new astrophysical version of a cell-based adaptive mesh refinement code ALLA for reactive flow fluid dynamic simulations, including a new implementation of α-network nuclear kinetics, and present preliminary results of first three-dimensional simulations of incomplete carbon-oxygen detonation in Type Ia Supernovae.

  7. Results of vapor space monitoring of flammable gas Watch List tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1997-09-18

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization Systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, release rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

  8. Results of Vapor Space Monitoring of Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    2000-09-27

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, released rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

  9. Estimation of vulnerable zones due to accidental release of toxic materials resulting in dense gas clouds.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Mohan, M; Panwar, T S; Chopra, H V

    1991-09-01

    Heavy gas dispersion models have been developed at IIT (hereinafter referred as IIT heavy gas models I and II) with a view to estimate vulnerable zones due to accidental (both instantaneous and continuous, respectively) release of dense toxic material in the atmosphere. The results obtained from IIT heavy gas models have been compared with those obtained from the DEGADIS model [Dense Gas Dispersion Model, developed by Havens and Spicer (1985) for the U.S. Coast Guard] as well as with the observed data collected during the Burro Series, Maplin Sands, and Thorney Island field trials. Both of these models include relevant features of dense gas dispersion, viz., gravity slumping, air entrainment, cloud heating, and transition to the passive phase, etc. The DEGADIS model has been considered for comparing the performance of IIT heavy gas models in this study because it incorporates most of the physical processes of dense gas dispersion in an elaborate manner, and has also been satisfactorily tested against field observations. The predictions from IIT heavy gas models indicate a fairly similar trend to the observed values from Thorney Island, Burro Series, and Maplin experiments with a tendency toward overprediction. There is a good agreement between the prediction of IIT Heavy Gas models I and II with those from DEGADIS, except for the simulations of IIT heavy gas model-I pertaining to very large release quantities under highly stable atmospheric conditions. In summary, the performance of IIT heavy gas models have been found to be reasonably good both with respect to the limited field data available and various simulations (selected on the basis of relevant storages in the industries and prevalent meteorological conditions performed with DEGADIS). However, there is a scope of improvement in the IIT heavy gas models (viz., better formulation for entrainment, modification of coefficients, transition criteria, etc.). Further, isotons (nomograms) have been prepared by using

  10. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation in momentum on leading edge heat transfer is discussed. Numerical and experimental results are presented for both a circular leading edge and a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. Reynolds numbers in the range of 10,000 to 240,000 based on leading edge diameter are investigated. The surface of the body is held at a constant uniform temperature. Numerical and experimental results with and without spanwise variations are presented. Direct comparison of the two-dimensional results, that is, with no spanwise variations, to the analytical results of Frossling is very good. The numerical calculation, which uses the PARC3D code, solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, assuming steady laminar flow on the leading edge region. Experimentally, increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficient as high as 50 percent above the two-dimensional value were observed. Numerically, the heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase by as much as 25 percent. In general, under the same flow conditions, the circular leading edge produced a higher heat transfer rate than the elliptical leading edge. As a percentage of the respective two-dimensional values, the circular and elliptical leading edges showed similar sensitivity to span wise variations in momentum. By equating the root mean square of the amplitude of the spanwise variation in momentum to the turbulence intensity, a qualitative comparison between the present work and turbulent results was possible. It is shown that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  11. Preliminary numerical modeling results - cone penetrometer (CPT) tip used as an electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A L

    2006-12-19

    Figure 1 shows the resistivity models considered in this study; log10 of the resistivity is shown. The graph on the upper left hand side shows a hypothetical resisitivity well log measured along a well in the upper layered model; 10% Gaussian noise has been added to the well log data. The lower model is identical to the upper one except for one square area located within the second deepest layer. Figure 2 shows the electrode configurations considered. The ''reference'' case (upper frame) considers point electrodes located along the surface and along a vertical borehole. The ''CPT electrode'' case (middle frame) assumes that the CPT tip serves as an electrode that is electrically connected to the push rod; the surface electrodes are used in conjuction with the moving CPT electrode. The ''isolated CPT electrode'' case assumes that the electrode at the CPT tip is electrically isolated from the pushrod. Note that the separate CPT push rods in the middle and lower frames are shown separated to clarify the figure; in reality, there is only one pushrod that is changing length as the probe advances. Figure 3 shows three pole-pole measurement schemes were considered; in all cases, the ''get lost'' electrodes were the leftmost and rightmost surface electrodes. The top frame shows the reference scheme where all surface and borehole electrodes can be used. The middle frame shows two possible configurations available when a CPT mounted electrode is used. Note that only one of the four poles can be located along the borehole at any given time; electrode combinations such as the one depicted in blue (upper frame) are not possible in this case. The bottom frame shows a sample configuration where only the surface electrodes are used. Figure 4 shows the results obtained for the various measurement schemes. The white lines show the outline of the true model (shown in Figure 1, upper frame). The starting initial model for these inversions is based on the electrical resistivity log

  12. Spallative nucleosynthesis in supernova remnants. II. Time-dependent numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parizot, Etienne; Drury, Luke

    1999-06-01

    We calculate the spallative production of light elements associated with the explosion of an isolated supernova in the interstellar medium, using a time-dependent model taking into account the dilution of the ejected enriched material and the adiabatic energy losses. We first derive the injection function of energetic particles (EPs) accelerated at both the forward and the reverse shock, as a function of time. Then we calculate the Be yields obtained in both cases and compare them to the value implied by the observational data for metal-poor stars in the halo of our Galaxy, using both O and Fe data. We find that none of the processes investigated here can account for the amount of Be found in these stars, which confirms the analytical results of Parizot & Drury (1999). We finally analyze the consequences of these results for Galactic chemical evolution, and suggest that a model involving superbubbles might alleviate the energetics problem in a quite natural way.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling---Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktinol, Eduardo

    Due to the complex nature of the subprocesses involved in nucleate boiling, it has not been possible to develop comprehensive models or correlations despite decades of accumulated data and analysis. Complications such as the presence of dissolved gas in the liquid further confound attempts at modeling nucleate boiling. Moreover, existing empirical correlations may not be suitable for new applications, especially with regards to varying gravity level. More recently, numerical simulations of the boiling process have proven to be capable of reliably predicting bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer by showing excellent agreement with experimental data. However, most simulations decouple the solid substrate by assuming constant wall temperature. In the present study complete numerical simulations of the boiling process are performed---including conjugate transient conduction in the solid substrate and the effects of dissolved gas in the liquid at different levels of gravity. Finite difference schemes are used to discretize the governing equations in the liquid, vapor, and solid phases. The interface between liquid and vapor phases is tracked by a level set method. An iterative procedure is used at the interface between the solid and fluid phases. Near the three-phase contact line, temperatures in the solid are observed to fluctuate significantly over short periods. The results show good agreement with the data available in the literature. The results also show that waiting and growth periods can be related directly to wall superheat. The functional relationship between waiting period and wall superheat is found to agree well with empirical correlations reported in the literature. For the case of a single bubble in subcooled nucleate boiling, the presence of dissolved gas in the liquid is found to cause noncondensables to accumulate at the top of the bubble where most condensation occurs. This results in reduced local saturation temperature and condensation rates

  14. Collisional evolution in the Eos and Koronis asteroid families - Observational and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, Richard P.

    1988-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Eos and Koronis families are addressed by an analysis of Binzel's (1987) observational results. The Maxwellian distribution of the Eos family's rotation rates implies a collisionally-evolved population; these rates are also faster than those of the Koronis family and nonfamily asteroids. While the age of the Eos family may be comparable to the solar system's, that of the Koronis family could be considerably younger. Greater shape irregularity may account for the Koronis family's higher mean lightcurve amplitude.

  15. [Implementation results of emission standards of air pollutants for thermal power plants: a numerical simulation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan-Shan; Pan, Li-Bo

    2014-03-01

    The emission inventory of air pollutants from the thermal power plants in the year of 2010 was set up. Based on the inventory, the air quality of the prediction scenarios by implementation of both 2003-version emission standard and the new emission standard were simulated using Models-3/CMAQ. The concentrations of NO2, SO2, and PM2.5, and the deposition of nitrogen and sulfur in the year of 2015 and 2020 were predicted to investigate the regional air quality improvement by the new emission standard. The results showed that the new emission standard could effectively improve the air quality in China. Compared with the implementation results of the 2003-version emission standard, by 2015 and 2020, the area with NO2 concentration higher than the emission standard would be reduced by 53.9% and 55.2%, the area with SO2 concentration higher than the emission standard would be reduced by 40.0%, the area with nitrogen deposition higher than 1.0 t x km(-2) would be reduced by 75.4% and 77.9%, and the area with sulfur deposition higher than 1.6 t x km(-2) would be reduced by 37.1% and 34.3%, respectively. PMID:24881370

  16. Analytical and Numerical Results for an Adhesively Bonded Joint Subjected to Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lundgren, Eric

    2006-01-01

    A one-dimensional, semi-analytical methodology that was previously developed for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives that exhibit inelastic material behavior is further verified in the present paper. A summary of the first-order differential equations and applied joint loading used to determine the adhesive response from the methodology are also presented. The method was previously verified against a variety of single-lap joint configurations from the literature that subjected the joints to cases of axial tension and pure bending. Using the same joint configuration and applied bending load presented in a study by Yang, the finite element analysis software ABAQUS was used to further verify the semi-analytical method. Linear static ABAQUS results are presented for two models, one with a coarse and one with a fine element meshing, that were used to verify convergence of the finite element analyses. Close agreement between the finite element results and the semi-analytical methodology were determined for both the shear and normal stress responses of the adhesive bondline. Thus, the semi-analytical methodology was successfully verified using the ABAQUS finite element software and a single-lap joint configuration subjected to pure bending.

  17. A numerical modeling study of a Montana thunderstorm: 1. Model results versus observations involving nonelectrical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsdon, John H.; Farley, Richard D.

    1987-05-01

    A recently developed Storm Electrification Model (SEM) has been used to simulate the July 19, 1981, Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) case study cloud. This part of the investigation examines the comparison between the model results and the observations of the actual cloud with respect to its nonelectrical aspects. A timing equivalence is established between the simulation and observations based on an explosive growth phase which was both observed and modeled. This timing equivalence is used as a basis upon which the comparisons are made. The model appears to do a good job of reproducing (in both space and time) many of the observed characteristics of the cloud. These include: (1) the general cloud appearance; (2) cloud size; (3) cloud top rise rate; (4) rapid growth phase; (5) updraft structure; (6) first graupel appearance; (7) first radar echo; (8) qualitative radar range-height indicator evolution; (9) cloud decay; and (10) the location of hydrometers with respect to the updraft/-downdraft structure. Some features that are not accurately modeled are the cloud base height, the maximum liquid water content, and the time from first formation of precipitation until it reaches the ground. While the simulation is not perfect, the faithfulness of the model results to the observations is sufficient to give us confidence that the microphysical processes active in this storm are adequately represented in the model physics. Areas where model improvement is indicated are also discussed.

  18. Numerical predictions and experimental results of a dry bay fire environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Gill, Walter; Black, Amalia Rebecca

    2003-11-01

    The primary objective of the Safety and Survivability of Aircraft Initiative is to improve the safety and survivability of systems by using validated computational models to predict the hazard posed by a fire. To meet this need, computational model predictions and experimental data have been obtained to provide insight into the thermal environment inside an aircraft dry bay. The calculations were performed using the Vulcan fire code, and the experiments were completed using a specially designed full-scale fixture. The focus of this report is to present comparisons of the Vulcan results with experimental data for a selected test scenario and to assess the capability of the Vulcan fire field model to accurately predict dry bay fire scenarios. Also included is an assessment of the sensitivity of the fire model predictions to boundary condition distribution and grid resolution. To facilitate the comparison with experimental results, a brief description of the dry bay fire test fixture and a detailed specification of the geometry and boundary conditions are included. Overall, the Vulcan fire field model has shown the capability to predict the thermal hazard posed by a sustained pool fire within a dry bay compartment of an aircraft; although, more extensive experimental data and rigorous comparison are required for model validation.

  19. Urban Surface Network In Marseille: Network Optimization Using Numerical Simulations and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeon, G.; Lemonsu, A.; Durand, P.; Masson, V.

    During the ESCOMPTE program (Field experiment to constrain models of atmo- spheric pollution and emissions transport) in Marseille between june and july 2001 an important device has been set up to describe the urban boundary layer over the built-up aera of Marseille. There was notably a network of 20 temperature and humid- ity sensors which has mesured the spatial and temporal variability of these parameters. Before the experiment the arrangement of the network had been optimized to get the maximum of information about these two varaibilities. We have worked on results of high resolution simulations containing the TEB scheme which represents the energy budgets associated with the gobal street geometry of the mesh. First, a qualitative analysis had enabled the identification of the characteristical phenomenons over the town of Marseille. There are narrows links beetween urban effects and local effects : marine advection and orography. Then, a quantitative analysis of the field has been developped. EOF (empirical orthogonal functions) have been used to characterised the spatial and temporal structures of the field evolution. Instrumented axis have been determined with all these results. Finally, we have choosen very carefully the locations of the instruments at the scale of the street to avoid that micro-climatic effects interfere with the meso-scale effect of the town. The recording of the mesurements, every 10 minutes, had started on the 12th of june and had finished on the 16th of july. We did not get any problem with the instrument and so all the period has been recorded every 10 minutes. The analysis of the datas will be led on different way. First, will be done a temporal study. We want to determine if the times when occur phenomenons are linked to the location in the town. We will interest particulary to the warming during the morning and the cooling during the evening. Then, we will look for correlation between the temperature and mixing ratio with the wind

  20. Numerical results for near surface time domain electromagnetic exploration: a full waveform approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Li, K.; Li, X., Sr.; Liu, Y., Sr.; Wen, J., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    Time domain or Transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey including types with airborne, semi-airborne and ground play important roles in applicants such as geological surveys, ground water/aquifer assess [Meju et al., 2000; Cox et al., 2010], metal ore exploration [Yang and Oldenburg, 2012], prediction of water bearing structures in tunnels [Xue et al., 2007; Sun et al., 2012], UXO exploration [Pasion et al., 2007; Gasperikova et al., 2009] etc. The common practice is introducing a current into a transmitting (Tx) loop and acquire the induced electromagnetic field after the current is cut off [Zhdanov and Keller, 1994]. The current waveforms are different depending on instruments. Rectangle is the most widely used excitation current source especially in ground TEM. Triangle and half sine are commonly used in airborne and semi-airborne TEM investigation. In most instruments, only the off time responses are acquired and used in later analysis and data inversion. Very few airborne instruments acquire the on time and off time responses together. Although these systems acquire the on time data, they usually do not use them in the interpretation.This abstract shows a novel full waveform time domain electromagnetic method and our recent modeling results. The benefits comes from our new algorithm in modeling full waveform time domain electromagnetic problems. We introduced the current density into the Maxwell's equation as the transmitting source. This approach allows arbitrary waveforms, such as triangle, half-sine, trapezoidal waves or scatter record from equipment, being used in modeling. Here, we simulate the establishing and induced diffusion process of the electromagnetic field in the earth. The traditional time domain electromagnetic with pure secondary fields can also be extracted from our modeling results. The real time responses excited by a loop source can be calculated using the algorithm. We analyze the full time gates responses of homogeneous half space and two

  1. Coupling FLEXPART to the regional scale numerical weather prediction model COSMO: Implementation, evaluation and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henne, Stephan; Kaufmann, Pirmin; Schraner, Martin; Brunner, Dominik

    2013-04-01

    allows particles to leave the limited COSMO domain. On the technical side, we added an OpenMP shared-memory parallelisation to the model, which also allows for asynchronous reading of input data. Here we present results from several model performance tests under different conditions and compare these with results from standard FLEXPART simulations using nested ECMWF input. This analysis will contain evaluation of deposition fields, comparison of convection schemes and performance analysis of the parallel version. Furthermore, a series of forward-backward simulations were conducted in order to test the robustness of model results independent of the integration direction. Finally, selected examples from recent applications of the model to transport of radioactive and conservative tracers and for in-situ measurement characterisation will be presented.

  2. Modelling Viscoelastic Behaviour of Polymer by A Mixed Velocity, Displacement Formulation - Numerical and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, VT.; Silva, L.; Digonnet, H.; Combeaud, C.; Billon, N.; Coupez, T.

    2011-05-04

    The objective of this work is to model the viscoelastic behaviour of polymer from the solid state to the liquid state. With this objective, we perform experimental tensile tests and compare with simulation results. The chosen polymer is a PMMA whose behaviour depends on its temperature. The computation simulation is based on Navier-Stokes equations where we propose a mixed finite element method with an interpolation P1+/P1 using displacement (or velocity) and pressure as principal variables. The implemented technique uses a mesh composed of triangles (2D) or tetrahedra (3D). The goal of this approach is to model the viscoelastic behaviour of polymers through a fluid-structure coupling technique with a multiphase approach.

  3. Numerical analysis of flow non-uniformity in the hot gas manifold of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoenes, J.; Robertson, S. J.; Ratliff, A. W.; Anderson, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional viscous flow in a conceptual hot gas manifold (HGM) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (SSME HPFTP) was numerically analyzed. A finite difference scheme was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. The exact geometry of the SSME HGM was modeled using boundary fitted curvilinear coordinates and the General Interpolants Method (GIM) code. Slight compressibility of the subsonic flow was modeled using a linearized equation of state with artificial compressibility. A time relaxation method was used to obtain a steady state solution. The feasibility and potential usefulness of computational methods in assisting the design of SSME components which involves the flow of fluids within complex geometrical shapes is demonstrated.

  4. [CFD numerical simulation onto the gas-liquid two-phase flow behavior during vehicle refueling process].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Jin-Hui; Zhu, Ling; Shang, Chao

    2011-12-01

    With the gradual improvement of environmental regulations, more and more attentions are attracted to the vapor emissions during the process of vehicle refueling. Research onto the vehicle refueling process by means of numerical simulation has been executed abroad since 1990s, while as it has never been involved so far domestically. Through reasonable simplification about the physical system of "Nozzle + filler pipe + gasoline storage tank + vent pipe" for vehicle refueling, and by means of volume of fluid (VOF) model for gas-liquid two-phase flow and Re-Normalization Group kappa-epsilon turbulence flow model provided in commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software Fluent, this paper determined the proper mesh discretization scheme and applied the proper boundary conditions based on the Gambit software, then established the reasonable numerical simulation model for the gas-liquid two-phase flow during the refueling process. Through discussing the influence of refueling velocity on the static pressure of vent space in gasoline tank, the back-flowing phenomenon has been revealed in this paper. It has been demonstrated that, the more the flow rate and the refueling velocity of refueling nozzle is, the higher the gross static pressure in the vent space of gasoline tank. In the meanwhile, the variation of static pressure in the vent space of gasoline tank can be categorized into three obvious stages. When the refueling flow rate becomes higher, the back-flowing phenomenon of liquid gasoline can sometimes be induced in the head section of filler pipe, thus making the gasoline nozzle pre-shut-off. Totally speaking, the theoretical work accomplished in this paper laid some solid foundation for self-researching and self-developing the technology and apparatus for the vehicle refueling and refueling emissions control domestically. PMID:22468545

  5. Active behavior of abdominal wall muscles: Experimental results and numerical model formulation.

    PubMed

    Grasa, J; Sierra, M; Lauzeral, N; Muñoz, M J; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B

    2016-08-01

    In the present study a computational finite element technique is proposed to simulate the mechanical response of muscles in the abdominal wall. This technique considers the active behavior of the tissue taking into account both collagen and muscle fiber directions. In an attempt to obtain the computational response as close as possible to real muscles, the parameters needed to adjust the mathematical formulation were determined from in vitro experimental tests. Experiments were conducted on male New Zealand White rabbits (2047±34g) and the active properties of three different muscles: Rectus Abdominis, External Oblique and multi-layered samples formed by three muscles (External Oblique, Internal Oblique, and Transversus Abdominis) were characterized. The parameters obtained for each muscle were incorporated into a finite strain formulation to simulate active behavior of muscles incorporating the anisotropy of the tissue. The results show the potential of the model to predict the anisotropic behavior of the tissue associated to fibers and how this influences on the strain, stress and generated force during an isometric contraction. PMID:27111629

  6. Induced current electrical impedance tomography system: experimental results and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Zlochiver, Sharon; Radai, M Michal; Abboud, Shimon; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Dong, Xiu-Zhen; Liu, Rui-Gang; You, Fu-Sheng; Xiang, Hai-Yan; Shi, Xue-Tao

    2004-02-01

    In electrical impedance tomography (EIT), measurements of developed surface potentials due to applied currents are used for the reconstruction of the conductivity distribution. Practical implementation of EIT systems is known to be problematic due to the high sensitivity to noise of such systems, leading to a poor imaging quality. In the present study, the performance of an induced current EIT (ICEIT) system, where eddy current is applied using magnetic induction, was studied by comparing the voltage measurements to simulated data, and examining the imaging quality with respect to simulated reconstructions for several phantom configurations. A 3-coil, 32-electrode ICEIT system was built, and an iterative modified Newton-Raphson algorithm was developed for the solution of the inverse problem. The RMS norm between the simulated and the experimental voltages was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.05 mV (<3%). Two regularization methods were implemented and compared: the Marquardt regularization and the Laplacian regularization (a bounded second-derivative regularization). While the Laplacian regularization method was found to be preferred for simulated data, it resulted in distinctive spatial artifacts for measured data. The experimental reconstructed images were found to be indicative of the angular positioning of the conductivity perturbations, though the radial sensitivity was low, especially when using the Marquardt regularization method. PMID:15005319

  7. Restricted diffusion in a model acinar labyrinth by NMR: Theoretical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Guillot, G.; Sapoval, B.

    2007-01-01

    A branched geometrical structure of the mammal lungs is known to be crucial for rapid access of oxygen to blood. But an important pulmonary disease like emphysema results in partial destruction of the alveolar tissue and enlargement of the distal airspaces, which may reduce the total oxygen transfer. This effect has been intensively studied during the last decade by MRI of hyperpolarized gases like helium-3. The relation between geometry and signal attenuation remained obscure due to a lack of realistic geometrical model of the acinar morphology. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations of restricted diffusion in a realistic model acinus to compute the signal attenuation in a diffusion-weighted NMR experiment. We demonstrate that this technique should be sensitive to destruction of the branched structure: partial removal of the interalveolar tissue creates loops in the tree-like acinar architecture that enhance diffusive motion and the consequent signal attenuation. The role of the local geometry and related practical applications are discussed.

  8. Buoyancy-driven melt segregation in the earth's moon. I - Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The densities of lunar mare magmas have been estimated at liquidus temperatures for pressures from 0 to 47 kbar (0.4 GPa; center of the moon) using a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation and compositionally dependent parameters from Large and Carmichael (1987). Results on primary magmatic compositions represented by pristine volcanic glasses suggest that the density contrast between very-high-Ti melts and their liquidus olivines may approach zero at pressures of about 25 kbar (2.5 GPa). Since this is the pressure regime of the mantle source regions for these magmas, a compositional limit of eruptability for mare liquids may exist that is similar to the highest Ti melt yet observed among the lunar samples. Although the moon may have generated magmas having greater than 16.4 wt pct TiO2, those melts would probably not have reached the lunar surface due to their high densities, and may have even sunk deeper into the moon's interior as negatively buoyant diapirs. This process may have been important for assimilative interactions in the lunar mantle. The phenomenon of melt/solid density crossover may therefore occur not only in large terrestrial-type objects but also in small objects where, despite low pressures, the range of melt compositions is extreme.

  9. Circulation induced by subglacial discharge in glacial fjords: Results from idealized numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo-Castro, Julio; Bourgault, Daniel; deYoung, Brad

    2011-09-01

    The flow caused by the discharge of freshwater underneath a glacier into an idealized fjord is simulated with a 2D non-hydrostatic model. As the freshwater leaves horizontally the subglacial opening into a fjord of uniformly denser water it spreads along the bottom as a jet, until buoyancy forces it to rise. During the initial rising phase, the plume meanders into complex flow patterns while mixing with the surrounding fluid until it reaches the surface and then spreads horizontally as a surface seaward flowing plume of brackish water. The process induces an estuarine-like circulation. Once steady-state is reached, the flow consists of an almost undiluted buoyant plume rising straight along the face of the glacier that turns into a horizontal surface layer thickening as it flows seaward. Over the range of parameters examined, the estuarine circulation is dynamically unstable with gradient Richardson number at the sheared interface having values of <1/4. The surface velocity and dilution factors are strongly and non-linearly related to the Froude number. It is the buoyancy flux that primarily controls the resulting circulation with the momentum flux playing a secondary role.

  10. The Formation of Asteroid Satellites in Catastrophic Impacts: Results from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durda, D. D.; Bottke, W. F., Jr.; Enke, B. L.; Asphaug, E.; Richardson, D. C.; Leinhardt, Z. M.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed new simulations of the formation of asteroid satellites by collisions, using a combination of hydrodynamical and gravitational dynamical codes. This initial work shows that both small satellites and ejected, co-orbiting pairs are produced most favorably by moderate-energy collisions at more direct, rather than oblique, impact angles. Simulations so far seem to be able to produce systems qualitatively similar to known binaries. Asteroid satellites provide vital clues that can help us understand the physics of hypervelocity impacts, the dominant geologic process affecting large main belt asteroids. Moreover, models of satellite formation may provide constraints on the internal structures of asteroids beyond those possible from observations of satellite orbital properties alone. It is probable that most observed main-belt asteroid satellites are by-products of cratering and/or catastrophic disruption events. Several possible formation mechanisms related to collisions have been identified: (i) mutual capture following catastrophic disruption, (ii) rotational fission due to glancing impact and spin-up, and (iii) re-accretion in orbit of ejecta from large, non-catastrophic impacts. Here we present results from a systematic investigation directed toward mapping out the parameter space of the first and third of these three collisional mechanisms.

  11. Gas potential of the Rome Trough in Kentucky: Results of recent Cambrian exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.C.; Drahovzal, J.A.

    1996-09-01

    A recent gas discovery in the Rome Trough suggests the need to re-evaluate the deep Cambrian potential of eastern Kentucky. A new phase of Cambrian exploration began in mid-1994 with a new pool discovery by the Carson Associates No. 1 Kazee well in Elliott County, Ky. This well blew out and initially flowed 11 MMcfd of gas from the upper Conasauga Group/Rome Formation at 6,258 to 6,270 feet. After this discovery, a second exploratory well (the Blue Ridge No. 1Greene) was drilled on a separate structure in Elliott County in late 1995. The Blue Ridge well was temporarily abandoned, but had shows of gas and condensate. In early 1996, Carson Associates offset their initial discovery well with the No. 33 Lawson Heirs well. This activity follows a frustrating exploration history in the Rome Trough that is marked by numerous gas and oil shows, but rare commercial production. Only three single-well pools have produced commercial gas from the trough, including the recent Kazee well. Stratigraphic units below the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group in the Rome Trough are dramatically thicker than their equivalents on the shelf to the north. The interval in the trough is thought to include rocks as old as Early Cambrian, consisting of a basal sandstone, equivalents of the Shady/Tomstown Dolomite, the Rome Formation, and the Conasauga Formation. Sandstones and fractured shales have been responsible for most of the production to date, but dolostone intervals may also have potential. Limited seismic data indicate possible fan-delta and basin-floor fan deposits that may have reservoir potential.

  12. A numerical theory of lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods in the computation of solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, A.B.H.

    1990-09-24

    A numerical theory for the massively parallel lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods for computing solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems is introduced. The convergence theory is based on consistency and stability arguments that are supported by the discrete Chapman-Enskog expansion (for consistency) and conditions of monotonicity (in establishing stability). The theory is applied to four lattice methods: Two of the methods are for some two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations. One of the methods is for the one-dimensional lattice method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. And one of the methods is for a two-dimensional nonlinear advection-diffusion equation. Convergence is formally proven in the L{sub 1}-norm for the first three methods, revealing that they are second-order, conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Computational results which support the theory for lattice methods are presented. In addition, a domain decomposition strategy using mesh refinement techniques is presented for lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods. The strategy allows concentration of computational resources on regions of high activity. Computational evidence is reported for the strategy applied to the lattice gas method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. 72 refs., 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  13. Run-of-River Impoundments Can Remain Unfilled While Transporting Gravel Bedload: Numerical Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Previous work at run-of-river (ROR) dams in northern Delaware has shown that bedload supplied to ROR impoundments can be transported over the dam when impoundments remain unfilled. Transport is facilitated by high levels of sand in the impoundment that lowers the critical shear stresses for particle entrainment, and an inversely sloping sediment ramp connecting the impoundment bed (where the water depth is typically equal to the dam height) with the top of the dam (Pearson and Pizzuto, in press). We demonstrate with one-dimensional bed material transport modeling that bed material can move through impoundments and that equilibrium transport (i.e., a balance between supply to and export from the impoundment, with a constant bed elevation) is possible even when the bed elevation is below the top of the dam. Based on our field work and previous HEC-RAS modeling, we assess bed material transport capacity at the base of the sediment ramp (and ignore detailed processes carrying sediment up and ramp and over the dam). The hydraulics at the base of the ramp are computed using a weir equation, providing estimates of water depth, velocity, and friction, based on the discharge and sediment grain size distribution of the impoundment. Bedload transport rates are computed using the Wilcock-Crowe equation, and changes in the impoundment's bed elevation are determined by sediment continuity. Our results indicate that impoundments pass the gravel supplied from upstream with deep pools when gravel supply rate is low, gravel grain sizes are relatively small, sand supply is high, and discharge is high. Conversely, impoundments will tend to fill their pools when gravel supply rate is high, gravel grain sizes are relatively large, sand supply is low, and discharge is low. The rate of bedload supplied to an impoundment is the primary control on how fast equilibrium transport is reached, with discharge having almost no influence on the timing of equilibrium.

  14. Neutron detection with noble gas scintillation: a review of recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Coplan, Michael; Miller, Eric C.; Thompson, Alan K.; Kowler, Alex; Vest, Rob; Yue, Andrew; Koeth, Tim; Al-Sheikhly, Mohammad; Clark, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Thermal neutron detection is of vital importance to many disciplines, including neutron scattering, workplace monitoring, and homeland protection. We survey recent results from our collaboration which couple low-pressure noble gas scintillation with novel approaches to neutron absorbing materials and geometries to achieve potentially advantageous detector concepts. Noble gas scintillators were used for neutron detection as early as the late 1950's. Modern use of noble gas scintillation includes liquid and solid forms of argon and xenon in the dark matter and neutron physics experiments and commercially available high pressure applications have achieved high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. Little attention has been paid to the overlap between low pressure noble gas scintillation and thermal neutron detection, for which there are many potential benefits.

  15. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary: Analysis of experimental measurements and numerical modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Sreeram

    Harbor observation and prediction system (NYHOPS) which provides 48-hour forecasts of salinity and temperature profiles. Initial results indicate that the NYHOPS forecast of sound speed profiles used in conjunction with the acoustic propagation model is able to make realistic forecasts of TL in the Hudson River Estuary.

  16. A comparative study between experimental results and numerical predictions of multi-wall structural response to hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Peck, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last three decades, multiwall structures have been analyzed extensively, primarily through experiment, as a means of increasing the protection afforded to spacecraft structure. However, as structural configurations become more varied, the number of tests required to characterize their response increases dramatically. As an alternative, numerical modeling of high-speed impact phenomena is often being used to predict the response of a variety of structural systems under impact loading conditions. This paper presents the results of a preliminary numerical/experimental investigation of the hypervelocity impact response of multiwall structures. The results of experimental high-speed impact tests are compared against the predictions of the HULL hydrodynamic computer code. It is shown that the hypervelocity impact response characteristics of a specific system cannot be accurately predicted from a limited number of HULL code impact simulations. However, if a wide range of impact loadings conditions are considered, then the ballistic limit curve of the system based on the entire series of numerical simulations can be used as a relatively accurate indication of actual system response.

  17. A Finite-Difference Numerical Method for Onsager's Pancake Approximation for Fluid Flow in a Gas Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    de Stadler, M; Chand, K

    2007-11-12

    Gas centrifuges exhibit very complex flows. Within the centrifuge there is a rarefied region, a transition region, and a region with an extreme density gradient. The flow moves at hypersonic speeds and shock waves are present. However, the flow is subsonic in the axisymmetric plane. The analysis may be simplified by treating the flow as a perturbation of wheel flow. Wheel flow implies that the fluid is moving as a solid body. With the very large pressure gradient, the majority of the fluid is located very close to the rotor wall and moves at an azimuthal velocity proportional to its distance from the rotor wall; there is no slipping in the azimuthal plane. The fluid can be modeled as incompressible and subsonic in the axisymmetric plane. By treating the centrifuge as long, end effects can be appropriately modeled without performing a detailed boundary layer analysis. Onsager's pancake approximation is used to construct a simulation to model fluid flow in a gas centrifuge. The governing 6th order partial differential equation is broken down into an equivalent coupled system of three equations and then solved numerically. In addition to a discussion on the baseline solution, known problems and future work possibilities are presented.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Anti-icing Systems and Comparison to Test Results on a NACA 0012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experimental tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis IRT on an electro-thermally heated NACA 0012 airfoil. Quantitative comparisons between the experimental results and those predicted by a computer simulation code were made to assess the validity of a recently developed anti-icing model. An infrared camera was utilized to scan the instantaneous temperature contours of the skin surface. Despite some experimental difficulties, good agreement between the numerical predictions and the experiment results were generally obtained for the surface temperature and the possibility for each runback to freeze. Some recommendations were given for an efficient operation of a thermal anti-icing system.

  19. Surfactant control of gas transfer velocity along an offshore coastal transect: results from a laboratory gas exchange tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R.; Schneider-Zapp, K.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the physical and biogeochemical controls of air-sea gas exchange is necessary for establishing biogeochemical models for predicting regional- and global-scale trace gas fluxes and feedbacks. To this end we report the results of experiments designed to constrain the effect of surfactants in the sea surface microlayer (SML) on the gas transfer velocity (kw; cm h-1), seasonally (2012-2013) along a 20 km coastal transect (North East UK). We measured total surfactant activity (SA), chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and chlorophyll a (Chl a) in the SML and in sub-surface water (SSW) and we evaluated corresponding kw values using a custom-designed air-sea gas exchange tank. Temporal SA variability exceeded its spatial variability. Overall, SA varied 5-fold between all samples (0.08 to 0.38 mg L-1 T-X-100), being highest in the SML during summer. SML SA enrichment factors (EFs) relative to SSW were ˜ 1.0 to 1.9, except for two values (0.75; 0.89: February 2013). The range in corresponding k660 (kw for CO2 in seawater at 20 °C) was 6.8 to 22.0 cm h-1. The film factor R660 (the ratio of k660 for seawater to k660 for "clean", i.e. surfactant-free, laboratory water) was strongly correlated with SML SA (r ≥ 0.70, p ≤ 0.002, each n = 16). High SML SA typically corresponded to k660 suppressions ˜ 14 to 51 % relative to clean laboratory water, highlighting strong spatiotemporal gradients in gas exchange due to varying surfactant in these coastal waters. Such variability should be taken account of when evaluating marine trace gas sources and sinks. Total CDOM absorbance (250 to 450 nm), the CDOM spectral slope ratio (SR = S275 - 295/S350 - 400), the 250 : 365 nm CDOM absorption ratio (E2 : E3), and Chl a all indicated spatial and temporal signals in the quantity and composition of organic matter in the SML and SSW. This prompts us to hypothesise that spatiotemporal variation in R660 and its relationship with SA is a consequence of compositional

  20. Field test results of the physical solvent N-Formyl morpholine for gas treating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Palla, N.; Lee, A.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is developing gas processing technology that will reduce gas processing costs for current production and allow subquality gas to be economically produced that would have been otherwise, not produced. The experimental program has primarily focused on the evaluation of N-Formyl Morpholine (NFM) as a physical solvent for the cost-effective upgrading of subquality natural gas to pipeline quality. The selection of NFM for this program was based on previous work conducted by IGT in the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide from coal gasifier effluents. That work showed that the use of NFM resulted in a significant cost advantage over 107 other solvents for that application. The project approach for the development of NFM process has been divided into following main categories: obtain vapor-liquid equilibrium, physical properties and additional published literature data; obtain mass-transfer coefficients using 2 inch absorber/stripper apparatus and calculate equation of state parameters and binary interaction parameters using VLE data; develop a gas processing model using Aspen Plus simulation program and evaluate economic advantages of the NFM process compared to commercial physical solvent; and design a pilot plant skid mounted field test unit and conduct field test experiments.

  1. Results and perspectives of the investigation of traditional and thermal stress induced thermophoresis of particles in gas in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Balapanov, Daniyar; Beresnev, Sergey; Queeckers, Patrick

    Thermophoretic motion of particles suspended in a gas has been a subject of extensive theoretical and experimental investigations for many years because of its wide spread in nature, significance for fundamental and applied aerosol physic. Negative thermophoresis, i.e. solid particle motion towards hotter region in a gas and not as usually from hotter region, was predicted more than 40 years ago and remains an unsolved problem for a choice between different models treating main driving mechanisms -- thermal slip and thermal stress induced gas motion. For a problem of negative thermophoresis, we present experimental evidences in favor of the latter mechanism based on direct observation of particle motion at microgravity; Knudsen particle number 2\\cdot 10(-3) (Kn being the ratio of the molecular mean free path to the particle size); particle-to-gas heat conductivity ratios 2\\cdot 10(4) for copper solid particles and 1.8 for glass bubbles. For both types of particles the experimental results fit well the gas kinetic model of Beresnev and Chernyak [1]. We present characteristics of a set-up and procedures that are able to provide sufficient accuracy and volume of experimental data for testing any model of particle thermophoresis. High quality microgravity is a necessity for such investigations. The short duration microgravity of drop towers suits well this requirement. The sign and value of the thermophoretic force strongly depends on the Knudsen number, particle-to-gas heat conductivity ratio and accommodation coefficients, all of which vary within several decimal orders of magnitude. In order to make crucial conclusions on the choice of the adequate model, there should be hundreds of short duration microgravity experiments. The European Space Agency scientific project Interaction in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems (ICAPS) [2] planned for the International Space Station, provides complementary opportunities for the investigation of thermophoresis at large

  2. Numerical modeling of landfill gas and heat transport in the deformable MSW landfill body. Part 1. Development of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyi, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    The article is devoted to studying the parameters of wells that are used as part of vertical gas extraction systems for degassing landfills. To this end, approaches to modeling the main processes occurring in the landfill's porous medium are considered. The considered approaches served as a basis for elaborating a thermophysical gas and heat transport model that takes into account variation in the hydrodynamic properties of wastes resulting from their secondary settlement. The adequacy of the results obtained using the developed model is confirmed by the data of classic works. The effect the secondary settlement of wastes has on the distribution of pressure and temperature in the landfill body is determined. It is shown that compaction of wastes due to their secondary settlement results in a growth of pressure by 40% on the average.

  3. NOx results from two combustors tested on medium BTU coal gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherlock, T. P.; Carl, D. E.; Vermes, G.; Schwab, J.; Notardonato, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of tests of two combustor configurations using coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are reported. The trials were run with a ceramic-lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannular swirl burner (MASB) using a range of temperatures and pressures representative of industrial turbine inlet conditions. A lean mixture was examined at 104, 197, and 254 Btu/Scf, yielding NO(x) emissions of 5, 20, and 70 ppmv, respectively. The MASB was employed only with a gas rated at 220-270 Btu/Scf, producing 80 ppmv NO(x) at rated engine conditions. The results are concluded to be transferrable to current machines. Further tests on the effects of gas composition, the scaling of combustors to utility size, and the development of improved wall cooling techniques and variable geometry are indicated.

  4. Numerical Analysis of Carbon Black Production from Sub-Quality Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghiman, M.; Javadi, M.; Ghodsirad, M. H.; Hosseini, N.; Soleimani, M.

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this paper is computational investigation of the carbon black production through the oxidative thermal decomposition of waste gases contain CH4 and H2S without requiring a H2S separation process. The chemical reaction model, which involves solid carbon, sulfur compounds and other precursor species for formation carbon black, based on an assumed Probability Density Function (PDF) is parameterized by the mean and variance of mixture fraction and β-PDF shape. The effects of feedstock mass flow rate and reactor temperature on carbon black, soot, CO, S2, SO2, COS and CS2 formation are investigated. The results show that the major factor influencing CH4 and H2S conversions is reactor temperature. The results reveal that at any temperature, H2S conversion is less than that of CH4 especially at temperature below 1300 °k wherein H2S conversion is less than 5%.

  5. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    The overall contractual effort and the theory and numerical solution for the Reacting and Multi-Phase (RAMP2) computer code are described. The code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. Fundamental equations for steady flow of reacting gas-particle mixtures, method of characteristics, mesh point construction, and numerical integration of the conservation equations are considered herein.

  6. OFF-GAS MERCURY CONTROL USING SULFUR-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON – TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg

    2007-05-01

    Several laboratory and pilot-scale tests since the year 2000 have included demonstrations of off-gas mercury control using fixed bed, sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. These demonstrations have included operation of carbon beds with gas streams containing a wide range of mercury and other gas species concentrations representing off-gas from several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste treatment processes including electrical resistance heated (joule-heated) glass melters, fluidized bed calciners, and fluidized bed steam reformers. Surrogates of various DOE mixed waste streams (or surrogates of offgas from DOE mixed waste streams) including INL “sodium bearing waste” (SBW), liquid “low activity waste” (LAW) from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and liquid waste from Savannah River National Laboratory (“Tank 48H waste”) have been tested. Test results demonstrate mercury control efficiencies up to 99.999%, high enough to comply with the Hazardous Waste (HWC) Combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards even when the uncontrolled off-gas mercury concentrations exceed 400,000 ug/dscm (at 7% O2), and confirm carbon bed design parameters for such high efficiencies. Results of several different pilot-scale and engineering-scale test programs performed over several years are presented and compared.

  7. Solutions of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model: Benchmarks and Results from a Wide Range of Numerical Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia-Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Kozik, E.; Liu, Xuan-Wen; Millis, Andrew J.; Prokof'ev, N. V.; Qin, Mingpu; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Shi, Hao; Svistunov, B. V.; Tocchio, Luca F.; Tupitsyn, I. S.; White, Steven R.; Zhang, Shiwei; Zheng, Bo-Xiao; Zhu, Zhenyue; Gull, Emanuel; Simons Collaboration on the Many-Electron Problem

    2015-10-01

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification of uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.

  8. The footprint of CO2 leakage in the water-column: Insights from numerical modeling based on a North Sea gas release experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielstädte, L.; Linke, P.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, S.; Wallmann, K.; McGinnis, D. F.; Haeckel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the environmental impact of potential CO2 leakage from offshore carbon dioxide storage sites necessitates the investigation of the corresponding pH change in the water-column. Numerical models have been developed to simulate the buoyant rise and dissolution of CO2 bubbles in the water-column and the subsequent near-field dispersion of dissolved CO2 in seawater under ocean current and tidal forcing. In order to test and improve numerical models a gas release experiment has been conducted at 80 m water-depth within the Sleipner area (North Sea). CO2 and Kr (used as inert tracer gas) were released on top of a benthic lander at varying gas flows (<140 kg/day) and bubble sizes (de: 1-6 mm). pCO2 and pH were measured by in situ sensors to monitor the spread of the solute in different vertical heights and distances downstream of the artificial leak. The experiment and numerical analysis show that the impact of such leakage rates is limited to the near-field bottom waters, due to the rapid dissolution of CO2 bubbles in seawater (CO2 is being stripped within the first two to five meters of bubble rise). In particular, small bubbles, which will dissolve close to the seafloor, may cause a dangerous low-pH environment for the marine benthos. However, on the larger scale, the advective transport by e.g. tidal currents, dominates the CO2 dispersal in the North Sea and dilutes the CO2 peak quickly. The model results show that at the small scales (<100 m) of the CO2 plume the lateral eddy diffusion (~0.01 m2/s) has only a negligible effect. Overall, we can postulate that CO2 leakage at a rate of ~ 100 kg per day as in our experiment will only have a localized impact on the marine environment, thereby reducing pH substantially (by 0.4 units) within a diameter of less than 50 m around the release spot (depending on the duration of leakage and the current velocities). Strong currents and tidal cycles significantly reduce the spreading of low-pH water masses into the far

  9. Scientific results of the Second Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition in the Ulleung Basin (UBGH2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, Michael; Kim, Gil-Young; Chun, Jong-Hwa; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Lee, Joo Yong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yoo, Dong-Geun

    2013-01-01

    As a part of Korean National Gas Hydrate Program, the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) was conducted from 9 July to 30 September, 2010 in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, offshore Korea using the D/V Fugro Synergy. The UBGH2 was performed to understand the distribution of gas hydrates as required for a resource assessment and to find potential candidate sites suitable for a future offshore production test, especially targeting gas hydrate-bearing sand bodies in the basin. The UBGH2 sites were distributed across most of the basin and were selected to target mainly sand-rich turbidite deposits. The 84-day long expedition consisted of two phases. The first phase included logging-while-drilling/measurements-while-drilling (LWD/MWD) operations at 13 sites. During the second phase, sediment cores were collected from 18 holes at 10 of the 13 LWD/MWD sites. Wireline logging (WL) and vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were also acquired after coring operations at two of these 10 sites. In addition, seafloor visual observation, methane sensing, as well as push-coring and sampling using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) were conducted during both phases of the expedition. Recovered gas hydrates occurred either as pore-filling medium associated with discrete turbidite sand layers, or as fracture-filling veins and nodules in muddy sediments. Gas analyses indicated that the methane within the sampled gas hydrates is primarily of biogenic origin. This paper provides a summary of the operational and scientific results of the UBGH2 expedition as described in 24 papers that make up this special issue of the Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology.

  10. Tank 241-SX-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  11. Tank 241-T-107 Headspace Gas and Vapor Characterization Results for Samples Collected in January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-26

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  12. Tank 241-TY-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  13. Tank 241-S-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  14. Tank 241-C-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-28

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  15. Tank 241-AX-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  16. Tank 241-C-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  17. THE ADIPIC ACID ENHANCED FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESS FOR INDUSTRIAL BOILERS. VOLUME 1. FIELD TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the effect of adding adipic acid on the SO2 removal of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on a coal-fired industrial boiler at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base near Columbus, OH. Emission data were collected in a...

  18. Tank 241-U-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-27

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  19. Tank 241-TX-105 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-25

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  20. Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-27

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  1. Tank 241-A-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  2. EVALUATION OF VAPOR EQUILIBRATION AND IMPACT OF PURGE VOLUME ON SOIL-GAS SAMPLING RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential sampling was utilized at the Raymark Superfund site to evaluate attainment of vapor equilibration and the impact of purge volume on soil-gas sample results. A simple mass-balance equation indicates that removal of three to five internal volumes of a sample system shou...

  3. Tank 241-C-110 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories.

  4. Development of comprehensive numerical schemes for predicting evaporating gas-droplets flow processes of a liquid-fueled combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics code for simulating complex turbulent flows inside a liquid rocket combustion chamber was validated and further developed. The Advanced Rocket Injector/Combustor Code (ARICC) is simplified and validated against benchmark flow situations for laminar and turbulent flows. The numerical method used in ARICC Code is re-examined for incompressible flow calculations. For turbulent flows, both the subgrid and the two equation k-epsilon turbulence models are studied. Cases tested include idealized Burger's equation in complex geometries and boundaries, a laminar pipe flow, a high Reynolds number turbulent flow, and a confined coaxial jet with recirculations. The accuracy of the algorithm is examined by comparing the numerical results with the analytical solutions as well as experimented data with different grid sizes.

  5. Greenhouse Gas Sensing Using Small Unmanned Aerial Systems - Field Experiment Results and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrey, A. D.; Christensen, L. E.; Brockers, R.; Thompson, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Requirements for greenhouse gas point source detection and quantification often require high spatial resolution on the order of meters. These applications, which help close the gap in emissions estimate uncertainties, also demand sensing with high sensitivity and in a fashion that accounts for spatiotemporal variability on the order of seconds to minutes. Low-cost vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) provide a means to detect and identify the location of point source gas emissions while offering ease of deployment and high maneuverability. Our current fielded gas sensing sUAS platforms are able to provide instantaneous in situ concentration measurements at locations within line of sight of the operator. Recent results from field experiments demonstrating methane detection and plume characterization will be discussed here, including performance assessment conducted via a controlled release experiment in 2013. The logical extension of sUAS gas concentration measurement is quantification of flux rate. We will discuss the preliminary strategy for quantitative flux determination, including intrinsic challenges and heritage from airborne science campaigns, associated with this point source flux quantification. This system approach forms the basis for intelligent autonomous quantitative characterization of gas plumes, which holds great value for applications in commercial, regulatory, and safety environments.

  6. First Operating Results of a Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbine in AN Industrial Hydrogen Liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, S.; Decker, L.

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogen has been brought into focus of industry and public since fossil fuels are depleting and costs are increasing dramatically. Beside these issues new high-tech processes in the industry are in need for hydrogen at ultra pure quality. To achieve these requirements and for efficient transportation, hydrogen is liquefied in industrial plants. Linde Gas has commissioned a new 5.5 TPD Hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany, which has been engineered and supplied by Linde Kryotechnik. One of the four expansion turbines installed in the liquefaction process is equipped with dynamic gas bearings. Several design features and operational characteristics of this application will be discussed. The presentation will include results of efficiency and operational reliability that have been determined from performance tests. The advantages of the Linde dynamic gas bearing turbine for future use in hydrogen liquefaction plants will be shown.

  7. Hot particulate removal and desulfurization results from the METC integrated gasification and hot gas cleanup facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is conducting experimental testing using a 10-inch diameter fluid-bed gasifier (FBG) and modular hot gas cleanup rig (MGCR) to develop advanced methods for removing contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas streams for commercial development of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The program focus is on hot gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The purpose of this poster is to present the program objectives and results of the work conducted in cooperation with industrial users and vendors to meet the vision for IGCC of reducing the capital cost per kilowatt to $1050 and increasing the plant efficiency to 52% by the year 2010.

  8. FIRST OPERATING RESULTS OF A DYNAMIC GAS BEARING TURBINE IN AN INDUSTRIAL HYDROGEN LIQUEFIER

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, S.; Decker, L.

    2010-04-09

    Hydrogen has been brought into focus of industry and public since fossil fuels are depleting and costs are increasing dramatically. Beside these issues new high-tech processes in the industry are in need for hydrogen at ultra pure quality. To achieve these requirements and for efficient transportation, hydrogen is liquefied in industrial plants. Linde Gas has commissioned a new 5.5 TPD Hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany, which has been engineered and supplied by Linde Kryotechnik. One of the four expansion turbines installed in the liquefaction process is equipped with dynamic gas bearings. Several design features and operational characteristics of this application will be discussed. The presentation will include results of efficiency and operational reliability that have been determined from performance tests. The advantages of the Linde dynamic gas bearing turbine for future use in hydrogen liquefaction plants will be shown.

  9. Comparison of numerical simulation results for transport and thermodynamic properties of the solid fuels combustion products with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmelkov, Yuriy; Samujlov, Eugueny

    2012-04-01

    Comparison of calculation results of transport properties of the solid fuels combustion products was made with known experimental data. Calculation was made by means of the modified program TETRAN developed in G.M. Krzhizhanovsky Power Engineering Institute. The calculation was spent with chemical reactions and phase transformations occurring during combustion. Also ionization of products of solid fuels combustion products at high temperatures was taken into account. In the capacity of fuels various Russian coals and some other solid fuels were considered. As a result of density, viscosity and heat conductivity calculation of a gas phase of solid fuels combustion products the data has been obtained in a range of temperatures 500-20000 K. This comparison has shown good convergence of calculation results with experiment.

  10. Paraxial light distribution in the focal region of a lens: a comparison of several analytical solutions and a numerical result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yang; Kelly, Damien P.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of the complex field in the focal region of a lens is a classical optical diffraction problem. Today, it remains of significant theoretical importance for understanding the properties of imaging systems. In the paraxial regime, it is possible to find analytical solutions in the neighborhood of the focus, when a plane wave is incident on a focusing lens whose finite extent is limited by a circular aperture. For example, in Born and Wolf's treatment of this problem, two different, but mathematically equivalent analytical solutions, are presented that describe the 3D field distribution using infinite sums of ? and ? type Lommel functions. An alternative solution expresses the distribution in terms of Zernike polynomials, and was presented by Nijboer in 1947. More recently, Cao derived an alternative analytical solution by expanding the Fresnel kernel using a Taylor series expansion. In practical calculations, however, only a finite number of terms from these infinite series expansions is actually used to calculate the distribution in the focal region. In this manuscript, we compare and contrast each of these different solutions to a numerically calculated result, paying particular attention to how quickly each solution converges for a range of different spatial locations behind the focusing lens. We also examine the time taken to calculate each of the analytical solutions. The numerical solution is calculated in a polar coordinate system and is semi-analytic. The integration over the angle is solved analytically, while the radial coordinate is sampled with a sampling interval of ? and then numerically integrated. This produces an infinite set of replicas in the diffraction plane, that are located in circular rings centered at the optical axis and each with radii given by ?, where ? is the replica order. These circular replicas are shown to be fundamentally different from the replicas that arise in a Cartesian coordinate system.

  11. Paraxial light distribution in the focal region of a lens: a comparison of several analytical solutions and a numerical result

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Kelly, Damien P.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of the complex field in the focal region of a lens is a classical optical diffraction problem. Today, it remains of significant theoretical importance for understanding the properties of imaging systems. In the paraxial regime, it is possible to find analytical solutions in the neighborhood of the focus, when a plane wave is incident on a focusing lens whose finite extent is limited by a circular aperture. For example, in Born and Wolf’s treatment of this problem, two different, but mathematically equivalent analytical solutions, are presented that describe the 3D field distribution using infinite sums of Un and Vn type Lommel functions. An alternative solution expresses the distribution in terms of Zernike polynomials, and was presented by Nijboer in 1947. More recently, Cao derived an alternative analytical solution by expanding the Fresnel kernel using a Taylor series expansion. In practical calculations, however, only a finite number of terms from these infinite series expansions is actually used to calculate the distribution in the focal region. In this manuscript, we compare and contrast each of these different solutions to a numerically calculated result, paying particular attention to how quickly each solution converges for a range of different spatial locations behind the focusing lens. We also examine the time taken to calculate each of the analytical solutions. The numerical solution is calculated in a polar coordinate system and is semi-analytic. The integration over the angle is solved analytically, while the radial coordinate is sampled with a sampling interval of Δρ and then numerically integrated. This produces an infinite set of replicas in the diffraction plane, that are located in circular rings centered at the optical axis and each with radii given by 2πm/Δρ, where m is the replica order. These circular replicas are shown to be fundamentally different from the replicas that arise in a Cartesian coordinate system. PMID

  12. Comparison of numerical simulation with experimental result for small scale one seater wing in ground effect (WIG) craft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharun, A. Tarmizi; Maimun, Adi; Ahmed, Yasser M.; Mobassher, M.; Nakisa, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, three dimensional data and behavior of incompressible and steady air flow around a small scale Wing in Ground Effect Craft (WIG) were investigated and studied numerically then compared to the experimental result and also published data. This computational simulation (CFD) adopted two turbulence models, which were k-ɛ and k-ω in order to determine which model produces minimum difference to the experimental result of the small scale WIG tested in wind tunnel. Unstructured mesh was used in the simulation and data of drag coefficient (Cd) and lift coefficient (Cl) were obtained with angle of attack (AoA) of the WIG model as the parameter. Ansys ICEM was used for the meshing process while Ansys Fluent was used for solution. Aerodynamic forces, Cl, Cd and Cl/Cd along with fluid flow pattern of the small scale WIG craft was shown and discussed.

  13. PINTEX Data: Numeric results from the Polarized Internal Target Experiments (PINTEX) at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    Meyer, H. O.

    The PINTEX group studied proton-proton and proton-deuteron scattering and reactions between 100 and 500 MeV at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). More than a dozen experiments made use of electron-cooled polarized proton or deuteron beams, orbiting in the 'Indiana Cooler' storage ring, and of a polarized atomic-beam target of hydrogen or deuterium in the path of the stored beam. The collaboration involved researchers from several midwestern universities, as well as a number of European institutions. The PINTEX program ended when the Indiana Cooler was shut down in August 2002. The website contains links to some of the numerical results, descriptions of experiments, and a complete list of publications resulting from PINTEX.

  14. Pericenter precession induced by a circumstellar disk on the orbit of massive bodies: comparison between analytical predictions and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, A.; Marzari, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Planetesimals and planets embedded in a circumstellar disk are dynamically perturbed by the disk gravity. It causes an apsidal line precession at a rate that depends on the disk density profile and on the distance of the massive body from the star. Aims: Different analytical models are exploited to compute the precession rate of the perihelion ϖ˙. We compare them to verify their equivalence, in particular after analytical manipulations performed to derive handy formulas, and test their predictions against numerical models in some selected cases. Methods: The theoretical precession rates were computed with analytical algorithms found in the literature using the Mathematica symbolic code, while the numerical simulations were performed with the hydrodynamical code FARGO. Results: For low-mass bodies (planetesimals) the analytical approaches described in Binney & Tremaine (2008, Galactic Dynamics, p. 96), Ward (1981, Icarus, 47, 234), and Silsbee & Rafikov (2015a, ApJ, 798, 71) are equivalent under the same initial conditions for the disk in terms of mass, density profile, and inner and outer borders. They also match the numerical values computed with FARGO away from the outer border of the disk reasonably well. On the other hand, the predictions of the classical Mestel disk (Mestel 1963, MNRAS, 126, 553) for disks with p = 1 significantly depart from the numerical solution for radial distances beyond one-third of the disk extension because of the underlying assumption of the Mestel disk is that the outer disk border is equal to infinity. For massive bodies such as terrestrial and giant planets, the agreement of the analytical approaches is progressively poorer because of the changes in the disk structure that are induced by the planet gravity. For giant planets the precession rate changes sign and is higher than the modulus of the theoretical value by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 1.8. In this case, the correction of the formula proposed by Ward (1981) to

  15. Controlling the electron energy distribution function of electron beam generated plasmas with molecular gas concentration: II. Numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Boris, D. R.; Petrova, Tz B.; Lock, E. H.; Fernsler, R. F.; Walton, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the second in a series of two, a spatially averaged model of an electron beam generated Ar-N2 plasma is developed to identify the processes behind the measured influence of trace amounts of N2 on the development of the electron energy distribution function. The model is based on the numerical solution of the electron Boltzmann equation self-consistently coupled to a set of rate balance equations for electrons, argon and nitrogen species. Like the experiments, the calculations cover only the low-energy portion (<50 eV) of the electron energy distribution, and therefore a source term is added to the Boltzmann equation to represent ionization by the beam. Similarly, terms representing ambipolar diffusion along and across the magnetic field are added to allow for particle loss and electrostatic cooling from the ambipolar electric field. This work focuses on the changes introduced by adding a small admixture of nitrogen to an argon background. The model predictions for the electron energy distribution function, electron density and temperature are in good agreement with the experimentally measured data reported in part I, where it was found that the electron and ion energy distributions can be controlled by adjusting the fraction of nitrogen in the gas composition.

  16. Role of the sample thickness on the performance of cholesteric liquid crystal lasers: Experimental, numerical, and analytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Enguita, G.; Ortega, J.; Folcia, C. L.; Aramburu, I.; Etxebarria, J.

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the performance characteristics of a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) laser as a function of the sample thickness. The study has been carried out both from the experimental and theoretical points of view. The theoretical model is based on the kinetic equations for the population of the excited states of the dye and for the power of light generated within the laser cavity. From the equations, the threshold pump radiation energy Eth and the slope efficiency η are numerically calculated. Eth is rather insensitive to thickness changes, except for small thicknesses. In comparison, η shows a much more pronounced variation, exhibiting a maximum that determines the sample thickness for optimum laser performance. The predictions are in good accordance with the experimental results. Approximate analytical expressions for Eth and η as a function of the physical characteristics of the CLC laser are also proposed. These expressions present an excellent agreement with the numerical calculations. Finally, we comment on the general features of CLC layer and dye that lead to the best laser performance.

  17. The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge 1992: Exhaust emissions testing and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, W. A.; Larsen, R. P.; Zammit, M. G.; Davies, J. G.; Salmon, G. S.; Bruetsch, R. I.

    The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge '92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the U.S. Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine-out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

  18. Geometry and Simulation Results for a Gas Turbine Representative of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W.; Beach, Tim; Turner, Mark; Hendricks, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the geometry and simulation results of a gas-turbine engine based on the original EEE engine developed in the 1980s. While the EEE engine was never in production, the technology developed during the program underpins many of the current generation of gas turbine engines. This geometry is being explored as a potential multi-stage turbomachinery test case that may be used to develop technology for virtual full-engine simulation. Simulation results were used to test the validity of each component geometry representation. Results are compared to a zero-dimensional engine model developed from experimental data. The geometry is captured in a series of Initial Graphical Exchange Specification (IGES) files and is available on a supplemental DVD to this report.

  19. Real-gas simulation for the Shuttle Orbiter and planetary entry configurations including flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    By testing configurations in a gas (like CF4) which can produce high normal-shock density ratios, such as those encountered during hypersonic entry, certain aspects of real-gas effects can be simulated. Results from force-moment, shock-shape and oil flow visualization tests are presented for both the Shuttle Orbiter and a 45 deg sphere-cone in CF4 and air at M = 6, and comparisons are made with flight results. Pitching-moment coefficients measured on a Shuttle Orbiter model in CF4 showed a nose-up increment, compared with air results, that was almost identical to the difference between preflight predictions and flight in the high hypersonic regime. The drag coefficient measured in CF4 on the 45 deg sphere-cone, which is the same configuration used on the forebody of the Pioneer Venus entry vehicles, showed excellent agreement with flight data at M = 6.

  20. Numerical Prediction of Radiation Measurements Taken in the X2 Facility for Mars and Titan Gas Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Prabhu, Dinesh; Brandis, Aaron; McIntyre, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Thermochemical relaxation behind a normal shock in Mars and Titan gas mixtures is simulated using a CFD solver, DPLR, for a hemisphere of 1 m radius; the thermochemical relaxation along the stagnation streamline is considered equivalent to the flow behind a normal shock. Flow simulations are performed for a Titan gas mixture (98% N2, 2% CH4 by volume) for shock speeds of 5.7 and 7.6 km/s and pressures ranging from 20 to 1000 Pa, and a Mars gas mixture (96% CO2, and 4% N2 by volume) for a shock speed of 8.6 km/s and freestream pressure of 13 Pa. For each case, the temperatures and number densities of chemical species obtained from the CFD flow predictions are used as an input to a line-by-line radiation code, NEQAIR. The NEQAIR code is then used to compute the spatial distribution of volumetric radiance starting from the shock front to the point where thermochemical equilibrium is nominally established. Computations of volumetric spectral radiance assume Boltzmann distributions over radiatively linked electronic states of atoms and molecules. The results of these simulations are compared against experimental data acquired in the X2 facility at the University of Queensland, Australia. The experimental measurements were taken over a spectral range of 310-450 nm where the dominant contributor to radiation is the CN violet band system. In almost all cases, the present approach of computing the spatial variation of post-shock volumetric radiance by applying NEQAIR along a stagnation line computed using a high-fidelity flow solver with good spatial resolution of the relaxation zone is shown to replicate trends in measured relaxation of radiance for both Mars and Titan gas mixtures.

  1. GH-3PAD - a new numerical solver for multiphase transport in porous media - new insights on gas hydrate and free gas co-existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwicz, E.; Rupke, L.; Wallmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    Gas Hydrate-3 Phase Advanced Dynamics (GH-3PAD) code has been developed to study the geophysical and biochemical processes associated with gas hydrate as well as free methane gas formation and dissolution in marine sediments. Biochemical processes influencing in-situ organic carbon decay and, therefore, gas hydrate formation, such as Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM), sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis have been considered. The new model assumes a Lagrangian reference frame that is attached to the deposited sedimentary layers, which compact according to their individual lithological properties. Differential motion of the pore fluids and free gas is modeled as Darcy flow. Gas hydrate and free gas formation is either controlled by 1) instant gas hydrate crystallization assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium or by a 2) kinetically controlled rate of gas hydrate growth. The thermal evolution is computed from an energy equation that includes contributions from all phases present in the model (sediment grains, saline pore fluids, gas hydrate, and free gas). A first application of the GH-3PAD model has been the Blake Ridge Site, offshore South Carolina. Here seismic and well data points to the out-of-equilibrium co-existence of gas hydrate and free gas. It has been reported that these two distinct phases appear within sediment column with a gaseous phase tending to migrate upwards throughout the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (GHSZ) until it reaches the seafloor despite relatively low gas hydrate content (4 - 7 vol. % after Paull et al., 1996). With the GH-3PAD model we quantify the complex transport- reaction processes that control three phase (gas hydrate, free gas, and dissolved CH4) out-of-equilibrium state. References: Paull C. K., Matsumoto R., Wallace P. J., 1996. 9. Site 997, Shipboard Scientific Party. Proceeding of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, Vol. 164.

  2. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; et al

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification ofmore » uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.« less

  3. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Kozik, E.; Liu, Xuan -Wen; Millis, Andrew J.; Prokof’ev, N. V.; Qin, Mingpu; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Shi, Hao; Svistunov, B. V.; Tocchio, Luca F.; Tupitsyn, I. S.; White, Steven R.; Zhang, Shiwei; Zheng, Bo -Xiao; Zhu, Zhenyue; Gull, Emanuel

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification of uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of supercritical gas flow in complex nanoporous media: Elucidating the relationship between permeability and pore space geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C. J.; Prodanovic, M.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mudrocks and shales are currently a significant source of natural gas and understanding the basic transport properties of these formations is critical to predicting long-term production, however, the nanoporous nature of mudrocks presents a unique challenge. Mudrock pores are predominantly in the range of 1-100 nm, and within this size range the flow of gas at reservoir conditions will fall within the slip-flow and early transition-flow regime (0.001 < Kn < 1.0). Therefore, flow-rates will significantly deviate from Navier-Stokes predictions. Currently, the study of slip-flows is mostly limited to simple tube and channel geometries, but the geometry of mudrock pores is often sponge-like (organic matter) and/or platy (clays). Here we present a local effective viscosity lattice Boltzmann model (LEV-LBM) constructed for flow simulation in the slip- and early-transition flow regimes, adapted here for complex geometries. At the macroscopic scale the LEV-LBM is parameterized with local effective viscosities at each node to capture the variance of the mean free path of gas molecules in a bounded system. The LEV-LBM is first validated in simple tube geometries, where excellent agreement with linearized Boltzmann solutions is found for Knudsen numbers up to 1.0. The LEV-LBM is then employed to quantify the length effect on the apparent permeability of tubes, which suggests pore network modeling of flow in the slip and early-transition regime will result in overestimation unless the length effect is considered. Furthermore, the LEV-LBM is used to evaluate the predictive value of commonly measured pore geometry characteristics such as porosity, pore size distribution, and specific solid surface area for the calculation of permeability. We show that bundle of tubes models grossly overestimate apparent permeability, as well as underestimate the increase in apparent permeability with decreasing pressure as a result of excluding topology and pore shape from calculations.

  5. Laser Spectroscopy Multi-Gas Monitor: Results of Technology Demonstration on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul D.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) is an up and coming trace and major gas monitoring technology with unmatched selectivity, range and stability. The technology demonstration of the 4 gas Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM), reported at the 2014 ICES conference, operated continuously on the International Space Station (ISS) for nearly a year. The MGM is designed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor in ambient cabin air in a low power, relatively compact device. While on board, the MGM experienced a number of challenges, unplanned and planned, including a test of the ammonia channel using a commercial medical ammonia inhalant. Data from the unit was downlinked once per week and compared with other analytical resources on board, notably the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA), a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. MGM spent the majority of the time installed in the Nanoracks Frame 2 payload facility in front breathing mode (sampling the ambient environment of the Japanese Experiment Module), but was also used to analyze recirculated rack air. The capability of the MGM to be operated in portable mode (via internal rechargeable lithium ion polymer batteries or by plugging into any Express Rack 28VDC connector) was a part of the usability demonstration. Results to date show unprecedented stability and accuracy of the MGM vs. the MCA for oxygen and carbon dioxide. The ammonia challenge (approx. 75 ppm) was successful as well, showing very rapid response time in both directions. Work on an expansion of capability in a next generation MGM has just begun. Combustion products and hydrazine are being added to the measurable target analytes. An 8 to 10 gas monitor (aka Gas Tricorder 1.0) is envisioned for use on ISS, Orion and Exploration missions.

  6. Preliminary Results from Electric Arc Furnace Off-Gas Enthalpy Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U; Thekdi, Arvind; Keiser, James R; Storey, John Morse

    2015-01-01

    This article describes electric arc furnace (EAF) off-gas enthalpy models developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate overall heat availability (sensible and chemical enthalpy) and recoverable heat values (steam or power generation potential) for existing EAF operations and to test ORNL s new EAF waste heat recovery (WHR) concepts. ORNL s new EAF WHR concepts are: Regenerative Drop-out Box System and Fluidized Bed System. The two EAF off-gas enthalpy models described in this paper are: 1.Overall Waste Heat Recovery Model that calculates total heat availability in off-gases of existing EAF operations 2.Regenerative Drop-out Box System Model in which hot EAF off-gases alternately pass through one of two refractory heat sinks that store heat and then transfer it to another gaseous medium These models calculate the sensible and chemical enthalpy of EAF off-gases based on the off-gas chemical composition, temperature, and mass flow rate during tap to tap time, and variations in those parameters in terms of actual values over time. The models provide heat transfer analysis for the aforementioned concepts to confirm the overall system and major component sizing (preliminary) to assess the practicality of the systems. Real-time EAF off-gas composition (e.g., CO, CO2, H2, and H2O), volume flow, and temperature data from one EAF operation was used to test the validity and accuracy of the modeling work. The EAF off-gas data was used to calculate the sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases to generate steam and power. The article provides detailed results from the modeling work that are important to the success of ORNL s EAF WHR project. The EAF WHR project aims to develop and test new concepts and materials that allow cost-effective recovery of sensible and chemical heat from high-temperature gases discharged from EAFs.

  7. Numerical study of RF exposure and the resulting temperature rise in the foetus during a magnetic resonance procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, J. W.; Li, Y.; Hajnal, J. V.

    2010-02-01

    Numerical simulations of specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature changes in a 26-week pregnant woman model within typical birdcage body coils as used in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI scanners are described. Spatial distributions of SAR and the resulting spatial and temporal changes in temperature are determined using a finite difference time domain method and a finite difference bio-heat transfer solver that accounts for discrete vessels. Heat transfer from foetus to placenta via the umbilical vein and arteries as well as that across the foetal skin/amniotic fluid/uterine wall boundaries is modelled. Results suggest that for procedures compliant with IEC normal mode conditions (maternal whole-body averaged SARMWB <= 2 W kg-1 (continuous or time-averaged over 6 min)), whole foetal SAR, local foetal SAR10g and average foetal temperature are within international safety limits. For continuous RF exposure at SARMWB = 2 W kg-1 over periods of 7.5 min or longer, a maximum local foetal temperature >38 °C may occur. However, assessment of the risk posed by such maximum temperatures predicted in a static model is difficult because of frequent foetal movement. Results also confirm that when SARMWB = 2 W kg-1, some local SAR10g values in the mother's trunk and extremities exceed recommended limits.

  8. Preliminary result of deep-towed resistivity investigation in a potential gas hydrate area off southwest Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C.; Hsu, S.; Goto, T.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.

    2012-12-01

    seafloor images. An important function of the side-scan sonar provides a stable towing of the whole system near the seafloor with altitude in range of 10 - 30 m. This configuration of the multidisciplinary geophysical system can roughly provide within 200 m of depth resolution beneath the seafloor according to the numerical modelling. A first multiple channels of deep-towed marine resistivity survey was carried out by R/V OR1-1001 from 21 to 23 June, 2012 to understand the detailed distribution of GH off SW Taiwan. Three survey lines were discovered in total length about 30 km. The towed speed was kept in 1.5 - 2.5 knots for both mapping of resistivity profiles and side-scan sonar images. An extremely high apparent resistivity anomaly appears in pockmark areas that corresponds to the side-scan sonar image. This high resistivity anomaly implies gas and/or gas hydrate reservoirs beneath the seafloor. The preliminary result has shown that our new resistivity system is a useful tool to explore GH deposits.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Stationary AC Tungsten Inert Gas Welding of Aluminum Plate in Consideration of Oxide Layer Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu

    An unified numerical simulation model of AC TIG welding of the aluminum plate considering energy balance among the electrode, the arc and the base metal and employing an analytical model for calculating cleaning rate of the oxide layer has been developed for investigating heat transport properties and weld pool formation process in AC TIG welding of aluminum plate. As a result of this simulation, it was shown that although the heat flux from the arc onto the base metal increases in EN (Electrode Negative) phase due to the electron condensation, that in EP (Electrode Positive) phase conversely decreases because mainly of cooling caused by the electron emission. Furthermore, the validity of the simulation model was confirmed by comparing to experimental results such as the arc voltage, the area of cleaning zone and the shape of weld pool.

  10. Characterization and Dessolution Test results for the January 2005 DWPF Off Gas Condensate Tank Samples (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T

    2005-04-08

    The Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) collects the condensate from the off-gas system of the melter. The condensate stream contains entrained solids that collect in the OGCT. Water from the OGCT is re-circulated to the Steam Atomized Scrubber and quencher and may provide a mechanism for re-introducing the particulates into the off-gas system. These particulates are thought to be responsible for plugging the downstream High Efficiency Mist Eliminator filters. Therefore, the OGCT needs to be periodically cleaned to remove the build-up of entrained solids. Currently, the OGCT is cleaned by adding nominally 12 wt% nitric acid with agitation to slurry the solids from the tank. Samples from the OGCT were sent to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) for characterization and to conduct tests to determine the optimum nitric acid concentration and residence time to allow more effective cleaning of the OGCT. This report summarizes the chemical and radionuclide results and the results from the nitric acid dissolution testing at 50% and 12% obtained for the OGCT sample.

  11. Preliminary Results of Cyclical De-Icing of a Gas-Heated Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Bowden, D. T.; VonGlahn, U.

    1952-01-01

    An NACA 65(sub 1)-212 airfoil of 8-foot chord was provided with a gas-heated leading edge for investigations of cyclical de-icing. De-icing was accomplished with intermittent heating of airfoil segments that supplied hot gas to chordwise passages in a double-skin construction. Ice removal was facilitated by a spanwise leading-edge parting strip which was continuously heated from the gas-supply duct. Preliminary results demonstrate that satisfactory cyclical ice removal occurs with ratios of cycle time to heat-on period (cycle ratio) from 10 to 26. For minimum runback, efficient ice removal, and minimum total heat input, short heat-on periods of about 15 seconds with heat-off periods of 260 seconds gave the best results. In the range of conditions investigated, the prime variables in the determination of the required heat input for cyclical ice removal were the air temperature and the cycle ratio; heat-off period, liquid water content, airspeed, and angle of attack had only secondary effects on heat input rate.

  12. 1995 National assessment of United States oil and gas resources; results, methodology, and supporting data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gautier, Donald L.; Dolton, G.L.; Takahashi, K.I.; Varnes, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a 3-year study of the oil and gas resources of the onshore and state waters of the United States by the U.S. Geological Survey. A parallel study of the Federal offshore is being conducted by the Minerals Management Service. Estimates are made of technically recoverable oil, including measured (proved) reserves, future additions to reserves in existing fields, and undiscovered resources. Estimates are also made of the technically recoverable conventional resources of natural gas in measured reserves, in anticipated growth of reserves in existing fields, and in undiscovered resources. Additionally, an assessment is made of recoverable resources in continuous-type (largely unconventional) accumulations in sandstones, shales, chalks, and coal beds.

  13. 1995 National Assessment of United States Oil and Gas Resources: Results, Methodology, and Supporting Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gautier, Donald L.; Dolton, Gordon L.; Takahashi, Kenneth I.; Varnes, Katharine L.

    1996-01-01

    This revised CD-ROM summarizes the results, released in 1995, of the 3-year study of the oil and gas resources of the onshore and state waters of the United States. Minor errors in the original DDS-30 (listed in DDS-35 and DDS-36) are corrected in this revised version and in the data files now released in DDS-35 and DDS-36. Estimates are made of technically recoverable oil, including measured (proved) reserves, future additions to reserves in existing fields, and undiscovered resources. Estimates are also made of the technically recoverable conventional resources of natural gas in measured reserves, in anticipated growth of reserves in existing fields, and in undiscovered resources. Additionally, an assessment is made of recoverable resources in continuous-type (largely unconventional) accumulations in sandstones, shales, chalks, and coal beds.

  14. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    One of the specific objectives of this expedition was to test gas hydrate formation models and constrain model parameters, especially those that account for the formation of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations. The necessary data for characterizing the occurrence of in situ gas hydrate, such as interstitial water chlorinities, core-derived gas chemistry, physical and sedimentological properties, thermal images of the recovered cores, and downhole measured logging data (LWD and/or conventional wireline log data), were obtained from most of the drill sites established during NGHP-01. Almost all of the drill sites yielded evidence for the occurrence of gas hydrate; however, the inferred in situ concentration of gas hydrate varied substantially from site to site. For the most part, the interpretation of downhole logging data, core thermal images, interstitial water analyses, and pressure core images from the sites drilled during NGHP-01 indicate that the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly associated with the presence of fractures in the sediments, and in some limited cases, by coarser grained (mostly sand-rich) sediments.

  15. Numerical investigations of the fluid flows at deep oceanic and arctic permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Jennifer Mary

    , allows us a unique opportunity to study the response of methane hydrate deposits to warming. Gas hydrate stability in the Arctic and the permeability of the shelf sediments to gas migration is thought to be closely linked with relict submarine permafrost. Submarine permafrost extent depends on several environmental factors, such as the shelf lithology, sea level variations, mean annual air temperature, ocean bottom water temperature, geothermal heat flux, groundwater hydrology, and the salinity of the pore water. Effects of submarine groundwater discharge, which introduces fresh terrestrial groundwater off-shore, can freshen deep marine sediments and is an important control on the freezing point depression of ice and methane hydrate. While several thermal modeling studies suggest the permafrost layer should still be largely intact near-shore, many recent field studies have reported elevated methane levels in Arctic coastal waters. The permafrost layer is thought to create an impermeable barrier to fluid and gas flow, however, talik formation (unfrozen regions within otherwise continuous permafrost) below paleo-river channels can create permeable pathways for gas migration from depth. This is the first study of its kind to make predictions of the methane gas flux to the water column from the Arctic shelf sediments using a 2D multi-phase fluid flow model. Model results show that the dissociation of methane hydrate deposits through taliks can supersaturate the overlying water column at present-day relative to equilibrium with the atmosphere when taliks are large (> 1 km width) or hydrate saturation is high within hydrate layers (> 50% pore volume). Supersaturated waters likely drive a net flux of methane into the atmosphere, a potent greenhouse gas. Effects of anthropogenic global warming will certainly increase gas venting rates if ocean bottom water temperatures increase, but likely won't have immediately observable impacts due to the long response times.

  16. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  17. Breakdown of the scale invariance in a near-Tonks-Girardeau gas: some exact results and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhedong; Astrakharchik, Gregory; Aveline, David; Choi, Steven; Perrin, Hélène; Bergeman, Thomas; Olshanii, Maxim

    2014-05-01

    In this Letter, we consider the elementary monopole excitations of the harmonically trapped Bose gas in the vicinity of Tonks-Girardeau limit. Using Girardeau's Fermi-Bose duality and subsequently, an effective fermion-fermion odd-wave interaction, we obtain the dominant correction to the scaleinvariance- protected value of the excitation frequency. We produce a series of diffusion Monte Carlo results that confirm our analytic perturbative value for three particles. And less expectedly, our result stands in an excellent agreement with the result of a hydrodynamic simulation of the collective excitations in the limit of a large number of atoms (with the Lieb-Liniger equation of state as an input). The sub-leading term in the near-Tonks-Girardeau expansion of the sum rule upper bound to the monopole frequency, by Menotti and Stringari [Phys. Rev. A 66, 043610 (2002)], also gives the same number. Surprisingly it was found that the usually successful hydrodynamic perturbation theory predicts a shift that is 9/4 higher than its ab initio numerical counterpart. We conjecture that the sharp boundary of the cloud in local density approximation-characterized by an infinite density gradient-renders the perturbation theory for the collective excitation frequencies inapplicable.

  18. Results from directly driven implosions of deuterated plastic shells filled with tritium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Gary; Casey, Daniel; Fincke, Jim; Pino, Jesse; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Steinkamp, Mike; Tipton, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Results from implosions of tritium filled plastic shells containing thin deuterated sub-layers, as well as comparisons with 1-D capsule only simulations will be reported. The implosions were directly driven using a square, 1 ns wide, 27 kJ laser pulse, provided by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. The 15 um thick, by 865 μm OD, CH capsules were fabricated with 1 μm thick, deuterated plastic layers, located either in direct contact with the tritium gas, or offset by a layer of CH. Neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusions signify atomic mixing between the deuterated shell and the gas payload, allowing for a detailed study of the dynamics of mix in 3-D implosions. Data has been collected on implosions from capsules with a depth of burial of 0, 1, and 2 um of CH, as well as non-deuterated control shots. Capsules were shot with two gas fill pressures, 4 and 10 atm., to provide information on mix as a function of convergence. We report nuclear and X-ray data collected from these experiments. Further, we present comparisons with, 1-D and 2-D, capsule only simulations. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA.

  19. Microfine coal firing results from a retrofit gas/oil-designed industrial boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.; Borio, R.W.; Liljedahl, G.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; McGowan, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    The development of a High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor (HEACC) has been in progress since 1987 and the ABB Power Plant Laboratories. The initial work on this concept produced an advanced coal firing system that was capable of firing both water-based and dry pulverized coal in an industrial boiler environment. Economics may one day dictate that it makes sense to replace oil or natural gas with coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn these fuels. The objective of the current program is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of this overall objective, the following specific areas were targeted: A coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; Maintaining boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; Maintaining NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb/MBtu; Achieving combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and Calculating economic payback periods as a function of key variables. The overall program has consisted of five major tasks: (1) A review of current state-of-the-art coal firing system components; (2) Design and experimental testing of a prototype HEACC burner; (3) Installation and testing of a HEACC system in a commercial retrofit application; (4) Economic evaluation of the HEACC concept for retrofit applications; and (5) Long term demonstration under commercial user demand conditions. This paper will summarize the latest key experimental results (Task 3) and the economic evaluation (Task 4) of the HEACC concept for retrofit applications. 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  1. Time-dependent thermocapillary convection in a Cartesian cavity - Numerical results for a moderate Prandtl number fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, L. J.; Biringen, S.

    1993-01-01

    The present numerical simulation explores a thermal-convective mechanism for oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a shallow Cartesian cavity for a Prandtl number 6.78 fluid. The computer program developed for this simulation integrates the two-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation by a time-accurate method on a stretched, staggered mesh. Flat free surfaces are assumed. The instability is shown to depend upon temporal coupling between large scale thermal structures within the flow field and the temperature sensitive free surface. A primary result of this study is the development of a stability diagram presenting the critical Marangoni number separating steady from the time-dependent flow states as a function of aspect ratio for the range of values between 2.3 and 3.8. Within this range, a minimum critical aspect ratio near 2.3 and a minimum critical Marangoni number near 20,000 are predicted below which steady convection is found.

  2. Interbeat Interval Modulation in the Sinoatrial Node as a Result of Membrane Current Stochasticity—A Theoretical and Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Dvir, Hila; Zlochiver, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    A single isolated sinoatrial pacemaker cell presents intrinsic interbeat interval (IBI) variability that is believed to result from the stochastic characteristics of the opening and closing processes of membrane ion channels. To our knowledge, a novel mathematical framework was developed in this work to address the effect of current fluctuations on the IBIs of sinoatrial pacemaker cells. Using statistical modeling and employing the Fokker-Planck formalism, our mathematical analysis suggests that increased stochastic current fluctuation variance linearly increases the slope of phase-4 depolarization, hence the rate of activations. Single-cell and two-dimensional computerized numerical modeling of the sinoatrial node was conducted to validate the theoretical predictions using established ionic kinetics of the rabbit pacemaker and atrial cells. Our models also provide, to our knowledge, a novel complementary or alternative explanation to recent experimental observations showing a strong reduction in the mean IBI of Cx30 deficient mice in comparison to wild-types, not fully explicable by the effects of intercellular decoupling. PMID:25762340

  3. The Trichoderma harzianum demon: complex speciation history resulting in coexistence of hypothetical biological species, recent agamospecies and numerous relict lineages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mitosporic fungus Trichoderma harzianum (Hypocrea, Ascomycota, Hypocreales, Hypocreaceae) is an ubiquitous species in the environment with some strains commercially exploited for the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi. Although T. harzianum is asexual (or anamorphic), its sexual stage (or teleomorph) has been described as Hypocrea lixii. Since recombination would be an important issue for the efficacy of an agent of the biological control in the field, we investigated the phylogenetic structure of the species. Results Using DNA sequence data from three unlinked loci for each of 93 strains collected worldwide, we detected a complex speciation process revealing overlapping reproductively isolated biological species, recent agamospecies and numerous relict lineages with unresolved phylogenetic positions. Genealogical concordance and recombination analyses confirm the existence of two genetically isolated agamospecies including T. harzianum sensu stricto and two hypothetical holomorphic species related to but different from H. lixii. The exact phylogenetic position of the majority of strains was not resolved and therefore attributed to a diverse network of recombining strains conventionally called 'pseudoharzianum matrix'. Since H. lixii and T. harzianum are evidently genetically isolated, the anamorph - teleomorph combination comprising H. lixii/T. harzianum in one holomorph must be rejected in favor of two separate species. Conclusions Our data illustrate a complex speciation within H. lixii - T. harzianum species group, which is based on coexistence and interaction of organisms with different evolutionary histories and on the absence of strict genetic borders between them. PMID:20359347

  4. Comparative analysis of numerical simulation and PIV experimental results for a flow caused by field-enhanced dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirkov, V. A.; Komarov, D. K.; Stishkov, Y. K.; Vasilkov, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    The paper studies a particular electrode system, two flat parallel electrodes with a dielectric plate having a small circular hole between them. Its main feature is that the region of the strong electric field is located far from metal electrode surfaces, which permits one to preclude the injection charge formation and to observe field-enhanced dissociation (the Wien effect) leading to the emergence of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow. The described electrode system was studied by way of both computer simulation and experiment. The latter was conducted with the help of the particle image velocimetry (or PIV) technique. The numerical research used trusted software package COMSOL Multiphysics, which allows solving the complete set of EHD equations and obtaining the EHD flow structure. Basing on the computer simulation and the comparison with experimental investigation results, it was concluded that the Wien effect is capable of causing intense (several centimeters per second) EHD flows in low-conducting liquids and has to be taken into account when dealing with EHD devices.

  5. Interbeat interval modulation in the sinoatrial node as a result of membrane current stochasticity-a theoretical and numerical study.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Hila; Zlochiver, Sharon

    2015-03-10

    A single isolated sinoatrial pacemaker cell presents intrinsic interbeat interval (IBI) variability that is believed to result from the stochastic characteristics of the opening and closing processes of membrane ion channels. To our knowledge, a novel mathematical framework was developed in this work to address the effect of current fluctuations on the IBIs of sinoatrial pacemaker cells. Using statistical modeling and employing the Fokker-Planck formalism, our mathematical analysis suggests that increased stochastic current fluctuation variance linearly increases the slope of phase-4 depolarization, hence the rate of activations. Single-cell and two-dimensional computerized numerical modeling of the sinoatrial node was conducted to validate the theoretical predictions using established ionic kinetics of the rabbit pacemaker and atrial cells. Our models also provide, to our knowledge, a novel complementary or alternative explanation to recent experimental observations showing a strong reduction in the mean IBI of Cx30 deficient mice in comparison to wild-types, not fully explicable by the effects of intercellular decoupling. PMID:25762340

  6. Resolve! Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    LAVENDER, J.C.

    2000-10-17

    RESOLVE! Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations.

  7. Bedrock gorges incising glacial hanging valleys (Western Alps, France): results from morphometric analysis, numerical modeling and 10Be cosmogenic dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, Pierre G.; van der Beek, Peter A.; Lague, Dimitri; Carcaillet, Julien

    2010-05-01

    Bedrock gorges are frequent features in glacial or post-glacial landscapes and allow measurements of fluvial bedrock incision in mountainous relief. Using digital elevation models, aerial photographs, topographic maps and field reconnaissance in the Pelvoux-Ecrins Massif (French Western Alps), we have identified ~30 tributary hanging valleys incised by gorges toward their confluence with the trunk streams. Longitudinal profiles of these tributaries are all convex and have abrupt knickpoints at the upper limit of oversteepened gorge reaches. From morphometric analyses, we find that mean channel gradients and widths, as well as knickpoint retreat rates, display a drainage-area dependence modulated by bedrock lithology. However, there appears to be no relation between horizontal retreat and vertical downwearing of knickpoints. Numerical modeling has been performed to test the capacity of different fluvial incision models to predict the inferred evolution of the gorges. Results from simple end-member models suggest transport-limited behavior of the bedrock gorges. Using a more sophisticated model including dynamic width adjustment and sediment-dependent incision rates, we show that bedrock gorge evolution requires significant supply of sediment from the gorge sidewalls triggered by gorge deepening, combined with pronounced inhibition of bedrock incision by sediment transport and deposition. We then use in-situ produced 10Be cosmogenic nuclides to date and quantify bedrock gorge incision into a single glacial hanging valley (Gorge du Diable). We have sampled gorge sidewalls and the active channel bed to derive both long-term and present-day incision rates. 10Be ages of sidewall profiles reveal rapid incision through the late Holocene (ca 5 ka), implying either delayed initiation of gorge incision after final ice retreat from internal Alpine valleys at ca 12 ka, or post-glacial surface reburial of the gorge. Both modeling results and cosmogenic dating suggest that

  8. Numerical investigation of inspiratory airflow in a realistic model of the human tracheobronchial airways and a comparison with experimental results.

    PubMed

    Elcner, Jakub; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav; Chovancova, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    In this article, the results of numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and a comparison with experiments performed with phase Doppler anemometry are presented. The simulations and experiments were conducted in a realistic model of the human airways, which comprised the throat, trachea and tracheobronchial tree up to the fourth generation. A full inspiration/expiration breathing cycle was used with tidal volumes 0.5 and 1 L, which correspond to a sedentary regime and deep breath, respectively. The length of the entire breathing cycle was 4 s, with inspiration and expiration each lasting 2 s. As a boundary condition for the CFD simulations, experimentally obtained flow rate distribution in 10 terminal airways was used with zero pressure resistance at the throat inlet. CCM+ CFD code (Adapco) was used with an SST k-[Formula: see text] low-Reynolds Number RANS model. The total number of polyhedral control volumes was 2.6 million with a time step of 0.001 s. Comparisons were made at several points in eight cross sections selected according to experiments in the trachea and the left and right bronchi. The results agree well with experiments involving the oscillation (temporal relocation) of flow structures in the majority of the cross sections and individual local positions. Velocity field simulation in several cross sections shows a very unstable flow field, which originates in the tracheal laryngeal jet and propagates far downstream with the formation of separation zones in both left and right airways. The RANS simulation agrees with the experiments in almost all the cross sections and shows unstable local flow structures and a quantitatively acceptable solution for the time-averaged flow field. PMID:26163996

  9. Numerical analysis of filmwise condensation in a plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger in presence of non-condensable gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benelmir, Riad; Mokraoui, Salim; Souayed, Ali

    2009-10-01

    In the present paper, a numerical model of a fin-and-tube heat exchanger is proposed. The simulation of water vapor condensation in presence of non-condensable gas (air) between two vertical plane plates and in a plate fin-and-tube heat exchanger in a stationary mode is performed using Fluent software. The differential equations that describe the heat and mass transfer were integrated by the finite volume method, in two and three dimensions.

  10. Numerical Simulations of the Partially-Ionized Gas in a 100-A LaB6 Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.; Jorns, Benjamin A.; Polk, James E.; Guerrero, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a hollow cathode with a LaB6 emitter operating at 100 A have been performed for the first time using the 2-D Orificed Cathode (OrCa2D) code. Results for a variety of plasma properties are presented and compared with laboratory measurements. The large size of the device permits peak electron number densities in the cathode interior that are lower than those established in the NSTAR hollow cathode, which operates with a 7.3x lower discharge current and 3.2x lower mass flow rate. Also, despite the higher discharge current in the LaB6 cathode, the maximum electron current density is lower, by 4.2x, than that in the NSTAR cathode due to the larger orifice size. Simulations and direct measurements show that at 12 sccm of xenon flow the peak emitter temperature is in the range of 1594-1630 C. It is also found that the conditions for the excitement of current-driven streaming instabilities and ion-acoustic turbulence (IAT) are satisfied in this cathode, similarly to what was found in the past in its smaller counterparts like the NSTAR cathode. Based on numerical simulations, it has long been argued that these instabilities may be responsible for the anomalously large ion energies that have been measured in these discharges as well as for the enhancement of the plasma resistivity. Confirmation of the presence of IAT in this cathode is presented for the first time in a companion paper.

  11. Results of a Long-Term Demonstration of an Optical Multi-Gas Monitor on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgett, Paul; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Previously at SAMAP we reported on the development of tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) based instruments for measuring small gas molecules in real time. TDLS technology has matured rapidly over the last 5 years as a result of advances in low power diode lasers as well as better detection schemes. In collaboration with two small businesses Vista Photonics, Inc. and Nanoracks LLC, NASA developed a 4 gas TDLS based monitor for an experimental demonstration of the technology on the International Space Station (ISS). Vista invented and constructed the core TDLS sensor. Nanoracks designed and built the enclosure, and certified the integrated monitor as a payload. The device, which measures oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and water vapor, is called the Multi-Gas Monitor (MGM). MGM measures the 4 gases every few seconds and records a 30 second moving average of the concentrations. The relatively small unit draws only 2.5W. MGM was calibrated at NASA-Johnson Space Center in July 2013 and launched to ISS on a Soyuz vehicle in November 2013. Installation and activation of MGM occurred in February 2014, and the unit has been operating nearly continuously ever since in the Japanese Experiment Module. Data is downlinked from ISS about once per week. Oxygen and carbon dioxide data is compared with that from the central Major Constituents Analyzer. Water vapor data is compared with dew point measurements made by sensors in the Columbus module. The ammonia channel was tested by the crew using a commercial ammonia inhalant. MGM is remarkably stable to date. Results of 18 months of operation are presented and future applications including combustion product monitoring are discussed.

  12. Source attribution of methane emissions from global oil and gas production: results of bottom-up simulations over three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglund-Isaksson, Lena

    2016-04-01

    Existing bottom-up emission inventories of historical methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems do not well explain year-on-year variations estimated by top-down models from atmospheric measurements. This paper develops a bottom-up methodology which allows for country- and year specific source attribution of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and natural gas production for the period 1980 to 2012. The analysis rests on country-specific simulations of associated gas flows which are converted into methane and ethane emissions. The associated gas flows are constructed from country-specific information on oil and gas production and associated gas generation and recovery, and coupled with generic assumptions to bridge regional information gaps on the fractions of unrecovered associated gas that is vented instead of flared. Summing up emissions from associated gas flows with global estimates of emissions from unintended leakage and natural gas transmission and distribution, the resulting global emissions of methane and ethane from oil and gas systems are reasonably consistent with corresponding estimates from top-down models. Also revealed is that the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990 had a significant impact on methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems.

  13. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  14. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS--SITE 2 RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Blythe; S. Miller; C. Richardson; K. Searcy

    2000-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests are being conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit is being used to test the activity of four different catalysts for a period of up to six months at each of three utility sites. Catalyst testing at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, was completed in December 1998. Testing at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, was completed in the fall of 1999, and testing at the third site, which fires a high-sulfur bituminous coal, will begin in early 2000. This technical note reports results from Site 2; results from Site 1 were reported in a previous technical note. At Site 2, catalysts were tested in several forms, including powders dispersed in sand bed reactors and in more commercially viable forms such as extruded beads and coated honeycomb structures. This technical note presents results from Site 2 for both the sand bed reactors and commercial catalyst forms. Site 3 results are not yet available, but should be available late in the year 2000. Field testing is being supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and to investigate methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results related to the

  15. A Study of The Eastern Mediterranean Hydrology and Circulation By Comparing Observation and High Resolution Numerical Model Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhammoud, B.; Béranger, K.; Mortier, L.; Crépon, M.

    The Eastern Mediterranean hydrology and circulation are studied by comparing the results of a high resolution primitive equation model (described in dedicated session: Béranger et al.) with observations. The model has a horizontal grid mesh of 1/16o and 43 z-levels in the vertical. The model was initialized with the MODB5 climatology and has been forced during 11 years by the daily sea surface fluxes provided by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analysis in a perpetual year mode corresponding to the year March 1998-February 1999. At the end of the run, the numerical model is able to accurately reproduce the major water masses of the Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Levantine Surface Water, modi- fied Atlantic Water, Levantine Intermediate Water, and Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water). Comparisons with the POEM observations reveal good agreement. While the initial conditions of the model are somewhat different from POEM observations, dur- ing the last year of the simulation, we found that the water mass stratification matches that of the observations quite well in the seasonal mean. During the 11 years of simulation, the model drifts slightly in the layers below the thermocline. Nevertheless, many important physical processes were reproduced. One example is that the dispersal of Adriatic Deep Water into the Levantine Basin is rep- resented. In addition, convective activity located in the northern part of the Levantine Basin occurs in Spring as expected. The surface circulation is in agreement with in-situ and satellite observations. Some well known mesoscale features of the upper thermocline circulation are shown. Sea- sonal variability of transports through Sicily, Otranto and Cretan straits are inves- tigated as well. This work was supported by the french MERCATOR project and SHOM.

  16. Numerical model for simulating the dynamic response of an inertial confinement fusion cavity gas to a target explosion

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    One of the methods suggested for protecting the first wall of an inertial confinement fusion cavity from the x-rays and ions emitted by an exploding target is to fill the cavity with a buffer gas. A computer code package is developed in this thesis for studying the radiative and hydrodynamic response of the gas to an exploding target.

  17. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS--SITE 2 RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Blythe; S. Miller; C. Richardson; K. Searcy

    2000-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests are being conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit is being used to test the activity of four different catalysts for a period of up to six months at each of three utility sites. Catalyst testing at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, was completed in December 1998. Testing at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, was completed in the fall of 1999, and testing at the third site, which fires a high-sulfur bituminous coal, will begin in 2000. This technical note reports results from Site 2; results from Site 1 were reported in a previous technical note. At Site 2, catalysts were tested in several forms, including powders dispersed in sand bed reactors and in commercial forms such as extruded beads and coated honeycomb structures. This technical note presents results from Site 2 for both the sand bed reactors and commercial catalyst forms. Field testing is being supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and to investigate methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results related to the Site 2 field effort are also included and discussed in this technical note. Preliminary economics, based

  18. Accuracy of numerical functional transforms applied to derive Molière series terms and comparison with analytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Okei, K.; Nakatsuka, T.

    Accuracies of numerical Fourier and Hankel transforms are examined with the Takahasi-Mori theory of error evaluation. The higher Moliere terms both for spatial and projected distributions derived by these methods agree very well with those derived analytically. The methods will be valuable to solve other transport problems concerning fast charged particles.

  19. Preliminary results and power analysis of the UAH SEDS G503 GAS can

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalbert, Lyle B.; Mustaikis, Steven, II; Nerren, Philip

    1995-01-01

    The G-503 Get Away Special (GAS) Canister contained four experiments. A stainless steel corrosion experiment, and experiment to mix and cure concrete, a plant root growth chamber, and a group of 8 chambers to characterize diatom growth cycles in microgravity. As would be expected for this selection of experiments a significant amount of power was required to carry out these investigations over several days in a GAS environment. This was accomplished through the use of low power experiment control circuitry, heaters, and an estimate 3.6 kWh battery pack. The battery was designed around 120 standard Duracell Alkaline F cells. This pack weighed 29.5 kg (65 lbs) including a DC/DC converter and the power distribution bus for all of the experiments. Although not rechargeable, this configurations was a fraction of the cost of rechargeable systems and did not require venting to the outside of the can. Combining this with the long term storage performance, 85% of initial capacity after four years at 20 C (70 F), this guarantees sufficient power even with unexpected launch delays. This paper describes the experiments, there operation and initial results. Also, the performance of the power system during the STS-68 SRL2 mission will be addressed.

  20. Numerical investigation of oxygen impurity distribution during multicrystalline silicon crystal growth using a gas flow guidance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Ying-Yang; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Lu, Chung-Wei; Chen, Chi-Yung

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen is one of the most important types of impurities that can cause thermal donor or light-induced degradation in mc-Si solar cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect that installing a gas flow guidance device in a mc-Si crystal-growth furnace would have on the oxygen impurity distribution in the melt during the growth process. The installation of such a gas flow guidance device can enhance the gas flow near the free surface, which would allow the argon to carry a greater amount of evaporated SiO gas outside the furnace. Furthermore, the enhanced motion of the gas flow also improves heat transfer near the free surface, which would make the melt vortex separate more easily. The separated melt vortex, which is located near the central region of the melt-crystal interface, directs any oxygen impurity towards the central region of the melt-crystal interface. This is why the oxygen concentration can be reduced by installing the gas flow guidance device. The effectiveness of the gas flow guidance device depends on the vertical distance between it and the free surface (h) as well as the gap between the crucible sidewall and the tip of the device (d). The effect on the oxygen concentration in the melt is significant when smaller values for h and d are adopted.